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Sample records for leeds teaching hospitals

  1. Realities of and perspectives for languages in the globalised world: Can language teaching survive the inadequacies of policies implemented today at Leeds Beckett University?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadia Gamir

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Various newspaper articles report that British ministers, university representatives, exam chiefs and business bodies agree that foreign languages skills in primary, secondary and tertiary UK education are in crisis. Lower funding and policy changes have caused language skills deficiencies felt gravely in the business sectors. Funding and support initiatives pledged by policy makers appear to be election-driven, barely outliving newly elected governments. Others blame secondary school language curriculum for failing to inspire students to take up a language when they reach 13 or 14. Others still argue that severe A-level examinations marking deters students from taking up a foreign language at 6th form level, producing fewer prospective language learners for university departments. Community languages are also undervalued as small-entry languages could soon be axed from GCSE and A-level examinations. In a world increasingly interconnected, it is essential the importance of language learning be reinstated in all our educational institutions. This paper reviews two decades of the conditions of language provision in the UK in general, with an emphasis on Leeds Beckett University. It also attempts to answer two questions emerging form the author’s personal teaching experience and reflections: What are the realities and challenges language teaching faces at Leeds Beckett University? And, how may we support language learners in fulfilling their ambition to acquire the required skills to communicate effectively in this globalised world?

  2. Citrate anticoagulation in the ICU: the Leeds experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumper, Charlotte

    2016-09-08

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is widely used in the management of critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. It requires effective anticoagulation of the extracorporeal blood circuit. Although heparin is the most commonly prescribed anticoagulant, there are issues associated with heparin, and there has been increasing interest in regional citrate anticoagulation as an alternative. In 2013, The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust switched from heparin to citrate anticoagulant for CRRT in intensive care units (ICUs) across the Trust. This article examines the reasons for the switch, the implementation of citrate and the impact of this quality-improvement project in terms of patient outcome data and feedback from the ICU nursing team.

  3. Auditing Autopsies: Lagos University Teaching Hospital Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antemortem diagnosis) with autopsies (post-mortem diagnosis) on patients managed at Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) between October 1999 and November, 2000. In the study period, a total of 1843 deaths were registered out of which ...

  4. Leeds under a cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Before 26 April 1986 few people in the west had heard of Chernobyl. Then Chernobyl experienced the world's worst nuclear power station accident. In the wake of the disaster radioactivity fell on Britain and much of Europe. There was confusion and rumour on the television, in the papers and amongst ordinary people. What would the effect of the Chernobyl accident be? Was it safe to go out of doors? Was it safe to eat fresh vegetables? What was a safe level of radiation? What was a becquerel, a milliSievert or any of the other scientific terms with which we were bombarded by scientists and other experts? This booklet sets out to help answer these questions by looking at a hypothetical disaster at the nuclear power station at Heysham, near Morecambe in Lancashire. Using this scenario it shows what the worst consequences of a nuclear accident might be for the citizens of Leeds. It also explains in a straightforward way the meaning of many technical terms which will help you to understand the advice and comments of experts and to make your own judgement of what they say. (author)

  5. teaching hospital: common bacterial pathogens seen.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pathogens in pyogenic meningitis. Most of the delivery occurred outside the teaching hospital, even those that delivered in the hospital, some come in during labour. ' _ Conclusion: Neonatal bacterial infections are still a cause of high morbidity and mortality of the newborn in our setting. To reduce the morbidity and mortality ...

  6. Head injury: Calabar Teaching Hospital experience | Ikpeme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken as part of a wider prospective study by the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital Trauma Study Group. The specific objective was to highlight the pattern, distribution causative and contributory factors to head injury in our locality and to assess the outcome of treatment. The overall aim was to ...

  7. Ectopic Pregnancy: Lagos University Teaching Hospital Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ectopic pregnancy remains one of the commonest gynaecological emergencies in developing countries. In a retrospective study of ectopic pregnancy carried out at Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Lagos, Nigeria, over a five year period, 272 cases were managed with an incidence of 43.8/1000 deliveries.

  8. Uterine rupture at Lagos University Teaching Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Omololu Adegbola; Adesumbo Kanyinsola Odeseye

    2017-01-01

    Background: Uterine rupture remains a major life-threatening obstetric disaster encountered in many developing countries and is associated with a high maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the incidence, associated risk factors, trend, clinical presentation, management as well as maternal and fetal outcome of uterine rupture at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Lagos, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This was a ret...

  9. Aggressive periodontitis in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwhator, Solomon Olusegun; Uhunmwangho, Iyobosa; Chukwuma, Benedict; Ikponmwosa, Osagie

    2014-07-01

    These case series were aimed at highlighting late presentations of aggressive periodontitis (AP) in a teaching hospital as well as proffering possible reasons for such presentations which would serve as part of the solution to prevent such presentations in the future. Aggressive periodontitis is a severe form of destructive periodontitis traditionally believed to present around puberty. However, many cases seen in a teaching hospital presented much later for yet-to-be explained reasons. Seven patients referred to the specialist periodontal clinic of a Nigerian teaching hospital presented with clinical features consistent with AP. Most of the patients were over twenty and some over thirty years of age. Aggressive periodontitis patients seen in our center were often outside the traditional age brackets. The range of treatment options available to the patients were under-utilized due to serious financial constraints. Aggressive periodontitis comes with serious psychological challenges and severe morbidity. Prompt diagnosis and effective management hold the key to success It is important to investigate why many of the cases seen in our center presented that late. Could be due to ignorance and poverty or could be due to failure of dentists recognize these cases and consequent misdiagnosis? Further studies are needed to answer these questions.

  10. Energy Efficiency: Comparison between GREENSHIP and LEED

    OpenAIRE

    Baharuddin; Rahim, Ramli

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares the energy efficiency in the two green building rating tools i.e. GREENSHIP and LEED. The study has been carried out by comparing the energy performance standard and the energy calculation method of both rating tools. GREENSHIP uses the OTTV (overall thermal transfer value) to measure the efficiency of energy use of the building design, while LEED uses ASHRAE standard for baseline building. The result shows that the energy standard uses in LEED rating tool is more stringen...

  11. Did recent changes in Medicare reimbursement hit teaching hospitals harder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konetzka, R Tamara; Zhu, Jingsan; Volpp, Kevin G

    2005-11-01

    To inform the policy debate on Medicare reimbursement by examining the financial effects of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) and subsequent adjustments on major academic medical centers, minor teaching hospitals, and nonteaching hospitals. The authors simulated the impacts of BBA and subsequent BBA adjustments to predict the independent effects of changes in Medicare reimbursement on hospital revenues using 1997-2001 Medicare Cost Reports for all short-term acute-care hospitals in the United States. The authors also calculated actual (nonsimulated) operating and total margins among major teaching, minor teaching, and nonteaching hospitals to account for hospital response to the changes. The BBA and subsequent refinements reduced Medicare revenues to a greater degree in major teaching hospitals, but the fact that such hospitals had a smaller proportion of Medicare patients meant that the BBA reduced overall revenues by similar percentages across major, minor, and nonteaching hospitals. Consistently lower margins may have made teaching hospitals more vulnerable to cuts in Medicare support. Recent Medicare changes affected revenues at teaching and nonteaching hospitals more similarly than is commonly believed. However, the Medicare cuts under the BBA probably exacerbated preexisting financial strain on major teaching hospitals, and increased Medicare funding may not suffice to eliminate the strain. This report's findings are consistent with recent calls to support needed services of teaching hospitals through all-payer or general funds.

  12. Evaluation of Data Recording at Teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Karbasi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Medical records of patients have an undeniable role on education, research and evaluation of health care delivery, and also could be used as reliable documents of past in casesof patients’ legal complains. This study was done to evaluate medical data recording at teaching hospital of Birjand University of Medical Sciences in 2004.Methods: In this descriptive-analytic study, 527 patients’ records of patients who had been discharged from general wards of the hospitals after 24 hours of hospitalization were randomly selected. 18 standard titles of records include in each patient’s record were evaluated using checklists. Data were analyzed using frequency distribution tables, independent t-test and Chi-square test.Results: Items on records’ titles were completed in a range of 0-100%. Titles of neonates and nursing care with 96% completeness were the most completed ones~ Titles of recovery, pre-delivery care, medical history, summary, and progress notes with 50% to 74% completeness were categorized as moderately completed titles; and titles of vital signs, pre-operation care and operation report were weak. Records of the infectious diseases ward were the most completed records (68% and the least completed were from ophthmology ward (35.8%. There were significant differences between the hospitals and between different wards.Conclusion: Results of this study show the need for further education on record writing, taking medical history, and order writing and more importantly the need for a system of continuous monitoringof the records.Keywords: MEDICAL RECORD, TEACHING HOSPITAL, EVALUATION

  13. Stroke Risk Factors among Patients in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... aim of this study was to describe the risk factors in stroke patients admitted in a Nigerian teaching hospital. Methods: This is a prospective study carried out in the Jos University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria. The participants were 120 patients admitted into the hospital with stroke. Stroke was defined by the WHO definition.

  14. A value-for-money solution in Leeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, M. [United Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    1998-05-01

    A contract energy services scheme is described which supplies all the electric power, heating and chilling needs of the United Leeds Hospital and the University of Leeds campus. In order to meet current needs, a major expansion of capacity and reconfiguration of an existing GSC built as a joint venture between Leeds General Infirmary and the University in the 1970s was required. The estimated capital investment for the project was Pound 6.5 M. The decision to develop the project as an energy services scheme was taken in view of the technical complexity requiring project management and engineering skills not available either in the Hospital or the University. It has been successfully implemented and is meeting expectations in terms both of delivery of service and savings. The Hospital and University have avoided the need to obtain and invest capital themselves, the combination of more energy efficient equipment and better use of existing capacity have reduced revenue costs and management time has been reduced. Over the lifetime of the 20-year contract, savings of Pound 700,000 per annum on average are expected. (UK)

  15. Presentation of Colorectal Cancer in Khartoum Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: To determine the age and gender distribution in Sudanese patients with colorectal cancer, as seen in Khartoum Teaching Hospital, and to study its emergency presentation. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted in Khartoum Teaching Hospital (Sudan). Two hundred and seventy seven (277) ...

  16. Overviewof Contraceptive Use In Jos University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Overviewof Contraceptive Use In Jos University Teaching Hospital, North Central Nigeria. JT Mutihir, VC Pam. Abstract. Background: Modern contraceptive methods accepted by 17,846 new clients in Jos University Teaching Hospital, a tertiary health institution, over two decades are presented. Methods: This was a review ...

  17. Frequency of endodontic treatment in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the frequency of endodontic treatment in dental patients treated in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital. Method: A survey of 470 patients undergoing endodontic treatment at the conservative clinic of the department of restorative dentistry of Lagos University Teaching Hospital was conducted to determine ...

  18. Childhood intussusception at the Moi teaching and referral hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To review the management of childhood intussusception at the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret and identify factors that require attention for improved outcome. Design: A retrospective descriptive study covering the period January 2000 to December 2003. Setting: Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, ...

  19. 35 Patterns of Mango Tree Trauma in Juba Teaching Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-12-02

    Dec 2, 2006 ... Introduction. Juba Teaching Hospital established back in the early 1920s is a Central Hospital in the Southern. Sudan. The hospital serves all the population of equatorial provinces and during peace time it ... diseases like Ebola, yellow fever and most importantly HIV. During the peaceful period, we are ...

  20. Uterine rupture at Lagos University Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omololu Adegbola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uterine rupture remains a major life-threatening obstetric disaster encountered in many developing countries and is associated with a high maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the incidence, associated risk factors, trend, clinical presentation, management as well as maternal and fetal outcome of uterine rupture at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH, Lagos, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of patients with uterine rupture at the LUTH, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria, from June 1, 2005 to May 31, 2013. The case records of patients in this period were retrieved from the medical health records department. The relevant data of sociodemographic characteristics, clinical presentation, management as well as maternal and perinatal outcome were collated using a structured questionnaire. Results: Of the 13,138 deliveries during the study period, there were eighty cases of uterine rupture giving a hospital incidence of 6.1/1000 deliveries. Patients with parities of 1 (28.36% and 2 (38.81% were identified to be at higher risk of uterine rupture. Previous caesarean section (46.28%, obstructed labor (26.87%, and injudicious use of oxytocin (16.42% were the common associated factors. Rupture along previous anterior scar was the most common site affected in 32.84%; repair with bilateral tubal ligation was the surgical procedure in most of the cases (47.76%. The case fatality rate for ruptured uterus was 11.94% for the mothers and the perinatal mortality rate of 791/1000 babies. Conclusion: Uterine rupture is a major cause of maternal and perinatal death in Lagos, Nigeria.

  1. Exploring the use of smartphones and tablets by medical House Officers in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnor-Ahiaku, Edem

    2016-03-01

    Smartphones and tablets are being used widely in the Western World creating benefits in healthcare. The Ministry of Health in Ghana has an e-Health strategy, with the aim of integrating such resources into healthcare. Whilst there are numerous mHealth projects going on in Ghana, there is little evidence of doctors using such devices in their practice. A qualitative study was undertaken in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital. Random sampling was used to identify House Officers, who engaged in semi-structured interviews. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic content analysis. Consent was gained from all participants and the University of Leeds granted ethical approval. The results demonstrate that current House Officers began using smartphones and tablets at various stages during medical school. Their use has increased since qualification. Although the overall use has increased, some staff remain resistant to the use of smartphones and tablets. In the future, the integration of smartphones and tablets into medical practice can be improved by integration with the medical curriculum and accepted practice. House Officers are routinely using smartphones and tablets to assist them in their daily practice. The use is informal and is peer led. Whilst they bring many benefits, there are issues, which need to be addressed. In Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital integrating smartphone and tablet use into practice is feasible and would prove beneficial.

  2. traumatic exposed bones at moi teaching and referral hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surg), Lecturer and Consultant. Plastic and ... and the management of patients with post- traumatic exposed bones for Africa, Kenya and Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital- .... meager resources (human, financial and facilities) among others (15 ...

  3. Vulvovaginal Candidiasis in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    11]. Increased vaginal colonization with candida has been shown after the use of oral contraceptives with high estrogen. Vulvovaginal Candidiasis in Aminu Kano Teaching. Hospital, North‑West Nigeria: Hospital‑Based. Epidemiological Study.

  4. Veterinary Teaching Hospital to launch small animal outpatient imaging service

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Christy

    2009-01-01

    Beginning in June 2009, the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech's Veterinary Teaching Hospital will introduce a new outpatient advanced imaging service for surrounding small animal veterinarian practices.

  5. Abdominal Injuries in University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    operative findings, postoperative complications, and outcome of management. Data analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 16. Abdominal Injuries in University of Port Harcourt. Teaching Hospital. Amabra ...

  6. Stroke Among Young Adults at the LAUTECH Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke Among Young Adults at the LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria. AF Mustapha, EO Sanya, TO Bello. Abstract. Background: Stroke in young adults is relatively rare and there are very few hospital reports about it in Nigeria. The aetiologic mechanisms of stoke among young adults are quite distinct from ...

  7. Juba Teaching Hospital College of Nursing and Midwifery Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Angel_D

    their 5th birthday, and there is 1 doctor for every 100,000 people1. The Government is well aware of the situation and the need for more trained staff, particularly nurses and midwives. In March 2008 a team from the St Mary's Hospital, Isle of Wight,. UK working with staff at Juba Teaching Hospital identified several problems ...

  8. Case control study of episiotomy in the University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to determine the incidence and identify the factors influencing the practice of episiotomy during delivery in the University Teaching Hospital, Yaounde. It is a retrospective review of all vaginal deliveries conducted in this hospital between January 2001 and December 2002 was undertaken to identify ...

  9. (ANC) patients at the Lagos state university teaching hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... teaching hospital. Tayo Adetokunbo O.1*, Akinola O. I.1, Shittu L. A. J.2, Ottun T. A.1, Bankole M. A.3, Akinola R. A.4, Shittu R. K.5 and Okunribido A. I.1 .... Hospital ethics and research committee before commencement of the study and all patients recruited gave their consent for the study. Statistical analysis.

  10. Promoting effective teaching and learning: hospital consultants identify their needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, D R; Campbell, R M

    2000-02-01

    The aim of this study was to help hospital consultants identify their needs in relation to teaching skills, leading to the development of a teacher training programme. The study was directed at all 869 consultants in the region and initially involved a postal questionnaire which had a 60.5% response rate. Hospitals throughout Northern Ireland. Hospital consultants. Results from this questionnaire indicated that while the majority of respondents were interested teachers, only 34% had received any teacher training. The questionnaire was followed by a focus group study involving three groups of consultants drawn randomly from those who had responded to the questionnaire. Participants in these groups identified the following key areas of hospital education: qualities of hospital teachers; selection procedures; problems of teaching in hospitals; the need for teacher training and how it should be provided. The study highlighted that hospital teachers need to acquire and update their teaching skills through attending courses that should include basic teaching and assessment/appraisal skills. These courses should last 1 or 2 days and be provided at a regional or subregional level. As a result of this study, teacher training courses have been developed in this region.

  11. LEED Credit Review System and Optimization Model for Pursuing LEED Certification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ouk Choi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating sustainability in construction can result in desirable building attributes and project life cycle. The Leadership in Engineering and Environmental Design (LEED® Rating System helps project teams make the right green building decisions for their projects through a process. However, in current practice, project teams do not have a systematic procedure or tool for choosing the LEED credits appropriate for a particular project. The researchers have developed a tool, which support the LEED integrative process during a charrette, and developed an optimization model that can be utilized to assist project teams determine which credits to pursue for LEED certification, taking into account potential benefits associated with any LEED credit. The tool enables owners to incorporate sustainability in construction by helping the project teams make the right green building decisions for their projects through an integrated procedure.

  12. Impact of teaching intensity and academic status on medical resource utilization by teaching hospitals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2012-11-01

    Teaching hospitals require excess medical resources to maintain high-quality care and medical education. To evaluate the appropriateness of such surplus costs, we examined the impact of teaching intensity defined as activities for postgraduate training, and academic status as functions of medical research and undergraduate teaching on medical resource utilization. Administrative data for 47,397 discharges from 40 academic and 12 non-academic teaching hospitals in Japan were collected. Hospitals were classified into three groups according to intern/resident-to-bed (IRB) ratio. Resource utilization of medical services was estimated using fee-for-service charge schedules and normalized with case mix grouping. 15-24% more resource utilization for laboratory examinations, radiological imaging, and medications were observed in hospitals with higher IRB ratios. With multivariate adjustment for case mix and academic status, higher IRB ratios were associated with 10-15% more use of radiological imaging, injections, and medications; up to 5% shorter hospital stays; and not with total resource utilization. Conversely, academic status was associated with 21-33% more laboratory examinations, radiological imaging, and medications; 13% longer hospital stays; and 10% more total resource utilization. While differences in medical resource utilization by teaching intensity may not be associated with indirect educational costs, those by academic status may be. Therefore, academic hospitals may need efficiency improvement and financial compensation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mass casualty management: Jos University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The classification recognises a category called “regional disaster” and attempts to enunciate a principle of initiation, mobilisation and co-ordination of management of such disasters among hospitals and human and material resources within the region. It is envisaged that coalescence of “regional disaster preparedness” ...

  14. Are medical students accepted by patients in teaching hospitals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Marwan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide, patients are the cornerstone of bedside teaching of medical students. In this study, the authors aimed to assess patients’ acceptability toward medical students in teaching hospitals of the Faculty of Medicine of Kuwait University. Methods: Ninehundred and ninety five patients were approached in 14 teaching hospitals; 932 patients agreed to participate (refusal rate is 6.3%. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Results: In general, higher acceptance of students by patients was found when there is no direct contact between the patient and the student (e.g., reading patients’ files, presenting in outpatient clinic, observing doctors performing examination or procedures compared to other situations (e.g., performing physical examination or procedures. Pediatrics patients showed higher acceptance of students compared to patients in other specialties, while Obstetrics/Gynecology patients showed the highest refusal of students. Gender of patients (especially females and students appeared to affect the degree of acceptance of medical students by patients. Majority of the patients (436; 46.8% believed that the presence of medical students in hospitals improves the quality of health care. Conclusion: Patients are an important factor of bedside teaching. Clinical tutors must take advantage of patients who accept medical students. Clinical tutors and medical students should master essential communication skills to convince patients in accepting students, thus improving bedside teaching. Also, using simulation and standardization should be considered to address scenarios that most patients are unwilling to allow students to participate.

  15. Prevalence of HIV among blood donors at Juba Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    respectively. Blood group O positive had the highest percentage 58.1 % (n=50) and was the commonest group. Conclusion. In this study, HIV prevalence is very high among blood donors at the Juba Teaching Hospital blood bank. The Republic of South Sudan has emerged from war in the past 9 years. These were years of ...

  16. Eclampsia and Pregnancy Outcome at Lautech Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality of care a woman receives in prenatal care has a significant impact on the outcome of the pregnancy. All the women in our study were not booked in our health facility which is a tertiary teaching hospital but this is not necessar- ily to be interpreted as a negative development. Within the. Nigerian health system ...

  17. Mortality In A Nigerian Teaching Hospital: Experience At Jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malnutrition and infection accounted for highest causes of death in paediatric ward. Death in surgery and obstetric and Gynaecology accounted for 9.3 and 5 percent respectively. Conclusion: The study clearly shows that infectious disease still account for the highest mortality in our teaching hospital. The authors are of the ...

  18. Ectopic pregnancy at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of ectopic pregnancy is on the increase worldwide. Objective: To determine the influence of age and parity on the incidence of ectopic pregnancy, findings at operation and pattern of treatment of ectopic pregnancy at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH), Kano, Nigeria. Methods: It was a descriptive ...

  19. Burkholderia cepacia infection at A university Teaching Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty five isolates of B. cepacia, representing 1.4% of all isolates, were obtained at the Microbiology Laboratory of a University Teaching Hospital in Lagos between January 1996 and December 1997. Identification of isolates was done using analytical profile index systems (Biomerieux, France) and sensitivity testing was ...

  20. Hypospadias Surgery at Korle-Bu Teaching hospital, Ghana: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to review experience in the management of hypospadias at a tertiary Paediatric Surgery Centre,Accra,Ghana. This was a prospective study of patientsmanaged for hypospadias at the Paediatric Surgery Unit of the Korle-Bu Teaching hospital, between 1st January 2004 and 30th September 2005.

  1. Abdominal Wall Hernias as seen in LAUTECH Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prospective survey of Abdominal Wall Hernia patients was done in LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, from November 2000 to February 2002. The objective is to determine the pattern, management and outcome in a 101 patients with 110 hernias. Males accounted for 88.1% of the patients with mean age of 51.1 ...

  2. Ectopic Pregnancy in Lagos State University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We set out to determine the socio-demographic factors,pattern of presentation and management of ectopic pregnancy in a University Teaching Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. A retrospective descriptive analysis of all cases of ectopic pregnancy over a 2-year period was carried out. The case notes were retrieved from the ...

  3. Singleton preterm births in Korle bu teaching hospital, Accra, Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the singleton preterm birth rate, the relative proportions of the clinical categories of preterm births and to compare the outcomes in these categories. Setting: Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecol-ogy, Korle Bu Teaching Hospital. Participants: Preterm births from 1st July to 31st December 2003.

  4. Caesarean Sections at Juba Teaching Hospital 2008 - 2009

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ann Burgess

    Summary. A summary and analysis of all recorded emergency and elective caesarean sections (CS) performed at Juba. Teaching Hospital (JTH), Juba, Southern Sudan from October 2008 to September 2009 was made. During this period 430 CS were performed giving a mean of 1.2 each day, the main reason being cited ...

  5. Endometrial pathology in a teaching hospital in North Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was a 5 year histopathological survey of endometrial biopsies seen at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital , Ilorin, North Central Nigeria from January 1st 1997 to December 31st 2001. It aimed at identifying the morphological patterns of endometrial disorders, prevalence of these disorders and the ...

  6. Retention of Medical Records in Ghanaian Teaching Hospitals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retention of Medical Records in Ghanaian Teaching Hospitals: Some International Perspectives. ... The study revealed that the problems inherent in the retention of management of non-current medical records are due to the absence of formal guidelines and procedures, and to the fact that those that exist are not properly ...

  7. Health workers' ICT literacy in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the ICT literacy among the health workers of Igbinedion University Teaching Hospital. The emergence of Internet for Telemedicine and health information revolution necessitates that issue of computer and other communication technology literacy among the health workers of Igbinedion University ...

  8. Anaemia in Pregnancy in Abia State University Teaching Hospital, Aba

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prospective study of incidence of anaemia in pregnancy at Abia state University Teaching Hospital, Aba was conducted over a six-month period spanning from 31st January 2000 to 31st July 2000. The incidence of anaemia in pregnancy was 29%. The vast majority (97.6%) had mild anaemia. The result showed that most ...

  9. Audit of day case surgery in LAUTECH teaching hospital, Osogbo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/ method: A retrospective study of all patients operated as day-case at the Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital Osogbo over a period of 14 months (October 2000 to November 2001) was carried out. Results: Seventy-six patients were operated as day-cases within the study period, but 74 case notes ...

  10. Medical Audit: A Nigerian Teaching Hospital's Preliminary Experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The definition, historical background, aims dimensions and the characteristics of medical audit as well as the indices to be measured in a medical audit exercise are highlighted. The preliminary experience of the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital (UITH) in the planning, implementation and monitoring of a viable medical ...

  11. Ischaemic heart disease in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ischaemic heart disease in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria: a 5 year review. ... Forty six patients were diagnosed to have IHD giving it a prevalence of 0.9% of medical conditions and 3.4% of all cardiovascular cases. There were 33 males and 13 females (M: F = 2.5:1). Twenty two patients (47.8%) had ...

  12. Paediatric Hand Injuries At The Lagos University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Paediatric hand trauma represents a subset of hand injury that can be quite challenging to manage. Local studies on this injuries are few therefore a 4 year retrospective study at the Trauma and hand rehabilitation unit of the Lagos University teaching hospital was carried out. Objectives: To determine the ...

  13. Uniocular blindness in Delta State Teaching Hospital, Oghara, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Uniocular blindness causes loss of binocular single vision. People with uniocular blindness are potentially at risk of developing binocular blindness. Aim: To determine the prevalence rate, causes and risk factors for uniocular blindness in a teaching hospital in southern Nigeria over a one-year period. Methods: ...

  14. Epidemiology of open tibial fractures in a teaching hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This is a prospective observational study of all open tibial fractures seen at the Accident and Emergency department of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH) over a twelve- month period (July 2002- June 2003). Data from a pre-designed proforma for the study was analyzed and descriptive ...

  15. Queueing and Service Patterns in a University Teaching Hospital FO

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    ABSTRACT: Analysis of queueing and service times is essential for designing effective congestion control at a service point. The objective of this is to be able to offer satisfactory service to waiting customers with minimum delay. In this study, using University of Abuja Teaching Hospital as a case study, we compared the ...

  16. the trend of hepatitis b surface antigenemia among teaching hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence and trend of Hepatitis B Virus infection in 2966 patients attending clinics of Aminu. Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano Nigeira was determined over a 3 year period 2001 to 2003. The samples was initially screened by latex agglutination techniques while the positive samples repeated by Enzyme.

  17. Introduction of bubble CPAP in a teaching hospital in Malawi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Heuvel, M.; Blencowe, H.; Mittermayer, K.; Rylance, S.; Couperus, A.; Heikens, G. T.; Bandsma, R. H. J.

    Background: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is relatively inexpensive and can be easily taught; it therefore has the potential to be the optimal respiratory support device for neonates in developing countries. Objective: The possibility of implementing bubble CPAP in a teaching hospital

  18. Trauma at a Nigerian teaching hospital: pattern and documentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trauma at a Nigerian teaching hospital: pattern and documentation of presentation. ... Incomplete documentation of accident and injury data occurred frequently, from 2% of some data to 100% of others. Conclusions: Lacerations and fractures were the most common injuries. Mortality is due usually to head and multiple ...

  19. Stroke mortality and its predictors in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Stroke is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Stroke mortality has been noted to be higher in blacks in biracial studies. There have been few studies on stroke mortality and its predictors in Nigeria. This study examines mortality of stroke and its predictors in a Northern Nigerian teaching hospital.

  20. Stroke mortality and its predictors in a Nigerian teaching hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Stroke mortality has been noted to be higher in blacks in biracial studies. There have been few studies on stroke mortality and its predictors in Nigeria. This study examines mortality of stroke and its predictors in a Northern Nigerian teaching hospital.

  1. Obstructed Labour at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital. Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Obstructed Labour at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital. Ilorin. AAG Jimoh, OR Balogun, Abubakar Danladi. Abstract. During a five-year period between 1st January 1995 to 31st December 1999, three hundred and twenty eight cases of obstructed labour were encountered out of a total of 12,614 deliveries managed ...

  2. Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A prospective study spanning two years (July 2002 – August 2004). Twenty two children with nephrotic syndrome were seen ate the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano. The demographic, clinical and laboratory features and response to treatment were documented. Results: Nephritic syndrome made up of 1.2% ...

  3. Experience with norplant at a Nigerian Teaching Hospital | Mutihir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experience with norplant at a Nigerian Teaching Hospital. ... Conclusion: Norplant implants provided contraceptive protection with high reliability, safety, independence from user compliance, rapid return of pre-existing fertility after removal, good tolerability, and relatively simple and quick insertion and removal.

  4. E-HEALTH CLOUD FOR NIGERIAN TEACHING HOSPITALS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    research and development project on health informatics. Its second version is currently available. It has been deployed across eight (8) Nigerian teaching hospitals as of July 2005, and it's suitable for the different types of health facilities as a result of its scalability. Cloud Computing Approach. In this paper we propose an ...

  5. 21 Goitre in a Teaching Hospital in North Western Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-12-02

    Dec 2, 2006 ... goitres in patient seen at Gondar College of Medical Sciences (GCMS), a teaching and referral. Hospital,. North. Western. Ethiopia. Methods: A ... enlargement to be the most common variant11,12,13. In the majority, these benign ... regular diet in 70.0% and only five patients. (6.3%) had knowledge of their ...

  6. Childhood pneumonia at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Objectives: Pneumonia is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children and thus this study was designed to document the sociodemographic, clinical features as well as the bacterial agents responsible for pneumonia in children seen at University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital. Methodology: A descriptive ...

  7. Outpatient waiting time in Jos University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Problem Long waiting time for services has been identified as a reason people avoid presenting to for care in African countries. Design Examination of causes for long outpatient waiting time and the effect of measures to reduce waiting time. Setting Outpatient department of the Jos University Teaching Hospital.

  8. Potent Motivators for Work among Staff of a Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proportionate sampling technique was used to sample 220 staff of Jos University Teaching Hospital and data was collected from and analyzed using Epi Info. Logistic regression was used to assess predictive factors for being highly motivated. There was a statistically significant difference in motivation between respondents ...

  9. Vacuum Delivery in Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Obstetric practice continues to change, particularly assisted vaginal delivery. Vacuum delivery is a mode of delivery technique in Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH) in the maternity unit. The objective of the study was to determine the rate of ventouse delivery, its indications, and maternal and fetal morbidity in our ...

  10. Racial Disparity in Duration of Patient Visits to the Emergency Department: Teaching Versus Non-teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zynal Karaca

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sources of racial disparity in duration of patients’ visits to emergency departments (EDs have not been documented well enough for policymakers to distinguish patient-related factors from hospital- or area-related factors. This study explores the racial disparity in duration of routine visits to EDs at teaching and non-teaching hospitals.Methods: We performed retrospective data analyses and multivariate regression analyses to investigate the racial disparity in duration of routine ED visits at teaching and non-teaching hospitals. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD were used in the analyses. The data include 4.3 million routine ED visits encountered in Arizona, Massachusetts, and Utah during 2008. We computed duration for each visit by taking the difference between admission and discharge times.Results: The mean duration for a routine ED visit was 238 minutes at teaching hospitals and 175 minutes at non-teaching hospitals. There were significant variations in duration of routine ED visits across race groups at teaching and non-teaching hospitals. The risk-adjusted results show that the mean duration of routine ED visits for Black/African American and Asian patients when compared to visits for white patients was shorter by 10.0 and 3.4%, respectively, at teaching hospitals; and longer by 3.6 and 13.8%, respectively, at non-teaching hospitals. Hispanic patients, on average, experienced 8.7% longer ED stays when compared to white patients at non-teaching hospitals.Conclusion: There is significant racial disparity in the duration of routine ED visits, especially in non-teaching hospitals where non-White patients experience longer ED stays compared to white patients. The variation in duration of routine ED visits at teaching hospitals when compared to non-teaching hospitals was smaller across race groups. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:529–541.

  11. 42 CFR 415.190 - Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... teaching hospitals. 415.190 Section 415.190 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.190 Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in teaching hospitals. (a...

  12. An institutional approach: education for sustainable development at the University of Leeds

    OpenAIRE

    Purvis, M; Young, CW; Marsh, C; Clarke, J

    2013-01-01

    Central to the strategic vision of the University of Leeds is the reaffirmation of the University’s commitment to provide an exceptional student experience centred on inspirational learning and teaching, grounded in world-class research. A key component of this vision is a major curriculum enhancement project. This chapter outlines the intent of this project, which reinforces existing provision that challenges undergraduate students to broaden their academic horizons and develop their capacit...

  13. An interview with Dr. Martin Lamb on research in English language learning and teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Torras Vila, Berta

    2016-01-01

    The author interviewed Dr. Martin Lamb (University of Leeds, United Kingdom) at the School of Education in Leeds, about research on English language learning and teaching and about the main challenges that this field of research currently faces.

  14. Occupational exposures among healthcare workers: A teaching hospital sample

    OpenAIRE

    Derya Öztürk Engin; Asuman İnan; Nurgül Ceran; Zeynel Abiddin Demir; Özgür Dağli; Emin Karagül; Seyfi Özyürek

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at risk for occupational injury associated with contaminated blood and body fluids. This study aims to examine the frequency and type of occupational injuries and to determine best practices after exposure. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Haydarpaşa Teaching Hospital in December 2010. The questionnaires were completed by healthcare workers with face-to-face interviews. The questionnaire was evaluated occupational injuries in the ho...

  15. Evaluation of drug administration errors in a teaching hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Berdot, Sarah; Sabatier, Brigitte; Gillaizeau, Florence; Caruba, Thibaut; Prognon, Patrice; Durieux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Medication errors can occur at any of the three steps of the medication use process: prescribing, dispensing and administration. We aimed to determine the incidence, type and clinical importance of drug administration errors and to identify risk factors. Methods Prospective study based on disguised observation technique in four wards in a teaching hospital in Paris, France (800 beds). A pharmacist accompanied nurses and witnessed the preparation and administration of drugs...

  16. Possible adverse drug events leading to hospital admission in a Brazilian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Rossi Varallo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Drug safety problems can lead to hospital admission. In Brazil, the prevalence of hospitalization due to adverse drug events is unknown. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of hospitalization due to adverse drug events and to identify the drugs, the adverse drug events, and the risk factors associated with hospital admissions. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was performed in the internal medicine ward of a teaching hospital in São Paulo State, Brazil, from August to December 2008. All patients aged ≥18 years with a length of stay ≥24 hours were interviewed about the drugs used prior to hospital admission and their symptoms/complaints/causes of hospitalization. RESULTS: In total, 248 patients were considered eligible. The prevalence of hospitalization due to potential adverse drug events in the ward was 46.4%. Overprescribed drugs and those indicated for prophylactic treatments were frequently associated with possible adverse drug events. Frequently reported symptoms were breathlessness (15.2%, fatigue (12.3%, and chest pain (9.0%. Polypharmacy was a risk factor for the occurrence of possible adverse drug events. CONCLUSION: Possible adverse drug events led to hospitalization in a high-complexity hospital, mainly in polymedicated patients. The clinical outcomes of adverse drug events are nonspecific, which delays treatment, hinders causality analysis, and contributes to the underreporting of cases.

  17. Teaching hospital performance: towards a community of shared values?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Marianna; Cardamone, Emma; Cavallaro, Giusy; Minvielle, Etienne; Rania, Francesco; Sicotte, Claude; Trotta, Annarita

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the performance dimensions of Italian teaching hospitals (THs) by considering the multiple constituent model approach, using measures that are subjective and based on individual ideals and preferences. Our research replicates a study of a French TH and deepens it by adjusting it to the context of an Italian TH. The purposes of this research were as follows: to identify emerging views on the performance of teaching hospitals and to analyze how these views vary among hospital stakeholders. We conducted an in-depth case study of a TH using a quantitative survey method. The survey uses a questionnaire based on Parsons' social system action theory, which embraces the major models of organizational performance and covers three groups of internal stakeholders: physicians, caregivers and administrative staff. The questionnaires were distributed between April and September 2011. The results confirm that hospital performance is multifaceted and includes the dimensions of efficiency, effectiveness and quality of care, as well as organizational and human features. There is a high degree of consensus among all observed stakeholder groups about these values, and a shared view of performance is emerging. Our research provides useful information for defining management priorities to improve the performance of THs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Relationship between organizational structure and creativity in teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Rita; Marhamati, Saadat; Nabeiei, Parisa; Marhamati, Raheleh

    2014-07-01

    Organization structure and manpower constitute two basic components of anorganization and both are necessary for stablishing an organization. The aim of this survey was to investigate the type of the organization structure (mechanic and organic) from viewpoint of senior and junior managers in Shiraz teaching hospitals and creativity in each of these two structures. In this cross-sectional and descriptive-analytic study, organization structure and organizational creation questionnaires were filled out by hospital managers. According to the statistical consultation and due to limited target population, the entire study population was considered as sample. Thus, the sample size in this study was 84 (12 hospitals and every hospital, n = 7). For data analysis, SPSS 14 was used and Spearman correlation coefficient and t-test were used. RESULTS showed that there is a negative association between centralization and complexity with organizational creation and its dimensions. Also there was a negative association between formalization and 4 organizational creation dimensions: reception change, accepting ambiguity, abet new view and less control outside (p=0.001). The results of this study showed that the creation in hospitals with organic structure is more than that in hospitals with mechanic structure.

  19. A comparative analysis of the CVP structure of nonprofit teaching and for-profit non-teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Lin; Forgione, Dana A; Younis, Mustafa Z

    2012-01-01

    Due to the market turbulence facing the hospital industry, the financial viability of teaching hospitals has been severely threatened. Their missions of education, research, and patient care even strengthen this crisis. Therefore, the objective of this study is to conduct a comparative analysis of the cost, volume, and profit (CVP) structure between large nonprofit urban teaching hospitals and small for-profit rural/suburban non-teaching hospitals. The following two hypotheses were developed: (1) large nonprofit urban teaching hospitals tend to have higher fixed cost, lower variable cost, lower total revenue adjusted by case mix index (CMI), and lower return on total assets (ROA); and (2) small for-profit rural/suburban non-teaching hospitals tend to have lower fixed cost, higher variable cost, higher total revenue adjusted by CMI, and higher ROA. Using 117 teaching hospitals and 102 non-teaching hospitals selected from the Medicare Cost Report database in 2005, the results from multiple regression indicated that large nonprofit teaching hospitals located in urban areas are more likely to have higher fixed cost and lower variable cost. While such cost structure doesn't necessarily affect their total revenue adjusted by CMI, it does lead to a lower return on hospitals' total assets. The results support our hypotheses in terms of fixed cost percentage, variable cost percentage, and ROA, but not total revenue adjusted by CMI. The results suggest that cost structure is significantly associated with hospitals' performance. Also, as teaching hospitals' portfolios of services and programs increase (e.g., provision of uncompensated care to Medicare and Medicaid patients and doing research), it becomes strategically necessary and critical to manage the allocation of resources or investments into the fixed capital that supports the business.

  20. 78 FR 32663 - Medicare Program; Notification of Closure of Teaching Hospitals and Opportunity To Apply for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ...] Medicare Program; Notification of Closure of Teaching Hospitals and Opportunity To Apply for Available... announces the closure of two teaching hospitals and the initiation of an application process where hospitals... modifying language at section 1886(d)(5)(B)(v) of the Act, to instruct the Secretary to establish a process...

  1. Nutritional Assessment in Elderly Hospitalized Patients in Qazvin Teaching Hospitals in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Ghorbani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Nutritional status in the elderly is an important issue in developing countries has been little attention to it. It results from complex interaction between personal and environmental factors that have a considerable effect on mortality, morbidity and quality of life of elderly people especially the hospitalized ones. The aim of this study was to investigate nutritional status in elderly hospitalized patients in Qazvin Teaching Hospitals and know Influential factors to plan appropriate programs for improving their health. Methods & Materials: In this cross-sectional study 233 elderly (151 women and 171 men aging more than 60 years, hospitalized in two hospitals in Qazvin city were studied. Nutritional status were evaluated using Mini Nutritional Assessment, The nutritional status was classified into: malnourished, risk of malnutrition and without malnutrition (adequate. Results: Among the assessed elderly 29.8% were well nourish, 13.4% malnourished and 42.95 at risk of malnutrition. There was more malnutrition in females compared to males (25.8% vs 7.2 P=23(62.5% vs. 12.6% P<0.001, Statistical analysis of the studied variables showed that nutritional status were significantly associated with Age, BMI, WC and WHR Conclusion: This study confirms a high prevalence of malnutrition risk in hospitalized elderly patients. The assessment of nutritional status with MNA that can facilitate evaluation of the nutritional status of elderly individuals in hospitals

  2. Point prevalence of hospital-acquired infections in two teaching hospitals of Amhara region in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yallew WW

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Walelegn Worku Yallew,1 Abera Kumie,2 Feleke Moges Yehuala3 1Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, 2School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, 3Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Purpose: Hospital-acquired infection (HAI is a major safety issue affecting the quality of care of hundreds of millions of patients every year, in both developed and developing countries, including Ethiopia. In Ethiopia, there is no comprehensive research that presents the whole picture of HAIs in hospitals. The objective of this study was to examine the nature and extent of HAIs in Ethiopia. Methods: A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted in two teaching hospitals. All eligible inpatients admitted for at least 48 hours on the day of the survey were included. The survey was conducted in dry and wet seasons of Ethiopia, that is, in March to April and July 2015. Physicians and nurses collected the data according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition of HAIs. Coded and cleaned data were transferred to SPSS 21 and STATA 13 for analysis. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to examine the prevalence of HAIs and relationship between explanatory and outcome variables. Results: A total of 908 patients were included in this survey, the median age of the patients was 27 years (interquartile range: 16–40 years. A total of 650 (71.6% patients received antimicrobials during the survey. There were 135 patients with HAI, with a mean prevalence of 14.9% (95% confidence interval 12.7–17.1. Culture results showed that Klebsiella spp. (22.44% and Staphylococcus aureus (20.4% were the most commonly isolated HAI-causing pathogens in these hospitals. The association of patient age and hospital type with the occurrence of HAI was

  3. Nursing Care Systematization: A Study At A Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Passos Vigolvino Macêdo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Investigate the understanding of nurses who work at a teaching hospital, in relation to NCS and the nursing process; ascertain facilities/difficulties related to the applicability of the nursing process in that service; and verify the opinions of those professionals for the improvement and/or effectiveness of the nursing process at the hospitalization units of the hospital. Method: Exploratory, descriptive study, with a qualitative approach. The sample consisted of 42 nurses who answered a questionnaire. The empirical material was analyzed and categorized based on the content analysis technique and discussed in the light of the literature. Results: From the participants' discourses, two categories of analysis emerged: 1 understanding of NCS as a tool to organize the Nursing work process and improve the quality of care; and 2 applicability of the nursing process at the various hospitalization units of the institution. Conclusion: The implementation and applicability of that method depend on not only the knowledge and motivation of the nursing professionals, but also on a strategic planning involving management and staff, from the recognition of their importance in order to obtain adherence and effective operationalization in practice. Descriptors: Nursing; Nursing Process; Professional Practice.

  4. Laryngeal cancer at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital Accra Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitcher, E.D.; Cheyuo, C.; Yarney, J.; Gyasi, R. K.

    2006-01-01

    Laryngeal cancer is the commonest head and neck cancer seen at the Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) Unit Korle Bu Teaching Hospital. The aim of this study was to determine the number of cases of laryngeal cancer seen at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, establish epidemiological parameters of the disease and to outline preventive measures. One hundred and fifteen (115) patients who were managed for laryngeal cancer from 1st January 1998 to 31st December 2003 were studied retrospectively with respect to age, sex, duration of symptoms at presentation, risk factors, symptoms complex, histopathology, stage of tumor, details of treatment offered and follow up. The age range was 17-85 years with a mean of 55.5 years (SD10.7). Majority of the patients (90.4%) were above 40 years. The commonest symptom at presentation was dysphonia. A significant proportion of cases (37.3%) presented with locally advanced disease. The commonest histological type of laryngeal tumour seen was squamous cell carcinoma. The treatment offered consisted of radiotherapy for 83 (79.8%) patients and total laryngectomy with neck dissection when necessary for 17 (16.3%) patients who also had postoperative radiotherapy. Only 58 (69.9%) patients completed radiotherapy treatment and in all 32 (24.3 %) patients did not report for any treatment. Majority of patients failed to report for post treatment follow-up. We conclude that significant number of patients with laryngeal cancer presented with locally advanced disease and dysphonia was the commonest symptom. (au)

  5. The impact of academic calendar cycle on coronary artery bypass outcomes: a comparison of teaching and non-teaching hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The commencement of new academic cycle in July is presumed to be associated with poor patient outcomes, although supportive evidence is limited for cardiac surgery patients. We sought to determine if the new academic cycle affected the outcomes of patients undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 10-year nationwide in-hospital data from 1998–2007. Only patients who underwent CABG in the first and final academic 3-month calendar quarter were included. Generalized multivariate regression was used to assess indicators of hospital quality of care such as risk-adjusted mortality, total complications and “failure to rescue“ (FTOR) - defined as death after a complication. Results Of the 1,056,865 CABG operations performed in the selected calendar quarters, 698,942 were at teaching hospitals. The risk-adjusted mortality, complications and FTOR were higher in the beginning of the academic year [Odds ratio = 1.14, 1.04 and 1.19 respectively; p teaching status. However, teaching status was associated with lower mortality (OR 0.9) despite a higher complication rate (OR 1.02); [p Effect thus contributed to only a 2.4% higher FTOR in teaching hospitals compared to 19% in non teaching hospitals. Conclusions The July Effect is reflective of an overall increase in morbidity in all hospitals at the beginning of the academic cycle and it had a pronounced effect in non-teaching hospitals. Teaching hospitals were associated with lower mortality despite higher complication rates in the beginning of the academic cycle compared to non-teaching hospitals. The July effect thus cannot be attributed to presence of trainees alone. Ultramini abstract This study compares the July effect in teaching and non-teaching hospitals and demonstrates that this effect is not unique to teaching hospitals for CABG patients. In fact, teaching hospitals have somewhat better outcomes at the beginning of the academic cycle and the

  6. A survey of radiology reporting practices in veterinary teaching hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, W.M.

    1998-01-01

    Radiologists from 28 veterinary schools and one private teaching hospital responded to a survey questionnaire focused on diagnostic image reporting. Radiologists at 26 hospitals generated a hard copy report on essentially all imaging studies performed. At 25 hospitals, radiologists dictated and transcriptionists typed all or most reports; radiologists at two institutions typed all or some of their reports. At five hospitals, preliminary and/or final handwritten reports were generated. The range of reports generated per day was <10 to 40 per radiologist on duty. Seven respondents generated reports as films came from the processor and another 12 routinely generated reports the day the studies were completed. Clinician access to a processed report averaged 2 to 4 days after study was completed (reported range: several hours to 7 or more days). Fifteen responding radiologists personally mounted films from storage jackets for a majority of their reporting. Fourteen respondents generated reports from films mounted on motorized or stationary viewers. Nineteen respondents generated reports in a busy viewing area where they were frequently interrupted. Radiologists' impression of clinician and resident satisfaction regarding availability of radiology reports was that they were satisfied or very satisfied at 15 of the 29 hospitals. Five respondents reported that clinicians and residents were not concerned about availability of processed radiology reports. Thirteen radiologists were planning to change their reporting method within the next 2 years. The change most frequently sought (12 respondents) was to decrease turn-around time of reports. Ten radiologists indicated an interest in trying a voice recognition dictation system. The most common reasons given for not planning any changes in radiology reporting in the next 2 years were: limited number of radiologists (8) and 1 ''satisfied as is'' (7). Turn-around of radiology reports at these veterinary institutions averaged 2

  7. Competitive strategy in turbulent healthcare markets: an analysis of financially effective teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langabeer, J

    1998-01-01

    As the healthcare marketplace, characterized by declining revenues and heavy price competition, continues to evolve toward managed care, teaching hospitals are being forced to act more like traditional industrial organizations. Profit-oriented behavior, including emphases on market strategies and competitive advantage, is now a necessity if these hospitals are going to survive the transition to managed care. To help teaching hospitals evaluate strategic options that maximize financial effectiveness, this study examined the financial and operating data for 100 major U.S. teaching hospitals to determine relationships among competitive strategy, market environment, and financial return on invested capital. Results should help major hospitals formulate more effective strategies to combat environmental turbulence.

  8. Transcatheter arterial revascularization outcomes at vascular and general surgery teaching hospitals and nonteaching hospitals are comparable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamidipati, Castigliano M; LaPar, Damien J; Stukenborg, George J; Lutz, Charles J; Tracci, Margaret C; Cherry, Kenneth J; Upchurch, Gilbert R; Kern, John A

    2012-07-01

    Outcomes following transcatheter interventions at vascular and general surgery teaching hospitals (STH) are unknown. We examine whether surgery training programs influence clinically relevant outcomes after commonly performed endovascular procedures. Using an all-payer inpatient care database from 2008, we selected adults who underwent either endovascular carotid stenting, endografting of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm, endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, or peripheral arterial revascularization. Patients were stratified by procedures completed at Surgery Teaching (Participate in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education [ACGME]-accredited vascular and general surgery programs), STH, or nonteaching hospitals (NTH). Hierarchical regression models assessed adverse outcomes and in-hospital mortality among groups. Of the 175,698 records, 44% of the patients were treated at STH, while 56% underwent procedures at NTH. The adjusted odds ratio of any complication or mortality at STH and NTH were similar. Transfers, weekend admissions, and nonelective cases were higher at STH (P STH treated fewer patients with more than three comorbidities compared with NTH (STH: 47% vs NTH: 53%; P STH. Following commonly performed transcatheter vascular procedures, and despite more transfers, weekend admissions, and nonelective procedures completed at STH, complications, and mortality were comparable across centers. Copyright © 2012 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Awareness and practice of patients' rights among hospitalized patients at Wad-Medani Teaching Hospital, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Abobaker A H; Hassan, Amal H A; Dmyatti, Eylaph M E H; Elmubarak, Mehad A H; Alterife, Rahma A A; Salim, Rawan E O; Mohamed, Samar A B; Ahmed, Wefag S A M

    2017-03-30

    Patients' rights are a fundamental human right and an important part of modern health care practice. This is a cross-sectional descriptive analytic study, conducted amongst 263 patients at Wadi-Medani Teaching Hospital, Sudan, in March-April 2015. Most patients (95.2%) did not know about the Bill of Rights and most of them (92.8%) were not able to mention any of the patients' rights. The most practiced rights were: the right to be asked for permission before examination (88.1%), proper handling (87.8%), safety of the hospital (87%), presence of a third person when examining a female by a male doctor (85.6%), and admission file confidentiality (75.5%). The awareness of Sudan FMOH Patients' Bill of Rights was very low among patients at Wad-Medani Teaching Hospital, yet they showed a high satisfaction rate probably due to their low socioeconomic status, educational level and expectations. Therefore, awareness of patients' rights must be increased.

  10. Cost analysis of LEED certified United States navy buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Kirar, Carl V.

    2011-01-01

    CIVINS (Civilian Institutions) Thesis document A study was completed at UW-Madison in 2010 that reviewed the energy consumption of US Navy buildings which earned Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). The research compared LEED certified buildings to a commercial counterpart within the US Navy inventory against Executive Order (EO) 13423. The EO mandated that all federal agencies meet a 30 percent reduction of...

  11. Reliability of contemporary data-acquisition techniques for LEED analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noonan, J.R.; Davis, H.L.

    1980-10-01

    It is becoming clear that one of the principal limitations in LEED structure analysis is the quality of the experimental I-V profiles. This limitation is discussed, and data acquisition procedures described, which for simple systems, seem to enhance the quality of agreement between the results of theoretical model calculations and experimental LEED spectra. By employing such procedures to obtain data from Cu(100), excellent agreement between computed and measured profiles has been achieved. 7 figures

  12. The practice of reporting adverse events in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Guerra Siman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Understanding the practice of reporting adverse events by health professionals. METHOD A qualitative case study carried out in a teaching hospital with participants of the Patient Safety Center and the nursing team. The collection took place from May to December 2015, and was conducted through interviews, observation and documentary research to treat the data using Content Analysis. RESULTS 31 professionals participated in the study. Three categories were elaborated: The practice of reporting adverse events; Barriers in the effective practice of notifications; The importance of reporting adverse events. CONCLUSION Notification was permeated by gaps in knowledge, fear of punishment and informal communication, generating underreporting. It is necessary to improve the interaction between leaders and professionals, with an emphasis on communication and educational practice.

  13. Quality of Life in Emergency Medicine Specialists of Teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Amini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality of life (QOL of emergency medicine specialists can be effective in providing services to patients. The aim of the present study was evaluating the lifestyle of emergency medicine practitioners, understanding their problems, and addressing the solutions to enhance and improve their lifestyles, in teaching hospitals in Iran. Method: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on emergency medicine physicians in 10 teaching hospitals of Iran in 2011. Emergency physicians with at least three years of experience who interested in the study, were enrolled in the project. All participants filled out the consent form and QOL questionnaires, then underwent physical examinations and some medical laboratory tests. Categorical variables were reported as percentages, while continuous variables expressed as means and standard deviations. p <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Totally, 100 subjects participated in the study, of whom 48 were male. The mean and standard deviation of the physicians’ age were 38.7±5.1 years. 43% of physicians had an average QOL, while 37% good. 96% of studied physicians had a good condition regarding habitual history, while 93% of them had a poor condition in performing screening tests. Exercise program and personal health in individuals with normal BMI were correlated with higher levels of QOL. BMI was higher in 40-50 years old subjects than youngers. Hypertension was present in five cases (5%, hypercholesterolemia in six (6%, hypertriglyceridemia in six (6%, increased LDL in four (4%, low HDL in four (4%, and impaired FBS in 4 (4%. Conclusion: The findings showed that 63% of studied emergency physicians had an average level of QOL and other ones good. The majority of physicians had undesirable situation regarding the performance of screening tests.

  14. Pattern of Leukaemia Patients Admitted in Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Any tissue of the body can give rise to cancer. However, those tissues which multiply rapidly are at high risk of developing cancer and haematopoietic system is one of them. Neoplasms of this system are known as leukaemia and lymphoma, according to the types of white cells involved.Study of cancer patterns in different societies, however can contribute a substantial knowledge about the aetiology of cancer. The present Study was designed and aimed to estimate the frequency of different types of leukaemia in patients admitted in Ayub Teaching hospital Abbottabad. Methods: Data from the patients admitted at oncology Department of Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from 2010 to 2015 was collected and analysed to calculate cumulative and year-wise frequency of leukaemia and its major types. Frequency distribution with reference to gender and age was also calculated. Results: In our analysis about 16 percent patients had acute myelocytic leukaemia and 32 percent patients had acute lymphocytic leukaemia; while chronic myeloid leukaemia outnumbered chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (11 percent and 3 percent); Hodgkin lymphoma was seen in 18 percent cases while Non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was present in 20 percent cases. Out of the total, 150 cases (75 percent) belonged to mountainous areas of Hazara, i.e., 40 cases belonged to Kohistan, another 40 cases were residents of Battagram, 45 cases belonged to hilly areas of Mansehra and 25 cases to Kaghan valley, while only 50 (25 percent) cases were from the plain areas of Abbottabad and Haripur districts, i.e., 20 and 30 cases respectively. Conclusion: Leukaemia is more common in hilly areas of Hazara, since majority of the cases belonged to well-known mountainous regions of Kohistan, Battagram, Kaghan or Mansehra and only few cases belonged to the plain areas of Abbottabad and Haripur districts. (author)

  15. 42 CFR 415.162 - Determining payment for physician services furnished to beneficiaries in teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... furnished to beneficiaries in teaching hospitals. 415.162 Section 415.162 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.162 Determining payment for physician services...

  16. The Relationship Between Strategic Thinking and Hospital Managers’ Productivity in Teaching Hospitals of Shiraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiaei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Using different methods of strategic thinking is essential for organizations such as hospitals; without them, many organizations will not survive. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the relationship between strategic thinking and management productivity in teaching hospitals of Shiraz. Objectives Because of the importance of strategic management in organizational productivity, the present study is conducted with the goal of assessing the relationship between strategic thinking and hospital managers’ productivity. Patients and Methods This descriptive-correlational study was conducted in 2015. The statistical population included all managers in different levels in the teaching hospitals of Shiraz (170 persons. Among these, 119 participants were selected through Cochran’s formula and a simple random sampling method. Data were collected by a questionnaire addressing strategic thinking based on Liedtka’s model and Hersey and Blanchard’s theory. Its validity was verified by a panel of experts and its reliability was measured in previous studies. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 20 using descriptive and analytic statistics (analysis of variance (ANOVA, Pearson’s correlation test and t-test. Results The average and Standard Deviation of strategic thinking managers was (2.2 ± 0.04, and productivity of management (2.32 ± 0.37 was estimated on the average level. There was a direct meaningful relationship between strategically thinking managers and productivity (r = 0.387, P < 0.001. The results also showed that there is a meaningful correlation between strategic thinking and sustainability, organizational support and understanding of the job. Conclusions Due to the correlation between strategic thinking and productivity, we recommend educating and training managers in the use of strategic thinking, and that they understand its importance to productivity. Managers should understand that increasing efficiency in a

  17. Are the medical records of high quality in teaching hospitals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somi MH

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Documentation of medical data in patient records is needed to improve the quality of healthcare and medical knowledge progress. Documentation of patient history, clinical problems, treatment, and follow-up care are needed to improve practice and research. Objective: To determine documentation of patient records at the internal medicine ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tabriz, Iran. Method: The study was descriptive and 100 patient records were selected through random sampling. Records were related to the patients who had been discharged from the general internal ward during April to June 2000. Data was collected using the questionnaire including 30 closed questions, and 5 open ones. The results were reported in ratios (% averages and standard deviation. T-test was used to examine the association of length of stay and records data adequacy scores. Data was analysed by the SPSS software. Results: Completeness of the patient records was moderately acceptable (68.7%. The difference between performance of residents, interns and students in documentation of primary diagnoses and differential diagnoses was significant (P<0.001 and performance of residents was more efficient (59.6%, (69.7%. Of the records, 22.2% were without summary sheet. Conclusion: Patient records had many deficiencies. Instructions for documentation are necessary. Regular monitoring and evaluation by the attending physicians and writing skills education could be effective in accurate documentation. Key words: DOCUMENTATION, MEDICAL RECORDS, REVIEW, TEACHING HOSPITALS, TABRIZ

  18. General surgical services at an urban teaching hospital in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Elizabeth; Amado, Vanda; Jacobe, Mário; Sacks, Greg D; Bruzoni, Matias; Mapasse, Domingos; DeUgarte, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    As surgery becomes incorporated into global health programs, it will be critical for clinicians to take into account already existing surgical care systems within low-income countries. To inform future efforts to expand the local system and systems in comparable regions of the developing world, we aimed to describe current patterns of surgical care at a major urban teaching hospital in Mozambique. We performed a retrospective review of all general surgery patients treated between August 2012 and August 2013 at the Hospital Central Maputo in Maputo, Mozambique. We reviewed emergency and elective surgical logbooks, inpatient discharge records, and death records to report case volume, disease etiology, and mortality. There were 1598 operations (910 emergency and 688 elective) and 2606 patient discharges during our study period. The most common emergent surgeries were for nontrauma laparotomy (22%) followed by all trauma procedures (18%), whereas the most common elective surgery was hernia repair (31%). The majority of lower extremity amputations were above knee (69%). The most common diagnostic categories for inpatients were infectious (31%), trauma (18%), hernia (12%), neoplasm (10%), and appendicitis (5%). The mortality rate was 5.6% (146 deaths), approximately half of which were related to sepsis. Our data demonstrate the general surgery caseload of a large, academic, urban training and referral center in Mozambique. We describe resource limitations that impact operative capacity, trauma care, and management of amputations and cancer. These findings highlight challenges that are applicable to a broad range of global surgery efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Congenital club foot in a teaching hospital in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewole, O A; Giwa, S O; Kayode, M O; Shoga, M O; Balogun, R A

    2009-06-01

    Congenital club foot has been sparsely reported in literature in Nigeria, although it has been reported as the commonest congenital musculoskeletal abnormality. This study enumerates the point prevalence of this disease in a university teaching hospital in Lagos. Better understanding of the epidemiology in our community should improve awareness, and influence management. Between June 2005 and July 2006, 72 consecutive patients with congenital club feet were seen in the orthopaedic clinic of our Hospital. Demographic data, birth weight, family history, birth facility, maternal age and associated congenital anomalies were recorded and analysed using Statistical Programme for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15. A total of 72 patients were seen, 28 of whom had bilateral club feet resulting in a total of 100 feet. There were 38 males and 34 females. Only 29% presented in the first month of life and 28% in the second month. Maternal ages ranged between 19 and 38 years and no family history of congenital club foot was given,. Babies delivered outside the orthodox medical system (churches, traditional healers, home etc) constituted 28%. The commonest associated congenital anomalies were tibia hemimelia, hydrocephalus, inguinal hernia and umbilical hernia. A default rate of 28% was observed during treatment. Congenital club foot may not be uncommon in Nigeria. Late presentation and high default rate before correction of the deformity were observed. Establishment of special club foot clinics should reduce the default rate. Training of healthcare workers in maternity units as well as Public awareness should encourage early referral to specialists.

  20. Research Utilization among Nurses at a Teaching Hospital in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albanus Kyalo Mutisya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the era of evidence based practice (EBP, health care delivery should be grounded on new or validated knowledge and evidence from research. The aim of the study was to assess research utilization by nurses and the influencing factors at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH, the largest teaching hospital in Kenya. Methods: The study employed a descriptive design that utilized both quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection. It incorporated the Barriers to Research Utilization Scale. It was conducted in six specialized care areas at KNH. Data was collected using questionnaires, Focus Group Discussion and in-depth interviews. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 13 and qualitative data analyzed using themes. Results: The study found that 20.6% of the nurses were participating in research related to their work and 53.6% of these were implementing research findings to practice. Over 2/3 (70.5% of the respondents were basing their evidence for practice on the knowledge gained during their nursing school. The three greatest barriers to research utilization were that research reports are not readily available (68.7%, unclear implications for practice (66.5% and inadequate facilities for implementation (66.4%.Conclusion: It is recommended that sensitization trainings on nursing research/ utilization of findings in nursing practice be established to create awareness, motivate and enhance nurses’ abilities and also facilities should be provided to enable implementation.

  1. Nutritional status among hospitalized children with mixed diagnoses at a referral teaching hospital in Manizales, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santafé Sánchez, L R; Sánchez Rodríguez, D A; Villegas Galarza, A L; González-Correa, C H

    2012-01-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of malnutrition in pediatric hospitals, this remains a problem that must be recognized and to call the attention of academia and health authorities to be handled in time. To evaluate the nutritional status of hospitalized children at a referral teaching hospital and to describe the current prevalence of malnutrition. The study was conducted during the months of February, March and April 2010 at the University Hospital Rafael Henao Toro Colombian Red Cross in Manizales, Colombia, South America. We evaluated all patients admitted to a day of each month by calculating the Z score of the, weight for age, height or length for age, body mass index, mid-arm circumference, triceps and subscapular folds for children under 5 years and height for age and body mass index for school children and adolescents. A total of 174 children (age 1-216 mo) were evaluated during the 3-days survey. There were 52.8% children less than 60 months old, 17.2% between 61 and 120 months and 29.9% over 121 months. There were 44.3% females and 55.7% males. Children from the urban residence were 83.3% and 16.6% were rural. The overall prevalence of underweight was 27%, stunting 22.4%, wasting 16.6% and overweight and obesity 6.3%. Males less than five years old were more affected than older children. Rural children were more affected than urban children. The prevalence of overweight children was greater in children 61-120 months than other ages. Given the observed levels of malnutrition, it takes up a system for early identification of children hospitalized with nutritional risk in order to provide adequate and timely support and prevent hospital-acquired malnutrition. This requires the use of previously validated pediatric protocols.

  2. Teaching hospital planning: a case study and the need for reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher K; Smith, Harry

    2010-08-16

    Academic teaching hospitals and their networks can best serve patients and other stakeholders by achieving critical mass and scope of clinical services, teaching and research. Successful hospital reconfigurations are associated with a convincing case and majority clinician buy-in. The inscrutable political decision to relocate services away from a major teaching hospital campus and into a merged Queensland Children's Hospital was determined without broad stakeholder consultation or a transparent and accountable business case. This compromised process poses a significant and enduring risk to patient care and Queensland's paediatric, perinatal, adolescent and obstetric academic teaching hospital services. As the proposed major stakeholder in Australia's public hospitals and medical workforce training, the federal government should review this decision using an effective methodology incorporating relevant criteria. National guidelines are needed to ensure best practice in the future planning and auditing of major health care projects. The medical profession is responsible for ensuring that health care policy complies with reliable evidence and good practice.

  3. Improvement of hospital processes through business process management in Qaem Teaching Hospital: A work in progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H; Ebrahimipour, Hossein; Doosty, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    In a world of continuously changing business environments, organizations have no option; however, to deal with such a big level of transformation in order to adjust the consequential demands. Therefore, many companies need to continually improve and review their processes to maintain their competitive advantages in an uncertain environment. Meeting these challenges requires implementing the most efficient possible business processes, geared to the needs of the industry and market segments that the organization serves globally. In the last 10 years, total quality management, business process reengineering, and business process management (BPM) have been some of the management tools applied by organizations to increase business competiveness. This paper is an original article that presents implementation of "BPM" approach in the healthcare domain that allows an organization to improve and review its critical business processes. This project was performed in "Qaem Teaching Hospital" in Mashhad city, Iran and consists of four distinct steps; (1) identify business processes, (2) document the process, (3) analyze and measure the process, and (4) improve the process. Implementing BPM in Qaem Teaching Hospital changed the nature of management by allowing the organization to avoid the complexity of disparate, soloed systems. BPM instead enabled the organization to focus on business processes at a higher level.

  4. Self-Efficacy and Postpartum Depression Teaching Behaviors of Hospital-Based Perinatal Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Logsdon, M. Cynthia; Foltz, Melissa Pinto; Scheetz, James; Myers, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Based upon the Self-Efficacy Theory, this study examined the relationship between self-efficacy, self-efficacy-related variables, and postpartum depression teaching behaviors of hospital-based perinatal nurses. Findings revealed that teaching new mothers about postpartum depression is related to a perinatal nurse's self-efficacy in postpartum-depression teaching, self-esteem, and the following self-efficacy-related variables: social persuasion (supervisor's expectations for teaching); mastery...

  5. Evaluation of ureteroscopy outcome in a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naimi, Abdulla; Alobaidy, Abdulqadir; Majzoub, Ahmad; Ibrahim, Tarek Ahmed Amin

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate factors affecting semi-rigid ureteroscopy (URS) results highlighting the influence of teaching on its outcomes. We reviewed the files of 891 adult patients who had undergone 1182 ureteroscopies at our institute during the period from July 2008 to June 2011. The outcomes of all URSs were evaluated. Outcomes were measured by stone- free rate and presence of complications, which were assessed using the Clavien-Dindo system. Patients were divided into 2 groups; Group 1 (favorable outcome) became stone- free after the first URS and had no documented complications, while Group 2 (unfavorable outcome) had residual stones and/or complications. Group 2 was subdivided according to the skill level of the operating surgeon into two subgroups. Patients belonging to subgroup A had their procedures performed by urology trainees under direct supervision of expert urologists, while those in subgroup B had their procedures performed by the expert urologists themselves. All groups were compared using univariate (chi-square and t tests) and multivariate (logistic regression) statistical tests to identify significant risk factors. All data was analyzed using SPSS. A total of 1182 URSs were evaluated. 958 patients had a favorable outcome (Group 1) while 224 patients had an unfavorable outcome (Group 2). Factors associated with an unfavorable outcome include location of the presenting stone (p<0.001) and presence of stone impaction (p<0.001). No statistically significant differences were detected in the overall complication rate between trainees and expert urologists. Trainees stone- free rate was comparable to that of experts; 90.3% vs. 91.1%, respectively, p=0.6. Factors such as stone impaction and proximal location are associated with an unfavorable surgical outcome. In a high- volume teaching hospital, semi-rigid URS done by trainees under direct supervision is safe and their outcome is comparable to literature findings.

  6. [Clinical and epidemiological aspects of burned patients hospitalized in a teaching hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Samanta Flor; Barbosa, Maria Helena; de Sousa Neto, Adriana Lemos

    2011-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize burned patients according to epidemiological and clinical variables and identify the treatments, invasive procedures and complications. This is a retrospective, descriptive and quantitative study. The sample consisted of 138 burned patients hospitalized in a teaching hospital from January 2003 to December 2007, in Uberaba-MG. Of the 138 hospitalized patients, 98 (71.0%) were male, and the average age was 26.1 years. The average length of stay was 16.2 days; 93 (67.4%) of the burns were caused by accidents and the main cause (68; 49.3%) was an open flame. The average burned body surface was 20.8% and most (122; 88.4%) had second degree burns. The most common topic treatment (93; 67.4%) was silver sulfadiazine. Forty-seven (34.0%) patients had indwelling catheters; 30 (21.7%) underwent tissue transplantation, and 28 (20.3%) underwent debridement; the lesions in 14 (10.1%) patients became infected.

  7. Do LEED-certified buildings save energy? Yes, but...

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newsham, Guy R.; Mancini, Sandra; Birt, Benjamin J. [National Research Council Canada - Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    We conducted a re-analysis of data supplied by the New Buildings Institute and the US Green Buildings Council on measured energy use data from 100 LEED-certified commercial and institutional buildings. These data were compared to the energy use of the general US commercial building stock. We also examined energy use by LEED certification level, and by energy-related credits achieved in the certification process. On average, LEED buildings used 18-39% less energy per floor area than their conventional counterparts. However, 28-35% of LEED buildings used more energy than their conventional counterparts. Further, the measured energy performance of LEED buildings had little correlation with certification level of the building, or the number of energy credits achieved by the building at design time. Therefore, at a societal level, green buildings can contribute substantial energy savings, but further work needs to be done to define green building rating schemes to ensure more consistent success at the individual building level. Note, these findings should be considered as preliminary, and the analyses should be repeated when longer data histories from a larger sample of green buildings are available. (author)

  8. Designing healthy communities: A walkability analysis of LEED-ND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana A. Zuniga-Teran

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Prevailing city design in many countries has created sedentary societies that depend on automobile use. Consequently, architects, urban designers, and land planners have developed new urban design theories, which have been incorporated into the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND certification system. The LEED-ND includes design elements that improve human well-being by facilitating walking and biking, a concept known as walkability. Despite these positive developments, relevant research findings from other fields of study have not been fully integrated into the LEED-ND. According to Zuniga-Teran (2015, relevant walkability research findings from multiple disciplines were organized into a walkability framework (WF that organizes design elements related to physical activity into nine categories, namely, connectivity, land use, density, traffic safety, surveillance, parking, experience, greenspace, and community. In this study, we analyze walkability in the LEED-ND through the lens of the nine WF categories. Through quantitative and qualitative analyses, we identify gaps and strengths in the LEED-ND and propose potential enhancements to this certification system that reflects what is known about enhancing walkability more comprehensively through neighborhood design analysis. This work seeks to facilitate the translation of research into practice, which can ultimately lead to more active and healthier societies.

  9. PRESENT SCENARIO OF NON TRAUMATIC QUADRIPARESIS IN A TEACHING HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Krishnan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AIMS & OBJECTIVES: Patients presenting with acute quadriparesis may pose therapeutic challenge to the treating physician especially the development of bulbar palsy and respiratory paralysis and require intensive monitoring and treatment in acute clinical and respiratory care units. So this study was conducted to know the etiology of cases of non - traumatic Quadriparesis and its outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 50 adult patients admitted in medical and neurology wards with non - traumatic quadriparesis were prospectively studied b etween October ’2012 to September ’2014at Government General Hospital, Kakinada, a teaching hospital with rural referrals. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS: In the study cohort of 50 cases the age of patients ranged from 13 to 80 years with more number of male patients. 29 patients (58% presented with flaccid and 21 cases (42% with spastic quadriparesis. Guillian barre syndrome with 18 (36% cases was the most common cause of quadriparesis followed by Spondylotic myelopathy 11 cases ( 22% and Hypokalemic perio dic paralysis in 8 cases (16%. Transverse Myelitis. Caries spine. Secondaries cervical spine, spinal epidural abscess were in other cases.7 (14% patients had cranial nerve dysfunction. 4(8% patients had facial nerve palsy . CONCLUSION: Guillian barre syn drome constituted the most common cause of nontraumatic quadriparesis, followed by Spondylotic myelopathy, Transverse Myelitis. Caries spine. S econdaries cervical spine, spinal epidural abscess . AIDP and Hypokalemic periodic paralysis were the most frequen t causes of flaccid quadriparesis while Spondylotic myelopathy was the most common cause of spastic quadriparesis . M.R.I was the most useful and appropriate investigation . Severity of paralysis and need for ventilator support were associated with poor prog nosis in patients with acute flaccid quadriparesis . Decompressive surgery in spondylotic myelopathy had good recovery after surgery. Patient recovery was

  10. Review of orbital exenterations in Korle-Bu teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackuaku-Dogbe, E

    2011-06-01

    Orbital exenteration (OE) is a disfiguring procedure which typically involves removal of the entire contents of the orbit including the periorbita, appendages, eyelids and, sometimes, a varying amount of surrounding skin and bone. It results in devastating functional, aesthetic and psychological losses. This study reports an experience of OE in a Teaching Hospital in Accra Ghana. The records of all patients who underwent OE between November 2005 and October 2009 were reviewed retrospectively. These were cases seen at the orbit and oculoplastic clinic of the eye unit. A total of 25 patients underwent OE. Nineteen (76%) of these were for invasive orbital squamous cell carcinomas and six (24%) were for other cases. Only one patient had OE for a benign condition (orbital haemangioma). Four patients had lid sparing procedures. One of these was for a patient with extensive ocular surface squamous cell carcinoma. Five patients had recurrent tumours. Among those patients with squamous cell carcinoma, seven had previous procedures, sometimes multiple before reporting to our clinic. Orbital exenterations in developing countries are mostly for neglected periorbital and ocular surface malignancies. Educating patients to seek medical attention as soon as they notice a persistent conjunctival growth could prevent this.

  11. Introduction of bubble CPAP in a teaching hospital in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, M; Blencowe, H; Mittermayer, K; Rylance, S; Couperus, A; Heikens, G T; Bandsma, R H J

    2011-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is relatively inexpensive and can be easily taught; it therefore has the potential to be the optimal respiratory support device for neonates in developing countries. The possibility of implementing bubble CPAP in a teaching hospital with a large neonatology unit but very limited resources was investigated. A CPAP system was developed consisting of a compressor, oxygen concentrator, water bottle to control the pressure and binasal prongs. Neonates with birthweights between 1 and 2·5 kg with persistent respiratory distress 4 hours after birth were eligible for bubble CPAP. In the 7-week introduction period from 11 March until 27 April 2008, 11 neonates were treated with CPAP. Five of these neonates met the inclusion criteria and six neonates did not meet these criteria. Of the five neonates who received CPAP and met the inclusion criteria, three survived. The six infants who did not meet the inclusion criteria included three preterm infants with apnoea (all died), two with birthweights <1 kg (both died) and a firstborn twin (1.2 kg) who survived. No major complications of CPAP occurred. Bubble CPAP could be used independently by nurses after a short training period. Successful long-term implementation of CPAP depends on the availability of sufficient trained nursing staff.

  12. Patient perceptions about laparoscopy at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyedu, Adam; Fugar, Setri; Price, Raymond; Bingener, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopy has become the gold standard for many surgical cases in the developed world. It however, remains a rarity in developing countries for several reasons, a major one being cost. This study aimed to determine the knowledge and attitude of patients attending Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Kumasi, Ghana toward laparoscopic surgery and their willingness to pay for it. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among patients attending specialist clinics at KATH. 1070 patients participated. Mean age was 40±15 years. 54% were city-dwellers. 14% had salary-paying jobs. None had undergone prior laparoscopic surgery. 3% had knowledge of laparoscopy. 95% preferred laparoscopy to open surgery mainly because of faster recovery and less post-op pain. Age >45 years (AOR = 0.53, p = 0.03) and higher education (AOR = 2.00, p = 0.04) were significant predictors of patient choice. Among those preferring laparoscopy, 78% were willing to pay more than the baseline cost of open surgery for laparoscopy. A history of previous abdominal surgery (AOR = 0.67, p = 0.02), having a salaried job compared with being unemployed (AOR = 2.36, p laparoscopy. Knowledge about laparoscopy and its benefits are severely lacking among patients at KATH. Once educated about its benefits, most people prefer laparoscopy even if they needed to pay more for it even in resource-limited countries like Ghana.

  13. Perceived and real histopathology turnaround time: A teaching hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinfenwa Taoheed Atanda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aims to audit analytic turnaround time (TAT in a histopathology laboratory with a view to assessing the timeliness of its reports, identify causes of delay in its TAT, and compare this with client perception of its performance. Materials and Methods: Records of 1440 batches of specimens processed over a 5-year period in the histopathology laboratory of a teaching hospital were retrieved from archives. From these, median and mean TATs were calculated and causes of delay identified. Questionnaires were also deployed to assess physicians' perception of the laboratory's performance. Results: Analytic TAT was 3.6 ± 2 days, with 86.7% of reports being ready within 5 working days. The delays in timeliness of report generation were due mainly to residency training-related factors; tissue processing-related factors, and inadequate clinical information among others. Client perception of TAT rated the laboratory below average by 18.4%; average by 57.5%; good by 20.7%, and excellent in its performance by 3.4% of respondents. Conclusion: Even though physicians perceived the laboratory's TAT to be just average, its analytic TAT for reports is within acceptable international standards but with room for improvement in its performance.

  14. Automated fenestration allocation as complying with LEED rating system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem Mohamed Talaat El Daly

    2014-12-01

    The allocation of windows, through the help of certain well known heuristic algorithms and simulation programs, could be reached automatically to compromise with the LEED rating system by achieving the required daylight amounts with a minimum solar radiation inside a particular building. This research shows a design method based on simulation techniques with the help of heuristic algorithms through a parametric design that automatically allocate windows to comply with LEED. At the end of the research, a small project is discussed for evaluating the design process.

  15. Effectiveness of mask ventilation performed by hospital doctors in an Irish tertiary referral teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, K

    2012-02-03

    The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of mask ventilation performed by 112 doctors with clinical responsibilities at a tertiary referral teaching hospital. Participant doctors were asked to perform mask ventilation for three minutes on a Resusci Anne mannequin using a facemask and a two litre self inflating bag. The tidal volumes generated were quantified using a Laerdal skillmeter computer as grades 0-5, corresponding to 0, 334, 434, 561, 673 and > 800 ml respectively. The effectiveness of mask ventilation (i.e. the proportion of ventilation attempts which achieved a volume delivery of > 434 mls) was greater for anaesthetists [78.0 (29.5)%] than for non anaesthetists [54.6 (40.0)%] (P = 0.012). Doctors who had attended one or more resuscitation courses where no more effective at mask ventilation than their colleagues who had not undertaken such courses. It is likely that first responders to in-hospital cardiac arrests are commonly unable to perform adequate mask ventilation.

  16. Noncompliance pattern due to medication errors at a Teaching Hospital in Srikot, India

    OpenAIRE

    Thakur, Heenopama; Thawani, Vijay; Raina, Rangeel Singh; Kothiyal, Gitanjali; Chakarabarty, Mrinmoy

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the medication errors leading to noncompliance in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital of a teaching institution from Srikot, Garhwal, Uttarakhand to analyze the medication errors in 500 indoor prescriptions from medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics and ENT departments over five months and 100 outdoor patients of medicine department. Results: Medication error rate for indo...

  17. Managing daily surgery schedules in a teaching hospital: a mixed-integer optimization approach

    OpenAIRE

    Pulido Martínez, Raúl; Aguirre, Adrián M.; Ortega Mier, Miguel Ángel; García Sánchez, Álvaro; Méndez, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study examined the daily surgical scheduling problem in a teaching hospital. This problem relates to the use of multiple operating rooms and different types of surgeons in a typical surgical day with deterministic operation durations (preincision, incision, and postincision times). Teaching hospitals play a key role in the health-care system; however, existing models assume that the duration of surgery is independent of the surgeon?s skills. This problem has not been properly ...

  18. Evaluation of drug administration errors in a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdot, Sarah; Sabatier, Brigitte; Gillaizeau, Florence; Caruba, Thibaut; Prognon, Patrice; Durieux, Pierre

    2012-03-12

    Medication errors can occur at any of the three steps of the medication use process: prescribing, dispensing and administration. We aimed to determine the incidence, type and clinical importance of drug administration errors and to identify risk factors. Prospective study based on disguised observation technique in four wards in a teaching hospital in Paris, France (800 beds). A pharmacist accompanied nurses and witnessed the preparation and administration of drugs to all patients during the three drug rounds on each of six days per ward. Main outcomes were number, type and clinical importance of errors and associated risk factors. Drug administration error rate was calculated with and without wrong time errors. Relationship between the occurrence of errors and potential risk factors were investigated using logistic regression models with random effects. Twenty-eight nurses caring for 108 patients were observed. Among 1501 opportunities for error, 415 administrations (430 errors) with one or more errors were detected (27.6%). There were 312 wrong time errors, ten simultaneously with another type of error, resulting in an error rate without wrong time error of 7.5% (113/1501). The most frequently administered drugs were the cardiovascular drugs (425/1501, 28.3%). The highest risks of error in a drug administration were for dermatological drugs. No potentially life-threatening errors were witnessed and 6% of errors were classified as having a serious or significant impact on patients (mainly omission). In multivariate analysis, the occurrence of errors was associated with drug administration route, drug classification (ATC) and the number of patient under the nurse's care. Medication administration errors are frequent. The identification of its determinants helps to undertake designed interventions.

  19. Evaluation of drug administration errors in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berdot Sarah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication errors can occur at any of the three steps of the medication use process: prescribing, dispensing and administration. We aimed to determine the incidence, type and clinical importance of drug administration errors and to identify risk factors. Methods Prospective study based on disguised observation technique in four wards in a teaching hospital in Paris, France (800 beds. A pharmacist accompanied nurses and witnessed the preparation and administration of drugs to all patients during the three drug rounds on each of six days per ward. Main outcomes were number, type and clinical importance of errors and associated risk factors. Drug administration error rate was calculated with and without wrong time errors. Relationship between the occurrence of errors and potential risk factors were investigated using logistic regression models with random effects. Results Twenty-eight nurses caring for 108 patients were observed. Among 1501 opportunities for error, 415 administrations (430 errors with one or more errors were detected (27.6%. There were 312 wrong time errors, ten simultaneously with another type of error, resulting in an error rate without wrong time error of 7.5% (113/1501. The most frequently administered drugs were the cardiovascular drugs (425/1501, 28.3%. The highest risks of error in a drug administration were for dermatological drugs. No potentially life-threatening errors were witnessed and 6% of errors were classified as having a serious or significant impact on patients (mainly omission. In multivariate analysis, the occurrence of errors was associated with drug administration route, drug classification (ATC and the number of patient under the nurse's care. Conclusion Medication administration errors are frequent. The identification of its determinants helps to undertake designed interventions.

  20. Evaluation of Pralidoxime Use in an Iranian Teaching Referral Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Banagozar Mohammadi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Organophosphorus (OP poisonings, a common source of pesticide poisoning, are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing countries. Combination therapy with atropine and oxime is a common practice in the management of OP poisoning. However, the additive benefit of using pralidoxime in addition to atropine remains controversial. Due to inappropriate and widespread use of this relatively expensive and low available antidote, we aimed to evaluate its usage in an Iranian teaching hospital. Methods: Medical files of patients with pesticide poisoning who had been admitted to the poisoning ward between September 2013 and September 2014 were reviewed. Patients with definite diagnosis of OPs poisoning were selected to evaluate rational use of pralidoxime in their treatment regimen. Data were collected using a checklist containing demographic, clinical, and para clinical characteristics, as well as the type of pesticide poisoning. Appropriateness of the pralidoxime therapy was determined based on clinical practice guideline and endorsed by an attending medical toxicologist. Results: 68.8% of patients had been poisoned with insecticides, 27.1% with aluminum phosphide, 2.1% with herbicides, and 2% with rodenticides, respectively. OPs were responsible for 43.8% of all poisoning. All patients with OPs poisoning received pralidoxime after they had been admitted to emergency department, while only 55% of them were eligible to receive pralidoxime. Moreover, pralidoxime had been administered for 59% of patients with non-OPs poisoning, which all of them were clinically inappropriate. Conclusion: The use of pralidoxime in the northwest of Iran is not appropriate and thus, it is highly recommended that a patient-tailored treatment guideline be provided and implemented regionally.

  1. Ten thousand steps: a pedometer study of junior dentists in a major British teaching hospital and a district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, R M; Thomas, M; McKechnie, A

    2017-05-01

    Sedentary behaviour is widely associated with deleterious health outcomes that in modern medicine have similar connotations to smoking tobacco and alcohol misuse. The integration of e-portfolio, e-logbook, British National Formulary (BNF) and encrypted emails has made smartphones a necessity for trainees. Smartphones also have the ability to record the amount of exercise taken, which allows activity at work to be monitored. The aim of this study to compare the activity of the same group of dental core trainees when they worked within a large multisite teaching hospital and a smaller district general hospital, to find out if supplementary activity was needed outside work. Data were collected from smartphones. To ensure continuity, data were collected only from those who had calibrated iPhones (n=10). At the teaching hospital six of the trainees walked over 10 000 steps a day while working (mean (SD) 10 004 (639)). At the district hospital none of the trainees walked 10 000 steps. The mean (SD) number of steps completed by all trainees was 6265 (119). Walking at work provides the full quota of recommended daily exercise most of the time for those working in the teaching hospital, but additional exercise is occasionally required. While working at the district hospital they walk less, meaning that they should try to increase their activity outside work. Trainees working in the teaching hospital walk significantly more steps than in the district hospital. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cost Analysis of Leed Certified United States Navy Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    employee productivity, investors seeking more socially conscious investments, and reputational issues that have been forcing the real estate sector...conscious investments, and reputational issues that have been forcing the real estate sector towards more efficient building techniques. LEED has...2011. 12. Macdonald, N., Cheng, D. Basic Finance for Marketers (Marketing and agribusiness texts - 1). Food and Agriculuture Organization of the

  3. Performance or marketing benefits? The case of LEED certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matisoff, Daniel C; Noonan, Douglas S; Mazzolini, Anna M

    2014-01-01

    Green building adoption is driven by both performance-based benefits and marketing based benefits. Performance based benefits are those that improve performance or lower operating costs of the building or of building users. Marketing benefits stem from the consumer response to green certification. This study illustrates the relative importance of the marketing based benefits that accrue to Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) buildings due to green signaling mechanisms, specifically related to the certification itself are identified. Of course, all participants in the LEED certification scheme seek marketing benefits. But even among LEED participants, the interest in green signaling is pronounced. The green signaling mechanism that occurs at the certification thresholds shifts building patterns from just below to just above the threshold level, and motivates builders to cluster buildings just above each threshold. Results are consistent across subsamples, though nonprofit organizations appear to build greener buildings and engage in more green signaling than for-profit entities. Using nonparametric regression discontinuity, signaling across different building types is observed. Marketing benefits due to LEED certification drives organizations to build "greener" buildings by upgrading buildings at the thresholds to reach certification levels.

  4. [Clinical research outside of teaching hospitals: Current situation in north-eastern France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, C; Dupoux, A; Déloy, L; Hertz, C; Jeanmaire, T; Parneix, N

    2015-04-01

    Most clinical research in France takes place in teaching hospitals. There are, however, many advantages to developing it in other hospitals: access to innovative treatments, improvement in healthcare quality, attractiveness of hospitals, increased trial inclusion rates and reduced selection bias. The objectives of our study were to report on the current situation of clinical research outside teaching hospitals. A three-stage survey was conducted between January 2012 and May 2013 in non-teaching hospitals of north-eastern France. First, questionnaires were sent to administrative and medical boards of all hospitals with more than 100 beds, then to head doctors of every department in hospitals with more than 300 beds and finally meetings were organized with members of 20 selected hospitals. The administrative and medical boards of 85 hospitals participated in the first stage of the survey; half of these hospitals were engaged in clinical research activities and for 10 the internal structuring was cross-disciplinary. Answers from 178 departments were obtained during the second stage; 47% reported a clinical research activity. Meetings with research teams in 20 hospitals allowed us to identify difficulties concerning research funding, transversal organization and sponsoring. Clinical research existed in more than half of the respondent non-teaching hospitals. Obstacles to its development can be grouped in three categories: 1) internal structuring of clinical research, 2) access to information and knowledge of how clinical research functions and to interlocutors outside the hospital and 3) access to skills necessary to sponsor clinical research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Antifungal agent utilization evaluation in hospitalized neutropenic cancer patients at a large teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vazin A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Afsaneh Vazin,1 Mohammad Ali Davarpanah,2 Setareh Ghalesoltani3 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; 2HIV Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; 3International Branch of Faculty of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran Abstract: To evaluate pattern of using of three antifungal drugs: fluconazole, amphotericin B and voriconazole, at the hematology–oncology and bone marrow transplant wards of one large teaching hospital. In a prospective cross-sectional study, we evaluated the appropriateness of using antifungal drugs in patients, using Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN guidelines. All the data were recorded daily by a pharmacist in a form designed by a clinical pharmacist and infectious diseases specialist, for antifungals usage, administration, and monitoring. During the study, 116 patients were enrolled. Indications of prescribing amphotericin B, fluconazole, and voriconazole were appropriate according to guidelines in 83.4%, 80.6%, and 76.9% respectively. The duration of treatments were appropriate according to guidelines in 75%, 64.5%, and 71.1% respectively. The dose of voriconazole was appropriate according to guidelines in 46.2% of patients. None of the patients received salt loading before administration of amphotericin B. The most considerable problems with the mentioned antifungals were about the indications and duration of treatment. In addition, prehydration for amphotericin B and dosage of voriconazole were not completely compatible with the mentioned guidelines. A suitable combination of controlling the use of antifungals and educational programs could be essential for improving the general process of using antifungal drugs at our hospital. Keywords: utilization evaluation, fluconazole, amphotericin B, voriconazole, neutropenia

  6. Prescribing Pattern and Antibiotic Use for Hospitalized Children in a Northern Nigerian Teaching Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Lawal Waisu; Isah, Abdulmuminu; Musa, Shuaibu; Umar, Bilkisu

    2018-01-01

    Background: Assessment of patterns of drug to detect performance problems and compliance with standards facilitates objective comparisons and impact evaluation. Children are at higher risk of consequences of irrational prescribing and antibiotic misuse. Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate the prescribing pattern and utilization of antibiotics for children using standard prescribing indicators and indices of rational drug prescribing. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of prescriptions for pediatric inpatients at a teaching hospital in Northern Nigeria. Information was obtained from eligible prescriptions received over 24-month period using a modified WHO prescribing indicator form. The WHO prescribing indicators and the Index of Rational Drug Prescribing (IRDP) were used to evaluate prescriptions. Data were analyzed and presented as proportions, means, tables, and charts, comparing with WHO standards and with findings of similar studies. Results: There were 3908 eligible prescription orders, with a mean patient age of 3.1 (±2.7) years. With an average of 2.1 drugs per prescription, 66.8% were written with generic names, whereas a single antibiotic was included among 63% of prescriptions with antibiotics. Antibiotics and injections were contained in 49.5% and 67.7% of prescriptions, respectively. Medications were available in the Essential Medicines List in 95.5% of cases. The IRDP obtained is 2.99, against a standard of 5. Aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, and penicillins were the most common choices, whereas ampicillin/cloxacillin was the most common combination. Conclusion: Drug prescribing and antibiotic use were generally inappropriate compared with ideal standards. Continuous training/retraining on rational drug use, periodic monitoring, and use of treatment protocols in tertiary hospitals are recommended. PMID:29363633

  7. Culture of Safety among Nurses in a Tertiary Teaching Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the culture of safety among nurses in a tertiary teaching hospital in Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in King Khaled University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A random sample of 492 nurses was included in the survey using a pre-validated instrument, Safety Attitudes ...

  8. Teaching Quality, Learning Satisfaction, and Academic Performance among Hospitality Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wen-Hwa; Chung, Feng-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of the teaching quality of culinary arts teachers and student learning satisfaction on the academic performance of hospitality students. This study surveys the students in hospitality departments at universities in Taiwan. A total of 406 (81.2%) valid questionnaires were received. Research results…

  9. Prescription pattern of analgesic drugs for patients receiving Palliative Care in a Teaching Hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishma Hydie Menezes

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The study shows that prescription pattern in palliative care unit of this hospital was in accordance with WHO pain management guidelines. The study showed the current trend in prescription of analgesic drugs in the teaching hospital where the study was conducted.

  10. A prospective audit of emergency urology activity in a university teaching hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2014-06-01

    Urology cover is commonly available out-of-hours in most teaching hospitals. However, increased pressure to reduce hospital expenditure has forced many institutions to consider removing middle grade cover outside of normal working hours. The aim of this study was to audit the emergency urology activity in our institution over a 12-month period.

  11. Large Variability in the Diversity of Physiologically Complex Surgical Procedures Exists Nationwide Among All Hospitals Including Among Large Teaching Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H; Thenuwara, Kokila; Lubarsky, David A

    2017-11-22

    Multiple previous studies have shown that having a large diversity of procedures has a substantial impact on quality management of hospital surgical suites. At hospitals with substantial diversity, unless sophisticated statistical methods suitable for rare events are used, anesthesiologists working in surgical suites will have inaccurate predictions of surgical blood usage, case durations, cost accounting and price transparency, times remaining in late running cases, and use of intraoperative equipment. What is unknown is whether large diversity is a feature of only a few very unique set of hospitals nationwide (eg, the largest hospitals in each state or province). The 2013 United States Nationwide Readmissions Database was used to study heterogeneity among 1981 hospitals in their diversities of physiologically complex surgical procedures (ie, the procedure codes). The diversity of surgical procedures performed at each hospital was quantified using a summary measure, the number of different physiologically complex surgical procedures commonly performed at the hospital (ie, 1/Herfindahl). A total of 53.9% of all hospitals commonly performed complex procedures (lower 99% confidence limit [CL], 51.3%). A total of 14.2% (lower 99% CL, 12.4%) of hospitals had >3-fold larger diversity (ie, >30 commonly performed physiologically complex procedures). Larger hospitals had greater diversity than the small- and medium-sized hospitals (P 30 procedures (lower 99% CL, 71.9% of hospitals). However, there was considerable variability among the large teaching hospitals in their diversity (interquartile range of the numbers of commonly performed physiologically complex procedures = 19.3; lower 99% CL, 12.8 procedures). The diversity of procedures represents a substantive differentiator among hospitals. Thus, the usefulness of statistical methods for operating room management should be expected to be heterogeneous among hospitals. Our results also show that "large teaching hospital

  12. Acute appendicitis in Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hospital is a tertiary care facility in competition with a large number of private hospitals with different levels of competence. Objective: The objective of the study is to review the outcome of the surgical management of acute appendicitis in our hospital. Method: A retrospective study of subjects who had appendectomy for ...

  13. Critical review of LEED system for rating sustainability of architecture of commercial interiors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Sanja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The LEED rating system for sustainability of architecture has gained large marketing potential in USA and became one of main ways American builders are attacking ecological challenges. In this paper the LEED rating system for commercial interiors is critically reviewed, pointing out its positive - focus on integrated design process - and negative impacts - low thresholds for highest ratings and tendency to gain LEED rating with projects that hardly pass the thresholds, largely neglecting the principles of energy efficiency. Based on a few prominent LEED platinum examples, the beginnings of a LEED style of designing interiors in historical landmark buildings are pointed out as well.

  14. Role of Organizational Climate in Organizational Commitment: The Case of Teaching Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Bahrami, Mohammad Amin; Barati, Omid; Ghoroghchian, Malake-sadat; Montazer-alfaraj, Razieh; Ranjbar Ezzatabadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective The commitment of employees is affected by several factors, including factors related to the organizational climate. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational commitment of nurses and the organizational climate in hospital settings. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 at two teaching hospitals in Yazd, Iran. A total of 90 nurses in these hospitals participated. We used stratified random sampling of the nursing population. The ...

  15. Some correlates of electronic health information management system success in nigerian teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Adebowale I; Popoola, Sunday O

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, an electronic health information management system (EHIMS) is crucial for patient care in hospitals. This paper explores the aspects and elements that contribute to the success of EHIMS in Nigerian teaching hospitals. The study adopted a survey research design. The population of study comprised 442 health information management personnel in five teaching hospitals that had implemented EHIMS in Nigeria. A self-developed questionnaire was used as an instrument for data collection. The findings revealed that there is a positive, close relationship between all the identified factors and EHIMS's success: technical factors (r = 0.564, P < 0.05); social factors (r = 0.616, P < 0.05); organizational factors (r = 0.621, P < 0.05); financial factors (r = 0.705, P < 0.05); and political factors (r = 0.589, P < 0.05). We conclude that consideration of all the identified factors was highly significant for the success of EHIMS in Nigerian teaching hospitals.

  16. Improved blood culture identification by FilmArray in cultures from regional hospitals compared with teaching hospital cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Timothy J J; Bzdyl, Nicole; Chua, I-Ly Joanna; Urosevic, Nadezda M; Leung, Michael J; Geelhoed, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Rapid identification of bacteria isolated from blood cultures by direct matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is now in wide spread use in major centres but is not yet feasible in smaller hospital laboratories. A FilmArray multiplex PCR panel for blood culture isolate identification (BCID) provides an alternative approach to near point-of-care microbial identification in regional hospitals. We assessed the accuracy and time to identification of the BCID FilmArray in a consecutive series of 149 blood cultures from 143 patients in a teaching hospital and smaller regional hospitals, currently identified by direct MALDI-TOF and proprietary molecular methods. The BCID FilmArray contained 18 of 34 species and 20 of 23 species isolated from teaching and regional hospital, respectively. Overall, 85 % of the teaching hospital and 100 % of the regional hospital monomicrobial blood cultures were identified, compared with 60 and 68 %, respectively, for direct MALDI-TOF on the same cultures. There were no incorrect results from blood cultures containing Staphylococcus aureus, streptococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Enterobacteriaceae. The three discrepant results were all in mixed cultures. The mean reduction in time to identification of blood culture isolates was 53 h, which did not include the time required to transport cultures from regional centres to a central laboratory. The overall performance of the BCID FilmArray is stronger in blood cultures from smaller regional hospitals that encounter a narrower range of bacterial species dominated by the commonest species. This approach is more suited to smaller clinical laboratories than the MALDI-TOF direct method.

  17. Profilaxia para tromboembolismo venoso em um hospital de ensino Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis at a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Melo Franco

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar se a profilaxia da trombose venosa profunda está sendo utilizada de maneira correta e rotineira em um hospital de ensino. MÉTODOS E CASUÍSTICA: Foi realizado um estudo transversal de pacientes internados em sete setores (enfermarias do Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba (Hospital de Ensino, no período de agosto de 2004 a agosto de 2005. Para estratificação do risco de trombose venosa profunda de cada paciente, foram pesquisados fatores clínicos e cirúrgicos, segundo o protocolo preconizado pela Sociedade Brasileira de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular. No período estudado, foram analisados 216 prontuários, dos quais 30 eram da cirurgia abdominal, 30 da cirurgia vascular, 30 da urologia, 31 da clínica médica, 31 da unidade de terapia intensiva, 31 da ortopedia e 33 da ginecologia/obstetrícia. RESULTADOS: Do total de pacientes, foi efetuada profilaxia para trombose venosa profunda em 57 (26%, sendo que, em 51 (89%, a execução foi de maneira correta e, em 6 (11%, não-preconizada. O método profilático mais utilizado foi o medicamentoso; 49 de 57 pacientes fizeram uso de heparina de baixo peso molecular. Também foi verificada a utilização de meias elásticas em cinco pacientes e deambulação precoce em sete. Já a compressão pneumática intermitente não foi utilizada em nenhum deles. CONCLUSÃO: De acordo com os resultados e com base no protocolo, concluiu-se que, no período da pesquisa, a profilaxia para trombose venosa profunda, no Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba, foi executada rotineiramente e de forma adequada em apenas 23,6% (51 do total de 216 pacientes.OBJECTIVE: To verify whether deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis is being correctly and routinely used at a teaching hospital. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of hospitalized patients on seven sectors at Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba (Hospital de Ensino was performed from August 2004 to August 2005. For the deep venous thrombosis risk stratification of

  18. Does outsourcing paramedical departments of teaching hospitals affect educational status of the students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi, Shandiz; Atefimanesh, Pezhman; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Ahmadzadeh, Nahal; Kafaeimehr, Mohamadhosein; Emamgholizadeh, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing trend of outsourcing public departments. Teaching hospitals also outsourced some of their departments to private sectors. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This study was conducted in six teaching hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences, which had public and outsourced teaching departments in 2015. One hundred fifty students from the departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory participated in this study and their perceptions about their educational status were assessed. A valid and reliable questionnaire was used; participation in the study was voluntary. Descriptive statistics such as mean (SD), t-test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov were used. Results: No difference was detected between the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory (p>0.05). Conclusion: Based on the students’ perception, the private sectors could maintain the educational level of the teaching departments similar to the public departments. It is recommended to involve all the stakeholders such as hospital administrators, academic staff and students in the decision- making process when changes in teaching environments are being considered. PMID:27683645

  19. Does outsourcing paramedical departments of teaching hospitals affect educational status of the students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi, Shandiz; Atefimanesh, Pezhman; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Ahmadzadeh, Nahal; Kafaeimehr, Mohamadhosein; Emamgholizadeh, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing trend of outsourcing public departments. Teaching hospitals also outsourced some of their departments to private sectors. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. This study was conducted in six teaching hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences, which had public and outsourced teaching departments in 2015. One hundred fifty students from the departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory participated in this study and their perceptions about their educational status were assessed. A valid and reliable questionnaire was used; participation in the study was voluntary. Descriptive statistics such as mean (SD), t-test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov were used. No difference was detected between the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory (p>0.05). Based on the students' perception, the private sectors could maintain the educational level of the teaching departments similar to the public departments. It is recommended to involve all the stakeholders such as hospital administrators, academic staff and students in the decision- making process when changes in teaching environments are being considered.

  20. [The contracting of teaching hospitals in the Brazilian Unified Health System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Sheyla Maria Lemos; Rivera, Francisco Javier Uribe

    2012-09-01

    This study identifies the potential and limitations of contracting to improve health care management, accountability and quality, and expand the participation of teaching hospitals in the health service network in the context of the Restructuring Program of Teaching Hospitals in the Brazilian Unified Health System. It is a case study of four teaching hospitals and their contracting State Health Departments. According to the hospital managers, the association is weak between contracting and the presence of mechanisms for hospital insertion into the health service network with practices and structures for managerial and healthcare qualification in the hospital. More structured hospitals in managerial and healthcare terms were more structured between contracting and the State Health Department. There was an increase in production of medium complexity outpatient care and a decrease in primary healthcare procedures. The proposal is for ongoing managerial development of the hospital and of the State Health Department, review of the operational plan, budgeting, monitoring mechanisms and an incentive system, bonding in the teams, among others.

  1. Paediatric utilisation of a teaching hospital and a community health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    promotive services, a Cape Provincial Administration (CPA) day hospital and a maternity obstetric unit (MQU) run by the. Peninsula Neonatal and Maternity Services (PNMS). The day hospital provid,es a 24-hour curative service and has a basic laboratory and X-ray facility, as well as a functioning rehydration unit. Despite ...

  2. Culinary and hospitality teaching as a research-based profession ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is not just an academic paper, it is a resource. It addresses the topic of how hospitality and tourism education is likely to change in 5, 10 and 15 years' time. The principal function of a hospitality academy is to design, plan, prepare and deliver a programme of learning in ways that foster and support student learning.

  3. Achieving LEED credit for ergonomics: Laying the foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mallory

    2014-01-01

    Despite guidance from the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) on the requirements for earning a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) ergonomics credit in the Innovation in Design and Innovation in Operations category, few projects have received the credit. The University of California, Berkeley ergonomics program, Ergonomics@Work, has aligned the ergonomics strategy to those of the USGBC and LEED to achieve the ergonomics credit in several new buildings. This article describes the steps needed to obtain the credit and highlights the opportunities it creates to partner with the project team to promote ergonomics. As a profession it is up to ergonomists to create the road map that incorporates ergonomics into the green building design.

  4. Rumpel-Leede Phenomenon in a Hypertensive Lady on Amlodipine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2014-01-01

    We are describing a 60-year-old hypertensive lady who developed Rumpel-Leede phenomenon following the use of a tourniquet to obtain a blood sample. History revealed that she was on amlodipine therapy and that spontaneous sun-exposure related purpura was often seen since amlodipine was prescribed. Examinations and investigations provided normal results. She refused consent for a skin biopsy. Symptoms resolved after its substitution with enalapril and dihydrochlorothiazide, without any further recurrence. PMID:24959504

  5. Hospital waste management status in Iran: a case study in the teaching hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzadkia, Mahdi; Moradi, Arash; Mohammadi, Mojtaba Shah; Jorfi, Sahand

    2009-06-01

    Hospital waste materials pose a wide variety of health and safety hazards for patients and healthcare workers. Many of hospitals in Iran have neither a satisfactory waste disposal system nor a waste management and disposal policy. The main objective of this research was to investigate the solid waste management in the eight teaching hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences. In this cross-sectional study, the main stages of hospital waste management including generation, separation, collection, storage, and disposal of waste materials were assessed in these hospitals, located in Tehran city. The measurement was conducted through a questionnaire and direct observation by researchers. The data obtained was converted to a quantitative measure to evaluate the different management components. The results showed that the waste generation rate was 2.5 to 3.01 kg bed(-1) day(-1), which included 85 to 90% of domestic waste and 10 to 15% of infectious waste. The lack of separation between hazardous and non-hazardous waste, an absence of the necessary rules and regulations applying to the collection of waste from hospital wards and on-site transport to a temporary storage location, a lack of proper waste treatment, and disposal of hospital waste along with municipal garbage, were the main findings. In order to improve the existing conditions, some extensive research to assess the present situation in the hospitals of Iran, the compilation of rules and establishment of standards and effective training for the personnel are actions that are recommended.

  6. Teaching Hospitals and the Disconnect Between Technology Adoption and Comparative Effectiveness Research: The Case of the Surgical Robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Danil V; Li, Huilin; Lepor, Herbert; Gross, Cary P; Blustein, Jan

    2017-06-01

    The surgical robot, a costly technology for treatment of prostate cancer with equivocal marginal benefit, rapidly diffused into clinical practice. We sought to evaluate the role of teaching in the early adoption phase of the surgical robot. Teaching hospitals were the primary early adopters: data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project showed that surgical robots were acquired by 45.5% of major teaching, 18.0% of minor teaching and 8.0% of non-teaching hospitals during the early adoption phase. However, teaching hospital faculty produced little comparative effectiveness research: By 2008, only 24 published studies compared robotic prostatectomy outcomes to those of conventional techniques. Just ten of these studies (41.7%) were more than minimally powered, and only six (25%) involved cross-institutional collaborations. In adopting the surgical robot, teaching hospitals fulfilled their mission to innovate, but failed to generate corresponding scientific evidence.

  7. Quality of clinical supervision as perceived by attending doctors in university and district teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busari, Jamiu O; Koot, Bart G

    2007-10-01

    Attending doctors (ADs) play important roles in the supervision of specialist registrars. Little is known, however, about how they perceive the quality of their supervision in different teaching settings. We decided to investigate whether there is any difference in how ADs perceive the quality of their supervision in university teaching hospital (UTH) and district teaching hospital (DTH) settings. We used a standardised questionnaire to investigate the quality of supervision as perceived by ADs. Fifteen items reflecting good teaching ability were measured on a 5-point Likert scale (1-5: never-always). We investigated for factors that influenced the perceived quality of supervision using Likert scale items (1-5: totally disagree-totally agree) and open-ended questionnaires. A total of 83 ADs (UTH: 51; DTH: 32) were eligible to participate in the survey. Of these, 43 (52%) returned the questionnaire (UTH: 25; DTH: 18). There was no difference in the overall mean of the 15 items between the UTH (3.67, standard deviation [SD] 0.35) and DTH (3.73, SD 0.31) ADs. Attending doctors in the DTH group rated themselves better at 'teaching technical skills' (mean 3.50, SD 0.70), compared with their UTH counterparts (mean 3.0, SD 0.76) (P = 0.03). Analysis of variance of the overall means revealed no significant difference between the different hospital settings. The results suggest that teaching hospital environments do not influence how ADs perceive the quality of their supervision. Lack of time for teaching was perceived as responsible for poor supervision. Other factors found to influence AD perceptions of good supervision included effective teaching skills, communication skills and provision of feedback.

  8. Childhood pneumonia at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-01-09

    Jan 9, 2013 ... salmonella in patients with radiologically confirmed severe pneumonia.10,11 A number of conditions such ... second cause of admission and deaths among children seen at the University of Ilorin Teaching ... UITH initially with symptom complex of pneumonia, with or without features of measles or pertussis ...

  9. Trainees' feedback on the prevailing teaching methods in postgraduate medical institute, Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Irum Sabir; Khan, Mumtaz; Khan, Atifullah; Shah, Muhammad Fahd; Ali, Gohar

    2012-05-01

    To determine the feedback of postgraduate (PG) trainees on their current teaching methods and their level of satisfaction with those at a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan. Cross-sectional study. Department of Surgery, Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar, from January to May 2010. A semi-structured proforma was filled by the trainees regarding teaching methods and preferences. Level of satisfaction was measured by five points Likert scale. Results were processed through SPSS 17.0 for descriptive statistics. The response rate was 260 out of the total 268 trainees. Lecture / tutorials were reported as the major method of teaching by 239 (91.9%), bedside teaching by 229 (88.1%), journal club by 217 (83.5%), e-learning by 157 (60.4%), audit meetings by 152 (58.5%), interactive sessions by 144 (55.4%), radiology meeting by 101 (38.8%) and TOACS by 39 (15%) trainees. Out of 28 units, TOACS were practised as a teaching method in 3 units. It was noted that 47 trainees (18.1%) graded the current training to be unsatisfactory, 127 as fair (48.8%), 77 as good (29.6%), 9 as very good (3.5%) while none considered it to be excellent. TOACS was the most preferred method of teaching, reported by 239 PGs (91.9%). Excessive work load as a cause for the dissatisfaction was reported by 229 trainees (88.1%), inadequate teaching by 157 (60.4%), lack of motivation 124 (47.7%), inappropriate teaching 122 (46.9%) and personal problems by 118 (45.4%). Lecture is the most commonly used method of teaching in the Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar, while TOACS is the most preferred method amongst trainees, but it is the least practiced.

  10. Hospital Accreditation: What is its Effect on Quality and Safety Indicators? Experience of an Iranian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Janati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: program evaluation is an integral and expected component in the development of any healthcare program. It helps decision-makers to base their decisions on facts. Objective: This paper analyzes the effect of accreditation on three indicators related to patient safety and hospital care quality in ICU wards of an Iranian teaching hospital. Methods: This interventional study was accomplished based on executive management and scientific methods such as plan-do-check-act (PDCA cycle and audit to improve quality and safety. We used data reported from ICU wards of the hospital to analyze the effect of accreditation on the three selected indicators. (SPSS version 22.00 was used for the statistical analysis. Results: In total, 6997 patients were analyzed. The accreditation interventions appeared to be effective at reducing pressure ulcer incidence average (from an average of 6.8 percent to 4.1 percent (p=0.045. The accreditation also. The average stay of the patients during the study also positively changed from an average of 1.58 days to 10.13 days (1.45 improvements(p=0.0303. In relation to hospital acquired infection but, unexpectedly, its effect on hospital was negative, then it considerably increased and rose from 1.5 percent to 8.1 percent (p=0.001. However this increasing was due to enhanced infection incident report system. Conclusion: hospital accreditation has presented ample opportunity a significant positive effect on hospitals

  11. Is leadership compatible with hospitals? Lessons from 10 years of teaching leadership to hospital managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Patrick M; Samson, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Leadership methods can be understood and applied by hospital managers in the same way teachers and the seminar's participants respect certain conventions. Each method should be discussed and adapted, recognizing its limitations for use within hospitals. This article first presents what is taught in a traditional leadership course and then, discusses ways the course can be adapted for use by hospital managers.

  12. The language of "Circule": discursive construction of false referral in Iranian teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhosseini, Seyyed-Abdolhamid; Fattahi, Hossein

    2010-09-01

    This article explores the practice of false patient out-referral by medical students in Iranian teaching hospital emergency departments. Drawing on participant-observations and interviews during eight months in six hospitals in Tehran, we investigate how discourse is appropriated to construct and legitimate out-referrals through four general strategies of sympathy, mystification, intimidation, and procrastination. Based on a critical approach to false out-referral discourse, we revisit the medical and educational functioning of teaching hospitals in Iran: Focusing on medical students involved in false out-referrals, their discursive reproduction of deception is examined along with their legitimate challenges to institutional structures. Moreover, focusing on the institution of hospital, institutional corruption is discussed along with the problematic of covert cultural defiance faced by a modernist organizational construct in a nonmainstream cultural context. Finally, we argue that the discourse of false out-referral calls for more profound public awareness in dealing with health institutions.

  13. A comparison of congestive heart failure readmissions among teaching and nonteaching hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio, Carlos; House, Jeffrey; Ibrahim, Saif; Touchan, Jean N; Mooradian, Ariana

    2014-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of hospitalization in the United States. With the population trend shifting to a higher volume of elderly adults, the efficient management of HF will become increasingly essential. The development and implementation of The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and subsequent changes in reimbursement practices have made 30-day readmission rates a topic of much interest and relevance. The aim of the study was to compare rates of readmission among teaching and nonteaching hospitals. The authors gathered retrospective data on HF quality measures and readmission rates between August 2011 and July 2012, extracted from the institution's managerial accounting database. These data were compared among teaching and nonteaching hospitals. Patient demographics, readmission rates, readmission diagnoses, severity of illness, patient disposition, medications prescribed, cost of services, and mortality were reviewed. Analysis of variance was used for continuous variables; χ(2) analysis was used for evaluating categorical variables. A higher proportion of patients on the cardiology teaching service were men than on either the medicine teaching service or the medicine nonteaching service. Length of stay, case costs, and care costs were lowest for the cardiology teaching service; however, patient illness severity was lower on this service than on the other two services. Overall, readmissions and mortality were similar among all groups, but readmission for the same diagnosis was more likely on the cardiology service than on the medicine teaching and nonteaching services. Studies comparing teaching and nonteaching providers for an HF diagnosis are needed. Hospital readmission and mortality rates were similar across services and compared favorably with national data. Opportunities that target cost reduction and length of stay may be leveraged.

  14. Factors affecting the informal payments in public and teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboutorabi, Ali; Ghiasipour, Maryam; Rezapour, Aziz; Pourreza, Abolghasem; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Tanoomand, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Informal payments in the health sector of many developing countries are considered as a major impediment to health care reforms. Informal payments are a form of systemic fraud and have adverse effects on the performance of the health system. In this study, the frequency and extent of informal payments as well as the determinants of these payments were investigated in general hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. In this cross-sectional study, 300 discharged patients were selected using multi-stage random sampling method. First, three hospitals were selected randomly; then, through a simple random sampling, we recruited 300 discharged patients from internal, surgery, emergency, ICU & CCU wards. All data were collected by structured telephone interviews and questionnaire. We analyzed data using Chi- square, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. The results indicated that 21% (n=63) of individuals paid informally to the staff. About 4% (n=12) of the participants were faced with informal payment requests from hospital staff. There was a significant relationship between frequency of informal payments with marital status of participants and type of hospitals. According to our findings, none of the respondents had informal payments to physicians. The most frequent informal payments were in cash and were made to the hospitals' housekeeping staff to ensure more and better services. There was no significant relationship between the informal payments with socio-demographic characteristics, residential area and insurance status. Our findings revealed that many strategies can be used for both controlling and reducing informal payments. These include training patients and hospitals' staff, increasing income levels of employees, improving the quantity and quality of health services and changing the entrenched beliefs that necessitate informal payments.

  15. Audit of stillbirths in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Objective: The purpose of this study is to classify the stillbirths (SBs) in our institution and to determine the avoidable contributors using a pro forma that was developed in our perinatal unit. Materials and Method: All mothers who delivered SBs at Obafemi Awolowo University Hospitals Complex Ile-Ife, Nigeria,.

  16. Prevalence of ototoxicity in University of Benin Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-01-23

    Jan 23, 2012 ... medicine (CM) services, not only homeopathy. Until around 1980, it was a small general hospital with a specialist homeopathic department. The surgical and other facilities were replaced by a range of CM services including the. NHS's first complementary cancer (1960), acupuncture. (1977), autogenic ...

  17. Utilization Pattern of Vancomycin in a University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Purpose: To assess the prescribing and utilization pattern of vancomycin in Sultan Qaboos University. Hospital (SQUH) in Oman. Methods: A retrospective study that included in-patients at SQUH who had used vancomycin from. January 1 2009 to December 31 2009 was conducted to determine the utilization patterns of the ...

  18. Retention of Medical Records in Ghanaian Teaching Hospitals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates medical records retention and storage practices in selected Ghanaian hospitals. The state- of- the- art in the use and final disposition of non-current patient records is reviewed with a view to recommending remedial measures that could contribute to the improvement of the existing system. The study ...

  19. Stroke Admission to Tikur Anbassa Teaching Hospital: With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although the burden of cerebrovascular accident is not known in Africa, including Ethiopia, it s a frequent cause of mortality and morbidity in hospital practice. Stroke in the young is associated with different spectrum of risk factors and treatment outcome as compared to stroke in the older age group. Method: To ...

  20. Microbiological assessment of indoor air of teaching hospital wards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, the objective of this study is to provide fundamental data related to the microbial quality of indoor air of Jimma University Specialized Hospital wards, to estimate the health hazard and to create standards for indoor air quality control. METHODS: The microbial quality of indoor air of seven wards of Jimma University ...

  1. Health screening among pharmacists in a teaching hospital in south ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted among 63 pharmacists in the Department of Pharmacy, University College Hospital, Ibadan, using a pretested questionnaire. The study lasted for three months. Participants' blood pressure, blood glucose and anthropometric measurements were determined using ...

  2. Hydatidiform mole in university of Calabar teaching hospital, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suction evacuation was done in all the cases. About 63% of patients had 1-3 months follow up, while 2.9% continued beyond 1 year. The case fatality was 1.47%. However. 12 patients never came back to the hospital after evacuation. Conclusion : Molar pregnancy is a common cause of first trimester miscarriages and ...

  3. Prevalence of malnutrition in hospital children in federal teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malnutrition is a state of excess or deficiency in energy, protein and or other nutrients which causes measurable adverse effects on body forms and function. A holistic approach is required in the management of hospitalized pediatric patients and includes the assessment and management of nutritional ...

  4. Circumcision: Perspective in a Nigerian teaching hospital | Abdur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The practice and pattern of male infants circumcised is infl uenced by culture, religion and socioeconomic classifi cation. The debate about the benefits and risks of circumcision has made a hospital-based practice the most acceptable. Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the ages, indications, ...

  5. Culinary and hospitality teaching as a research-based profession

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Administration Quarterly) and similar institutions such as the Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Education (CHRIE), the International Journal of Hospitality Management and the Journal of Culinary Science and Technology. The latter is approaching only its tenth year of publication ...

  6. Point prevalence survey of antimicrobial utilization in a Canadian tertiary-care teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Lee

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: This prospective point prevalence survey provided important baseline information on antimicrobial use within a large tertiary care teaching hospital and identified potential targets for future antimicrobial stewardship initiatives. A multi-center point prevalence survey should be considered to identify patterns of antimicrobial use in Canada and to establish the first steps toward international antimicrobial surveillance.

  7. THE EFFECT OF OUTPATIENT SERVICE QUALITY ON PATIENT SATISFACTION IN TEACHING HOSPITALS IN IRAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouragha, Behrouz; Zarei, Ehsan

    2016-02-01

    The quality of services plays a primary role in achieving patient satisfaction. The main purpose of this study was to explore the effect of outpatient service quality on patient satisfaction in teaching hospitals in Iran. this cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014. The study sample included 500 patients were selected with systematic random method from the outpatient departments (clinics) of four teaching hospitals in Tehran. The survey instrument was a questionnaire consisted of 44 items, which were confirmed its reliability and validity. The data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation, and multivariate regression methods with the SPSS.18 software. According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience in the outpatient departments of the teaching hospitals and thus evaluated the services as good. Perceived service costs, physician consultation, physical environment, and information to patient were found to be the most important determinants of outpatient satisfaction. The results suggest that improving the quality of consultation, providing information to the patients during examination and consultation, creating value for patients by reducing costs or improving service quality, and enhancing the physical environment quality of the clinic can be regarded as effective strategies for the management of teaching hospitals toward increasing outpatient satisfaction.

  8. Clinical pharmacology and general patient care in two teaching hospitals1

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Susan M; Turner, Paul; Vere, Duncan

    1980-01-01

    The clinical responsibilities and activities over 12-month periods of the Departments of Clinical Pharmacology of two London teaching hospitals have been analysed. The results suggest that clinical pharmacology should not be regarded only as an academic specialty but that it has an important role in patient care.

  9. An audit of spirometry at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correspondence to: Dr. Olufemi O. Desalu, Department of Medicine, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, ... Evaluation of bronchial asthma was the most common indication for spirometry (43 ... pourraient être étudiés par la spirométrie, manque de compétences dans l'interprétation des résultats, le manque de.

  10. A "Prepaid Package" for Obstetrics: Effect on Teaching and Patient Care in a University Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Philip E.

    1976-01-01

    The changing social milieu has removed the charity patient but not the need for a teaching population. The University Hospital's program is described, in which patients prepaid a fixed, single fee for all obstetrics-related care through the third post partum day. (LBH)

  11. Data Envelopment Analysis for estimating Health Care Efficiency in the Southwest Teaching Hospitals in Niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilqis Bolanle Amole,

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Health care services in Nigerian teaching hospitals have been considered as less desirable. In the same vein, studies on the proper application of model in explicating the factors that influence the efficiency of health care delivery are limited. This study therefore deployed Data Envelopment Analysis in estimating health care efficiency in six public teaching hospitals located in southwest Nigeria. To do this, the study gathered secondary data from annual statistical returns of six public teaching hospitals in southwest, Nigeria, spanned five years (2010 - 2014. The data collected were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistical tools. The Inferential statistical tools used included Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA with the aid of DEAP software version 2.1, Tobit model with the aid of STATA version 12.0. The results revealed that the teaching hospitals in Southwest Nigeria were not fully efficient. The average scale inefficiency was estimated to be approximately 18%. Result from the Tobit estimates showed that insufficient number of professional health workers, especially doctors, pharmacist and laboratory technicians engineers and beds space for patient use were responsible for the observed inefficiency in health care delivery, in southwest Nigeria. This study has implication for decisions on effective monitoring of the entire health system towards enhancing quality health care service delivery which would enhance health system efficiency.

  12. Social impact of HIV/AIDS on clients attending a teaching hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ofonime E. Johnson * Ofonime E. Johnson is a Nigerian, married with four Children. The higher educational institutions that she attended along with the dates are as follows: University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria, 1979–1985; University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria, 2004–2005 [MPH]; and University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria, 2006–2009. Her qualifications along with the dates are as follows: MBBch (1985) and MPH (2005). She is a fellow of the West African College of Physicians (FWACP) and a fellow of the Medical College of Public Health, Nigeria (FMCPH), 2009. She is a consultant public health physician working as a residency training coordinator in the Department of Community Health, University of Uyo Teaching Hospital, Uyo, Nigeria (2009–to date). drjohnsonoe@yahoo.com

    2012-06-20

    Jun 20, 2012 ... To cite this article: Ofonime E. Johnson (2012): Social impact of HIV/AIDS on clients attending a teaching hospital in ... The objectives of this study were to assess the level of self-disclosure of status by PLWHA, to describe the level and .... Ife, Nigeria, among university students showed that 64.5% indi-.

  13. The practice of episiotomy in a university teaching hospital in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Episiotomy is essentially a surgical procedure but it is often relegated to the least experienced member of the obstetric team with possible untoward consequences to the mother. Aim: This study set out to appraise how episiotomy was practiced in the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital during the period of ...

  14. Case-fatality of adult Tetanus at Jimma University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tetanus remains a major health problem in Ethiopia like in most other developing countries. Objectives: To assess the clinical presentation, complications and outcome of tetanus patients. Methods: In this retrospective study, patients (age > 13 years) who were admitted to Jimma University Teaching Hospital ...

  15. Tetanus: A 10-year review of cases in a teaching hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim/Objectives: The objective of this study was to present the descriptive characteristics of non-neonatal tetanus cases seen in a teaching hospital in Northwestern Nigeria over a 10-year period and to discuss the implications of the study findings for anti-tetanus vaccination policy and implementation in developing countries.

  16. Audit of child and adolescent psychiatry in a teaching hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. This study aimed to identify the socio-demographic characteristics, pattern of psychiatric disorders and management of children and adolescents before the setting up of a dedicated child and adolescent unit at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria. Method. A retrospective study, carried out at the ...

  17. Teaching Computer Programming to Medical Doctors, Nurses and Hospital Staff : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kubben, Pieter; Looije, Pepijn; Scherpbier, Albert; van Merode, Frits

    2017-01-01

    There is plenty of opportunity where the medical world can benefit from caregivers who can translate point-of-care challenges into digital solutions using coding skills. The objective of this pilot study is to evaluate the feasibility of teaching computer programming to hospital staff with no or

  18. Factors Associated with Waiting Time for Breast Cancer Treatment in a Teaching Hospital in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedey, Florence; Wu, Lily; Ayettey, Hannah; Sanuade, Olutobi A.; Akingbola, Titilola S.; Hewlett, Sandra A.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Cole, Helen V.; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Adanu, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in Ghana. Data are limited on the predictors of poor outcomes in breast cancer patients in low-income countries; however, prolonged waiting time has been implicated. Among breast cancer patients who received treatment at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, this study…

  19. Resident training in a teaching hospital: How do attendings teach in the real operative environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glarner, Carly E; Law, Katherine E; Zelenski, Amy B; McDonald, Robert J; Greenberg, Jacob A; Foley, Eugene F; Wiegmann, Douglas A; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2017-07-01

    The study aim was to explore the nature of intraoperative education and its interaction with the environment where surgical education occurs. Video and audio recording captured teaching interactions between colorectal surgeons and general surgery residents during laparoscopic segmental colectomies. Cases and collected data were analyzed for teaching behaviors and workflow disruptions. Flow disruptions (FDs) are considered deviations from natural case progression. Across 10 cases (20.4 operative hours), attendings spent 11.2 hours (54.7%) teaching, using directing (M = 250.1), and confirming (M = 236.1) most. FDs occurred 410 times, accounting for 4.4 hours of case time (21.57%). Teaching occurred with FD events for 2.4 hours (22.2%), whereas 77.8% of teaching happened outside FD occurrence. Teaching methods shifted from active to passive during FD events to compensate for patient safety. Understanding how FDs impact operative learning will inform faculty development in managing interruptions and improve its integration into resident education. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. The relationship between employees’ continuing education and performance in Tehran’s teaching hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Ghobadi Tara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Continuing education and training of employees significantly affect a hospital’s performance and efficiency, and learning organizations usually exhibit higher efficiency. Hence, the objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the hospital employees’ continuing education and performance indicators in the teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran’s Azad University. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran’s Azad University in 2014. The subjects consisted of 70 professional hospital employees, including physicians, nurses, midwives and other personnel who had attended continuing education courses. A data collection form was used to collect the data. The data were analyzed with SPSSW-20 software. Pearson correlation coefficient was used at a significance level of 0.05. Results:The number of continuing education courses held for physicians and nurses was equal five courses, while fewer courses were held for the remaining personnel. There were significant associations between the employees’ continuing education and bed occupancy rate (p=0.009 and bed turnover interval (p=0.01. There was no significant association between the employees’ continuing education and hospital death rate (p=0.19. Conclusion: Training employees ultimately affects their performance in the hospital. Hence, a deeper insight into the significance of hospital training is needed for decision-making policy-makers and for hospitals’ executive managers to efficiently use the limited therapeutic resources and eventually achieve optimum effectiveness.

  1. Self-Concept, Values Orientation, and Teaching Performance Among Hospitality Educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy D. Jocson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This survey-correlational study aimed to investigate the self-concept, values orientation, and teaching performance among hospitality educators of the West Visayas State University System. The study was conducted in January 2013 and utilized 42 randomly selected hospitality educators as participants. The simple random sampling method was used in the selection of the participants. Three (3 standardized and published datagathering instruments were adapted to obtain the data for the study. To ascertain the degree of self-concept, Girdano and Everly’s (1979 Self-perception Test instrument was used. In determining the pre-dominant values orientation, Rokeach’s (1973 Value Survey Form used by Rabago (1988 was utilized. To ascertain the level of teaching performance, the WVSU F-PES was employed. Frequency counts, rank, percentage analyses, mean scores, and standard deviations were employed as descriptive statistics; while t-test for independent samples, one-way ANOVA, and Pearson’s Product Moment Coefficient of Correlation (Pearson’s r were employed as inferential statistics. The criterion for the acceptance or rejection of the null hypotheses was set at .05 alpha level. The results of the study revealed that, generally, the hospitality educators had outstanding teaching performance and strong self-concept. Family security, salvation, and happiness were their most important terminal values while social recognition, a world of beauty and pleasure were their least important values. Loving, responsible, and honest were their most important instrumental values and imaginative, ambitious, and clean were their least important values. In terms of teaching performance, no significant differences existed when hospitality educators were classified according sex, age, civil status, educational attainment, status of employment and number of years in teaching. Significant differences existed in the degree of self-concept among hospitality educators grouped

  2. [Cataract extraction with intraocular lenses in a teaching hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, R; Charlín, R; Schweikart, A; Stoppel, J; Maul, E

    1991-07-01

    One hundred and twelve primary posterior chamber intraocular lens implants from a series of 560 eyes operated on at the Eye Service of Hospital Salvador in Santiago, Chile, were analyzed to determine the postoperative visual acuity. The follow up time varied between 3 and 26 months. Lenses were implanted by experienced ophthalmologists and residents in training. Visual acuity was 0.5 or better in 79.5% of cases. The postoperative visual acuity varied with age, being worse in patients over 70 years old.

  3. Prevalence of auditory changes in newborns in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães, Valeriana de Castro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The precocious diagnosis and the intervention in the deafness are of basic importance in the infantile development. The loss auditory and more prevalent than other joined riots to the birth. Objective: Esteem the prevalence of auditory alterations in just-born in a hospital school. Method: Prospective transversal study that evaluated 226 just-been born, been born in a public hospital, between May of 2008 the May of 2009. Results: Of the 226 screened, 46 (20.4% had presented absence of emissions, having been directed for the second emission. Of the 26 (56.5% children who had appeared in the retest, 8 (30.8% had remained with absence and had been directed to the Otolaryngologist. Five (55.5% had appeared and had been examined by the doctor. Of these, 3 (75.0% had presented normal otoscopy, being directed for evaluation of the Evoked Potential Auditory of Brainstem (PEATE. Of the total of studied children, 198 (87.6% had had presence of emissions in one of the tests and, 2 (0.9% with deafness diagnosis. Conclusion: The prevalence of auditory alterations in the studied population was of 0,9%. The study it offers given excellent epidemiologists and it presents the first report on the subject, supplying resulted preliminary future implantation and development of a program of neonatal auditory selection.

  4. Patient safety: the experience of an Italian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Marchetti

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Introduction The risk management project of The University Hospital “A. Gemelli” aims to define the necessary procedures to manage clinical risk, by identifying the structures involved within this process, so that all of the personnel can contribute to a measurable improvement in the safety of both patients and staff.

    Methods The Risk Management Program is comprised of 5 long-term phases: Phase 1 - Strategy Definition and Communication: a clear and shared Risk Management Strategy is indispensable to guarantee a coordinated action plan, in order to focus all of the interventions towards the achievement of common and measurable results. Phase 2 - Risk Management System Governance: all of the organisational structures have been activated in order to effectively manage the Risk Management System. The system has been introduced to interact within all areas of the hospital and to transfer information. Phase 3 - Promotion within the Organisation: this phase fosters the aims of the project within the whole organisation, by stressing the concept of “learning from errors”. This is crucial if organisational and healthcare workers are to understand the true aims of risk prevention and protection and offer to contribute to the process. Phase 4 - Risk Assessment: a data survey system was created and institutionalized. This phase begins with an analysis of the information flow, in order to estimate the probabilities that certain risks occur, and ends with defining the interventions to undertake. Risk assessment makes it possible to forecast the consequences of certain risks and thus prioritise those for prevention. Phase 5 - Risk Management: this consists of planning and implementing all of the actions necessary to prevent risks, protect and finance (in terms of prevention A. Gemelli University Hospital.

    Results The results achieved are remarkable especially when one

  5. Applying the Balanced Scorecard approach in teaching hospitals: a literature review and conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Annarita; Cardamone, Emma; Cavallaro, Giusy; Mauro, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    Teaching hospitals (THs) simultaneously serve three different roles: offering medical treatment, teaching future doctors and promoting research. The international literature recognises such organisations as 'peaks of excellence' and highlights their economic function in the health system. In addition, the literature describes the urgent need to manage the complex dynamics and inefficiency issues that threaten the survival of teaching hospitals worldwide. In this context, traditional performance measurement systems that focus only on accounting and financial measures appear to be inadequate. Given that THs are highly specific and complex, a multidimensional system of performance measurement, such as the Balanced Scorecard (BSC), may be more appropriate because of the multitude of stakeholders, each of whom seek a specific type of accountability. The aim of the paper was twofold: (i) to review the literature on the BSC and its applications in teaching hospitals and (ii) to propose a scorecard framework that is suitable for assessing the performance of THs and serving as a guide for scholars and practitioners. In addition, this research will contribute to the ongoing debate on performance evaluation systems by suggesting a revised BSC framework and proposing specific performance indicators for THs. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Postplacental intrauterine device insertion at a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatlaoui, Tara C; Marcus, Michele; Jamieson, Denise J; Goedken, Peggy; Cwiak, Carrie

    2014-06-01

    To determine whether postplacental intrauterine device (IUD) insertion can be safely and effectively performed within a teaching program. This was a prospective cohort of 177 subjects planning vaginal delivery enrolled antenatally who desired postplacental IUD insertion of either the copper T380A IUD or levonorgestrel IUS. Insertions were performed primarily by resident physicians following a training session. Follow-up included a 4- to 8-week visit and telephone calls at 3 and 6 months. Ninety-nine subjects underwent successful postplacental IUD insertion of 100 attempts. Seventeen expulsions (17%) were noted: 10 complete and 7 partial. The study identified no differences in outcome by training level; however, the study lacked statistical power to evaluate anything other than large differences. Postplacental IUD insertions can be safely and effectively performed within a training program. A training protocol may safely and feasibly be initiated among physicians, advanced practice clinicians or trainees with no prior experience with postplacental IUD insertion. By initiating this practice, access to highly effective contraception may increase for patients who have difficulty returning for a visit or otherwise receiving effective methods. © 2014.

  7. A Study on the LEED Energy Simulation Process Using BIM

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    Han-Soo Ryu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the domestic and international environmentally friendly certification system, energy-related credit occupies a high ratio in the total distribution of certification score Leadership in the Energy and Environmental Design (LEED system is a certification system developed by the US Green Building Council (USGBC in order to assess the environmental friendliness of buildings. The energy-related credit is approximately 30% of the total and also the energy simulation ratio specifically is the highest among the single credits as it is 20%. In this research, the energy simulation process using Building Information Modeling (BIM based on the energy simulation case performed at the A-Tower, LEED certification was proposed. It places an emphasis on the verification process which was short in the previous research. The architectural geometry modeled through the BIM tool is converted to the gbXML, and in this process the geometry is verified through the interference check functions, the gbXML Viewer and the FZKViewer. The energy simulation is performed after the verification procedure. The geometry verification process in the A-Tower project is presented throughout this paper. In conclusion, an improved process is proposed for the productivity and reliability of energy simulation.

  8. Organ donation after circulatory death in a university teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulos, S; Treasure, E; Silvester, W; Opdam, H; Warrillow, S J; Jones, D

    2016-07-01

    Although organ transplantation is well established for end-stage organ failure, many patients die on waiting lists due to insufficient donor numbers. Recently, there has been renewed interest in donation after circulatory death (DCD). In a retrospective observational study we reviewed the screening of patients considered for DCD between March 2007 and December 2012 in our hospital. Overall, 148 patients were screened, 17 of whom were transferred from other hospitals. Ninety-three patients were excluded (53 immediately and 40 after review by donation staff). The 55 DCD patients were younger than those excluded (P=0.007) and they died from hypoxic brain injury (43.6%), intraparenchymal haemorrhage (21.8%) and subarachnoid haemorrhage (14.5%). Antemortem heparin administration and bronchoscopy occurred in 50/53 (94.3%) and 22/55 (40%) of cases, respectively. Forty-eight patients died within 90 minutes and proceeded to donation surgery. Associations with not dying in 90 minutes included spontaneous ventilation mode (P=0.022), absence of noradrenaline infusion (P=0.051) and higher PaO2:FiO2 ratio (P=0.052). The number of brain dead donors did not decrease over the study period. The time interval between admission and death was longer for DCD than for the 45 brain dead donors (5 [3-11] versus 2 [2-3] days; Porgan transplants due to DCD. Introducing a DCD program can increase potential organ donors without reducing brain dead donors. Antemortem investigations appear to be acceptable to relatives when included in the consent process.

  9. Effects of implementing time-variable postgraduate training programmes on the organization of teaching hospital departments.

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    van Rossum, Tiuri R; Scheele, Fedde; Sluiter, Henk E; Paternotte, Emma; Heyligers, Ide C

    2018-01-31

    As competency-based education has gained currency in postgraduate medical education, it is acknowledged that trainees, having individual learning curves, acquire the desired competencies at different paces. To accommodate their different learning needs, time-variable curricula have been introduced making training no longer time-bound. This paradigm has many consequences and will, predictably, impact the organization of teaching hospitals. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of time-variable postgraduate education on the organization of teaching hospital departments. We undertook exploratory case studies into the effects of time-variable training on teaching departments' organization. We held semi-structured interviews with clinical teachers and managers from various hospital departments. The analysis yielded six effects: (1) time-variable training requires flexible and individual planning, (2) learners must be active and engaged, (3) accelerated learning sometimes comes at the expense of clinical expertise, (4) fast-track training for gifted learners jeopardizes the continuity of care, (5) time-variable training demands more of supervisors, and hence, they need protected time for supervision, and (6) hospital boards should support time-variable training. Implementing time-variable education affects various levels within healthcare organizations, including stakeholders not directly involved in medical education. These effects must be considered when implementing time-variable curricula.

  10. Pattern of sudden death at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, South West Nigeria

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    Akinwusi PO

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Patience Olayinka Akinwusi,1,2 Akinwumi Oluwole Komolafe,3 Olanrewaju Olayinka Olayemi,2 Adeleye Abiodun Adeomi41Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Osun State University, 2Department of Medicine, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, 3Department of Morbid Anatomy, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching, Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Osun State, 4Department of Community Medicine, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, NigeriaBackground: The purpose of this study was to determine the etiology and epidemiologic characteristics of sudden death at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology (LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, South West Nigeria.Methods: This was a retrospective descriptive study of all cases of natural unexpected death, either occurring out of hospital or less than 24 hours after admission to LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, over a nine-year period from January 2003 to December 2011. Data were generated from information in the case notes and autopsy reports for these cases.Results: Sudden death accounted for 29 (4.0% of 718 adult medical deaths and 1.0% of all adult medical admissions. Out-of-hospital deaths occurred in 72.4% of cases. The mean age of the patients was 46.8 ± 11.5 (range 25–74 years. The male to female ratio was 6.25:1. Cardiovascular disease were the most common cause of death (51.7%, followed by respiratory disease (20.7%, pulmonary thromboembolism (10.4%, central nervous system disease (13.8%, gastrointestinal disorders (13.8%, severe chemical/drug poisoning (13.8%, and combined cardiovascular and central nervous system disease (13.8%. Hypertension-related causes were responsible for 14/29 (48.3% of the sudden deaths. Hypertensive heart disease accounted for 86.7% of the cardiovascular deaths, hypertensive heart failure accounted for 73.3%, whilst all heart failure cases accounted for 80.0%. Left ventricular hypertrophy was present in 69.2% of the patients with hypertensive heart disease. Moderate to severe

  11. Assessment of preoperative exams request in a teaching hospital

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    Eduardo Toshiyuki Moro

    2014-04-01

    Background: preoperative exams aim to identify disorders that may compromise the patient´s perioperative care. However, unnecessary tests rarely change the outcome, and are expensive to institution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the preoperative tests ordered in Santa Lucinda hospital, Sorocaba - SP. Methods: after approval by the Ethics Committee of PUC-SP University, we assessed pre-anesthetic evaluation of patients undergoing elective surgery from march to August, 2011. We recorded: age, sex, ASA physical status, the presence of coexisting diseases, medication use, type of surgery and preoperative tests. They were classified as sufficient, sufficient with unnecessary tests, insufficient, or insufficient with unnecessary tests. Results: two hundred and nineteen records were evaluated, of which 52% were considered sufficient, but with unnecessary tests. For 24% of patients, the tests were insufficient, with some ordered unnecessarily. To 8% of patients, the tests were insufficient, and only 16% didn´t have insufficient and unnecessary tests. The most frequently ordered tests were hematocrit and hemoglobin. The exams most unnecessarily ordered were coagulation tests and dosage of serum urea. Among the necessary examinations, but unsolicited, there were ECG (27%, electrolytes (13% and creatinine (11%. Seventy-nine tests showed some kind of problem, but they didn´t change in behavior. Conclusions: preoperative tests unnecessarily ordered are frequent, which do not guarantee that some patients present to surgery without fundamental exams according to their risk group.

  12. Technical Efficiency of Teaching Hospitals in Iran: The Use of Stochastic Frontier Analysis, 1999–2011

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    Reza Goudarzi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Hospitals are highly resource-dependent settings, which spend a large proportion of healthcare financial resources. The analysis of hospital efficiency can provide insight into how scarce resources are used to create health values. This study examines the Technical Efficiency (TE of 12 teaching hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS between 1999 and 2011. Methods The Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA method was applied to estimate the efficiency of TUMS hospitals. A best function, referred to as output and input parameters, was calculated for the hospitals. Number of medical doctors, nurses, and other personnel, active beds, and outpatient admissions were considered as the input variables and number of inpatient admissions as an output variable. Results The mean level of TE was 59% (ranging from 22 to 81%. During the study period the efficiency increased from 61 to 71%. Outpatient admission, other personnel and medical doctors significantly and positively affected the production (P< 0.05. Concerning the Constant Return to Scale (CRS, an optimal production scale was found, implying that the productions of the hospitals were approximately constant. Conclusion Findings of this study show a remarkable waste of resources in the TUMS hospital during the decade considered. This warrants policy-makers and top management in TUMS to consider steps to improve the financial management of the university hospitals.

  13. Trends in neurosurgical complication rates at teaching vs nonteaching hospitals following duty-hour restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Travis M; Tranmer, Bruce I; Horgan, Michael A; Rughani, Anand I

    2012-11-01

    In 2003 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education implemented duty-hour restrictions for residents, with an unclear impact on patient care. The authors hypothesize that implementation of duty-hour restrictions is not associated with decreased morbidity for neurosurgical patients. This hypothesis was tested with the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to examine inpatient complications associated with a common elective procedure, craniotomy for meningioma. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was queried for all patients admitted for elective craniotomy for meningioma from 1998 to 2008, excluding the year 2003. Each case was queried for common in-hospital postoperative complications. The complication rate was compared for 5-year epochs at teaching and nonteaching hospitals before (1998-2002) and after (2004-2008) the adoption of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education work-hour restriction. Multivariate analysis was performed to control for the effects of age and medical comorbidities. We identified 21177 patients who met inclusion criteria. We identified an effect of age, preexisting medical comorbidity, and timing of surgery on postoperative complication rates. At teaching hospitals, the complication rate increased from 14% to 16% (P < .001). In contrast, this increase was not mirrored at nonteaching hospitals, which saw a nearly constant postoperative complication rate of 15% from 1998 to 2002 and 15% for the years 2004 to 2008 (P = .979). This effect remained significant in a multivariate analysis including age and existing comorbidities as covariates (P = .016). In patients undergoing craniotomy for meningioma, postoperative complication rates increased at teaching hospitals, but not at nonteaching hospitals over the 5-year epochs before and after 2003.

  14. Malpractice awareness among surgeons at a teaching hospital in Pakistan.

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    Sheikh, Asfandyar; Ali, Sajid; Ejaz, Sadaf; Farooqi, Marium; Ahmed, Syed Salman; Jawaid, Imran

    2012-11-06

    The duty of a doctor to take care presumes the person who offers medical advice and treatment to unequivocally possess the skills and knowledge to do so. However, a sense of responsibility cannot be guaranteed in the absence of accountability, which in turn requires a comprehensive medical law system to be in place. Such a system is almost non-existent in Pakistan. Keeping the above in mind, we designed this study to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of surgeons regarding malpractice at a tertiary care center in Pakistan. This was an observational, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted during a three month period from 31st March, 2012 to 30th June, 2012 at Civil Hospital, Karachi. Surgeons who were available during the period of our study and had been working in the hospital for at least 6 months were included. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed after seeking informed, written consent. The specialties included were general surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, pediatric surgery, orthopedic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery and gynecology and obstetrics. The study questionnaire comprised of four sections. The first section was concerned with the demographics of the surgeons. The second section analyzed the knowledge of the respondents regarding professional negligence and malpractice. The third section assessed the attitudes surgeons with regard to malpractice. The last section dealt with the general and specific practices and experiences of surgeons regarding malpractice. Of the 319 surgeons interviewed, 68.7% were oblivious of the complete definition of malpractice. Leaving foreign objects inside the patient (79.6%) was the most commonly agreed upon form of malpractice, whereas failure to break news in entirety (43.9%) was most frequently disagreed. In the event of a medical error, majority (67.7%) were ready to disclose their error to the patient. The most

  15. Malpractice awareness among surgeons at a teaching hospital in Pakistan

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    Sheikh Asfandyar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The duty of a doctor to take care presumes the person who offers medical advice and treatment to unequivocally possess the skills and knowledge to do so. However, a sense of responsibility cannot be guaranteed in the absence of accountability, which in turn requires a comprehensive medical law system to be in place. Such a system is almost non-existent in Pakistan. Keeping the above in mind, we designed this study to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of surgeons regarding malpractice at a tertiary care center in Pakistan. Methods This was an observational, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted during a three month period from 31st March, 2012 to 30th June, 2012 at Civil Hospital, Karachi. Surgeons who were available during the period of our study and had been working in the hospital for at least 6 months were included. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed after seeking informed, written consent. The specialties included were general surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, pediatric surgery, orthopedic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery and gynecology and obstetrics. The study questionnaire comprised of four sections. The first section was concerned with the demographics of the surgeons. The second section analyzed the knowledge of the respondents regarding professional negligence and malpractice. The third section assessed the attitudes surgeons with regard to malpractice. The last section dealt with the general and specific practices and experiences of surgeons regarding malpractice. Results Of the 319 surgeons interviewed, 68.7% were oblivious of the complete definition of malpractice. Leaving foreign objects inside the patient (79.6% was the most commonly agreed upon form of malpractice, whereas failure to break news in entirety (43.9% was most frequently disagreed. In the event of a medical error, majority (67.7% were ready

  16. Audit of colonoscopy practice in Lagos University Teaching Hospital

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    Adedapo Osinowo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent procurement of new endoscopies and accessories led to the reactivation of diagnostic and therapeutic colonoscopy services at our center. A preliminary audit is deemed necessary after a 2-year period of open access colonoscopy. Objective: To assess the pattern of indications, diagnostic yield, and selected key performance indicators in the practice of colonoscopy at our tertiary hospital. Patients and Methods: The endoscopy reports of all patients that underwent colonoscopy from January 2012 to April 2014 were reviewed. The demographic data, indications, and endoscopic findings were recorded. Information on cecal intubation, colonoscopy withdrawal time, polyp detection, adverse events, and bowel preparation quality were also extracted and analyzed. Results: Colonoscopy was performed in 149 patients. They were 81 males and 68 females, aged between 18 and 101 years with a mean of 46.9 ± 22.7 years. 126 (84.5% patients had a colonoscopy for symptomatic conditions while 5 (4% were for screening. Bowel preparation was assessed to be excellent in 81 (54.4%, adequate in 42 (28.2%, and inadequate in 26 (17.4% patients, respectively. The cecal intubation rate (CIR was 80.2%, polyp detection rate 7.4%, average colonoscopy withdrawal time was 6 min 53 s, overall diagnostic yield 55.9% and there were no adverse events. Tumors were seen in 19 patients (10.1%; 13 were located in the rectum, three in the sigmoid and three in the descending colon. Conclusion: The audit revealed that our CIR could be improved by a more effective bowel preparation, increased expertise, and procedure volume of endoscopists. Tumors of the colorectum were detected in 10.1% of patients.

  17. PREVALENCE OF THYROID DISORDERS IN PREGNANCY AT A TEACHING HOSPITAL

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    Guntoory Indira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Thyroid disorders are the second most common endocrinological disorders seen in pregnant women. Thyroid hormone plays a crucial role in pregnancy both in the development of a healthy baby and in maintaining the health of the mother. Several studies have shown a rising prevalence of thyroid disease in India and in South Asian countries. The diagnosis of thyroid disease in pregnancy is difficult as many of the signs and symptoms of thyroid disease are also common to pregnancy. The aim of the study is to determine the prevalence of thyroid disease in pregnant women. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a hospital-based cross-sectional study. 333 antenatal women were screened in their first visit to the antenatal clinic by serum TSH, fT3, fT4. Statistical analysis of the results was done. RESULTS 283 women out of 333 antenatal women screened were found to be euthyroid. 50 women were detected to be having thyroid disorder. 45 women had subclinical hypothyroidism, one woman had overt hypothyroidism and four women had subclinical hyperthyroidism. 4 women had hypothyroidism prior to pregnancy. The overall prevalence of thyroid disorders in pregnancy in our study was found to be 16.21%. CONCLUSION The prevalence was found to be high in our study and in several studies from India and in its neighbouring countries. This is probably due to iodine deficiency being prevalent in several areas in our country. The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism is high. This all the more stresses the need for universal screening of pregnant women for thyroid disease in our country.

  18. Methicillin-resistant staphylococcal contamination of cellular phones of personnel in a veterinary teaching hospital

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    Julian Timothy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital-associated infections are an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in veterinary patients. With the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria, these infections can be particularly difficult to eradicate. Sources of hospital-associated infections can include the patients own flora, medical staff and inanimate hospital objects. Cellular phones are becoming an invaluable feature of communication within hospitals, and since they are frequently handled by healthcare personnel, there may be a potential for contamination with various pathogens. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of contamination of cellular phones (hospital issued and personal carried by personnel at the Ontario Veterinary College Health Sciences Centre with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Results MRSP was isolated from 1.6% (2/123 and MRSA was isolated from 0.8% (1/123 of cellular phones. Only 21.9% (27/123 of participants in the study indicated that they routinely cleaned their cellular phone. Conclusions Cellular phones in a veterinary teaching hospital can harbour MRSP and MRSA, two opportunistic pathogens of significant concern. While the contamination rate was low, cellular phones could represent a potential source for infection of patients as well as infection of veterinary personnel and other people that might have contact with them. Regardless of the low incidence of contamination of cellular phones found in this study, a disinfection protocol for hospital-issued and personal cellular phones used in veterinary teaching hospitals should be in place to reduce the potential of cross-contamination.

  19. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirghani, Hyder O; Elnour, Mohammed A; Taha, Akasha M; Elbadawi, Abdulateef S

    2016-01-01

    Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P 0.05). Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications.

  20. Surveillance of nosocomial infections in the Yaounde University Teaching Hospital, Cameroon.

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    Nouetchognou, Julienne Stéphanie; Ateudjieu, Jérôme; Jemea, Bonaventure; Mesumbe, Edmond Nzene; Mbanya, Dora

    2016-12-08

    Nosocomial infections (NI) represent a real public health problem in developing countries. Their surveillance is recommended to provide needed information for better control. The aim of this study was to describe the frequency and distribution of NI in the Yaoundé University Teaching Hospital (YUTH). It was a longitudinal and descriptive study targeting hospitalized patients in the intensive care, gynaecological, surgical and neonatal units. Each consenting patient was administered a questionnaire at the beginning of the study and followed up daily for the duration of their hospitalization using a standardized grid to detect all nosocomial infections. Cumulative incidence was used to estimate NI frequency. There were 307 patients included. The cumulative incidence and specific mortality rate of NI were 19.21% (16.9-21.5) and 28% (16.2-42.5) respectively. Septicaemia (20.34%), infection of the skin and soft tissues (20.34%) and urinary tract infections (15.25%) were the most frequent type of NI. Klebsiella spp. was the most frequently isolated bacterium (27%). Nosocomial infections contribute to high hospital morbidity in the Yaounde University Teaching Hospital. Strategies need to be identified for a sustainable and continuous monitoring of NI in all health facilities of Cameroon. In addition, Further studies should identify NI determinants and interventions for efficient and better control.

  1. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan

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    Hyder O Mirghani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. Objectives: To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. Results: A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P 0.05. Conclusion: Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications.

  2. Teaching evidence-based practice in the hospital and the library: two different groups, one course.

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    Blake, Lindsay; Ballance, Darra

    2013-01-01

    Key roles in teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) are of interest to many hospital and academic librarians. This article describes how three academic librarians, in collaboration with the academic medical center's EBP Nursing Council, developed a seminar consisting of three credit hours of instruction in the basics of evidence-based practice. The seminar consists of three core elements: basic principles of EBP and finding literature, clinical experience and integration of knowledge into the hospital setting, and patient education and participation. Emphasis is placed upon analysis of the literature, institutional models of practice change, and the importance of patient roles in guideline development.

  3. The design of diagnostic imaging and nuclear medicine facilities in a major new teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The design of the layout and radiation shielding for diagnostic imaging and nuclear medicine facilities in a modern teaching hospital requires the collaboration of persons from a number of professions including architects, engineers, radiologists, nuclear medicine physi cians, medical imaging technologists and medical physicists. This paper discusses the design of such facilities, including PET/CT and T-131 ablation therapy suites for a major new tertiary hospital in Perth. The importance of involving physicists on the planning team from the earliest stages of the design process is stressed, design plans presented, and some of the problems which may present themselves and their solutions are illustrated.

  4. Patients’ Perception on Hospital Quality in a Teaching Hospital of Tehran

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    Samad Azari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and Objectives : Due to unique characteristics of the health sector, measuring the efficiency and quality of services provided are the top priorities of the Ministry of Health and Medical Education. In health systems, an appropriate response to the needs and demands of patients is a priority. This study was conducted to assess hospital’s services quality using logit model for prioritizing service attributes based on patients’ perception in 2012. Material and Methods : In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 330 patients in Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran were entered into the study based on Cochran method. Data were gathered using questionnaire in 5 dimensions and 10 scenarios. Reliability and validity of the questionnaire were approved. Data were input into STATA software 10th edition and utility function was estimated to calculate the marginal utility specifications. Results : According to the patients’ perception, type of examination and treatment was ranked as the first and cleaning services of the departments and toilets was ranked as the last priority. The results about waiting time between hospital arrival until admission was negative which means reverse influence on patient perception of quality. Except cleaning services of the departments and toilets and handling patients, other features had significant relationship with patient preferences. Conclusion : In order to increase the desirability of visiting patients in hospitals and delivering high quality services and considering patient preferences; hospital administrators need to be focused on improving the quality of the programs.

  5. Noncompliance pattern due to medication errors at a Teaching Hospital in Srikot, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Heenopama; Thawani, Vijay; Raina, Rangeel Singh; Kothiyal, Gitanjali; Chakarabarty, Mrinmoy

    2013-01-01

    To study the medication errors leading to noncompliance in a tertiary care teaching hospital. This study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital of a teaching institution from Srikot, Garhwal, Uttarakhand to analyze the medication errors in 500 indoor prescriptions from medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics and ENT departments over five months and 100 outdoor patients of medicine department. Medication error rate for indoor patients was found to be 22.4 % and 11.4% for outdoor patients as against the standard acceptable error rate 3%. Maximum errors were observed in the indoor prescriptions of the surgery department accounting for 44 errors followed by medicine 32 and gynecology 25 in the 500 cases studied leading to faulty administration of medicines. Many medication errors were noted which go against the practice of rational therapeutics. Such studies can be directed to usher in the rational use of medicines for increasing compliance and therapeutic benefits.

  6. Residents’ perception of duty hour limits through teaching hospital accreditation status—experience in Taiwan

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    Tsung-Hsi Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Residents’ work overload is a rising issue in Taiwan. Duty hours of the residents in the United States have been limited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Common Program Requirements since 2003; similar standards were not implemented in Taiwan until 2013. Taiwanese duty hour standards are the work hour limits adopted as part of the required teaching hospital accreditation status. In January 2015, the Ministry of Health and Welfare conducted a national survey for all house officers in Taiwan. We collected data including those on demographics and perceptions of residents regarding duty hour limits. Most respondents reported positive perceptions of the duty hour standards. They felt that these limits will improve resident education, quality of life, and patient safety. The strong incentive to follow the regulations (through teaching hospital accreditation could help protect residents (and patients from unsafe working conditions. However, further studies on the influence of shortened duty hour on professional development are necessary for future improvement.

  7. Patients’ experiences of being nursed by student nurses at a teaching hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Ferdinand C. Mukumbang; Oluyinka Adejumo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Teaching hospitals are medical institutes at which most nursing education institutions provide their students with practical nursing experience. Although the focus of care is the patient, attention is sometimes focused more on the nursing students rather than on the patients who are undergoing care at the hands of both the nursing professionals and students. However, proper nursing care should also take into account the experiences of patients during the care process in the health...

  8. Study of Infertile Couples Attending a Teaching Hospital in Eastern Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Shanti Subedi; Sabina Lamichhane; Manisha Chhetry

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility is a global health issue and a socially destabilizing condition for couples with several stigmas including medical, social, psychological burdens and a marital disharmony. The aim was to study the incidence of infertility in couples attending outdoor of Nobel Medical College and to know the contributing factors among the infertile couples. Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was carried out in the outpatient department of a teaching hospital July 2015-Jun...

  9. PREVALENCE OF VAGINITIS IN FEMALES ATTENDING NATIONAL MEDICAL COLLEGE AND TEACHING HOSPITAL, BIRGUNJ, NEPAL

    OpenAIRE

    Dipak Bhargava*, Sanjay Kar, Abhilasha Saha, Mukesha Saha

    2016-01-01

    Vaginitis which include bacterial vaginosis, vulvovaginal candidiasis and trichomoniasis are the major gynaecological problems associated with the females of reproductive age group. In this study a sincere effort has been put to find out the prevalence of common types of vaginitis in females attending the Gynaecological outpatient Department of National medical college and teaching hospital, Birgunj from 1st January, 2016 to 30th June, 2016. A total of three hundred and thirty high vaginal sw...

  10. Pattern of cardiovascular admissions at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, South East Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Osuji, Charles Ukachukwu; Onwubuya, Emmanuel Ikechukwu; Ahaneku, Gladys Ifesinachi; Omejua, Emeka Godwin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the top killer diseases in the world sparing neither developed or developing countries. The study was carried out to determine the pattern of cardiovascular admissions at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi South East Nigeria. Methods The study was a retrospective study covering the period January 2007 to December 2009. SPSS version 13 software was used to analyze data. Results 537 (15%) patients were admitted into the study ou...

  11. Nurses exposure to workplace violence in a large teaching hospital in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Teymourzadeh, Ehsan; Rashidian, Arash; Arab, Mohammad; Akbari-Sari, Ali; Hakimzadeh, Seyyed Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Background Workplace violence is one of the factors which can strongly reduce job satisfaction and the quality of working life of nurses. The aim of this study was to measure nurses’ exposure to workplace violence in one of the major teaching hospitals in Tehran in 2010. Methods We surveyed the nurses in a cross-sectional design in 2010. The questionnaire was adapted from a standardized questionnaire designed collaboratively by the International Labor Office (ILO), the Inter...

  12. Medical and surgical ward rounds in teaching hospitals of Kuwait University: students’ perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlMutar S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sara AlMutar,1 Lulwa AlTourah,1 Hussain Sadeq,2 Jumanah Karim,2 Yousef Marwan3 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pediatrics, Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Al-Razi Orthopedic Hospital, Kuwait City, Kuwait Background: Teaching sessions for medical students during ward rounds are an essential component of bedside teaching, providing students with the opportunity to regard patients as actual people, and to observe their physical conditions directly, allowing a better understanding of illnesses to be developed. We aim to explore medical students’ perceptions regarding medical and surgical ward rounds within the Faculty of Medicine at Kuwait University, and to evaluate whether this teaching activity is meeting the expectation of learners. Methods: A pretested questionnaire was used to collect data from 141 medical students during the 2012–2013 academic year. They were asked to provide their current and expected ratings about competencies that were supposed to be gained during ward rounds, on a scale from 1 (lowest to 5 (highest. Mean scores were calculated, and the Student t-test was used to compare results. P < 0.05 was the cut-off level for significance. Results: Only 17 students (12.1% declined to participate in the study. The students' current competency scores (for competencies taught within both disciplines – medical and surgical were significantly lower than the scores indicating students’ expectations (P < 0.001. The best-taught competency was bedside examination, in both medical (mean: 3.45 and surgical (mean: 3.05 ward rounds. However, medical ward rounds were better than surgical rounds in covering some competencies, especially the teaching of professional attitude and approach towards patients (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Both medical and surgical ward rounds were deficient in meeting the students’ expectations. Medical educators should utilize the available literature to improve the bedside

  13. Evolving pattern of anaesthesia for caesarean section experience at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadasun, F E; Idehen, H O; Edomwonyi, N P

    2013-01-01

    The WHO puts caesarean section rate in Nigeria at 1.8%. This is much higher in teaching, specialist and referral hospitals. In our centre University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), the average annual rate is 33.4%. General anaesthesia is the predominant choice for caesarean section (C/S) in most centres. The trend is increasing towards regional anaesthesia. Many studies have reported the trend in several centres. This study examined the evolving pattern in our centre. To examine the evolving pattern of anaesthetic technique for caesarean section, at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital. A ten-year retrospective period (2001-2010), data were pooled from the computerized data system of the department of obstetrics and gynaecology. Also, anaesthetic chart and staff records from the department of anaesthesiology were studied. Information about C/S, anaesthetic method and anaesthetist profile were derived from these sources. The data were analysed and presented as simple frequency and nominal data. Six thousand, six hundred and eleven C/S were done over the 10-year period. Emergency C/S was 82%, while 12% were elective cases. Average annual rate of anaesthetic technique used was regional anaesthesia 76.5% and general anaesthesia 23.5%. The use of regional anaesthesia grew from 30% in 2001, to 89% in 2010. Number of anaesthetists increased from 22 in 2001 to 37 in 2010. The study shows an increasing use of regional anaesthesia for C/S, predominantly subarachnoid blockade.

  14. Patients’ experiences of being nursed by student nurses at a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand C. Mukumbang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teaching hospitals are medical institutes at which most nursing education institutions provide their students with practical nursing experience. Although the focus of care is the patient, attention is sometimes focused more on the nursing students rather than on the patients who are undergoing care at the hands of both the nursing professionals and students. However, proper nursing care should also take into account the experiences of patients during the care process in the health facility.Objectives: The study had three objectives: to describe the experiences of patients nursed by student nurses in a teaching hospital in the Western Cape; to identify patterns in the experiences of patients receiving patient care from student nurses; and to analyse aspects of the experiences that may need further attention for the training of student nurses.Method: A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to explore the experiences of patients nursed by student nurses. Participant selection took place purposively from different wards of the identified teaching hospital, and thematic saturation was achieved at 10 participants. The data were collected through in-depth interviews and analysed using thematic content analysis.Results: Three main themes were discovered after data analysis: methods of identification of student nurses by patients; positive perceptions of student nurses by patients; and negative perceptions of student nurses by patients.Conclusion: The findings will inform the clinical supervisors and educational institutions of aspects of the nursing training of student nurses that need improvement and those that require enforcement. 

  15. Awareness and Knowledge of Glaucoma Among Adult Patients at the Eye Clinic of a Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkum, G; Lartey, S; Frimpong, C; Micah, F; Nkum, B

    2015-09-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is an irreversible blinding disease that often presents late because it is symptomless in the early stages. Prognosis depends on early diagnosis and treatment and patient understanding of their condition. Many patients present late because of poor awareness and knowledge. This study was conducted to assess patient's awareness and knowledge of glaucoma in a referral Teaching Hospital. Descriptive cross-sectional study conducted among glaucoma patients aged 40 years and above attending the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH). Patients were selected by simple random sampling. They were recruited after informed consent had been given. A questionnaire on demographics, socio-economics and awareness of glaucoma was administered. There were a total of 117 participants, 61 males and 56 females. The median and modal age group was 50 and 59 years. Amongst the participants, 74% were aware of glaucoma. There were no significant statistical difference in the various age groups, sex, ethnic group or religion and their awareness of glaucoma (P > 0.05).There were statistically significant differences between those who had higher education and their awareness of glaucoma (P < 0.001). Yet only 27% of these had accurate knowledge of glaucoma. Glaucoma awareness in patients attending Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital is high. Higher education was associated with higher awareness yet this was not translated into accurate knowledge as there were significant misconceptions. There is the need to review the contents of health education with the aim of reducing dangerous misconception of glaucoma and targeting the lower socioeconomic population.

  16. Patient safety culture in teaching hospitals in Iran: assessment by the hospital survey on patient safety culture (HSOPSC

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    Mohammad Zakaria Kiaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient safety culture is an important part of improvement in the safety of health care. Knowing its present status is required for development of safety culture. The present study aimed to evaluate the current status of Patient safety culture in hospitals of three central provinces of Iran. Method: The present cross-sectional study was performed in teaching hospitals of Tehran, Alborz, and Qazvin provinces. The standard HSOPSC questionnaire was used for evaluation of the patient safety culture from the viewpoint of 522(Qazvin: 200, Tehran: 312, Alborz: 40 individuals who were randomly selected as workers of the hospitals. The collected data were analyzed using Chi-square and ANOVA tests. Results:The mean positive response to 12 aspects of the patient safety was 62.9%. “Organizational learning” had the highest proportion of positive response (71.18% and “Handoffs & Transitions” had the lowest (54.49%. There was a statistically significant difference in scores of “Teamwork within Units”(p=0.006(,”Manager Expectations & actions promoting”(p=0.014,”organizational learning and continuous improvement”(p=0.001, “Management support”(p=0.007, “Feedback and communication”(p=0.012, and “Communication openness”(p=0.003 among the provinces, respectively. Conclusion: We performed a full assessment of the patient safety culture in the studied provinces. Organizational learning was satisfactory in the hospitals. The studied hospitals need arrangement of safety-based programs and supports of senior administrators to perform more sophisticated efforts and improve the patient safety culture.

  17. Anesthesia Capacity in Ghana: A Teaching Hospital's Resources, and the National Workforce and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, Mark A; Aidoo, Alfred J; Hondras, Maria A; Boateng, Nana A; Antwi-Kusi, Akwasi; Addison, William; Hermanson, Alec R

    2017-12-01

    Quality anesthetic care is lacking in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Global health leaders call for perioperative capacity reports in limited-resource settings to guide improved health care initiatives. We describe a teaching hospital's resources and the national workforce and education in this LMIC capacity report. A prospective observational study was conducted at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Kumasi, Ghana, during 4 weeks in August 2016. Teaching hospital data were generated from observations of hospital facilities and patient care, review of archival records, and interviews with KATH personnel. National data were obtained from interviews with KATH personnel, correspondence with Ghana's anesthesia society, and review of public records. The practice of anesthesia at KATH incorporated preanesthesia clinics, intraoperative management, and critical care. However, there were not enough physicians to consistently supervise care, especially in postanesthesia care units (PACUs) and the critical care unit (CCU). Clean water and electricity were usually reliable in all 16 operating rooms (ORs) and throughout the hospital. Equipment and drugs were inventoried in detail. While much basic infrastructure, equipment, and medications were present in ORs, patient safety was hindered by hospital-wide oxygen supply failures and shortage of vital signs monitors and working ventilators in PACUs and the CCU. In 2015, there were 10,319 anesthetics administered, with obstetric and gynecologic, general, and orthopedic procedures comprising 62% of surgeries. From 2011 to 2015, all-cause perioperative mortality rate in ORs and PACUs was 0.65% or 1 death per 154 anesthetics, with 99% of deaths occurring in PACUs. Workforce and education data at KATH revealed 10 anesthesia attending physicians, 61 nurse anesthetists (NAs), and 7 anesthesia resident physicians in training. At the national level, 70 anesthesia attending physicians and 565 NAs cared for Ghana's population

  18. Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in the Cookridge area of Leeds

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, K; Judd, P M; Lowe, A J; Shaw, J

    2002-01-01

    On the 8 and 9 May 2002 representatives of the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) performed a radiofrequency electromagnetic field survey in the Cookridge area of Leeds in order to assess exposure to radio signals from transmitters mounted on a water tower/a lattice tower and a radio station tower. Guidelines on limiting exposure to radio signals have been published by NRPB and the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). These guidelines are designed to prevent established adverse effects on human health. During this survey, the total exposures due to all radio signals from 30 MHz to 18000 MHz (18 GHz) were measured. This frequency range was chosen as it includes mobile phone base station transmissions, which are at around 900 and 1800 MHz and super high frequency (SHF) transmissions from most of the large microwave dish antennas mounted on the towers. In addition, other major sources of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in the environment such as broadcast radio...

  19. The Effect of Job Demand-Control-Social Support Model on Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Specialized Teaching Hospitals, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Negussie, Nebiat; Kaur, Geetinder

    2016-01-01

    Background The job demand-control-social support model has been widely studied in western countries but has not been theoretically addressed on health workers of sub-Saharan African countries. Therefore, this study investigates the relationship between Job Demand-Control-Support Model and job satisfaction in specialized teaching hospitals in Ethiopia. Method A cross-sectional survey was conducted from September 2014 to May 2015 in three public specialized teaching hospitals in Ethiopia. Among...

  20. The Effect of Service Compact (SERVICOM) on Service Delivery in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Jude Kennedy Emejulu; M. C. Muo; E. E.O. Chukwuemeka

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of service compact (Servicom Service delivery) in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi. Questionnaire and face-to-face interviews were used in the collection of data. The hypotheses were tested using descriptive statistics. The study discovered among other things that with the inauguration of the SERVICOM Charter by the Federal Government of Nigeria, the Management of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi identified key areas that requir...

  1. Job satisfaction of nurses in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negussie, Nebiat

    2016-03-01

    In Ethiopia nurses have played a very important role in providing timely and quality health service in healthcare organizations. However, there is a limited literature in the area of nurses' job satisfaction in Ethiopian public hospitals. The objective of this research is to measure job satisfaction of nurses in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital and to determine the influencing factors. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from January 2012 to June 2012 in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital. All full-time nurses with nonsupervisory management position and more than 1 year of work experience were invited to participate in the study. Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire was used to collect the data. A total of 175 copies of the questionnaires were returned out of 186 copies distributed to the respondents. The results indicated that nurses were not satisfied by their job (mean=2.21, SD=0.52). Remuneration (r=0.71, Pjob advancement (r=0.69, Pjob satisfaction. Job security was associated with highest satisfaction (r=0.41, Pjob advancement were the most important factors for nurses' job satisfaction. Hospital administrators as well as health policy makers need to address the two major identified sources of nurses' job dissatisfaction in the study (i.e. remuneration and narrow opportunity of job advancement) and take appropriate measures to overcome their consequences.

  2. Computer-assisted instruction: a library service for the community teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkel, J; Cook, V

    1986-04-01

    This paper reports on five years of experience with computer-assisted instruction (CAI) at Winthrop-University Hospital, a major affiliate of the SUNY at Stony Brook School of Medicine. It compares CAI programs available from Ohio State University and Massachusetts General Hospital (accessed by telephone and modem), and software packages purchased from the Health Sciences Consortium (MED-CAPS) and Scientific American (DISCOTEST). The comparison documents one library's experience of the cost of these programs and the use made of them by medical students, house staff, and attending physicians. It describes the space allocated for necessary equipment, as well as the marketing of CAI. Finally, in view of the decision of the National Board of Medical Examiners to administer the Part III examination on computer (the so-called CBX) starting in 1988, the paper speculates on the future importance of CAI in the community teaching hospital.

  3. Neonatal mortality and morbidity in the post-implementation period of a neonatal teaching program in provincial hospitals in Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S; Bounnack, S; Hoehn, T

    2018-01-01

    Aim of this study was to analyze neonatal mortality and morbidity in the post-implementation period of a neonatal teaching program to examine a possible impact on neonatal outcomes. This study is a retrospective data analysis of all neonatal patients treated in five provincial hospitals in Laos after implementation of a neonatal teaching program. A simulation-based teaching program aims to have positive impact on the theoretical and practical skill of hospital staff in the field of newborn care. A comparison between pre-implementation and post-implementation data of newborns admitted to provincial hospitals in Laos was used to quantify the effect of repetitive teaching on neonatal outcomes. Neonatal mortality and morbidity as well as case fatality rates of infections and asphyxia decreased in the post-implementation period. In contrast, neonatal mortality rate as well as case fatality rate of prematurity increased. The total neonatal mortality rate increased in the post-implementation period. The pre-implementation and post-implementation data enable longitudinal comparisons between hospitals and highlight the differences between hospitals concerning neonatal mortality and morbidity in provincial hospitals in Laos. These data can serve as a basis for an individual adaption of the teaching program to the unique requirements of each single hospital. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Job satisfaction among hospital staff working in a Government teaching hospital of India

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    Poonam Jaiswal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In a resource-limited and high burden disease setting, satisfied human resource is an asset in terms of high productivity, efficiency and quality care. Aim: To assess job satisfaction among permanent employees working in a government hospital. Materials and Methods: A sample of 200 staff members was interviewed using 34-item, Likert response based, modified job satisfaction scale. Key factors for job satisfaction were identified after subjecting data to principal component analysis, varimax rotation and multivariate analysis using step-wise regression procedure. Results: The mean job satisfaction index was computed to be in a similar range, but was found to be highest for nurses (0.68, followed by doctors (0.66, support staff (0.63 and technicians (0.62. Nine uncorrelated and critical factors related to job satisfaction that explained 68.09% of the variability was identified, that is, communication, pay/salary, working conditions, organization supervision system, co-workers, workload, benefits, career aspects and rewards. A positive association was reported between job satisfaction score and factor scores (units of communication (0.133, benefits (0.110, working condition (0.027 and co-workers (0.032 and a negative relation with organizational supervision system (0.118, workload (0.093, rewards (0.035, pay/salary (0.034 and career prospects (0.017 respectively for all categories of respondents. However in case of doctors, co-workers (0.023 units showed a negative relation. Conclusion: There is scope for interventions to enhance job satisfaction and concomitant continuous monitoring can be useful in determining various service aspects that necessitate improvement. By enhancing job satisfaction, hospital administrator can improve not only the mental, psychological and social well-being of work-force, but also the financial health of an organization.

  5. Associations between teaching effectiveness scores and characteristics of presentations in hospital medicine continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratelle, John T; Wittich, Christopher M; Yu, Roger C; Newman, James S; Jenkins, Sarah M; Beckman, Thomas J

    2015-09-01

    There is little research regarding characteristics of effective continuing medical education (CME) presentations in hospital medicine (HM). Therefore, we sought to identify associations between validated CME teaching effectiveness scores and characteristics of CME presentations in the field of HM. This was a cross-sectional study of participants and didactic presentations from a national HM CME course in 2014. Participants provided CME teaching effectiveness (CMETE) ratings using an instrument with known validity evidence. Overall CMETE scores (5-point scale: 1 = strongly disagree; 5 = strongly agree) were averaged for each presentation, and associations between scores and presentation characteristics were determined using the Kruskal-Wallis test. The threshold for statistical significance was set at P teaching effectiveness scores and characteristics of effective CME presentations in HM. Our findings, which support previous research in other fields, indicate that CME presentations may be improved by increasing interactivity through the use of audience response systems and allowing longer presentations. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  6. Teaching Hospital ,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (42.4 percent) were infants, 15 (45.5 percent) pre-school children and four (12.1 percent) were school-aged children. A majority (93.9 percent) of the patients were infected with the HIV-1 strain, while the route of transmission was predominantly vertical. The main clinical features at presentation were chronic diarrhoea (69.7 ...

  7. Predicting future staffing needs at teaching hospitals: use of an analytical program with multiple variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine C; Ashley, Stanley W; Zinner, Michael J; Moore, Francis D

    2007-04-01

    To develop a model to predict future staffing for the surgery service at a teaching hospital. Tertiary hospital. A computer model with potential future variables was constructed. Some of the variables were distribution of resident staff, fellows, and physician extenders; salary/wages; work hours; educational value of rotations; work units, inpatient wards, and clinics; future volume growth; and efficiency savings. Outcomes Number of staff to be hired, staffing expense, and educational impact. On a busy general surgery service, we estimated the impact of changes in resident work hours, service growth, and workflow efficiency in the next 5 years. Projecting a reduction in resident duty hours to 60 hours per week will require the hiring of 10 physician assistants at a cost of $1 134 000, a cost that is increased by $441 000 when hiring hospitalists instead. Implementing a day of didactic and simulator time (10 hours) will further increase the costs by $568 000. A 10% improvement in the efficiency of floor care, as might be gained by advanced information technology capability or by regionalization of patients, can mitigate these expenses by as much as 21%. On the other hand, a modest annual growth of 2% will increase the costs by $715 000 to $2 417 000. To simply replace residents with alternative providers requires large amounts of human and fiscal capital. The potential for simple efficiencies to mitigate some of this expense suggests that traditional patterns of care in teaching hospitals will have to change in response to educational mandates.

  8. Adherence to oral anti-diabetic drugs among patients attending a Ghanaian teaching hospital

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    Bruce SP

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The burden of diabetes mellitus, especially Type-2, continues to increase across the world. Medication adherence is considered an integral component in its management. Poor glycemic controls due to medication nonadherence accelerates the development of long-term complications which consequently leads to increased hospitalization and mortality. Objective: This study examined the level of adherence to oral antidiabetic drugs among patients who visited the teaching hospital and explored the probable contributory factors to non-adherence. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study using systematic sampling to collect quantitative data was undertaken. Questionnaires were administered to out-patients of the medical department of a teaching hospital in Ghana. Logistic regression was performed with statistical significance determined at p<0.05. Results: A total of 200 diabetic patients participated in the study. Using the Morisky Medication Adherence scale, the level of adherence determined was 38.5%. There were significant correlations between level of adherence and educational level [(OR=1.508; (CI 0.805- 2.825, P=0.019, and mode of payment [(OR=1.631; (CI 0.997- 2.669, P=0.05. Conclusion: Adherence in diabetic patients was low among respondents and this can be improved through education, counseling and reinforcement of self-care. There were several possible factors that contributed to the low adherence rate which could benefit from further studies.

  9. Patient education process in teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedin, Hesam; Goharinezhad, Salime; Vatankhah, Soodabeh; Azmal, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Patient education is widely recognized as a core component of nursing. Patient education can lead to quality outcomes including adherence, quality of life, patients' knowledge of their illness and self-management. This study aimed to clarify patient education process in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013. In this descriptive quantitative study, the sample covered 187 head nurses selected from ten teaching hospitals through convenience sampling. Data were collected with a questionnaire developed specifically for this study. The questionnaire measured patient education process in four dimensions: need assessment, planning, implementing and evaluating. The overall mean score of patient education was 3.326±0.0524. Among the four dimensions of the patient education process, planning was in the highest level (3.570±0.0591) and the lowest score belonged to the evaluation of patient education (2.840 ±0.0628). Clarifying patient education steps, developing standardized framework and providing easily understandable tool-kit of the patient education program will improve the ability of nurses in delivering effective patient education in general and specialized hospitals.

  10. Assessment of Safety Condition in One of the Teaching Hospitals in Kermanshah (2015: A Case Study

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    Masod Ghanbari Kakavand

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Many working conditions-related stress factors that can produce injuries and illnesses are important in hospital environments. So, the health and safety of nurses and patients from workplace-induced injuries and illnesses is important. In this study, we have assessed the safety condition of one of the teaching hospitals in Kermanshah (2015. Materials and Methods: This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted in one of the teaching hospital of Kermanshah University of medical sciences. For this aim a checklist was prepared based on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's standards and Part 3 of the manual of National Building Regulations. These checklists comprised (The final checklist had 239 questions of 9 dimensions various sections of safety including; fire safety, building safety, electrical safety, emergency exit routes safety, heating and cooling equipment safety, operating room and laundry room and salty home safety. Eventually, using SPSS 16 and descriptive statistics, data were analyzed. Results: According to the results of this study, 66.6% of the units had poor safety and 33.4% of them were moderately safe. As well as, only ICU and CCU unit, heating and cooling equipment and operational room showed moderate compliance with safety requirements and other sections were poorly complied. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that safety conditions of hospital were not at favorable level. These poor safety statues can jeopardize patients and hospital personnel. Thus some interventions such as improvement of working conditions, compliance with safety acts and implementation of health, safety and environmental management system would be necessary.

  11. Analysis of pediatric dermatology inpatient consultations in a pediatric teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Fatma S

    2017-12-01

    Although skin diseases are associated with low rate of hospitalization, dermatological manifestations are frequent in hospitalized patients. The aim of the study was to describe the inpatient dermatological consultations in a pediatric teaching hospital. Recorded data from inpatient pediatric dermatology consultation requests on a total of 539 consecutive inpatients (aged 0-18 years) from January 2004 to April 2010 were analyzed for consult diagnosis, dermatological disease group, primary diagnosis, requesting department, diagnostic pattern, treatment modality and referral to another department. Of the 539 inpatients, 310 (57.51%) were males and 229 (42.49%) were females. The most frequent requesting department was general pediatrics (37.5%) followed by oncology (15.6%) and pediatric surgery (11.1%). Most of the patients (32.1%) had been hospitalized for dermatological or related disease followed by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (4.1%), chronic renal failure (2.6%), bronchopneumonia (2.6%) and epilepsy (2.4%). Allergic skin diseases (47.1%) were the leading group of dermatoses, which were followed by infectious diseases (14.7%), and systemic diseases with cutaneous manifestations (10.2%). Atopic dermatitis (7.4%) and unclassified eczema (7.4%) were the most frequent dermatoses followed by papular urticaria (5.4%). Most of the patients (80.0%) had diagnosis on clinical basis, whereas skin biopsy was performed in 15.9% and laboratory investigation in 4.1% of the patients. Local treatment was applied to 50.8% of the patients, systemic treatment to 5.8%, local and systemic treatment together to 31.0% while no treatment was given to 11.1%. Only 1.9% of the patients were referred to another department. This study provided important data on the spectrum of skin disorders and their management in pediatric inpatients from the consultation perspective in a pediatric teaching hospital with multispecialty clinics.

  12. Managing daily surgery schedules in a teaching hospital: a mixed-integer optimization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Raul; Aguirre, Adrian M; Ortega-Mier, Miguel; García-Sánchez, Álvaro; Méndez, Carlos A

    2014-10-15

    This study examined the daily surgical scheduling problem in a teaching hospital. This problem relates to the use of multiple operating rooms and different types of surgeons in a typical surgical day with deterministic operation durations (preincision, incision, and postincision times). Teaching hospitals play a key role in the health-care system; however, existing models assume that the duration of surgery is independent of the surgeon's skills. This problem has not been properly addressed in other studies. We analyze the case of a Spanish public hospital, in which continuous pressures and budgeting reductions entail the more efficient use of resources. To obtain an optimal solution for this problem, we developed a mixed-integer programming model and user-friendly interface that facilitate the scheduling of planned operations for the following surgical day. We also implemented a simulation model to assist the evaluation of different dispatching policies for surgeries and surgeons. The typical aspects we took into account were the type of surgeon, potential overtime, idling time of surgeons, and the use of operating rooms. It is necessary to consider the expertise of a given surgeon when formulating a schedule: such skill can decrease the probability of delays that could affect subsequent surgeries or cause cancellation of the final surgery. We obtained optimal solutions for a set of given instances, which we obtained through surgical information related to acceptable times collected from a Spanish public hospital. We developed a computer-aided framework with a user-friendly interface for use by a surgical manager that presents a 3-D simulation of the problem. Additionally, we obtained an efficient formulation for this complex problem. However, the spread of this kind of operation research in Spanish public health hospitals will take a long time since there is a lack of knowledge of the beneficial techniques and possibilities that operational research can offer for

  13. Evaluation of Parenteral Nutritional Support in the Surgical and Medical Wards of a Referral Teaching Hospital

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    Samaneh Bairami

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose:Malnutrition is a common problem in patients who are hospitalized in surgical and medical wards. Surgical patients, geriatric populations and individuals with severe illness are more vulnerable to malnutrition during their hospitalization course.The purpose of this study was evaluation of parenteral nutrition services in a referral teaching hospital, Tehran, Iran.Method:Medical records of 72 patients who received parenteral nutrition during one year period in different surgical and medical wards of Imam Khomeini hospital were reviewed retrospectively by clinical pharmacists. Criteria for initiation of parenteral nutrition, selection of appropriate formulation and monitoring parameters were assessed based on the American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition recommendations.Results:Based on the patients’ anthropometric parameters and serum albumin levels, 4.2%, 75% and 20.8% of the patients were well-nourished, moderately malnourished and severely malnourished respectively at the hospital admission and before nutritional support. Adequate calorie, protein, carbohydrate and lipid supports were achieved in 21.1%, 32.4%, 23.7% and 10.5% of the patients respectively. About 91% of the patients experienced at least onecomplication of the nutritional support.Conclusion:In this evaluation, several errors in assessment, establishing goals, and monitoring of parenteral nutrition regimens have been detected. Approximately all of the patients did notreceive to the trace elements supports goals.

  14. Evaluation of parenteral nutritional support in the surgical and medical wards of a referral teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bairami Samaneh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Malnutrition is a common problem in patients who are hospitalized in surgical and medical wards. Surgical patients, geriatric populations and individuals with severe illness are more vulnerable to malnutrition during their hospitalization course. The purpose of this study was evaluation of parenteral nutrition services in a referral teaching hospital, Tehran, Iran. Method Medical records of 72 patients who received parenteral nutrition during one year period in different surgical and medical wards of Imam Khomeini hospital were reviewed retrospectively by clinical pharmacists. Criteria for initiation of parenteral nutrition, selection of appropriate formulation and monitoring parameters were assessed based on the American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition recommendations. Results Based on the patients' anthropometric parameters and serum albumin levels, 4.2%, 75% and 20.8% of the patients were well-nourished, moderately malnourished and severely malnourished respectively at the hospital admission and before nutritional support. Adequate calorie, protein, carbohydrate and lipid supports were achieved in 21.1%, 32.4%, 23.7% and 10.5% of the patients respectively. About 91% of the patients experienced at least one complication of the nutritional support. Conclusion In this evaluation, several errors in assessment, establishing goals, and monitoring of parenteral nutrition regimens have been detected. Approximately all of the patients did not receive to the trace elements supports goals.

  15. HEALTH WORKERS' PERCEPTIONON THE QUALITY OF SERVICE AND CORPORATE CULTURE OF A TEACHING HOSPITAL IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Etukumana Etiobong; Bassey, Orie Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Quality of service delivery remains the most important issue in hospitals since patients expect higher standard care and services. This quality service is rooted in the culture of the health care organization. Therefore,this study seeks to determine health workers' perception on the quality of service and corporate culture at University of Uyo Teaching hospital, Uyo, Nigeria. A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out. Using structured questionnaire and convenient sampling technique, data were collected from 250 hospital workers.The responses on questions to elicit the hospital's quality of service and corporate culture were rated on a five-point Likert Scale as follows; Strongly Agree (SA), Agree (A), Neutral(N), Disagree (D) and Strongly Disagree (SD). Data entry and analysis were performed using Epi Info 3.2.2 (CDC, Atlanta, Georgia, USA). The minimum and maximum ages of the respondents were 21 years and 60 years respectively. The mean, median and mode ages in the respondents were 34.6 (± 7.88) years, 33 years, and 30 years respectively. Majority of the study respondents were in the age group of 31-40 years (30%), female (56.8%) and Doctors (36%). The respondents' positive perception on quality of service offered by the hospital was 69.2% (OR 5.05, 95% CI 3.39-7.52, P corporate culture to achieve a higher quality of service.

  16. Universidad de Leeds - Gran Bretaña

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamberlin, -

    1977-11-01

    Full Text Available Located 1,500 m from the center of the city, the Leeds University complex actively participates in city life. Designed in the 60's and built later on, this architectonic complex is outstanding because it offers an «ideal» city, perfectly integrated in the «real» city and conditioned to its own needs, to a great extent. In the beginning, this challenge of converting this university complex with a capacity for 10,000 students, in an architectonically attractive urban center met with difficulties referring to traffic and parking problems corresponding to a city as large as the one projected; this obstacle was overcome by adequate organization of underground and overhead traffic arteries which reserved large garden areas exclusively for pedestrians, freeing them from the traffic congestion and offering the pleasant and relaxed atmosphere required. The large «campus» ¡s sub-divided into different garden areas, connected one to the other and In the center of each one we have a varied and complementary architecture, which breaks with the conventional monolithic style.Situado a 1.500 m del centro de la ciudad, el conjunto universitario de Leeds participa activamente de la misma. Concebido en la década de los 60, y construido posteriormente, este complejo arquitectónico se destaca por encerrar una propuesta de ciudad «ideal», perfectamente integrada en la ciudad «real» y sujeta en buena medida a sus mismas necesidades. La alternativa de convertir a este conjunto universitario, con capacidad para 10.000 estudiantes, en un núcleo urbano arquitectónicamente atractivo, tropezó inicialmente con los condicionamientos surgidos del tráfico, circulación y estacionamiento de vehículos, correspondientes a la magnitud de la ciudad proyectada; impedimento que fue resuelto de forma adecuada mediante la organización de una red subterránea y superficial de circulación vehicular, que reserva grandes espacios verdes para la circulaci

  17. Why are urban hospital costs so high? The relative importance of patient source of admission, teaching, competition, and case mix.

    OpenAIRE

    Thorpe, K E

    1988-01-01

    This article examines factors accounting for higher costs in urban hospitals as well as their relative contribution to those costs. The costs of urban hospitals are influenced by case mix, wages, competition, the ratio of forecasted to actual admissions, teaching, and the percentage of patients admitted through the emergency room. The bulk of the higher costs in urban hospitals are linked to graduate medical education. Treatment of poor patients and the admission of patients through the emerg...

  18. Role and Structure of Morning Report in Children’s Teaching Hospitals in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliheh Kadivar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Morning report is an integral component of medical training programs. It is conducted as "evidence based" or "problem based". It takes an efficient time of all members of the medical team in teaching hospitals, it seems necessary to evaluate its role in the education. Because of the importance of morning report in education, we evaluated the current and ideal conditions of morning report according to the opinions of medical teams in teaching children’s hospitals. Methods: A cross- sectional descriptive study conducted in three children’s teaching hospitals in Tehran in 2005. The opinion and perception of 358 participants, including faculties, residents, fellows, interns, and medical students, were collected by a questionnaire regarding the importance and structure of morning report. The data were presented as frequency and percentage. Results: 78% of respondents expected a high educational role for morning report. Although 317(88.54% had a regular attendance in morning report, only 34.1% were satisfied from current condition. The majority believed that faculty had better to lead the sessions, and voted for case presentation to be selected by senior resident on call, despite the prominent current leadership of the faculty. Most of the participants (88.6% preferred complicated and unusual cases for presentation. Current morning reports predominantly based on the presentation of the interesting or complicated cases were admitted on the previous day. A few number of cases were reintroduced after achieving the final diagnosis. In addition out-patients and those under observation in emergency room were usually ignored in the meetings. Conclusion: Regarding the educational role of morning report, there is a far distance between the present and ideal condition. Unattractiveness of presentations and poor participation in discussion might have negative impact on achieving the goals.

  19. A survey of digital radiography practice in four South African teaching hospitals: an illuminative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyathi, T; Chirwa, Tf; van der Merwe, Dg

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess radiographer familiarity and preferences with digital radiography in four teaching hospitals and thereafter make recommendations in line with the migration from screen film to digital radiography. A questionnaire was designed to collect data from either qualified or student radiographers from four teaching hospitals. From the four teaching hospitals, there were a total of 205 potential respondents. Among other things, responses regarding experiences and preferences with digital radiography, quality control procedures, patient dose, advantages and disadvantages of digital radiography were sought. The information collected was based on self-reporting by the participants. The study is exploratory in nature and descriptive statistics were generated from the collected data using Microsoft Excel 2007 and StatsDirect software. Sixty-three out of 205 (31%) radiographers from all the four radiology centers responded to the circulated questionnaire. Only 15% (8) of the qualified radiographers had 4 or more years of experience with digital radiography compared to 68% (36) for the same amount of experience with screen-film radiography. Sixty-one percent (38) of the participants had been exposed to digital radiography during their lectures while at university. A small proportion, 16% (10) of the respondents underwent formal training in quality control procedures on the digital X-ray units they were using. Slightly more than half (55%) of the participants felt it was easier for them to retake an image in digital radiography than in screen film radiography. The results of this survey showed that the participants are familiar with digital radiography and have embraced this relatively new technology as shown by the fact that they can identify both its advantages and disadvantages as applied to clinical practice. However, there are minimal quality control procedures specific to digital radiography being undertaken as such there is need for

  20. Tetanus immunization: perception of residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Western India

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    Dhande Priti P, Beri Shirish G, Patel Hardik R

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevention of tetanus is far easier than its treatment where mortality is very high. Most cases of tetanus occur due to lack of proper vaccination against the disease and incomplete immunization on exposure. Residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital constitute the first contact physicians for patients. Aim: To assess the perception about Tetanus immunization among residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Pune city. Methodology: A pre tested questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge & recommendations about tetanus immunization among randomly selected 157 residents. Results: 73.25% residents were not aware of the number of doses of tetanus vaccine recommended for children under the age of 16 years. Around 50% residents were not aware of the recommended number of doses of tetanus vaccine for adults over the age of 16 years and during pregnancy. Nearly 60% of the residents considered the wound after every injury to be tetanus prone. 75.8% of residents thought burn injuries to be prone to the development of tetanus while 13.4% and 36.9% of the residents did not consider animal bite and human bite to be tetanus prone respectively. 99.4% residents considered tetanus toxoid administration in wound with rusted iron. The knowledge regarding tetanus immunization in relation to the wound categories depending on the immunization status of the patients was very poor amongst the residents. Conclusion: Better awareness and adherence of tetanus prophylaxis recommendations is needed in residents who are the first tier of health care providers in teaching hospitals.

  1. Quality assessment of clinical education services in teaching hospitals located in Kerman, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi-Feyzabadi, Vahid; Gozashti, Mohammad Hossein; Komsari, Samane; Mohammadtaghizadeh, Sedigheh; Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza

    2015-11-01

    Clinical education is one of the most important components of the resource generation function of health systems, and it has a very important role in graduates' competency with respect to effective, practical education. This study aimed to assess the quality of clinical services in Kerman's teaching hospitals located in southeastern Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011 on 303 medical students at different levels of medical education at Kerman's teaching hospitals. A modified SERVQUAL instrument was used to collect the data after its validity and reliability were checked. The data were analyzed by SPSS 18.0 using the paired t-test, Kruskal-Wallis, and post hoc tests, when appropriate. In all five dimensions of quality, gaps were observed between students' perceptions and expectations as follows: Assurance (mean = -1.18), Responsiveness (-1.56), Empathy (-1.4), Reliability (-1.27), and Tangibles (-1.21). There was a significant difference between the quality perceptions and expectations of the medical students (p < 0.001). A significant difference was observed between three educational levels, including externships, internships, and assistantships regarding the dimensions of the quality gaps (p < 0.001). The clinical services provided by teaching hospitals in the study did not meet the students' expectations at any of the three educational levels. As we precisely assessed the dimensions and items that had the higher quality gaps, it was apparent that, for most part, clinical education officials could improve the quality by designing interventions, which would not be very difficult to do.

  2. Study of the local structure of binary surfaces by electron diffraction (XPS, LEED)

    OpenAIRE

    Gereová, Katarína

    2006-01-01

    Study of local structure of binary surface with usage of ultra-thin film of cerium deposited on a Pd (111) single-crystal surface is presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction (XPS, XPD), angle resolved UV photoemission spectroscopy (ARUPS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) was used for our investigations. LEED and X-ray excited photoemission intensities results represent a surface-geometrical structure. As well, mapping of ultra-violet photoelectron intensities as a...

  3. Fibreoptic gastro-intestinal endoscopy at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, Kofi N; Archampong, Emmanuel Q

    2017-12-01

    Fibreoptic (or Flexible) endoscopy has revolutionized and completely transformed practice of gastroenterology, and many other medical specialties, over the past half century or so. At the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra the development of this facility has evolved gradually, especially involving specialists from the Departments of Medicine and Surgery since the 1970s. This article is an attempt to trace and record this journey and to highlight some of the problems and challenges yet to be overcome. It is an anecdotal account based on the authors' recollection with attempts at verification of important dates.

  4. Six cases of sepsis caused by Pantoea agglomerans in a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberto, Maria Carla; Matera, Giovanni; Puccio, Rossana; Lo Russo, Teresa; Colosimo, Elena; Focà, Emanuele

    2009-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans is an environmental organism which may seldom cause opportunistic infections. Here we report on a 6 case outbreak in a teaching hospital. Within three months . agglomerans was isolated from blood cultures of 5 patients from oncology and 1 patient from ICU departments. P. agglomerans was in pure culture in 5 cases, while in the last one Rahnella aquatilis and Candida famata were also isolated. Therefore, P. agglomerans is able to produce nosocomial infections in patients with primary pathology often associated with immune suppression.

  5. Clinical features and the role of atypical pathogens in nursing and healthcare-associated pneumonia (NHCAP): differences between a teaching university hospital and a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Akaike, Hiroto; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Hayashi, Toshikiyo; Kurihara, Takeyuki; Okimoto, Niro

    2012-01-01

    The Japan Respiratory Society documented a new category of guidelines for nursing and healthcare-associated pneumonia (NHCAP), which is distinct from community acquired pneumonia (CAP). The objective of this study was to determine the epidemiological differences between NHCAP patients in a teaching university hospital and a community hospital. In addition, to clarify the strategy for treatment of NHCAP, we investigated the role of atypical pathogens. We analyzed 250 NHCAP and 421 CAP cases in a university hospital and 349 NHCAP and 374 CAP cases in a community hospital. Patient age and the incidences of poor general condition were significantly higher in the community hospital compared with those in the university hospital. The distribution and frequency of pathogens, especially multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, were significantly different between the two hospitals. Central nervous system disorders, dementia and poor performance status, which was possibility related to aspiration pneumonia, were significantly more frequent in patients with NHCAP compared with those with CAP in both hospitals. Atypical pathogens were detected in a few cases in patients with NHCAP. There were many differences in the clinical characteristics between NHCAP patients in a university hospital and a community hospital even for hospitals located in the same area. Aspiration pneumonia was thought to be the main characteristic of NHCAP in both hospitals. Thus, all NHCAP patients did not need the same empiric therapy with a multidrug regimen directed against MDR pathogens. In addition, physicians rarely need to consider atypical pathogens in NHCAP treatment.

  6. Knowledge and power necessary to reconstruct nursing after management changes at a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino, Elizabeth; Felli, Vanda Elisa Andres

    2008-01-01

    This study was carried out at a teaching hospital in Southern Brazil, which adopted a management model that provoked the dismantling of the nursing service and the disbandment of nursing professionals. Its general goal was to promote changes that would be implemented in the re-organization of nursing work. It is a case study with a historical-dialectic approach, whose data were collected in March and April 2005 through the focal group technique. The study subjects were eight nurses, two technicians and two nursing auxiliaries. Data were analyzed through thematic content analysis. Results evidenced that the greatest challenges nursing faced at this hospital were: to construct a new identity, carry out teamwork while maintaining its professional identity, acquire visibility in the institution, change care and expand management.

  7. Prevalence of pressure ulcers in three university teaching hospitals in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Paul

    2012-02-03

    AIM: Pressure ulceration is a significant, but preventable, cause of morbidity and resource utilisation in hospital populations. Data on pressure ulcer prevalence in Ireland are limited. This study aims to determine (i) the point-prevalence of pressure ulcers in three teaching hospitals in Ireland and (ii) risk factors for their development. METHODS: Eight teams of one doctor and one nurse visited 672 adult patients over a 2-day period in three teaching hospitals. Each patient was examined and pressure ulcers graded with the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel system. Mental test score, Barthel index, type of support surface, length of stay, documentation of risk assessment and serum albumin were recorded. RESULTS: Point-prevalence of pressure ulceration was 18.5%. Seventy-seven percent of pressure ulcers were hospital-acquired, 49% grade 1, 37% grade 2, 11% grade 3 and 3% grade 4. Reduced mobility, urinary incontinence, cognitive impairment, low serum albumin and length of stay were significantly associated with pressure ulcers. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found reduced mobility (odds ratio 8.84; 95% CI 5.04-15.48, p<0.0001) and length of stay (odds ratio 1.02; 95% CI 1.01-1.02, p<0.0001) to be predictive of the presence of pressure ulcers. Age, gender and risk assessment documentation were not associated with pressure ulcers. Sixty-five percent of patients with pressure ulcers were positioned on appropriate support surfaces. DISCUSSION: Point-prevalence of pressure ulceration was 18.5%, similar to international data. Regular audit of prevalence, prevention and management strategies may raise awareness, influence resource allocation and ultimately improve patient care.

  8. Prescription Pattern of Analgesic Drugs for Patients Receiving Palliative Care in a Teaching Hospital in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Vishma Hydie; Nair, Shoba N; Soumya, M S; Tarey, S D

    2016-01-01

    Drugs used in the palliative care unit for managing symptoms are major contributors toward the expenditure occurring in palliative care. This study was conducted to understand the prescription pattern of analgesic drugs in the patients who are receiving palliative care in a teaching hospital in India by a retrospective study of case records. Case record based, retrospective, descriptive study was conducted at the Pain and Palliative Care Department of St. John's Medical College Hospital, Bengaluru. Case record files of all patients referred to Pain and Palliative Care Department for the treatment of pain in the year of 2012 were studied. Patients' age, gender, diagnoses, numerical pain rating scale (0-10), drugs prescribed, dosage, frequency, route of administration were recorded. The difference in drug utilization between the genders was done using Chi-square test. Data were collected from 502 patients of which 280 (56%) were males and 222 (44%) were females. Twelve percent of patients had mild pain (1-3), 34% had moderate pain (4-6), and 54% had severe pain (7-10). The most commonly used analgesic drugs were opioids (47%), followed by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (36%). The opioids used were tramadol (56%), and morphine (38%). Ninety percent of patients with numerical pain scale more than 6 received morphine. There was no difference in analgesic drug utilization with regards to gender. Prescription pattern differed depending on the severity of pain. Opioids were the most commonly used drugs for pain management. The study shows that prescription pattern in palliative care unit of this hospital was in accordance with WHO pain management guidelines. The study showed the current trend in prescription of analgesic drugs in the teaching hospital where the study was conducted.

  9. Chi-Square Test of Word of Mouth Marketing with Impact on the Evaluation of Patients' Hospital and Services: An Application in Teaching and Research Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelda ŞENER

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study, using data provided from 223 inpatients in a teaching and research hospital, hospital’s preference is to explain the effect of word of mouth marketing. For this purpose, word of mouth marketing process is evaluated in terms of providing information about the hospital and the patient’s level of intimacy, both of patients and information provider’s level of expertise with related to hospital and services, the patient’s perceived level of risk for hospitals and services and providing information’s level of impact on patient being treated in hospital. The obtain data, after evaluation by frequency distributions these factors impact on word of mouth marketing is demonstrated by descriptive statistics, chi-square analysis and pearson’s correlation analysis. As a result of this study is concluded word of mouth marketing on the training and research hospital is preferred by the patints to have a significant impact.

  10. Simulation-Based Dysphagia Training: Teaching Interprofessional Clinical Reasoning in a Hospital Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Anna; Friary, Philippa; Jackson, Bianca; Sekula, Julia; Braakhuis, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated hospital readiness and interprofessional clinical reasoning in speech-language pathology and dietetics students following a simulation-based teaching package. Thirty-one students participated in two half-day simulation workshops. The training included orientation to the hospital setting, part-task skill learning and immersive simulated cases. Students completed workshop evaluation forms. They filled in a 10-question survey regarding confidence, knowledge and preparedness for working in a hospital environment before and immediately after the workshops. Students completed written 15-min clinical vignettes at 1 month prior to training, immediately prior to training and immediately after training. A marking rubric was devised to evaluate the responses to the clinical vignettes within a framework of interprofessional education. The simulation workshops were well received by all students. There was a significant increase in students' self-ratings of confidence, preparedness and knowledge following the study day (p training with the greatest increase in clinical reasoning (p training has benefits in developing hospital readiness and clinical reasoning in allied health students.

  11. Questionnaire survey of working relationships between nurses and doctors in University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbimi, Roseline I; Adebamowo, Clement A

    2006-02-21

    Smooth working relationships between nurses and doctors are necessary for efficient health care delivery. However, previous studies have shown that this is often absent with negative impact on the quality of health care delivery. In 2002, we studied factors that affect nurse-doctor working relationships in University Teaching Hospitals (UTH) in Southern Nigeria in order to characterize it and identify managerial and training needs that might be used to improve it. Questionnaire survey of doctors and nurses working in four UTH in Southern Nigeria was done in 2002. The setting and subjects were selected by random sampling procedures. Information on factors in domains of work, union activities, personnel and hospital management were studied using closed and open-ended questionnaires. Nurse-doctor working relationships were statistically significantly affected by poor after-work social interaction, staff shortages, activist unionism, disregard for one's profession, and hospital management and government policies. In general, nurses had better opinion of doctors' work than doctors had about nurses' work. Working relationships between doctors and nurses need to be improved through improved training and better working conditions, creation of better working environment, use of alternative methods of conflict resolution and balanced hospital management and government policies. This will improve the retention of staff, job satisfaction and efficiency of health care delivery in Nigeria.

  12. Questionnaire survey of working relationships between nurses and doctors in University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebamowo Clement A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smooth working relationships between nurses and doctors are necessary for efficient health care delivery. However, previous studies have shown that this is often absent with negative impact on the quality of health care delivery. In 2002, we studied factors that affect nurse-doctor working relationships in University Teaching Hospitals (UTH in Southern Nigeria in order to characterize it and identify managerial and training needs that might be used to improve it. Method Questionnaire survey of doctors and nurses working in four UTH in Southern Nigeria was done in 2002. The setting and subjects were selected by random sampling procedures. Information on factors in domains of work, union activities, personnel and hospital management were studied using closed and open-ended questionnaires. Results Nurse-doctor working relationships were statistically significantly affected by poor after-work social interaction, staff shortages, activist unionism, disregard for one's profession, and hospital management and government policies. In general, nurses had better opinion of doctors' work than doctors had about nurses' work. Conclusion Working relationships between doctors and nurses need to be improved through improved training and better working conditions, creation of better working environment, use of alternative methods of conflict resolution and balanced hospital management and government policies. This will improve the retention of staff, job satisfaction and efficiency of health care delivery in Nigeria.

  13. The role of place on healthcare quality improvement: A qualitative case study of a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Sara

    2018-03-02

    This article examines how the built environment impacts, and is impacted by, healthcare staff day to day practice, care outcomes and the design of new quality and patient safety (Q&PS) projects. It also explores how perceptions of the built environment affect inter-professional dynamics. In doing so, it contributes to the overlooked interplay between the physical, social, and symbolic dimensions associated with a hospital's place. The study draws on 46 in-depth semi-structured interviews conducted at a large teaching hospital in Portugal formed by two buildings. Interview transcripts were analysed inductively using thematic analysis. The major contribution of this study is to advance the understanding of the interactions among the different dimensions of place on Q&PS improvement. For example, findings indicate that some of the characteristics of the physical infrastructure of the hospital have a negative impact on the quality of care provided and/or significantly limit the initiatives that can be implemented to improve it, including refurbishment works. However, decisions on refurbishment works were also influenced by the characteristics of the patient population, hospital budget, etc. Likewise, clinicians' emotional reactions to the limitations of the buildings depended on their expectations of the buildings and the symbolic projections they attributed to them. Nevertheless, differences between clinicians' expectations regarding the physical infrastructure and its actual features influenced clinicians' views on Q&PS initiatives designed by non-clinicians. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. TEACHING AND LEARNING: AN EXPERIENCE WITH GROUPS OF PARENTS OF HOSPITALIZED CHILDREN

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    Lourdes Maria Silva Andraus

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This paper intends to retell an experience in the practical teaching of “Enfermagem Materno-Infanto-Juvenil”, involving nursing care for guardians of hospitalized children through team work coordinated by nursing students. The aim was to describe the experience in using group technology as a strategy in order to assist hospitalized children’s guardians and also to show nursing students the importance of helping this group of clients. The team work with these guardians has been very efficient to show their real needs. In addiction to that it allows the socialization of the subject experiences related to the child’s hospitalization and the search for healthier behaviors to face the situation. This technology was also effective to provide students the opportunity to deal with theoretical aspects of the nurse-patient-family relation, raising their interest in helping those in charge of making the children company. In conclusion, the usage of team techniques for the assistance of hospitalized children provides the development of sensitivity and personal growth of students and parents, besides improving the quality of the offered nursing care. Key words: pediatric nursing; parents; education.

  15. Medication error detection in two major teaching hospitals: What are the types of errors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Saghafi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasing number of reports on medication errors and relevant subsequent damages, especially in medical centers has become a growing concern for patient safety in recent decades. Patient safety and in particular, medication safety is a major concern and challenge for health care professionals around the world. Our prospective study was designed to detect prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administering medication errors in two major university hospitals. Materials and Methods: After choosing 20 similar hospital wards in two large teaching hospitals in the city of Isfahan, Iran, the sequence was randomly selected. Diagrams for drug distribution were drawn by the help of pharmacy directors. Direct observation technique was chosen as the method for detecting the errors. A total of 50 doses were studied in each ward to detect prescribing, transcribing and administering errors in each ward. The dispensing error was studied on 1000 doses dispensed in each hospital pharmacy. Results: A total of 8162 number of doses of medications were studied during the four stages, of which 8000 were complete data to be analyzed. 73% of prescribing orders were incomplete and did not have all six parameters (name, dosage form, dose and measuring unit, administration route, and intervals of administration. We found 15% transcribing errors. One-third of administration of medications on average was erroneous in both hospitals. Dispensing errors ranged between 1.4% and 2.2%. Conclusion: Although prescribing and administrating compromise most of the medication errors, improvements are needed in all four stages with regard to medication errors. Clear guidelines must be written and executed in both hospitals to reduce the incidence of medication errors.

  16. Ectopic pregnancy management in Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad: a ten year survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeba, Farhat; Khan, Bushra; Khattak, Samina Naseem

    2012-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is a common life-threatening emergency in the developing world. It is a cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in the first trimester and these mortalities can be reduced if it is properly managed. The objective of this study was to assess the variable clinical presentations and outcome of treatment of ectopic pregnancy in Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad. Two hundred and fifty-five patients with ectopic pregnancy managed in Ayub Teaching Hospital over period of 10 years, were included in the study. The clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities and out come of treatment were recorded and analysed. Out of 255 patients 43 (16.86%) had un-ruptured tubal pregnancy, 183 (71.76%) had ruptured ectopic pregnancy and 22 (8.62%) had chronic ectopic pregnancy. At laparotomy, salpingectomy was done in 229 (89.80%) patients, salpingo-ophrectomy in 2 patients (0.78%), linear salpingostomy in 15 (5.88%) patients. Medical treatment was given to 5 patients and 8 patients were treated conservatively. There was no maternal mortality. In spite of various recent advances in the management of ectopic pregnancy, conventional surgical treatment by laparotomy is still the most widely used modality of treatment in our institution. With appropriate and prompt management, maternal mortality due to ectopic pregnancy can be prevented.

  17. Evaluating the Rate of Compliance with Radiation Protection Standards in Shohada Teaching Hospital -Tabriz

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    Faramarz Pourasghar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ​ Background and Objectives : If proper diagnosis is regarded as the basis of modern medicine, medical radiography is the foundation of medical diagnosis. Properly applied radiography helps physicians to diagnose problems. On one side, using it to improve quality of life is essential but on the other hand, its hazards are obvious. A reasonable usage and according to protection standards are the best way to benefit its advantages and reduce the hazards. Material and Methods : This cross-sectional study was conducted by a researcher-made check list that its validity and reliability were confirmed by experts. It was performed as direct observation in Shohada teaching hospital. Collected data were entered into Excel software and analyzed applying descriptive statistics. Results : The results indicated that compliance with protection standards regarding staff protection ranged from 73.6 to 100 percent and it ranged from 0 to 99.2 percent regarding patient protection. Compliance with protection standards concerning the availability of the devices was lower than average but it was rated higher than average regarding environmental protection. Conclusion : In general, not all protection standards for radiological diagnostic tests are followed at the radiology ward in the shohada teaching hospital. Continuous training courses and increasing staff and patients' awareness might resolve this problem.

  18. Etiology of strokes and hemiplegia in children presenting at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Tahir Saeed; Rehman, Anis ur; Ahmed, Basharat

    2006-01-01

    Strokes in pediatric age group are not common. However diagnosing the cause of stroke will help in providing preventive and curative treatment. Present study was conducted to find etiology of strokes/hemiplegia in children. This study was conducted in Department of Pediatrics, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from December 2002 to December 2005. All children from two months to fifteen years of age were included in the study. Children with weakness due to acute poliomyelitis and Guillan barre syndrome were excluded. Investigations were based on findings on history and clinical examination and included full blood count, PT, APTT, Platelets count, ECG, Echocardiography, hematocrit, lumber puncture with CSF analysis and culture and CT-scan skull. Data of all the patients presenting with strokes/hemiplegia was entered on prepared proforma. The main etiology of strokes was intracranial infection causing strokes in 23(56.09%)children and majority of children (78.26%) in this group were below five years. Etiology was un-known in 7(17.07%) children after necessary available investigations. Intracranial infection Infections that is meningitis and encephalitis are commonest etiology of strokes and hemiplegia in paediatrics patients presenting at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad.

  19. Profile of neurological admissions at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenze, O S; Onwuekwe, I O; Ezeala Adikaibe, B A

    2010-01-01

    The burden of Neurological diseases may be on the increase especially in developing countries. Improved outcome in these settings may require appreciation of the spectrum of Neurological diseases and the impediments to their management. We aim to determine the profile of neurological admissions and the challenges of managing these diseases at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu South East Nigeria. Analysis of Neurological admissions into the medical wards of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu from January 2003 to December 2007. Neurological admissions comprise about 14.8% of medical admissions. There were 640 (51%) males and 609 (49%) females. The spectrum of neurological diseases were stroke 64.9%, central nervous system infections (21.8% ), HIV related neurological diseases 3.5%, hypertensive encephalopathy (3.4%), dementia (3%), subarachnoid haemorrhage (2.2%), Guillian Barre syndrome (1.2%), Parkinson's disease (1.1%), myasthenia gravis (1.0%), motor neurone disease and peripheral neuropathy and accounted for 0.8% and 0.6% respectively. Overall, noninfectious disease accounted for 78.2% of neurological admissions while infectious diseases accounted for 11.8%. A wide spectrum of neurological diseases occurs in our setting. The high incidence of CNS infections indicates that efforts should be geared towards preventive measures. A major challenge to be addressed in the management of neurological diseases in our setting is the lack of specialized facilities.

  20. Contraceptive choices among women attending the fertility research unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance E Shehu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most sensitive and intimate decisions made by any individual or couple is that of fertility control . The knowledge of the factors which influence contraceptive choices may increase its acceptance and uptake. This study determines the choice and reason for contraception among new clients attending the Fertility Research Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study a structured questionnaire was administered to 251 consecutive clients, who attended the Fertility Research Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto between 1 July 2008 and 31 December 2008. Results: Most (58.2% of the clients were between 21 and 30 years of age. Many (42.6% were grand multipara. Majority (76.9% of the clients were married. The main source of knowledge of contraception and referral (45.8% was the physicians. Child spacing (87.7% was the most common reason given for contraceptive use. Majority (55.8% of the clients chose Implanon and the least preferred method of contraception was the condom (2.0%. Conclusion: Our data shows that the most commonly chosen contraceptive method in the study population was the Implanon. Child spacing was the main reason for seeking family planning while the source of contraceptive knowledge was the physicians.

  1. Patients’ experiences of being nursed by student nurses at a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand C. Mukumbang

    2014-09-01

    Objectives: The study had three objectives: to describe the experiences of patients nursed by student nurses in a teaching hospital in the Western Cape; to identify patterns in the experiences of patients receiving patient care from student nurses; and to analyse aspects of the experiences that may need further attention for the training of student nurses. Method: A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to explore the experiences of patients nursed by student nurses. Participant selection took place purposively from different wards of the identified teaching hospital, and thematic saturation was achieved at 10 participants. The data were collected through in-depth interviews and analysed using thematic content analysis. Results: Three main themes were discovered after data analysis: methods of identification of student nurses by patients; positive perceptions of student nurses by patients; and negative perceptions of student nurses by patients. Conclusion: The findings will inform the clinical supervisors and educational institutions of aspects of the nursing training of student nurses that need improvement and those that require enforcement.

  2. Toward Safer Transitions: A Curriculum to Teach and Assess Hospital-to-Hospice Handoffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Neha J; O'Connor, Nina R

    2016-06-01

    Patient handoffs are an increasingly emphasized skill in medical and nursing education, and handoff education is required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Traditional handoff tools lack content that is unique to hospice and palliative medicine. The objective of the study was to develop a comprehensive curriculum to teach and assess patient handoffs in hospice and palliative medicine fellowships. Eight hospice physicians, nurse practitioners, and nurses were interviewed to determine core content for a hospital-to-hospice handoff. This content was used to create a verbal handoff template and direct observation assessment tool, which were reviewed by the same hospice providers for content validity. The handoff template was taught to two groups of palliative medicine fellows and one group of internal medicine residents using an interactive didactic and role play, and feedback was obtained to further refine the curriculum. After refinement, the complete handoff curriculum (verbal handoff template, didactic with role play, assessment by faculty using direct observation tool) was successfully integrated into a hospice and palliative medicine fellowship, satisfying Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements related to transitions in care. The hospital-to-hospice handoff is a unique opportunity to teach patient safety in a palliative medicine context. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. FACTORS AFFECTING IMPLEMENTATION OF EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE AMONG PHYSIOTHERAPISTS IN MOI TEACHING REFFERAL HOSPITAL KENYA

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    Naomi Wanjiru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The application of the concept of Evidenced Based Practice into clinical decision-making and practicehas outstanding benefits both to clinicians and the patient. However, the utilization of this concept has not been copiously utilized in most health facilities by the physiotherapists in Kenya. Therefore, the objectives for this study was to determine the level of awareness of evidence based practice among Physiotherapist, establish the availability of resource for Evidence Based Practice and to assess the challenges encountered by physiotherapist in engaging in evidence based practice at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital. Methods: All physiotherapists working in Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (42 took part in a cross-sectional descriptive survey. Questionnaires were used for data collection and analyzed by SPSS version 22. Results: there was high level of awareness on Evidence Based Practice (95 % and confidence in EBP (72.5 %. However, lack of information resources, poor skills to implement EBP, poor organization support 90%, insufficient authority to induct change in the practice setting 85%, inadequate facilities 74% and lack of time were identified as the major challenges in implementation of EBP Conclusion: Strategies should be developed to provide PTs with EBP resources, such as access to databases or links to guidelines, and continuous education regarding specific topics. Professional organizations and Associations should aim at changing the current practice to ensure full utilization of EBP.

  4. Awareness regarding research skills among clinical and academic post graduate doctors in teaching hospitals of Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Mehr; Zehra, Nosheen; Ahmad, Farah; Obaid, Munazza Suharwardy

    2014-06-01

    To assess the awareness regarding research skills among clinical and academic post-graduate doctors in teaching hospitals of Karachi. The cross-sectional study was carried out from August to October 2012 in two teaching hospitals of Karachi. Total 92 doctors who were enrolled in academic and clinical post-graduation programmes were included in the study through convenience sampling. Data was collected through a self-administered questionnaire and analysed by SPSS version 20. The mean age of the 92 doctors was 30.4 + 3.4 years; 49 (53.3%) were clinical; and 43 (46.7%) were academic post-graduate trainee doctors. Besides, 74 (80.4%) post-graduate doctors had attended research methodology course during their academic or professional careers. Low level of competence was found regarding various research skills, such as 56 (60.8%) in statistics, 47 (51.09%) in paper preparation, 40 (43.5%) in study design, 39 (42.4%) both in result interpretation and paper presentation, 37 (40.2%) in protocol writing and 35 (38.04%) in sampling technique. Moreover, 68 (73.91%) doctors reported lack of research curriculum (p research output in Pakistan. Post-graduate medical doctors showed positive attitude towards research, but they lacked research skills. They needed training in all aspects of research skills.

  5. The Relationship between Energy Consumption and Hospital Functional Indicators in Teaching Hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences: 2009-2011

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    Zahra Kavosi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospitals as major energy consumers can manage their energy consumption by intelligent interventions. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the amount of energy consumption of Water, Electricity, and Gas, and their association with functional indicators in teaching hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from 2009 to 2011. Methods: The present study was descriptive and cross-sectional in design which analyzed energy consumption and functional indicators from the beginning of 2009 to the end of 2011. The sample consisted of 7 teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Data were collected from the departments of consumption pattern reform and statistics and recorded in the data collection form  developed by the researcher. Data were entered in SPSS16 and analyzed using descriptive and analytical tests such as Pearson correlation test. Results: The average consumption of water, electricity, and gas per occupied bed days were 0.09 m3, 2.78 kWh, and 1.56 m3, respectively. Also, statistically significant and positive relationships were found between the amount of water consumption and the number of active beds (P = 0.009 and occupied bed days (P = 0.007. Conclusion: Energy consumption in teaching hospitals of Shiraz is lower than similar domestic studies and in some cases more than foreign studies. More active beds with lower productivity increase energy consumption. Hospitals can reduce energy consumption and their costs with more efficient use of resources.

  6. TEACHING BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE FOR TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY THROUGH COLLABORATIVE WRITING APPROACH

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    Budi Purnomo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aims at answering problems: (1 ―How to teach business correspondence for tourism and hospitality (BCTH through collaborative writing approach (CWA?‖ (2 ―What are the advantages of teaching BCTH through CWA?‖ and (3 ―What are the disadvantages of teaching BCHT through CWA?‖ This study is a descriptive and qualitative research. It uses three techniques for collecting data: observation and field notes, questionnaire and in-depth interviewing. It was undertaken in a Business Correspondence class at Sahid Tourism Institute of Surakarta from July to December 2013. There are 28 undergraduate students of semester five and one English lecturer as research subjects. Through CWA students in pairs were given tasks to compose (1 introduction letter, (2 letter of inquiry and offer, (3 reservation letter, (4 letter of collection, (5 letter of changes and cancelation, (6 letter of complaint, (7 letter of joint venture, (8 invitation letter, (9 application letter, (10 letter of resignation, (11 letter of recommendation and (12 business report. The research findings show that procedures to teach BCTH through CWA are: teacher explains a BCTH topic and shows a model of letter; students choose their partners themselves; teacher gives a writing task to students; student A writes a letter and student B writes a reply letter; pairs exchange information during the process of writing; students submit their products of writing; teacher makes a correction for their products outside of class. The advantages of teaching BCTH through CWA are: CWA helps students work together to reach the best products of writing; CWA improves the content of writing; CWA develops grammatical and structural proficiency and CWA reduces stress and saves time. The disadvantages of teaching BCTH through CWA are: CWA affects a conflict related to personal learning style; CWA improves the use of unexpected spoken Indonesian and Javanese languages during doing the tasks and

  7. Stroke among young adults at the LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, A F; Sanya, E O; Bello, T O

    2012-01-01

    Stroke in young adults is relatively rare and there are very few hospital reports about it in Nigeria. The aetiologic mechanisms of stoke among young adults are quite distinct from those of the adults' populations. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the frequency, aetiologic mechanisms and prognosis of stroke among young adults at the LAUTECH Teaching Hospital Osogbo Nigeria. The study was both retrospective and descriptive. Case notes of stroke patients aged 16-45 years managed at the LAUTECH Teaching Hospital Osogbo from June 2005 till February 2008 were retrieved. Demographic data, clinical profile of stroke, laboratory investigation results and treatment outcomes were collated. Clinical diagnosis and classification of stroke was mainly clinical using the WHO clinical criteria. Only 3 patients had cranial CT scan. Out of the total number of 208 stroke patients managed during this period, 27(12.9%) were aged 45 years and below. This comprised of 17 males and 10 females. The age range was between 23-45 years. Using the WHO clinical criteria, there were 14 cases of heamorrhagic CVD and 13 cases of ischaemic CVD. The three cranial CT scan that were done revealed cerebral infarction which was consistent with the clinical diagnosis. Severe hypertension was found in 16 (59.2%) patients on admission. 3 patients had clinical and electrocardiographic evidence of rheumatic heart disease with infective endocarditis. Other risk factors included Sickle cell disease, cardiac arrhythmias etc. 8 out of the 27 patients died giving a percentage mortality of 29.6% and 7 patients were discharged against medical advice. Heamorrhagic stroke was slightly more frequent than ischaemic CVD. Systemic hypertension was also found to be prevalent among these young Nigerian adults with stroke. However, it was difficult to unravel the aetiologic mechanisms of stroke in this study because of paucity of investigations.

  8. Fecal shedding of Salmonella spp among cattle admitted to a veterinary medical teaching hospital.

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    Cummings, Kevin J; Divers, Thomas J; McDonough, Patrick L; Warnick, Lorin D

    2009-06-15

    OBJECTIVE- To estimate the prevalence of fecal shedding of Salmonella spp among bovine patients at a veterinary teaching hospital, to identify risk factors for fecal shedding of Salmonella organisms, and to characterize the serotypes. DESIGN- Retrospective cohort study. SAMPLE POPULATION- 5,398 hospitalized cattle. PROCEDURES- Data were collected for all cattle admitted during an 11-year period. Fecal shedding of Salmonella spp was determined by means of standard bacteriologic culture. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify risk factors for shedding of Salmonella spp among patients. RESULTS- The prevalence of Salmonella shedding among clinical suspects was 6.5% (50/768), whereas that among nonsuspects tested through routine surveillance was 2.5% (50/2,020). Among clinical suspect calves, fecal shedding of Salmonella spp was more likely for those admitted in the fall (odds ratio [OR], 5.9), those with septicemia (OR, 3.3), or those with an umbilical hernia (OR, 8.6). Among clinical suspect adult cattle, those with enteritis (OR, 9.9) or metritis (OR, 5.2) were more likely to be shedding Salmonella spp. Among nonsuspect cattle, none of the variables were significant predictors of shedding status. Twenty-one serotypes were detected during the study period, with the most common being Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium (33%), Newport (23%), and Agona (12%). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE- Seasonal and disease risk factors for fecal shedding of Salmonella spp were evident among clinical suspect cattle admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital. In contrast, lack of significant associations among nonsuspect cattle would suggest that targeted screening within this population is not warranted.

  9. A quantitative summary of nutrition support services in a veterinary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, S

    1991-04-01

    A full-time nutrition support service provided 1,133 consultations in a small animal teaching hospital from July 1986 to June 1988, consisting of 840 dogs, 260 cats, 23 exotic species, and 10 consultations with incomplete information. The dog and cat consultations represented 2.1 and 3.7% of canine and feline admissions, respectively. Consultations involved the determination of nutritional goals which led to recommendations of specific dietary regimens. Most frequent requests were for diet evaluation and diet formulation to meet estimated calorie and protein needs during illness and stress (23%), for specific calorie or nutrient modification given a working diagnosis (23%), and for avoidance of tissue utilization or weight loss (23%). Frequently involved single organ systems were gastrointestinal (16%), liver (12%), kidney (9%), and pancreas (4%), but multiple system involvement was more common (19%). Most frequent diagnostic categories were metabolic disorders (17%), chronic organ failure (17%), and neoplasia (12%). Enteral nutrition was preferred for 98% of consultations. Voluntary consumption was deemed adequate in 81% of consultations, and highly palatable balanced homemade diets and specialty products were recommended in 74% of these. Human hospital liquid enteral products were used in 95% of consultations recommending involuntary feeding, either fed alone, blended with petfoods, or supplemented with modules of protein or fat. The service demonstrated that full-time nutrition support can be utilized effectively in a small animal teaching hospital. Further development of such services will depend on research focused especially on determination of case-specific nutritional goals, patient responses, and cost effectiveness.

  10. Intraoperative complications of outpatient interval tubal sterilization at a teaching hospital in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilbaz, B.; Akdag, D.; Cengiz, H.; Akyunak, A.; Dilbaz, S.; Haberal, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to evaluate the intra-operative complications of outpatient interval tubal sterilization at a teaching hospital. The data of 461 patients who underwent interval tubal ligation ITL at the Family Planning Clinic of Ankara Etlik Maternity and Women's Health Teaching and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey between January 2002 and December 2005 were reviewed from a computerized database. The demographic characteristics, operative technique and intra- and early postoperative complications of patients were evaluated. Only 11 patients had minilaparotomy for ITL. Laparoscopic ITL was performed using bipolar cautery. The cases who were hospitalized or had a complication and/or an unplanned laparotomy were analyzed. The mean age of patients was 35.1 range: 21-51, gravidity was 4.6 range: 2-9, parity was 3.2 range: 2-7 and number of living children was 3.1 range 2-6. Out of 461 patients, only 20.4% had complications related with general anesthesia. Two cases 0.4% had bleeding from the port-site, 3 cases 0.6% had meso-salpingeal and meso-ovarian bleeding, one had omental bleeding 0.2% from vagina wall. There was only one 0.2% intestinal burn that required a laparotomy and segmental resection followed by end-to-end anastomosis. The mortality was nil, whilst the morbidity was found to be 2.1% and all the complications were encountered in patients who had laparoscopic surgery. Outpatient tubal ligation is a convenient and safe procedure and implementing endoscopic surgical techniques is necessary for correction of the complications. (author)

  11. Surveillance of ESBL producing multidrug resistant Escherichia coli in a teaching hospital in India

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    Shakti Rath

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To record nosocomial and community-acquired accounts of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli (E. coli strains, isolated from clinical samples of a teaching hospital by surveillance, over a period of 39 months (November 2009-January 2013. Methods: Clinical samples from nosocomial sources, i.e., wards and cabins, intensive care unit (ICU and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, and community (outpatient department, OPD sources of the hospital, were used for isolating strains of E. coli, which were subjected for testing for production of ‘extended spectrum beta-lactamase’-(ESBL enzyme as well as determining antibiotic sensitivity pattern with 23 antibiotics. Results: Of the total 1642 (100% isolates, 810 (49.33% strains were from OPD and 832 (50.66% were from hospital settings. Occurrence of infectious E. coli strains increased in a mathematical progression in community sources, but in nosocomial infections, such values remained almost constant in each quarter. A total of 395 (24.05% ESBL strains were isolated from the total 810 isolates of community; of the total of 464 (28.25% isolates of wards and cabins, 199 (12.11% were ESBL strains; and among the total of 368 (22.41% isolates of ICU and NICU, ESBLs were 170 (10.35%; the total nosocomial ESBL isolates, 369 (22.47% were from the nosocomial total of 832 (50.66% isolates. Statistically, it was confirmed that ESBL strains were equally distributed in community or hospital units. Antibiogram of 23 antibiotics revealed progressive increases of drug-resistance against each antibiotic with the maximum resistance values were recorded against gentamicin: 92% and 79%, oxacillin: 94% and 69%, ceftriaxone: 85% and 58%, and norfloxacin 97% and 69% resistance, in nosocomial and community isolates, respectively. Conclusions: This study revealed the daunting state of occurrence of multidrug resistant E. coli and its infection dynamics in both community and hospital settings.

  12. The role of teaching and research hospitals in improving global health (in a globalized world).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Sandra G; Tse, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    Globalization is impacting on Hong Kong and Australia in different ways, but the experience of the public healthcare systems in both jurisdictions suggests a need for teaching and research hospitals to refocus from the management of international patients to better meet the needs for global health. Traditional globalization suggests a stockpiling of capital--a focus on improving global health suggests dismantling the stockpiles and sharing access to the necessary data, information, knowledge and discoveries to further develop local health expertise. Consistent with its position as a leading healthcare provider, the University Health Network (UHN) has been reflecting on the impact of increasing globalization on hospitals. The goals of the UHN paper on globalization are threefold--to suggest how the external and internal environments of hospitals will change as a result of globalization; to suggest a role for hospitals in a globalized world; and to stimulate discussion and debate. Given our perspective, from the other side of the world, we are pleased to contribute to the discussion and debate but will limit our comments to the future role of teaching and research hospitals based on some of the experiences of Australia and Hong Kong. The citizens of Hong Kong have been acutely aware of the issue of globalization--the excellent deep-water harbour has ensured the position of Hong Kong as a major trading hub. Hong Kong has also had a continually evolving role as a financial centre and gateway to China, and with China's accession to the World Trade Organization the impact of globalization will be even greater. On the other hand, the citizens of Australia have lived with geographic isolation, relatively limited natural resources and a small population, all of which have limited their role in global trade and financial markets. However, both Hong Kong and Australia have seen recent benefits from the increasing speed of communication and information transfer and exchange

  13. Diagnostic outcome of patients presenting with severe thunderclap headache at saidu teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A.; Khan, P.; Ahmad, K.; Syed, A.

    2008-01-01

    To find out the frequency of patients attending Casualty department of a Teaching Hospital with sudden severe thunderclap headache, their diagnostic out-come and follow up. The study was conducted in Casualty and Medical, Departments of Saidu Teaching Hospital, Saidu Sharif, from January 2006 to December 2006. Out of 22,000 patients with different Medical problems attended Casualty department during study period of which 128 cases had acute severe thunderclap headache. Age range was 15 to 80 years with mean age of 46+-10 years. Seventy eight patients (61%) were female and fifty (39%) were male. Protocol included proper clinical examination, basic laboratory investigations, admission to the General medical ward / Intensive care unit for observation, treatment and follow-up. CT scan of brain and or lumber puncture was performed in all the studied patients. The in-hospital follow up period was from two to fourteen days. The patients were reviewed one month later after discharge from hospital. Out of 120 patients twenty cases (15.6%) had Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) seven patients (5.4%) had Cerebral infarction, five patients (3.9%) had an Intracerebral Haematoma. Five patients (3.9%) had aseptic meningitis. Two cases (1.5%) were reported as cerebral edema. One case (0.8%) had venous sinus thrombosis. As there was no specific finding on investigations and follow up of 88 cases (69%): these were labeled as idiopathic thunder-clap headache. Past history of not more than three similar episodes was present in 33 cases (25.78%). Out of these 33 cases, thirty belonged to the benign group of 88; other three cases had organic causes. Clinical diagnosis of Migraine was made in 37 cases out of these 88 cases. Attack of severe thunderclap headache is not an un-common emergency. Attack due to Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) or other serious underlying disease cannot be distinguished from non specific headaches on clinical grounds alone. It is recommended that all such patients be

  14. Destructive vaginal deliveries at a teaching hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Amir; Abdella, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    To assess the incidence, indications and complications of destructive vaginal deliveries. Retrospective study on the incidence, methods used, and outcomes of destructive vaginal deliveries (DVDs) performed by residents in obstetrics-gynecology from 1997 to 2002. Tikur Anbessa Teaching Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Overall, there were 7.8 DVDs per 1000 deliveries, with an increasing trend during the five years of the study. Craniotomy was the most common (94%) DVD-procedure mainly used for cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD), accounting for 89% of the craniotomies. The proportion of craniotomy to all the DVDs used was significantly more (p-value Sidamo hospital (3243 g)), the average birth weight of the fetuses in the craniotomy group (2957 g) found in this study ivas smaller. This may indicate that, in Ethiopia, the role of small pelvic size in CPD is more important than fetal weight. To alleviate the painful and difficult travel of laboring mothers to major hospitals, training of general practitioners in destructive vaginal delivery, pre- and post procedure care need to be strengthened

  15. Role of Organizational Climate in Organizational Commitment: The Case of Teaching Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Mohammad Amin; Barati, Omid; Ghoroghchian, Malake-Sadat; Montazer-Alfaraj, Razieh; Ranjbar Ezzatabadi, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    The commitment of employees is affected by several factors, including factors related to the organizational climate. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational commitment of nurses and the organizational climate in hospital settings. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 at two teaching hospitals in Yazd, Iran. A total of 90 nurses in these hospitals participated. We used stratified random sampling of the nursing population. The required data were gathered using two valid questionnaires: Allen and Meyer's organizational commitment standard questionnaire and Halpin and Croft's Organizational Climate Description Questionnaire. Data analysis was done through SPSS 20 statistical software (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA). We used descriptive statistics and Pearson's correlation coefficient for the data analysis. The findings indicated a positive and significant correlation between organizational commitment and organizational climate (r = 0.269, p = 0.01). There is also a significant positive relationship between avoidance of organizational climate and affective commitment (r = 0.208, p = 0.049) and between focus on production and normative and continuance commitment (r = 0.308, p = 0.003). Improving the organizational climate could be a valuable strategy for improving organizational commitment.

  16. Integration of complementary and alternative medicine in a major pediatric teaching hospital: an initial overview.

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    Highfield, Ellen Silver; McLellan, Mary C; Kemper, Kathi J; Risko, Wanessa; Woolf, Alan D

    2005-04-01

    To describe the establishment of a multidisciplinary team of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers and educators in an urban pediatric hospital and affiliated medical school. Pediatric CAM use is increasing. Physicians are interested in CAM-related education but few programs had been developed in pediatrics. In 1998, Children's Hospital Boston established the Center for Holistic Pediatric Education and Research (CHPER), a CAM multidisciplinary team providing clinical services, education, and research. A retrospective review describing data from patient consultation notes, CAM lectures, clinical practice guidelines, curriculum materials, team meeting minutes, and team member manuscripts and publications. Over 5.5 years, CHPER staff provided over 2100 consults: acupuncture, massage, holistic pediatrician, relaxation therapies, biofeedback, hypnosis, and bio-pharmaceutics. Acupuncture and massage therapies were incorporated into a Clinical Practice Guideline. Formal education was delivered through didactic sessions, workshops, self-learning modules, clinical observation, and clinical practice. CHPER faculty published 1 book and 64 articles on CAM-related topics. An interdisciplinary team of CAM clinicians and educators can be integrated into an urban pediatric teaching hospital to provide CAM medical education and clinical services.

  17. Medication Reviews by a Clinical Pharmacist at an Irish University Teaching Hospital

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    Alan Kearney

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Pharmacist-led medication reviews in hospitals have shown improvement in patient outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the prevalence and nature of pharmacist interventions (PIs following a medication review in an Irish teaching hospital. Methods: PIs were recorded over a six-month period in 2015. PIs were assessed by a panel of healthcare professionals (n = 5 to estimate the potential of adverse drug events (ADEs. Descriptive statistics were used for the variables and the chi square test for independence was used to analyse for any association between the variables. Results: Of the 1216 patients (55.8% female; median age 68 years (interquartile range 24 years who received a medication review, 313 interventions were identified in 213 patients. 412 medicines were associated with PIs, of which drugs for obstructive airway disease (n = 82, analgesics (n = 56, and antibacterial products for systemic use (n = 50 were the most prevalent. A statistically significant association was found between PI and patient’s age ≥65 years (p = 0.000, as well as female gender (p = 0.037. A total of 60.7% of the PIs had a medium or high likelihood of causing an ADE. Conclusion: Pharmacist-led medication review in a hospital setting prevented ADEs. Patients ≥65 years of age and female patients benefited the most from the interventions.

  18. Review of eclampsia at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University teaching hospital, Nnewi (January 1996-December 2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikechebelu, J I; Okoli, C C

    2002-05-01

    In a retrospective study of 43 cases of eclampsia managed at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi over a 5-year period, an incidence of 0.75% out of 5750 labour ward admissions was found. Eclampsia was more prevalent in the primigravidae (65%) and unbooked patients (83.7%) than in the multigravidae (35%) and booked (16.3%) patients. The mean age of the patients was 23.5 years. The majority of the eclamptic seizure (55.8%) occurred in the antepartum period. Many unbooked patients presented after more than two seizures. The most frequently used drugs in the management of eclampsia in the hospital were intravenous diazepam and hydralazine. For the 35 cases of antepartum eclampsia, 85.7% had a caesarean section while 14.3% had an operative vaginal delivery; none had a spontaneous vaginal delivery. There were four maternal deaths (9.3% of the cases) and seven perinatal deaths (16.3% of the cases). Clinical causes of death in the women were cardiopulmonary failure (three cases) and coagulation disorders (one case). The total maternal deaths in the hospital during this period was 19 given a maternal mortality rate of 330 per 100 000. Eclampsia, therefore, contributed 21.1% of the maternal deaths. The role of health education and good antenatal, labour and early puerperal supervision is stressed in the reduction of the incidence of eclampsia in the developing countries.

  19. tEACHING AND LEARNING: AN EXPERIENCE WITH GROUPS OF PARENTS OF HOSPITALIZED CHILDREN

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    Denize Bouttelet Munari

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to retell an experience in the practical teaching of “Enfermagem Materno-Infanto-Juvenil”, involving nursing care for guardians of hospitalized children through team work coordinated by nursingstudents. The aim was to describe the experience in using group technology as a strategy in order to assisthospitalized children’s guardians and also to show nursing students the importance of helping this group of clients.The team work with these guardians has been very efficient to show their real needs. In addiction to that it allowsthe socialization of the subject experiences related to the child’s hospitalization and the search for healthierbehaviors to face the situation. This technology was also effective to provide students the opportunity to deal withtheoretical aspects of the nurse-patient-family relation, raising their interest in helping those in charge of making thechildren company. In conclusion, the usage of team techniques for the assistance of hospitalized children providesthe development of sensitivity and personal growth of students and parents, besides improving the quality of theoffered nursing care.

  20. Paediatric urologic pathologies at the national teaching hospital in Cotonou: A etiological and therapeutic aspects

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    Augustin Karl Agossou-Voyeme

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urological pathologies of children are dominated by congenital malformations of the kidneys and urinary tract. Their management is often surgical. The objective of this survey was to study etiological and therapeutic aspects of urological presentations in children. Patients and Methods: Data for aetiology, treatment, and results in children hospitalized at the Paediatric Surgery service of National Teaching Hospital (CNHU in Cotonou were retrospectively analyzed from January 1999 to December 2008. Results: A total of 214 patients with complete data were evaluated. Urological pathologies represented 4.8% of the hospitalizations in paediatric surgery, with an incidence of 21 cases per year. The mean age was 4.9 ± 3.2 years (age 1 week to 14 years. The male to female ratio was 14:14. Cryptorchidism, hydrocele, nephroblastoma, the posterior urethral valves, ureteropelvic junction obstructions, post-circumcision haemorrhage and hypospadias were the most frequent pathologies. Congenital urological malformations represented 81.3%, followed neoplastic pathologies (7.9%, traumatic pathologies (6.1% and others (4.7%. The disorders of male genitalia were more frequent and constituted 68.2% of the cases. The anomalies of the urinary tract were 30.8% and intersex disorders were 0.9%. The average age of the children urological pathologies at the time of consultation was 8.85 ± 4.6 years. The treatment was often surgical with a mortality of 2.8%.

  1. Very high prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in bacteriemic patients hospitalized in teaching hospitals in Bamako, Mali.

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    Samba Adama Sangare

    Full Text Available The worldwide dissemination of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae, (ESBL-E and their subset producing carbapenemases (CPE, is alarming. Limited data on the prevalence of such strains in infections from patients from Sub-Saharan Africa are currently available. We determined, here, the prevalence of ESBL-E/CPE in bacteriemic patients in two teaching hospitals from Bamako (Mali, which are at the top of the health care pyramid in the country. During one year, all Enterobacteriaceae isolated from bloodstream infections (E-BSI, were collected from patients hospitalized at the Point G University Teaching Hospital and the pediatric units of Gabriel Touré University Teaching Hospital. Antibiotic susceptibility testing, enzyme characterization and strain relatedness were determined. A total of 77 patients had an E-BSI and as many as 48 (62.3% were infected with an ESBL-E. ESBL-E BSI were associated with a previous hospitalization (OR 3.97 95% IC [1.32; 13.21] and were more frequent in hospital-acquired episodes (OR 3.66 95% IC [1.07; 13.38]. Among the 82 isolated Enterobacteriaceae, 58.5% were ESBL-E (20/31 Escherichia coli, 20/26 Klebsiella pneumoniae and 8/15 Enterobacter cloacae. The remaining (5 Salmonella Enteritidis, 3 Morganella morganii 1 Proteus mirabilis and 1 Leclercia adecarboxylata were ESBL negative. CTX-M-1 group enzymes were highly prevalent (89.6% among ESBLs; the remaining ones being SHV. One E. coli produced an OXA-181 carbapenemase, which is the first CPE described in Mali. The analysis of ESBL-E relatedness suggested a high rate of cross transmission between patients. In conclusion, even if CPE are still rare for the moment, the high rate of ESBL-BSI and frequent cross transmission probably impose a high medical and economic burden to Malian hospitals.

  2. Very high prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in bacteriemic patients hospitalized in teaching hospitals in Bamako, Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangare, Samba Adama; Rondinaud, Emilie; Maataoui, Naouale; Maiga, Almoustapha Issiaka; Guindo, Ibrehima; Maiga, Aminata; Camara, Namory; Dicko, Oumar Agaly; Dao, Sounkalo; Diallo, Souleymane; Bougoudogo, Flabou; Andremont, Antoine; Maiga, Ibrahim Izetiegouma; Armand-Lefevre, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    The worldwide dissemination of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae, (ESBL-E) and their subset producing carbapenemases (CPE), is alarming. Limited data on the prevalence of such strains in infections from patients from Sub-Saharan Africa are currently available. We determined, here, the prevalence of ESBL-E/CPE in bacteriemic patients in two teaching hospitals from Bamako (Mali), which are at the top of the health care pyramid in the country. During one year, all Enterobacteriaceae isolated from bloodstream infections (E-BSI), were collected from patients hospitalized at the Point G University Teaching Hospital and the pediatric units of Gabriel Touré University Teaching Hospital. Antibiotic susceptibility testing, enzyme characterization and strain relatedness were determined. A total of 77 patients had an E-BSI and as many as 48 (62.3%) were infected with an ESBL-E. ESBL-E BSI were associated with a previous hospitalization (OR 3.97 95% IC [1.32; 13.21]) and were more frequent in hospital-acquired episodes (OR 3.66 95% IC [1.07; 13.38]). Among the 82 isolated Enterobacteriaceae, 58.5% were ESBL-E (20/31 Escherichia coli, 20/26 Klebsiella pneumoniae and 8/15 Enterobacter cloacae). The remaining (5 Salmonella Enteritidis, 3 Morganella morganii 1 Proteus mirabilis and 1 Leclercia adecarboxylata) were ESBL negative. CTX-M-1 group enzymes were highly prevalent (89.6%) among ESBLs; the remaining ones being SHV. One E. coli produced an OXA-181 carbapenemase, which is the first CPE described in Mali. The analysis of ESBL-E relatedness suggested a high rate of cross transmission between patients. In conclusion, even if CPE are still rare for the moment, the high rate of ESBL-BSI and frequent cross transmission probably impose a high medical and economic burden to Malian hospitals.

  3. Variable lengths of stay among ischemic stroke subtypes in Chinese general teaching hospitals.

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    Yi Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Length of stay (LOS is one of the most important quantitative indexes that measures health service utilization within a hospital. Many studies have examined the association of three major stroke categories with LOS. Our aim is to investigate the differences of LOS among ischemic stroke subtypes, results from which are helpful to healthcare providers and government agencies to improve health care delivery efficiency. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the Beijing Municipal Health Bureau's hospitalization summary reports, we performed a retrospective study among first-ever in-hospital patients with ischemic stroke (ICD-10 I63 in three general teaching hospitals in Beijing, China, from 2006 to 2010 with generalized linear model. In our study, 5,559 patients (female, 36.0%; age, 64.4 ± 12.9 years were included. The estimated mean LOS of ischemic stroke was 17.4 ± 1.8 days. After adjusting for confounders, LOS of lacunar infarction (14.7 days; p<0.001 and LOS of small cerebral infarction (17.0 days; p=0.393 were shorter than that of single cerebral infarction (17.9 days, p<0.001. LOS of multi-infarct (19.0 days; p=0.028, brainstem infarction (19.3 days; p=0.045, basal ganglia infarction (18.5 days; p=0.452 and other subtypes of ischemic stroke (18.9 days; p=0.327 were longer than that of single cerebral infarction. CONCLUSIONS: LOS of ischemic stroke patient differes across single cerebral infarction, lacunar infarction, multi-infarct and brainstem infarction patients. The ascending order of LOS was lacunar infarction, small cerebral infarction, single cerebral infarction, basal ganglia infarction, other subtypes of ischemic stroke, multi-infarct and brainstem infarction.

  4. Nurses Exposure to Workplace Violence in a Large Teaching Hospital in Iran

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    Ehsan Teymourzadeh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Workplace violence is one of the factors which can strongly reduce job satisfaction and the quality of working life of nurses. The aim of this study was to measure nurses’ exposure to workplace violence in one of the major teaching hospitals in Tehran in 2010. Methods We surveyed the nurses in a cross-sectional design in 2010. The questionnaire was adapted from a standardized questionnaire designed collaboratively by the International Labor Office (ILO, the International Health Organization (IHO, the International Council of Nurses (ICN, and the Public Services International (PSI. Finally, in order to analyze the relationships among different variables in the study, T-test and Chi-Square test were used. Results Three hundred and one nurses responded to the questionnaire (a response rate of 73%. Over 70% of the nurses felt worried about workplace violence. The participants reported exposure to verbal abuse (64% CI: 59-70%, bullying-mobbing (29% CI: 24-34% and physical violence (12% CI: 9-16% at least once during the previous year. Relatives of hospital patients were responsible for most of the violence. Nurses working in the emergency department and outpatient clinics were more likely to report having experienced violence. Nurses were unlikely to report violence to hospital managers, and 40% of nurses were unaware of any existing policies within the hospital for reducing violence. Conclusion We observed a considerable level of nurse exposure to workplace violence. The high rate of reported workplace violence demonstrates that the existing safeguards that aim to protect the staff from abusive patients and relatives are inadequate.

  5. Nurses exposure to workplace violence in a large teaching hospital in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymourzadeh, Ehsan; Rashidian, Arash; Arab, Mohammad; Akbari-Sari, Ali; Hakimzadeh, Seyyed Mostafa

    2014-11-01

    Workplace violence is one of the factors which can strongly reduce job satisfaction and the quality of working life of nurses. The aim of this study was to measure nurses' exposure to workplace violence in one of the major teaching hospitals in Tehran in 2010. We surveyed the nurses in a cross-sectional design in 2010. The questionnaire was adapted from a standardized questionnaire designed collaboratively by the International Labor Office (ILO), the International Health Organization (IHO), the International Council of Nurses (ICN), and the Public Services International (PSI). Finally, in order to analyze the relationships among different variables in the study, T-test and Chi-Square test were used. Three hundred and one nurses responded to the questionnaire (a response rate of 73%). Over 70% of the nurses felt worried about workplace violence. The participants reported exposure to verbal abuse (64% CI: 59-70%), bullying-mobbing (29% CI: 24-34%) and physical violence (12% CI: 9-16%) at least once during the previous year. Relatives of hospital patients were responsible for most of the violence. Nurses working in the emergency department and outpatient clinics were more likely to report having experienced violence. Nurses were unlikely to report violence to hospital managers, and 40% of nurses were unaware of any existing policies within the hospital for reducing violence. We observed a considerable level of nurse exposure to workplace violence. The high rate of reported workplace violence demonstrates that the existing safeguards that aim to protect the staff from abusive patients and relatives are inadequate.

  6. Predictors of preoperative anxiety among surgical patients in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital, South Western Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospitalization and surgery are critical negative life events that lead to the experience of considerable anxiety in patients. Patients may perceive the day of surgery as the biggest and the most threatening day in their lives. There is paucity of information on predictors of anxiety in the current study area. The main objective of this study is to assess predictors of preoperative anxiety among patients scheduled for surgery in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted using quantitative data collection technique in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital from February 13 to April 13, 2012 on 239 patients scheduled for surgery. The data were collected by five trained diploma nurses using structured interviewer administered questionnaires that were prepared based on state trait anxiety inventory measurement scale. The quantitative data were entered into SPSS for windows version 16. 0 and descriptive, simple and multiple linear regression analyses were performed. Results A total of 239 patients were enrolled in the study with a response rate of 93.0%. Their mean age was 42.7 ± 1.8 years (range 16 to 85 years). Nearly over half 53.6% were females, while 48.1% illiterate, 72.4% Oromo and 56.5% were Muslim followers. Significant preoperative anxiety was seen in 70.3% patients. The most common factors that lead to anxiety were fear of death 38.1% and fear of unknown origin 24.3% and the most common strategy mentioned by patient in reducing anxiety were talking to other patient 79.8% and religious belief. Conclusions In the present study, two third 70.3% of preoperative patients had anxiety. Factors which were positively correlated with anxiety were trait anxiety, single and divorced, time of operation and income. Factors which were shown to reduce anxiety were preoperative anxiety related information provision and afternoon operation. Health professionals working in the hospital

  7. Spinal cord and spine trauma in a large teaching hospital in Ghana.

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    Ametefe, M K; Bankah, P E; Yankey, K P; Akoto, H; Janney, D; Dakurah, T K

    2016-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating injury, with its effect going beyond the injured patient to the care givers and family and with economic implications that can be long lasting. The study determined the occurrence and patterns of SCI and spine injury patterns, treatment and treatment outcomes in a large tertiary health facility in Ghana. This was a retrospective review of health records of patients at the Korle bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana. Data on 185 patients were collected over a period of 18 months from September 2012 to February 2014. Data were collected on basic demographic characteristics (age distribution), cause of SCI, type and severity of injuries, mode of transportation to the hospital and treatment modalities. In addition, data were collected on the imaging techniques used, waiting time and delays encountered, complications and follow-up. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze data using Windows Excel 2007 version. A total of 185 patients were treated in the study period, 125 (67.6%) patients had cervical spine injury, 33 (17.8%) had thoracic spine injuries and 27 (14.6%) had lumbar injuries. In all, 141 (76%) were males. The age range of patients was 4 years to 86 years; mean age was 36.25±13.62 years. Spinal injuries were most common in the 31-45-year age group, followed by 16-30-year group. Most prevalent cause of spinal injury was road traffic accident (RTA), 130 (70.3%), whereas assault was the least common, 5 (2.7%). Delay in getting imaging studies conducted was high; 43 (23%) of the computed tomography scans required were performed after 48 h of admission. Only 76 (41%) patients were able to afford the cost of magnetic resonance imaging. Pressure sore (23%) and pneumonia (21%) were the most common complication during admission. RTA was the most common cause of spinal injuries and occurred in the relatively young population, especially among men. Structured public education and enforcement of road safety measures are imperative

  8. Patients characteristics and perception of quality of care in a teaching hospital in Anambra State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelumadu, O F; Ndulue, C N

    2012-01-01

    Patients' assessment of quality of health care despite its importance in uptake of available services has not been closely examined in developing countries. The main objective of this study was to assess patient's perception of the quality of healthcare services as offered at the General Outpatients Department (GOPD) of a teaching hospital in order to obtain rational information for effective policy formulation on improved patient care in our hospitals. This was a four-week duration descriptive cross-sectional study involving three hundred and ninety (390) new adult patients seen at the General Out-Patients' Department of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi. Using a self-administered pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire in English language, relevant information was obtained from the participants. A total of 390 adult new patients with mean age 31.4 years participated in the study of which females 216 (55.5%) were slightly more than males 174 (45.5%). About 225 (57.7%) of the respondents received at most a primary school education. The major reasons for seeking care at the GOPD were expectations of being attended to by qualified doctors and nurses (38%); receiving efficient and quality service (36%) and obtaining cheaper and affordable drugs (14.5%). A quarter ofthe patients (25%) waited for up to one hour to register, while 38% spent more than an hour before being attended to by a doctor. Seventy percent (70%) of thepatients opined that the nurses were friendly, 94.5% of the patients rated the doctors as being friendly while 82.5% expressed satisfaction with the care received from the doctors. The conditions of the waiting hall were deemed very comfortable by 42%,and 42% felt hat it was uncomfortable. In all 79% of the patients felt at the quality of care was good and 82% were willing to return for consultations in future if need be. The waiting time for obtaining the patients card and doctors' consultation appeared to be acceptably long in this

  9. Prevalence of infection in patients with temporary catheter for hemodialysis in a teaching hospital

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    Palmiane de Rezende Ramim Borges

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the prevalence of infection related to the provisional catheter for hemodialysis in a teaching hospital and evaluate the risk factors associated with these infections.  A cross-sectional study analyzed by descriptive statistics and parametric tests. It was found that out of 129 patients, 48.8 % had catheter-related infection in hemodialysis, 65 % were male, 33.3 % were 60 years old and over, and 88 % of patients were admitted to intensive care unit. The prevalence of infection in this group was high, and the vast majority of diagnoses of infection were empirical. Given this, it is suggested to establish the routine culture of the catheter tip in all cases of suspected catheter infection to improve the quality of patient care, and the relentless pursuit of the causes that trigger the infection process in line with good practice from across the healthcare team.

  10. Use of abbreviations in the nursing records of a teaching hospital

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    Sylvia Miranda Carneiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the use of abbreviations in nursing records of a teaching hospital and describing their profile in different sectors, work shifts and professional nursing categories. Methods: documentary study that analyzed 627 nursing records in 24 patient charts using a systematic observation script. Results: we identified 1,792 abbreviations, and 35.8% were nonstandard. The incidence of abbreviations was higher in the Intensive Care Unit, used by nurses and in the night shift. Conclusion: abbreviations are part of the day-to-day of nursing records. The use of nonstandard abbreviations make difficult to understand the note content, can generate misinterpretations, put at risk the users’ safety and impair the continuity of labor work.

  11. Otolaryngology outreach to Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital: a medical and educational partnership.

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    Waller, B; Larsen-Reindorf, R; Duah, M; Opoku-Buabeng, J; Edwards, B M; Brown, D; Moyer, J; Prince, M; Basura, G J

    2017-07-01

    Medical and educational partnerships between high- and low-resourced countries provide opportunities to have a long-term meaningful impact on medical training and healthcare delivery. An otolaryngology partnership between Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana, and the University of Michigan Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery has been undertaken to enhance healthcare delivery at both institutions. A temporal bone dissection laboratory, with the equipment to perform dedicated otological surgery, and academic platforms for clinical and medical education and residency training have been established. This article describes the details of this partnership in otological surgery and hearing health, with an emphasis on creating in-country surgical simulation, training on newly acquired medical equipment and planning regarding the formulation of objectified metrics to gauge progress going forward.

  12. Pregnancy and cirrhosis: four cases at the Lome campus university teaching hospital (Togo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagny, A; Akolly, D A E; Lawson-Ananisoh, L M; Bouglouga, O; Douaguibe, B; El Hadji Yacoubou, R; Koffi, S; Lawson Evi, K; Guedenon, K M; Atakouma, Y D; Akpadza, K; Redah, D

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the hepatic and obstetric complications in pregnant women with cirrhosis. We report the cases of four pregnant women with cirrhosis treated in the gastroenterology and obstetrics-gynecology departments of the Lome Campus University Teaching Hospital between 2013 and 2015. The women's mean age was 32 years. Three were in the first trimester of pregnancy. Almost all had signs of advanced cirrhosis, including ascites (50%), lower-limb edema (75%), and jaundice (25%). All (100%) had liver failure and anemia. Cirrhosis was due to hepatitis virus B infection for 3 women. All had singleton pregnancies. Two mothers died; fetal outcome included one fetal loss and one stillbirth. This study shows the high risk associated with the combination of pregnancy and cirrhosis. Prognosis is poor for both mother and fetus.

  13. An audit of letters of referral to a prosthodontic department in a dental teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenlon, Michael R; Glick, Shiri; Sherriff, Martyn

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the quality and number of letters of referral for new patients received in the Prosthodontics Department of a Dental Teaching Hospital. Letters received during the month of May 2006 were included. Each letter of referral was tested against five criteria which might be expected in an appropriate letter of referral. These were information on the following: relevant dental history, relevant medical history, teeth present, diagnosis, and treatment plan. The results showed that only 8% of letters met all five criteria and 11% met none of them. Letters requesting better information were sent to referring practitioner as a result of this audit. However a re-audit in May 2007 showed that 9% of letters met all five criteria and 15% met none of them. A need has been identifiedfor better referral letters and ways of achieving this were discussed.

  14. Traffic flow and microbial air contamination in operating rooms at a major teaching hospital in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauning, M. T.; Bediako-Bowan, A.; Andersen, L. P.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Current literature examining the relationship between door-opening rate, number of people present, and microbial air contamination in the operating room is limited. Studies are especially needed from low- and middle-income countries, where the risk of surgical site infections is high....... Aim: To assess microbial air contamination in operating rooms at a Ghanaian teaching hospital and the association with door-openings and number of people present. Moreover, we aimed to document reasons for door-opening. Methods: We conducted active air-sampling using an MAS 100® portable impactor.......02). In empty operating rooms, the mean cfu count was 39 cfu/m3 after 1 h of uninterrupted ventilation and 52 (51%) of 102 samples exceeded a recommended level of 35 cfu/m3. Conclusion: The study revealed high values of intraoperative airborne cfu exceeding recommended levels. Minimizing the number of door...

  15. Study of Infertile Couples Attending a Teaching Hospital in Eastern Nepal.

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    Subedi, S; Lamichhane, S; Chhetry, M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a global health issue and a socially destabilizing condition for couples with several stigmas including medical, social, psychological burdens and a marital disharmony. The aim was to study the incidence of infertility in couples attending outdoor of Nobel Medical College and to know the contributing factors among the infertile couples. A prospective cross-sectional study was carried out in the outpatient department of a teaching hospital July 2015-June 2016, where the incidence of infertility and the contributing factors for the same were evaluated. The incidence of infertility in this study was 5.45% and it was dominated by secondary infertility. The most important cause was male factor in 37.39%. Majority of male factor abnormality was due to exposure to heat as these male work abroad in Arabian Countries. The study shows a dominance of secondary infertility and male factor being a major contributor. The most common semen abnormality was oligospermia.

  16. The pattern of neurological disorders in patients admitted to El shaab teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Taj Eldin Hag Osman

    1999-01-01

    This thesis was designed to study the pattern of neurological disorders of admitted patients to the neurology centre at El shaab teaching hospital in the period from january 1997 to december 1998. 402 cases were admitted. (35%) were in the age group 21-40, 30% in 41-60, 20% in 61-80, 14% in 0-20 and 1% in >81 males constituted 72% and females 28%. Cerebrovascular diseases top the list with 18.9%, followed by paraplegia's with 17.4%, peripheral neuropathies 11.7, (guillain barre was the most common). Brain space occupying lesions 10.4% (tumors and tuberculomas was the most common),movement disorders with 10% (Parkinson's disease was the most encountered), muscle disorders 6.2% (myasthenia gravis was the commonest). Ataxias 5.5%, headache and migraine was the least group of disorders

  17. Re-evaluation of 60Co treatment facility of Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adu, S.

    2008-06-01

    The radiological protection assessment based on the shielding of the Co-60 Radiotherapy facility at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital after the source replacement has been carried out. The results indicate that the concrete biological shield is adequate to attenuate the gamma photons from the new 222 TBq Co-60 source in use. The dose rates at critical locations of the public access area are within the recommended dose rate limit of O.5J..1Sv/h and 7.5J..1Sv/h for public and staff respectively. Thus the shielding has not deteriorated and still provides adequate protection for members of the public and the operating staff (au).

  18. The prevalence of malaria parasitaemia in blood donors in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okocha, E C; Ibeh, C C; Ele, P U; Ibeh, N C

    2005-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia among blood donors and to determine the possible risk of transmission of malaria parasite to recipients of blood in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Anambra State. Four hundred and forty-four subjects were selected randomly and EDTA added blood was collected for screening malaria parasites using Giemsa stain. The data were subjected to chi2 analysis. Prevalence of malaria was 30.2% among blood donors and showed bimodal distribution with significant variation in different months. Due to high prevalence of asymptomatic malaria parasitaemia in this region, all blood samples should be screened for malaria parasites (post-donor screening) and administered with a curative dose of antimalarials prophylactically to all patients transfused with malaria parasite positive blood.

  19. Maternal and fetal outcomes of emergency obstetric referrals to a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaba, Godwin O; Ekele, Bissallah A

    2017-01-01

    Our study sought to determine the maternal and fetal outcomes of emergency obstetric referrals to a Nigerian teaching hospital as well as assess reasons for these referrals. We enrolled women referred or who presented themselves to the emergency obstetric unit for management of complications of pregnancy, labour, delivery or the puerperium. The majority presented late, their mean duration of stay at the referring facility being 22.25 h. Only nine (7.3%) were transported by ambulance. Severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia (in 33, 26.8%) were the commonest obstetric indications for referral. Stillbirths occurred in 20/122(16.4%). There were eleven maternal deaths, giving an emergency referral fatality rate of 8.9%. Both maternal and fetal outcomes of these emergency obstetric referrals were poor owing mainly to late presentation, this being the result, among other factors, of an inefficient referral system.

  20. Factors Influencing Laboratory Information System Effectiveness Through Strategic Planning in Shiraz Teaching Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahador, Fateme; Sharifian, Roxana; Farhadi, Payam; Jafari, Abdosaleh; Nematolahi, Mohtram; Shokrpour, Nasrin

    This study aimed to develop and test a research model that examined 7effective factors on the effectiveness of laboratory information system (LIS) through strategic planning. This research was carried out on total laboratory staff, information technology staff, and laboratory managers in Shiraz (a city in the south of Iran) teaching hospitals by structural equation modeling approach in 2015. The results revealed that there was no significant positive relationship between decisions based on cost-benefit analysis and LIS functionality with LIS effectiveness, but there was a significant positive relationship between other factors and LIS effectiveness. As expected, high levels of strategic information system planning result in increasing LIS effectiveness. The results also showed that the relationship between cost-benefit analysis, LIS functionality, end-user involvement, and information technology-business alignment with strategic information system planning was significant and positive.

  1. An audit of parental satisfaction of pediatric day case surgery at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital

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    Olumide A Elebute

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent past, there has been a gradual increase in the volume of patients treated on a day case basis in our center. However, no study has been conducted to audit pediatric day case surgery practice at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. Objectives: To determine the level of parental satisfaction with pediatric day case surgery at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. Patients and Methods: A total of 101 parents or the patient′s caretakers whose wards had day case surgery were administered a self-completed questionnaire on the first postoperative day visit at the surgical outpatient clinic. The questions assessed parental satisfaction with the following: (a Communication with doctors (surgeons and anesthesiologists, (b Physical conditions of the theatre environment, (c Staff′s care, (d Need to care for the child at home, and (e Postoperative complication. Result: There were 101 respondents with an age range of 22-56 years (mean 35.05 ± 6.85. Eighty-seven (86% of the respondents were satisfied with the amount of information they obtained from their doctors before the operation; 43 (42.6% were satisfied with the waiting time, whereas 47 (46.5% were satisfied with the fasting time. However, 26 (25.7% of the respondents were dissatisfied with the waiting room environment and 87 parents (87.1% were dissatisfied with the nursing care. Conclusion: Most parents are satisfied with pediatric day case surgery care. Some adjustments, however, need to be made on reducing the waiting and fasting time of the patients and improving both the waiting room environment and the nursing care in order to increase its acceptance.

  2. Appropriateness and diagnostic yield of referrals for oesophagogastroduodenoscopy at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachi, K; Nkrumah, K N

    2011-01-01

    Increasing endoscopy workload in open-access services necessitates adoption of appropriateness criteria to check abuse and improve yield. To assess the appropriateness of referrals for oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) and its relationship to yield at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH), Accra. Referrals, signs, and symptoms of 375 consecutive patients for diagnostic oesophagogastroduodenoscopy were evaluated over four months. Indications were categorized as appropriate or inappropriate using the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) guidelines and endoscopic findings (yield) categorized as positive or negative. The relationship between these was analyzed and the diagnostic accuracy of the guidelines determined. There were 209 (55.7%) females, and 316 (84.3%) open-access procedures. Mean age was 46±17 years. Dyspepsia, 272 (72.5%) and epigastric tenderness, 192 (41.4 %) were the commonest symptom and sign respectively. Only 133 (35.5%) reported alarm symptoms. Appropriate referrals constituted 221(58.9%). Inappropriate referral rate was similar for endoscopists and non-endoscopists. Positive yield was 62.7%. Male sex, age > 45 years, haematemesis, persistent vomiting, gastroenterologists' referrals and epigastric tenderness were the best predictors of positive yield. Gastritis, 121 (32.3%), duodenal ulcer, 48 (12.5%) and oesophagitis, 36 (9.6%) were the leading endoscopy diagnoses. Carcinomas were reported only after 45 years and 18 (81.8%) of the cases had alarm symptoms. Inappropriate referral for OGD rate is high in Accra. Yield is improved by adherence to the ASGE guidelines but its accuracy as a screening tool for OGD at Korle- Bu Teaching Hospital is too low to recommend it for adoption.

  3. Retrospective evaluation of the clinical management of patients with periodontal abscesses attending a teaching hospital

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    Modupeoluwa Omotunde Soroye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to examine the clinical management of patients who attended a Nigerian teaching hospital with periodontal abscesses. Setting and Design: This is a retrospective study among patients who attended the Periodontics Clinic of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Rivers State, Nigeria, between January 2008 and December 2015. Patients and Methods: Information about the diagnosis was obtained from the departmental log book, and case notes were retrieved from record department. Data collection elicited information on age, sex, tribe, frequency of tooth brushing, dental attendance, medical history, clinical features, involved tooth/teeth, and treatment received. Statistical Analysis Used: Epi info version 3.5.1 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Patients aged between 15 and 87 years, with a mean age of 35.53 ± 19.30 years. Majority of patients were males, had minor ethnic extractions, had some form of education, first dental clinic attendees, indulged in once-daily toothbrushing, fully dentate, and had fair/poor oral hygiene. A total of 8.8% and 31.6% of the participants smoked cigarettes and consumed alcohol, respectively. A fifth of the participants had systemic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and peptic ulcer disease. Majority of the participants (91.2% had severe pain. About two-fifths had periodontal abscess around the incisors and the molars. The upper right quadrant was mostly involved (31.6%. Two-fifth of the patients had extraction done. Conclusion: Data from this study revealed periodontal abscess as a severely painful condition in naÏve dental patients, successfully treated mainly through extraction of the implicated tooth/teeth. This implies that oral health awareness and regular dental attendance may prevent its occurrence.

  4. Midwives’ knowledge and use of partographs at Juba Teaching Hospital, South Sudan

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    Clara Roba Alfred

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence shows that good knowledge of partographs and proper application of this knowledge results in a remarkable reduction in prolonged and obstructed labour and reduces maternal mortality. Obstructed labour can be prevented by a simple and cost-effective health intervention tool, the partograph. A partograph is a graphical record of the progress of labour and salient conditions of the mother and foetus plotted against time in hours. This provides an opportunity for early identification of deviation from normal progress. Early detection of prolonged labour greatly contributes to prevention of obstructed labour and related complications. Objective: To assess midwives’ knowledge and use of partographs in the maternity ward of Juba Teaching Hospital, South Sudan. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted to assess utilisation of partographs among healthcare providers in Juba Teaching Hospital. All providers working at the time of the study were included. An interviewer administered questionnaire prepared in English was used to assess socio-demographic and other related variables of respondents as well as knowledge and practice. Ethical procedures were followed at every step. Results: Only 20% of the 30 respondents were registered midwives, 67% knew the components -of a partograph, and 93% could differentiate between normal and abnormal labour with the use of a partograph. The factors affecting the use of partographs included; shortage of partographs in the ward, lack of protocols on partograph use, understanding semantics of the English language, absence of refresher training, late reporting of mothers to the ward, and a shortage of staff. Conclusions: Despite good knowledge of the partograph, about half of the providers do not use them. We recommend training and recruitment of more qualified midwives, a continuous supply of partographs to improve use of partographs continuous supportive supervision, mentoring of

  5. Patient satisfaction in outreach dental programs of a Dental Teaching Hospital in Modinagar (India

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    Vaibhav Vashishtha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient satisfaction with dental services has received minimal attention in India. The perceptions of satisfaction of the oral health care service among patients in outreach dental programs and their level of satisfaction are an important factor toward improving the service provided. Aim: To assess patient satisfaction at outreach dental programs of a Dental Teaching Hospital in Modinagar India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients attending community dental outreach programs organized by the Dental Teaching Hospital over a period of 1-month. A total of 4 weekly and 1 monthly camp were included, and all the subjects who attended these camps were administered the pretested structured questionnaire. The questions were related to the satisfaction level of the patient in outreach dental camps and answers were recorded using a four-point "Likert" scale with Chi-square and independent t-test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The results showed that level of satisfaction among patients were higher in weekly camps (95.2% as compared to monthly camps that is (80%. The response rate for the weekly camps was 95.2%, whereas for the monthly camp was 80%. Overall patient satisfaction scores with the care received ranged from the poor (1 to excellent (4. The highest reported levels of satisfaction were for the aspects of explanation of dental treatment by the doctor followed by meeting of perceived need of the patient with the treatment. Conclusion: Patient satisfaction with the community dental outreach programs was high, reflecting the delivery of quality treatment and positive attitude of the dental team during the camps. The overall high level of patient satisfaction reflected the dental team′s approach of responsibility and accountability toward the target population.

  6. Pneumatic reduction of intussusception in children at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital: An initial experience

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    Yaw Boateng Mensah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intussusception is a common abdominal emergency in children which necessitates prompt diagnosis and management. Nonsurgical methods of managing this condition are rapidly gaining popularity with fluoroscopic-guided pneumatic reduction being one of such methods that has been used with great success in many countries. We present our initial experience with fluoroscopic-guided pneumatic reduction of intussusception at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital which is also the first time the technique has been used in Ghana. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 children were enrolled in the study between August 2007 and February 2008 at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. Patients were given air enema under fluoroscopic-guidance using locally assembled equipment. The intraluminal pressure was monitored with a pressure gauge and was not permitted to go above 120 mmHg. A total of three attempts of 3 min each were allowed. Results: There were 12 males and 6 females. The average age of the patients was 8.3 months (SD= 3 months. Twelve (67% of the cases were reduced successfully while 6 (33% failed to reduce. A majority of those that did not reduced had symptoms for at least 2 days. Bowel perforation occurred in three (16.7% cases. Conclusion: Pneumatic reduction of intussusception is a cost-effective and rapid method of management of intussusception. It however has limitations like high reported rate of bowel perforation and limited ability to identify lead points. The benefits however seem to outweigh these challenges, such as fluoroscopic-guided pneumatic reduction has a very high success rate. Fluoroscopic guided pneumatic reduction should be considered as one of the primary modes of reduction in Ghana and other neighbouring countries that are yet to practice it.

  7. Audit of audit: review of a clinical audit programme in a teaching hospital intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter; Fee, Peter; Shulman, Rob; Bellingan, Geoffrey; Howell, David

    2012-09-01

    A comprehensive review of the clinical audit programme in a teaching hospital intensive care unit. A retrospective analysis of the clinical audit projects undertaken within the intensive care unit over the preceding 2 years and compared with published national guidelines for clinical audit. A 27-bedded teaching hospital intensive care unit in the UK. Each audit project was reviewed independently by two assessors. The following questions were assessed. 1. Were the projects true audits? 2. Were they prospective of retrospective? 3. Did the projects have input from appropriate members of the multidisciplinary team. 4. How many of the audit projects were re-audits? 5. Of the re-audits how many showed evidence of service improvement? each audit project was also scored against the Audit Project Assessment Tool produced by the UK Clinical Governance Support Team. Of the twenty five audit projects reviewed twenty two were considered to be true audits. All of the projects used only retrospective data. Audit projects were contributed from all sections of the multidisciplinary critical care team but there were few truly multidisciplinary projects. Four of the audit projects were re-audits, of these three showed service improvement and one showed deterioration. Of the twenty two true audit projects reviewed, eleven were classified as good quality projects using the Audit Project Assessment Tool. Despite the clinical audit programme being active and well supported, objective evidence of clinical governance benefit was lacking. The overall clinical audit programme has been revitalised by a series of improvements since undertaking this review and this approach is recommended to other organizations who are interested in improving their clinical audit performance.

  8. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR PAIN DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME IN PATIENTS ATTENDING LAGOS UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL, LAGOS, NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eweka, O M; Ogundana, O M; Agbelusi, G A

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome (TMJPDS) is the most common temporomandibular disorder. This condition presents with symptoms of pain, restricted jaw movement and joint noise. Other symptoms include otalgia, headache, neck pain and trismus. To determine the pattern of Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome patients managed at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria. A descriptive study of patients with signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome attending the Oral Medicine Clinic of Lagos University Teaching Hospital. Twenty-one patients with Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome were enrolled into the study, out of which 10(48%) were females and 11(52%) were males. The age range was 23-81years with a mean of 45.2 ± 18.9 years. Majority of the patients 20(95.2%) complained of pain around the joint, in the pre-auricular region, in the muscles of mastication and the ear. While 7(35%) complained of clicking sounds, 10(47.6%) complained of pain on mouth opening and during mastication only. In all 5(23.8%) had impaired movement of the jaws, mouth opening was normal in 18(85.7%) but reduced in 3(14.3%) patients. Over half of patients 12(57%) experienced clicking sounds, there was tenderness around the temporomandibular joint in 16(76.2%) cases, pain in the ear of 7(33.3%) patients and 13(61.9%) people presented with tenderness of the muscles of mastication. Conservative management of all the cases resulted in resolution of the symptoms. Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome has diverse clinical presentation and though distressing, it responds to prompt and effective conservative management.

  9. Post-operative pain management in paediatric surgery at Sylvanus Olympio University Teaching Hospital, Togo

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    Hamza Doles Sama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate pain management in paediatric surgery at Sylvanus Olympio University Teaching Hospital, Lome. Patients and Methods: A prospective descriptive study was conducted in the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care at Sylvanus Olympio teaching hospital from 1 January to 30 June 2012. Data collected include: demography, type of surgery, American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA classification, anaesthetic protocol, analgesia technique, post-operative complications and cost of analgesia. Results: The study includes 106 post-operative children. Abdominal surgery was performed in 41.5% and orthopaedic surgery in 31.1%. A total of 75% of patients were classified ASA 1. General anaesthesia (GA was performed in 88%. Anaesthetists supervised post-operative care in 21.7% cases. Multimodal analgesia was used in every case and 12% of patients received a regional block. The most frequently unwanted effects of analgesics used were nausea and/or vomiting in 12.3%. At H24, child under 7 years have more pain assessment than those from 7 to 15 years (46% vs 24% and this difference was statistically significant (chi-square = 4.7598; P = 0.0291 < 0.05. The average cost of peri-operative analgesia under loco regional analgesia (LRA versus GA during the first 48 h post-operative was US $23 versus $46. Conclusion: Our study showed that post-operative pain management in paediatric surgery is often not well controlled and paediatric loco regional analgesia technique is under practiced in sub Saharan Africa.

  10. A STUDY ON CLINICAL AND AETIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF HEART FAILURE AT KBN TEACHING AND GENERAL HOSPITAL

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    Chandrakala Guruprasad Yelwanti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The heart failure is a worldwide health problem with ever increasing proportion and is a major health problem in elderly persons. It has many aetiological factors. It is one of the most frequently encountered illnesses in day-to-day practice and most common cause of death in patients with cardiac disease. This study was done to determine the age and sex distribution and to evaluate clinical features and aetiological factors in patients admitted with heart failure at Khaja Banda Nawaz Teaching and General Hospital, Gulbarga, on the basis of clinical assessment, electrocardiography and echocardiography. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was done in Department of General Medicine at Khaja Banda Nawaz Teaching and General Hospital, Gulbarga, from January 2015 to June 2016 on patients with heart failure to determine the clinical and aetiological profile. A total of 100 cases above the age of 20 years were included in the study. The patients below the age of 20 years and known cases of congenital heart disease were excluded. RESULTS Out of 100 patients, the heart failure was seen more commonly in men than in women between the age groups of 46-65 years of age. Breathlessness was the most common presentation followed by pedal oedema, orthopnoea, etc. In our study, the primary aetiology for heart failure was found to be coronary artery disease (47% followed by dilated cardiomyopathy (20%, hypertension (14%, rheumatic heart disease (7%, anaemia (6%, cor pulmonale (4% and others (2%. Dyslipidaemia was the common risk factor followed by obesity and smoking. CONCLUSION The heart failure commonly occurs in elderly people and the incidence was higher in men than in women. The commonest presentation was breathlessness followed by pedal oedema. The commonest cause of heart failure was coronary artery disease followed by dilated cardiomyopathy and then hypertension combined with ischaemic heart disease.

  11. Epidemiology of Death in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Five U.S. Teaching Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jeffrey P.; Sellers, Deborah E.; Meyer, Elaine C.; Lewis-Newby, Mithya; Truog, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the epidemiology of death in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) at 5 geographically diverse teaching hospitals across the United States. Design, Setting, and Patients In the PICUs of five teaching hospitals across the United States, we prospectively identified 192 consecutive patients who died prior to PICU discharge. Each site enrolled between 24 and 50 patients. Each PICU had similar organizational and staffing structures. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results The overall mortality rate was 2.39% (range 1.85% to 3.38%). 133 (70%) patients died following the withholding or withdrawal of life-sustaining treatments, 30 (16%) were diagnosed as brain dead, and 26 (14%) died following an unsuccessful resuscitation attempt. Fifty-seven percent of all deaths occurred within the first week of admission;these patients, who were more likely to have new onset illnesses or injuries, included the majority of those who died following unsuccessful CPR attempts or brain death diagnoses. Patients who died beyond one week length-of-stay in the PICU were more likely to have pre-existing diagnoses, to be technology dependent prior to admission, and to have died following the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment. Only 64% of the patients who died following the withholding or withdrawing of life support had a formal DNR order in place at the time of their death. Conclusions The mode of death in the PICU is proportionally similar to that reported over the past two decades, while the mortality rate has nearly halved. Death is largely characterized by two fairly distinct profiles that are associated with whether death occurs within or beyond one week length-of-stay. Decisions not to resuscitate are often made in the absence of a formal DNR order. These data have implications for future quality improvement initiatives, especially around palliative care, end-of-life decision making, and organ donation. PMID:24979486

  12. How do Supervising Clinicians of a University Hospital and Associated Teaching Hospitals Rate the Relevance of the Key Competencies within the CanMEDS Roles Framework in Respect to Teaching in Clinical Clerkships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilg, Stefanie; Möltner, Andreas; Berberat, Pascal; Fischer, Martin R; Breckwoldt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In German-speaking countries, the physicians' roles framework of the "Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists" (CanMEDS) is increasingly used to conceptualize postgraduate medical education. It is however unclear, whether it may also be applied to the final year of undergraduate education within clinical clerkships, called "Practical Year" (PY). Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore how clinically active physicians at a university hospital and at associated teaching hospitals judge the relevance of the seven CanMEDS roles (and their (role-defining) key competencies) in respect to their clinical work and as learning content for PY training. Furthermore, these physicians were asked whether the key competencies were actually taught during PY training. 124 physicians from internal medicine and surgery rated the relevance of the 28 key competencies of the CanMEDS framework using a questionnaire. For each competency, following three aspects were rated: "relevance for your personal daily work", "importance for teaching during PY", and "implementation into actual PY teaching". In respect to the main study objective, all questionnaires could be included into analysis. All seven CanMEDS roles were rated as relevant for personal daily work, and also as important for teaching during PY. Furthermore, all roles were stated to be taught during actual PY training. The roles "Communicator", "Medical Expert", and "Collaborator" were rated as significantly more important than the other roles, for all three sub-questions. No differences were found between the two disciplines internal medicine and surgery, nor between the university hospital and associated teaching hospitals. Participating physicians rated all key competencies of the CanMEDS model to be relevant for their personal daily work, and for teaching during PY. These findings support the suitability of the CanMEDS framework as a conceptual element of PY training.

  13. Quality of life among dentists in teaching hospitals in South Canara, India

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    Dolar Doshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This paper reports on the quality of life among dentists using World Health Organization Abbreviated Instrument for Quality of Life Assessment, comprising 26 items which measure the following broad domains: Physical health, psychological health, social relationships, and environment. Materials and Methods : The instrument was self-administered among dentists in four teaching dental institutions. A total of 191 questionnaires were given out. Of those, 187 were consented and answered, making up a response rate of 97.9%. The internal consistency of the questionnaire, measured by Cronbach′s alpha was estimated at 0.75. Results : Highest mean score was seen for Domain 3 (Social relationships (16.15 + 2.38 and the least score was for Domain 4 (Environment (14.72 + 2.12. Higher proportions of respondents rated their quality of life as good (65.1 percent, and also majority of dentists (63.5 percent were satisfied with their health. Conclusion : Quality of life recognizes the value of an individual′s health in the broader psychologic and social aspects of his/her life. In this study, the overall rating of quality of life among dentists in teaching hospitals is good.

  14. A comparative study of collimation in bedside chest radiography for preterm infants in two teaching hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stollfuss, J.; Schneider, K.; Krüger-Stollfuss, I.

    2015-01-01

    •Potential factors influencing non-optimal image collimation in the setting of bedside chest X-ray in preterm infants were investigated.•A comparable rate of optimal images was observed in two hospitals.•Size, weight or disease severity had no influence on collimation quality.•Unrelated to the years of experience a large variation of the technician in correct collimation was noted (18–86%).•Individualized quality control and education is necessary. Potential factors influencing non-optimal image collimation in the setting of bedside chest X-ray in preterm infants were investigated. A comparable rate of optimal images was observed in two hospitals. Size, weight or disease severity had no influence on collimation quality. Unrelated to the years of experience a large variation of the technician in correct collimation was noted (18–86%). Individualized quality control and education is necessary. Unnecessary exposure of the abdomen, arms or head may lead to a substantial increase of the radiation dose in portable chest X-rays on the neonatal intensive care unit. The objective was to identify potential factors influencing inappropriate exposure of non-thoracic structures in two teaching hospitals. The study analysed 200 consecutive digital chest radiographs in 20 preterm neonates (mean gestation 25 ± 1 weeks). Demographical data, tube settings and exposure parameters were recorded. To grade the collimation, we used a scoring system with a maximum of 12 exposed non-thoracic structures. Length of gestation, age, the radiographer, years of experience in performing X-rays and the number of in situ catheters or lines, were correlated with collimation quality. There was no significant difference between the rates of optimal images obtained in the two hospitals (0.32 vs 0.39, n.s.). Scores showed that most suboptimal images had only mildly reduced image quality (1.40 ± 1.38 vs 1.20 ± 1.43, n.s.). Length of gestation or presence of surgical drains, catheters and

  15. Development of an effective risk management system in a teaching hospital

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    Adibi Hossein

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unsafe health care provision is a main cause of increased mortality rate amongst hospitalized patients all over the world. A system approach to medical error and its reduction is crucial that is defined by clinical and administrative activities undertaken to identify, evaluate, and reduce the risk of injury. The aim of this study was to develop and implement a risk management system in a large teaching hospital in Iran, especially of the basis of WHO guidelines and patient safety context. Methods WHO draft guideline and patient safety reports from different countries were reviewed for defining acceptable framework of risk management system. Also current situation of mentioned hospital in safety matter and dimensions of patient safety culture was evaluated using HSOPSC questionnaire of AHRQ. With adjustment of guidelines and hospital status, the conceptual framework was developed and next it was validated in expert panel. The members of expert panel were selected according to their role and functions and also their experiences in risk management and patient safety issues. The validated framework consisted of designating a leader and coordinator core, defining communications, and preparing the infrastructure for patient safety education and culture-building. That was developed on the basis of some values and commitments and included reactive and proactive approaches. Results The findings of reporting activities demonstrated that at least 3.6 percent of hospitalized patients have experienced adverse events and 5.3 percent of all deaths in the hospital related with patient safety problems. Beside the average score of 12 dimensions of patient safety culture was 46.2 percent that was considerably low. The “non-punitive responses to error” had lowest positive score with 21.2 percent. Conclusion It is of paramount importance for all health organizations to lay necessary foundations in order to identify safety risks and improve

  16. Development of an effective risk management system in a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Hossein; Khalesi, Nader; Ravaghi, Hamid; Jafari, Mahdi; Jeddian, Ali Reza

    2012-09-21

    Unsafe health care provision is a main cause of increased mortality rate amongst hospitalized patients all over the world. A system approach to medical error and its reduction is crucial that is defined by clinical and administrative activities undertaken to identify, evaluate, and reduce the risk of injury. The aim of this study was to develop and implement a risk management system in a large teaching hospital in Iran, especially of the basis of WHO guidelines and patient safety context. WHO draft guideline and patient safety reports from different countries were reviewed for defining acceptable framework of risk management system. Also current situation of mentioned hospital in safety matter and dimensions of patient safety culture was evaluated using HSOPSC questionnaire of AHRQ. With adjustment of guidelines and hospital status, the conceptual framework was developed and next it was validated in expert panel. The members of expert panel were selected according to their role and functions and also their experiences in risk management and patient safety issues. The validated framework consisted of designating a leader and coordinator core, defining communications, and preparing the infrastructure for patient safety education and culture-building. That was developed on the basis of some values and commitments and included reactive and proactive approaches. The findings of reporting activities demonstrated that at least 3.6 percent of hospitalized patients have experienced adverse events and 5.3 percent of all deaths in the hospital related with patient safety problems. Beside the average score of 12 dimensions of patient safety culture was 46.2 percent that was considerably low. The "non-punitive responses to error" had lowest positive score with 21.2 percent. It is of paramount importance for all health organizations to lay necessary foundations in order to identify safety risks and improve the quality of care. Inadequate participation of staff in education

  17. Avoidable iatrogenic complications of urethral catheterization and inadequate intern training in a tertiary-care teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thomas, Arun Z

    2009-10-01

    To examine the magnitude of potentially avoidable iatrogenic complications of male urethral catheterization (UC) within a tertiary-care supra-regional teaching hospital, and to evaluate risk factors and subjective feeling of interns in our institution on the adequacy of training on UC.

  18. Development and use of DNA archives at veterinary teaching hospitals to investigate the genetic basis of disease in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelhano, Marta G P; Acland, Gregory M; Ciccone, Penelope A; Corey, Elizabeth E; Mezey, Jason G; Schimenti, John C; Todhunter, Rory J

    2009-01-01

    The DNA archives developed at veterinary medical teaching hospitals will be important resources for mapping disease loci and identifying underlying genes. The most important feature of a DNA archive is accurate identification or exclusion of diseases in each animal. Such archives will be complimentary resources to tissue banks that are currently available.

  19. Knowledge Practice and Outcome of Quality Nursing Care among Nurses in University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (UCTH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyira, Emilia James; Ella, R. E.; Chukwudi, Usochukwu Easter; Paulina, Akpan Idiok

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The main purpose of this study was to determine knowledge practice and outcome of quality nursing care among nurses in University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (UCTH). Three research questions and one hypothesis were formulated to guide this study. Literature related to the variables under study was reviewed according to the research…

  20. Mock Hospital Ethics Committee: An Innovative Simulation to Teach Prelicensure Nursing Students the Complexities of Ethics in Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn Wonder, Amy

    Limited opportunities exist for prelicensure nursing students to observe the interprofessional process required to resolve complex ethical cases in practice. Therefore, a mock hospital ethics committee (MHEC) was assembled to teach the application of ethics in practice through simulation. The MHEC meeting is an example of how nursing education and practice can partner to create meaningful learning experiences.

  1. Utilization of potentially inappropriate medications in elderly patients in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India

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    Binit N Jhaveri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the use of potentially inappropriate medicines in elderly inpatients in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed for cases of elderly patients admitted between January 2010 and December 2010. Data on age, gender, diagnosis, duration of hospital stay, treatment, and outcome were collected. Prescriptions were assessed for the use of potentially inappropriate medications in geriatric patients by using American Geriatric Society Beer′s criteria (2012 and PRISCUS list (2010. Results: A total of 676 geriatric patients (52.12% females were admitted in the medicine ward. The average age of geriatric patients was 72.69 years. According to Beer′s criteria, at least one inappropriate medicine was prescribed in 590 (87.3% patients. Metoclopramide (54.3%, alprazolam (9%, diazepam (8%, digoxin > 0.125 mg/day (5%, and diclofenac (3.7% were the commonly used inappropriate medications. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in heart and renal failure patients was the commonly identified drug-disease interaction. According to PRISCUS list, at least one inappropriate medication was prescribed in 210 (31.06% patients. Conclusion: Use of inappropriate medicines is highly prevalent in elderly patients.

  2. Cost awareness among doctors in an Irish university-affiliated teaching hospital

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    William H.C. Tiong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in USA and Canada have found that physicians and physicians in training have a limited understanding of medical care costs. In this study, we set out to survey all grades of doctors in the surgical department, emergency department, and anaesthetic department in a university-affiliated, Irish teaching hospital. Open-ended questionnaires on cost of 25 routinely used items in the hospital were sent to each department. The aims of the study were to assess the present knowledge of cost among the various grades of doctors, and to evaluate the level of professional experience on cost awareness and their confidence in their estimates. We had an overall response rate of 56.8% with 68.5% of doctors admitted to have estimated more than 90% of their responses. Ninety three percent of doctors have no confidence in their estimates on cost of listed items. We found that the lack of cost awareness was universal among doctors of all grades (P = 0.236. The doctors in our study population showed a high level of inaccuracy on their estimates of cost of routinely used items with 84% of the items overestimated. Our results were discouraging and demonstrated that considerable educational activity will be necessary if doctors are to be more cost effective in meeting the national health care budget.

  3. Resistance and utilisation pattern of antibacterial agents in outpatient settings in two Teaching Hospitals in Colombo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senadheera, G P; Sri Ranganathan, S; Patabendige, G; Fernando, G H; Gamage, D; Maneke, R M; Fernandopulle, B M

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial resistance (ABR) is a public threat. Sri Lanka is a country with limited surveillance of ABR in the community. The WHO methodology was adapted to identify ABR in outpatient settings (nonhospitalised patients) and its link to consumption of antibiotics. It was a cross-sectional descriptive community based study to collect ABR data from Out Patient Department (OPD) of two leading Teaching Hospitals in Colombo district. The indicator organism Escherichia coli (E. coli) was obtained from the urine specimens of patients who were suspected to have urinary tract infections. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed for commonly used oral antibiotics using disc diffusion method. The antibiotic consumption aggregate data were collected from the OPD pharmacies of the said hospitals and expressed as Defined Daily Doses (DDD) per 1000 inhabitants per 1000 day. Of the 2183 urine samples, pathogenic E. coli was isolated in 9.3% (204), and 8% (n=16) of them were Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamase (ESBL) producers. E.coli was most resistant to ampicillin (85%), followed by nalidixic acid (58.5%), trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (47.1%), ciprofloxacin (46.2%), norfloxacin (43.7%) amoxicillin /clavulanic acid (36.3%) and nitrofurantoin (15%). Multi-drug resistance was seen in 44%. Amoxicillin was the most frequently consumed antibacterial agent (2.65 DDD per 1000 inhabitants per day). There is an alarmingly high antibiotic resistance in the non-hospitalised patients indicating high prevalence of E. coli resistance in the community.

  4. Maternal and fetal mortality and complications associated with cesarean section deliveries in teaching hospitals in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Bachtiar, Hafni; Chowdhury, Mahbub Elahi; Fernando, Sunil; Suwanrath, Chitkasaem; Kor-Anantakul, Ounjai; Tuan, Le Anh; Lim, Apiradee; Lumbiganon, Pisake; Manandhar, Bekha; Muchtar, Masrul; Nahar, Lutfan; Hieu, Nguyen Trong; Fang, Pan Xiao; Prasertcharoensuk, Witoon; Radnaabarzar, Erdenetungalag; Sibuea, Daulat; Than, Kyu Kyu; Tharnpaisan, Piangjit; Thach, Tran Son; Rowe, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    To compare the mortality, morbidity of emergency and elective cesarean section with vaginal delivery among Asian teaching hospitals. Hospital based prospective study at 12 centers of 9 countries. 12 591 vaginal deliveries, 3062 elective and 4328 emergency cesarean section were followed up to 5 days postpartum. Maternal deaths (95% CI) per 1000 births among vaginal deliveries being 0.47 (0.17, 1.03) was not significantly different from 0.31 (0.01, 1.73) of elective cesarean section and both rates were significantly lower than 2.87 (1.53, 4.91) per 1000 births of emergency section. The vaginal delivery group had significantly lower incidences of all major complication except significantly higher chance of secondary operations and non-significantly different risk for endometritis. Corresponding neonatal mortality per 1000 deliveries among the three groups were 7 (5.6, 8.6), 2.2 (0.9, 4.6) and 12.4 (9.3, 16.2) (P cesarean section. Maternal complications were increased by cesarean delivery but elective section may reduce neonatal complication.

  5. Improving the quality of the order-writing process for inpatient orders in a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Peter A; Rylander, Jeanette; Dizon, Dominic T; Peterson, Michael W

    2007-01-01

    Physicians' illegible handwriting is a notorious contributing factor to medical errors. Furthermore, an illegible signature or failure to print prescribers' name interferes with the ability of staff to clarify orders. We surveyed support medical staff at a teaching hospital before and 2 months after providing all internal medicine department residents a self-inking stamp with their name and pager number. Responses were received from 51% at the first and 36% at the second survey of 401 eligible staff. Responses to questions regarding illegible or absent signature, illegible or absent pager number, and failure to print prescribers' name showed a significant improvement (P < .0001) after 52 residents working in the hospital started to sign orders with their stamp. The support staff also noted a significant reduction in the time required to contact a physician to clarify orders, from more than 10 minutes to 1 to 5 minutes (P < .0001). Physicians signing orders using a stamp with their name and pager number provide support staff legible identification, leading to an improvement in the quality of the order-writing process. This kind of signature allows clarification of orders in a timely fashion.

  6. An analysis of uterine rupture at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, Southeast Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbamara, S U; Obiechina, Nja; Eleje, G U

    2012-01-01

    Uterine rupture is a preventable condition which has persistently remained in our environment. The aim of this study therefore is to ascertain the incidence of uterine rupture, examine the predisposing factors and maternal and fetal outcome of patients managed of uterine rupture in a tertiary hospital. This descriptive case series was conducted at the department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Nnamdi Azikiwe, University Teaching Hospital Nnewi from March 2004 to February 2009. The incidence of uterine rupture was 6.2 per 1000 deliveries. The commonest age range of occurrence was 30-34 years. Uterine rupture occurred predominantly among women of low parity. Previous caesarean section with concurrent use of oxytocics was the commonest risk factor documented.The maternal and perinatal mortality ratio was 94 per 100,000 deliveries and 6 per 1000 births respectively. Surgery was the main stay of treatment and the commonest procedure carried out was uterine repair only. Rupture of the gravid uterus is still a significant cause of maternal mortality and morbidity in our environment. The causes are commonly preventable. The provision of maternal care by skilled personnel, proper antenatal care, update training programmes for health care providers and appropriate legislation on maternal care will significantly reduce the incidence of uterine rupture and improve its prognosis.

  7. Pattern of clinical presentation of eclampsia at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Southeastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinma, E D; Echendu, D A

    2012-01-01

    Eclampsia contributes significantly to maternal and perinatal mortalities globally. The objective of this study is to review the pattern of Eclampsia in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi, Nigeria. A retrospective study that reviewed records from labour ward and the Medical Records Department, of cases of Eclampsia managed at NAUTH over a ten year period 1st January-31st December, 2009. There were 57 cases of Eclampsia out of a total of 6,262 deliveries within the study period, giving a prevalence of 0.91%. The highest prevalence of 0.24% occurred in 2009. It was most common, 14 (30.4%), in the 25-29 year age group. The nulliparous women, 28 (61%) were more commonly affected. The prevalence was higher in the un-booked patients (89%), and antepartum Eclampsia was the commonest type (76%). Twenty one (45.7%) patients had three or more convulsions prior to the institution of therapy. Headache, oedema, and blurring of vision were the commonest symptoms, 74%, 71%, and 65% respectively. Eclampsia occurred mainly in un-booked and primigravid patients in this study. Early registration of pregnant women, especially primigravid, in health facilities for effective antenatal care and supervised hospital delivery will significantly reduce the prevalence and complications of Eclampsia.

  8. Urological injuries following gynecological operations--our experience in a teaching hospital in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chianakwana, G U; Okafor, P I S; Ikechebelu, J I; Mbonu, Okechukwu O

    2006-01-01

    Various grades of urological injuries occur following gynecological operations. Some are recognized during or after surgery but others pass unnoticed. To study the urological injuries that follow gynecological operations in our centre. Retrospective study. Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi Nigeria, a third generation tertiary institution serving rural, semi-urban, and urban communities. Searching through the records, all the gynecological operations performed in our centre from 1st July 1998 to 30th June 2003 were reviewed. Those patients in whom there were documented evidences of urological injuries were noted. Similarly, all the urological injuries treated in our institution during the same period but resulting from gynecological operations carried out in peripheral hospitals were also noted. From the relevant medical records, the following data were extracted: type of gynecological operation, nature of urological injury, time when injury was detected, status of the surgeon, management modalities, and outcome. A total of 37 urological injuries occurred but, because of incomplete records in five, only 32 patients were included in this study. Ligation of the ureters following hysterectomy was the most common injury and occurred in 28 (87.5%) of the patients. Ureteric ligation is a common urological injury following gynecological operations in our centre.

  9. Nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in individuals with HIV/ AIDS attended in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital

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    Lilian Andreia Fleck Reinato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the prevalence of nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in individuals with HIV/AIDS under inpatient treatment in a teaching hospital in the state of São Paulo (Brazil. METHOD: a cross-sectional study undertaken in two units specialized in attending people living with HIV/AIDS, in the period August 2011 - July 2012. Socio-demographic and clinical data was collected through individual interviews and from the medical records; samples of nasal secretion were collected with Stuart swabs on the first day of inpatient treatment. Ethical aspects were respected. RESULT: of the 229 individuals with HIV/AIDS hospitalized in this period, 169 participated in the study, with Staphylococcus aureus being identified in the culture tests of 46 (27.2% of the individuals, resistance to oxacillin being evidenced in 10 (21.8% participants. CONCLUSION: the results of the research indicate that the prevalence of colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in individuals with HIV/AIDS in the specialized units was considered relevant, possibly contributing to future investigations and, moreover, to the implementation of measures to prevent and control this pathogen in this population.

  10. Nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in individuals with HIV/ AIDS attended in a Brazilian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinato, Lilian Andreia Fleck; Pio, Daiana Patrícia Marchetti; Lopes, Letícia Pimenta; Pereira, Fernanda Maria Vieira; Lopes, Ana Elisa Ricci; Gir, Elucir

    2013-01-01

    to evaluate the prevalence of nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in individuals with HIV/AIDS under inpatient treatment in a teaching hospital in the state of São Paulo (Brazil). a cross-sectional study undertaken in two units specialized in attending people living with HIV/AIDS, in the period August 2011 - July 2012. Socio-demographic and clinical data was collected through individual interviews and from the medical records; samples of nasal secretion were collected with Stuart swabs on the first day of inpatient treatment. Ethical aspects were respected. of the 229 individuals with HIV/AIDS hospitalized in this period, 169 participated in the study, with Staphylococcus aureus being identified in the culture tests of 46 (27.2%) of the individuals, resistance to oxacillin being evidenced in 10 (21.8%) participants. the results of the research indicate that the prevalence of colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in individuals with HIV/AIDS in the specialized units was considered relevant, possibly contributing to future investigations and, moreover, to the implementation of measures to prevent and control this pathogen in this population.

  11. Welcoming with risk classification in teaching hospitals: assessment of structure, process and result

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    Dagmar Willamowius Vituri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess, from the worker's viewpoint, the structure, the process and the results of the Emergency Hospital Services that have taken up the guideline of "Welcoming with Risk Classification" in two teaching hospitals of the state of Paraná. METHOD: quantitative and descriptive research, exploratory and prospective, using random sampling stratified by professional category, comprising a universe of 216 professional people. RESULTS: they found some points of agreement regarding the promotion of a welcoming and humane environment; privacy and security; welcome and shelter of the companion and also the sheltering and classification of all patients; however, there was disagreement about the comfort of the environment, reference system and counter-reference, prioritisation of seriously ill patients in post-classification service, communication between the members of the multi-professional team and reassessment of the guideline. CONCLUSION: the workers assess the development of the guideline as being precarious, due mainly to the lack of physical structure, due to the lack of physical structure and shortcomings in the service process.

  12. Optimizing nurse capacity in a teaching hospital neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokangul, Ali; Akcan, Serap; Narli, Mufide

    2017-06-01

    Patients in intensive care units need special attention. Therefore, nurses are one of the most important resources in a neonatal intensive care unit. These nurses are required to have highly specialized training. The random number of patient arrivals, rejections, or transfers due to lack of capacity (such as nurse, equipment, bed etc.) and the random length of stays, make advanced knowledge of the optimal nurse a requirement, for levels of the unit behave as a stochastic process. This stochastic nature creates difficulties in finding optimal nurse staffing levels. In this paper, a stochastic approximation which is based on the required nurse: patient ratio and the number of patients in a neonatal intensive care unit of a teaching hospital, has been developed. First, a meta-model was built to generate simulation results under various numbers of nurses. Then, those experimented data were used to obtain the mathematical relationship between inputs (number of nurses at each level) and performance measures (admission number, occupation rate, and satisfaction rate) using statistical regression analysis. Finally, several integer nonlinear mathematical models were proposed to find optimal nurse capacity subject to the targeted levels on multiple performance measures. The proposed approximation was applied to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a large hospital and the obtained results were investigated.

  13. Clinical teaching and learning within a preceptorship model in an acute care hospital in Ireland; a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, Edel; Lathlean, Judith

    2017-04-01

    A preceptorship model of clinical teaching was introduced to support the new all-graduate nurse education programme in Ireland in 2002. Little is known about how this model impacts upon the pedagogical practices of the preceptor or student learning in clinical practice leading to question what constitutes effective teaching and learning in clinical practice at undergraduate level. This study aimed to explore the clinical teaching and learning within a preceptorship model in an acute care hospital in Ireland and identify when best practice, based on current theoretical professional and educational principles occurred. A qualitative research study of a purposively selected sample of 13 students and 13 preceptors, working together in four clinical areas in one hospital in Ireland. Methods were semi-structured interviews, analysed thematically, complemented by documentary analysis relating to the teaching and assessment of the students. Ethical approval was gained from the hospital's Ethics Committee. Preceptor-student contact time within an empowering student-preceptor learning relationship was the foundation of effective teaching and learning and assessment. Dialoguing and talking through practice enhanced the students' knowledge and understanding, while the ability of the preceptor to ask higher order questions promoted the students' clinical reasoning and problem solving skills. Insufficient time to teach, and an over reliance on students' ability to participate in and contribute to practice with minimal guidance were found to negatively impact students' learning. Concepts such as cognitive apprenticeship, scaffolding and learning in communities of practice can be helpful in understanding the processes entailed in preceptorship. Preceptors need extensive educational preparation and support to ensure they have the pedagogical competencies necessary to provide the cognitive teaching techniques that foster professional performance and clinical reasoning. National

  14. Maternal morbidity and mortality due to primary PPH-experience at ayub teaching hospital abbottabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, H.; Sarwar, I.; Nisa, A.U.

    2008-01-01

    Postpartum Haemorrhage (PPH) remains a significant cause of maternal mortality and morbidity like hypovolemic shock, anaemia, multi organ failure, consumptive coagulopathy, disseminated intra vascular coagulation (DIC), blood transfusion related complications and hysterectomy leading to loss of childbearing potential. The present study was conducted to determine the frequency of PPH and the associated maternal morbidity at the Department of Gynaecology Unit B, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad. The study was carried out in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Unit B of the Ayub teaching Hospital Abbottabad from 18th April 2006 to 17 July 2006. The study population included all cases admitted with primary PPH during the study period. For calculation of frequencies, the total number of deliveries in the setting during the study period was used. All subjects underwent a complete obstetrical clinical workup comprising of history, general physical examination, abdominal and pelvic examination, relevant laboratory investigations. The maternal condition was assessed and managed according to established hospital protocols which included both pharmacological and surgical intervention. All maternal complications were noted and recorded on pre-designed proformas. Data was entered and analyzed by computer. A total of 50 cases of primary PPH were recorded during the study period. The frequency of PPH was calculated as 7.1%. The major cause of PPH was uterine atony found in 29 (58%) cases, followed by cervical, vaginal and perineal tears in 12 (24%) cases. Initially all patients were managed pharmacologically followed by surgical intervention. Subtotal (haemostatic) hysterectomy was performed in 10 (20%) cases. Maternal morbidity was detected in 31 (62%) of cases; the major morbidities were DIC in 3 (6%) cases. Acute renal failure in 3 (6%) patients and shock in 2 (9.9%) cases and anaemia in 20 (90.1%) cases. The study concludes that the frequency of primary PPH in this

  15. Pattern of acute organophosphorus poisoning at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinew, Getnet Mequanint; Asrie, Assefa Belay; Birru, Eshetie Melese

    2017-04-04

    Despite the apparent benefits of organophosphate compounds (OPCs) acute organophosphate (OP) pesticide poison is an increasing problem worldwide. In a country like Ethiopia, where agriculture is a major component of the economy, these compounds are readily available to the general public. There is paucity of evidence from Ethiopia showing the pattern of organophosphate poisoning (OPP) in healthcare facilities. The objective of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the pattern of acute OPP at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital in northwest Ethiopia, during September 2010 through December 2014 was conducted. Data was collected through chart review of patients who were admitted due to poisoning. Data was analysed using SPSS 20. Organophosphate poisoning in University of Gondar teaching hospital accounts for about 38.46% of all emergency room admissions for poisoning. Out of the 90 cases studied 60% (54) were women, with male to female ratio of 1:1.5. The mean age of the patients was 25.5 with a standard deviation of 9.45. 56.7% of the cases studies lived in an urban environment compared to 43.3% who lived rurally. In the vast majority of patients, 90% (81) patients had ingested OP as an act of suicide. Regarding the route of exposure, oral ingestion was most common in suicidal cases (88.9%). The elapsed time between the time of poison ingestion and the start of the treatment, ranged from 13 min to 1 day. Health care professionals' useds decontamination methods such as gastric lavage and activated charcoal (45.6%) and 36.7% use atropine for OPP treatment. The mean hospital stay was 0.74 days. In the present study family problems were a leading cause of suicides and accounted for 45.8% of all cases. As a developing nation who economy relies heavily on agriculture, Ethiopia continues to have OP compounds remain a common cause of acute poisonings. This is particularly concerning for younger generation who have high rates of OPP and whose numbers continue

  16. Opinions of clinical veterinarians at a US veterinary teaching hospital regarding antimicrobial use and antimicrobial-resistant infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Megan E; Hoppin, Jane A; Steers, Nicola; Davis, Jennifer L; Davidson, Gigi; Hansen, Bernie; Lunn, Katharine F; Murphy, K Marcia; Papich, Mark G

    2015-10-15

    To determine opinions of faculty members with clinical appointments, clinical veterinarians, residents, and interns at a US veterinary teaching hospital regarding antimicrobial use and antimicrobial-resistant infections. Cross-sectional survey. 71 veterinarians. An online questionnaire was sent to all veterinarians with clinical service responsibilities at the North Carolina State University veterinary teaching hospital (n = 167). The survey included 23 questions regarding demographic information, educational experiences, current prescribing practices, and personal opinions related to antimicrobial selection, antimicrobial use, restrictions on antimicrobial use, and antimicrobial resistance. Of the 167 veterinarians eligible to participate, 71 (43%) responded. When respondents were asked to rate their level of concern (very concerned = 1; not concerned = 5) about antimicrobial-resistant infections, most (41/70 [59%]) assigned a score of 1, with mean score for all respondents being 1.5. Most survey participants rated their immediate colleagues (mean score, 1.9) as more concerned than other veterinary medical professionals (mean score, 2.3) and their clients (mean score, 3.4). Fifty-nine of 67 (88%) respondents felt that antimicrobials were overprescribed at the hospital, and 32 of 69 (46%) respondents felt uncomfortable prescribing at least one class of antimicrobials (eg, carbapenems or glycopeptides) because of public health concerns. Findings indicated that veterinarians at this teaching hospital were concerned about antimicrobial resistance, thought antimicrobials were overprescribed, and supported restricting use of certain antimicrobial classes in companion animals. Findings may be useful in educating future veterinarians and altering prescribing habits and antimicrobial distribution systems in veterinary hospitals.

  17. Survey of the knowledge, perception, and attitude of medical students at the University of Leeds toward organ donation and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, K K; Hakeem, A R; Dave, R; Lewington, A; Sanfey, H; Ahmad, N

    2015-03-01

    The shortage of organ donors is the key rate-limiting factor for organ transplantation in the United Kingdom. Many strategies have been proposed to increase donation; one strategy aims to improve awareness of organ donation and transplantation (ODT) among medical students. This survey seeks to investigate the knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes of the medical students in the United Kingdom toward ODT and the curriculum content. A 32-item online questionnaire was distributed to 957 medical students at the University of Leeds (October to December 2012). There were 216 (22.6%) respondents. Students were aware of kidney, heart, and liver transplantation (91.6%, 88.8%, and 86.5%). Awareness of small intestine (36.7%) and islet of Langerhans (33.0%) transplantation was poor. Students understood the term "brain stem death" (82.3%); however, they lacked understanding of criteria used for brain stem death testing (75.8%). Their perceptions and attitudes were favorable toward ODT; 43.3% of the students were unhappy with their current knowledge, and 87.6% of the students agree that ODT teaching should be included in the curriculum. Students have a basic understanding of ODT but lack detailed knowledge. They accept its importance and desire further teaching to supplement their current knowledge to be able to understand the issues related to ODT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Infection dynamics of vancomycin and inducible clindamycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis in an Indian teaching hospital

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    Debasmita Dubey

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To do surveillance for vancomycin and inducible clindamycin resistance of Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis, a Gram-positive bacterium in a teaching hospital. Methods: E. faecalis strains isolated from clinical samples were screened for vancomycin and inducible clindamycin resistance, i.e., D-test positivity, using vancomycin screen agar and blood agar plates, respectively. For the D-test screening, erythromycin resistant (Er-r and clindamycin sensitive (Cd-s strain were used. Results: Of 265 isolated E. faecalis strains, 159 (60% were vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE and 106 were vancomycin sensitive Enterococcus (VSE. Of 265 strains, 42 were constitutively resistant to clindamycin and erythromycin and of 148 Er-r and Cd-s strains, 87 (32.83% had D-test positivity, while the rest 61 strains were D-test negatives. D-test results examined with 6 hospital factors as bivalents, only 2 factors, the VSE/VRE and the presence/absence of prior antibiotic use > 90 days bivalent were statistically significant. A VRE strain with D-test positivity would be picked up 0.570 2 times more frequently than a strain with VSE and D-test positivity. Also, patients with prior antibiotic use > 90 days had 3.737 5 times more chance of picking up D-test positive strains than patients without any prior antibiotic use. Resistance pattern of E. faecalis strains to individual 14 antibiotics were recorded; the maximum values of resistance were against ampicillin 10 μg/disc and linezolid 30 μg/disc. Student’s t-test for hospital acquired and community acquired data revealed that drug resistant strains were equally prevalent in both sources. Conclusions: Prevalence of 60% VRE in both hospital and adjoining community creates consternation. In total 87 (32.83% strains had D-test positivity; patients who had used antibiotics within the last 90 days have got an ample chance of picking of D-test positive E. faecalis. D-test protocol should be followed with

  19. Place and role of multifield hospital in teaching program on surgery for students

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    A. V. Kapshytar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Present time is characterized by increase of dynamics of world and social development, introduction of ECTS (European Credit Transfer System [Andrushchenko V. P. at al. 2007; Pertseva T. O. at al. 2008]. Features of new information technologies and forms of educational process dictate need of active introduction of the principles of evidential medicine [Pidayev A. Century at al. 2004; Pishak at al. 2005; Bereznitsky Y. S. at al. 2006]. Thus the main postulate of the Bologna declaration is providing adequate material level of educational base where the training program is implemented in the hospital [Desyaterik V.I. 2008]. Research objective: to determine place and role of multifield clinical base in student’s teaching “General surgery”. Material and research methods. The chair of the general surgery with care of the patients, located in the Community organization “City clinical hospital urgent and an emergency medical service” based in 3 abdominal surgical departments. The hospital has totally 10 surgical departments of a various profile which are the specialized centers and bases of chairs of urology and medicine of accidents, military medicine, anesthesiology and resuscitation. Results of research. Students under the supervision of the teacher visit departments in the hospital and achieve practical skills according to subject goals, make the acquaintance of structure of surgical departments, desmurgy, an asepsis and antiseptics, anesthesia, participate in primary surgical processing of wounds, a bleeding stop, reposition of changes and dislocations, imposing of plaster bandages, imposing or removal of spoke and rod devices, performance of drainage. Big importance has studying of nosological forms is purulent - septic diseases of skin and hypoderma, chronic specific and nonspecific surgical infection, an necrosis, sepsis, tumors and anomalies of development, etc. Wreath of an educational program, the General surgery is writing of the

  20. Medication prescribing errors in a public teaching hospital in India: A prospective study.

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    Pote S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: To prevent medication errors in prescribing, one needs to know their types and relative occurrence. Such errors are a great cause of concern as they have the potential to cause patient harm. The aim of this study was to determine the nature and types of medication prescribing errors in an Indian setting.Methods: The medication errors were analyzed in a prospective observational study conducted in 3 medical wards of a public teaching hospital in India. The medication errors were analyzed by means of Micromedex Drug-Reax database.Results: Out of 312 patients, only 304 were included in the study. Of the 304 cases, 103 (34% cases had at least one error. The total number of errors found was 157. The drug-drug interactions were the most frequently (68.2% occurring type of error, which was followed by incorrect dosing interval (12% and dosing errors (9.5%. The medication classes involved most were antimicrobial agents (29.4%, cardiovascular agents (15.4%, GI agents (8.6% and CNS agents (8.2%. The moderate errors contributed maximum (61.8% to the total errors when compared to the major (25.5% and minor (12.7% errors. The results showed that the number of errors increases with age and number of medicines prescribed.Conclusion: The results point to the establishment of medication error reporting at each hospital and to share the data with other hospitals. The role of clinical pharmacist in this situation appears to be a strong intervention; and the clinical pharmacist, initially, could confine to identification of the medication errors.

  1. Outcomes of a natural rubber latex control program in an Ontario teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlo, S M; Easty, A; Eubanks, K; Parsons, C R; Min, F; Juvet, S; Liss, G M

    2001-10-01

    Allergy to natural rubber latex (NRL) has been frequently reported in health care workers. However, there is little published evidence of the outcome of hospital intervention programs to reduce exposure and detect cases of sensitization early. This study assesses the effects of intervention to reduce NRL allergy in an Ontario teaching hospital with approximately 8000 employees. A retrospective review assessed annual numbers of employees visiting the occupational health clinic, allergy clinic, or both for manifestations of NRL allergy compared with the timing of introduction of intervention strategies, such as worker education, voluntary medical surveillance, and hospital conversion to low-protein, powder-free NRL gloves. The number of workers identified with NRL allergy rose annually, from 1 in 1988 to 6 in 1993. When worker education and voluntary medical surveillance were introduced in 1994, a further 25 workers were identified. Nonsterile gloves were changed to low-protein, powder-free NRL gloves in 1995: Diagnoses fell to 8 workers that year, and 2 of the 3 nurses who had been off work because of asthma-anaphylaxis were able to return to work with personal avoidance of NRL products. With a change to lower protein, powder-free NRL sterile gloves in 1997, allergy diagnoses fell to 3, and only 1 new case was identified subsequently up to May 1999. No increased glove costs were incurred as a result of consolidated glove purchases. This program to reduce NRL allergy in employees was effectively achieved without additional glove costs while reducing expenses from time off work and workers' compensation claims.

  2. Management of perforated peptic ulcer in patients at a teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bin-Taleb, Ali K.; Razzaq, Riyadh A.; Al-Kathiri, Zaki O.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to explore and analyze the current status in management of patients with perforated peptic ulcers (PPU). A retrospective study carried out at the Surgical Department, Al-Gamhouria Teaching Hospital, Aden, Yemen. Patients admitted with perforated benign peptic ulcers from January 1997 to December 2006 were included in the study. A total of 156 patients, 138 (88.5%) male and 18 (11.5%) female, with an overall mean age of 39.08 years (range 14-75 years) and a higher frequency of PPU were noted in patients 21-40 years (58.3%). The perforated duodenal ulcer and perforated gastric ulcer ratio was 4.8:1. The mean time of presentation was 16.5 hours, and operative intervention after admission was 5.25 hours. Simple perforation closure was used in 91.7% of the patients. Postoperative complication rate was 41% (statistically significant in cases admitted later than 12 hours) wound sepsis making the majority at 55.2%, 6 deaths (3.9%), the correlation with presentation time was not significant. The overall mean post-operative hospitalization period was 12.76 days; 14.7% of the patients stayed more than 3 weeks. Younger patients (21-40 years) were frequently affected. Emphasis should be placed on shortening the time to surgery. Simple closure remains the selected treatment in the majority of patients. Overall post-operative mortality was low (3.9%). Improving the surgical skills, wound care, administrative regulations, hospital environment and the equipments are needed to reduce the high rate of complications. (author)

  3. Management of perforated peptic ulcer in patients at a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin-Taleb, Ali K; Razzaq, Riyadh A; Al-Kathiri, Zaki O

    2008-02-01

    To explore and analyze the current status in management of patients with perforated peptic ulcers (PPU). A retrospective study carried out at the Surgical Department, Al-Gamhouria Teaching Hospital, Aden, Yemen. Patients admitted with perforated benign peptic ulcers from January 1997 to December 2006 were included in the study. A total of 156 patients, 138 (88.5%) male and 18 (11.5%) female, with an overall mean age of 39.08 years (range 14-75 years) and a higher frequency of PPU was noted in patients 21-40 years (58.3%). The perforated duodenal ulcer and perforated gastric ulcer ratio was 4.38:1. The mean time of presentation was 16.5 hours, and operative intervention after admission was 5.25 hours. Simple perforation closure was used in 91.7% of the patients. Postoperative complication rate was 41% (statistically significant in cases admitted later than 12 hours), wound sepsis making the majority at 55.2%, 6 deaths (3.9%), the correlation with presentation time was not significant. The overall mean post-operative hospitalization period was 12.76 days; 14.7% of the patients stayed more than 3 weeks. Younger patients (21-40 years) were frequently affected. Emphasis should be placed on shortening the time to surgery. Simple closure remains the selected treatment in the majority of patients. Overall post-operative mortality was low (3.9%). Improving the surgical skills, wound care, administrative regulations, hospital environment, and equipment are needed to reduce the high rate of complications.

  4. Economic burden of managing Type 2 diabetes mellitus: Analysis from a Teaching Hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Aniza; Suddin, Leny Suzana; Sulong, Saperi; Ahmed, Zafar; Kamaruddin, Nor Azmi; Sukor, Norlela

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic disease that consumes a large amount of health-care resources. It is essential to estimate the cost of managing T2DM to the society, especially in developing countries. Economic studies of T2DM as a primary diagnosis would assist efficient health-care resource allocation for disease management. This study aims to measure the economic burden of T2DM as the primary diagnosis for hospitalization from provider's perspective. A retrospective prevalence-based costing study was conducted in a teaching hospital. Financial administrative data and inpatient medical records of patients with primary diagnosis (International Classification Disease-10 coding) E11 in the year 2013 were included in costing analysis. Average cost per episode of care and average cost per outpatient visit were calculated using gross direct costing allocation approach. Total admissions for T2DM as primary diagnosis in 2013 were 217 with total outpatient visits of 3214. Average cost per episode of care was RM 901.51 (US$ 286.20) and the average cost per outpatient visit was RM 641.02 (US$ 203.50) from provider's perspective. The annual economic burden of T2DM for hospitalized patients was RM 195,627.67 (US$ 62,104) and RM 2,061,520.32 (US$ 654,450) for those being treated in the outpatient setting. Economic burden to provide T2DM care was higher in the outpatient setting due to the higher utilization of the health-care service in this setting. Thus, more focus toward improving T2DM outpatient service could mitigate further increase in health-care cost from this chronic disease.

  5. Identification and molecular characterization of Escherichia coli blaSHVgenes in a Chinese teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mei; Yang, Guangjian; Li, Ailing; Zong, Li; Dong, Zhaoguang; Lu, Junwan; Zhang, Kaibo; Cheng, Cong; Chang, Qingli; Wu, Xiuying; Ying, Jianchao; Li, Xianneng; Ding, Li; Zheng, Haixiao; Yu, Junping; Ying, Jun; Xu, Teng; Yi, Huiguang; Li, Peizhen; Li, Kewei; Wu, Songquan; Bao, Qiyu; Wang, Junrong

    2017-02-05

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) commonly reside in human intestine and most E. coli strains are harmless, but some serotypes cause serious food poisoning. This study identified and molecularly characterized bla SHV genes from 490 E. coli strains with multi-drug resistance in a hospital population. PCR and molecular cloning and southern blot were performed to assess functions and localizations of this resistant E. coli gene and the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was utilized to demonstrate the clonal relatedness of the positive E. coli strains. The data showed that 4 of these 490 E. coli strains (4/499, 0.8%) carried bla SHV genes that included EC D2485 (bla SHV-5 ), EC D2487 (bla SHV-5 ), EC D2684 (bla SHV-11 ) and EC D2616 (bla SHV-195, a novel bla SHV ). Analysis of bla SHV open-reading frame showed that bla SHV-5 had a high hydrolysis activity to the broad-spectrum penicillin (ampicillin or piperacillin), ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime and aztreonam. bla SHV-195 and bla SHV-11 had similar resistant characteristics with high hydrolysis activities to ampicillin and piperacillin, but low activities to cephalosporins. Moreover, the two bla SHV-5 genes were located on a transferable plasmid (23kb), whereas the other two bla SHV variants (bla SHV-11 and bla SHV-195 ) seemed to be located in the chromosomal material. Both EC D2485 and EC D2487 clones isolated in 2010 had the same DNA finger printing profile and they might be the siblings of clonal dissemination. The data from the current study suggest that the novel bla SHV and clonal dissemination may be developed, although bla SHV genes were infrequently identified in this hospital population. The results of the work demonstrate the necessity for molecular surveillance in tracking bla SHV -producing strains in large teaching hospital settings and emphasize the need for epidemiological monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Descriptions of Acute Transfusion Reactions in the Teaching Hospitals of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandeh, Mehrdad; Zare, Mohammad Erfan; Kansestani, Atefeh Nasir; Pakdel, Shirin Falah; Jahanpour, Firuzeh; Yousefi, Hoshang; Soleimanian, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Background Transfusion services rely on transfusion reaction reporting to provide patient care and protect the blood supply. Unnecessary discontinuation of blood is a major wastage of scarce blood, as well as man, hours and funds. The aim of the present study was to describe the main characteristics of acute transfusion reactions reported in the 4 hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran. Material and Methods The study was carried out at 4 teaching hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran, over18 months from April 2010. All adult patients on admission in the hospitals who required blood transfusion and had establish diagnosis and consented were included in the study. Results In the year 2010 until 2012, a total of 6238 units of blood components were transfused. A total of 59 (0.94%) cases of transfusion reaction were reported within this 3 years period. The commonest were allergic reactions which presented with various skin manifestations such as urticarial, rashes and pruritus (49.2%), followed by increase in body temperature of > 1°C from baseline which was reported as febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction (37.2%). pain at the transfusion site (6.8%) and hypotension (6.8%). Conclusion It is important that each transfusion of blood components to be monitor carefully. Many transfusion reactions are not recognized, because signs and symptoms mimic other clinical conditions. Any unexpected symptoms in a transfusion recipient should at least be considered as a possible transfusion reaction and be evaluated. Prompt recognition and treatment of acute transfusion reaction are crucial and would help in decreasing transfusion related morbidity and mortality, but prevention is preferable. PMID:24505522

  7. Role of transformational leadership on employee productivity of teaching hospitals: using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatankhah, Soudabeh; Alirezaei, Samira; Khosravizadeh, Omid; Mirbahaeddin, Seyyed Elmira; Alikhani, Mahtab; Alipanah, Mobarakeh

    2017-08-01

    In today's transforming world, increased productivity and efficient use of existing facilities are practically beyond a choice and become a necessity. In this line, attention to change and transformation is one of the affecting factors on the growth of productivity in organizations, especially in hospitals. To examine the effect of transformational leadership on the productivity of employees in teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 254 participants from educational and medical centers affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran) in 2016. The standard questionnaires of Bass & Avolio and of Hersi & Goldsmith were used to respectively assess transformational leadership and level of productivity. The research assumptions were tested in a significance level of 0.05 by applying descriptive statistics and structural equations modeling (SEM) using SPSS 19 and Amos 24. Results of the fitting indicators of the assessing model after amending includes Chi-square two to degrees of freedom of 2.756, CFI indicator 0.95, IFI indicator 0.92, Root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) indicator 0.10. These results indicate that the assessing model is well fitting after the amendment. Also, analysis of the model's assumptions and the final model of the research reveals the effect of transformational leadership on employees' productivity with a significance level of 0.83 (p=0.001). This research indicates that the more the leadership and decision-making style in hospitals lean towards transformational mode, the more positive outcomes it brings among employees and the organization due to increased productivity. Therefore, it is essential to pay focused attention to training/educational programs in organizations to create and encourage transformational leadership behaviors which hopefully lead to more productive employees.

  8. Prevalence and pattern of congenital malformations among neonates in the neonatal unit of a teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.; Sabir, M.; Tarar, S. H.; Mushtaq, R.; Asghar, I.; Chattha, M. N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and pattern of congenital malformations among neonates in a teaching hospital. Methods: The prospective hospital-based study was conducted over a period of 18 months in the neonatal unit of Combined Military Hospital, Kharian, from September 2011 to February 2013. All neonates from newborn to 28 days of age admitted to the unit irrespective of their condition comprised the study population. Neonatal examination was done by the Registrar at the time of admission followed by neonatologist/paediatrician. Information regarding gender, weight, gestational age, mode of delivery, consanguinity, maternal age, antenatal visit record and family history were recorded on a predesigned proforma. After clinical examination, if required, relevant investigations like ultrasonography, radiology, echocardiography, laboratory and genetic studies were done to confirm diagnosis. Data was statistically analysed by using SPSS 20. Results: Out of 3,210 total admissions, 226 (7%) neonates were congenitally malformed. Of them, 130 (57.52 %) were male and 96 (42.47 %) females. Among different body systems affected, anomalies related to the central nervous system were 46(20.35%) musculoskeletal 42(18.58%), genitourinary 34 (15.04%), cardiovascular system 30 (13.27%), ear, eye, face, neck 27(11.94%), digestive system 19 (8.40%), syndromes and skin 14 (6.19%) each. Conclusion: Congenital Malformations are not rare in our community and central nervous system is the most commonly affected system. Healthcare managers must stress upon primary prevention in the form of vaccination, nutrition and drugs to decrease preventable share of congenital malformations. (author)

  9. Descriptions of acute transfusion reactions in the teaching hospitals of kermanshah university of medical sciences, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandeh, Mehrdad; Zare, Mohammad Erfan; Kansestani, Atefeh Nasir; Pakdel, Shirin Falah; Jahanpour, Firuzeh; Yousefi, Hoshang; Soleimanian, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion services rely on transfusion reaction reporting to provide patient care and protect the blood supply. Unnecessary discontinuation of blood is a major wastage of scarce blood, as well as man, hours and funds. The aim of the present study was to describe the main characteristics of acute transfusion reactions reported in the 4 hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran. The study was carried out at 4 teaching hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran, over18 months from April 2010. All adult patients on admission in the hospitals who required blood transfusion and had establish diagnosis and consented were included in the study. In the year 2010 until 2012, a total of 6238 units of blood components were transfused. A total of 59 (0.94%) cases of transfusion reaction were reported within this 3 years period. The commonest were allergic reactions which presented with various skin manifestations such as urticarial, rashes and pruritus (49.2%), followed by increase in body temperature of > 1°C from baseline which was reported as febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction (37.2%). pain at the transfusion site (6.8%) and hypotension (6.8%). It is important that each transfusion of blood components to be monitor carefully. Many transfusion reactions are not recognized, because signs and symptoms mimic other clinical conditions. Any unexpected symptoms in a transfusion recipient should at least be considered as a possible transfusion reaction and be evaluated. Prompt recognition and treatment of acute transfusion reaction are crucial and would help in decreasing transfusion related morbidity and mortality, but prevention is preferable.

  10. Obstetric and Perinatal Outcomes of Teenage Pregnant Women Attending a Tertiary Teaching Hospital in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahma Al-Haddabi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the obstetrical and perinatal outcomes of teenage Omani girls with singleton pregnancies at a tertiary teaching hospital.  Methods: This is a retrospective case control study. We reviewed obstetric and perinatal outcomes of teenage nulliparous pregnant Omani girls with singleton pregnancies aged 14 to 19 years, delivered at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2013. We compared their outcomes with outcomes of pregnant nulliparous Omani women with singleton pregnancies aged 20 to 25 years old delivered at the same hospital during the same period.  Results: When compared with pregnant women (n=307, teenage pregnant girls (n=307 were found to have higher proportion of preterm delivery <32 weeks (7% vs. 3%, p=0.040, preterm pre-labor rupture of membranes (PPROM (19% vs. 11%, p=0.005 and anemia (58% vs. 44%, p=0.005. Cesarean section rate was higher in women than teenager girls (20% vs. 10%, p=0.001. Teenager girls had lighter babies (mean weight ± standard deviation 2,750±690 vs. 2,890±480, p=0.020, incidence of very low birth weight babies (<1,500g was higher in teenagers (3.9% vs. 0.3%, p=0.003, but perinatal mortality rate was similar in the two groups.  Conclusion: Teenage pregnant Omani women are at increased risk of preterm delivery before 32 weeks gestation, PPROM, anemia, and delivering very low birth weight babies.

  11. Nasal Colonization rate of Staphylococcus aureus strains among Health Care Service Employee’s of Teaching University Hospitals in Yazd

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    Khalili Mohammad Bagher

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to find the extent of staphylococcal carriages including Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus MRSA in employee's of teaching university hospitals in Yazd. Nasal swabs of 742 employees in four different medical teaching hospitals in Yazd were collected, and tested for detection of staphylococci strains. Out of 742 employees, 94 (12.7% were carrier of staphylococcus aurus and 57 (11.38% for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA respectively. Prevalence of Staphylococci aureus and MRSA in individual hospitals and wards were different. In general the highest carriers were personnel of dialysis ward and the lowest pediatrics wards. Resistance rate of MRSA against Ciprofloxacin, Vancomycin, and Rifampin were found to be as 28.1%, 10.5% and 35.1% respectively.

  12. The Leeds Evaluation of Efficacy of Detoxification Study (LEEDS prisons project pilot study: protocol for a randomised controlled trial comparing dihydrocodeine and buprenorphine for opiate detoxification

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    Dalton Richard

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United Kingdom (UK, there is an extensive market for the class 'A' drug heroin. Many heroin users spend time in prison. People addicted to heroin often require prescribed medication when attempting to cease their drug use. The most commonly used detoxification agents in UK prisons are buprenorphine, dihydrocodeine and methadone. However, national guidelines do not state a detoxification drug of choice. Indeed, there is a paucity of research evaluating the most effective treatment for opiate detoxification in prisons. This study seeks to address the paucity by evaluating routinely used interventions amongst drug using prisoners within UK prisons. Methods/Design The Leeds Evaluation of Efficacy of Detoxification Study (LEEDS Prisons Pilot Study will use randomised controlled trial methodology to compare the open use of buprenorphine and dihydrocodeine for opiate detoxification, given in the context of routine care, within HMP Leeds. Prisoners who are eligible and give informed consent will be entered into the trial. The primary outcome measure will be abstinence status at five days post detoxification, as determined by a urine test. Secondary outcomes during the detoxification and then at one, three and six months post detoxification will be recorded.

  13. Potentially avoidable inpatient nights among warfarin receiving patients; an audit of a single university teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, Dónall

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warfarin is an oral anticoagulant (OAT) that needs active management to ensure therapeutic range. Initial management is often carried out as an inpatient, though not requiring inpatient facilities. This mismatch results in financial costs which could be directed more efficaciously. The extent of this has previously been unknown. Here we aim to calculate the potential number of bed nights which may be saved among those being dose optimized as inpatients and examine associated factors. METHODS: A 6 week prospective audit of inpatients receiving OAT, at Cork University Hospital, was carried out. The study period was from 11th June 2007 to 20th July 2007. Data was collected from patient\\'s medications prescription charts, medical record files, and computerised haematology laboratory records. The indications for OAT, the patient laboratory coagulation results and therapeutic intervals along with patient demographics were analysed. The level of potentially avoidable inpatient nights in those receiving OAT in hospital was calculated and the potential cost savings quantified. Potential avoidable bed nights were defined as patients remaining in hospital for the purpose of optimizing OAT dosage, while receiving subtherapeutic or therapeutic OAT (being titred up to therapeutic levels) and co-administered covering low molecular weight heparin, and requiring no other active care. The average cost of euro638 was taken as the per night hospital stay cost for a non-Intensive Care bed. Ethical approval was granted from the Ethical Committee of the Cork Teaching Hospitals, Cork, Ireland. RESULTS: A total of 158 patients were included in the audit. There was 94 men (59.4%) and 64 women (40.6%). The mean age was 67.8 years, with a median age of 70 years.Atrial Fibrillation (43%, n = 70), followed by aortic valve replacement (15%, n = 23) and pulmonary emboli (11%, n = 18) were the commonest reasons for prescribing OAT. 54% had previously been prescribed OAT prior to

  14. Analysis of the quality of hospital information systems in Isfahan teaching hospitals based on the DeLone and McLean model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghaeiannejad-Isfahani, Sakineh; Saeedbakhsh, Saeed; Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Habibi, Mahboobeh

    2015-01-01

    Quality is one of the most important criteria for the success of an information system, which refers to its desirable features of the processing system itself. The aim of this study was the analysis of system quality of hospital information systems (HIS) in teaching hospitals of Isfahan based on the DeLone and McLean model. This research was an applied and analytical-descriptive study. It was performed in teaching hospitals of Isfahan in 2010. The research population consisted of the HIS's users, system designers and hospital information technology (IT) authorities who were selected by random sampling method from users' group (n = 228), and system designers and IT authorities (n = 52) using census method. The data collection tool was two researcher-designed questionnaires. Questionnaires' reliability was estimated by using Cronbach's alpha was calculated. It was 97.1% for the system designers and IT authorities' questionnaire and 92.3% for system users' questionnaire. Findings showed that the mean of system quality score in a variety of HIS and among different hospitals was significantly different and not the same (P value ≥ 0.05). In general, Kosar (new version) system and Rahavard Rayaneh system have dedicated the highest and the lowest mean scores to themselves. The system quality criterion overall mean was 59.6% for different HIS and 57.5% among different hospitals respectively. According to the results of the research, it can be stated that based on the applied model, the investigated systems were relatively desirable in terms of quality. Thus, in order to achieve a good optimal condition, it is necessary to pay particular attention to the improving factors of system quality, type of activity, type of specialty and hospital ownership type.

  15. The relationship of centralization, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasirpour, Amir Ashkan; Gohari, Mahmoud Reza; Moradi, Saied

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in the efficiency and efficacy of an organization is its structural issue. Organizational culture is also considered as an effective factor in the performance of many organizations. The main goal of the present study was to determine the relationship of Centralization and organizational culture and performance indexes in Teaching Hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This correlation study was performed in the year 2007. The population studied consisted of 4408 personnel from 13 hospitals among whom 441 subjects were selected and studied via a class sampling method. Data was compiled using a check list concerning the evaluation status of Centralization and another form concerning performance indexes as well as Robbin's organizational culture questionnaire. Data were obtained from the subjects by self answering and analyzed by using descriptive statistical indexes, T- test and Fisher's exact tests. Among the organizational culture indexes of the hospitals studied, control and organizational identity was better as compared to others (mean=3.32 and 3.30). Concerning the extent of Centralization in the hospitals studied, 53.85 % and 46.15 % were reported to have upper and lower organizational Centralization, respectively. Mean ratio of surgical operations to inpatients was 40%, the mean rate of admissions per active bed was 60.83, mean bed occupancy coefficient was 70.79%, average length of stay was 6.96 days, and mean net death rate was 1.41%. No significant correlation was seen between Centralization degree, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals Tehran university of medical sciences. (with 95% confidence interval). Due to the fact that first grade Teaching hospitals use board certified members, expert personnel, and advanced equipments and because of the limitation of patients choice and, the extent of Centralization and many organizational culture components have no significant

  16. Efficacy and Safety of Deferasirox in Pediatric Patients of Thalassemia at a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, Dhaval R; Desai, Chetna K; Kapadia, Jigar D; Dikshit, Ram K; Mehariya, K M

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy, safety and utilization pattern of deferasirox in paediatric patients of transfusion dependant β Thalassemia Major at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Gujarat. This observational, prospective-retrospective, single centre, continuous study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital among paediatric patients of transfusion dependent β Thalassemia Major. Patients treated with deferasirox for not more than 12 weeks were enrolled. Details of blood transfusions, relevant investigations performed every 3 weeks and 3 months and drugs used were recorded in a pretested case record form. Parents were provided with a diary to record the details of ADRs. Data were analyzed for demographic characteristics, number and mean volume of blood transfusions, changes in serum ferritin and iron levels, number and types of ADRs and progression, causality, severity and preventability of ADRs. Of the 60 patients enrolled, one patient was lost to follow up and four withdrew their consent. Of the remaining 55 patients, 36 were boys and 19 were girls (mean age: 6 ± 3.14 years), including patients of 1-3 years (11), 4-6 years (24), 7-10 years (12) and 11-12 years (8). Thirty six patients were born of consanguineous marriages. Adherence to blood transfusion guidelines and deferasirox prescribing and administration guidelines was observed. A serial and significant decrease in mean serum ferritin and serum iron at 3 weeks and 3 months with deferasirox treatment was observed in all age groups except that of 11-12 years. A total of 117 ADRs were observed in 52 patients from 19498 doses, most common being diarrhea (24), raised serum creatinine (15), raised hepatic enzymes (14), abdominal pain (14) and rashes (14). A reduction in dose was required in 32 cases, while a temporary stoppage was indicated in 41 cases. Deferasirox was the possible and probable cause of 65 and 51 ADRs respectively as assessed by WHO-UMC scale. Majority of ADRs were definitely preventable

  17. Increasing Regional Anesthesia Use in a Serbian Teaching Hospital through an International Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis L. Baysinger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs report low rates of regional anesthesia (RA use for cesarean delivery (CD, despite its association with lower maternal major morbidity and mortality. Also, the prevalence of neuraxial analgesia for labor (NAL is often low in LMICs. We report on the results of a collaboration in clinical education over a multi-year period between Kybele Inc., an international non-profit organization, and Klinicki Centar Vojvodine (CCV, a teaching hospital in Novi Sad, Serbia, to increase RA use for CD and NAL at CCV. From late 2011 through 2015, teams from Kybele participated in annual to biannual didactic conferences and week-long bedside teaching efforts involving obstetric and anesthesia staff from CCV and surrounding hospitals. Ongoing contact occurred at least weekly between Kybele and the host to discuss progress. De-identified quality improvement data on total deliveries, numbers of elective and non-elective CDs, number of vaginal deliveries, type of anesthesia for CD, and the number of NALs were collected. RA use for CD increased to 25% in year 2015 versus 14% in base year 2011 [odds ratio (OR: 2.05; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.73,2.42; p < 0.001]. NAL increased to 10.5% of laboring women in 2015 versus 1.2% in 2011 (OR: 9.6; 95% CI: 7.2, 12.8; p < 0.001. Greater increases for RA use during non-elective CD were observed between 2011 and 2015 (1.4 versus 7.5% of total CD; OR: 5.52; 95% CI: 2.63, 8.41; p < 0.001 relative to elective CD (12.5 versus 17.5% of total CD; OR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.23, 1.77; p < 0.001. Overall, RA for CD increased during the 4 year collaboration but was not as great as reported in other countries with similar health-care demographics utilizing a similar program. Detailed descriptions of program interventions and barriers to change at CCV are presented.

  18. Increasing Regional Anesthesia Use in a Serbian Teaching Hospital through an International Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysinger, Curtis L; Pujic, Borislava; Velickovic, Ivan; Owen, Medge D; Serafin, Joanna; Shotwell, Matthew S; Braveman, Ferne

    2017-01-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) report low rates of regional anesthesia (RA) use for cesarean delivery (CD), despite its association with lower maternal major morbidity and mortality. Also, the prevalence of neuraxial analgesia for labor (NAL) is often low in LMICs. We report on the results of a collaboration in clinical education over a multi-year period between Kybele Inc., an international non-profit organization, and Klinicki Centar Vojvodine (CCV), a teaching hospital in Novi Sad, Serbia, to increase RA use for CD and NAL at CCV. From late 2011 through 2015, teams from Kybele participated in annual to biannual didactic conferences and week-long bedside teaching efforts involving obstetric and anesthesia staff from CCV and surrounding hospitals. Ongoing contact occurred at least weekly between Kybele and the host to discuss progress. De-identified quality improvement data on total deliveries, numbers of elective and non-elective CDs, number of vaginal deliveries, type of anesthesia for CD, and the number of NALs were collected. RA use for CD increased to 25% in year 2015 versus 14% in base year 2011 [odds ratio (OR): 2.05; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.73,2.42; p  < 0.001]. NAL increased to 10.5% of laboring women in 2015 versus 1.2% in 2011 (OR: 9.6; 95% CI: 7.2, 12.8; p  < 0.001). Greater increases for RA use during non-elective CD were observed between 2011 and 2015 (1.4 versus 7.5% of total CD; OR: 5.52; 95% CI: 2.63, 8.41; p  < 0.001) relative to elective CD (12.5 versus 17.5% of total CD; OR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.23, 1.77; p  < 0.001). Overall, RA for CD increased during the 4 year collaboration but was not as great as reported in other countries with similar health-care demographics utilizing a similar program. Detailed descriptions of program interventions and barriers to change at CCV are presented.

  19. Pregnancy outcome following non-obstetric abdominal surgery in Jos University Teaching Hospital: A 5-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambe, I H; Dikkol, N; Ozoilo, K N

    2016-01-01

    The need for nonobstetric abdominal surgical interventions in pregnant females arises periodically in practice and can be a source for concern for both the patient and the surgeon because of the risk of adverse outcome. To determine the indications for, and assess maternal and fetal outcome following nonobstetric abdominal surgeries in Jos University Teaching Hospital. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study analyzing clinical records of pregnant women, who had nonobstetric abdominal surgeries in Jos University Teaching Hospital between January 2007 and December 2011. Fifty patients had nonobstetric abdominal surgery during the study period (January 2007 to December 2011). The ages of the women ranged 15-49 years with a mean of 29 ± 8.13 years. Intraoperative findings in the patients were consistent with acute appendicitis in 43 (86%) patients, two patients (4%) had ruptured spleen while one patient each (2.0%) had a transverse colon injury, postoperative adhesion bands, ruptured uterus and urinary bladder, and mesenteric injury. One (2.0%) mother died after surgery. 38 (76%) had spontaneous deliveries, and there were 11 miscarriages (22%) and 1 perinatal death. The perinatal mortality rate was 0.093/1000 deliveries. The mean hospital stay was 5.52 days. Nonobstetric abdominal surgeries in pregnant women are an infrequent occurrence at Jos University Teaching Hospital but when they do occur, they are indicated by acute appendicitis in pregnancy.

  20. Fail to prepare and you can prepare to fail: the experience of financing path changes in teaching hospitals in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshmangir, Leila; Rashidian, Arash; Jafari, Mehdi; Ravaghi, Hamid; Takian, Amirhossein

    2016-04-21

    In 1995, teaching and public hospitals that are affiliated with the ministry of health and medical education (MOHME) in Iran were granted financial self-sufficiency to practice contract-based relations with insurance organizations. The so-called "hospital autonomy" policy involved giving authority to the insurance organizations to purchase health services. The policy aimed at improving hospitals' performance, hoping to reduce government's costs. However, the policy was never implemented as intended. This was because most participating hospitals gave up to implement autonomous financing and took other financing pathways. This paper analyses the reasons for the gap between the intended policy and its execution. The lessons learned from this analysis can inform, we envisage, the implementation of similar initiatives in other settings. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 28 national and 13 regional health policy experts. We also gathered a comprehensive and purposeful set of related documents and analyzed their content. The qualitative data were analyzed by thematic inductive-deductive approach. We found a number of prerequisites and requirements that were not prepared prior to the implementing hospital autonomy policy and categorized them into policy content (sources of funds for the policy), implementation context (organization of insurance organizations, medical tariffs, hospitals' organization, feasibility of policy implementation, actors and stakeholders' support), and implementation approach (implementation method, blanket approach to the implementation and timing of implementation). These characteristics resulted in unsuitable platform for policy implementation and eventually led to policy failure. Autonomy of teaching hospitals and their exclusive financing through insurance organizations did not achieve the desired goals of purchaser-provider split in Iran. Unless contextual preparations are in place, hospital autonomy will not succeed and problematic

  1. Regional Variations of Credits Obtained by LEED 2009 Certified Green Buildings—A Country Level Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED is one of the most widely recognized green building rating systems. With more than 20% of the projects certified in non-United States (US countries, LEED’s global impact has been increasing and it is critically important for developers and regulatory authorities to understand LEED’s performance at the country level to facilitate global implementation. This study therefore aims to investigate the credit achievement pattern of LEED 2009, which is one of the well-developed versions of LEED, by using 4021 certified projects in the US, China, Turkey, and Brazil. The results show that significant differences can be identified on most rating categories, including sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, indoor environmental quality, and innovation in design. Using a post hoc analysis, country-specific credit allocation patterns are also identified to help developers to understand existing country-specific green building practices. In addition, it is also found that there is unbalanced achievement of regional priority credits. The study offers a useful reference and benchmark for international developers and contractors to understand the regional variations of LEED 2009 and for regulatory authorities, such as the U.S. Green Building Council, to improve the rating system, especially on designing regional priority credits.

  2. Integrating Building Information Modeling and Green Building Certification: The BIM-LEED Application Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Building information modeling (BIM) and green building are currently two major trends in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry. This research recognizes the market demand for better solutions to achieve green building certification such as LEED in the United States. It proposes a new strategy based on the integration of BIM…

  3. Pattern and presentation of acute abdomen in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agboola, John Owoade; Olatoke, Samuel Adegboyega; Rahman, Ganiyu Abebisi

    2014-05-01

    Abdominal pain of sudden onset is the hallmark of most non-traumatic emergency surgical presentations. This presents a scenario of urgency to the young surgeon who has to determine which of a myriad of disease conditions the patient is presenting with. Such a physician has to rely on experience and a sound knowledge of the local aetiological spectrum in making a clinical diagnosis. To determine the epidemiology and aetiological spectrum of diseases presenting as acute abdomen in the adult population at the hospital surgical emergency unit. Two hundred and seventy-six patients presenting at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital emergency unit and managed by the general surgeons between 1(st) of May 2009 and 30(th) of April 2010 were recruited and followed-up throughout the period of admission. The biodata and clinical information inclusive of diagnosis, investigations, treatment modality and outcome were entered in a structured questioner. Standardised treatment was given to all patients and difficulties encountered in their management were also noted. The data collected was evaluated using SPSS16. Acute abdomen constituted 9.6% of total surgical emergency admissions with patients aged 16-45 years constituting 78.3%. The commonest cause of acute abdomen was appendicitis (30.3%) followed by intestinal obstruction (27.9%), perforated typhoid ileitis 14.9% and peptic ulcer disease (7.6%), respectively. The result from the study is similar to what has been reported in other tropical settings with inflammatory lesions being the major problem. There is also a rising incidence of post-operative adhesions and gradual decline in incidence of obstructed hernia.

  4. Bacteriological features of infectious spondylodiscitis at Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital of Rabat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zohoun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available To review the bacteriological features of infectious spondylodiscitis and provide recommendations for the initial therapy which remains empirical in our context. Retrospective study including patients diagnosed with spondylodiscitis over a period of 4 years (2006-2009 at the Rabat Military Teaching Hospital. During the study period, we analysed 30 cases: the mean age was 49.9 years and 21 cases (70% were male. The patients were predominantly hospitalized in neurosurgery department (15/30 followed by rheumatology department (10/30. The site of infection was lumbar in 21 cases (21/30, dorsal in 7 cases (7/30. 26 cultures were positive of which 19 (19/26 were monomicrobial. Tuberculosis (TB was implicated in 10 cases (10/30 including 4 cases in association with common organisms (Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Corynebacterium species. Brucella melitensis was isolated in 1 case. Infections caused by pyogenic bacteria were isolated in 15 cases of which 12 (12/15 revealed simple organisms including Gram-positive cocci in 9 cases (9/12 with 3 cases of S. aureus and Gram-negative bacilli in 3 cases (3/12 with 2 cases of P. aeruginosa. Blood cultures carried out for 16 patients were positive in 7 cases. The anatomopathologic exams carried out for 20 patients found in 6 cases epithelioid granulomata and giants cells with caseous necrosis in total concordance with TB culture. TB is the most frequent cause of spondylodiscitis in Morocco. Our study found the same frequency for non-specific and specific germs. Empirical treatment must take into account S. aureus and M. tuberculosis.

  5. Process mapping evaluation of medication reconciliation in academic teaching hospitals: a critical step in quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Anne; Bowen, James M; Patel, Harsit; O'Brien, Chris; You, John J; Tahavori, Roshan; Doleweerd, Jeff; Berezny, Tim; Perri, Dan; Nieuwstraten, Carmine; Troyan, Sue; Patel, Ameen

    2016-12-30

    Medication reconciliation (MedRec) has been a mandated or recommended activity in Canada, the USA and the UK for nearly 10 years. Accreditation bodies in North America will soon require MedRec for every admission, transfer and discharge of every patient. Studies of MedRec have revealed unintentional discrepancies in prescriptions but no clear evidence that clinically important outcomes are improved, leading to widely variable practices. Our objective was to apply process mapping methodology to MedRec to clarify current processes and resource usage, identify potential efficiencies and gaps in care, and make recommendations for improvement in the light of current literature evidence of effectiveness. Process engineers observed and recorded all MedRec activities at 3 academic teaching hospitals, from initial emergency department triage to patient discharge, for general internal medicine patients. Process maps were validated with frontline staff, then with the study team, managers and patient safety leads to summarise current problems and discuss solutions. Across all of the 3 hospitals, 5 general problem themes were identified: lack of use of all available medication sources, duplication of effort creating inefficiency, lack of timeliness of completion of the Best Possible Medication History, lack of standardisation of the MedRec process, and suboptimal communication of MedRec issues between physicians, pharmacists and nurses. MedRec as practised in this environment requires improvements in quality, timeliness, consistency and dissemination. Further research exploring efficient use of resources, in terms of personnel and costs, is required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Maternal mortality and morbidity of unsafe abortion in a university teaching hospital of Karachi, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, N.; Hossain, N.; Khan, N.H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the mortality and morbidity of unsafe abortion in a University Teaching Hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Unit III, Dow Medical College and Civil Hospital Karachi from January 2005 to December 2009. Data regarding the socio demographic characteristics, reasons and methods of abortion, nature of provider, complications and treatment were collected for 43 women, who were admitted with complications of unsafe abortion, and an analysis was done. Results: The frequency of unsafe abortion was 1.35% and the case fatality rate was 34.9%. Most of the women belonged to a very poor socioeconomic group (22/43; 51.2%) and were illiterate (27/43; 62.8%). Unsafe abortion followed an induced abortion in 29 women and other miscarriages in 14 women. The majority of women who had an induced abortion were married (19/29, 65.5%). A completed family was the main reason for induced abortion (14/29; 48.2%) followed by being unmarried (8/29, 27.5%) and domestic violence in 5/29 cases (17.2%). Instruments were the commonest method used for unsafe abortion (26/43;68.4%).The most frequent complication was septicaemia (34; 79%) followed by uterine perforation with or without bowel perforation (13, 30.2%) and haemorrhage (9; 20.9%). Majority of induced abortions were performed by untrained providers (22/26; 84.6%) compared to only 3/14 cases (21.4%) of other miscarriages (p=0.0001). Conclusion: The high maternal mortality and morbidity of unsafe abortion in our study highlights the need for improving contraceptive and safe abortion services in Pakistan. (author)

  7. Family violence among mothers seen at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria

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    B A Ayinmode

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The attention given to family violence (FV in primary medical care in Nigeria is still very insufficient in relation to its known adverse medical and psychosocial implications for women’s health. The objective of this preliminary study was to assess the prevalence rate, correlates and effects of FV among mothers attending a primary care facility in Nigeria, with the aim of gaining an understanding of whether screening for FV in the primary care setting in Nigeria would be beneficial. Methodology . A cross-sectional study of FV among 250 mothers attending the General Outpatient Department of the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital was undertaken over a 5-month period. Data on the mothers’ sociodemographic characteristics, and experience of FV and its psychosocial correlates and effects were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire and a 20-item Self- Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ as instruments. Data analysis . EPI Info version 6 was used to analyse the data. Results. Sixty-nine mothers (28% had experienced FV at the hands of their husbands. Of these women, 49 (71% indicated occurrences within the preceding 2 years; in 17 (25%, the violence was severe enough to warrant a hospital visit or treatment. Mothers who experienced FV were significantly more likely to have had previous experiences of violence by an in-law; to have reported child cruelty by a husband; to have children with difficult behaviour; and to have reported that they were neglected by their husbands and not enjoying their marriages. They were also significantly more likely to have a high score on the SRQ and be identified as probable cases with psychological problems (SRQ score ≥ 5. Conclusion. In view of these findings, screening for FV in the primary care setting would be beneficial. Primary care physicians should therefore increase their interest, improve their skill, and carry out more research in the identification and management of FV.

  8. Drug risk Factors Associated with a Sustained Outbreak of Clostridium difficile Diarrhea in a Teaching Hospital

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    Swapan K Nath

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A case-control study was undertaken to identify and quantify antimicrobial and nonantimicrobial drug risk factors associated with a sustained outbreak of Clostridium difficile diarrhea on two medical (teaching and nonteaching units and an oncology unit. In total, 80 cases associated with an endemic clone of toxigenic C difficile were compared with controls. Eighty controls were selected from a group of 290 controls randomly chosen from the outbreak period. The controls were matched to cases according to age, admitting diagnosis and unit of admission. Seventy (88% patients in the case group received at least one antibiotic before diarrhea, compared with 37 (46% patients in the control group. Major risk factors implicated in the development of C difficile diarrhea in hospitalized patients were the following antimicrobial agents: ceftazidime (adjusted odds ratio [aor]=26.01, 95% ci 5.67 to 119.19, P=0.0001; cefuroxime (aor=5.17, ci 1.86 to 14.36, P=0.005; ciprofloxacin (aor=3.81, ci 1.05 to 13.79, P=0.04; and clindamycin (aor=15.16, ci 2.93 to 78.44, P=0.004. This is the first time that the use of ciprofloxacin has been linked to the development of C difficile diarrhea. Use of gastrointestinal drugs (ranitidine, famotidine, cimetidine, omeprazole and sucralfate was also an added risk (aor=3.20, ci 1.39 to 7.34, P=0.01; however, antineoplastic therapy was not significant (P<0.53. Recognition of the specific high risk drugs may spur more restricted use of these agents, which may help in controlling C difficile diarrhea in hospitalized patients.

  9. Pattern of cardiovascular admissions at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, South East Nigeria.

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    Osuji, Charles Ukachukwu; Onwubuya, Emmanuel Ikechukwu; Ahaneku, Gladys Ifesinachi; Omejua, Emeka Godwin

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the top killer diseases in the world sparing neither developed or developing countries. The study was carried out to determine the pattern of cardiovascular admissions at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi South East Nigeria. The study was a retrospective study covering the period January 2007 to December 2009. SPSS version 13 software was used to analyze data. 537 (15%) patients were admitted into the study out of 3546 patients {females 1756 and 1790} admitted into medical wards. 322 (60%) of study population were males and 215 (40%) females. 359(67.5%) were discharged, 170 (32%) died and 8 (0.5%) were discharged against medical advice. The majority of the deaths 105(61.8%), were in patients with CVA. Most of the deaths (111 or 65.3%) occurred within the first seven days of admission. The mean age of the population was 60.7 years ±15.9 with a range of 18 to 110 years. The length of stay in hospital ranged between 1 and 140 days with a mean of 13.5 ± 13.9 days and a median of 10 days. 33 of the subjects were single, 406 were married, 94 were widowed (11 males and 83 females) and 4 were divorced. 46.7% (251) were admitted for CVA and 30.9% (166) for heart failure. Cardiomyopathy/valvular heart diseases (clinical diagnosis due to absence of echocardiography) constituted 3.9%, hypertension 20.5% and pre-existing hypertension with uremia 1.9%. The study has shown that cardiovascular disease contributed significantly to medical admissions the elderly accounting for a significant proportion. There is thus the need for intensification of primary preventive strategies for cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Placenta praevia: review of clinical presentation and management in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

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    Ikechebelu, J I; Onwusulu, D N

    2007-01-01

    The study aims at reviewing the clinical presentation and management of placenta praevia in a tertiary health facility. This is a retrospective study of 59 cases of placenta praevia managed at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi from January 1997 to December 2001. The case records of 44 of the patients were obtained from the hospital medical records department and analysed. During the five year period, there were 3565 deliveries and 59 cases of placenta praevia giving an incidence of 1.65%. Thirty four (77.3%) occurred in women aged 35 years and below. The commonest was type 111 (12 cases; 27.3%) followed by type IV (10 cases; 22.7%). Previous uterine scar was associated with 22 (50.0%) cases. Age had no statistically significant effect on the prevalence. The commonest GA range at presentation (13; 29.6%) and at delivery (18; 40.9%) was 37-40 weeks. The commonest mode of presentation was antepartum haemorrhage (34; 77.3%) followed by abnormal lie and malpresentation (4 each; 9.1%). The average admission delivery interval was one week in 33 (75.0%) cases and only two (4.5%) received blood transfusion. Forty (90.9%) women had caesarean delivery while 12 (27.3%) babies were of low birth weight. There were only 2 (4.5%) fetal deaths and one (2.3%) caesarean hysterectomy. The commonest predisposing factor to placenta praevia in this study is previous uterine scar. Judicious use of caesarean section especially in the primigravida will help reduce the incidence of placenta praevia. Also a screening ultrasonography at 34-36 weeks gestation (especially in women with previously scarred uterus) is recommended.

  11. Surveillance of pediatric infections in a teaching hospital in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

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    M.R. Chang

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections (NI result in considerably high mortality and morbidity rates, especially among pediatric patients. Considering current worldwide changes, information about the occurrence of pathogens and susceptibility tests are now seen as decisive for optimizing treatment. The purpose of this research was to determine the frequency of microorganisms, antimicrobial and genetic profiles, and risk factors associated with nosocomial infections in a teaching hospital in Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul. From January 1998 to December 1999, 108 patients were characterized as having nosocomial infection, from which 137 pathogens were isolated. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by conventional and automated techniques. Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains were characterized by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. Pathogens were most often isolated from infants one-month old or younger, and bloodstream infections were the most frequent. The main isolated agents isolated were: coagulase-negative staphylococci (38, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19, S. aureus (26, K. pneumoniae (18, and Candida spp. (13. The risk conditions that were most closely related to NI acquisition were: prolonged hospital stays (69.4%, prematurity (60.9% and exposure to high-risk device procedures (95.4%. Ciprofloxacin and imipenem were the most effective drugs, inhibiting all or almost all of the Enterobacteriaceae, P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus isolates. Only 23% of the S. aureus samples were resistant to oxacillin. Genomic typing revealed 10 distinct patterns for S. aureus and 13 for K. pneumoniae, suggesting that most them did not belong to the same clone. PFGE was effective in differentiating the strains.

  12. Surveillance of pediatric infections in a teaching hospital in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

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    Chang M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections (NI result in considerably high mortality and morbidity rates, especially among pediatric patients. Considering current worldwide changes, information about the occurrence of pathogens and susceptibility tests are now seen as decisive for optimizing treatment. The purpose of this research was to determine the frequency of microorganisms, antimicrobial and genetic profiles, and risk factors associated with nosocomial infections in a teaching hospital in Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul. From January 1998 to December 1999, 108 patients were characterized as having nosocomial infection, from which 137 pathogens were isolated. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by conventional and automated techniques. Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains were characterized by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. Pathogens were most often isolated from infants one-month old or younger, and bloodstream infections were the most frequent. The main isolated agents isolated were: coagulase-negative staphylococci (38, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19, S. aureus (26, K. pneumoniae (18, and Candida spp. (13. The risk conditions that were most closely related to NI acquisition were: prolonged hospital stays (69.4%, prematurity (60.9% and exposure to high-risk device procedures (95.4%. Ciprofloxacin and imipenem were the most effective drugs, inhibiting all or almost all of the Enterobacteriaceae, P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus isolates. Only 23% of the S. aureus samples were resistant to oxacillin. Genomic typing revealed 10 distinct patterns for S. aureus and 13 for K. pneumoniae, suggesting that most them did not belong to the same clone. PFGE was effective in differentiating the strains.

  13. [Antibiotherapy in osteoarticular infections in children suffering from hemoglobinopathy in the University Teaching Hospital of Yopougon].

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    Aguéhoundé, Cosme; da Silva, Sylvia Anoma; Dieth, Attafi Gaudens; Roux, Constant; Brouh, Yapo; Sanogo, Ibrahim; Sangaré, Amadou; Agbodjan, Prince John

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate antibiotherapy in osteo-articular infections found in children with henioglobinopathy, by identifying the antibiotics used and their mode of action. Their cost and efficacy were also assessed. The study was retrospective and it took place in the haematology unit, the paediatric surgical department and the central pharmacy of the University Teaching Hospital of Yopougon from 1991 through 1998. Thirty-two medical records of children, carriers of osteo-articular infections (OAI), were selected. Amongst these patients, most of whom had sickle-cell anaemia (97%), 50% were homozygous. Osteomyelitis represented 78% of these infections (salmonella infections being the most frequent cause, amounting to 35%). Fifteen types of antibiotics amongst 57 from 5 families of drugs were used, with biotherapy (association of two drugs) being used in 69% of cases. The association of pefloxacine and netilmicine was the most frequently used and it was found to be the most expensive. The treatment was judged efficacious, with a satisfactory result in 75% of cases, based on the clinical criteria. Bitherapy is the type of treatment, which is often of concern to many authors and relies on the general consensus surrounding the most likely emergency treatment of osteo-articular infections. Certain particularities are worth mentioning regarding this utilisation: the multiplicity of the molecules due to frequent rupture of hospital stock; the use of fluoroquinolones exceptionally prescribed in children under 15. This antibiotherapy is justified owing to its efficacy on a sensitive issue concerning a pathology with grave sequellae, where long-term monitoring is necessary. Copyright John Libbey Eurotext 2003

  14. Maternal mortality and morbidity of unsafe abortion in a university teaching hospital of Karachi, Pakistan.

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    Shah, Nusrat; Hossain, Nazli; Noonari, Mukhtiar; Khan, Nusrat Hassan

    2011-06-01

    To study the mortality and morbidity of unsafe abortion in a University Teaching Hospital. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Unit III, Dow Medical College and Civil Hospital Karachi from January 2005 to December 2009. Data regarding the sociodemographic characteristics, reasons and methods of abortion, nature of provider, complications and treatment were collected for 43 women, who were admitted with complications of unsafe abortion, and an analysis was done. The frequency of unsafe abortion was 1.35% and the case fatality rate was 34.9%. Most of the women belonged to a very poor socioeconomic group (22/43; 51.2%) and were illiterate (27/43; 62.8%). Unsafe abortion followed an induced abortion in 29 women and other miscarriages in 14 women. The majority of women who had an induced abortion were married (19/29, 65.5%). A completed family was the main reason for induced abortion (14/29; 48.2%) followed by being unmarried (8/29, 27.5%) and domestic violence in 5/29 cases (17.2%). Instruments were the commonest method used for unsafe abortion (26/43; 68.4%).The most frequent complication was septicaemia (34; 79%) followed by uterine perforation with or without bowel perforation (13, 30.2%) and haemorrhage (9; 20.9%). Majority of induced abortions were performed by untrained providers (22/26; 84.6%) compared to only 3/14 cases (21.4%) of other miscarriages (p = 0.0001). The high maternal mortality and morbidity of unsafe abortion in our study highlights the need for improving contraceptive and safe abortion services in Pakistan.

  15. Bioaerosol sampling for airborne bacteria in a small animal veterinary teaching hospital

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    Tisha A. M. Harper

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Airborne microorganisms within the hospital environment can potentially cause infection in susceptible patients. The objectives of this study were to identify, quantify, and determine the nosocomial potential of common airborne microorganisms present within a small animal teaching hospital. Methods: Bioaerosol sampling was done initially in all 11 rooms and, subsequently, weekly samples were taken from selected rooms over a 9-week period. Samples were collected twice (morning and afternoon at each site on each sampling day. The rooms were divided into two groups: Group 1, in which morning sampling was post-cleaning and afternoon sampling was during activity, and Group 2, in which morning sampling was pre-cleaning and afternoon sampling was post-cleaning. The total aerobic bacterial plate counts per m3 and bacterial identification were done using standard microbiological methods. Results: A total of 14 bacterial genera were isolated with the most frequent being Micrococcus spp. followed by species of Corynebacterium, Bacillus, and Staphylococcus. There was a significant interaction between location and time for rooms in Group 1 (p=0.0028 but not in Group 2 (p>0.05. Microbial counts for rooms in Group 2 were significantly greater in the mornings than in the afternoon (p=0.0049. The microbial counts were also significantly different between some rooms (p=0.0333. Conclusion: The detection of significantly higher airborne microbial loads in different rooms at different times of the day suggests that the probability of acquiring nosocomial infections is higher at these times and locations.

  16. Elastic stable intramedullary nailing in paediatric traumatology at Yopougon Teaching Hospital (Abidjan

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    T H Odéhouri-Koudou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Elastic stable intramedullary nailing has revolutionised the treatment of fractures in children. Aim : To report our experience with this current technique of management of fractures in children. Methods and Materials : A retrospective study of all children with fractures treated by this method from November 2003 to June 2006 at the Paediatric Surgery Department of Yopougon Teaching Hospital, Abidjan, Côte d′Ivoire. Data were recorded from their medical charts regarding demographics, fracture patterns, associated injuries, morbidity, and outcome. Results : A total of 38 children (14 boys; mean age, 11.7 years; range, 9-15 years with 41 fractures, sited at femur (n=15, humerus (n=8, tibia and fibula (n=6, forearm (n=7, and radial neck (n=5, associated with other injuries in 7 cases, were enrolled in the study. The mean interval for surgery was 6.8 days. Open reduction was required 5 times (12.1%. The hospital stay was in the range 5-12 days. Minor adverse events were 1 (2.4% early tibial loss of reduction, 3 (7.3% skin irritations and 2 (4.8% transient knee limitations. Complications (17.3% included 2 axial (4.8% and 1 rotational (2.4% femoral malunions below 15°; 3 elbow (7.3% and 1 knee stiffness (2.4% in openly reduced cases. Solid consolidation was achieved in all cases, with no disturbance in standard union times. At a mean follow-up period of 16 months (range, 9-28 months, all but 3 patients with opened joints recovered full range of motion, and none showed either limp and gait anomalies or re-fracture after removal of wires. Conclusion : Elastic stable intramedullary nailing in children fractures is easy to perform and has little complications if a proper technique is used.

  17. Census of Ligurian Internal Medicine Wards of non-teaching hospitals

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    Micaela La Regina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available What is the future of internal medicine in Italy? Which competencies? Which potentialities? To this aim Ligurian FADOI Regional Society performed a census among 18 Internal Medicine Wards (IMWs in non-teaching Ligurian Hospital. We administered, by email, a questionnaire to the heads of IMWs. Data about staffing, equipment, skills, competencies and productivity during 2011 were collected from 1st to 31st November 2012. A total of 15/18 (83.3% chiefs answered to the questionnaire. The number of beds was largely variable among the wards. In 2011, mean diagnosis-related group (DRG-weight was 1.09 (range 0.91-1.6 and that revenues/costs ratio much higher than 1.5. Staff was quite adequate to standards defined by current law, only 33% has got a doctor:patients ratio superior to 1:6.4. However, annual hospitalizations exceed the availability of beds in medicine and the complexity of the patients would require a lower doctor:patients ratio, at least for a group of patients. In fact, 4 wards have a progressive care organization with a defined area for more seriously ill patients. Mean length of stay was 10 days. Expertise was wide, covering almost all medical sub-specialties. Acquired skills such as abdominal, heart and vascular ultrasounds, invasive procedures and their comprehensive knowledge make internists complete and cost-effective specialists. IMWs, as a concentrate of medical knowledge and skills, are the natural destination of current patients with co-morbidities. Staffing and number of beds should be revised according to this new demand. Their revenues/costs ratio resulted favorable and their global approach to patients and not to disease can be useful for resource rationalization. Wider and further studies are needed to improve the awareness of stakeholders about Internal Medicine.

  18. Pharmaceutical interventions in medications prescribed for administration via enteral tubes in a teaching hospital

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    Carolina Justus Buhrer Ferreira Neto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: to analyze the impact of guidelines regarding errors in medications prescribed for administration through enteral tubes. Method: quantitative study, in three phases, undertaken in internal medicine, neurology and an intensive care unit in a general teaching hospital. In Phase 1, the following was undertaken: a protocol for dilution and unit-dose repackaging and administration for 294 medications via enteral tubes; a decision flowchart; operational-standard procedures for dilution and unit-dose repackaging of oral pharmaceutical forms and for administration of medications through enteral tubes. In phase 2, errors in 872 medications prescribed through enteral tubes, in 293 prescriptions for patients receiving inpatient treatment between March and June, were investigated. This was followed by training of the teams in relation to the guidelines established. In Phase 3, pharmaceutical errors and interventions in 945 medications prescribed through enteral tubes, in 292 prescriptions of patients receiving inpatient treatment between August and September, were investigated prospectively. The data collected, in a structured questionnaire, were compiled in the Microsoft Office Excel(r program, and frequencies were calculated. Results: 786 errors were observed, 63.9% (502 in Phase 2, and 36.1% (284 in Phase 3. In Phase 3, a reduction was ascertained in the frequency of prescription of medications delivered via enteral tubes, medications which were contraindicated, and those for which information was not available. Conclusion: guidelines and pharmaceutical interventions were determined in the prevention of errors involving medications delivered through enteral tubes.

  19. Breech deliveries in Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital Sokoto, Northwestern Nigeria: A 10-year review

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    Karima Tunau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breech delivery is a major issue in obstetric practice mainly because of the high perinatal morbidity and mortality associated with it. The aims of the study are to determine the prevalence management and perinatal outcome of singleton breech deliveries in our center. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study involving 395 singleton breech deliveries out of 24,160 deliveries conducted at the Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital Sokoto, Sokoto, over a 10-year (2001-2010 period. Results: The prevalence rate of singleton breech delivery was 1.7%. Breech deliveries occurred more in the primigravidae. Most babies (69.1% had vaginal delivery. There was a high caesarean section (CS rate of 30.9%. Babies delivered by CS had better Apgar scores than those delivered through the vagina (P < 0.05. The perinatal mortality rate in breech deliveries (410/1000 was significantly higher than that (101.5/10000 in their cephalic counterparts (P < 0.05. Similarly, perinatal deaths were more common in unbooked than in booked patients (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Breech delivery was frequent in the study population. Singleton breech delivered by CS had better outcome than those who were delivered through the vagina.

  20. Long term preservation of electronic health records. Recommendations in a large teaching hospital in Belgium.

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    France, F H; Beguin, C; van Breugel, R; Piret, C

    2000-01-01

    Health records should be readily accessed by authorised persons for diagnosis, treatment and legal security purposes during patient's lifetime and thereafter for research and training purposes. Technology makes difficult the preservation of digital material, because of rapid changes in information media, hardware and software evolution, and because of the multiplicity of its location as well as the complexity of its environment. A committee in a large teaching hospital in Belgium, recommends two complementary approaches: (1) After a patient departure, all his health information should be managed by a unique organisation that would update regularly accesses to all data bases concerned by this patient. Health archives should be formatted using XML (Extensible Mark up Language) software family, and set on supports such as DVD-ROM, to be upgraded or updated when needed. This archive media is fast but not safe. (2) Computer output microfilm (COM) and scanners for non electronic data to be preserved appears to be also needed, as it is storage safe for at least 250 years and readable directly by eye. This archive media is safe but not fast.

  1. Drug-induced diseases (DIDs: An experience of a tertiary care teaching hospital from India

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    Vishal R Tandon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Drug-induced diseases (DIDs are well known but least studied. Data on DIDs from India are not available. Hence, this retrospective cross-sectional study was undertaken using suspected adverse drug reaction (ADR data collected form Pharmacovigilance Programme of India (PvPI to evaluate profile of DIDs over two years, in a tertiary care teaching hospital from north India. Methods: The suspected ADRs in the form of DID were evaluated for drug and disease related variables and were classified in terms of causality. Results: DID rate was 38.80 per cent. Mean duration of developing DIDs was 26.05 ± 9.6 days; 25.16 per cent had more than one co-morbid condition. Geriatric population (53.99% accounted for maximum DIDs followed by adult (37.79% and paediatric (8.21%. Maximum events were probable (93.98% followed by possible (6.04%. All DIDs required intervention. Gastritis (7.43%, diarrhoea (5.92%, anaemia (4.79%, hypotension (2.77%, hepatic dysfunction (2.69%, hypertension (1.51%, myalgia (1.05%, and renal dysfunction (1.01% were some of the DIDs. Anti-tubercular treatment (ATT, anti- retroviral treatment (ART, ceftriaxone injection, steroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antimicrobials and anticancer drugs were found as commonly offending drugs. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings show that DIDs are a significant health problem in our country, which need more attention.

  2. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy at Derby Teaching Hospitals: sustained benefits in glucose control.

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    Anyanwagu, U; Olaoye, H; Jennings, P; Ashton-Cleary, S; Sugunendran, S; Hughes, D; Idris, I; Wilmot, E G

    2017-08-01

    In the short term, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) has been associated with improved glycaemic control, reduced hypoglycaemia and improved quality of life (QOL). However, limited data are available on its long-term benefits, particularly in the UK. We aimed to assess the impact of CSII on longer term outcomes. Patient-level data were obtained for CSII users at Derby Teaching Hospitals, UK. Patient confidence and satisfaction questionnaires using the Likert scale were used to assess confidence in self-management. Comparative statistics were conducted using Pearson's chi-square and Student's t-tests. Some 258 CSII users were identified (60.1% female, mean age 43.9 ± 13.4 years). Overall, there was significant decrease in HbA 1c from 78 mmol/mol (9.3 ± 2.0%) at baseline, to 69 mmol/mol (8.5 ± 1.3%) at 6 months [mean difference (md): -0.64; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): -0.91 to -0.37; P quality of care received in the insulin pump service. CSII therapy led to a sustained long-term improvement in glycaemic control in addition to a reduction in self-reported hypoglycaemia. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  3. Epidemiology of benign eyelid lesions in patients presenting to a teaching hospital

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    Al-Faky, Yasser H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates the relative frequency of benign eyelid lesions presented to a teaching hospital in Saudi population. Patients and methods Charts of patients with benign eyelid lesions were retrospectively reviewed from January 2003 to December 2008. Clinical details included demographic data, symptoms and signs, surgical findings, primary diagnosis, and indication for biopsy were analyzed in a histopathologically confirmed benign eyelid lesions. Eyelid lesions were arranged according to their order of frequencies. Results A total of 222 biopsies were evaluated from 181 patients (male 39.2% and female 60.8%). The age of the patient at the time of biopsy ranged from 2 to 87 years old. The most common benign eyelid lesion encountered in our practice was sweat gland hidrocystoma followed by chalazion, skin tag, epidermal cyst, nevus, seborrheic keratosis, xanthelasma, and molluscum contagiosum respectively. Histopathological studies confirmed the clinical diagnosis in 95.9% (213/222) of specimens and was different from the clinical diagnosis in 4.1% (9/222) of the lesions which included seborrheic keratosis (n = 3), pilomatrixoma, steatocystoma, hemangioendothelioma, juvenile xanthogranuloma, calcinosis cutis, and syringocystadenoma papilliferum. No malignant lesion was labeled as benign. Conclusion Epidemiology of benign eyelid lesions in Saudi population is different from Far East or Western populations. Sweat gland hidrocystoma with classical clinical features and straightforward diagnosis is the most frequent lesion in our series which could be due to characteristic dry climate. PMID:23960994

  4. Postnatal counseling on exclusive breastfeeding using video - experience from a tertiary care teaching hospital, south India.

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    Adhisivam, B; Vishnu Bhat, B; Poorna, Rachel; Thulasingam, Mahalakshmy; Pournami, Femitha; Joy, Rojo

    2017-04-01

    Adequate antenatal counseling combined with postnatal lactation support is likely to improve exclusive breastfeeding rates. To assess the impact of a postnatal video based health education program in promoting exclusive breastfeeding among primiparous mothers. This interventional study was done in a tertiary care teaching hospital, south India. Primiparous mothers in one postnatal ward (group A) received routine lactation counseling. A similar group of primiparous mothers in another postnatal ward (group B) were administered a video based health education program on exclusive breastfeeding in the local language Tamil in addition to the routine lactation counseling. The exclusive breastfeeding rates of these two groups of mothers were compared. Their knowledge and perceptions after intervention were also compared using a pretested questionnaire. Among 878 primiparous mothers, 94% fed colostrum and 43% initiated breastfeeding within one hour of delivery. Correct attachment was noted with 96% and 13% had lactation issues. Group B had marginally better exclusive breastfeeding rate at six months but not statistically significant. Mothers in group B had a statistically significant better knowledge score post-intervention compared to those in Group A. Use of gripe water was more in group A compared to group B. The video based health education program when combined with routine lactation counseling improved the knowledge regarding exclusive breastfeeding among postnatal primiparous mothers better than with routine lactation counseling alone. However, both interventions had similar effect on exclusive breastfeeding rate at six months.

  5. Intestinal parasitosis: data analysis 2006-2011 in a teaching hospital of Ancona, Italy.

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    Silvestri, Carmela; Greganti, Gianfranco; Arzeni, Daniela; Morciano, Angela; Castelli, Pamela; Barchiesi, Francesco; Cirioni, Oscar; Giacometti, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    Intestinal parasites are a serious problem in developing countries, but should not be underestimated in industrialised countries either. Between January 2006 and December 2011, stool specimens and the scotch tests of 5323 Italian and non Italian patients (adults and children) attending the laboratory of our Infectious Diseases Clinic in a teaching Hospital at Ancona were analyzed specifically for intestinal parasites. The present study shows that, over a six-year period, of a total of 5323 patients 305 harboured at least one species of parasite (5.7%). Among the pathogenic protozoa Giardia lamblia was the most common, the overall prevalence of giardiasis being 1.8 % (99/5323). Helminths were found in 0.9% of the patients (48/5323). In particular, Hymenolepis nana, Strongyloides stercoralis and Trichuris trichiura were most commonly recovered in non-Italian children, suggesting that certain intestinal parasites are restricted to endemic areas in the tropics. Eighteen of the 305 infected patients had more than one parasite in their stools. Our study demonstrates that intestinal parasites must be considered even in industrialised areas and stool examination should be supported by epidemiological data and clinical features.

  6. Screening for Tuberculosis in Health Care Workers: Experience in an Italian Teaching Hospital

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    Christian Napoli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Health care workers (HCW are particularly at risk of acquiring tuberculosis (TB, even in countries with low TB incidence. Therefore, TB screening in HCW is a useful prevention strategy in countries with both low and high TB incidence. Tuberculin skin test (TST is widely used although it suffers of low specificity; on the contrary, the in vitro enzyme immunoassay tests (IGRA show superior specificity and sensitivity but are more expensive. The present study reports the results of a three-year TB surveillance among HCW in a large teaching hospital in Rome, using TST (by standard Mantoux technique and IGRA (by QuantiFERON-TB as first- and second-level screening tests, respectively. Out of 2290 HCW enrolled, 141 (6.1% had a positive TST; among them, 99 (70.2% underwent the IGRA and 16 tested positive (16.1%. The frequency of HCW tested positive for TB seems not far from other experiences in low incidence countries. Our results confirm the higher specificity of IGRA, but, due to its higher cost, TST can be considered a good first level screening test, whose positive results should be further confirmed by IGRA before the patients undergo X-ray diagnosis and/or chemotherapy.

  7. Awareness and perception of pregnant women about obstetrics ultrasound at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital

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    A A Saleh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ultrasonography is firmly embedded in antenatal maternity care around the world. It proves accuracy in calculation of gestational age, earlier identification of multiple pregnancies, and diagnosis of nonviable pregnancies and certain fetal malformations. Objective: The study is aimed to determine the awareness and perception of pregnant women towards obstetric scan, at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective and cross-sectional study conducted among 400 pregnant women that attended antenatal ultrasound scan at AKTH. A pretested and structured questionnaire was used. Only women that agreed to participate were included in the study. Convenience sampling technique was employed for the data collection. Information collected from the participants was: Age, marital status, occupation, level of education, parity, level of awareness and level of perception. The collected data was analyzed using SPSS (16.0 software for windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA to obtain frequency, mean and percentages. Results: A total of 400 women were included in the study, of which most of them were within the age range of 21–30 years. Almost all the participants (97% had ultrasound before, and they believed it is safe. The majority (93.8% believed that ultrasound is necessary during pregnancy. Ninety-seven percent believed it is done to determine fetal viability and wellbeing. Conclusion: The study established that most of the participants are aware of ultrasound scan. The subjects also believed that the procedure is safe, and the main purpose is for fetal wellbeing and viability.

  8. HIV/AIDS and Postnatal Depression at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyimana, Augustine; Andrews, Ben; Ahmed, Yussuf; Vwalika, Bellington

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the contribution of HIV/AIDS to the problem of postnatal depression among women receiving postnatal care at University Teaching Hospital (UTH), Lusaka, Zambia. BACKGROUND: Postnatal depression (PND), a major depressive episode during the puerperium, affects between 10% and 22% of adult women before the infant's first birthday. HIV seropositivity has been associated with increased risk of mental disease, but its influence on postnatal depression has not been fully explored. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study, involving 229 mothers receiving postnatal care at UTH. The presence of postnatal depression and mean scores on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) were assessed, along with the patients' HIV status and other demographic and clinical characteristics. RESULTS: 146 of 229 patients (64%) had depressive symptoms as measured by an EPDS score ≥ 8. Sixty-four women (28%) had severe PND, defined as an EPDS score ≥ 13. There were 46 HIV positive women (20.1%). HIV status was not associated with PND (adjusted OR 1.22, 95% CI 0.50-2.96) or severe PND (adjusted OR 1.77, 95% CI 0.68-4.61). Mixed mode of infant feeding and parity of 4-5 were independently associated with PND. CONCLUSIONS: Depression is a real health problem among mothers attending postnatal care at UTH. HIV status was not independently associated with increased risk of postnatal depression. Keywords: postnatal depression, puerperium, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, prevalence of HIV/AIDS.

  9. Retrospective study of antibiotic resistance among uropathogens from rural teaching hospital, Tamilnadu, India

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    Kasi Murugan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the community associated urinary tract infection (UTI causing uropathogen's prevalence, antibiotic resistance pattern and the risk factors predisposing infection in Indian rural settings. Methods: A pilot study was conducted between January and December 201 0 among out patients attending rural teaching medical college hospital at Tamilnadu, India. The demographic details, culture, common antibiotic Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion assay susceptibility profiles of the isolates and the resistance analysis by WHONET 5.6 software were performed. Results: During this surveillance study, a total number of 1 359 urinary samples were collected, among which 309 (22.78% gave positive culture. The common uropathogens encountered were Escherichia coli (66.02%, Staphylococcus sp. (12.62%, Klebsiella sp. (5.83%, Streptococcus sp. (5.1 8%, Enterococcus sp. (2.59% and Proteus sp., (2.26%. Antibiotic resistance analysis revealed the multiple drug resistance nature of the isolates to the commonly used antibiotics. It is also found that both genders at the specific age group of 40-50 were more prone to infection and seasonal variations also play an important role in their establishment. Conclusions: The obtained results suggest that antibiotic selection for empirical treatment should be based on individual drug-sensitive test results. There is also an urgent need to develop a new combination of chemotherapeutic agents and awareness on antibiotic use for the effective UTI management in rural settings.

  10. Post dural puncture headache in obstetric patients: experience from a West African teaching hospital.

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    Nafiu, O O; Salam, R A; Elegbe, E O

    2007-01-01

    This prospective, non-randomised study examined the frequency and severity of post dural puncture headache in 96 Ghanaian women who consented to spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. Spinal anaesthesia was performed using 22-gauge (n = 22), 25-gauge (n = 46) or 26-gauge (n = 38) Quincke needles. Patients were followed up to determine the incidence and severity of post spinal headache. The overall incidence of post dural puncture headache was 8.3%, but was significantly higher (33%) in patients in whom 22-gauge Quincke needles were used than in the other two groups (4% and 5% respectively: P = 0.003). Most patients rated their headache as mild to moderate on a 10-cm visual analogue scale. In view of the high incidence of headache and the need for treatment associated with the use of the 22-gauge Quincke needle, we recommend that this should not be used in the obstetric population. We are also aware that the incidence of post dural puncture headache could be further reduced by the use of small calibre pencil-point needles but these are currently very expensive and many obstetric units in developing countries may not be able to afford them.

  11. Film reject analysis and image quality in diagnostic Radiology Department of a Teaching hospital in Ghana

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    J. Owusu-Banahene

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients usually undergo repeated X-ray examinations after their initial X-ray radiographs are rejected due to poor image quality. This subjects the patients to an excess radiation exposure and extra cost and necessitates the need to investigate the causes of reject. The use of reject analysis as part of the overall quality assurance programs in clinical radiography and radiology services is vital in the evaluation of image quality of a well-established practice. It is shown that, in spite of good quality control maintained by the Radiology Department of a Teaching hospital in Ghana, reject analysis performed on a number of radiographic films developed indicated 14.1% reject rate against 85.9% accepted films. The highest reject rate was 57.1 ± 0.7% which occurs in cervical spine and the lowest was7.7 ± 0.5% for lumbar spine. The major factors contributing to film rejection were found to be over exposure and patient positioning in cervical spine examinations. The most frequent examination was chest X-ray which accounts for about 42.2% of the total examinations. The results show low reject rates by considering the factors for radiographic rejection analysis in relation to both equipment functionality and film development in the facility.

  12. Characteristics of smokers and their knowledge about smoking at a teaching hospital in Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qidwai, W.; Zahid, N.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the characteristics of smokers and their knowledge about smoking, among Family Practice Patients, at a teaching hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Main outcome measures: Age at starting smoking, duration and number of cigarettes smoked, started smoking under influence of friends, colleagues, family members or self motivation, number of friends and colleagues who smoked, whether smoking is unhealthy, and actual chance of harm to an individual due to smoking is very rare or not. Results: One hundred patients who visited Family Practice Center were interviewed. Sixty one percent were young married men, well educated and either student, in private service, self employed or unemployed. Eighty-four (84%) smokers started smoking between 16-25 years of age, and smoked 6-20 cigarettes daily for two to twenty five years. Sixty-nine (69%) of them started smoking under the influence of friends and had 3-5 friends and colleagues who smoked. 91% of smokers believed that smoking is unhealthy and were aware that it causes lung cancer and heart disease. Majority of them (69%) believed that the actual harm of smoking to an individual is not very rare. Conclusion: We have documented the characteristics of smokers and their knowledge about smoking among Family Practice patients. Majority of the respondents started smoking at a young age under the influence of friends though they were aware of its harmful effects. Though the sample size is small but it does give an indication about the responsible factors to plan interventional preventive strategies. (author)

  13. Fertility status of males working in radiology departments of teaching hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, O.P.; Jain, A.K.; Sankhla, D.K.; Kothari, L.K.; Agarwal, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    All the 33 male doctors and para-medical staff employed in the radiology departments of two teaching hospitals have been studied for their fertility status. Their mean age was 32.5 years and they had been doing radiological work for 8.6 years on an average. Out of the 33 males, all of whom were married, one had primary infertility with severe oligospermia. He was successfully treated with oral vitamin A and E along with a 3-month off from handling x-ray machines; the child born was healthy and normal. Another 5 subjects had been married for only less than two years and their seminograms were essentially normal. They were classified as 'Unproven fertility'. The remaining 27 persons had fathered 61 children-16 born before the father had started working in radiology and 45 conceived later. There was 1 case of still-birth and 1 of microcephaly. However, the overall incidence of infertility and congenital defects was not significantly different than in the general population. (author)

  14. Awareness and attitude of doctors and nurses at a teaching hospital to skin donation and banking.

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    Michael, A I; Ademola, S A; Olawoye, O A; Iyun, A O; Oluwatosin, O M

    2014-12-01

    This study sought to determine the awareness and attitude of doctors and nurses in a teaching hospital to skin donation and banking, and to identify needs for personnel educational programmes. A cross sectional survey on doctors and nurses was carried out using a 44-item questionnaire that included a Likert scale on attitudes. Predictors of favourable attitudes were determined. Eighty (49.7%) doctors and 81 (50.3%) nurses participated in the study. Many participants, 126 (78.3%), knew that skin could be donated, but only 96 (59.6%) participants were aware of skin banking. The main source of information was during professional training (17.4%). Only 41 (25.5%) participants were willing to donate skin after death. Body disfigurement was the major reason (20.5%) against skin donation. Participants who were doctors, were aware of skin banking, and who were previous blood donors had higher attitudes scores (pbanking were predictors of favourable attitudes to skin donation and banking. Knowledge transfer during health professional training on the usefulness of banked skin in patients with major burns may lead to improved attitude of health professionals and acceptance of this modality of burn management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Job satisfaction of nurses in a Saudi Arabian university teaching hospital: a cross-sectional study.

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    Al-Dossary, R; Vail, J; Macfarlane, F

    2012-09-01

    Saudi Arabia is developing very fast in all disciplines, especially in nursing and health. Only about five studies between 1990 and 2010 have been undertaken in Saudi Arabia concerning factors influencing job satisfaction of nurses, although a body of knowledge exists globally. The purpose of this research was to measure nurses' job satisfaction in Saudi Arabia in a university teaching hospital and to determine the influencing factors. A quantitative, cross sectional method, self-administered questionnaire was used for this study. A systematic sample of N=189 nurses was used to collect data. The SPSS version 16.0. was used to analyze the data. An independent t-test and one-way analysis of variance were used to test hypotheses concerning different groups, and correlation tests (the Pearson's and Spearman's rank tests) were used to examine relationships between variables. Overall, nurses were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with their jobs. However, nurses indicated satisfaction with supervision, co-workers and nature of work. The sources of dissatisfaction were with subscales such as pay, fringe benefits, contingent rewards and operating conditions. These findings indicate that there is a need to increase nurses' salaries and bonuses for extra duties. More training programmes and further education also should be encouraged for all nurses. Therefore, it is imperative that nursing managers and policy makers in Saudi Arabia consider these findings to improve nurses' job satisfaction. © 2012 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2012 International Council of Nurses.

  16. Vancomycin Utilization Evaluation in a teaching hospital: A case- series study in Iran.

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    Fanak Fahimi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasing antimicrobial resistance is now a critical point of human being in the world. Especially wide spectrum antibiotics resistance germs like vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE should be dealt as soon as possible as an emergency conflict. Our study tries to reveal the amount of irrational use of vancomycin in a teaching hospital in Iran.Methods: We elected the whole inpatients that received vancomycin between February 2007 and May 2008.Results: Forty four out of those 45 patients had inappropriate indication and dosing regimen of vancomycin (97.7%. The most use of vancomycin was recorded in hematology – oncology ward and then Intensive Care Unit (ICU. Culture responses were negative despite great clinical evidence of infection.Conclusion: Vancomycin irrational use was high compared to other countries and it could be concerned as a major health problem by health policy makers and physicians to deal. However more detailed researches are needed to reveal the other aspects of this problem. Implementation of antibiotic protocols and standard treatment guidelines are recommended.

  17. Aetiology and types of neonatal seizures presenting at ayub teaching hospital abbottabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najeeb, S.; Qureshi, A.M.; Rehman, A.U.; Ahmed, F.; Shah, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neonatal seizures (NS) affect approximately 1% of neonates. Clonic, tonic, myoclonic and subtle seizures are the common types. Birth asphyxia, sepsis, metabolic derangements, intracranial bleed, kernicterus, tetanus and 5th day fits are the common aetiologies. This study was planned to evaluate the types and causes of neonatal seizures. Methods: It was a descriptive case series conducted at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from 12th December 2006 to 25th September 2007 on neonates having seizures. Serum chemistry, blood counts, cerebrospinal fluid examination and cranial ultrasound were done in all patients. Blood culture, renal and liver function tests, computerised tomography scan, metabolic and septic screening was done in selected patients. Descriptive statistics were applied for analysis. Results: Tonic clonic seizure was the commonest type (28%) followed by multi-focal clonic, and focal tonic seizures (25% each). Birth asphyxia was found to be the main aetiology (46%). Conclusion: Tonic clonic seizure was the commonest type and birth asphyxia the main aetiology identified in the majority of neonatal seizures. (author)

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Bone Scintigrams at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguette, E.Y.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Qualitative method of diagnosis has been the traditional means of diagnosing bone tumours at the Nuclear Medicine Department of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital over the years. Although this method is commendable, a more accurate diagnostic means is the quantitative approach. Study on ninety-five patients undergoing bone scans has been performed quantitatively using image J. The patients were administered with activity ranging from 15 to 30 mCi depending on their weights, and were then scanned with an installed e.Cam SPECT system. A 256 x 1024 matrix size was used in acquiring the bone scans. Quantitative analyses performed with the image J, revealed that uptake levels in all selected body parts were higher for metastatic tumours compared to non-metastatic tumours. The average normalised uptake in the recorded metastatic cases was 1.37332 cts/mm 2 /mCi and the corresponding uptake in the non-metastatic cases was 0.85230 cts/mm 2 /mCi. The relative higher uptake in metastatic tumours is attributed to high osteoblastic activity and blood flow in metastatic cases compared to non-metastatic cases. Quantitative assessment of bone scintigrams is recommended for its high accuracy and quicker means of diagnosing.(author)

  19. Management outcomes of abruptio placentae at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria.

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    Igwegbe, A O; Eleje, G U; Okpala, B C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine incidence, risk factors and management outcomes of abruptio placentae (AP) and comparing them with cases without AP who delivered within the same period. A 10 year retrospective study of AP managed at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria, between January 2001 and December 2010 was undertaken. Proforma was initially used for data collection before transfer to Epi-info 2008 software. Test of associations were evaluated and P < 0.05 was considered significant. Sixty nine cases out of a total delivery of 8,811 were seen, giving an incidence of 0.8%. The mean age and parity of women with AP were 30.8 +/- 0.9 years and 4.1 +/- 0.6 respectively and majority (78.3%) of cases were unbooked (p = 0.0019). Grand multiparity and age = 35 years were significant risk factors ( p < 0.05). Fifty two (75.4%) cases were delivered by caesarean section (c/s) ( P = 0.0000). The sex ratio was 160 ( p = 0.0134). The overall maternal mortality ratio during the study period was 987 per 100,000 live births with AP contributing 3.8% of the maternal deaths while perinatal mortality rate was 52.2%. A significant number of cases have high perinatal mortality. Unbooked, high parity, advanced maternal age and previous c/s scar were significant aetiological risk factors.

  20. Malignant renal tumours in adults in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria.

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    Mbaeri, T U; Orakwe, J C; Nwofor, A M E; Oranusi, C K; Ulebe, A O

    2012-01-01

    Malignant renal tumour is the third commonest urological tumour after prostate and bladder cancer. It is however the urological tumour with the highest mortality/incidence ratio. To review the frequency, mode of presentation and histological pattern of patients with malignant renal tumours in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital. A 7 year retrospective review of all our renal tumour folders in the institution. 19 patients qualified for the study with a male/female ratio of 1:2.8 and a mean age of 52.6 +/- 15.8 years. The peak age was in the seventh decade. Most patient present late (78.9%).Renal cell cancer was the commonest tumour type with the commonest mode of presentation being abdominal mass and pain. Malignant renal tumours present very late in our environment and patients hesitate in accepting available treatment option which is surgery. There is need for increased patient awareness and high index of suspicion by the clinician, particularly during imaging procedures, as this would significantly enhance the early detection of these patients.

  1. Improving maternal mortality at a university teaching hospital in Nnewi, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igwegbe, Anthony O; Eleje, George U; Ugboaja, Joseph O; Ofiaeli, Robinson O

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of the introduction of the Service Compact with all Nigerians (SERVICOM) contract on maternal health at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria. A retrospective and comparative study of maternal deaths between 2004 and 2010 was carried out. The main outcome measures were yearly maternal mortality ratio (MMR), relative risk (RR) of maternal mortality, and presentation-intervention interval. The yearly MMR and the RR of maternal mortality were compared with the figures from 2004, which represented the pre-SERVICOM era. There were 4916 live births and 54 maternal deaths during the study period, giving an MMR of 1098 per 100,000 live births. Pre-eclampsia/eclampsia was the most common direct cause (25.0%), followed by hemorrhage (18.8%) and sepsis (8.3%). Anemia (12.5%) was the most common indirect cause. There was a progressive reduction in MMR and RR of maternal mortality, with a corresponding increase in live births. The presentation-intervention interval improved significantly from 2006. A positive change in the attitude of health workers and the elimination of fee-for-service in emergency obstetric care would reduce type 3 delays in public health facilities, and consequently reduce maternal mortality. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Frequency of Blood Culture Isolates and their Antibiogram in a Teaching Hospital

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    Subha Shrestha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bloodstream infections are associated with significant patient morbidity and mortality. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns should guide the choice of empiric antimicrobial regimens for patients with bacteremia. Methods: Blood sample received from the patient attending Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital from March 2013 – August, 2013 were subjected to for culture. Isolate identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by standard microbiological method Results: Out of the total 2,766 blood samples, 13.3% showed bacterial growth. The percentage of neonatal septicemia was 13.3%. Staphylococcus aureus (28% was the most common isolates followed by Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi (22%, Coagulase negative Staphylococci (9.5%, Salmonella enterica Serotype Paratyphi ((7.6% and Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.6%. 26.3% of the isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were oxacillin resistant. Most of the gram positive organisms were susceptible to amikacin and vancomycin and showed high level resistance to cefuroxime and cotrimoxazole. Out of 109 isolates of typhoid bacilli, 95.3% were resistant to nalidixic acid ,79% to ciprofloxacin and 60.5% to ofloxacin. More than 50% of the isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli showed resistance to cephalosporins and cotrimoxazole. Acinetobacter spp showed high resistance (more than 60% to ceftriaxone and ofloxacin. More than 20% of the isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were resistant to ciprofloxacin and amikacin. Conclusions: Ongoing surveillance for antimicrobial susceptibility remains essential, and will enhance efforts to identify resistance and attempt to limit its spread. Keywords: antibiotic; bacteria; blood stream infections.

  3. Risk factors associated with postpartum haemorrhage at Juba Teaching Hospital, South Sudan, 2011

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    Thomas Tako Akim Ujjiga

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study risk factors associated with post partum haemorrhage (PPH in Juba Teaching Hospital, South Sudan. Method: An unmatched case control study was conducted in which 44 cases and 88 Controls were involved, from September to December 2011. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire in face to face interviews, and analyzed using Epi-info 3.5.3 statistical programme to determine if there was a correlation. Results: Maternal demographic and obstetric characteristics were found to be associated with the risk of bleeding during Bivariate analysis. However, age was found to confound emergency admission, uterotonic use (Oxytocin and Misoprostol use and delivery type, the latter being modified, in the development of post partum haemorrhage. Conclusion: These results indicate that active management of the third stage of labour (AMTSL and prompt intervention reduced the risk of developing PPH. Understanding the factors that cause PPH will allow us to better strengthen and effect pre delivery and emergency obstetric care which may help us reduce maternal mortality due to post partum haemorrhage.

  4. Cracked tooth syndrome: characteristics and distribution among adults in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoye, Christopher I; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2009-03-01

    This study highlighted the characteristics and distribution of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) and the associated factors in adult attendees in the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital. Three hundred seventy patients aged 18 years to 77 years with CTS-like conditions were included and studied over 12 months. The following information was recorded: suspected tooth and the dental arch, restorative status of the tooth, age and sex of the patient, results of bite test and transillumination, and the pulpal and periapical status of the tooth. CTS was seen most often in the 41 to 50 years age band (36.4%), in molars (63.6%), and in the maxillary arch (51.5%). Also, it was more frequent in men (55.8%). About 82% of CTS occurred in amalgam-restored teeth. All cases had a positive response to the bite test and a normal response to the electric pulp test. Only 10% gave a positive history of masticatory accident as against none with history of bruxism habits. It was concluded that patients with unexplained pain in a vital, amalgam-restored tooth (especially in maxillary molars), with or without a history of a masticatory accident, may have a cracked or fractured tooth.

  5. Prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Lumbini Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Palpa, Western Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Shristi; Bajracharya, Kishor; Adhikari, Janak; Pant, Sushama Suresh; Adhikari, Bipin

    2017-06-02

    Multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus is common in both tertiary and primary health care settings. Emergence of methicillin resistance in S. aureus (MRSA) along with macrolide, lincosamide, streptogramin B (MLSB) has made treatment of Staphylococcal infection more challenging. The main objective of this study was to detect MRSA, MLSB (inducible; MLSBi and constitutive; MLSBc) resistant S. aureus using phenotypic methods and to determine their antibiogram. Various samples were collected from 1981 patients who attended Lumbini Medical College and Teaching Hospital (LMCTH) during the period of 6 months from September 2015 to February 2016. Out of a total of 1981 samples, 133 S. aureus were isolated. Cefoxitin was used to detect MRSA by the disk diffusion test. Inducible clindamycin resistance (MLSBi) was detected by the D-zone test. The antibiotic profile of all isolates was tested by a modified Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method. Among 133 S. aureus, there were 58 (43.6%) MRSA, 34 (25.6%) MLSBi and 30 (22.6%) MLSBc. Of a total of 64 MLSB, a significant proportion (62.5%) was MRSA (p aureus, MRSA showed significant resistance to 9 (p resistance to multiple antibiotics (p resistance profiles from this study can optimize the treatment of multi-drug resistant S. aureus.

  6. Association between placental abruption and caesarean section among patients at Khyber teaching hospital Peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, S.; Jamal, T.; Rana, G.E.; Majid, A.; Iqbal, M.; Abrar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ante partum haemorrhage remains to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. 30 percentage of this haemorrhage is attributed to placental abruption. Along with other adverse maternal outcomes, it increases the risk of Caesarean sections in patients, which is a public health concern. This study was conducted to find out whether any significant association exists between placental abruption and C-section in our set up. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from July 26th, 2011 to May 1st, 2013 (i.e., 21 months) in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Khyber Teaching Hospital Peshawar on a sample of 334 patients who presented with antepartum haemorrhage after 28 weeks of gestation. All those patients with and without placental abruption were followed throughout pregnancy and labour to detect the risk of caesarean section. Results: Among study participants, parity had the highest dispersion while gestational age had the lowest. Caesarean section was performed on 26.3 percentage (95 percentage CI) of the study participants. Proportion of placental abruption among patients presenting with ante partum haemorrhage was 20.6 percentage, (95 percentage CI) out of which 7.5 percentage underwent C-section. Association between placental abruption and C-section was found significant at a=0.05 (ρ=0.03). Conclusion: Risk of caesarean section is increased in pregnancies complicated by placental abruption as compared to pregnancies complicated by other causes of ante partum haemorrhage. (author)

  7. Appropriate Use of Prophylactic Antibiotic Agents in Gynecologic Surgeries at a Midwestern Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppendahl, Locke; Chiles, Caitlin; Shields, Stephanie; Dong, Fanglong; Kraft, Elizabeth; Duong, Jennifer; Delmore, James

    2018-02-16

    The purpose of this study was to establish compliance with guidelines published by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) regarding prophylactic antibiotic use in gynecologic surgery at our institution, and define areas of improvement to promote antibiotic stewardship. This was a retrospective cohort study at a single, large tertiary care and teaching hospital in Kansas. Patients who underwent inpatient or outpatient gynecologic surgery during 2013 were included. Based on published guidelines for prophylactic antibiotic agents for gynecologic surgery by ACOG, procedures were classified as antibiotic-indicated or antibiotic-not-indicated. Chi-square and Fisher exact test analysis were used to identify factors associated with antibiotic use. Of the 1,735 cases eligible for inclusion, 1,045 (60.2%) had antibiotic agents recommended per guidelines, and appropriate antibiotic agents were given in 1,031 (98.7%) of those cases. In 690 (39.8%) cases, prophylactic antibiotics were either not recommended or the guidelines are not well defined. Of the 690 cases without indication for antibiotic agents, 394 (57.1%) received prophylactic antibiotic agents. Agreement with guidelines varied substantially based on patient age, race, insurance status, area of residence, and if the procedure was a resident case (p gynecologic surgeries for which published guidelines are not well defined. Future studies need to identify strategies to reduce antibiotic use in surgical procedures unlikely to benefit from prophylaxis.

  8. Detection of adverse events of transfusion in a teaching hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Ofori, A K; Owusu-Ofori, S P; Bates, I

    2017-06-01

    Monitoring the whole chain of events from the blood donors to recipients, documenting any undesirable or untoward effects and introducing measures to prevent their recurrence if possible are components of haemovigilance systems. Only few sub-Saharan African countries have haemovigilance systems, and there are very little data on adverse events of transfusion. Adverse events monitoring is an integral part of a haemovigilance system. Our study aimed to establish the incidence and types of adverse events of transfusions in Ghana and to identify interventions to improve effectiveness. This prospective observational 1-year study enrolled 372 recipients of 432 transfusions in a Ghanaian teaching hospital. Vital signs were monitored at 15, 30 and 60 min intervals during the transfusion, then 8 h until 24 h post-transfusion. Three investigators independently classified any new signs and symptoms according to Serious Hazards of Transfusion definitions. The adverse events incidence was 21·3% (92/432), predominantly mild acute transfusion reactions (84%). A total of 20 transfusions (4·6%) were stopped before completion, 60% of them for mild febrile reactions, which could have been managed with transfusion in situ. This prospective study indicates a high incidence of adverse events of transfusion in Kumasi, Ghana. The significant numbers of discontinued transfusions suggest that guidelines on how to manage transfusion reactions would help preserve scarce blood stocks. Gradual implementation of a haemovigilance system, starting with monitoring adverse transfusion events, is a pragmatic approach in resource-limited settings. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  9. Perception of Palliative Care among Medical Students in a Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, S; Gaire, D; Dhakal, S; Jaishwal, N; Kharel, P M; Vaidya, P

    2015-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness. Palliative care must be a part of every medical personnel's practice. But still medical education curriculums have not included palliative care in its syllabus, sufficiently due to which most of the health professional are not aware about this specialty. The purpose of this study is to find out the perception of the medical students in palliative care in a teaching hospital. A descriptive study was done among 270 undergraduate medical students studying in Institute of Medicine using a self structured pretested questionnaire. Data was entered in Microsoft Excel and analyzed by using SPSS 21. Of the total 270 undergraduate medical students only 152 has heard the word "palliative care". Only 84 students know, palliative care can be provided early in the life threatening illness. Total 80 students know it doesn't intend to postpone and hasten death. Though only 49 students didn't know PC is not included in our curriculum, 227 are interested to learn about it if given any opportunity. The perception of palliative care medicine is low in first couple of year of medical study. It is increased in clinically exposed students but is surprisingly more in fourth year than final year undergraduate medical students. However, it should be included in undergraduate medical study.

  10. HAND HYGIENE PRACTICES POST EBOLA VIRUS DISEASE OUTBREAK IN A NIGERIAN TEACHING HOSPITAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, S O; Osiyemi, A O

    2017-06-01

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) is a highly contagious viral infection that requires a high risk perception and practice of good hand hygiene by regular hand washing or use of hand sanitizers for infection control at all time. The declaration of Nigeria as an Ebola-free country by the World Health Organization on the 20th of October, 2014 has prompted many Nigerians, including healthcare workers, to discontinue the regular practice of good hand hygiene which was commonplace during the EVD outbreak. The study assessed hand hygiene practices for infection control after the West African Ebola virus disease outbreak in a Nigerian teaching hospital. This study was cross-sectional in design. A total of 450 staff of the University College Hospital, Ibadan participated in the survey. Data was collected using a structured, self-administered questionnaire. Chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression were used to determine associations between predictors of good hand hygiene practice at 5% level of significance. The mean age was 42.2 ± 8.6 years. A higher proportion of respondents in this study had a good knowledge of the risk factors of EVD; good knowledge of the precautionary measures against EVD and a good risk perception towards EVD. However, the majority of respondents, 359 (80.0%), had a poor practice of hand hygiene for infection control. Having good knowledge of risk factors and precautionary measures against EVD was associated with practice of good hand hygiene. Respondents with good risk perception of EVD were 1.63 times more likely to practice good hand hygiene (OR= 1.63; 95% CI= 1.20 - 4.38; p= 0.019). There was a good knowledge of risk factors and precautionary measures of EVD among staff of the University College Hospital, Ibadan. However, the majority of respondents had a poor practice of hand hygiene for infection control, Post EVD. Sensitization workshops to promote the regular practice of good hand hygiene is recommended for healthcare workers to control

  11. Survey of Employees' Safety Attitude in a Teaching Hospital Tehran 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mahmmoudi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimsThe Medical Errors and the potential unsafe actions are always regarded as a serious trouble by the managers and health care providers. Using the employees' attitude data as a measurement criterion in the evaluation of the hospitals performance in the field of the “Safety” can improve the safety level among the personnel and patients . Survey of employees' attitude about safety and its comparison with different groups of offering health services in a teaching Hospital was the main objective of present study.   MethodsIn order to specify patient safety culture in Moddares hospital, all employees including physicians, nurses, managers and employees of Para-clinic, a volume sample consisting of 212 persons were selected. Then it was used from questionnaire of safety attitude within 6 dimensions including Teamwork climate, Safety climate, perceptions of Management , Job Satisfaction, Working Conditions and Stress Recognition. At first this questionnaire was gone under assessing validity and trust. The scale of measuring, Likert was 5 grades. In order to specify difference between groups under study it was used from ANOVA test.   Results Positive safety culture within 6 dimensions including Teamwork Climate, Safety climate, Job Satisfaction, Stress Recognition, Perception of Management , Working Conditions for doctors were 3, 4.13, 17.4, 0, 4.3, and 8.7 respectively; the aforesaid Dimensions for nurses were 19, 2.6, 10.3, 7.8, 2.6 and 15.5 respectively, the aforesaid Dimensions for managers were 30.3, 6.1, 33.3, 0, 18.2 and 21.2 respectively and the aforesaid Dimensions for employees of Para-clinic Were 50, 12.5, 25, 12.5, 10 and 37.5 respectively. There was Significant difference from View Point of statistics (p<0.5 from Dimensions of Job satisfaction among managers and nurses, employees of Para-clinic and nurses this difference Were zero and 0.001. From View Point of Stress recognition among managers and employees of Para

  12. Abdominal surgical site infections: incidence and risk factors at an Iranian teaching hospital

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    Sabouri Kashani Ahmad

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal surgical site infections are among the most common complications of inpatient admissions and have serious consequences for outcomes and costs. Different risk factors may be involved, including age, sex, nutrition and immunity, prophylactic antibiotics, operation type and duration, type of shaving, and secondary infections. This study aimed to determine the risk factors affecting abdominal surgical site infections and their incidence at Imam Khomeini, a major referral teaching hospital in Iran. Methods Patients (n = 802 who had undergone abdominal surgery were studied and the relationships among variables were analyzed by Student's t and Chi-square tests. The subjects were followed for 30 days and by a 20-item questionnaire. Data were collected through pre- and post-operative examinations and telephone follow-ups. Results Of the 802 patients, 139 suffered from SSI (17.4%. In 40.8% of the cases, the wound was dirty infected. The average age for the patients was 46.7 years. The operations were elective in 75.7% of the cases and 24.7% were urgent. The average duration of the operation was 2.24 hours, the average duration of pre-operative hospital stay 4.31 days and the average length of (pre- and post-operation hospital stay 11.2 days. Three quarters of the cases were shaved 12 hours before the operation. The increased operation time, increased bed stay, electivity of the operation, septicity of the wound, type of incision, the administration of prophylactic antibiotic, type of operation, background disease, and the increased time lapse between shaving and operation all significantly associated with SSI with a p-value less than 0.001. Conclusion In view of the high rate of SSI reported here (17.4% compared with the 14% quoted in literature, this study suggests that by reducing the average operation time to less than 2 hours, the average preoperative stay to 4 days and the overall stay to less than 11 days, and

  13. Puerperal sepsis, the leading cause of maternal deaths at a Tertiary University Teaching Hospital in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngonzi, Joseph; Tornes, Yarine Fajardo; Mukasa, Peter Kivunike; Salongo, Wasswa; Kabakyenga, Jerome; Sezalio, Masembe; Wouters, Kristien; Jacqueym, Yves; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre

    2016-08-05

    Maternal mortality is highest in sub-Saharan Africa. In Uganda, the WHO- MDG 5 (aimed at reducing maternal mortality by 75 % between 1990 and 2015) has not been attained. The current maternal mortality ratio (MMR) in Uganda is 438 per 100,000 live births coming from 550 per 100,000 in 1990. This study sets out to find causes and predictors of maternal deaths in a tertiary University teaching Hospital in Uganda. The study was a retrospective unmatched case control study which was carried out at the maternity unit of Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital (MRRH). The sample included pregnant women aged 15-49 years admitted to the Maternity unit between January 2011 and November 2014. Data from patient charts of 139 maternal deaths (cases) and 417 controls was collected using a standard audit/data extraction form. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to assess for the factors associated with maternal mortality. Direct causes of mortality accounted for 77.7 % while indirect causes contributed 22.3 %. The most frequent cause of maternal mortality was puerperal sepsis (30.9 %), followed by obstetric hemorrhage (21.6 %), hypertensive disorders in pregnancy (14.4 %), abortion complications (10.8 %). Malaria was the commonest indirect cause of mortality accounting for 8.92 %. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, the factors associated with maternal mortality were: primary or no education (OR 1.9; 95 % CI, 1.0-3.3); HIV positive sero-status (OR, 3.6; 95 % CI, 1.9-7.0); no antenatal care attendance (OR 3.6; 95 % CI, 1.8-7.0); rural dwellers (OR, 4.5; 95 % CI, 2.5-8.3); having been referred from another health facility (OR 5.0; 95 % CI, 2.9-10.0); delay to seek health care (delay-1) (OR 36.9; 95 % CI, 16.2-84.4). Most maternal deaths occur among mothers from rural areas, uneducated, HIV positive, unbooked mothers (lack of antenatal care), referred mothers in critical conditions and mothers delaying to seek health care. Puerperal sepsis is

  14. Colonization with hospital flora and its associated risk factors in neonates hospitalized in neonatal ward of a teaching center in Isfahan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirani, Kiana; Mostafavizadeh, Kamyar; Ataei, Behrouz; Akhani, Khatere

    2018-01-01

    Due to the high incidence and prevalence of infection in neonatal ward, especially Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) reported by different studies and the important role of colonization with hospital germs in the development of nosocomial infections, we intended to evaluate the risk of colonization with hospital germs in neonates and its associated risk factors. This cross-sectional, descriptive-analytical study was conducted in 2016 in a Teaching Center in Iran. In total, 51 neonates were selected based on the inclusion criteria, and after recording their information in a checklist, samples were taken by swab from outer ear, axilla, and groin for culture. Neonates with negative culture from mentioned regions were enrolled in the study. The swab samples again were taken and sent for culture from mentioned regions in at least 3 days after hospitalization. Culture results from first and second sampling were collected and analyzed statistically. This study was conducted on 51 neonates. The mean gestational age among the neonates ranged from 35.25 (Week) ± 2.98. 22 girls (43.1%) and 29 boys (56.9%), most of them were born by cesarean. Based on the results of logistic regression, a significant association was found between the occurrence of colonization of hospital flora and the place hospitalization of the newborns (odds ratio (OR): 4.750; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.26-17.85). This study revealed that the only risk factors of colonization with hospital flora in neonates are the type of delivery and place of hospitalization. Based on findings of the study, it is recommended to focus on efforts in increasing the rate of natural birth as well as improving conditions of infection control in NICUs to reduce the number of incidences of colonization with hospital flora in neonates.

  15. Awareness of Patients' Rights among Inpatients of a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital- A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Upasana; D'Souza, Brayal C; Seetharam, Arun Mavaji

    2017-09-01

    The rights of a patient are a set of rules of conduct which govern the interaction between the patients' and healthcare professionals. Every patient has a right to be informed about their rights and also the responsibility of the healthcare provider. To assess awareness among inpatient about patients' rights at an academic accredited hospital. A questionnaire based cross-sectional study was carried out among 350 patients admitted to the wards of a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital. A 21-point questionnaire was developed based on standards of the National Accreditation Board for Hospitals and Healthcare Providers (NABH) and patients' charter of rights and validated. This charter of rights is also displayed in the hospital for patient's awareness. Frequencies and percentages were depicted. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Positive awareness among the patients ranged from 28% to 97.4%. Females were more aware of their rights than males for 11 out of the 21 patient rights items. Younger adults were more aware than any other age group participants. Participants who were admitted to wards of higher categories (deluxe rooms) had high degree of awareness about patients' rights and education. Patients from urban areas and higher educational status were more aware than patients coming from rural areas. The study concludes that effective measures should be taken to improve the overall awareness not only among patients but also among different stakeholders in the healthcare delivery system. Readability of the patients' rights charter with good readability score, developing and distributing patient education materials in simple language about the rights and responsibilities to the patient and their family/relatives during their stay in the hospital or at the time of registration.Continuing nursing and medical education in medical teaching institutions and hospitals should focus on patients' rights and its importance, its need for awareness and its consequences

  16. Birth outcomes in a tertiary teaching hospitals and local outposts: a novel approach to service delivery from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moudi, Z; Tabatabaei, S M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of childbirth care in a tertiary teaching hospital and Safe Delivery Posts (SDPs) to determine the safety of out-of-hospital care by midwives in Zahedan, Iran. A quasi-experimental design was applied in this study. In this study, 2063 women who gave birth in SDPs, along with 983 women who underwent vaginal delivery in a tertiary teaching hospital, were evaluated in 2011-2012. Retrospective chart review was applied to collect data from the medical records of mothers and neonates. Only low-risk women with a singleton live birth, cephalic presentation, gestational age ≥37 weeks, spontaneous labour, and no prior history of uterine scar were recruited. Based on the findings, episiotomy, perineal tear, cervical laceration, postpartum haemorrhage and need for blood transfusion (or hysterectomy) were less commonly reported in the SDP group, compared to the hospital group. In the SDP group, 15 (0.73%) women were transferred to the hospital after delivery. Overall, one (0.10%) case from the hospital group and two (0.10%) cases from the SDP group were admitted to the intensive care unit. One-minute Apgar score lower than seven, resuscitation, NICU admission and neonatal death were more commonly reported in the hospital group, compared to the SDP group. Overall, hospital transfer was reported in 12 (0.58%) neonates born in SDPs. In the present study, women who gave birth in SDPs had more opportunities to experience natural birth with fewer adverse outcomes. However, considering the possibility of life-threatening complications for mothers and newborns, substantial evidence is required to improve the quality of care before implementing such novel strategies in different settings. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hospital staffing and hospital costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, R R

    1976-08-07

    A comparative study of costs per bed per day in teaching hospitals affiliated with Monash University compared with large non-teaching metropolitan hospitals (1964 to 1974) shows they are much higher in teaching hospitals. There is no evidence that this is due to the additional costs arising from the clinical schools. Research in the teaching hospitals and the accompanying high professional standards and demands on services are major factors accounting for the difference. Over the decade studied, the resident staff have increased by 77% and other salaried staff by 24%. The index of expenditure for the three teaching hospitals in the decade has increased by 386%.

  18. Teaching Effectiveness and Student’s Learning Acquisition in Selected Major Courses in the International Tourism and Hospitality Management Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlita C. Medallon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Assessment in the classroom is done to determine the effectiveness of the lesson delivery and the extent of learning acquired by the students. The study identified the determinants of teaching effectiveness and learning acquisition of students enrolled in selected major courses in the International Hospitality Management Program. Utilizing a descriptive-evaluative design, data were collected from 210 students enrolled in courses of the International Tourism and Hospitality Management Program. Findings show that the level of interest of the students is a great consideration in increasing their level of learning acquisition. The significant determinants of teaching effectiveness are number of absences and the level of interest of the students. The significant determinant of learning acquisition is the level of interest of the students.

  19. Characteristics of simulation activities at North American medical schools and teaching hospitals: an AAMC-SSH-ASPE-AACN collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace C; Sacks, Heather; Devita, Michael; Reynolds, Robby; Gammon, Wendy; Saleh, Michael; Gliva-McConvey, Gayle; Owens, Tamara; Anderson, Julie; Stillsmoking, Kristina; Cantrell, Mary; Passiment, Morgan

    2012-12-01

    In September 2011, the Association of American Medical Colleges released the results of a survey conducted in 2010 on simulation activities at its member medical schools and teaching hospitals. In this commentary, we offer a synthesis of data and conclude that (1) simulation is used broadly at Association of American Medical Colleges member institutions, for many types of learners, including other health care professionals; (2) it addresses core training competencies and has many educational purposes; (3) its use in learner assessment is more prevalent at medical schools but is still significant at teaching hospitals; and (4) it requires a considerable investment of money, space, personnel, and time. These data confirm general perceptions about the state of simulation in North America for physician training. Future endeavors should include a more granular examination of how simulation is integrated into curricula, a similar survey of other health care-related institutions and professions, and a periodic assessment to characterize trends over time.

  20. Distribution of Reproductive Cases Presented at the University Of Ibadan Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Nigeria (1995-2009)

    OpenAIRE

    Oluwatoyin O. Ajala; Adetunji P. Fayomi

    2011-01-01

    We studied the distribution of reproductive cases presented at the University of Ibadan Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Nigeria for 15 years (1995 to 2009). Records of presented cases were sourced from the case files and subjected to descriptive analysis. The recorded reproduction cases were distributed by the reproductive condition, species, breed, sex and year of occurrence. Dystocia>pregnancy diagnosis>mastitis>transmissible venereal tumor>metritis were the most frequently presented conditio...

  1. Cryptococcosis in Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Patients Clinically Confirmed and/or Diagnosed at Necropsy in a Teaching Hospital in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Torres, Rafael; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Micheletti, Adilha Rua; Ribeiro, Barbara de Melo; Silva, Leonardo Eurípedes Andrade; Mora, Delio Jose; Paim, Kennio Ferreira; Silva-Vergara, Mario León

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcosis occurs in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with poor compliance to antiretroviral therapy or unaware of their human immunodeficiency virus status who present severe immunosuppression at admission. Consequently, high mortality rates are observed due to disseminated fungal infection. This report presents clinical and postmortem data of AIDS patients with cryptococcosis in a teaching hospital in Brazil. Retrospectively, medical and necropsy records of AIDS patien...

  2. Clonal Spread of Carbapenem Non-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii in an Intensive Care Unit in a Teaching Hospital in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Qiao; Xu, Weidong; Wu, Yuanjian; Xu, Hongxing

    2012-01-01

    Background This study was aimed to investigate the genetic diversity and antibiotic resistance profile of the nosocomial infection agent Acinetobacter baumannii from a medical intensive care unit (ICU) in a teaching hospital in Suzhou, China. Methods The genetic relationship among A. baumannii isolates in an ICU was investigated using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The antibiotic resistance pattern was determined by performing an antibiotic susceptible test, which included an agar dilutio...

  3. Maternal mortality at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Southeast Nigeria: a 10-year review (2003?2012)

    OpenAIRE

    Obiechina, NJ; Okolie, VE; Okechukwu, ZC; Oguejiofor, CF; Udegbunam, OI; Nwajiaku, LSA; Ogbuokiri, C; Egeonu, R

    2013-01-01

    NJ Obiechina, VE Okolie, ZC Okechukwu, CF Oguejiofor, OI Udegbunam, LSA Nwajiaku, C Ogbuokiri, R Egeonu Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria Background: Maternal mortality is high the world over, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, including Nigeria. Nigeria has consistently demonstrated one of the most abysmally poor reproductive health indices in the world, maternal mortality inclusive. This is a sad reminder that, unless thing...

  4. Comparing Outcomes of Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Among Large Teaching and Urban Hospitals in China and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhe; Zhang, Heng; Yuan, Xin; Rao, Chenfei; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yun; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Krumholz, Harlan M; Hu, Shengshou

    2017-06-01

    Coronary artery disease is prevalent in China, with concomitant increases in the volume of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The present study aims to compare CABG-related outcomes between China and the United States among large teaching and urban hospitals. Observational analysis of patients aged ≥18 years, discharged from acute-care, large teaching and urban hospitals in China and the United States after hospitalization for an isolated CABG surgery. Data were obtained from the Chinese Cardiac Surgery Registry in China and the National Inpatient Sample in the United States. Analysis was stratified by 2 periods: 2007, 2008, and 2010; and 2011 to 2013 periods. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality, and the secondary outcome was length of stay. The sample included 51 408 patients: 32 040 from 77 hospitals in the China-CABG group and 19 368 from 303 hospitals in the US-CABG group. In the 2007 to 2008, 2010 period and for all-age and aged ≥65 years, the China-CABG group had higher mortality than the US-CABG group (1.91% versus 1.58%, P =0.059; and 3.12% versus 2.20%, P =0.004) and significantly higher age-, sex-, and comorbidity-adjusted odds of death (odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidential interval, 1.22-2.04; and odds ratio, 1.73; 95% confidential interval, 1.24-2.40). There were no significant mortality differences in the 2011 to 2013 period. For preoperative, postoperative, and total hospital stay, respectively, the median (interquartile range) length of stay across the entire study period between China-CABG and US-CABG groups were 9 (8) versus 1 (3), 9 (6) versus 6 (3), and 20 (12) versus 7 (5) days (all P China and the United States. The longer length of stay in China may represent an opportunity for improvement. © 2017 The Authors.

  5. Estimating the direct costs of ischemic heart disease: evidence from a teaching hospital in BRAZIL, a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatter, Rosane Paixão; Hirakata, Vânia Naomi; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne

    2017-07-04

    Coronary artery disease is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease. In the United States, 7% of adults over 20 years of age are estimated to have coronary artery disease. In Brazil, a prevalence of 5 to 8% has been estimated in adults over 40 years of age, with an increased number of hospitalizations associated with both stable and acute clinical manifestations; and health care costs have quadrupled in the last decade. To estimate the direct costs of managing ischemic heart disease patient care in a teaching hospital in Brazil from the perspective of the service payer, the Brazilian Unified Health System. This study was a retrospective cohort study for the identification and valuation of resources used at both the outpatient and in-hospital levels in a sample of 330 patients selected from the hospital's ischemic heart disease clinic. Data were collected from computerized hospital records and patients' hospital bills from January 2000 to October 2015. A bivariate analysis and binary logistic regression were performed with p cost of outpatient management was US $1,521 per patient. The mean cost per hospitalization was US $1,976, and the expenses were higher in the first and last years of follow-up. Unstable angina, revascularization procedures, diabetes, hypertension and obesity were predictors of higher hospitalization costs (p cost estimates in this study indicate a high proportion of drug treatment costs in the treatment of ischemic heart disease. Treatment costs are higher in the first year and at the end of treatment, and some clinical factors are associated with greater hospital care costs. These results may serve as a basis for the evaluation of existing public policies and inputs for cost-effectiveness studies in coronary artery disease. CEP HCPA 11-0460 . Ethics Committee of Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre.

  6. Assessment of Service Quality in Teaching Hospitals of Yazd University of Medical Sciences: Using Multi-criteria Decision Making Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafii, Milad; Rafiei, Sima; Abooee, Fatemeh; Bahrami, Mohammad Amin; Nouhi, Mojtaba; Lotfi, Farhad; Khanjankhani, Khatere

    2016-08-01

    Hospitals as integrated parts of the wide-ranging health care systems have dominant focus on health care provision to meet, maintain and promote people's health needs of a community. This study aimed to assess the service quality of teaching hospitals of Yazd University of Medical Sciences using Fuzzy Analytical Hierarchy Process (FAHP) and Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS). A literature review and a qualitative method were used to obtain experts' viewpoints about the quality dimensions of hospital services to design a questionnaire. Then, using a self-made questionnaire, perceptions of 300 patients about the quality of delivered services were gathered. Finally, FAHP was applied to weigh each quality dimension and TOPSIS method to rank hospital wards. Six dimensions including responsiveness, assurance, security, tangibles, health communication and Patient orientation were identified as affecting aspects of hospital services quality among which, security and tangibles got the highest and lowest importance respectively (0.25406, 0.06883). Findings also revealed that in hospital A, orthopedics and ophthalmology wards obtained the highest score in terms of quality while cardiology department got the lowest ranking (0.954, 0.323). In hospital B, the highest and the lowest ranking was belonged to cardiology and surgical wards (0.895, 0.00) while in hospital C, surgical units were rated higher than internal wards (0.959, 0.851). Findings emphasized that the security dimension got the lowest ranking among SERVQUAL facets in studied hospitals. This requires hospital executives to pay special attention to the issue of patients' security and plan effectively for its promotion.

  7. Experiences of leaders in the implementation of Lean in a teaching hospital--barriers and facilitators in clinical practices: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aij, K.H.; Simons, F.E.; Widdershoven, G.A.; Visse, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To date, experiences of leaders in the implementation of Lean after a Lean Training Programme have not been systematically investigated within teaching hospitals. Existing studies have identified barriers and facilitators only from an improvement programme perspective and have not

  8. Comparison of Patient Outcome Measures between a Traditional Teaching Hospitalist Service and a Non-Teaching Hospitalist Service at an Academic Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarchichi, Tony R; Garrison, Jessica; Jeong, Kwonho; Fabio, Anthony

    2017-12-01

    Inpatient pediatric care is increasingly provided by pediatric hospitalists. This, in addition to changes in resident duty hour restrictions, has led to the creation of new models of care for inpatient pediatric patients. The objective of this study was to compare traditional outcome measures between a pediatric hospitalist-only service and a more traditional academic service in which care was provided by pediatric hospitalists, residents, and medical students. Attending physicians on the hospitalist-only service had an average of 1.7 years of post-residency experience compared to an average 16 years of experience for those working on the traditional academic service. This retrospective cohort study (hospitalist-only v. teaching service) used electronic medical records data of patients (n=1,059) admitted to a quaternary care, academic, children's hospital in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania with diagnoses of bronchiolitis, viral syndrome, and gastroenteritis from July 2011 to June 2014. Primary outcome measures included length of stay, hospital costs, and readmission rates. Patients with a diagnosis of bronchiolitis admitted to the hospitalist-only service had a significantly higher severity-of-illness-score than those admitted to the teaching service. A decreased length of stay and lower hospital costs were seen for patients admitted to the hospitalist-only service; however, these differences did not reach a level of statistical significance. There were no statistically significant differences in the outcome measures of patients with common pediatric illnesses admitted to a hospitalist-only versus a teaching hospitalist service. The model of a hospitalist-only service staffed by recent residency graduates may provide an efficient and effective model of care as patients admitted to this service had similar outcome measures to those patients cared for by more-experienced attending physicians.

  9. Prevalence rates of infection in intensive care units of a tertiary teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toufen Junior Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence rates of infections among intensive care unit patients, the predominant infecting organisms, and their resistance patterns. To identify the related factors for intensive care unit-acquired infection and mortality rates. DESIGN: A 1-day point-prevalence study. SETTING:A total of 19 intensive care units at the Hospital das Clínicas - University of São Paulo, School of Medicine (HC-FMUSP, a teaching and tertiary hospital, were eligible to participate in the study. PATIENTS: All patients over 16 years old occupying an intensive care unit bed over a 24-hour period. The 19 intensive care unit s provided 126 patient case reports. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of infection, antimicrobial use, microbiological isolates resistance patterns, potential related factors for intensive care unit-acquired infection, and death rates. RESULTS: A total of 126 patients were studied. Eighty-seven patients (69% received antimicrobials on the day of study, 72 (57% for treatment, and 15 (12% for prophylaxis. Community-acquired infection occurred in 15 patients (20.8%, non- intensive care unit nosocomial infection in 24 (33.3%, and intensive care unit-acquired infection in 22 patients (30.6%. Eleven patients (15.3% had no defined type. The most frequently reported infections were respiratory (58.5%. The most frequently isolated bacteria were Enterobacteriaceae (33.8%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26.4%, and Staphylococcus aureus (16.9%; [100% resistant to methicillin]. Multivariate regression analysis revealed 3 risk factors for intensive care unit-acquired infection: age > 60 years (p = 0.007, use of a nasogastric tube (p = 0.017, and postoperative status (p = 0.017. At the end of 4 weeks, overall mortality was 28.8%. Patients with infection had a mortality rate of 34.7%. There was no difference between mortality rates for infected and noninfected patients (p=0.088. CONCLUSION: The rate of nosocomial infection is high in intensive care

  10. Surveillance of infection status of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an Indian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasmita Dubey

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To access nosocomial and community accounts of multidrug resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolated by surveillance in a teaching hospital, over a period of 30 months. Methods: Clinical samples from nosocomial sources, i.e. , wards and cabins, intensive care unit (ICU and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU sources, as well as community or outpatient department (OPD sources of a hospital were used for isolating strains of S. aureus resistant to methicillin/oxacillin and vancomycin, over a period, November 2009-April 2012. Results: Of a total of 1 507 S. aureus isolates, 485 strains from community and 1 022 isolates were from nosocomial sources; Out of 485 (100% OPD S. aureus isolates, 390 (80.41% were MRSA strains. Similarly, from wards and cabins of 564 (100% isolates, 461 (81.73% strains were MRSA; whereas of 458 (100% isolates obtained from ICU and NICU, 363 (79.25% strains were MRSA. It was ascertained with χ2-tests of independence that MRSA strains were equally distributed in "community " or "wards and cabins " or "ICU and NICU " sources, alike rest other drug-resistant S. aureus strains. Antibiotic sensitivity patterns of isolated strains with 16 antibiotics were ascertained. Out of 390 (100% MRSA strains isolated from OPD, 80 (20.51% were vancomycin resistant (VRSA and 173 (44.35% strains were moderately sensitive to vancomycin or called, vancomycin intermediate strains (VISA. Similarly, from nosocomial sources, out of 461 (100% MRSA isolates obtained from wards and cabins, 110 (23.86% strains were VRSA and 208 (45.11% were VISA strains, whereas out of 363 MRSA isolates obtained from ICU and NICU, 61 (16.8% VRSA strains and 164 (45.17% VISA strains were found. A progressive increase of percent values of drug resistance to 16 antibiotics used for antibiotic profiling revealed its subtle infection dynamics. Conclusions: This study revealed the appalling state of occurrence of MRSA and VRSA in a resource

  11. Patient dose assessment from fluoroscopic procedures at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyekye, P. K.

    2008-06-01

    Organ and effective dose to ninety (90) patients undergoing myelogram, urethrogram, barium swallow, barium meal and barium enema examinations at the KorIe-Bu Teaching Hospital was estimated using the Monte Carlo Code (PCXMC). Free in air measurements were made with a calibrated ionisation chamber to estimate the entrance surface air kerma for each examination. Evaluation of fluoroscopy beam on time and number of radiographs taken per patient was done for all the examinations considered and studies were done on how they affect patient dose. Dose area product (DAP) was calculated from the entrance surface air kerma and the area of the beam on the surface of the patient and compared with internationally accepted reference levels. Excess relative risk of site specific solid cancer and all solid cancers excluding thyroid and Non-melanoma skin cancers incidences were estimated for the various examinations using Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation VII Committee risk model from the knowledge of the mean effective doses for each examination. The mean effective dose was found to be 0.29 :±: 0.07 mSv for urethrogram, 0.84:±: 0.13 mSv for barium swallow, 3.15 :±: 0.44 mSv for barium meal, 6.24 :±: 0.7 mSv for barium enema and 0.38 :I: 0.05 mSv for myelogram examinations. The estimated mean dose area product (DAP) was found to be 3.55 :±: 0.95 Gycm2 for urethrogram, 16.44:1: 2.60 Gycm2 for barium swallow, 50.81 :±: 7.04 Gycm2 for barium meal, 99.69 :±: 10.85 Gycm2 for barium enema and 9.32 :±: 0.99 Gycm2 for myelogram examinations. The estimated excess relative risk for the occurrence of all solid cancer was found to be 9.5700E-S and 1.6530E-4 for males and females respectively undergoing urethrogram examination, 2.7720E-4 and 4.7880E-4 for males and females respectively undergoing barium swallow examination, 1.0395E-3 and 1.7955E-3 for males and females respectively undergoing barium meal examination, 2.0592E-3 and 3.5568E-3 for males and females respectively

  12. Childhood Pyogenic Septic Arthritis as Seen in a Teaching Hospital South East Nigeria.

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    Omoke, Njoku Isaac; Obasi, Akputa Aja

    2017-01-01

    Childhood pyogenic septic arthritis and its associated musculoskeletal morbidity is an important health concern in developing countries. Its pattern of presentation that varies from and within subregions has implications on the early recognition, treatment, and outcome. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern and outcome of childhood septic arthritis in our environment. This was a retrospective study of all the children seen with pyogenic septic arthritis in Federal Teaching Hospital Abakaliki between January 2005 and December 2015. Childhood septic arthritis accounted for 44 (83%) of the 53 patients seen with pyogenic septic arthritis. Female to male ratio was 1:1.75 and the mean age was 5.7 ± 0.73 years. Eight patients (18.2%) had polyarticular involvements. The right shoulder was significantly more involved than the left and the left hip more than right. Overall, there was a preponderance of onset of symptoms in the dry season. Children from the rural areas accounted for 85.7% of those with the onset of symptom in rainy season. Delayed presentation >6 days (in 68.2% of patients) was related to age ( P septic shock, and joint stiffness were three top complications observed. Mortality rate was 2.3%, and cause of death was overwhelming sepsis. In our setting, pyogenic septic arthritis is predominantly a childhood health problem and children under 5 years of age are the most vulnerable. Delayed presentation, an important factor in morbidity and mortality associated with septic arthritis was common among the patients, calls for a public enlightenment program on the importance of early presentation.

  13. Candidemia epidemiology and susceptibility profile in the largest Brazilian teaching hospital complex

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    Adriana Lopes Motta

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Although the spectrum of fungi causing bloodstream fungal infections continues to expand, Candida spp. remains responsible for the majority of these cases. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to characterize the candidemia epidemiology, species distribution and antifungal susceptibility patterns at a Brazilian tertiary teaching public hospital with 2,500 beds. METHODS: Records from the microbiology laboratory were used to identify patients with positive blood cultures during 2006. The in vitro activity of amphotericin B, caspofungin, itraconazole, fluconazole, voricanozole, and posaconazole were determined using the Etest method. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-six cases of candidemia were identified and 100 strains were available for antifungal susceptibility testing. The overall incidence of candidemia was 1.87 cases/1.000 admissions and 0.27 cases/1.000 patient-days. Among the patients, 58.1% were male, and the median age was 40 years old. C. albicans was the most common species (52.2%, followed by C. parapsilosis (22.1%, C. tropicalis (14.8%, and C. glabrata (6.6%. All strains were susceptible to amphotericin B with a MIC90 of 0.5 µg/mL. Overall susceptibility for voriconozole, fluconazole, and caspofungin was > 97% with a MIC90 of 0.064, 4.0 and 1.0 µg/mL, respectively. For itraconazole the susceptibility rate was 81% with a MIC90 of 0.5 µg/mL. Posaconazole also demonstrated good in vitro activity with a MIC90 of 0.25 µg/mL. CONCLUSION: This is the first antifungal susceptibility report in our institution

  14. Suboptimal use of risk reduction therapy in peripheral arterial disease patients at a major teaching hospital

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    Al-Omran, Mohammed; Verma, Subodh; Lindsay, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Current evidence suggests that modification of atherosclerosis risk factors plays an important role in reducing adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). This study was undertaken to determine whether patients in this high-risk group were adequately using risk factor modification therapy. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective study of consecutive patients with PAD from a teaching hospital. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The collected data included information about atherosclerotic risk factors and utilization of risk factor modification therapy RESULTS: The 391 patients had a mean (standard deviation of 3 (1) atherosclerotic risk factors. Hypertension was identified in 56.8% of patients (222/391), of whom only 37.4% (83/222) had adequate blood pressure control (BP 2.5 mmol/L, compared to a rate of 76.5% (117/153) among non-statin users (P<.001). The majority of patients of patients ( 72.4%; 283/391) were overweight/obese. Many patients (67.3%; 263/391) were nonsmokers; however, most (73.4%; 193/263) had a history of smoking. Antiplatelets were prescribed for 78.3% of patients (306/391), of whom 70.6% (216/306) were taking aspirin. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors were prescribed for 44.8% of patients (175/391). Among rampril users, only 36.8% of patients (53/144) were on an optimal dose. CONCLUSION: Although atherosclerotic risk factors were prevalent in patients with PAD, we found that patients received sub-optimal use of risk reduction treatments. Effective strategies to encourage health professionals to use these adjunctive therapies need to be developed. PMID:21808113

  15. Proton Beam Radiotherapy for Uveal Melanomas at Nice Teaching Hospital: 16 Years' Experience

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    Caujolle, Jean-Pierre; Mammar, Hamid; Chamorey, Emmanuel Phar; Pinon, Fabien; Herault, Joel; Gastaud, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present the results of uveal melanomas treated at Nice Teaching Hospital. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study included 886 consecutive patients referred to our clinic for the treatment of uveal melanomas by proton beam radiotherapy from June 1991 to December 2007. Survival rates were determined by using Kaplan-Meier estimates, and prognostic factors were evaluated using the log-rank test or Cox model. Results: The number (percent total) of subjects staged according to the TNM classification system (6th edition) of malignant tumors included 39 stage T1 (4.4%), 420 stage T2 (47.40%), 409 stage T3 (46.16%), and 18 stage T4 (2.03%) patients. The median follow-up was 63.7 months. The Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate at 5 years according to the sixth edition TNM classification was 92% for T1, 89% for T2, 67% for T3, and 62% for T4; and at 10 years, 86% for T1, 78% for T2, 43% for T3, and 41% for T4. Five factors were found to be associated with an increased death rate: advanced age, tumor thickness, largest tumor basal diameter, tumor volume, and tumor volume-to-eyeball volume ratio. The metastasis-free survival rates were 88.3 % at 5 years and 76.4 % at 10 years. The local control rates were 93.9% at 5 years and 92.1% at 10 years. The ocular conservation rates were 91.1% at 5 years and 87.3% at 10 years. Conclusions: We report the results of a large series of patients treated for uveal melanomas with a very long follow-up. Despite the large tumor volume treated, our results were similar to previously published findings relating to proton beam therapy.

  16. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at the korle bu teaching hospital, accra, ghana.

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    Aduful, Hk; Naaeder, Sb; Darko, R; Baako, Bn; Clegg-Lamptey, Jna; Nkrumah, Kn; Adu-Aryee, Na; Kyere, M

    2007-03-01

    To study the indications for endoscopy, the endoscopic diagnosis and other lessons learnt. A retrospective and prospective audit of all upper gastrointestinal endoscopies performed in the Endoscopy Unit of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital from January 1995 to December 2002 was performed. A total of 6977 patients, 3777 males and 3200 females with age range 1 year 8 months to 93 years were endoscoped. The mean age of males was 43.5 +/- 0.5 and females 43.7 +/- 0.6 years. Epigastric pain (42.5%), dyspepsia (32.8%) and haematemesis and melaena (14.2%) were the commonest reasons for endoscopy. Chronic duodenal ulcer (19.6%), acute gastritis (12.7%), duodenitis (10.2%), oesophagitis (7.5%) were the commonest diagnoses. Normal endoscopy was reported in 41.1% patients, and was higher in the younger age group compared to the older (R = 0.973, P<0.001). Nine hundred and ninety (14.2%) patients were endoscoped for haematemesis and melaena of which chronic duodenal ulcer (32.1%), gastritis/gastric erosions (12.8%), oesophageal varices (9.8%), carcinoma of the stomach (6.4%), and duodenitis (4.2%), were the commonest causes. No lesion was found in 20.6% of these patients. Urease test was positive in 75% of all biopsy specimen and 85% in chronic duodenal ulcer, gastritis and duodenitis. The normal endoscopy rate is high and needs to be reduced in order to help prolong the lives of the endoscopes. Chronic duodenal ulcer is usually associated with H. pylori infection and is the commonest cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  17. Maxillofacial and concomitant injuries in multiple injured patients at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana.

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    Parkins, G; Boamah, M O; Avogo, D; Ndanu, T; Nuamah, I K

    2014-01-01

    Patients with maxillofacial injuries may sustain concomitant injuries. The presentation of other injuries may be the initial focus of attention of the primary attending surgeon who may miss the maxillofacial injuries to the detriment of the patient. To determine the incidence of injuries associated with maxillofacial injuries at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH) from January 2009 to December 2010. A prospective study was carried out on patients who were referred to the Maxillofacial Unit of the University of Ghana Dental School and KBTH over the two years with maxillofacial injuries. Their age, sex, type of injury in the maxillofacial region, its aetiology and concomitant injuries were charted. The data was analysed using SPSS 16.0 software. Two hundred and fifty eight (258) patients were seen of which 67 (26.0%) had concomitant injuries. The average age was 29.1 years. The peak incidence was in the age group 21-30 (N=73, 28.3%). 74% were male and 26.0% female. The commonest cause of injury was road traffic accident (RTA) (N=142;55.0%). 52.7% (N=136) of the patients had injuries of the maxillofacial region. 26.7% (N=69) had mandibular fractures, 19.4% (N=50) had middle third fractures and 8.1% (N=21) had fractures of both. Concomitant injuries were mainly orthopaedic (N=31;12%) and the head and spinal region (N=29;11.2%). A significant number of patients who suffer maxillofacial injuries also sustain injuries of other parts of the body at KBTH. Prompt multidisciplinary management may contribute to improved outcomes.

  18. Sleep quality assessment in 35 Parkinson's disease patients in the Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal.

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    Maiga, B; Diop, M S; Sangare, M; Dembele, K; Cisse, L; Kone, O; Seck, L B; Landoure, G; Guinto, C O; Ndiaye, M; Ndiaye, M M

    2016-03-01

    Sleep disorders are diverse in Parkinson's disease. We aimed to assess the quality of sleep in patients with Parkinson's disease in an African population. In a transversal and prospective study from April to June 2014, all parkinsonian patients followed at the Fann Teaching Hospital Neurology Clinic (Dakar, Senegal) were assessed using the Hoehn and Yahr's scale and filled out the following questionnaires: Parkinson's disease sleep scale (PDSS), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). A PDSS score5 indicated poor quality or impaired sleep. An ESS score>10 indicated excessive daytime sleepiness. We used the Pearson coefficient to search for correlation between age, disease stage, disease duration, and the importance of sleep impairment. Hoehn and Yahr staging was 2.42±0.90 in the 35 patients (60% male, mean age 65.7±7.4years, disease duration 32.4±23.4months). The mean total PDSS score was 99.5±24.1 and 74.3% of the patients had an abnormally high PSQI score, indicating high frequency and intensity of sleep disorders. Most frequent disorders were pain or cramps interrupting sleep, night waking to urinate and fatigue or sleepiness on waking. Patients exhibited excessive diurnal sleepiness in 22.9% of the cases; they often had an abnormal PSQI score. Both the total PDSS score and the difficulty to sleep increased with disease stage, but not with age or disease duration. We found evidence of major alteration of sleep quality in Senegalese Parkinson patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Dentists' knowledge and attitude towards informed consent taking in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

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    Adeyemi, A T; Kosoko, J O; Ifesanya, J U

    2011-09-01

    There has been an increase in medical and dental knowledge in the world today. More and more people are getting to know their rights and cases of medical and dental liability is on the increase. Hence a proper approach towards obtaining informed consent in dental practice has become necessary. This study assessed dentists' perception on informed consent taking for dental procedures. Self administered questionnaires were given to all dentists working in one of the teaching hospitals in the south west region of Nigeria. The questionnaires assessed the doctors' ability to properly define informed consent, knowledge of aspects relevant to informed consent taking and procedures for which they felt informed consent should be taking routinely. The result revealed 10 out of 56 dentists (17.5%) were able to rightly and fully define informed consent. Almost all the dentists (98.4%) claimed to have taken informed consent at one time or the other, out of which 31 dentists (59.6%) claim that they always take verbal informed consent on routine dental treatment. However 21 (42%) of the dentists believed that informed consent scares patients, while 31 (54.5%) believed informed consent prepares patients better for the procedure. Generally the dentists agreed that the more invasive the dental treatment procedure was the more they felt informed consent should be taken. Dentists knowledge about informed consent seems to be inadequate as only few of them were able to define informed consent. However their attitude towards informed consent seems to be more positive as almost all claimed to have taken informed consent from patients at one time or the other. Therefore regular update about knowledge and significance of informed consent should be encouraged.

  20. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in children: The Lagos University Teaching Hospital experience

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    Oluwafunmilayo Funke Adeniyi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Paediatric endoscopy is now standard care in the developed world for the management of gastrointestinal (GI disorders. However, in developing countries endoscopy remains an underutilised tool. Objective. To determine the indications and the spectrum of endoscopic findings in children seen at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Methods. The indications for upper GI endoscopy and endoscopic findings in children ≤16 years old, referred for the procedure from June 2013 to June 2016, were documented. The endoscopic yield in these children was also determined. Results. In total 71 children were referred for upper GI endoscopy during the study period. There were 35 boys and 36 girls aged 3 months to 16 years. The indications for upper endoscopy were recurrent abdominal pain in 37 (52.1%, upper GI bleeding in 17 (23.9%, recurrent vomiting in 7 (9.9%, dyspepsia in 5 (7.0, heartburn in 2 (2.8%, dysphagia in 1 (1.4, portal hypertension in 1 (1.4 and ingestion of corrosives in 1 (1.4% of the subjects. Endoscopic findings were as follows: gastritis 19 (26.8%, hiatus hernia in 13 (18.3%, gastric erosions in 12 (16.9%, oesophageal varices 6 (8.4%, duodenitis in 4 (5.6%, gastric ulcer in 3 (4.2%, gastric polyp in 2 (2.8%. The overall endoscopic yield was 60.2%. Conclusion. There is a need to increase the awareness of the role of paediatric endoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of GI disorders in developing countries. Recurrent abdominal pain still remains a relevant indication for the procedure. The need to develop training programmes for paediatric endoscopy and paediatric gastroenterology in general in developing countries cannot be overemphasised.

  1. Acute coronary syndrome-related mortality audit in a teaching hospital at Port Blair, India

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    Shiv Shankar Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: India has a growing trend of acute myocardial infarction (AMI due to shifting lifestyle. Objective: To study the profile of patients died due to AMI and to find its risk correlates. Methods: A study was conducted on consecutive AMI cases admitted in the teaching hospital at Port Blair from April 2011 to March 2016. During inpatients management, outcomes were followed up from admission till discharge or expiry. Results: Of the total 491 cases, majority (75.99% had ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI; mean age of 73 deaths was 58.01 ± 13.60, mortality probability among females was less; in the age group 41–50 years the case fatality rate was the lowest (7.58%. Mean age of survival was 56.75 ± 10.47; great majorities were males across all age groups in cases and deaths; highest number of cases were in the age group 51–60 (34.21%; reportedly 83.10% had some physical activities; 6.52% were vegetarian; 34.22% were smokers; 10.39% had family history of AMI, majority (59.06% were from white collar profession (teacher, clerical, etc.; 52.95% were diabetics; and 47.45% were hypertensives. Lifestyle-related risk factors, physical activity, and vegetarian diet were not protective; family history and addiction to smoking were significantly associated with AMI deaths. Thrombolytic intervention helped the survival of 73.68%, and the odds ratio of survival showed benefit. Conclusions: Acute STEMI had male and middle-age predominance with a common risk factor of family history, smoking, diabetes, and hypertension.

  2. Acquired uterine vascular abnormalities associated with persistent human chorionic gonadotropin: Experience at a Korean teaching hospital.

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    Ju, Da Hye; Yi, Sang Wook; Sohn, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Soo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe our experience with the diagnosis and management of acquired uterine vascular abnormalities associated with persistent human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Through this case series, we sought to establish our protocol for the treatment and follow-up of uterine vascular lesions associated with persistent hCG. We examined the clinical presentations of 28 Korean women with acquired vascular uterine abnormalities associated with persistent hCG who were seen in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Gangneung Asan Teaching Hospital, Gangneung-si, Korea between October 2006 and July 2012 and retrospectively reviewed their medical records. The mean patient age was 32.5 ± 6.4 years, and the mean parity was 1.4 ± 1.2. The mean size of the vascular lesions in color Doppler sonography and multidetector computed tomography with angiography was 3.1 ± 1.6 cm and 3.9 ± 1.6 cm, respectively. Multidetector computed tomography revealed arteriovenous malformation-like vascular lesions (n = 15) and pseudoaneurysms (n = 3). Treatments included clinical observation (n = 11), uterine artery embolization (n = 11), hysterectomy (n = 4), and chemotherapy, including single methotrexate (MTX) treatment and combination chemotherapy (n = 9). When the uterine vascular lesion is not decreased, or if weekly clinical follow-up reveals that the serum β-hCG level is persistently elevated or sustained in conjunction with vaginal hemorrhage, a proper management strategy is required. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Anthropometry of children with cerebral palsy at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital

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    Titilayo Olubunmi Adekoje

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy (CP is one the most common causes of disability among children in developing countries and is often associated with poor growth. The assessment of growth and nutrition of children is an important aspect of health monitoring and is one of the determinants of child survival. Aim: To assess the nutritional status of children with CP as seen in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH. Subjects and Methods: A prospective case-control study was conducted on children with CP attending the weekly pediatric neurology clinic of the LUTH between April 2005 and March 2006. Controls were apparently healthy children being followed up at the children′s out-patient clinic of LUTH for acute illness that had resolved. Anthropometric measurements of weight, length/height, mid-upper arm circumference, and skinfold thickness were taken according to the protocols recommended by the International Society of the Advancement of Kinanthropometry. Statistical Analysis: EPI-INFO (version 6.04 was used for analysis. Chi-square test was used to determine associations. Student′s t-test was used to compare means of patients and matched controls. Probability P < 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. Results: The controls had higher weight than the patients with mean weight (standard deviation of 13.7 (4.8 kg, and 12.0 (4.5 kg, respectively (P = 0.01. There were also statistically significant differences in the subscapular and biceps skinfold measurements between the patient and control groups (P = 0.00004 and 0.000008, respectively. Twenty-four (25.8% and 5 (5.4% of the patients had moderate and severe undernutrition compared to 6 (6.1% and none, respectively, in the control group (P = 0.00005. Conclusion: Children with CP had significantly lower mean anthropometric parameters and were more malnourished compared with the control group of children matched for age, sex, and social class.

  4. Quality of Morning Report at Yazd Shahid Sadoughi Teaching Hospital in 1386

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    S Zare

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ackground : Morning report has been the basis of educational programs for internal residents over years. It consists of various groups including instructors, trainers, and students with varying educational objectives. Yet, there is no uniform pattern for this purpose. So, the present study was conducted to evaluate the quality of morning report at Yazd Shahid Sadoughi Teaching Hospital. Methods : This was a descriptive cross-sectional study carried out on a total of 117 subjects (37 males, and 80 females including 39 assistant students, 39 attending students, and 39 trainees in the Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Obstetrics Wards. A questionnaire including 29 items was given to the students to survey the quality of morning report in different wards. The related data were collected and analyzed using Chi-square. Each questionnaire was scored on the basis of a predetermined criterion measure. The data were classified into "excellent" and "moderate" groups. Results : No statistically significant difference was found between questionnaire score and sex (P-value = 0.05 yet, there was a statistically significant difference between questionnaire scores relating to the three said wards (P-value = 0.019. The obstetrics ward (48% was at the excellent level. 22.2% of the students presented their morning reports including a follow-up. 55.6% of the students presented their reports at the assistant level. 66.7% of the students presented their report in the form of question-and-answer, while 33.3% of them presented it as a speech. Further, 66.3% of the students maintained that the morning report has had an effective impact on the management of the patients. Conclusion : Based on the findings, it is advisable to provide evidence as films, papers, books, etc. to promote the quality of morning report.

  5. Clinical profile of newly presenting diabetic patients at the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unadike, B.C.; Akpan, N.A.; Essien, I.O.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is emerging as a major health challenge with the incidence and prevalence of the disease on the increase. It also contributes to overall morbidity and mortality with complications like cardiovascular disease, neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy and lower extremity amputation. There are few local studies on the clinical characteristics of the disease in our wet up and this study therefore set out to characterize the clinical profile of newly presenting diabetic patients in a health facility in Nigeria. It is a cross sectional, descriptive study carried out at the diabetes clinic of the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital between January 2007 and September 2008. Data obtained included age, sex, anthropometric indices, symptomatology, co-morbidities, complications and treatment of diabetes. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 10. A total of two hundred and seventy patients were studied (120 males, 150 females). About 89.2% were Type 2 DM patients and majority of the study subjects were overweight. Diabetic neuropathy was the commonest complication present in 38.8% of the subjects. Polyuria was the commonest symptom and hypertension the commonest comorbidity. Majority of the subjects were on oral hypolgycaemic agents for the management of their disease with the sulphonyureas and biguanides being the most common medication that was taken by them. A few of the patients were also taking herbal medication for treatment of their disease. Majority of the patients presenting in our facility have Type 2 diabetes, were hypertensive and overweight. Hypertension was the commonest co-morbidity and diabetic neuropathy the commonest complication. Adequate health education, subsidies on medications and proper funding of the health sector is necessary to stem the tide of the burden attributable to the disease. (author)

  6. Presenting signs of retinoblastoma at a tertiary level teaching hospital in Ethiopia.

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    Shifa, Jemal Zeberga; Gezmu, Alemayehu Mekonnen

    2017-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a primary malignant intraocular neoplasm that arise from immature retinoblasts with in developing retina. The commonest presenting sign in developing country is proptosis which is the late presenting sign. We report presenting signs of retinoblastoma in Ethiopian children seen at a tertiary level teaching hospitals in Ethiopia. Prospective case series study was done on children who presented with retinoblastoma between May 1, 2005 and September 1, 2006. This study was done as part of requirement for partial fulfilment of certificate of specialty study in ophthalmology during the year 2005 to 2006. SPSS 11 statistical package was used to analyse the data. Among 41 patients seen during the study period, 24 (58.5%) were males and 17(41%) were females. Unilateral retinoblastoma was found in 32 (78%) patients and bilateral cases were found in 9(22%). Mean age of onset for right eye was 27.5 months and left eye 33.7 months. The mean ages of presentation at time of diagnosis for right and left eye were 34.4 and 40.2 months, respectively .In bilateral retinoblastoma mean age of presentation was 33.3 months. The commonest presenting sign was proptosis 22(53.7%) followed by leucocorea nine (22%),ocular inflammation four (9.0 %), strabismus three (7.3%), glaucoma one (2.4%), loss of vision one (2.4%)and hyphemaone (2.4%). The commonest presenting signs of retinoblastoma in our set up were Proptosis followed by leucocorea. This is due to late presentation of patient and late referral by medical professionals. Health education to the public and health professionals will help early detection of retinoblastoma.

  7. The Auckland Cataract Study: Assessing Preoperative Risk Stratification Systems for Phacoemulsification Surgery in a Teaching Hospital.

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    Kim, Bia Z; Patel, Dipika V; Sherwin, Trevor; McGhee, Charles N J

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate 2 preoperative risk stratification systems for assessing the risk of complications in phacoemulsification cataract surgery, performed by residents, fellows, and attending physicians in a public teaching hospital. Cohort study. One observer assessed the clinical data of 500 consecutive cases, prior to phacoemulsification cataract surgery performed between April and June 2015 at Greenlane Clinical Centre, Auckland, New Zealand. Preoperatively 2 risk scores were calculated for each case using the Muhtaseb and Buckinghamshire risk stratification systems. Complications, intraoperative and postoperative, and visual outcomes were analyzed in relation to these risk scores. Intraoperative complication rates increased with higher risk scores using the Muhtaseb or Buckinghamshire stratification system (P = .001 and P = .003, respectively, n = 500). The odds ratios for residents and fellows were not significantly different from attending physicians after case-mix adjustment according to risk scores (P > .05). Postoperative complication rates increased with higher Buckinghamshire risk scores but not with Muhtaseb scores (P = .014 and P = .094, respectively, n = 476). Postoperative corrected-distance visual acuity was poorer with higher risk scores (P < .001 for both, n = 476). This study confirms that the risk of intraoperative complications increases with higher preoperative risk scores. Furthermore, higher risk scores correlate with poorer postoperative visual acuity and the Buckinghamshire risk score also correlates with postoperative complications. Therefore, preoperative assessment using such risk stratification systems could assist individual informed consent, preoperative surgical planning, safe allocation of cases to trainees, and more meaningful analyses of outcomes for individual surgeons and institutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders among Health Workers in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital

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    Chidozie Emmanuel Mbada

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: Studies comparing the occurrence and characteristics of work – related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs across various occupational groups in the health sector from Sub-Sahara Africa are sparse. This study investigated the prevalence and pattern of WMSDs among health workers in Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. METHODS: An adapted questionnaire from the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire was used as the survey instrument. Data were collected on demographics, lifetime, 12-months and point prevalence, and pattern and consequence of WMSDs. A response rate of 91% was obtained in this study. RESULTS: Sixty eight point seven percent of the respondents have experienced WMSDs in their occupational lives with a higher percentage among males than females (39.6 vs.29.1%. The 12-months period and point prevalence rate of WMSDs was 64.4% and 48.2% respectively. WMSDs reported mostly for low back (50% followed by the shoulder (27.5% and knees (18.1%. Nurses (30.4% had the highest rate of WMSDs among the health workers. Most nurses with complaints (53.4% took a sick leave as a result of WMSDs, followed by doctors (32% and support staff (25%. CONCLUSIONS: WMSDs are common among health workers from Nigeria with the low back being injured most often. The rate of WMSDs and consequent sick leave is higher among nurses than other health workers. Preventive programmes on musculoskeletal disorders among health workers are recommended in order to reduce the rate of WMSDs among them and to promote efficiency in patient care. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(5.000: 583-588

  9. Evaluation of Nutritional Status in a Teaching Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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    Mohammadreza Rafati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extrauterine growth restriction remains a common and serious problem in newborns especially who are small, immature, and critically ill. Very low birth weight infants (VLBW had 97% and 40% growth failure at 36 weeks and 18-22 months post-conceptual age respectively. The postnatal development of premature infants is critically dependent on an adequate nutritional intake that mimics a similar gestational stage. Deficient protein or amino acid administration over an extended period may cause significant growth delay or morbidity in VLBW infants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate current nutritional status in the neonatal intensive care unit in a teaching hospital. Methods: During this prospective observational study, the nutritional status of 100 consecutive critically ill neonates were evaluated by anthropometric and biochemical parameters in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit. Their demographic characteristics (weight, height and head circumference, energy source (dextrose and lipid and protein were recorded in the first, 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th days of admission and blood samples were obtained to measure serum albumin and prealbumin. The amount of calorie and protein were calculated for all of preterm and term neonates and compared to standard means separately. Results: The calorie and amino acids did not meet in the majority of the preterm and term neonates and mean daily parenteral calorie intake was 30% or lower than daily requirements based on neonates’ weight. Mortality rate was significantly higher in neonates with lower serum albumin and severity of malnutrition but not with serum prealbumin concentration. Conclusion: Infants were studied did not receive their whole of daily calorie and protein requirements and it is recommended early and enough administration of calorie source (dextrose, lipids and amino acids. Prealbumin was a more benefit biochemical parameter than albumin to evaluate short term nutrition

  10. Critical incidents, including cardiac arrest, associated with pediatric anesthesia at a tertiary teaching children's hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Song, In-Kyung; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Soo; Kim, Chong-Sung; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of critical incidents provides valuable information to improve the quality and safety of patient care. This study identified and analyzed pediatric anesthesia-related critical incidents including cardiac arrests in a tertiary teaching children's hospital. All pediatric anesthesia-related critical incidents reported in a voluntary departmental reporting system between January 2008 and August 2013 were included in the analysis. A critical incident was defined as (i) any incident that altered patients' vital signs and affected the management of patients while they were under the care of an anesthesiologist, and (ii) human factor: where patient injury or accidents were as a result of human error. Changes in vital signs that recovered spontaneously were excluded. During the 6-year study period, a total of 229 critical incidents were reported from 49,373 anesthetic procedures. The most frequently reported incidents were associated with the respiratory system (55%), with tracheal tube-related events accounting for 40.9% of respiratory incidents followed by laryngospasm (17.3% of respiratory incidents). Cardiac arrest occurred in 42 cases in this study (8.5 cases per 10,000 anesthetics). Cardiovascular problems were the major causes of cardiac arrest (66.7%), and incidents of cardiogenic shock and hemorrhage/hypotension contributed equally to the cardiac arrest induced by cardiovascular problems (each 16.7%). Human factor-related events accounted for 58.5% of all critical incidents of which 53.7% were respiratory events. Despite recent improvements in safety of pediatric anesthesia, many preventable factors still remain that can lead to critical incidents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. An ecological study on the association between characteristics of hospital units and the risk of occupational injuries and adverse events on the example of an Italian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Francesca; Liva, Giulia; Bellomo, Fabrizio; De Corti, Daniela; Degan, Stefania; Cattani, Giovanni; Rosa, Ilaria; Mizza, Agnese; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    We explored the association of workplace characteristics with occupational injuries and adverse events in an Italian teaching hospital. This ecological study was conducted using data routinely collected in the University Hospital of Udine, Northeastern Italy. Poisson regression models were used to investigate, at the hospital unit level, the association between 5 outcomes, including: occupational injuries, patient falls, medication errors, other adverse events and near-misses, and various characteristics of the units. The proportion of female workers in a unit, the average number of sick-leave days and of overtime hours, the number of medical examinations requested by employees, and being a surgical unit were significantly associated with some of the outcomes. Despite ecological nature of the study, which does not allow for inferences to be drawn at the individual level, the results of our study provide useful clues to support strategies and interventions directed towards healthier work environments and better patient care in hospitals. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  12. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  13. Prevalence of nasal carriage and diversity of Staphylococcus aureus among inpatients and hospital staff at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egyir, Beverly; Guardabassi, Luca; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2013-01-01

    %) was more common than for other agents (resistant S. aureus carriage was observed among IP compared with HS (P = 0.01). High genetic diversity was shown by spa typing, with 55 spa types found among 105 isolates; the predominant spa types were t355 (10%) and t084 (10......There is a paucity of data on Staphylococcus aureus epidemiology in Africa. Prevalence of nasal carriage and genetic diversity of S. aureus were determined among hospital staff (HS) and inpatients (IP) at the largest hospital in Ghana. In total, 632 nasal swabs were obtained from 452 IP and 180 HS...... in the Child Health Department (CHD) and Surgical Department (SD). S. aureus carriage prevalences were 13.9% in IP and 23.3% in HS. The chance of being a carrier was higher in HS (P = 0.005) and IP staying ≤7 days in hospital (P = 0.007). Resistance to penicillin (93%), tetracycline (28%) and fusidic acid (12...

  14. Impact of waste management training intervention on knowledge, attitude and practices of teaching hospital workers in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ramesh; Somrongthong, Ratana; Ahmed, Jamil

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the sustainability and effectiveness of training as an intervention to improve the knowledge, attitude and practices of hospital workers on health care waste management. We conducted this quasi-experimental study in two tertiary care teaching hospitals in Rawalpindi in October 2013. Training, practical demonstrations and reminders on standard waste management were given to 138 hospital workers in one hospital and compared with 137 workers from the control hospital. We collected data 18 months after intervention through a structured questionnaire to assess the impact of the intervention. We used paired t-test to compare the scores on knowledge, attitude and practices at baseline and first follow up and final impact assessment. Chi square test was used to compare group variables between intervention and control groups. After 18 months since intervention the mean scores on knowledge attitude and practices differed statistically significantly since baseline and intervention group had statistically significantly better knowledge positive attitudes and good health care waste management practices (p waste management guidelines were sustainable among the intervention group after 18 months which shows the positive impact of our intervention. It is recommended that the trainings as intervention be included in the overall policies of the public and private sector hospitals in Pakistan and other similar settings.

  15. Surgical support during the terrorist attacks in Paris, November 13, 2015: Experience at Bégin Military Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Olivier; Malgras, Brice; Choufani, Camille; Bouchard, Antoine; Ollat, Didier; Versier, Gilbert

    2017-06-01

    Recent conflicts have allowed the French Army Health Service to improve management quality for wartime-injured people during military operations. On November 13, 2015, it was in Paris that France was directly attacked and Bégin Military Teaching Hospital, like several hospitals in Paris, had to face a large number of gunshot victims. Thanks to our operational experience, injured people hospitalized in military hospitals benefited from a management based on triage and damage control (DC) principles. Forty-five patients were taken care of in our hospital with an average age of 32 years. During triage, eight patients were categorized T1 (with four extreme emergencies) and 10 were classified T2 and 27 as T3. Twenty-two patients underwent emergency surgery, 15 for soft tissue lesions of limbs, 8 for ballistic fractures (one of which was a cervical wound), and 5 for abdominal wounds. Two patients classified T1 died early. In total, more than 50 operations were performed including iterative debridements, bone fixation, three amputations, and two flaps. After 9 months, all of the patients had healed. One woman with limb stiffness required an arthrolysis. This event showed that terrorist attacks and mass casualties with war wounds can occur in France. Acquired experience regarding war wounds by the French Army Health Service is precious. Everyone must understand the importance of triage and the principles of damage control. Every hospital must be ready to face this type of massive influx of injured people (white plan). Epidemiological study, level V.

  16. Predicting Risk Factors of Working Aged Hemorrhagic Stroke Patients in a Tertiary Teaching Hospital in Chiang Mai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suphannee Triamvisit

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the third leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Thailand accounting for a significant and increasing share of hospital costs. The purpose of this project is to study the epidemiology of the prevalence and its predicting factors of working aged hemorrhagic stroke (HS patients admitted at a tertiary teaching hospital in Chiang Mai, Thailand. We conducted a five-year retrospective descriptive study. The subjects in this study were patients diagnosed with HS, between 15-59 years of age, and admitted to a tertiary teaching hospital in Chiang Mai, Thailand from January 2009 to December 2013. A total of 404 working aged adults who had HS were admitted to the hospital during this review period; 60.9% males and 39.1% females. Nearly 70% of patients were between 46-59 years of age (M = 47.5, SD = 9.8. Of the patients admitted to the hospital, 76.7% were transferred there from other hospitals. Intracerebral hemorrhage was present in 59.7% of patients. Severe HS occurred in 35.9% of the patients with a Glasgow Coma Score from 3-8. Approximately 69% of the working aged HS patients required surgery. The top five identified risk factors for HS were hypertension (83.4%, hyperlipidemia (38.9%, alcohol consumption (21.5%, smoking (15.3 %, and drug non-adherence (14.9%. We found significantly associated risk factors in working-aged HS by multivariate analysis among male gender (p < .001, drug non-adherence (p = .047, and hypertension (p = .048. Raising awareness to reduce risk behavior and health promotion in the community are the keynotes for health care providers in working-aged HS prevention.

  17. Informed consent practices for surgical care at university teaching hospitals: a case in a low resource setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochieng, Joseph; Ibingira, Charles; Buwembo, William; Munabi, Ian; Kiryowa, Haruna; Kitara, David; Bukuluki, Paul; Nzarubara, Gabriel; Mwaka, Erisa

    2014-05-19

    Informed consent in medical practice is essential and a global standard that should be sought at all the times doctors interact with patients. Its intensity would vary depending on the invasiveness and risks associated with the anticipated treatment. To our knowledge there has not been any systematic review of consent practices to document best practices and identify areas that need improvement in our setting. The objective of the study was to evaluate the informed consent practices of surgeons at University teaching Hospitals in a low resource setting. A cross-sectional study conducted at three university teaching hospitals in Uganda. Self-guided questionnaires were left at a central location in each of the surgical departments after verbally communicating to the surgeons of the intention of the study. Filled questionnaires were returned at the same location by the respondents for collection by the research team. In addition, 20 in-depth interviews were held with surgeons and a review of 384 patients' record files for informed consent documentation was done. A total of 132 (62.1%) out of 214 questionnaires were completed and returned. Respondents were intern doctors, residents and specialists from General surgery, Orthopedic surgery, Ear, Nose and Throat, Ophthalmology, Dentistry, Obstetrics and Gynaecology departments. The average working experience of respondents was 4.8 years (SD 4.454, range 0-39 years). 48.8% of the respondents said they obtained consent all the time surgery is done while 51.2% did not obtain consent all the time. Many of the respondents indicated that informed consent was not obtained by the surgeon who operated the patient but was obtained either at admission or by nurses in the surgical units. The consent forms used in the hospitals were found to be inadequate and many times signed at admission before diagnosing the patient's disease. Informed consent administration and documentation for surgical health care is still inadequate at

  18. Chemical reactivity and structural determination of metal and gaseous adsorbates on Cu{100} using TPD and LEED

    OpenAIRE

    Younis Ahmed, Hamid M.

    2003-01-01

    The structures formed by adsorbing thin-film platinum, formic acid and oxygen on Cu{ 100} single crystal are investigated by quantitative low-energy electrondiffraction (LEED) and Temperature Programmed Reaction Spectroscopy (TPRS) Symmetrized Automated Tensor LEED (SATLEED) calculations are used to determine the structure of the formed surface alloys and overlayers. TPRS was used to probe the surface reactivity of the systems studied while surface composition was obtained using Auger Electro...

  19. Assessment of Energy Credits in LEED-Certified Buildings Based on Certification Levels and Project Ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Pelin Gurgun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared to other categories, the Energy and Atmosphere category contributes the most to the maximum obtainable points in the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED certification system. The objective of the study was to identify the extent to which project teams take advantage of the credits in the Energy and Atmosphere category of LEED. This study analyzes the performance of practitioners in achieving points in the Energy and Atmosphere credits of LEED-New Construction (NC 2009 for 1500 buildings that received LEED certification in the US. For a better understanding of the credit patterns, the differences in the performance of practitioners are investigated relative to certification levels and project ownership. Achievement in credits is calculated in terms of percent of maximum points (PMP, since the maximum achievable points differ for each credit. Practitioners’ achievements in the credits were ranked as follows: (1 enhanced commissioning, (2 optimized energy performance, (3 enhanced refrigerant management, (4 green power, (5 measurement and verification, and (6 on-site renewable energy. The largest achievement differences were observed in the on-site renewable energy credit. Concerning building ownership, investors were found to optimize mostly energy efficiency and on-site renewable energy, but to mostly skip enhanced refrigerant management. Performance in the measurement and verification credit was similar for all owner types, whereas investors performed differently from corporations, and government agencies in the enhanced commissioning credit. Practitioners who recognize these priorities and differences are expected to be better positioned to make sustainability-related decisions in building design and construction.

  20. LEED structural analysis of GaAs(001)-c(4X4) surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanyuk, Olexandr; Jiříček, Petr; Cukr, Miroslav; Bartoš, Igor

    566-568, - (2004), s. 89-93 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : electron-solid interactions * low energy electron diffraction(LEED) * molecular beam epitaxy(MBE) * surface relaxation and reconstruction * gallium arsenide * low index single crystal scattering * diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2004

  1. Evaluation of hospital information systems of the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, based on the American College of Physicians Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Emami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospital information system (HIS is a computerized system used for management of hospital information as an electronic device and has an indispensible role in the field of qualified healthcare services. Nevertheless, compared to other industrial and commercial systems, this information system is lagged in using the information technology and applying the controlling standards for satisfying the customers. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate HIS, identify its strength and weak points, and improve it in the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Method: The present descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in the 8 teaching hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences which used HIS in 2011. The study data were collected through interview and direct observation using the criteria of American Physician College check-list. Finally, SPSS statistical software was used to analyze the data through descriptive statistics. Results: The study results showed that laboratory and medical records had respectively the most %43.5 and the least %21.03 conformity to the criteria of American College of Physicians. Also, Faghihi and Zeinabiye hospitals respectively had the most %41.8 and the least %25.2 conformity to the American College of Physicians’ criteria. In pharmacy, data entrance mechanism and presentation of reports had complete conformity to the scales of American College of Physicians, while drug interactions showed no conformity. In laboratory, data entrance mechanism had complete conformity to the above-mentioned criteria and keeping the test history had %87.5 conformity. The possibility of receiving information from centers out of laboratory had no conformity to the desired criteria. In the radiology department, data entrance mechanism had complete conformity to the above-mentioned criteria and keeping the test history had %87.5 conformity. Besides, the possibility

  2. Teaching and practice for Position requirements-oriented training system of ICU training nurses in secondary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-yan HUANG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Establish position requirements-oriented training system of ICU training nurses in secondary hospital .To standardize the teaching management and improve the training effect for the training nurses in our ICU. Methods: Form the ICU training nurse teaching staff; Formulate training manual according to survey results of nurse training demand;Implement clinical teaching in stages according to the content of the training manual; Proceed comprehensive skills assessment in the different stages of training. Results: The pass rate of the 84 training nurses in 2013was 100%, the excellent rate was 25.72%,the good rate was 36.37%. 84 training nurses completed the training task perfectly according to the training manual, and during the training there was no nursing security incidents. Conclusion: To establish position requirements-oriented training system of ICU training nurses is the main method to solve the shortage of nursing professionals  in secondary hospital. This kind of training system is appropriate to the needs of the development of intensive care ,training requirement and clinical requirement. It should be extended in nurse training work in ICU.

  3. The association between the geography of fast food outlets and childhood obesity rates in Leeds, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Lorna K; Edwards, Kimberley L

    2010-11-01

    To analyse the association between childhood overweight and obesity and the density and proximity of fast food outlets in relation to the child's residential postcode. This was an observational study using individual level height/weight data and geographic information systems methodology. Leeds in West Yorkshire, UK. This area consists of 476 lower super-output areas. Children aged 3-14 years who lived within the Leeds metropolitan boundaries (n=33,594). The number of fast food outlets per area and the distance to the nearest fast food outlet from the child's home address. The weight status of the child: overweight, obese or neither. 27.1% of the children were overweight or obese with 12.6% classified as obese. There is a significant positive correlation (pfast food outlets and higher deprivation. A higher density of fast food outlets was significantly associated (p=0.02) with the child being obese (or overweight/obese) in the generalised estimating equation model which also included sex, age and deprivation. No significant association between distance to the nearest fast food outlet and overweight or obese status was found. There is a positive relationship between the density of fast food outlets per area and the obesity status of children in Leeds. There is also a significant association between fast food outlet density and areas of higher deprivation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Indoor environmental quality differences between office types in LEED-certified buildings in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young S. [School of Planning, Design, and Construction, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Guerin, Denise A. [College of Design, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN 55108 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The study compared IAQ, thermal quality, and lighting quality between 5 different office types in LEED-certified buildings in relation to employees' environmental satisfaction and their job performance. This was to provide workplaces where workers in each specific office environment could be provided with appropriate office settings regarding these IEQ criteria when organizations comply with LEED standards. The five types of office included private enclosed, private shared, open-plan with high cubicle over 5', open-plan with low cubicle lower than 5', and open-plan with no partitions (bullpen) offices. The study found IAQ enhanced workers' job performance in enclosed private offices more than both high cubicles and low cubicles. All four office types had higher satisfaction with the amount of light and visual comfort of light as well as more enhancement with job performance due to lighting quality than high cubicles. There was no difference in thermal quality between the five office types. IAQ and lighting quality were not different between enclosed private, enclosed shared, and bullpen office types, either. The study findings suggest a careful workplace design considering the height of partitions in LEED-certified buildings to improve employee's environmental satisfaction and job performance. (author)

  5. Investigation of reordered (001) Au surfaces by positive ion channeling spectroscopy, LEED and AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, B.R.; Noggle, T.S.; Miller, J.W.; Schow, O.E. III; Zehner, D.M.; Jenkins, L.H.; Barrett, J.H.

    1974-01-01

    As a consequence of the channeling phenomenon of positive ions in single crystals, the yield of ions Rutherford scattered from an oriented single crystal surface is dependent on the density of surface atoms exposed to the incident ion beam. Thus, the positive ion channeling spectroscopy (PICS) technique should provide a useful tool for studying reordered surfaces. This possibility was explored by examining the surfaces of epitaxially grown thin Au single crystals with the combined techniques of LEED-AES and PICS. The LEED and AES investigations showed that when the (001) surface was sputter cleaned in ultra-high vacuum, the normal (1 x 1) symmetry of the (001) surfaces reordered into a structure which gave a complex (5 x 20) LEED pattern. The yield and energy distributions of 1 MeV He ions scattered from the Au surfaces were used to determine the number of effective monolayers contributing to the normal and reordered surfaces. These combined measurements were used to characterize the nature of the reordered surface. The general applicability of the PICS technique for investigations of surface and near surface regions is discussed

  6. Evaluation of LEED for Neighbourhood Development and Envision Rating Frameworks for Their Implementation in Poorer Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Diaz-Sarachaga

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The unstoppable world population growth is increasing the concentration of people in urban settlements and the number of megacities, especially in developing countries where urbanization exacerbates social and economic inequalities. Green rating systems have been launched during the last decades to facilitate the assessment of sustainable development in terms of building and infrastructure, including the evaluation of sustainable urban development through the study of communities. This article assesses two of the most renowned sustainable rating systems through the prism of economy, environment and society and the international actions undertaken toward the promotion of sustainable development worldwide, in order to determine their effectiveness to assess urban development in poorer nations. Hence, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Neighbourhood Development (LEED ND and Envision, both from the United States, were chosen as representatives of building and infrastructure fields, respectively, so that the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs and the New Urban Agenda (Habitat III were the benchmarks selected to define the sustainability aspects required to evaluate their potential application in less developed countries. The absence of metrics in the New Urban Agenda led to relate its commitments to the SDGs, which revealed that the prerequisites and credits included in LEED ND and Envision mainly focused on managerial and environmental aspects and disregarded the economic and social dimensions. Consequently, the premises under which LEED ND and Envision were developed must be updated and complemented with the two latest guidelines recently adopted by the United Nations in the field of urban and sustainable development.

  7. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Core Competencies at a Community Teaching Hospital: Is There a Gap in Awareness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Temimi, Mohammed; Kidon, Michael; Johna, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Reports evaluating faculty knowledge of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies in community hospitals without a dedicated residency program are uncommon. Faculty evaluation regarding knowledge of ACGME core competencies before a residency program is started. Physicians at the Kaiser Permanente Fontana Medical Center (N = 480) were surveyed for their knowledge of ACGME core competencies before starting new residency programs. Knowledge of ACGME core competencies. Fifty percent of physicians responded to the survey, and 172 (71%) of respondents were involved in teaching residents. Of physicians who taught residents and had complete responses (N = 164), 65 (39.7%) were unsure of their knowledge of the core competencies. However, most stated that they provided direct teaching to residents related to the knowledge, skills, and attitudes stated in each of the 6 competencies as follows: medical knowledge (96.3%), patient care (95.7%), professionalism (90.7%), interpersonal and communication skills (86.3%), practice-based learning (85.9%), and system-based practice (79.6%). Physician specialty, years in practice (1-10 vs > 10), and number of rotations taught per year (1-6 vs 7-12) were not associated with knowledge of the competencies (p > 0.05); however, full-time faculty (teaching 10-12 rotations per year) were more likely to provide competency-based teaching. Objective assessment of faculty awareness of ACGME core competencies is essential when starting a residency program. Discrepancy between knowledge of the competencies and acclaimed provision of competency-based teaching emphasizes the need for standardized teaching methods that incorporate the values of these competencies.

  8. Potential drug-drug interactions in a Brazilian teaching hospital: age-related differences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Oliveira Melo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes to measure frequency and to characterize the profile of potential drug interactions (pDDI in a general medicine ward of a teaching hospital. Data about identification and clinical status of patients were extracted from medical records between March to August 2006. The occurrence of pDDI was analyzed using the database monographs Micromedex® DrugReax® System. From 5,336 prescriptions with two or more drugs, 3,097 (58.0% contained pDDI. The frequency of major and well document pDDI was 26.5%. Among 647 patients, 432 (66.8% were exposed to at least one pDDI and 283 (43.7% to major pDDI. The multivariate analysis identified that factors related to higher rates of major pDDI were the same age (p< 0.0001, length of stay (p< 0.0001, prevalence of hypertension [OR=3.42 (p< 0.0001] and diabetes mellitus [OR=2.1 (p< 0.0001], cardiovascular diseases (p< 0.0001 and the number of prescribed drugs (Spearman’s correlation=0.640622, p< 0.0001. Between major pDDI, the main risk was hemorrhage (50.3%, the most frequent major pDDI involved combination of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. Among moderate pDDI, 3,866 (90.8% involved medicines for the treatment of chronic non-communicable diseases, mainly hypertension. In HU-USP, the profile of pDDI was similar among adults and elderly (the most frequent pDDI and major pDDI were same, the difference was only the frequency in either group. The efforts of the clinical pharmacists should be directed to elderly patients with cardiovascular compromise, mainly in use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. Furthermore, hospital managers should increase the integration between levels of health care to promote safety patient after discharge.Keywords: Drug interactions. Aged. Internal Medicine. Hospitals, University. RESUMOInterações medicamentosas potenciais em um hospital escolar brasileiro: diferenças relacionadas à idade?O estudo tem por objetivo descrever o perfil de intera

  9. Adverse incidents resulting in exposure to body fluids at a UK dental teaching hospital over a 6-year period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A Hughes,1 L Davies,1 R Hale,1 JE Gallagher21Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, 2King's College London Dental Institute, London, United KingdomBackground: The safety and protection of patients and health care workers is of paramount importance in dentistry, and this includes students in training who provide clinical care. Given the nature of dental care, adverse incidents can and do occur, exposing health care workers to body fluids and putting them at risk of infection, including contracting a blood-borne virus. The aim of this research was to analyze trends in the volume, rate, nature, management, and outcome of adverse incidents reported at one dental teaching hospital from 2005 to 2010.Methods: Descriptive analysis of trends in the volume, rate, nature, management, and outcome of adverse incidents reported at one dental teaching hospital over a six-year period was undertaken in relation to the level of outpatient and day surgery activity.Results: In total, 287 incidents were reported over a six-year period, which amounted to 0.039% of outpatient or day surgery appointments. Nearly three quarters of all the incidents (n = 208, 72% took place during treatment or whilst clearing away after the appointment. The most frequent incidents were associated with administration of local anesthetic (n = 63, 22%, followed by burs used in dental hand pieces (n = 51, 18%.Conclusion: This research confirms that adverse incidents are a feature of dental hospitals and reports the common sources. The importance of accurate and consistent reporting of data to ensure that these issues are monitored to inform action and reduce risks to staff, students, and patients are highlighted.Keywords: risk management, blood-borne virus, dental hospital, body fluids exposure, adverse event reporting

  10. [A Survey of the Perception of Nurses Toward the Practice Environment at a Regional Teaching Hospital in Central Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jui-Tai; Lin, Ching-Wen; Wen, Wei-Chun; Lin, Esther Ching-Lan

    2015-08-01

    The nursing practice environment has been shown to wield significant influence on nursing retention and nursing quality of care. Because a large percentage of Taiwan nurses currently work at regional teaching hospitals, exploring the perception toward the practice environment of nurses working at this type of hospital is important. This study explored the perception of nurses working at a regional teaching hospital in central Taiwan toward their practice environment. A cross-sectional research design with a sample of 474 nurses from a regional hospital in central Taiwan was conducted. Instruments including the demographic data and the Chinese-version Practice Environment Scale-Nursing Work Index (CPES-NWI) were anonymously self-administered. Overall, participants were moderately satisfied with their practice environment, with the greatest dissatisfaction focused on staffing and resource adequacy. Work unit and nursing level, respectively, had significant impacts on perceptions regarding the practice environment. Furthermore, discriminant analysis identified two new compound variables: 1) adequate staffing resources and partnership in the workplace and 2) supportive administrative management environment. Participants who worked in medical and surgical units were significantly more dissatisfied with the adequacy of staffing resources and partnership in the workplace than participants who worked in acute/intensive and special units. Participants at the N2 level were significantly more dissatisfied with the supportive nature of the administrative management environment. These findings support that the nursing practice environment of regional hospitals may be improved using several measures, including: modifying the staffing and resource adequacy of nurses, fostering collaborative nurse-physician relationships, and further involving nurses in administrative management and decision-making.

  11. Improving pressure ulcer risk assessment and management using the Waterlow scale at a London teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, S; Gao, L; Nageshwaran, S; Vickers, C; Bottomley, T; Grewal, P

    2014-12-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) cost the National Health Service (NHS) up to 4% of its health care expenditure. Arising from this are also clinical negligence claims, where inadequate risk assessment has been cited as one of the principal drawbacks in the prevention of PUs. This two-cycle audit aims to examine the consistency and accuracy of risk assessment of patients, and demonstrates how simple focused interventions can improve the quality of care provided. The Waterlow pressure ulcer risk assessment tool was employed to assess inpatients during a 6-month period at a London teaching hospital. Patients were risk assessed, and examined to detect PUs and to determine the type of mattress. We compared our findings with clinical (nursing and medical) documentation. Interventions were made through questionnaires given to staff, educational sessions, presentations and posters addressing where improvements could be made in risk stratifying patients. A repeat audit was carried out 24 months later and the results from both cycles were compared. Statistical analysis was carried out using Fisher's exact and the Student's T-test. In total 100 in-patients were assessed in each cycle with a mean age of 71.4 years in cycle 1 and 70.1 years in cycle 2. A nursing Waterlow score was recorded for 81% of patients in cycle 1 and 100% in cycle 2 (pintervention this had reduced to a minimal difference (mean 8.5 versus 9.0, median 8.0 versus 9.0, p=0.08). Nursing scores recorded in the notes were lower than the study scores in cycle 1, primarily from a failure to appropriately assess certain categories of the Waterlow scale. These differences reduced after focused education of staff. Our results suggest that targeted interventions tailored towards nursing and medical staff can result in improvements in the risk assessment for prevention and subsequent management of PUs. However, it also highlights the need for increased input from the entire multidisciplinary team in order to reduce the morbidity

  12. Intestinal parasitosis and shigellosis among diarrheal patients in Gondar teaching hospital, northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huruy Kahsay

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrheal diseases are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in developing world. Understanding the etiologic agents of diarrheal diseases and their association with socio-demographic characteristics of patients would help to design better preventive measures. Thus, this study was aimed to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites and enteropathogenic bacteria in diarrheic patients. Methods A cross-sectional study involving 384 consecutive diarrheal patients who visited Gondar teaching hospital, Gondar, Ethiopia from October 2006 to March 2007 was conducted. Stool specimens were collected and examined for intestinal parasites and enteropathogenic bacteria following standard parasitological and microbiological procedures. Results Intestinal parasites were diagnosed in 36.5% of the patients. The most frequently encountered protozoan parasite was Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (7.3% followed by Giardia lamblia (5.0%, Cryptosporidium parvum (1.8% and Isospora belli (1.3%. The dominant helminthic parasite identified was Ascaris lumbricoides (5.5% followed by Strongyloides stercoralis and Schistosoma mansoni (3.1% each, hookworm infection (1.8%, and Hymenolepis species (1.3%. Multiple infections of intestinal parasites were also observed in 6.3% of the patients. Among the enteropathogenic bacteria Shigella and Salmonella species were isolated from 15.6% and 1.6%, respectively, of the patients. Escherichia coli O57:H7 was not found in any of the stool samples tested. Eighty eight percent and 83.3% of the Shigella and Salmonella isolates were resistant to one or more commonly used antibiotics, respectively. Intestinal parasitosis was higher in patients who live in rural area, in patients who were washing their hands after visiting toilet either irregularly with soap and without soap or not at all, in patients who used well and spring water for household consumption, and in patients who had nausea (P P Conclusions The high

  13. Hirschsprung′s disease: 8 years experience in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hirschsprung′s disease (HD is a common cause of intestinal obstruction in children. Despite increased understanding of the disease and several techniques of treatment, significant complications continued to be associated with its management. Objective: To study the outcome of management of HD in the University Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The clinical records of all children managed for HD between January 1998 and December 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic data, modes of presentation, methods of diagnosis, age at colostomy formation, age and type of definitive operations were noted from patients′ records. Complications associated with colostomy, pre- and postoperative complications, final outcome and duration of follow-up were also noted. Results: Twenty-one patients (20 males, one female managed for HD were reviewed. Eight (38% were diagnosed in the neonatal period, the mean age at diagnosis being 22 months. Fourteen patients had completed the three stages of the operation, one is awaiting colostomy closure and two patients are waiting for definitive operations. Out of the 15 patients who had definitive surgery, nine had Swenson′s pull-through operations while six had Duhamel operations. At presentation, six patients had enterocolitis, one of whom had spontaneous colonic perforation, two patients had sepsis. Colostomy-related complications recorded included sixteen patients with dermatitis, nine with colostomy prolapse, one patient with colostomy diarrhea and one with enterocolitis and sepsis. Following definitive surgery, three patients had wound infection, one partial intestinal obstruction, one postDuhamel hemorrhage and two enterocolitis. Complications after colostomy closure included two wound infections and one severe enterocolitis. There were five deaths (23.8%-two from sepsis, two from enterocolitis and one from an adverse drug reaction. One of the children who had

  14. Working towards implementation of a nuclear medicine accreditation program in a South African teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiselen, T.; Ellmann, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Quality assurance in Nuclear Medicine is of utmost importance in order to ensure optimal scintigraphic results and correct patient management and care. The implementation of a good quality assurance program should address all factors that playa role in the optimal functioning of a department. It should be developed by scientific findings as well as national and international guidelines. Aim: To develop a tailor made program that can be managed according to the individual needs and requirements of a Nuclear Medicine department in a teaching hospital. This program is aimed at international accreditation of the department. Materials and methods: Auditing of the following aspects was conducted: organizational, clinical and technical, personnel satisfaction, patient experience and satisfaction, referring physicians experience and satisfaction. Information was collected by means of questionnaires to groups and individuals for opinion polls; one-to-one interviews with personnel and patients; technical evaluation of equipment according to manufacturer's specifications and international standards; laboratory equipment evaluation according to precompiled guidelines and investigation of laboratory procedures for standardization and radiation safety. Existing procedure protocols were measured against international guidelines and evaluated for possible shortcomings of technical as well as cosmetic details, and data storage facilities were evaluated in terms of user friendliness, viability and cost effectiveness. A number of international accreditation experts were also visited to establish the validity of our results. Results: Patient questionnaires indicated overall satisfaction with personal service providing, but provision of written and understandable information, long waiting periods and equipment must receive attention. Staff questionnaires indicated a general lack of communication between different professional groups and the need for

  15. Systems analysis of voluntary reported anaesthetic safety incidents occurring in a university teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Matthew W; Lehnus, Kristina S

    2018-01-01

    To identify factors contributing to the development of anaesthetic safety incidents. Prospective, descriptive, voluntary reporting audit of safety incidents with subsequent systems analysis. All animals anaesthetized in a multispecies veterinary teaching hospital from November 2014 to October 2016. Peri-anaesthetic incidents that risked or caused unnecessary harm to an animal were reported by anaesthetists alongside animal morbidity and mortality data. A modified systems analysis framework was used to identify contributing factors from the following categories: Animal and Owner, Task and Technology, Individual, Team, Work Environmental, and Organizational and Management. The outcome was graded using a simple descriptive scale. Data were analysed using Pearson's Chi-Square test for association and univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis. Totally, 3379 anaesthetics were performed during the audit period. Of these, 174 incident reports were analysed, 163 of which impacted safe veterinary care and 26 incidents were considered to have had major or catastrophic outcomes. Incident outcome was believed to have been limited by anaesthetist intervention in 104 (63.8%) cases. Various factors were identified as: Individual in 123 (70.7%), Team in 108 (62.1%), Organizational and Management in 94 (54.0%), Task and Technology in 80 (46.0%), Work Environmental in 53 (30.5%) and Animal and Owner in 36 (20.7%) incidents. Individual factors were rarely seen in isolation. Significant associations were identified between Experience and Supervision, X 2 (1, n=174)=54177, p=0.001, Failure to follow a standard operating procedure and Task Management, X 2 (2, n=174)=11318, p=0.001, and Staffing and Poor Scheduling, X 2 (1, n=174)=36742, p=0.001. Animal Condition [odds ratio (OR)=16210, 95% confidence interval (CI)=5573-47147)] and anaesthetist Decision Making (OR=3437, 95% CI=1184-9974) were risk factors for catastrophic and major outcomes. Individual factors contribute

  16. Evaluation of Randomly Selected Completed Medical Records Sheets in Teaching Hospitals of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Parsa Mahjob

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Medical record documentation, often use to protect the patients legal rights, also providing information for medical researchers, general studies, education of health care staff and qualitative surveys is used. There is a need to control the amount of data entered in the medical record sheets of patients, considering the completion of these sheets is often carried out after completion of service delivery to the patients. Therefore, in this study the prevalence of completeness of medical history, operation reports, and physician order sheets by different documentaries in Jahrom teaching hospitals during year 2009 was analyzed. Methods and Materials: In this descriptive / retrospective study, the 400 medical record sheets of the patients from two teaching hospitals affiliated to Jahrom medical university was randomly selected. The tool of data collection was a checklist based on the content of medical history sheet, operation report and physician order sheets. The data were analyzed by SPSS (Version10 software and Microsoft Office Excel 2003. Results: Average of personal (Demography data entered in medical history, physician order and operation report sheets which is done by department's secretaries were 32.9, 35.8 and 40.18 percent. Average of clinical data entered by physician in medical history sheet is 38 percent. Surgical data entered by the surgeon in operation report sheet was 94.77 percent. Average of data entered by operation room's nurse in operation report sheet was 36.78 percent; Average of physician order data in physician order sheet entered by physician was 99.3 percent. Conclusion: According to this study, the rate of completed record papers reviewed by documentary in Jahrom teaching hospitals were not desirable and in some cases were very weak and incomplete. This deficiency was due to different reason such as medical record documentaries negligence, lack of adequate education for documentaries, High work

  17. Walkable new urban LEED_Neighborhood-Development (LEED-ND) community design and children's physical activity: selection, environmental, or catalyst effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Interest is growing in physical activity-friendly community designs, but few tests exist of communities explicitly designed to be walkable. We test whether students living in a new urbanist community that is also a pilot LEED_ND (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design-Neighborhood Development) community have greater accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) across particular time periods compared to students from other communities. We test various time/place periods to see if the data best conform to one of three explanations for MVPA. Environmental effects suggest that MVPA occurs when individuals are exposed to activity-friendly settings; selection effects suggest that walkable community residents prefer MVPA, which leads to both their choice of a walkable community and their high levels of MVPA; catalyst effects occur when walking to school creates more MVPA, beyond the school commute, on schooldays but not weekends. Methods Fifth graders (n = 187) were sampled from two schools representing three communities: (1) a walkable community, Daybreak, designed with new urbanist and LEED-ND pilot design standards; (2) a mixed community (where students lived in a less walkable community but attended the walkable school so that part of the route to school was walkable), and (3) a less walkable community. Selection threats were addressed through controlling for parental preferences for their child to walk to school as well as comparing in-school MVPA for the walkable and mixed groups. Results Minutes of MVPA were tested with 3 × 2 (Community by Gender) analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs). Community walkability related to more MVPA during the half hour before and after school and, among boys only, more MVPA after school. Boys were more active than girls, except during the half hour after school. Students from the mixed and walkable communities--who attended the same school--had similar in-school MVPA levels, and community groups

  18. Interpretation and intent: a study of the (mis)understanding of DNAR orders in a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Zoë; Fuld, Jonathan; Haydock, Stephen; Palmer, Chris

    2010-09-01

    Do not attempt resuscitation (DNAR) orders have been shown to be subject to misinterpretation in the 1980s and 1990s. We investigated whether this was still the case, and examined what perceptions doctors and nurses had of what care patients with DNAR orders receive. Using an anonymous written questionnaire, we directly approached 50 doctors and 40 nurses from a range of medical specialities and grades in our teaching hospital. All 50 physicians and 35/40 nurses took part. Using McNemar's test, there were highly significant differences (pcommunication and understanding. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation of relationship between quality of working life and organizational commitment of nurses in teaching hospitals in Tabriz in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoddoosi-Nejad, D; Baghban Baghestan, E; Janati, A; Imani, A; Mansoorizadeh, Z

    2015-01-01

    The current research aimed to investigate the link between the quality of working life and the systematic commitment of nurses in the teaching hospitals in Tabriz. The methodology used was functional regarding the purpose and the proportional allocation as far as the stratified sampling method was concerned. The study population consisted of all the nurses in Tabriz. The instrument used in this study was a standard questionnaire, whose reliability was approved in national and international studies. Also data were collected and inserted into SPSS 20 software and a statistical analysis was performed. The results showed that the individuals' quality of working life had a direct effect on their action in the organization.

  20. [Causes of iron-deficiency anaemia in the internal medecine department of the national teaching hospital of Ouagadougou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacoulma, Eric William Camille; Sakande, Jean; Ouermi, Alain; Tieno, Hervé; Drabo, Youssoufou Joseph

    2008-01-01

    This retrospective study in the internal medicine department of the national teaching hospital of Ouagadougou was conducted to identify the main causes of iron-deficiency anaemia. Among the 65 subjects meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria, mean haemoglobin was 7.5 g/dl, with mean serum ferritin 8.9 microg/l among women and 15.5 microg/l among men. The most common cause was chronic blood loss, and hookworm was a major cause in 19.6% of cases. These results suggest the need for preventive measures against iron deficiency and for reinforcement of the fight against diseases producing fecal blood loss.

  1. Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The challenge could be briefly seen in these terms: hospitals as places for treatment where there’s a technology focus and hospitals for healing where there’s a human focus. In the 60s - 70s wave of new hospital building, an emphasis on technology can be seen. It’s time to move from the technology....... Documentation exists in; well-being of patients and staff, sleep disorders, pain distraction, confidentiality and privacy, levels of errors in hospitals. Art and the use of color: Art can be context related so one should be aware whether it is in a private ward or the foyer and related to the experience...... of the patient. Art can be used as a stress reducing factor, pain distracter, and also to orientate and to provide landmarks in the hospital landscape. Air, the use of natural ventilation as much as possible, complemented by mechanical ventilation in most cases, particularly in northern Europe; the emphasis...

  2. Knowledge attitude and practice (kap) of chronic kidneys disease among medical officers of teaching hospitals of lahore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anees, M.; Mumtaz, A.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) about kidney diseases among medical officers working in different hospitals of Lahore.Doctors working on the medical floors of different tertiary care teaching hospitals (Mayo Hospital (MH), Sir Ganga Ram Hospital (SGRH), Service Institute of Medical Sciences (SIMS), Fatima Memoral Hospitals (FMH), Lahore General Hospitals (LGH), Shalamar Hospital (SH), Jinnah hospital (JH)) of Lahore were included in the study. Each doctor was given a questionnaire comprising of 28 questions. Each participant was given 10-15 minutes for completing the questionnaire at the spot. Categorization of doctors according to the KAP score was done as poor ( 70%).Results: One hundred eighty five doctors participated in the study who fulfilled the criteria. In this study majority 134 (62.6%) of the doctors were not taught about nephrology during their graduation which was statistically significant. Most of the doctors either had some knowledge or didn't know about procedures done in nephrology. Majority of the doctors 208(97.2%) know that nephrology deals with medical diseases of the kidney which was statistically significant. Most of the doctors 138(64.5) feel that nephrology services are insufficient in their hospital. More than 90% doctors want that kidney diseases should be taught during MBBS curriculum and separate nephrology department should be established which was statistically significant. Most of the doctors don't know the management of hyperkalemia very well. About 90% of the doctors know that there are five stages of CKD. Majority of the doctors know that ACE inhibitors are used in hypertension and diabetic nephropathy. They also know that urine complete examination help in early detection of diabetic nephropathy which was statistically significant.Conclusion:Most of the doctors have poor to average knowledge and practice about kidney diseases. Most of the doctors think that nephrology services are

  3. Pharmaceutical interventions in medications prescribed for administration via enteral tubes in a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Carolina Justus Buhrer; Plodek, Caroline Koga; Soares, Franciny Kossemba; Andrade, Rayza Assis de; Teleginski, Fernanda; Rocha, Maria Dagmar da

    2016-01-01

    to analyze the impact of guidelines regarding errors in medications prescribed for administration through enteral tubes. quantitative study, in three phases, undertaken in internal medicine, neurology and an intensive care unit in a general teaching hospital. In Phase 1, the following was undertaken: a protocol for dilution and unit-dose repackaging and administration for 294 medications via enteral tubes; a decision flowchart; operational-standard procedures for dilution and unit-dose repackaging of oral pharmaceutical forms and for administration of medications through enteral tubes. In phase 2, errors in 872 medications prescribed through enteral tubes, in 293 prescriptions for patients receiving inpatient treatment between March and June, were investigated. This was followed by training of the teams in relation to the guidelines established. In Phase 3, pharmaceutical errors and interventions in 945 medications prescribed through enteral tubes, in 292 prescriptions of patients receiving inpatient treatment between August and September, were investigated prospectively. The data collected, in a structured questionnaire, were compiled in the Microsoft Office Excel(r) program, and frequencies were calculated. 786 errors were observed, 63.9% (502) in Phase 2, and 36.1% (284) in Phase 3. In Phase 3, a reduction was ascertained in the frequency of prescription of medications delivered via enteral tubes, medications which were contraindicated, and those for which information was not available. guidelines and pharmaceutical interventions were determined in the prevention of errors involving medications delivered through enteral tubes. analisar o impacto de diretrizes sobre erros em medicamentos prescritos para administração via sondas enterais. estudo quantitativo, em três fases, realizado em clínica médica, neurologia e unidade de terapia intensiva de hospital geral universitário. Na Fase 1 elaborou-se: protocolo de diluição, unitarização - transformação e

  4. Bridging the Gap: A Framework and Strategies for Integrating the Quality and Safety Mission of Teaching Hospitals and Graduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tess, Anjala; Vidyarthi, Arpana; Yang, Julius; Myers, Jennifer S

    2015-09-01

    Integrating the quality and safety mission of teaching hospitals and graduate medical education (GME) is a necessary step to provide the next generation of physicians with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to participate in health system improvement. Although many teaching hospital and health system leaders have made substantial efforts to improve the quality of patient care, few have fully included residents and fellows, who deliver a large portion of that care, in their efforts. Despite expectations related to the engagement of these trainees in health care quality improvement and patient safety outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the Clinical Learning Environment Review program, a structure for approaching this integration has not been described.In this article, the authors present a framework that they hope will assist teaching hospitals in integrating residents and fellows into their quality and safety efforts and in fostering a positive clinical learning environment for education and patient care. The authors define the six essential elements of this framework-organizational culture, teaching hospital-GME alignment, infrastructure, curricular resources, faculty development, and interprofessional collaboration. They then describe the organizational characteristics required for each element and offer concrete strategies to achieve integration. This framework is meant to be a starting point for the development of robust national models of infrastructure, alignment, and collaboration between GME and health care quality and safety leaders at teaching hospitals.

  5. Profile of Under-Five Malnourished Children Admitted in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in Pune, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhrubajyoti J Debnath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malnutrition is a major public health problem in a developing country like India. Keeping this in mind a study was carried out to find the proportion of under-five children suffering from malnutrition among the under-five hospitalized children and to study co-morbid illnesses and epidemiological factors associated with malnutrition. Methods: This was a hospital-based cross sectional study carried out in the pediatric ward of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Pune, India. All under-five children suffering from malnutrition were studied over a period of 1 month. Results: Total number of under five children diagnosed as malnourished were 47 (39.83%. Moderate and severe/very severe malnutrition was statistically significantly higher in a girl child. The proportion of moderate and severe/very severe malnutrition was higher in low birth weight babies, children who were incompletely immunized for age. Faulty infant feeding practice was observed in 28 (59.6% children. Some of the co-morbid illnesses contributing to morbidity in the malnourished child were acute diarrheal diseases, acute respiratory infection, anemia, and septicemia. Conclusion: A large proportion of hospitalized children were malnourished. Girl child suffered from moderate to severe forms of malnutrition as compared to male child and this was the only statistically significant association. This may be due to neglect of girl child.

  6. Survey of Cancer Patient Safety Culture: A Comparison of Chemotherapy and Oncology Departments of Teaching Hospitals of Tehran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeissi, Pouran; Sharifi, Marziye; Khosravizadeh, Omid; Heidari, Mohammad

    2017-10-26

    Background: Patient safety culture plays an important role in healthcare systems, especially in chemotherapy and oncology departments (CODs), and its assessment can help to improve quality of services and hospital care. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate and compare items and dimensions of patient safety culture in the CODs of selected teaching hospitals of Iran and Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical crosssectional survey was conducted during a six-month period on 270 people from chemotherapy and oncology departments selected through a cluster sampling method. All participants answered the standard questionnaire for “Hospital Survey of Patient Safety Culture” (HSOPSC). Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS/18 software. Results: The average score for patient safety culture was three for the majority of the studied CODs. Statistically significant differences were observed for supervisor actions, teamwork within various units, feedback and communications about errors, and the level of hospital management support. (ppatient safety culture were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Conclusion: Our results showed that the overall status of patient safety culture is not good in the studied CODs. In particular, teamwork across different units and organizational learning with continuous improvement were the only two properly operating items among 12 dimensions of patient safety culture. Therefore, systematic interventions are strongly required to promote communication. Creative Commons Attribution License

  7. The Leeds Evaluation of Efficacy of Detoxification Study (LEEDS project: An open-label pragmatic randomised control trial comparing the efficacy of differing therapeutic agents for primary care detoxification from either street heroin or methadone [ISRCTN07752728

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheard Laura

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heroin is a synthetic opioid with an extensive illicit market leading to large numbers of people becoming addicted. Heroin users often present to community treatment services requesting detoxification and in the UK various agents are used to control symptoms of withdrawal. Dissatisfaction with methadone detoxification 8 has lead to the use of clonidine, lofexidine, buprenorphine and dihydrocodeine; however, there remains limited evaluative research. In Leeds, a city of 700,000 people in the North of England, dihydrocodeine is the detoxification agent of choice. Sublingual buprenorphine, however, is being introduced. The comparative value of these two drugs for helping people successfully and comfortably withdraw from heroin has never been compared in a randomised trial. Additionally, there is a paucity of research evaluating interventions among drug users in the primary care setting. This study seeks to address this by randomising drug users presenting in primary care to receive either dihydrocodeine or buprenorphine. Methods/design The Leeds Evaluation of Efficacy of Detoxification Study (LEEDS project is a pragmatic randomised trial which will compare the open use of buprenorphine with dihydrocodeine for illicit opiate detoxification, in the UK primary care setting. The LEEDS project will involve consenting adults and will be run in specialist general practice surgeries throughout Leeds. The primary outcome will be the results of a urine opiate screening at the end of the detoxification regimen. Adverse effects and limited data to three and six months will be acquired.

  8. Mining Association Rules Between Credits in the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Green Building Assessment System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas, Benjamin J

    2008-01-01

    .... Taking this vision into account, the individual credits that comprise LEED are designed to reward design teams for employing sustainable design strategies that reduce the total environmental impact...

  9. Audit of antibiotic prescribing in two governmental teaching hospitals in Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadi, U.; Duerink, D.O.; Lestari, E.S.; Nagelkerke, N.J.; Keuter, M.; Huis in 't Veld, D.; Suwandojo, E.; Rahardjo, E.; Broek, P. van den; Gyssens, I.C.J.

    2008-01-01

    This article estimates the magnitude and quality of antibiotic prescribing in Indonesian hospitals and aims to identify demographic, socio-economic, disease-related and healthcare-related determinants of use. An audit on antibiotic use of patients hospitalized for 5 days or more was conducted in two

  10. Multi-drug and methicillin resistance of staphylococci from canine patients at a veterinary teaching hospital (2006-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detwiler, Ashley; Bloom, Paul; Petersen, Annette; Rosser, Edmund J

    2013-06-01

    Over the past 10 years, an increase in methicillin and multi-drug resistant staphylococcal species has been identified worldwide and anecdotally reported within our veterinary teaching hospital. To determine the methicillin resistance (MR) and multi-drug resistance (MDR) patterns of staphylococcal species isolated from canine patients between 2006 and 2011. Staphylococcal isolates (n = 1069) were cultured from the canine patient population of the veterinary teaching hospital. The susceptibility reports of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, S. aureus, S. schleiferi v. coagulans, S. schleiferi v. schleiferi, and other coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were assessed. Isolates were organized into five site categories. Isolates were scored on a 0-10 scale based on resistance to antimicrobial classes, with MDR classified as an isolate scoring a value ≥3. Statistical analysis included χ(2), Fisher's exact test, and ANOVA with mean square and post hoc analysis; p methicillin resistant. Of all the isolates, 27.5% were MDR. The mean resistance score of S. pseudintermedius isolates increased significantly comparing 2006 and 2008 (p = 0.0006) and 2006 and 2009 (p = 0.0009). The mean score of all combined isolates increased significantly comparing 2006 and 2008 (p = 0.001). MR staphylococci isolation is similar when compared to other studies. However, increased MDR isolation is of greater concern and high-scoring MDR staphylococci will limit our future antimicrobial choices.

  11. The Effect of Service Compact (SERVICOM on Service Delivery in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude Kennedy Emejulu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of service compact (Servicom Service delivery in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi. Questionnaire and face-to-face interviews were used in the collection of data. The hypotheses were tested using descriptive statistics. The study discovered among other things that with the inauguration of the SERVICOM Charter by the Federal Government of Nigeria, the Management of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi identified key areas that required re-evaluation and attention based on the submissions of every service unit and department, after an analysis of the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT of each of the service areas. A pre-SERVICOM Charter workshop which was supervised by the Federal Government was held in the various institutions nationwide to enable care providers enumerate their current service capacity and identify their impediments. In the light of the foregoing, some of the recommendations proffered are that the SERVICOM Charter project should be sustained and supervision and control of the SERVICOM Charter project should be intensified in order to ensure that the Nigerian factor of service-fatigue would not supervene in care delivery in the near future.