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Sample records for leeds multiple sclerosis

  1. Multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indwelling catheter Osteoporosis or thinning of the bones Pressure sores Side effects of medicines used to treat the ... Daily bowel care program Multiple sclerosis - discharge Preventing pressure ulcers Swallowing problems Images Multiple sclerosis MRI of the ...

  2. Multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Kuehn, A.L.; Backens, M.; Papanagiotou, P.; Shariat, K.; Kostopoulos, P.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of myelin with interspersed lesions in the white matter of the central nervous system. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the diagnosis and monitoring of white matter diseases. This article focuses on key findings in multiple sclerosis as detected by MRI. (orig.) [de

  3. Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the myelin sheath, the material that surrounds and protects your nerve cells. This damage slows down ...

  4. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Egon; Stenager, E N; Knudsen, Lone

    1994-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 117 randomly selected patients (52 men, 65 women) with definite multiple sclerosis, it was found that 76 percent were married or cohabitant, 8 percent divorced. Social contacts remained unchanged for 70 percent, but outgoing social contacts were reduced for 45 percent......, need for structural changes in home and need for pension became greater with increasing physical handicap. No significant differences between gender were found. It is concluded that patients and relatives are under increased social strain, when multiple sclerosis progresses to a moderate handicap...

  5. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1988-01-01

    Forty-two (12%) of a total of 366 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) had psychiatric admissions. Of these, 34 (81%) had their first psychiatric admission in conjunction with or after the onset of MS. Classification by psychiatric diagnosis showed that there was a significant positive correlation...

  6. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    In a cross-sectional investigation of 116 patients with multiple sclerosis, the social and sparetime activities of the patient were assessed by both patient and his/her family. The assessments were correlated to physical disability which showed that particularly those who were moderately disabled...

  7. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1990-01-01

    An investigation on the correlation between ability to read TV subtitles and the duration of visual evoked potential (VEP) latency in 14 patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS), indicated that VEP latency in patients unable to read the TV subtitles was significantly delayed in comparison...

  8. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1994-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 94 patients (42 males, 52 females) with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) in the age range 25-55 years, the correlation of neuropsychological tests with the ability to read TV-subtitles and with the use of sedatives is examined. A logistic regression analysis reveals...

  9. Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  10. Multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadashima, Hiromichi; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Imai, Terukuni; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Matsumoto, Sadayuki; Yamamoto, Toru; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Maya, Kiyomi

    1986-01-01

    Eleven patients with a definite diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were examined in terms of correlations between the clinical features and the results of cranial computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: In 5 of the 11 patients, both CT and MRI demonstrated lesions consistent with a finding of multiple sclerosis. In 3 patients, only MRI demonstrated lesions. In the remaining 3 patients, neither CT nor MRI revealed any lesion in the brain. All 5 patients who showed abnormal findings on both CT and MRI had clinical signs either of cerebral or brainstem - cerebellar lesions. On the other hand, two of the 3 patients with normal CT and MRI findings had optic-nerve and spinal-cord signs. Therefore, our results suggested relatively good correlations between the clinical features, CT, and MRI. MRI revealed cerebral lesions in two of the four patients with clinical signs of only optic-nerve and spinal-cord lesions. MRI demonstrated sclerotic lesions in 3 of the 6 patients whose plaques were not detected by CT. In conclusion, MRI proved to be more helpful in the demonstration of lesions attributable to chronic multiple sclerosis. (author)

  11. Fatigue and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign In In Your Area Donate Donate ... of MS What Causes MS? Who Gets MS? Multiple Sclerosis FAQs Types of MS Related Conditions Symptoms & Diagnosis ...

  12. Multiple sclerosis research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglia, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This volume proceedings contains four contributions which are in INIS scope, dealing with MRI and SPECT in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and assessment of disease activity. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs

  13. Rehabilitation and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    In a chronic and disabling disease like multiple sclerosis, rehabilitation becomes of major importance in the preservation of physical, psychological and social functioning. Approximately 80% of patients have multiple sclerosis for more than 35 years and most will develop disability at some point......, a paradigm shift is taking place and it is now increasingly acknowledged that exercise therapy is both safe and beneficial. Robot-assisted training is also attracting attention in multiple sclerosis rehabilitation. Several sophisticated commercial robots exist, but so far the number of scientific studies...... promising. This drug has been shown to improve walking ability in some patients with multiple sclerosis, associated with a reduction of patients' self-reported ambulatory disability. Rehabilitation strategies involving these different approaches, or combinations of them, may be of great use in improving...

  14. Multiple Sclerosis and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Editors David C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Multiple sclerosis and vitamin D Andrew J. Solomon, MD WHAT ... caused by improper immune responses (autoimmune diseases), including multiple sclerosis (MS). A recent Patient Page in Neurology provided ...

  15. Seizures in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Polman, Susan; De Keyser, Jacques

    Seizures have long been recognized to be part of the disease spectrum of multiple sclerosis (MS). While they occur in only a minority of patients with MS, epileptic seizures can have serious consequences. The treatment of MS can be epileptogenic, and antiepileptic treatment can conversely worsen the

  16. Zinc in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredholt, Mikkel; Fredriksen, Jette Lautrup

    2016-01-01

    In the last 35 years, zinc (Zn) has been examined for its potential role in the disease multiple sclerosis (MS). This review gives an overview of the possible role of Zn in the pathogenesis of MS as well as a meta-analysis of studies having measured Zn in serum or plasma in patients with MS...

  17. Vaccines and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, J. L.; Topsøe Mailand, M.

    2017-01-01

    An association between certain vaccinations and onset or relapse of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been debated. Based on PubMed, we made a thorough literature review and included all relevant studies, 51 on MS and 15 on optic neuritis (ON). Case studies were excluded. With the exception of a live...

  18. Vaccines and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailand, Mia Topsøe; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2017-01-01

    on the database PubMed. The study found no change in risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) after vaccination against hepatitis B virus, human papillomavirus, seasonal influenza, measles–mumps–rubella, variola, tetanus, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), polio, or diphtheria. No change in risk of relapse...

  19. Chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffoli, A.; Micheletti, E.; Capra, R.; Mattioli, F.; Marciano', N.

    1991-01-01

    A long-lasting immunological suppression action seems to be produced by total lymphoid irradiation; some authors emphasize the favorable effect of this treatment on chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. In order to evaluate the actual role of TLI, 6 patients affected with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis were submitted to TLI with shaped and personalized fields at the Istituto del Radio, University of Brescia, Italy. The total dose delivered was 19.8 Gy in 4 weeks, 1.8 Gy/day, 5d/w; a week elapsed between the first and the second irradiation course. Disability according to Kurtzke scale was evaluated, together with blood lymphocyte count and irradiation side-effects, over a mean follow-up period of 20.8 months (range: 13-24). Our findings indicate that: a) disease progression was not markedly reduced by TLI; b) steroid hormones responsivity was restored after irradiation, and c) side-effects were mild and tolerable

  20. Suicide and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E N; Stenager, Egon; Koch-Henriksen, N

    1992-01-01

    In a nationwide investigation the risk of death by suicide for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) was assessed using records kept at the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR) and the Danish National Register of Cause of Death. The investigation covers all MS patients registered with DSMR...... with an onset of the disease within the period 1953-85, or for whom MS was diagnosed in the same period. Fifty three of the 5525 cases in the onset cohort group committed suicide. Using the figures from the population death statistics by adjustment to number of subjects, duration of observation, sex, age......, and calendar year at the start of observation, the expected number of suicides was calculated to be nearly 29. The cumulative lifetime risk of suicide from onset of MS, using an actuarial method of calculation, was 1.95%. The standard mortality ratio (SMR) of suicide in MS was 1.83. It was highest for males...

  1. Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bošnjak-Pašić, Marija; Vidrih, Branka; Miškov, Snježana; Demarin, Vida

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, characterized by multifocal inflammatory destruction of myelin, axonal damage and loss of oligodendrocytes. The disease is carried through two stages: inflammatory and degenerative. The most common form of disease in approximately 85% of the cases is RRMS (relapsing-remitting form). The treatment of MS is divided into: treatment of the acute phase of illness, prevention of new relapses and di...

  2. Midkine and multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune neurological disease characterized by inflammatory demyelination with subsequent neuronal damage in the CNS. MS and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), have been thought as autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated diseases. CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T-cell (Treg) plays a pivotal role in autoimmune tolerance, and tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCreg) drive the development of inducible Treg cells. Thus, a dysfunction in the d...

  3. Rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubsik-Gidlewska, Anna M; Klimkiewicz, Paulina; Klimkiewicz, Robert; Janczewska, Katarzyna; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the study is to present a strategy of rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis on the basis of the latest developments in the field of physiotherapy. The publications on the problem discuss a wide range of methods of physiotherapy that can be used in order to reduce the degree of disability and alleviate the symptoms associated with the disease. The complexity of the disease, the difficulty in determining the appropriate treatment and a wide range of symptoms require a comprehensive approach to the patient, which would include both pharmacology and neurorehabilitation. Rehabilitation, which includes psychotherapy and symptomatic therapy, is regarded nowadays as the best form of treatment for multiple sclerosis. An indepth diagnostic assessment of functional status and prognosis should be carried out before the start of the rehabilitation process. The prognosis should take into account the mental state, the neurological status and the awareness of the patient. The kinesiotherapy program in multiple sclerosis is based on a gradation of physiotherapy which assumes a gradual transition from basic movements to more complex ones till global functions are obtained. The most appropriate form of treatment is functional rehabilitation combined with physical procedures. Recent reports indicate the need for aerobic training to be included in the rehabilitation program. The introduction of physical activities, regardless of the severity of the disease, will reduce the negative effects of akinesia, and thus increase the functional capabilities of all body systems.

  4. Interferon Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Alajbegovic, Azra; Deljo, Dervis; Alajbegovic, Salem; Djelilovic-Vranic, Jasminka; Todorovic, Ljubica; Tiric-Campara, Merita

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) differ: treatment of relapse, treatment slow the progression of the disease (immunomodulators and immunosuppression), and symptomatic treatment. The aim: The aim of this study is to analyze the application of interferon therapy in the treatment of MS-E: Process the disease, patients with multiple sclerosis who have passed the commission for multiple sclerosis at the Neurology Clinic of Clinical Center of Sarajevo University as a refere...

  5. Vascular comorbidities in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Anja; Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence of vascular comorbidities before and after the clinical onset of multiple sclerosis. In this combined case-control and cohort study, all Danish born citizens with onset of multiple sclerosis 1980-2005 were identified from the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry...... and randomly matched with controls regarding year of birth, gender, and municipality on January 1st in the year of multiple sclerosis (MS) onset (index date). Individual-level information on comorbidities was obtained from several independent nationwide registries and linked to the study population by unique...

  6. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy.

  7. Multiple sclerosis and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Anthony; Pavisian, Bennis

    2017-06-01

    Mortality rates are elevated in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) relative to the general population. There is, however, some uncertainty whether suicide contributes to this. Epidemiological data suggest that the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for suicide in MS is approximately twice that of the general population with younger males in the first few years following diagnosis most at risk. Rates of suicidal intent, a potential harbinger of more self-destructive behavior, are also elevated, but the frequency with which intent is followed by suicide is not known. Depression, severity of depression, social isolation, and alcohol abuse are associated with thoughts of suicide. The variables linked with suicide and suicidal intent are therefore well defined and should be readily available from routine clinical inquiry. While vigilance on the part of clinicians is required, particularly in the context of high-risk patients, it is also recognized that prevention is dependent on full disclosure of intent.

  8. Falls in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Patricia N; Shumway-Cook, Anne; Bamer, Alyssa M; Johnson, Shana L; Amtmann, Dagmar; Kraft, George H

    2011-07-01

    To examine incidence, associated factors, and health care provider (HCP) response to falls in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Cross-sectional retrospective design. Community setting. Four hundred seventy-four persons with MS. Mailed survey questionnaire examined incidence, risk factors, and HCP response to falls in persons with MS who were dwelling in the community. Univariate and multiple ordinal regression analysis identified variables associated with single and multiple falls. Falls, causes and perceived reasons for falls, and HCP response. A total of 265 participants (58.2%) reported one or more falls in the previous 6 months, and 58.5% of falls were medically injurious. Trips/slips while walking accounted for 48% of falls. Factors associated with falls included use of a cane or walker (odds ratio [OR] 2.62; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.66-4.14), income falls; recommended strategies included safety strategies (53.2%), use of gait assistive devices (42.1%), exercise/balance training (22.2%), and home modifications (16.6%). Factors associated with falls in persons with MS are similar to those in other populations with neurologic diseases. Despite the high incidence of falls, fewer than 50% of people with MS receive information about prevention of falls from an HCP. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Future challenges in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Óscar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis occurs in genetically susceptible individuals, in whom an unknown environmental factor triggers an immune response, giving rise to a chronic and disabling autoimmune disease. Currently, significant progress is being made in our knowledge of the frequency and distribution of multiple sclerosis and its risk factors, genetics, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and prognostic markers, and treatment. This has radically changed patients' and clinicians' expectations of multiple sclerosis and has raised hope that there will soon be a way to control the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-04-12

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth.

  11. Current concepts in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiethoelter, Horst; Dichgans, Johannes

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains 9 articles dealing with the use of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and positron emitted tomography in the diagnosis and staging of multiple sclerosis. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs

  12. Multiple sclerosis and organic solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, J T; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, K

    1998-01-01

    We investigated a possible causal relation between exposure to organic solvents in Danish workers (housepainters, typographers/printers, carpenters/cabinetmakers) and onset of multiple sclerosis. Data on men included in the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Register (3,241 men) were linked with data from......, and butchers. Over a follow-up period of 20 years, we observed no increase in the incidence of multiple sclerosis among men presumed to be exposed to organic solvents. It was not possible to obtain data on potential confounders, and the study design has some potential for selection bias. Nevertheless......, the study does not support existing hypotheses regarding an association between occupational exposure to organic solvents and multiple sclerosis....

  13. Multiple Sclerosis After Infectious Mononucleosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Rasmussen; Rostgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Nete Munk

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious mononucleosis caused by the Epstein-Barr virus has been associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis. However, little is known about the characteristics of this association. OBJECTIVE: To assess the significance of sex, age at and time since infectious mononucleosis......, and attained age to the risk of developing multiple sclerosis after infectious mononucleosis. DESIGN: Cohort study using persons tested serologically for infectious mononucleosis at Statens Serum Institut, the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register, and the Danish...... Multiple Sclerosis Registry. SETTING: Statens Serum Institut. PATIENTS: A cohort of 25 234 Danish patients with mononucleosis was followed up for the occurrence of multiple sclerosis beginning on April 1, 1968, or January 1 of the year after the diagnosis of mononucleosis or after a negative Paul...

  14. Defining active progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, Finn; Börnsen, Lars; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether disease activity according to consensus criteria (magnetic resonance imaging activity or clinical relapses) associate with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) changes in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVE: To compare CSF biomarkers in active and inactive...

  15. Occupational therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Cardol, M.; Nes, J.C.M. van de; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are referred to occupational therapy with complaints about fatigue, limb weakness, alteration of upper extremity fine motor coordination, loss of sensation and spasticity that causes limitations in performance of activities of daily living and social

  16. [Current therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio García Merino, J

    2014-12-01

    Since the introduction of interferon beta 1 b for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, there has been a progressive increase in the number of drugs available for this disease. Currently, 11 drugs have been approved in Spain, and their indications depend on specific clinical characteristics. The present article reviews these indications and also discusses other medications without official approval that have also been used in multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Viruses and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Jussi Oskari; Jacobson, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a heterogeneous disease that develops as an interplay between the immune system and environmental stimuli in genetically susceptible individuals. There is increasing evidence that viruses may play a role in MS pathogenesis acting as these environmental triggers. However, it is not known if any single virus is causal, or rather several viruses can act as triggers in disease development. Here, we review the association of different viruses to MS with an emphasis on two herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6). These two agents have generated the most impact during recent years as possible co-factors in MS disease development. The strongest argument for association of EBV with MS comes from the link between symptomatic infectious mononucleosis and MS and from seroepidemiological studies. In contrast to EBV, HHV-6 has been found significantly more often in MS plaques than in MS normal appearing white matter or non-MS brains and HHV-6 re-activation has been reported during MS clinical relapses. In this review we also suggest new strategies, including the development of new infectious animal models of MS and antiviral MS clinical trials, to elucidate roles of different viruses in the pathogenesis of this disease. Furthermore, we introduce the idea of using unbiased sequence-independent pathogen discovery methodologies, such as next generation sequencing, to study MS brain tissue or body fluids for detection of known viral sequences or potential novel viral agents. PMID:22583435

  18. Midkine and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hideyuki

    2014-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune neurological disease characterized by inflammatory demyelination with subsequent neuronal damage in the CNS. MS and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), have been thought as autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated diseases. CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg) plays a pivotal role in autoimmune tolerance, and tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCreg) drive the development of inducible Treg cells. Thus, a dysfunction in the development of Treg and DCreg leads to the development of autoimmune diseases. However, the factors that regulate Treg and DCreg are largely unknown. We recently showed that removal of midkine (MK) suppressed EAE due to an expansion of the Treg cell population as well as a decrease in the numbers of autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cells. MK decreased the Treg cell population by suppressing the phosphorylation of STAT5, which is essential for the expression of Foxp3, the master transcriptional factor of Treg cell differentiation. Furthermore, MK reduces the DCreg cell population by inhibiting the phosphorylation of STAT3, which is critical for DCreg development. Blockade of MK signalling by a specific RNA aptamer significantly elevated the population of DCreg and Treg cells and ameliorated EAE without detectable adverse effects. Therefore, the inhibition of MK may provide an effective therapeutic strategy against autoimmune diseases including MS. This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Multiple Sclerosis: Can It Cause Seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... multiple sclerosis and epilepsy? Answers from B Mark Keegan, M.D. Epileptic seizures are more common in ... controlled with anti-seizure medication. With B Mark Keegan, M.D. Lund C, et al. Multiple sclerosis ...

  20. Emotional Disorders in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Evidence-based Guideline for PATIENTS and their FAMILIES EMOTIONAL DISORDERS IN PEOPLE WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS This fact sheet presents the current research on emotional disorders in multiple sclerosis (MS) and summarizes the ...

  1. Treatment of Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pierson, Susan H.; Griffith, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis is an increasingly recognized entity. This article reviews the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis, its prevalence, its relationship to different types of multiple sclerosis, and its contribution to long-term functional prognosis. The discussion also focuses on the key elements of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis which distinguish it from other forms of cognitive impairment. Therapeutic interventions potentially effective for the co...

  2. Neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, J. L.; de Seze, J.; Lana-Peixoto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that preferentially targets the optic nerves and spinal cord. The clinical presentation may suggest multiple sclerosis (MS), but a highly specific serum autoantibody against the astrocytic water channel...

  3. [Biological treatment of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, P.S.; Sellebjerg, F.

    2008-01-01

    In 1996 interferon (IFN)beta was the first biopharmaceutical product to be approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). In 2006 the more potent monoclonal antibody natalizumab was approved. Presently, a number of monoclonal antibodies are being studied, including ale...

  4. Uric acid in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, M; De Keyser, J

    Peroxynitrite, a reactive oxidant formed by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide at sites of inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS), is capable of damaging tissues and cells. Uric acid, a natural scavenger of peroxynitrite, reduces inflammatory demyelination in experimental allergic

  5. The danish multiple sclerosis registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Stenager, Egon

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Danish Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Registry was established in 1956. Content: The register comprises data on all Danes who had MS in 1949 or who have been diagnosed since. Data on new cases and updated information on persons with an MS diagnosis already notified are continuously...

  6. The immunogenetics of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejgaard, A.

    2008-01-01

    with complex genetic backgrounds. HLA controls immune response genes and HLA associations indicate the involvement of autoimmunity. Multiple sclerosis (MS) was one of the first conditions proven to be HLA associated involving primarily HLA class II factors. We review how HLA studies give fundamental...

  7. Laboratory diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Stovner, L.J.; Rinck, P.A.; Nilsen, G.; Romslo, I.

    1991-01-01

    In 26 patients with multiple sclerosis 100% responded abnormally to magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Lesions in the posterior fossa were observed in 18 patients. The auditory brain stem response was abnormal in 15 patients, and 22 had abnormal immunoglobulins in the cerebrospinal fluid. The correlation between abnormalities of the auditory brain stem response and the magnetic resonance images was greatest in a subgroup where the two investigations were performed within a ten day interval. Results from magnetic resonance imaging, evoked potentials and cerebrospinal fluid investigations were used to reclassify 13 of 15 patients with clinically ''possible'' or ''probable''multiple sclerosis to a higher level using Poser's criteria. Evoked potentials (the auditory brain stem response in particular) correlated best with clinical multiple sclerosis category. The authors recommend that the magnetic resonance imaging is established as a first-hand investigation in evaluation of multiple sclerosis. Evoked potentials and cerebrospinal fluid investigations may prove to be more specific, however, and these investigations should also be performed as a routine. 23 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Vascular aspects of multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'haeseleer, Miguel; Cambron, Melissa; Vanopdenbosch, Ludo; De Keyser, Jacques

    Three types of vascular dysfunction have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). First, findings from epidemiological studies suggest that patients with MS have a higher risk for ischaemic stroke than people who do not have MS. The underlying mechanism is unknown, but might involve endothelial

  9. Treatment of Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Susan H.; Griffith, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis is an increasingly recognized entity. This article reviews the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis, its prevalence, its relationship to different types of multiple sclerosis, and its contribution to long-term functional prognosis. The discussion also focuses on the key elements of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis which distinguish it from other forms of cognitive impairment. Therapeutic interventions potentially effective for the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis are reviewed including the effects of disease modifying therapies and the use of physical and cognitive interventions. PMID:16720960

  10. Multiple sclerosis and herpesvirus interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Sciascia do Olival

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, and its etiology is believed to have both genetic and environmental components. Several viruses have already been implicated as triggers and there are several studies that implicate members of the Herpesviridae family in the pathogenesis of MS. The most important characteristic of these viruses is that they have periods of latency and exacerbations within their biological sanctuary, the central nervous system. The Epstein-Barr, cytomegalovirus, human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 viruses are the members that are most studied as being possible triggers of multiple sclerosis. According to evidence in the literature, the herpesvirus family is strongly involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, but it is unlikely that they are the only component responsible for its development. There are probably multiple triggers and more studies are necessary to investigate and define these interactions.

  11. Vitamin D Levels Predict Multiple Sclerosis Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters February 3, 2014 Vitamin D Levels Predict Multiple Sclerosis Progression Among people ... sclerosis (MS), those with higher blood levels of vitamin D had better outcomes during 5 years of ...

  12. Multiple sclerosis in magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Walecki, J.; Stelmasiak, Z.

    1994-01-01

    The authors analyzed MR examination of 277 patients with multiple sclerosis. White matter hyperintesities in brain were found in 270 of them, in spinal cord in 32. The most frequently they were found in periventricular white matter, in subcortical localization and in the corpus callosum. MR examination allows the estimate the activity of the disease on the basis of the presence of edema around the plaques and their contrast enhancement with Gd-DTPA. About one third of all cases were accompanied by cortical brain atrophy (the most often seen in the frontal lobes), subcortical brain atrophy was less frequent. In about two third of all cases the corpus callosum atrophy was found. MR examination is a highly sensitive method of multiple sclerosis diagnosis, of the assessment of its activity and progression. (author)

  13. [Current description of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Río, Jordi; Montalbán, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a multifocal demyelinating disease leading to progressive neurodegeneration caused by an autoimmune response in genetically predisposed individuals. In the last few years, the knowledge and management of this disease has been revolutionized by a series of findings. The present article reviews pathological features of the disease, in which cortical involvement is increasingly implicated, and aspects related to novel pathogenic mechanisms, such as the role of the microbiota in the genesis of multiple sclerosis, as well as recent contributions from the fields of epidemiology and genetics. Also reviewed are the latest diagnostic criteria, which currently allow a much earlier diagnosis, with clear therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Cognitive deficits in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, H; Jønsson, A; Andresen, Jesper Graubæk

    2012-01-01

    of the cognitive impairment seen in MS and constitute a supplement to traditional measurement of T2 lesion volume. Materials and Methods - Fifty patients with clinically definite MS were included (38 women, 12 men). Patients were MR scanned, neuropsychologically tested, and evaluated clinically with the Kurtzke......Objectives - Although disease load in multiple sclerosis (MS) often is based on T2 lesion volumes, the changes in T2 of normal appearing brain tissue (NABT) are rarely considered. By means of magnetic resonance, (MR) we retrospectively investigated whether T2 changes in NABT explain part...... Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Multiple Sclerosis Impairment Scale (MSIS). Voxel-wise T2 estimates and total T2 lesion volume were tested for correlations with eight cognitive domains, a general cognitive dysfunction factor (CDF), and the two clinical scales. Results - We found distinct...

  15. Multiple sclerosis and birth order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, W H

    1984-01-01

    Studies on the birth order of patients with multiple sclerosis have yielded contradictory conclusions. Most of the sets of data, however, have been tested by biased tests. Data that have been submitted to unbiased tests seem to suggest that cases are more likely to occur in early birth ranks. This should be tested on further samples and some comments are offered on how this should be done. PMID:6707558

  16. Multiple sclerosis and birth order.

    OpenAIRE

    James, W H

    1984-01-01

    Studies on the birth order of patients with multiple sclerosis have yielded contradictory conclusions. Most of the sets of data, however, have been tested by biased tests. Data that have been submitted to unbiased tests seem to suggest that cases are more likely to occur in early birth ranks. This should be tested on further samples and some comments are offered on how this should be done.

  17. Multiple Sclerosis: Pathogenesis and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Loma, Ingrid; Heyman, Rock

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It affects approximately 400,000 people in the United States and onset is usually during young adulthood. There are four clinical forms of MS, of which relapsing remitting type is the most common. As the etiology of MS is unknown, finding a cure will remain challenging. The main mechanism of injury appears to be inflammation and 8 agents are now FDA approved to help control MS. Th...

  18. Treatment Satisfaction in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Glanz, Bonnie I.; Musallam, Alexander; Rintell, David J.; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L.; Healy, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) are associated with inconvenient methods of administration, significant side effects, and low adherence rates. This study was undertaken to compare treatment satisfaction in MS patients treated with interferon beta-1a intramuscular (IFNβ-1a IM), interferon beta-1a subcutaneous (IFNβ-1a SC), glatiramer acetate (GA), and natalizumab (NTZ), and to examine the associations between treatment satisfaction ra...

  19. Estrogen Treatment in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gold, Stefan M; Voskuhl, Rhonda R

    2009-01-01

    Currently available treatments for multiple sclerosis reduce inflammatory lesions on MRI and decrease clinical relapses but have limited effects on disability. Novel treatment options that target both the inflammatory as well as the neurodegenerative component of the disease are therefore needed. A growing body of evidence from basic science and clinical studies supports the therapeutic potential of estrogens in MS. Mechanisms of action include both immunomodulatory and directly neuroprotecti...

  20. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotti, G.; Caputo, D.; Cazzullo, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. (orig.)

  1. Multiple sclerosis: current immunological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cuevas-García

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is the most common inflammatory, chronic and degenerative condition of the central nervous system, and represents the first cause of disability in young adults. In Mexico, 11 to 20 out of every 100 000 people suffer from this disease. The causes of multiple sclerosis remain unknown, but several theories have been proposed on its origin: the interaction of environmental factors, viral infectious factors and genetic and immune susceptibility of each individual patient, which induce an autoimmune response and promote neuronal/axonal degeneration. In this review, the immune reaction main components and neurodegeneration present in multiple sclerosis are analyzed, as well as the inflammatory cascade associated with demyelination. Available treatments’ main purpose is to modulate aspects related to the adaptive immune response (B and T cells. The therapeutic challenge will be antigen-specific immune-tolerance induction, for example, with the use of tolerance protocols with peptides or DNA or nanoparticles vaccines. Future therapies should aim to control innate components (microglia, macrophages, astrocytes and to promote remyelination. To optimize the treatment, a combined therapeutic approach targeting the control of inflammatory and neurodegenerative components of the disease and monitoring of biomarkers will be necessary.

  2. Does vagotomy protect against multiple sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundbøll, Jens; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Adelborg, Kasper; Svensson, Elisabeth

    2017-07-01

    To examine the association between vagotomy and multiple sclerosis. We conducted a matched cohort study of all patients who underwent truncal or super-selective vagotomy and a comparison cohort, by linking Danish population-based medical registries (1977-1995). Hazard ratios (HRs) for multiple sclerosis, adjusting for potential confounders were computed by means of Cox regression analysis. Median age of multiple sclerosis onset corresponded to late onset multiple sclerosis. No association with multiple sclerosis was observed for truncal vagotomy (0-37 year adjusted HR=0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.48-1.74) or super-selective vagotomy (0-37 year adjusted HR=1.28, 95% CI: 0.79-2.09) compared with the general population. We found no association between vagotomy and later risk of late onset multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiple sclerosis: a geographical hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlyle, I P

    1997-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis remains a rare neurological disease of unknown aetiology, with a unique distribution, both geographically and historically. Rare in equatorial regions, it becomes increasingly common in higher latitudes; historically, it was first clinically recognized in the early nineteenth century. A hypothesis, based on geographical reasoning, is here proposed: that the disease is the result of a specific vitamin deficiency. Different individuals suffer the deficiency in separate and often unique ways. Evidence to support the hypothesis exists in cultural considerations, in the global distribution of the disease, and in its historical prevalence.

  4. Suicide attempts in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Elsebeth Nylev; Jensen, Børge; Stenager, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of the study were (1) to estimate the risk of suicide attempts in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in Denmark and compare the risk to the background population in the County of Funen, Denmark; (2) to estimate the risk of suicide attempts in MS patients receiving immunomodulating...... therapy compared with untreated patients. The Danish MS Registry, the Danish MS Treatment Registry and the Suicide Attempt Registry are linked and merged together using a person identification number given to all persons residing in Denmark. Among 404 MS patients, 15 patients had attempted suicide...

  5. [Special cases of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendibe Bilbao, Mar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease that usually occurs in young people and affects them for the rest of their lives. Patients and their families usually have a series of doubts and questions on everyday matters and all types of situations that occur during the distinct stages of life and which can influence the course of the disease. The aim of this review is to provide specific answers to these questions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Symptomatic management in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushkar Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the commonest cause of disability in young adults. While there is increasing choice and better treatments available for delaying disease progression, there are still, very few, effective symptomatic treatments. For many patients such as those with primary progressive MS (PPMS and those that inevitably become secondary progressive, symptom management is the only treatment available. MS related symptoms are complex, interrelated, and can be interdependent. It requires good understanding of the condition, a holistic multidisciplinary approach, and above all, patient education and empowerment.

  7. Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Etesam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment can emerge in the earliest phases of multiple sclerosis. It strongly impacts different aspects of Multiple Sclerosis (MS patients' lives, like employment, social relationships and the overall quality of life; thus, its on-time recognition and treatment is mandatory. This paper discusses issues, diagnostic methods and treatment options for cognitive dysfunctions in MS. This paper is a descriptive review of the related studies in the recent 10 years, performing a keyword search in the main databases4T. Cognitive impairment mostly involves aspects of information processing, memory and executive functioning in MS. Neuropsychological tests like MACFIMS and BRB-N are recommended for its assessment. Still, there is no fully efficient treatment for cognitive impairment. Researchers have shown some positive effects, using disease-modifying therapies and cognitive rehabilitation. Depression, pain, fatigue and other factors influencing cognitive functions must be paid attention to4T. Recognizing cognitive impairment as a major symptom for MS, makes studying this subject one of the priorities in dealing with the disease. Therefore, a consecutive research for identification and management of this part of quality of life in MS patients is obligatory4T.4T

  8. The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, E.A.C.M.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis describes recently developed research methods for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. In Chapter X the use of the CT-scan in the detection of hemispheral or cerebellar lesions is discussed. In chapter XIII the results of the application of all methods to a group of 89 patients with definite, probable or possible multiple sclerosis and to a group of 25 purely optic neuritis patients are presented. With the aid of the CT-scan, hypo- or hyperdense areas in the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres were found in 52% of the 114 patients. Most reports ascribe these lesions to demyelinating cerebral plaques. The CT-scan showed no cerebellar or brainstem lesions. The CT-scan is independent of the duration of, and degree of incapacitation due to, the disease and can be helpful in giving a definite diagnosis in an early stage of the disease. The CT-scan will always play an important role for the differential diagnosis. (Auth.)

  9. Reproduction and the risk of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils Iørgen; Pfleger, Claudia Christina

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark has doubled in women since 1970, whereas it has been almost unchanged in men.......The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark has doubled in women since 1970, whereas it has been almost unchanged in men....

  10. Demyelination of subcortical nuclei in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krutenkova, E; Aitmagambetova, G; Khodanovich, M; Yarnykh, V; Bowen, J; Gangadharan, B; Henson, L; Mayadev, A; Repovic, P; Qian, P

    2016-01-01

    Myelin containing in basal ganglia in multiple sclerosis patients was evaluated using new noninvasive quantitative MRI method fast whole brain macromolecular proton fraction mapping. Myelin level in globus pallidus and putamen significantly decreased in multiple sclerosis patients as compared with healthy control subjects but not in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus. (paper)

  11. Demyelination of subcortical nuclei in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutenkova, E.; Aitmagambetova, G.; Khodanovich, M.; Bowen, J.; Gangadharan, B.; Henson, L.; Mayadev, A.; Repovic, P.; Qian, P.; Yarnykh, V.

    2016-02-01

    Myelin containing in basal ganglia in multiple sclerosis patients was evaluated using new noninvasive quantitative MRI method fast whole brain macromolecular proton fraction mapping. Myelin level in globus pallidus and putamen significantly decreased in multiple sclerosis patients as compared with healthy control subjects but not in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus.

  12. Computerized tomography in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delouvrier, J.J.; Tritschler, J.L.; Desbleds, M.T.; Cambier, J.; Nahum, H.

    1980-01-01

    The double scan CT method was applied to a homogeneous population of 50 multiple sclerosis patients and the following features were studied: well defined low-density areas, localized contrast enhancements, cerebral atrophy and white matter homogeneity. The analyses of the variance of the white matter (centrum ovale) can disclose those lesions which individually do not surpass the visibility threshold. The lesions that are localized in the white matter are mainly periventricular, most often multiple, and they do not displace the neighbouring structures. By revealing a large number of clinically silent cerebral lesions, the cerebral CT becomes a highly important diagnostic tool. The value of the CT examinations seems to be of major importance each time that the clinical diagnosis is hesitant, particularly when faced with medullary signs or an initial neurological episode. (C.F.)

  13. Demyelination versus remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramow, Stephan; Frischer, Josa M; Lassmann, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The causes of incomplete remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis are unknown, as are the pathological correlates of the different clinical characteristics of patients with primary and secondary progressive disease. We analysed brains and spinal cords from 51 patients with progressive...... multiple sclerosis by planimetry. Thirteen patients with primary progressive disease were compared with 34 with secondary progressive disease. In patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, we found larger brain plaques, more demyelination in total and higher brain loads of active demyelination...... compared with patients with primary progressive disease. In addition, the brain density of plaques with high-grade inflammation and active demyelination was highest in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and remained ~18% higher than in primary progressive multiple sclerosis after adjustments...

  14. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milenkova, Maria; Milanov, Ivan; Kmetska, Ksenia; Deleva, Sofia; Popova, Ljubomira; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Groudeva, Violeta; Hadjidekova, Savina; Domínguez, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied radiosensitivity to in vitro γ-irradiated lymphocytes from MS patients. • Immunotherapy in RRMS patients reduced the yield of radiation induced MN. • The group of treated RRMS accounts for the low radiosensitivity in MS patients. • Spontaneous yield of MN was similar in treated and untreated RRMS patients. - Abstract: Multiple sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease leading to severe neurological disability. Although during the last years many disease-modifying agents as treatment options for multiple sclerosis have been made available, their mechanisms of action are still not fully determined. In the present study radiosensitivity in lymphocytes of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and healthy controls was investigated. Whole blood cultures from multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls were used to analyze the spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes. A subgroup of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis was treated with immunomodulatory agents, interferon β or glatiramer acetate. The secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients group was not receiving any treatment. Our results reveal that the basal DNA damage was not different between relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls. No differences between gamma-irradiation induced micronuclei frequencies in binucleated cells from relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls were found either. Nevertheless, when we compared the radiation induced DNA damage in binucleated cells from healthy individuals with the whole group of patients, a reduction in the frequency of micronuclei was obtained in the patients group. Induced micronuclei yield was significantly lower in the irradiated samples from treated relapsing–remitting multiple

  15. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milenkova, Maria; Milanov, Ivan; Kmetska, Ksenia [III Neurological Clinic, University Hospital Saint Naum, Sofia (Bulgaria); Deleva, Sofia; Popova, Ljubomira; Hadjidekova, Valeria [Laboratory of Radiation Genetics, NCRRP, Sofia (Bulgaria); Groudeva, Violeta [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University Hospital St. Ekaterina, Sofia (Bulgaria); Hadjidekova, Savina [Department of Medical Genetics, Medical University, Sofia (Bulgaria); Domínguez, Inmaculada, E-mail: idomin@us.es [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Biology, University of Seville, Avda. Reina Mercedes 6, 41012 (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We studied radiosensitivity to in vitro γ-irradiated lymphocytes from MS patients. • Immunotherapy in RRMS patients reduced the yield of radiation induced MN. • The group of treated RRMS accounts for the low radiosensitivity in MS patients. • Spontaneous yield of MN was similar in treated and untreated RRMS patients. - Abstract: Multiple sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease leading to severe neurological disability. Although during the last years many disease-modifying agents as treatment options for multiple sclerosis have been made available, their mechanisms of action are still not fully determined. In the present study radiosensitivity in lymphocytes of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and healthy controls was investigated. Whole blood cultures from multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls were used to analyze the spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes. A subgroup of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis was treated with immunomodulatory agents, interferon β or glatiramer acetate. The secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients group was not receiving any treatment. Our results reveal that the basal DNA damage was not different between relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls. No differences between gamma-irradiation induced micronuclei frequencies in binucleated cells from relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls were found either. Nevertheless, when we compared the radiation induced DNA damage in binucleated cells from healthy individuals with the whole group of patients, a reduction in the frequency of micronuclei was obtained in the patients group. Induced micronuclei yield was significantly lower in the irradiated samples from treated relapsing–remitting multiple

  16. Association between systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis: lupoid sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Yimy F; Martinez, Jose B; Fernandez, Andres R; Quintana, Gerardo; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Rondon, Federico; Gamarra, Antonio Iglesias

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with/without antiphospholipid syndrome are autoimmune illnesses. It has been described in many occasions the association of these two illnesses and the clinical picture of MS with characteristics of laboratory of SLE. When they affect to the central nervous system they can make it in a defined form for each illness or they can also make it in interposed or combined form of the two illnesses what has been called lupoid sclerosis; making that in some cases difficult the differentiation of the two illnesses and therefore to address the treatment. We present four cases of lupoid sclerosis, discuss the clinical and laboratory characteristics of this entity and we make a differentiation of the multiple sclerosis with the neurological affectation of SLE especially for images and laboratory results.

  17. Statin treatment in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl-Jensen, Gorm; Tsakiri, Anna; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to progressive disability. Statins [hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors] are widely prescribed drugs in hypercholesterolemia. They exert immunomodulatory and neurotrophic effects and are attractive...... candidates for MS treatment due to reliable safety profiles and favorable costs. Studies of statins in a murine MS model and in open-label trials in MS have shown decreased disease severity. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to assess current evidence to support statin treatment in MS and clinically isolated......)-β treatment in RRMS, one of statin monotherapy in CIS, one of statin monotherapy in optic neuritis (ON)/CIS, and one of statin monotherapy in secondary progressive MS (SPMS)]. Three trials with eligible characteristics had not been published in peer-reviewed journals and were therefore not included. Due...

  18. Implicit Memory in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Latchford

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of neuropsychological studies have revealed that memory problems are relatively common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. It may be useful to compare MS with conditions such as Huntington's disease (HD, which have been referred to as subcortical dementia. A characteristic of these conditions may be an impairment in implicit (unconscious memory, but not in explicit (conscious memory. The present study examined the functioning of explicit and implicit memory in MS. Results showed that implicit memory was not significantly impaired in the MS subjects, and that they were impaired on recall but not recognition. A correlation was found between implicit memory performance and disability status in MS patients. Findings also suggest the possibility of long-term priming of implicit memory in the control subjects. The implications of these results are discussed.

  19. Cognitive dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana eGuimarães

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In Multiple Sclerosis (MS prevalence studies of community and clinical samples, indicate that 45–60% of patients are cognitively impaired. These cognitive dysfunctions have been traditionally described as heterogeneous, but more recent studies suggest that there is a specific pattern of MS-related cognitive dysfunctions. With the advent of disease-modifying medications for MS and emphasis on early intervention and treatment, detection of cognitive impairment at its earliest stage becomes particularly important. In this review the authors address: the cognitive domains most commonly impaired in MS (memory, attention, executive functions, speed of information processing and visual spatial abilities; the physiopathological mechanism implied in MS cognitive dysfunction and correlated brain MRI features; the importance of neuropsychological assessment of MS patients in different stages of the disease and the influence of its course on cognitive performance; the most used tests and batteries for neuropsychological assessment; therapeutic strategies to improve cognitive abilities.

  20. Connected health and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M

    2018-04-18

    There is as yet no consensual definition of "connected health". In general, the term refers to the growing use of technology and, in particular, mobile technology in medicine. Over the past 10 years, there have been an increasing number of published reports on the wide-ranging and heterogeneous fields involving the application of technology in medicine, ranging from telemedicine to tools to improve patients' evaluation and monitoring by physicians, as well as a multitude of patient-centered applications. They also represent promising tools in the field of clinical research. This report is a review of the importance of using this technology in the management of multiple sclerosis patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Multiple sclerosis and other white matter diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) by computerized tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance are shown, including the examination of cerebral spinal fluid. Lymphocytic, foamy histiocytic perivascular cuffing, degenerated oligodendrocytes, and microglia proliferation with relative axonal sparing are presented. In the latter stage of the chronic MS plaque there is sclerosis with microcystic formation with complete demyelination and organization. (author)

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Barker, G J; MacKay, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The theory of relaxation processes and their measurements are described. An overview is presented of the literature on relaxation time measurements in the normal and the developing brain, in experimental diseases in animals, and in patients with multiple sclerosis. RESULTS...... AND CONCLUSION: Relaxation time measurements provide insight into development of multiple sclerosis plaques, especially the occurrence of oedema, demyelination, and gliosis. There is also evidence that normal appearing white matter in patients with multiple sclerosis is affected. What is now needed are fast...

  3. Suicide among Danes with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, H; Stenager, E; Nylev Stenager, E

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the suicide risk among Danish citizens with multiple sclerosis with that of the general population, and to evaluate changes over 45 years. METHODS: The study was based on linkage of the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry to the Cause of Death Registry. It comprised all 10...... taken their own lives, whereas the expected number of suicides was 54.2 (29.1 men, 25.1 women). Thus the suicide risk among persons with multiple sclerosis was more than twice that of the general population (SMR = 2.12). The increased risk was particularly high during the first year after diagnosis (SMR...... = 3.15). CONCLUSIONS: The risk of suicide in multiple sclerosis was almost twice as high as expected more than 20 years after diagnosis. The excess suicide risk has not declined since 1953....

  4. Respiratory muscle training for multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietberg, Marc B.; Veerbeek, Janne M.; Gosselink, Rik; Kwakkel, Gert; van Wegen, Erwin E.H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system, affecting approximately 2.5 million people worldwide. People with MS may experience limitations in muscular strength and endurance - including the respiratory muscles, affecting functional performance and

  5. Defining the clinical course of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lublin, Fred D; Reingold, Stephen C; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Accurate clinical course descriptions (phenotypes) of multiple sclerosis (MS) are important for communication, prognostication, design and recruitment of clinical trials, and treatment decision-making. Standardized descriptions published in 1996 based on a survey of international MS experts...

  6. Recent advances in multiple sclerosis therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonsette, R.E.; Delmotte, P.

    1989-01-01

    Seven papers in this volume are in INIS scope, one dealing with autoradiographic detection of multiple sclerosis plaques with radiologands, and the others with magnetic resonance imaging of MS lesions. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs

  7. Plasma homocysteine levels in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsaransing, G S M; Fokkema, M R; Teelken, A; Arutjunyan, A V; Koch, M; De Keyser, J

    Background: There is evidence that homocysteine contributes to various neurodegenerative disorders, and elevated plasma homocysteine levels have been observed in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective: To investigate if and why plasma homocysteine levels are increased in MS, and whether

  8. Gait Characteristics in Adolescents With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalron, Alon; Frid, Lior; Menascu, Shay

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a progressive autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. A presentation of multiple sclerosis before age18 years has traditionally been thought to be rare. However, during the past decade, more cases have been reported. We examined gait characteristics in 24 adolescents with multiple sclerosis (12 girls, 12 boys). Mean disease duration was 20.4 (S.D. = 24.9) months and mean age was 15.5 (S.D. = 1.1) years. The mean expanded disability status scale score was 1.7 (S.D. = 0.7) indicating minimal disability. Outcomes were compared with gait and the gait variability index value of healthy age-matched adolescents. Adolescents with multiple sclerosis walked slower with a wider base of support compared with age-matched healthy control subjects. Moreover, the gait variability index was lower in the multiple sclerosis group compared with the values in the healthy adolescents: 85.4 (S.D. = 8.1) versus 96.5 (S.D. = 7.4). We present gait parameters of adolescents with multiple sclerosis. From a clinical standpoint, our data could improve management of walking dysfunction in this relatively young population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multiple Sclerosis Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Giovannoni

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is the body fluid closest to the pathology of multiple sclerosis (MS. For many candidate biomarkers CSF is the only fluid that can be investigated. Several factors need to be standardized when sampling CSF for biomarker research: time/volume of CSF collection, sample processing/storage, and the temporal relationship of sampling to clinical or MRI markers of disease activity. Assays used for biomarker detection must be validated so as to optimize the power of the studies. A formal method for establishing whether or not a particular biomarker can be used as a surrogate end-point needs to be adopted. This process is similar to that used in clinical trials, where the reporting of studies has to be done in a standardized way with sufficient detail to permit a critical review of the study and to enable others to reproduce the study design. A commitment must be made to report negative studies so as to prevent publication bias. Pre-defined consensus criteria need to be developed for MS-related prognostic biomarkers. Currently no candidate biomarker is suitable as a surrogate end-point. Bulk biomarkers of the neurodegenerative process such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and neurofilaments (NF have advantages over intermittent inflammatory markers.

  10. Islamic fasting and multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Month-long daytime Ramadan fasting pose s major challenges to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in Muslim countries. Physicians should have practical knowledge on the implications of fasting on MS. We present a summary of database searches (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PubMed) and a mini-symposium on Ramadan fasting and MS. In this symposium, we aimed to review the effect of fasting on MS and suggest practical guidelines on management. Discussion In general, fasting is possible for most stable patients. Appropriate amendment of drug regimens, careful monitoring of symptoms, as well as providing patients with available evidence on fasting and MS are important parts of management. Evidence from experimental studies suggests that calorie restriction before disease induction reduces inflammation and subsequent demyelination and attenuates disease severity. Fasting does not appear to have unfavorable effects on disease course in patients with mild disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score ≤3). Most experts believed that during fasting (especially in summer), some MS symptoms (fatigue, fatigue perception, dizziness, spasticity, cognitive problems, weakness, vision, balance, gait) might worsen but return to normal levels during feasting. There was a general consensus that fasting is not safe for patients: on high doses of anti-convulsants, anti-spastics, and corticosteroids; with coagulopathy or active disease; during attacks; with EDSS score ≥7. Summary These data suggest that MS patients should have tailored care. Fasting in MS patients is a challenge that is directly associated with the spiritual belief of the patient. PMID:24655543

  11. [Oral treatments in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meca-Lallana, José Eustasio; Hernández-Clares, Rocío; Carreón-Guarnizo, Ester

    2014-12-01

    The development of new disease-modifying drugs (DMD) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), which share the common denominator of oral administration, considerably improves patient expectations in terms of effectiveness, tolerability and treatment adherence compared with currently available drugs. However, the common route of administration of these drugs does not mean that they are equivalent, since the heading of "oral route" encompasses drugs with distinct indications and mechanisms of action, as well as heterogeneous results in terms of efficacy and safety, allowing treatment to be personalized according to the each patient' s characteristics. Currently, four oral DMD are available or in an advanced stage of clinical development: fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate and laquinimod. In pivotal trials versus placebo, these molecules reduced the annualized rate of exacerbations versus placebo by 54%, 31%, 53% and 23%, respectively, the risk of progression of disability by 31%, 30%, 38% and 36%, and the number of active lesions showing contrast uptake on magnetic resonance imaging by 82%, 80%, 90% and 37%, respectively. Based on the risk/benefit ratio, fingolimod is indicated in patients with suboptimal response to initial DMD or in severe rapidly progressing RRMS, while the remaining drugs can be used as first-line options. Clinical experience with these treatments will provide new data on safety and effectiveness, which will be determinant when establishing therapeutic algorithms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Remyelination Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Danielle E; Honce, Justin M; Miravalle, Augusto A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disorder of the central nervous system that results in destruction of the myelin sheath that surrounds axons and eventual neurodegeneration. Current treatments approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS target the aberrant immune response and successfully reduce the severity of attacks and frequency of relapses. Therapies are still needed that can repair damage particularly for the treatment of progressive forms of MS for which current therapies are relatively ineffective. Remyelination can restore neuronal function and prevent further neuronal loss and clinical disability. Recent advancements in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating myelination, as well as the development of high-throughput screens to identify agents that enhance myelination, have lead to the identification of many potential remyelination therapies currently in preclinical and early clinical development. One problem that has plagued the development of treatments to promote remyelination is the difficulty in assessing remyelination in patients with current imaging techniques. Powerful new imaging technologies are making it easier to discern remyelination in patients, which is critical for the assessment of these new therapeutic strategies during clinical trials. This review will summarize what is currently known about remyelination failure in MS, strategies to overcome this failure, new therapeutic treatments in the pipeline for promoting remyelination in MS patients, and new imaging technologies for measuring remyelination in patients.

  13. Remyelination Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle E. Harlow

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an immune-mediated disorder of the central nervous system that results in destruction of the myelin sheath that surrounds axons and eventual neurodegeneration. Current treatments approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS target the aberrant immune response and successfully reduce the severity of attacks and frequency of relapses. Therapies are still needed that can repair damage particularly for the treatment of progressive forms of MS for which current therapies are relatively ineffective. Remyelination can restore neuronal function and prevent further neuronal loss and clinical disability. Recent advancements in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating myelination, as well as the development of high throughput screens to identify agents that enhance myelination, have lead to the identification of many potential remyelination therapies currently in pre-clinical and early clinical development. One problem that has plagued the development of treatments to promote remyelination is the difficulty in assessing remyelination in patients with current imaging techniques. Powerful new imaging technologies are making it easier to discern remyelination in patients, which is critical for the assessment of these new therapeutic strategies during clinical trials. This review will summarize what is currently known about remyelination failure in MS, strategies to overcome this failure, new therapeutic treatments in the pipeline for promoting remyelination in MS patients, and new imaging technologies for measuring remyelination in patients.

  14. Neuroendocrine Immunoregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Deckx

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, it is generally accepted that multiple sclerosis (MS is a complex multifactorial disease involving genetic and environmental factors affecting the autoreactive immune responses that lead to damage of myelin. In this respect, intrinsic or extrinsic factors such as emotional, psychological, traumatic, or inflammatory stress as well as a variety of other lifestyle interventions can influence the neuroendocrine system. On its turn, it has been demonstrated that the neuroendocrine system has immunomodulatory potential. Moreover, the neuroendocrine and immune systems communicate bidirectionally via shared receptors and shared messenger molecules, variously called hormones, neurotransmitters, or cytokines. Discrepancies at any level can therefore lead to changes in susceptibility and to severity of several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Here we provide an overview of the complex system of crosstalk between the neuroendocrine and immune system as well as reported dysfunctions involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, including MS. Finally, possible strategies to intervene with the neuroendocrine-immune system for MS patient management will be discussed. Ultimately, a better understanding of the interactions between the neuroendocrine system and the immune system can open up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MS as well as other autoimmune diseases.

  15. Natalizumab therapy of multiple sclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hutchinson, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the commonest disabling neurological disease of young and middle-aged adults affecting 1 million persons world wide. The illness begins with a relapsing-remitting MS course in 85%-90% of patients; the other 10%-15% have a primary progressive onset MS. Our current understanding is that MS is an autoimmune disorder with an inflammatory T-cell attack on myelin or some component of the oligodendrocyte--myelin structure. Relapses of disease activity result in plaques of demyelination with destruction of myelin and, to a lesser, extent axons. Lymphocytes within the central nervous system tissue recruit more cells leading to an inflammatory cascade that causes myelin damage, axonal disruption, and neuronal death. If the plaque occurs in a vocal area of the central nervous system then symptoms relating to that area result. However, magnetic resonance imaging shows that approximately 10 times more lesions occur in asymptomatic areas of the brain. Recovery from an initial relapse may appear relatively complete but persistent inflammation results in axonal injury and residual disability results. With time and accumulated lesion load, secondary degeneration of denuded axons results in the phase of secondary progressive MS usually 15-20 years after onset.

  16. Pediatric multiple sclerosis in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín A. Peña

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of Venezuelan pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. METHODS: Database records from the National Program for MS were searched for patients with an established diagnosis of MS whose first symptoms appeared before age 18. RESULTS: The national database held records of 1.710 patients; 3.8% had onset of the first symptoms before age 18. 46.7% were boys, yielding an F:M ratio of 1.13:1. Many children had a disease onset characterized by motor impairment (30.7%, brainstem/cerebellum and spinal cord affectation (27.6%, headache (26%. Less frequent symptoms were sensory symptoms (8% and optic neuritis (7%. DISCUSSION: Pediatric MS patients in Venezuela represent a significant proportion of all MS cases. The clinical pattern is characterized by motor symptoms at onset, and predominantly monosymptomatic presentation with a relapsing-remitting pattern. This is the first systematic attempt to estimate the prevalence of pediatric MS in Venezuela.

  17. MRI findings of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Min Yun; Sol, Chang Hyo; Chung, Choon Phill; Kim, Byung Soo; Park, Byung Ho

    1993-01-01

    Nine patients of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS) were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1.0 T. The MS plaques were seen in the brain and spinal cord in eight and three patients, respectively. The frequent sites of MS plaques were periventricular white matter, brain stem, and cervical cord. The shape of most brain MS plaques was round or finger-like configuration. The MS plaques showed high signal intensity on T2 weighted images and low or iso signal intensity on T1 weighted images in all nine cases. Contrast enhancement was seen in 4 cases. Mild brain atrophy was noted in 2 cases and mass effect in 1 case. The sites of cord MS plaques in three patients were C2-C4, C2-C5, and C4-C6 levels respectively. The core MS plaques showed high signal intensity on T2 weighted image and contrast enhancement on Gd-DTPA enhanced T1 weighted images in all 3 case with mild cord expansion in 2 cases. In conclusion, MRI is a useful diagnosis tool in evaluating the MS plaques involved central nervous system

  18. Nutrition Facts in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Riccio

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness.

  19. Hearing disorders in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Miriam; Levine, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that is both a focal inflammatory and a chronic neurodegenerative disease. The focal inflammatory component is characterized by destruction of central nervous system myelin, including the spinal cord; as such it can impair any central neural system, including the auditory system. While on the one hand auditory complaints in MS patients are rare compared to other senses, such as vision and proprioception, on the other hand auditory tests of precise neural timing are never "silent." Whenever focal MS lesions are detected involving the pontine auditory pathway, auditory tests requiring precise neural timing are always abnormal, while auditory functions not requiring such precise timing are often normal. Azimuth sound localization is accomplished by comparing the timing and loudness of the sound at the two ears. Hence tests of azimuth sound localization must obligatorily involve the central nervous system and particularly the brainstem. Whenever a focal lesion was localized to the pontine auditory pathway, timing tests were always abnormal, but loudness tests were not. Moreover, a timing test that included only high-frequency sounds was very often abnormal, even when there was no detectable focal MS lesion involving the pontine auditory pathway. This test may be a marker for the chronic neurodegenerative aspect of MS, and, as such could be used to complement the magnetic resonance imaging scan in monitoring the neurodegenerative aspect of MS. Studies of MS brainstem lesion location and auditory function have led to advances in understanding how the human brain processes sound. The brain processes binaural sounds independently for time and level in a two-stage process. The first stage is at the level of the superior olivary complex (SOC) and the second at a level rostral to the SOC. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comorbidity of Bipolar Disorder and Multiple Sclerosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is a chronic demyelinating disease of a central nervous system. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in multiple sclerosis and bipolar disorder is one of the most common psychiatric disorders that coexist with multiple sclerosis. Manic episodes may be the first presenting symptom of multiple sclerosis as comorbid pathology or as an adverse effect of pharmacotherapies used in multiple sclerosis. The comorbidity of bipolar disorder and multiple sclerosis is well-proven but its etiology is not known and investigated accurately. Recent studies support a common genetic susceptibility. Management of bipolar disorder in multiple sclerosis is based on evidence provided by case reports and treatment should be individualized. In this report, the association between bipolar disorder and multiple sclerosis, epidemiology, ethiology and treatment is discussed through a case had diagnosed as multiple sclerosis and had a manic episode with psychotic features. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 832-836

  1. Multiple sclerosis - etiology and diagnostic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, Joanna; Koper, Olga M; Piechal, Kinga; Kemona, Halina

    2017-06-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of autoimmune originate. The main agents responsible for the MS development include exogenous, environmental, and genetic factors. MS is characterized by multifocal and temporally scattered central nervous system (CNS) damage which lead to the axonal damage. Among clinical courses of MS it can be distinguish relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPSM), primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), and progressive-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RPMS). Depending on the severity of signs and symptoms MS can be described as benign MS or malignant MS. MS diagnosis is based on McDonald's diagnostic criteria, which link clinical manifestation with characteristic lesions demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, and visual evoked potentials. Among CSF laboratory tests used to the MS diagnosis are applied: Tibbling & Link IgG index, reinbegrams, and CSF isoelectrofocusing for oligoclonal bands detection. It should be emphasized, that despite huge progress regarding MS as well as the availability of different diagnostics methods this disease is still a diagnostic challenge. It may result from fact that MS has diverse clinical course and there is a lack of single test, which would be of appropriate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for quick and accurate diagnosis.

  2. Multiple sclerosis - etiology and diagnostic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kamińska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of autoimmune originate. The main agents responsible for the MS development include exogenous, environmental, and genetic factors. MS is characterized by multifocal and temporally scattered central nervous system (CNS damage which lead to the axonal damage. Among clinical courses of MS it can be distinguish relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPSM, primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS, and progressive-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RPMS. Depending on the severity of signs and symptoms MS can be described as benign MS or malignant MS. MS diagnosis is based on McDonald’s diagnostic criteria, which link clinical manifestation with characteristic lesions demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis, and visual evoked potentials. Among CSF laboratory tests used to the MS diagnosis are applied: Tibbling & Link IgG index, reinbegrams, and CSF isoelectrofocusing for oligoclonal bands detection. It should be emphasized, that despite huge progress regarding MS as well as the availability of differentdiagnostics methods this disease is still a diagnostic challenge. It may result from fact that MS has diverse clinical course and there is a lack of single test, which would be of appropriate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for quick and accurate diagnosis.

  3. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Hayriye Sorgun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neuropathy findings by lesion localization on brain MRI. METHODS: Ninety-five attacks of 86 MS patients were included in the study. The patients underwent a complete neurological examination, and cranial nerve palsies (CNP were determined during MS attacks. RESULTS: CNP were found as follows: 3rd CNP in 7 (7.4%, 4th CNP in 1 (1.1%, 5th CNP in 6 (6.3%, 6th CNP in 12 (12.6%, 7th CNP in 5 (5.3%, 8th CNP in 4 (4.2%, and 9th and 10th CNP in 2 (2.1% out of 95 attacks. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO was detected in 5 (5.4%, nystagmus in 37 (38.9%, vertigo in 9 (6.3%, and diplopia in 14 (14.7% out of 95 attacks. Pons, mesencephalon and bulbus lesions were detected in 58.7%, 41.5% and 21.1% of the patients, respectively, on the brain MRI. Cranial nerve palsy findings could not be explained by the localization of the lesions on brainstem MRI in 5 attacks; 2 of them were 3rd CNP (1 with INO, 2 were 6th CNP and 1 was a combination of 6th, 7th and 8th CNP. CONCLUSION: The most frequently affected cranial nerve and brainstem region in MS patients is the 6th cranial nerve and pons, respectively. A few of the MS patients have normal brainstem MRI, although they have cranial neuropathy findings in the neurologic examination.

  4. Registers of multiple sclerosis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch-Henriksen, N; Magyari, M; Laursen, B

    2015-01-01

    between a number of different environmental exposures in the past and the subsequent risk of MS. Some of these studies have been able to exonerate suspected risk factors. The other register, the nationwide Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register, is a follow-up register for all patients who have......There are two nationwide population-based registers for multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark. The oldest register is The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR), which is an epidemiological register for estimation of prevalence and incidence of MS and survival, and for identifying exposures earlier...... received disease-modifying treatments since 1996. It has, in particular, contributed to the knowledge of the role of antibodies against the biological drugs used for the treatment of MS....

  5. Retinal layer segmentation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petzold, Axel; Balcer, Laura J; Calabresi, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Structural retinal imaging biomarkers are important for early recognition and monitoring of inflammation and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis. With the introduction of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), supervised automated segmentation of individual retinal...... layers is possible. We aimed to investigate which retinal layers show atrophy associated with neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis when measured with SD-OCT. METHODS: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched for studies in which SD-OCT was used to look at the retina in people...... with multiple sclerosis with or without optic neuritis in PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar between Nov 22, 1991, and April 19, 2016. Data were taken from cross-sectional cohorts and from one timepoint from longitudinal studies (at least 3 months after onset in studies of optic neuritis). We classified...

  6. New management algorithms in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Per Soelberg

    2014-01-01

    complex. The purpose of the review has been to work out new management algorithms for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis including new oral therapies and therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent large placebo-controlled trials in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Our current treatment algorithms include only IFN-β and glatiramer as available first-line disease-modifying drugs and natalizumab and fingolimod as second-line therapies. Today, 10 drugs have been approved in Europe and nine in the United States making the choice of therapy more...

  7. Reproductive History and Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, N. M.; Jorgensen, K. T.; Stenager, E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that reproductive factors may be involved in the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied associations of reproductive history with MS risk in a population-based setting. Methods: Using national databases, we established a cohort comprising 4.4 million...... Danish men and women born between 1935 and 1989 and alive in 1968 or later. We obtained information about their live-born children, pregnancy losses, pregnancy complications, and infertility diagnoses. MS cases in the cohort were identified through 2004 in the Danish Register of Multiple Sclerosis...

  8. The risk of fracture in incident multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bazelier, Marloes T; Bentzen, Joan; Vestergaard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at increased risk of fractures owing to osteoporosis and falling.......Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at increased risk of fractures owing to osteoporosis and falling....

  9. Multiple Sclerosis, Personal Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Multiple Sclerosis Personal Stories: Nicole Lemelle, Iris Young, Michael Anthony, ... something quite different for a person living with multiple sclerosis, such as his girlfriend's brother, Chuy. The more ...

  10. What's new in multiple sclerosis spasticity research? Poster session highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Ralf

    2017-11-01

    Each year at the Multiple Sclerosis Experts Summit, relevant research in the field of multiple sclerosis spasticity is featured in poster sessions. The main studies presented at this year's meeting are summarized herein.

  11. Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutashov V.A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to identify the degree of cognitive impairment (CN and to optimize the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Material and methods. A total of 695 patients (278 men and 417 women were ranged from 18 to 63 years. The mean age was 30.2±0.7 years: women (417 28.5±0.5 years, while for men (278 31.8±0.7 years. Relaps-ing-remitting type (RT of MS was established in 520 patients (74.8%, secondary progressive type (VPT MS in 132 patients (18.9% and primary progressive type (PPT MS in 10 patients (1.5%. Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS was detected in 33 patients (4.8%. The diagnosis of MS 662 patients according to the criteria McDonald etal. (2005. Score of neurologic deficit was carried out on an extended scale of disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale — EDSS. CN were evaluated by conventional tests. To estimate the orientation in time, assessment of short-term and long-term memory, attention and concentration, as well as executive functions, memory, language, evaluation of optical-spatial activities, conceptual thinking, the account used by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale (MoCA. For the screening of dementia with a primary lesion of the frontal lobes and subcortical cerebral structures used battery frontal test to assess frontal dysfunction. Results. The ratio of male (265 and female (397 was 1:1.5. The severity of the condition patients EDSS scale ranged from 1.5 to 8.0 points, and the average score was 3.5±1.2. In the group of patients with RT RS average score EDSS was more than a half (2.5±1.1, than in the group of patients with MS VAC (5.5±1.2 and POS PC (6.5±1.2. In the study of history, it was found that the development of the RS (662 patients was preceded by the following conditions: a viral infection in 277 patients (41.84%; fatigue in 147 patients (22.21%; transferred psycho-emotional load from 218 (32.93%; after pregnancy and childbirth in 20 patients (3.02%. Conclusion. Among the patients with MS

  12. Onset symptoms in paediatric multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Magnus Spangsberg; Sellebjerg, Finn; Blinkenberg, Morten

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) carries a relatively higher mortality and morbidity than adult MS. Paediatric MS symptoms and paraclinical findings at the first demyelinating event have never before been characterised in a Danish setting. The aim of this study was to compare...

  13. Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... questions and enable an era of optimized MS treatment. Read more... The Accelerated Cure Project for MS is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization whose mission is to accelerate efforts toward a cure for multiple sclerosis by rapidly advancing research that determines its causes ...

  14. Myeloproliferative neoplasms in five multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2013-01-01

    The concurrence of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) is unusual. We report five patients from a localized geographic area in Denmark with both MS and MPN; all the patients were diagnosed with MPNs in the years 2007-2012. We describe the patients' history and treatment...

  15. Pharmacologic treatment of depression in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus W.; Glazenborg, Arjon; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Mostert, Jop; De Keyser, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Background Depression is a common problem in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). It is unclear which pharmacologic treatment is the most effective and the least harmful. Objectives To investigate the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacologic treatments for depression in patients with MS. Search

  16. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogojan, C; Frederiksen, J L

    2009-01-01

    Intensive immunosuppresion followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been suggested as potential treatment in severe forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Since 1995 ca. 400 patients have been treated with HSCT. Stabilization or improvement occurred in almost 70% of cases at least...

  17. Multiple sclerosis: general features and pharmacologic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen Lagumersindez, Denis; Martinez Sanchez, Gregorio

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune, inflammatory and desmyelinization disease central nervous system (CNS) of unknown etiology and critical evolution. There different etiological hypotheses talking of a close interrelation among predisposing genetic factors and dissimilar environmental factors, able to give raise to autoimmune response at central nervous system level. Hypothesis of autoimmune pathogeny is based on study of experimental models, and findings in biopsies of affected patients by disease. Accumulative data report that the oxidative stress plays a main role in pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Oxygen reactive species generated by macrophages has been involved as mediators of demyelinization and of axon damage, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and strictly in multiple sclerosis. Disease diagnosis is difficult because of there is not a confirmatory unique test. Management of it covers the treatment of acute relapses, disease modification, and symptoms management. These features require an individualized approach, base on evolution of this affection, and tolerability of treatments. In addition to diet, among non-pharmacologic treatments for multiple sclerosis it is recommended physical therapy. Besides, some clinical assays have been performed in which we used natural extracts, nutrition supplements, and other agents with promising results. Pharmacology allowed neurologists with a broad array of proved effectiveness drugs; however, results of research laboratories in past years make probable that therapeutical possibilities increase notably in future. (Author)

  18. The risk of multiple sclerosis in nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Egon; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    2003-01-01

    The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in nurses during the period 1980-1996 was calculated in a nationwide study. The cohort consisted of 69,428 nurses, 2185 men and 67,243 women. Sixty (two men and 58 women) with definite MS were observed, whereas 69.3 were expected. We found no significant...

  19. The socioeconomic consequences of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Wanscher, Benedikte; Frederiksen, Jette

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has serious negative effects on health-, social-, and work-related issues for the patients and their families, thus causing significant socioeconomic burden. The objective of the study was to determine healthcare costs and indirect illness costs in MS patient in a national...

  20. The association between multiple sclerosis and uveitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tine Gadegaard; Frederiksen, Jette

    2016-01-01

    The association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and uveitis has been questioned. Nerve tissue and eye tissue develop from the same embryonic cells; thus, MS and uveitis could be etiologically associated. In published studies, the prevalence of MS in patients with uveitis differe from 0.7% to 30...

  1. Psychiatric co-morbidity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Huong; Laursen, Bjarne; Stenager, Elsebeth N

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of depression and anxiety in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have reported higher rates in MS patients than the general population. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of depression and anxiety and the use of tricyclic antidepressant and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors...

  2. MYO9B polymorphisms in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemppinen, A.; Suvela, M.; Tienari, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 3' region of myosin IXB (MYO9B) gene have recently been reported to associate with different inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. We monitored for the association of MYO9B variants to multiple sclerosis (MS) in four Northern European populations. First...

  3. Antigen-specific therapies in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, J.M. van

    1998-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the major neurological disease of young adults in the western world, affecting about 1 per 1,000. It is characterised by chronic or recurrent lesions of inflammatory damage in the white matter of the central nervous system. Within such lesions, the protective myelin sheath is

  4. Monoclonal Antibodies for Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blinkenberg, Morten; Soelberg Sørensen, Per

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) has improved considerably over the last decade because of new insights into MS pathology and biotechnological advances. This has led to the development of new potent pharmaceutical compounds targeting different processes in the complex autoimmune pathology...... the context of different treatment strategies. Finally, we consider the most important future developments....

  5. Concordance for multiple sclerosis in Danish twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T; Skytthe, Axel; Stenager, Egon

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in twins has not previously been studied in complete nationwide data sets. The existence of almost complete MS and twin registries in Denmark ensures that essentially unbiased samples of MS cases among twins can be obtained. In this population-based study...

  6. Treating fatigue in multiple sclerosis : Aerobic training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heine, M

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered a chronic and debilitating autoimmune-mediated inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system. It is the number one neurological condition in young adults, affecting approximately 17.000 people in the Netherlands. Patients with MS

  7. Lung volume recruitment in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim Srour

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pulmonary function abnormalities have been described in multiple sclerosis including reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC and cough but the time course of this impairment is unknown. Peak cough flow (PCF is an important parameter for patients with respiratory muscle weakness and a reduced PCF has a direct impact on airway clearance and may therefore increase the risk of respiratory tract infections. Lung volume recruitment is a technique that improves PCF by inflating the lungs to their maximal insufflation capacity. OBJECTIVES: Our goals were to describe the rate of decline of pulmonary function and PCF in patients with multiple sclerosis and describe the use of lung volume recruitment in this population. METHODS: We reviewed all patients with multiple sclerosis referred to a respiratory neuromuscular rehabilitation clinic from February 1999 until December 2010. Lung volume recruitment was attempted in patients with FVC <80% predicted. Regular twice daily lung volume recruitment was prescribed if it resulted in a significant improvement in the laboratory. RESULTS: There were 79 patients included, 35 of whom were seen more than once. A baseline FVC <80% predicted was present in 82% of patients and 80% of patients had a PCF insufficient for airway clearance. There was a significant decline in FVC (122.6 mL/y, 95% CI 54.9-190.3 and PCF (192 mL/s/y, 95% 72-311 over a median follow-up time of 13.4 months. Lung volume recruitment was associated with a slower decline in FVC (p<0.0001 and PCF (p = 0.042. CONCLUSION: Pulmonary function and cough decline significantly over time in selected patients with multiple sclerosis and lung volume recruitment is associated with a slower rate of decline in lung function and peak cough flow. Given design limitations, additional studies are needed to assess the role of lung volume recruitment in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  8. The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magyari M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Melinda Magyari,1,3 Nils Koch-Henriksen,1,2 Per Soelberg Sørensen3 1Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Clinical Institute, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, 3Danish Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Aim of the database: The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register (DMSTR serves as a clinical quality register, enabling the health authorities to monitor the quality of the disease-modifying treatment, and it is an important data source for epidemiological research. Study population: The DMSTR includes all patients with multiple sclerosis who had been treated with disease-modifying drugs since 1996. At present, more than 8,400 patients have been registered in this database. Data are continuously entered online into a central database from all sites in Denmark at start and at regular visits. Main variables: Include age, sex, onset year and year of the diagnosis, basic clinical information, and information about treatment, side effects, and relapses. Descriptive data: Notification is done at treatment start, and thereafter at every scheduled clinical visit 3 months after treatment start, and thereafter every 6 months. The longitudinally collected information about the disease activity and side effects made it possible to investigate the clinical efficacy and adverse events of different disease-modifying therapies. Conclusion: The database contributed to a certain harmonization of treatment procedures in Denmark and will continue to be a major factor in terms of quality in clinical praxis, research and monitoring of adverse events, and plays an important role in research. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, epidemiology, immunomodulatory treatment, neutralizing antibodies, observational studies, registry research, disease modifying therapy

  9. [Multiple sclerosis, loss of functionality and gender].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-González, Félix; Álvarez-Roldán, Arturo

    2017-12-01

    To identify the type of support and assistance that patients with multiple sclerosis need in order to cope with the loss of functionality, and to show how gender affects the perception of these needs. Interpretative-phenomenological qualitative study. Granada (Spain). Year: 2014. Intentional sample: 30 patients and 20 family caregivers. Data were gathered from 26 interviews and 4 focus groups. The data were coded and analysed with the NVivo programme. The multiple sclerosis patients and family caregivers had different perceptions of the loss of capacity to undertake activities of daily living. Being able to self care was considered the last vestige of autonomy. The women with multiple sclerosis tried to take on the responsibility of housework, but the male caregivers became gradually involved in these tasks. Gender roles were redefined with respect to housekeeping. The multiple sclerosis patients showed a need for emotional support. Some of the men had abandoned the stereotype of the strong male as a result of the decline in their health. Adaptations in the home took place without planning them in advance. The use of mobility devices started on an occasional basis. A fear of stigma was an obstacle for regular use of assistive technology. Health care for people with multiple sclerosis should include family caregivers. Gender influences the perception that caregivers and patients have of the assistance they require to maximise their quality of life. This flags up several intervention areas for the follow-up and long-term care of these patients by the healthcare system. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Possibilities of computer tomography in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vymazal, J.; Bauer, J.

    1983-01-01

    Computer tomography was performed in 41 patients with multiple sclerosis, the average age of patients being 40.8 years. Native examinations were made of 17 patients, examinations with contrast medium of 19, both methods were used in the examination of 5 patients. In 26 patients, i.e. in almost two-thirds, cerebral atrophy was found, in 11 of a severe type. In 9 patients atrophy affected only the hemispheres, in 16 also the stem and cerebellum. The stem and cerebellum only were affected in 1 patient. Hypodense foci were found in 21 patients, i.e. more than half of those examined. In 9 there were multiple foci. In most of the 19 examined patients the hypodense changes were in the hemispheres and only in 2 in the cerebellum and brain stem. No hyperdense changes were detected. The value and possibilities are discussed of examinations by computer tomography multiple sclerosis. (author)

  11. Mining gene expression data of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi Guo

    Full Text Available Microarray produces a large amount of gene expression data, containing various biological implications. The challenge is to detect a panel of discriminative genes associated with disease. This study proposed a robust classification model for gene selection using gene expression data, and performed an analysis to identify disease-related genes using multiple sclerosis as an example.Gene expression profiles based on the transcriptome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of 44 samples from 26 multiple sclerosis patients and 18 individuals with other neurological diseases (control were analyzed. Feature selection algorithms including Support Vector Machine based on Recursive Feature Elimination, Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve, and Boruta algorithms were jointly performed to select candidate genes associating with multiple sclerosis. Multiple classification models categorized samples into two different groups based on the identified genes. Models' performance was evaluated using cross-validation methods, and an optimal classifier for gene selection was determined.An overlapping feature set was identified consisting of 8 genes that were differentially expressed between the two phenotype groups. The genes were significantly associated with the pathways of apoptosis and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. TNFSF10 was significantly associated with multiple sclerosis. A Support Vector Machine model was established based on the featured genes and gave a practical accuracy of ∼86%. This binary classification model also outperformed the other models in terms of Sensitivity, Specificity and F1 score.The combined analytical framework integrating feature ranking algorithms and Support Vector Machine model could be used for selecting genes for other diseases.

  12. The Danish multiple sclerosis treatment register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the database: The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register (DMSTR) serves as a clinical quality register, enabling the health authorities to monitor the quality of the diseasemodifying treatment, and it is an important data source for epidemiological research. Study population: The DMSTR...... includes all patients with multiple sclerosis who had been treated with disease-modifying drugs since 1996. At present, more than 8,400 patients have been registered in this database. Data are continuously entered online into a central database from all sites in Denmark at start and at regular visits. Main...... variables: Include age, sex, onset year and year of the diagnosis, basic clinical information, and information about treatment, side effects, and relapses. Descriptive data: Notification is done at treatment start, and thereafter at every scheduled clinical visit 3 months after treatment start...

  13. Pulmonary function and dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, S C; Utell, M J; Rudick, R A; Herndon, R M

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary function was studied in 25 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis with a range of motor impairment. Forced vital capacity (FVC), maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV), and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) were normal in the ambulatory patients (mean greater than or equal to 80% predicted) but reduced in bedridden patients (mean, 38.5%, 31.6%, and 36.3% predicted; FCV, MVV, and MEP, respectively) and wheelchair-bound patients with upper extremity involvement (mean, 69.4%, 50.4%, and 62.6% predicted; FVC, MVV, and MEP, respectively). Forced vital capacity, MVV, and MEP correlated with Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status scores (tau = -0.72, -0.70, and -0.65) and expiratory muscle weakness occurred most frequently. These findings demonstrate that marked expiratory weakness develops in severely paraparetic patients with multiple sclerosis and the weakness increases as the upper extremities become increasingly involved.

  14. SOME NEUROCHEMICAL DISTURBANCES IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Markelov

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe data presented in this manuscript suggest a pivotal role of the central nervous system (CNS in the regulation of immune status. We describe here that some neurochemical disturbances may provoke development of various diseases including multiple sclerosis. Some theoretic and practical backgrounds, how to improve the multiple sclerosis sufferers and patients with other autoimmune disorders, are also given.RESUMENLos datos que presentamos en este manuscrito, sugieren un papel guia del sistema nervioso central (SNC en la regulación del estado inmune. Describimos aquí que varias alteraciones neuroquímicas pueden provocar el desarrollo de varias enfermedades, incluyendo esclerosis múltiple. También se comenta acerca del trasfondo teórico y práctico, y cómo mejorar a víctimas y pacientes con esclerosis múltiple y otras alteraciones autoinmunes.

  15. Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, N.M.; Westergaard, T.; Frisch, M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) and multiple sclerosis (MS) contribute considerably to the burden of autoimmune diseases in young adults. Although HLA patterns of T1D and MS are considered mutually exclusive, individual and familial co-occurrence of the 2 diseases has been reported...... Multiple Sclerosis Register were used to identify patients with T1D, defined as patients in whom diabetes was diagnosed before age 20 years (N = 6078), and patients with MS (N = 11 862). First-degree relatives (N = 14,771) of patients with MS were identified from family information in the Danish Civil....... OBJECTIVE: To assess the co-occurrence of T1D and MS by estimating the risk for MS in patients with T1D and the risk for T1D in first-degree relatives of patients with MS. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Two population-based disease registers, the Danish Hospital Discharge Register and the Danish...

  16. Sibship characteristics and risk of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, P.; Nielsen, N.M.; Bihrmann, K.

    2006-01-01

    sibling, or exposure to younger siblings under 2 years of age and risk of MS later in life. There was no association of MS risk with multiple birth (vs. singleton birth) or with the age of the mother or father at birth. These results do not lend support to the hypothesis that number of older siblings......It has been hypothesized that age at infection with a common microbial agent may be associated with the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). The authors addressed this hypothesis by using number of older siblings and other sibship characteristics as an approximation of age at exposure to common...... Sclerosis Register. The cohort of 1.9 million Danes was followed for 28.1 million person-years; during that time, 1,036 persons developed MS. Overall, there was no association between number of older siblings, number of younger siblings, total number of siblings, age distance from the nearest younger...

  17. Musical identity of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Shirlene Vianna; França, Cecília Cavalieri; Moreira, Marcos Aurélio; Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurélio

    2009-03-01

    Musical autobiographies consist of a powerful therapeutic tool by which individuals define themselves. The use of this technique may help (re)construction personal identities and improve quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Eight adult patients on treatment at CIEM Multiple Sclerosis Investigation Center after selecting 10 to 15 pieces of music most significant in their lives were interviewed. The data collected were classified according to Even Rudd categories, which reveal how a person expresses his personal, social, temporal and transpersonal identities. We observed that recall of musical history makes MS patients get better perception both of their feelings and body awareness, as well as provide them with an alternative way to express themselves, activate and contextualize affective memories, and achieving a sense of life continuity in spite of the disease.

  18. Optimizing treatment success in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ziemssen, T; Derfuss, T; de Stefano, N; Giovannoni, G; Palavra, F; Tomic, D; Vollmer, T; Schippling, S

    2016-01-01

    Despite important advances in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) over recent years, the introduction of several disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), the burden of progressive disability and premature mortality associated with the condition remains substantial. This burden, together with the high healthcare and societal costs associated with MS, creates a compelling case for early treatment optimization with highly efficacious therapies. Often, patients receive several first-line therapie...

  19. Amyloid PET in pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Cabrera-Martín, María Nieves; Cortés-Martínez, Ana; Pytel, Vanesa; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Carreras, José Luis; Matías-Guiu, Jorge

    2017-07-01

    Pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis is a rare form of demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Positron emission tomography (PET) using amyloid-tracers has also been suggested as a marker of damage in white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis due to the nonspecific uptake of these tracers in white matter. We present the case of a 59 year-old woman with a pathological-confirmed pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis, who was studied with the amyloid tracer 18 F-florbetaben. The patient had developed word-finding difficulties and right hemianopia twelve years ago. In that time, MRI showed a lesion on the left hemisphere with an infiltrating aspect in frontotemporal lobes. Brain biopsy showed demyelinating areas and inflammation. During the following years, two new clinical relapses occurred. 18 F-florbetaben PET showed lower uptake in the white matter lesion visualized in the CT and MRI images. Decreased tracer uptake was also observed in a larger area of the left hemisphere beyond the lesions observed on MRI or CT. White matter lesion volume on FLAIR was 44.2mL, and tracer uptake change between damaged white matter and normal appearing white matter was - 40.5%. Standardized uptake value was inferior in the pseudotumoral lesion than in the other white matter lesions. We report the findings of amyloid PET in a patient with pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis. This case provides further evidence on the role of amyloid PET in the assessment of white matter and demyelinating diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Visual field abnormalities in multiple sclerosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, V H; Heron, J R

    1980-01-01

    Visual fields were examined with a tangent screen in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) or optic neuritis (ON). Visual fields were abnormal in all patients with definite MS, 94% with probable MS and 81% with possible MS. Three-quarters of the MS patients with no history of visual symptoms had abnormal fields. The commonest defect found was an arcuate scotoma. As a diagnostic test of visual pathway involvement in MS, tangent screen examination compares favourably with more sophisticated ...

  1. [Multiple sclerosis in literature, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vazquez, S; Carrillo, J M; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, R

    2016-12-16

    Today, the care of patients with multiple sclerosis and those around them represents a clinical and therapeutic challenge for healthcare professionals. The aim of this study is to analyse the appearance of multiple sclerosis in literature, cinema and television, and to reflect upon the image it has in these media. Several representative works that have addressed multiple sclerosis were reviewed, and many of them were seen to offer a very true-to-life vision of the disease. Likewise, a review was also conducted of the most relevant films and TV series that, on occasions, offer the general public a close look at the impact of the disease on patients or relatives, although they are sometimes somewhat exaggerated for the sake of increased dramatic effect and offer a slightly distorted view of reality. Literature largely reflects the real epidemiology, the symptoms and development of the disease, while less attention seems to be given to the diagnostic and therapeutic options open to patients. Cinema and television have offered a correct image but sometimes with the addition of more dramatic effects. It is important for literature, cinema and television to offer a realistic view of this neurological disease so as to make it better known among the public and to help lessen the stigma attached to it.

  2. Multiple sclerosis: Pregnancy and women's health issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendibe Bilbao, M; Boyero Durán, S; Bárcena Llona, J; Rodriguez-Antigüedad, A

    2016-08-18

    The course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is influenced by sex, pregnancy and hormonal factors. To analyse the influence of the above factors in order to clarify the aetiopathogenic mechanisms involved in the disease. We conducted a comprehensive review of scientific publications in the PubMed database using a keyword search for 'multiple sclerosis', 'MS', 'EAE', 'pregnancy', 'hormonal factors', 'treatment', and related terms. We reviewed the advances presented at the meeting held by the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) in March 2013 in London, as well as recommendations by international experts. We provide recommendations for counselling and treating women with MS prior to and during pregnancy and after delivery. Current findings on the effects of treatment on the mother, fetus, and newborn are also presented. We issue recommendations for future research in order to address knowledge gaps and clarify any inconsistencies in currently available data. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesselring, J.; Ormerod, I.E.C.; Miller, D.H.; Du Boulay, G.H.; McDonald, W.I.

    1989-01-01

    In 1983 the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Great Britain and Northern Ireland set up the Multiple Sclerosis NMR Research Group at the Institute of Neurology and the National Hospital, Queen Square. The first aim of the Group was to define the role of MRI in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, and this Atlas represents a summary of that work. Our strategy was to determine the pattern of MRI abnormalities in clinically definite MS and to compare it with those of isolated clinical syndromes of the kind seen in MS (e.g. optic neuritis) and of other disorders with which MS can be confused clinically or radiologically. We have also been involved in a major program of experimental work designed to elucidate the origin of the abnormal signals in MRI. To describe this in full detail would go beyond the scope of the Atlas, but we have incorporated such results as far as they illuminate our clinical problems. The imager used was a 0.5 Tesla Picker superconducting system. Technical advances have been rapid since we began. Nevertheless, the quality of the images obtained at our relatively low field has enabled us to establish the patterns of abnormality in the brain in MS and the diseases which must be distinguished from it. (orig./MG)

  4. Strategies to reduce hyperthermia in ambulatory multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Cox, Mary Jude; Long, William B; Winters, Kathryne L; Becker, Daniel G

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 400,000 Americans have multiple sclerosis. Worldwide, multiple sclerosis affects 2.5 million individuals. Multiple sclerosis affects two to three times as many women as men. The adverse effects of hyperthermia in patients with multiple sclerosis have been known since 1890. While most patients with multiple sclerosis experience reversible worsening of their neurologic deficits, some patients experience irreversible neurologic deficits. In fact, heat-induced fatalities have been encountered in multiple sclerosis patients subjected to hyperthermia. Hyperthermia can be caused through sun exposure, exercise, and infection. During the last 50 years, numerous strategies have evolved to reduce hyperthermia in individuals with multiple sclerosis, such as photoprotective clothing, sunglasses, sunscreens, hydrotherapy, and prevention of urinary tract infections. Hydrotherapy has become an essential component of rehabilitation for multiple sclerosis patients in hospitals throughout the world. On the basis of this positive hospital experience, hydrotherapy has been expanded through the use of compact aquatic exercise pools at home along with personal cooling devices that promote local and systemic hypothermia in multiple sclerosis patients. The Multiple Sclerosis Association of America and NASA have played leadership roles in developing and recommending technology that will prevent hyperthermia in multiple sclerosis patients and should be consulted for new technological advances that will benefit the multiple sclerosis patient. In addition, products recommended for photoprotection by The Skin Cancer Foundation may also be helpful to the multiple sclerosis patient's defense against hyperthermia. Infections in the urinary tract, especially detrusor-external sphincter dyssynergia, are initially managed conservatively with intermittent self-catheterization and pharmacologic therapy. In those cases, refractory to conservative therapy, transurethral external

  5. Inverse comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Anja; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Laursen, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    onset of MS 1980-2005. We randomly matched each MS-case with five population controls. Comorbidity data were obtained from multiple, independent nationwide registries. Cases and controls were followed from January 1977 to the index date, and from the index date through December 2012. We controlled...

  6. The management of multiple sclerosis in children: a European view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghezzi, Angelo; Banwell, Brenda; Boyko, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    in the paediatric multiple sclerosis population has triggered the use of disease-modifying therapies that have been shown to reduce relapse rate, disease progression and cognitive decline in adult patients with multiple sclerosis. Hard evidence for the right treatment and its appropriate timing is scarce...... in the management of paediatric multiple sclerosis. One of the aims was to generate a common view on the management of paediatric multiple sclerosis patients. The result of this meeting is presented here to help standardize treatment and to support clinicians with less experience in this field.......About 3-5% of all patients with multiple sclerosis experience the onset of their disease under the age of 16. A significant proportion of paediatric multiple sclerosis patients develop significant cognitive disturbances and persistent physical disability. The high relapse rate and the morbidity...

  7. Etiology and pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Ransohoff, R M

    1998-01-01

    The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unknown despite decades of intense research. The major research disciplines that have been brought to bear on this question include genetics, epidemiology, neuropathology, immunology, and virology. Recent advances in the understanding of the inflammatory...... characteristics of the MS lesion may herald the development of specific and effective treatments. The goal of this research is to improve our management of a disease that remains the major cause of neurologic disability among young adults in North America and Europe....

  8. Gender and autoimmune comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Pfleger, Claudia C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The female preponderance in incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) calls for investigations into sex differences in comorbidity with other autoimmune diseases (ADs). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether male and female patients with MS have a higher frequency of autoimmune comorbidity than...... controls, and to describe the type and frequency of ADs that are associated with MS. METHODS: Our database was established by linkage of the Danish MS Registry to The Danish National Patient Register and consisted of 1403 patients of both sexes with clinical onset of MS between 2000 and 2004, and 25...

  9. Risks of multiple sclerosis in relatives of patients in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, H; Vlietinck, R; Debruyne, J; DeKeyser, J; DHooghe, MB; Loos, R; Medaer, R; Truyen, L; Yee, IML; Sadovnick, AD

    Objectives - To calculate age adjusted risks for multiple sclerosis in relatives of Flemish patients with multiple sclerosis. Methods - Lifetime risks were calculated using the maximum likelihood approach. Results - Vital information was obtained on 674 probands with multiple sclerosis in Flanders

  10. Alemtuzumab for the treatment of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mark D Willis, Neil P Robertson Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neuroscience, Cardiff University, University Hospital of Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff, UK Abstract: Alemtuzumab is an anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody, recently approved for the treatment of active, relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS. Administration of alemtuzumab causes a rapid and dramatic reduction in circulating lymphocytes, with a predictable subsequent pattern of immune reconstitution. Although the precise mode of action remains unclear, treatment results in a marked reduction in annualized relapse rates, slowing of disability progression compared with an active comparator, and may even cause disability reversal. Although conferring clear clinical benefits, alemtuzumab carries a significant long-term risk of autoimmune disease (AID, which has a particular predilection for the thyroid gland, although a wide range of other disorders have also been reported. However, risks of AID can usually be anticipated and treated successfully, provided rigorous monitoring and surveillance protocols are followed by clinicians and patients alike. Despite its immunosuppressive mechanism of action serious infections are rare and malignancies commonly associated with immunodeficiency have not been observed to date. Alemtuzumab’s unique mode of administration, as well as it’s durability of effect, provides an important addition to currently available therapeutic interventions for MS, and in particular is a valuable treatment option in recent onset and highly active relapsing disease. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, alemtuzumab, autoimmune disease

  11. Update on rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzé, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    Given that mobility impairment is a hallmark of multiple sclerosis, people with this disease are likely to benefit from rehabilitation therapy throughout the course of their illness. The review provides an update on rehabilitation focused on balance and walking impairment. Classical rehabilitation focusing on muscle rehabilitation, neurotherapeutic facilitation is effective and recommended. Other techniques did not prove their superiority: transcutaneal neurostimulation, repetitive magnetic stimulation, electromagnetic therapy, whole body vibration and robot-assisted gait rehabilitation and need more studies to conclude. Cooling therapy, hydrotherapy, orthoses and textured insoles could represent a complementary service to other techniques in specific conditions. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation program provides positive effects and high satisfaction for patients with multiple sclerosis but needs more evaluation. New technologies using serious game and telerehabilitation seem to be an interesting technique to promote physical activity, self-management and quality of life. Rehabilitation like other therapy needs regular clinical evaluation to adapt the program and propose appropriate techniques. Moreover, the objective of rehabilitation needs to be decided with the patient with realistic expectation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Vitamin D and remyelination in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guíu, J; Oreja-Guevara, C; Matias-Guiu, J A; Gomez-Pinedo, U

    2018-04-01

    Several studies have found an association between multiple sclerosis and vitamin D (VD) deficiency, which suggests that VD may play a role in the immune response. However, few studies have addressed its role in remyelination. The VD receptor and the enzymes transforming VD into metabolites which activate the VD receptor are expressed in central nervous system (CNS) cells, which suggests a potential effect of VD on the CNS. Both in vitro and animal model studies have shown that VD may play a role in myelination by acting on factors that influence the microenvironment which promotes both proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and oligodendrocytes. It remains unknown whether the mechanisms of internalisation of VD in the CNS are synergistic with or antagonistic to the mechanisms that facilitate the entry of VD metabolites into immune cells. VD seems to play a role in the CNS and our hypothesis is that VD is involved in remyelination. Understanding the basic mechanisms of VD in myelination is necessary to manage multiple sclerosis patients with VD deficiency. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Job satisfaction among multiple sclerosis certified nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, Elsie E; Halper, June; Costello, Kathleen

    2007-08-01

    Several studies document high levels of job satisfaction among certified nurses, but no study has examined job satisfaction and factors influencing job satisfaction of certified multiple sclerosis (MS) nurses. This study tested a theoretical model proposing that two organizational factors, colleague relationships and benefits, will predict job satisfaction. Job satisfaction was represented by four factors: autonomy, professional status, professional growth, and time efficiency. Participants included MS nurses certified for 6 months or more practicing mostly in three countries (Canada, Great Britain, and the United States) who anonymously completed the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Scale, an overall job satisfaction rating, and demographic information. Findings indicate that colleague relationships and benefits significantly estimated organization structure and that autonomy, professional status, professional growth, and time efficiency significantly estimated job satisfaction; furthermore, organization factors such as colleague relationships and benefits significantly predict job satisfaction. Among the countries, several statistically significant differences were observed between job satisfaction factors as well as items in both organization and job satisfaction subscales. Average factor scores among the countries were mostly rated satisfactory. The International Organization of Multiple Sclerosis Nurses Executive Board plans to use the study findings to see how it needs to focus efforts as an organization toward enhancing and standardizing MS care and develop MS nurse professionalism worldwide.

  14. Fatal accidents among Danes with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Hansen, Thomas; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    We compared the rate of fatal accidents among Danes with multiple sclerosis (MS) with that of the general population. The study was based on linkage of the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry to the Cause of Death Registry and covered all 10174 persons in whom MS was diagnosed during the period 19...... for deaths from burns (SMR = 8.90) and suffocation (SMR = 5.57). We conclude that persons with MS are more prone to fatal accidents than the general population. The excess risk is due not to traffic accidents but to burns and suffocation.......-1996. The end of follow-up was 1 January 1999. We calculated standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for various types of fatal accidents. A total of 76 persons (48 men and 28 women) died from accidents, whereas the expected number of fatalities from such causes was 55.7 (31.4 men and 24.3 women). Thus, the risk...... for death from accidents among persons with MS was 37% higher than that of the general population (SMR = 1.37). We found no significant excess risk for fatal road accidents (SMR = 0.80). The risk for falls was elevated (SMR = 1.29) but not statistically significantly so. The risks were particularly high...

  15. Oroal manifestations in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grajales González Hilda María

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, characterized by the presence of acute focal inflammatory demyelination, axonal loss and gliosis. It affects predominantly in young adults between 20 and 40 years of age; it is infrequent in the pediatric age. A observational, retrospective and descriptive cohort research was conducted between May 1999 and January 2012 to assess demographic characteristics, and pathological manifestations in the oral cav- ity of children with this condition. Records of 17 patients, under 18 years of age, of either sex were included, who had been evaluated in the Department of Stomatology. Data recorded were age, sex, State of origin, oral and facial pathological features, focal cavity infections and ceod index. There were no patients with trigeminal neuralgia or facial paralysis; a 5.7% ceod index was identified. Most of the patients were under immunopressive treatment. A protocol for stomatological follow-up in patients with multiple sclerosis does not exist. The medical profession must be sensibilized to establish strategies for an integral follow-up in patients with this condition.

  16. The cost of multiple sclerosis in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, B; Myhr, K-M; Nyland, H; Aarseth, J H

    2012-02-01

    Health economic aspects have been increasingly important during introduction of new treatments for multiple sclerosis. As a partial response for Norway, a cost-of-illness study was carried out to estimate the yearly cost of the illness to society and relate costs and patients' quality of life to illness severity. Estimated cost to society was Euro 439 million in 2002 exclusive of the cost of reduced quality of life. The cost per patient was close to Euro 65,000. Account taken of methodological differences, the results compare to results for Sweden, Norway's closest neighboring country. The illness reduced patients' quality of life with 0.26. More patients were early retired because of their MS in Norway than in any of nine other European countries comprised by a recent European study, illustrating a liberal practice in Norway. The Norwegian cost of unpaid assistance was almost identical to the Swedish cost that was the lowest found across the countries in the European study. When related to illness severity, the cost per patient increased, and the patients' experienced quality of life decreased with increasing EDSS levels in line with what has been found for other countries. Cost-of-MS studies have been carried out for a number of countries. Together they contribute to our understanding of the economic consequences of multiple sclerosis and, if their results are related to illness severity, also provide valuable information for further economic analyses of treatment and medication. Our study adds to this.

  17. The natural history of primary progressive multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus; Kingwell, Elaine; Rieckmann, Peter; Tremlett, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Background: Primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) carries the worst prognosis of the multiple sclerosis (MS) subtypes and is currently untreatable. A previous analysis of the British Columbia MS database challenged the view that disability progression is rapid in PPMS, but identified few

  18. The risk of multiple sclerosis in bereaved parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, J; Johansen, C; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that psychological stress may play a role in the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the evidence is very limited.......Previous studies have suggested that psychological stress may play a role in the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the evidence is very limited....

  19. Epidemiological and biochemical aspects of progression in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus Werner

    2008-01-01

    Patients with a progressive form of multiple sclerosis have the worst prognosis. They can expect that their symptoms will steadily worsen, and there is currently no treatment that has a proven effect on progressive multiple sclerosis. The underlying pathophysiology of the progressive forms of

  20. Incidence of multiple sclerosis in Denmark 1948-1982

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Hyllested, K

    1992-01-01

    The incidence rates of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark were estimated as a result of a continuous nationwide epidemiological survey since 1948 by the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR). Among cases notified to the DMSR, 6,478 met the diagnostic criteria and had onset of MS from 1948...

  1. Disconnection as a Mechanism for Cognitive Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineen, R. A.; Vilisaar, J.; Hlinka, J.; Bradshaw, C. M.; Morgan, P. S.; Constantinescu, C. S.; Auer, D. P.

    2009-01-01

    Disconnection of cognitively important processing regions by injury to the interconnecting white matter provides a potential mechanism for cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. The contribution of tract-specific white matter injury to dysfunction in different cognitive domains in patients with multiple sclerosis has not previously been…

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnostics of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, J.P.; Tjoerstad, K.; Kaass, B.; Oedegaard, H.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an important and frequent neurological disease and the diagnosis might be difficult. The clinical criteria of multiple sclerosis and the role of laboratory examinations in the diagnosis of the disease are discussed. In particular the help offered by the magnetic resonance imaging method is the subject of this paper. Three patients are reported and discussed

  3. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, T B; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta).......To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta)....

  4. The management of multiple sclerosis in children: a European view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghezzi, Angelo; Banwell, Brenda; Boyko, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    About 3-5% of all patients with multiple sclerosis experience the onset of their disease under the age of 16. A significant proportion of paediatric multiple sclerosis patients develop significant cognitive disturbances and persistent physical disability. The high relapse rate and the morbidity i...

  5. Clustering of multiple sclerosis in Galion, Ohio, 1982-1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingalls, T.H. (Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Epidemiologic evidence indicates that the outbreak of 30-40 cases of multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating syndromes in Galion, Ohio, USA, during 1982-1985 was related to an excess concentration of heavy-metal wastes, especially of cadmium and chromium in sewage and river water. Both multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis were diagnosed by board-certified neurologists.

  6. Abundance of Stress, Anxiety and Depression in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dehghan

    2013-05-01

    Conclusion: The findings of this research revealed high stress, anxiety and depression in Multiple Sclerosis Patients that can jeopardize their health. Hence the providing appropriate education for coping and adapting with the symptoms in Multiple Sclerosis Patients seems to be necessary.

  7. A typical MR imaging of multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katagiri, Shinako; Kan, Shinichi; Ikeda, Toshiaki; Nishiyama, Syougo; Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Matsubayashi, Takashi; Hata, Takashi [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    MR imaging is very useful in detecting the intracranial lesion of multiple sclerosis (MS). We present six patients of MS with atypical MR imaging findings. Six patients aged 27-56 years (mean 36 years), and sexuality of six patients were 2 men and 4 females. Three patient`s clinical course had episodes of optic neuritis. The plaque`s size of the predominant lesion of the patients ranged from 3.0 to 9.0 cm in diameter. The plaques were oval, elliptically and other shaped. At acute stage, MR imaging detected perfocal edema and focal mass effect in three cases of our study. Two out of six cases showed multiple irregularly enhancing lesion with Gadolinium-DTPA. Plaques of all cases did not disappear completely in final MR imaging study. (author).

  8. A typical MR imaging of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Shinako; Kan, Shinichi; Ikeda, Toshiaki; Nishiyama, Syougo; Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Matsubayashi, Takashi; Hata, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    MR imaging is very useful in detecting the intracranial lesion of multiple sclerosis (MS). We present six patients of MS with atypical MR imaging findings. Six patients aged 27-56 years (mean 36 years), and sexuality of six patients were 2 men and 4 females. Three patient's clinical course had episodes of optic neuritis. The plaque's size of the predominant lesion of the patients ranged from 3.0 to 9.0 cm in diameter. The plaques were oval, elliptically and other shaped. At acute stage, MR imaging detected perfocal edema and focal mass effect in three cases of our study. Two out of six cases showed multiple irregularly enhancing lesion with Gadolinium-DTPA. Plaques of all cases did not disappear completely in final MR imaging study. (author)

  9. Carnitine for fatigue in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejani, Aaron M; Wasdell, Michael; Spiwak, Rae; Rowell, Greg; Nathwani, Shabita

    2012-05-16

    Fatigue is reported to occur in up to 92% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and has been described as the most debilitating of all MS symptoms by 28% to 40% of MS patients. To assess whether carnitine (enteral or intravenous) supplementation can improve the quality of life and reduce the symptoms of fatigue in patients with MS-related fatigue and to identify any adverse effects of carnitine when used for this purpose. A literature search was performed using Cochrane MS Group Trials Register (09 September 2011), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) "The Cochrane Library 2011, issue 3", MEDLINE (PubMed) (1966-09 September 2011), EMBASE (1974-09 September 2011), and www.clinicaltrials.gov for ongoing trials retrieval. Reference lists of review articles and primary studies were also screened. A hand search of the abstract book of recent relevant conference symposia was also conducted. Personal contact with MS experts and a manufacturer (Source Naturals, United States) of carnitine formulation was contacted to determine if they knew of other clinical trials. No language restrictions were applied. Full reports of published and unpublished randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials of any carnitine intervention in adults affected by multiple sclerosis with a clinical diagnosis of fatigue associated with multiple sclerosis were included. Data from the eligible trials was extracted and coded using a standardized data extraction form and entered into RevMan 5. Discrepancies were to be resolved by discussion with a third reviewer, however this was not necessary.The quality items to be assessed were method of randomization, allocation concealment, blinding (participants, investigators, outcome assessors and data analysis), intention-to-treat analysis and completeness of follow up. The search identified one ongoing randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial (expected completion 2013) and one completed randomized, active

  10. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease with classical traits of demyelination, axonal damage, and neurodegeneration. The migration of autoimmune T cells and macrophages from blood to central nervous system as well as the destruction of blood brain barrier are thought to be the major processes in the development of this disease. Chemokines, which are small peptide mediators, can attract pathogenic cells to the sites of inflammation. Each helper T cell subset expresses different chemokine receptors so as to exert their different functions in the pathogenesis of MS. Recently published results have shown that the levels of some chemokines and chemokine receptors are increased in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients. This review describes the advanced researches on the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of MS and discusses the potential therapy of this disease targeting the chemokine network.

  11. Multiple Sclerosis: Immunopathology and Treatment Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, Narges; Katsara, Maria; Tselios, Theodore; Androutsou, Maria-Eleni; Matsoukas, John

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) has changed over the last 20 years. All immunotherapeutic drugs target relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) and it still remains a medical challenge in MS to develop a treatment for progressive forms. The most common injectable disease-modifying therapies in RRMS include β-interferons 1a or 1b and glatiramer acetate. However, one of the major challenges of injectable disease-modifying therapies has been poor treatment adherence with approximately 50% of patients discontinuing the therapy within the first year. Herein, we go back to the basics to understand the immunopathophysiology of MS to gain insights in the development of new improved drug treatments. We present current disease-modifying therapies (interferons, glatiramer acetate, dimethyl fumarate, teriflunomide, fingolimod, mitoxantrone), humanized monoclonal antibodies (natalizumab, ofatumumab, ocrelizumab, alemtuzumab, daclizumab) and emerging immune modulating approaches (stem cells, DNA vaccines, nanoparticles, altered peptide ligands) for the treatment of MS. PMID:28686222

  12. Pharmacological management of spasticity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otero-Romero, Susana; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Comi, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Treatment of spasticity poses a major challenge given the complex clinical presentation and variable efficacy and safety profiles of available drugs. We present a systematic review of the pharmacological treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Methods...... improvement is seen with the previous drugs. Nabiximols has a positive effect when used as add-on therapy in patients with poor response and/or tolerance to first-line oral treatments. Despite limited evidence, intrathecal baclofen and intrathecal phenol show a positive effect in severe spasticity...... and suboptimal response to oral drugs. Conclusion: The available studies on spasticity treatment offer some insight to guide clinical practice but are of variable methodological quality. Large, well-designed trials are needed to confirm the effectiveness of antispasticity agents and to produce evidence...

  13. Biomarkers in the evolution of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Nonimaging biomarkers can be applied in differential diagnosis, evaluation of disease progression and therapy monitoring of multiple sclerosis (MS). Presence of oligoclonal IgG bands in cerebrospinal fluid is a diagnostic element and a negative predictor of MS evolution. AQP4 antibodies are pathogenic and diagnostic for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Antibodies to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein develop in about 50% of predominantly pediatric patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, but their possible role in pathogenesis is unknown. Currently, there are no individualized biomarkers suitable to track disease progression. Neutralizing antibodies against IFN-β, natalizumab and daclizumab arise with variable frequency and reduce treatment efficacy. The anti-John Cunningham virus antibody index has potential as a biomarker for risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

  14. Multiple sclerosis in Latter Day Saints (Mormons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, C H; Ramkumar, N; Baker, R; Lyon, J L

    2007-04-01

    Compliant members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS, Mormons) have a low incidence of heart and lung disease that may relate to their healthy life style. We wished to determine whether multiple sclerosis (MS) was less frequent in this religious body. To ascertain this, diagnostic and treatment coding records were accessed from the Deseret Mutual Benefit Administrators (DMBA) for the 6 year period 1997-2002. DMBA is a medical insurance company that provides medical insurance to all employees of LDS Church in the US. This information was combined with prescribing records for disease modifying treatment, principally beta-interferon and Copaxone which are medications specific to MS. Using various search strategies we derived an approximate MS prevalence of 45-64/100,000. Comparison with MS rates from Utah and other states of comparable latitude suggest that strict LDS have an MS prevalence that is lower than expected and may reflect their healthy life style.

  15. [Treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms and exacerbations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto González, José María

    2014-12-01

    In the last few years, there has been an explosion of new drugs acting on the clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) but less attention has been paid to better knowledge of the symptoms of this disease and their pathogenesis and treatment, which is essential to improve patients' quality of life. Because many patients have numerous concurrent symptoms during their clinical course, their management is complex and consequently it is important to know which symptoms are a direct result of the degenerative lesions of MS. The present article describes all the therapeutic options available for spasticity and its associated pain, paroxystic symptoms, fatigue, genitourinary disorders and sexual dysfunction, tremor, ataxia, gait disorder and cognitive impairment, with special emphasis on novel treatments. The article also defines exacerbations, how to recognize them and the available treatments, mainly oral administration of high-dose methylprednisolone and plasmapheresis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Memory and learning disturbances in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izquierdo, Guillermo; Mir, Jordi; Gonzalez, Manuel; Martinez-Parra, Carlos; Campoy, Francisco Jr

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) were studied. They underwent neuropsychological testing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI findings at different brain areas levels were compared with the neuropsychological findings. A quantitative system was used to measure MRI-MS lesions. In this series, a positive correlation was established between memory and learning disturbances measured by Battery 144, and the lesions measured by MRI (total, hemispheric and , particularly, periventricular lesions). MRI can detect MS lesions, and this study shows that a correlation between MRI and neuropsychological findings is possible if quantitative methods are used to distinguish different MS involvement areas in relation to neuropsychological tasks. These findings suggest that hemispheric lesions in MS produce cognitive disturbances and MRI could be a useful tool in predicting memory and learning impairment. (author). 20 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  17. High Intensity Exercise in Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wens, Inez; Dalgas, Ulrik; Vandenabeele, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low-to-moderate intensity exercise improves muscle contractile properties and endurance capacity in multiple sclerosis (MS). The impact of high intensity exercise remains unknown. Methods Thirty-four MS patients were randomized into a sedentary control group (SED, n = 11) and 2...... exercise groups that performed 12 weeks of a high intensity interval (HITR, n = 12) or high intensity continuous cardiovascular training (HCTR, n = 11), both in combination with resistance training. M.vastus lateralis fiber cross sectional area (CSA) and proportion, knee-flexor/extensor strength, body...... composition, maximal endurance capacity and self-reported physical activity levels were assessed before and after 12 weeks. Results Compared to SED, 12 weeks of high intensity exercise increased mean fiber CSA (HITR: +21±7%, HCTR: +23±5%). Furthermore, fiber type I CSA increased in HCTR (+29±6%), whereas type...

  18. Neuropsychology in Multiple Sclerosis: A literature review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodneys Mauricio Jiménez Morales

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that is characterized by demyelination and degeneration. The objective of this article is to offer a review of the latest scientific discoveries in the field of neuropsychology in ME. A description is presented of the most frequent neuropsychological manifestations and their probable association with other factors such as: school level, fatigue, disability, cerebral dysfunction, time and clinical form of evolution, as well as depression and other states of mind starting from recent evidences in the scientific community. Also addressed is the development of tests and valid sensitive neuropsychological sets to evaluate cognitive functions. The use of sensitive and specific test facilitates the evaluation of neuropsychological alterations associated to ME, besides other socio-demographic and clinical-evaluative factors to contemplate in the exploration.

  19. Benefits of Exercise Training in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motl, Robert W; Sandroff, Brian M

    2015-09-01

    Exercise training represents a behavioral approach for safely managing many of the functional, symptomatic, and quality of life consequences of multiple sclerosis (MS). This topical review paper summarizes evidence from literature reviews and meta-analyses, supplemented by recent individual studies, indicating that exercise training can yield small but important improvements in walking, balance, cognition, fatigue, depression, and quality of life in MS. The paper highlights limitations of research on exercise training and its consequences and future research directions and provides an overview for promotion of exercise training in MS based on recent prescriptive guidelines. Collectively, the evidence for the benefits of exercise training in MS suggests that the time is ripe for the promotion of exercise by healthcare providers, particularly neurologists as a central part of the clinical care and management of MS patients.

  20. Allergies, antibiotics use, and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jinma; Ni, Huijuan; Kim, Minchul; Cooley, Kimberly L; Valenzuela, Reuben M; Asche, Carl V

    2017-08-01

    The associations between allergies, antibiotics use, and multiple sclerosis (MS) remain controversial and their mediating or moderating effects have not yet been examined. We aimed to assess the direct and indirect influences of allergies and antibiotics use on MS development, and their interactions. A 1:3 matched case-control study was performed using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey database from 2006 to 2013 in the USA. Multiple sclerosis was identified based on the ICD-9 code (340.0) in any position. Cases were matched to their controls based on survey year, age, gender, race, payer type, region, and tobacco use. Allergy diseases and antibiotics prescriptions were extracted by ICD-9 code and drug classification code, respectively. Both generalized structural equation model and MacArthur approach were used to examine their intrinsic relationships. The weighted prevalence of MS was 133.7 per 100,000 visits. A total of 829 MS patients and 2441 controls were matched. Both respiratory tract allergies (OR = 0.29, 95% CI: 0.18, 0.49) and other allergies (OR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.19, 0.77) were associated with a reduction of the risk of MS. Patients with respiratory tract allergies were more likely to use penicillin (OR = 8.73, 95% CI: 4.12, 18.53) and other antibiotics (OR = 3.77, 95% CI: 2.72, 5.21), and those with other allergies had a higher likelihood of penicillin use (OR = 4.15, 95% CI: 1.27, 13.54); however, the link between antibiotics use and MS was not confirmed although penicillin use might mediate the relationship between allergies and MS. The findings supported allergy as a protective factor for MS development. We also suggest antibiotics use might not be a suitable indicator of bacterial infection to investigate the cause of MS.

  1. Total lymphoid irradiation for multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devereux, C.K.; Vidaver, R.; Hafstein, M.P.; Zito, G.; Troiano, R.; Dowling, P.C.; Cook, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Although chemical immunosuppression has been shown to benefit patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), it appears that chemotherapy has an appreciable oncogenic potential in patients with multiple sclerosis. Accordingly, we developed a modified total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) regimen designed to reduce toxicity and applied it to a randomized double blind trial of TLI or sham irradiation in MS. Standard TLI regimens were modified to reduce dose to 1,980 rad, lowering the superior mantle margin to midway between the thyroid cartilage and angle of the mandible (to avert xerostomia) and the lower margin of the mantle field to the inferior margin of L1 (to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity by dividing abdominal radiation between mantle and inverted Y), limiting spinal cord dose to 1,000 rad by custom-made spine blocks in the mantle and upper 2 cm of inverted Y fields, and also protecting the left kidney even if part of the spleen were shielded. Clinical efficacy was documented by the less frequent functional scale deterioration of 20 TLI treated patients with chronic progressive MS compared to to 20 sham-irradiated progressive MS patients after 12 months (16% versus 55%, p less than 0.03), 18 months (28% versus 63%, p less than 0.03), and 24 months (44% versus 74%, N.S.). Therapeutic benefit during 3 years follow-up was related to the reduction in lymphocyte count 3 months post-irradiation (p less than 0.02). Toxicity was generally mild and transient, with no instance of xerostomia, pericarditis, herpes zoster, or need to terminate treatment in TLI patients. However, menopause was induced in 2 patients and staphylococcal pneumonia in one

  2. Recurrent myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis: a case report of a child with Schilder's variant of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, M.J.; Coleman, L.T.

    2000-01-01

    Myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis (MDS, Schilder's disease) is a rare CNS demyelinating disorder affecting mainly children and usually presenting as an intracranial mass lesion. We report the first case of recurrent intracranial MDS where the third episode of demyelination involved the cervical spinal cord. This may represent a subset of the disease, which should be considered as Schilder's variant (childhood form) of multiple sclerosis. (orig.)

  3. Neuraxial anesthesia in patients with multiple sclerosis - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmar Bornemann-Cimenti

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Current guidelines for neuraxial analgesia in patients with multiple sclerosis are ambiguous and offer the clinician only a limited basis for decision making. This systematic review examines the number of cases in which multiple sclerosis has been exacerbated after central neuraxial analgesia in order to rationally evaluate the safety of these procedures. Methods: A systematic literature search with the keywords "anesthesia or analgesia" and "epidural, peridural, caudal, spinal, subarachnoid or intrathecal" in combination with "multiple sclerosis" was performed in the databases PubMed and Embase, looking for clinical data on the effect of central neuraxial analgesia on the course of multiple sclerosis. Results and conclusions: Over a period of 65 years, our search resulted in 37 reports with a total of 231 patients. In 10 patients multiple sclerosis was worsened and nine multiple sclerosis or neuromyelitis optica was first diagnosed in a timely context with central neuraxial analgesia. None of the cases showed a clear relation between cause and effect. Current clinical evidence does not support the theory that central neuraxial analgesia negatively affects the course of multiple sclerosis.

  4. Gut microbiota in multiple sclerosis: possible influence of immunomodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarel, Brandi L; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Chehoud, Christel; Kuczynski, Justin; DeSantis, Todd Z; Warrington, Janet; Venkatesan, Arun; Fraser, Claire M; Mowry, Ellen M

    2015-06-01

    Differences in gut bacteria have been described in several autoimmune disorders. In this exploratory pilot study, we compared gut bacteria in patients with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls and evaluated the influence of glatiramer acetate and vitamin D treatment on the microbiota. Subjects were otherwise healthy white women with or without relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who were vitamin D insufficient. Patients with multiple sclerosis were untreated or were receiving glatiramer acetate. Subjects collected stool at baseline and after 90 days of vitamin D3 (5000 IU/d) supplementation. The abundance of operational taxonomic units was evaluated by hybridization of 16S rRNA to a DNA microarray. While there was overlap of gut bacterial communities, the abundance of some operational taxonomic units, including Faecalibacterium, was lower in patients with multiple sclerosis. Glatiramer acetate-treated patients with multiple sclerosis showed differences in community composition compared with untreated subjects, including Bacteroidaceae, Faecalibacterium, Ruminococcus, Lactobacillaceae, Clostridium, and other Clostridiales. Compared with the other groups, untreated patients with multiple sclerosis had an increase in the Akkermansia, Faecalibacterium, and Coprococcus genera after vitamin D supplementation. While overall bacterial communities were similar, specific operational taxonomic units differed between healthy controls and patients with multiple sclerosis. Glatiramer acetate and vitamin D supplementation were associated with differences or changes in the microbiota. This study was exploratory, and larger studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results.

  5. The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry. History, data collection and validity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch-Henriksen, N; Rasmussen, S; Stenager, E

    2001-01-01

    The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry was formally established in 1956 but started operating in 1949 with a nationwide prevalence survey. Since then, the Registry has continued collecting data on new and old cases of multiple sclerosis (MS) or suspected MS from multiple sources. The Registry...... instrument for monitoring incidence and prevalence, analysing survival, performing genetic analysis, providing unselected patient samples for clinical analyses, performing case-control studies and prospective studies and estimating the need for treatment and care....

  6. Symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection and multiple sclerosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Martyn, C N; Cruddas, M; Compston, D A

    1993-01-01

    In a case-control study of 214 patients with multiple sclerosis, recall of infectious mononucleosis in subjects seropositive for Epstein-Barr viral capsid antigen was associated with a relative risk of 2.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 7.2). Those who reported having infectious mononucleosis before the age of 18 years had a relative risk of multiple sclerosis of 7.9 (95% CI 1.7 to 37.9). The pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis may involve an age-dependent host response to Epstein-Barr virus infection.

  7. Bone Health in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vit Zikan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a gait disorder characterized by acute episodes of neurological defects leading to progressive disability. Patients with MS have multiple risk factors for osteoporotic fractures, such as progressive immobilization, long-term glucocorticoids (GCs treatment or vitamin D deficiency. The duration of motor disability appears to be a major contributor to the reduction of bone strength. The long term immobilization causes a marked imbalance between bone formation and resorption with depressed bone formation and a marked disruption of mechanosensory network of tightly connected osteocytes due to increase of osteocyte apoptosis. Patients with higher level of disability have also higher risk of falls that combined with a bone loss increases the frequency of bone fractures. There are currently no recommendations how to best prevent and treat osteoporosis in patients with MS. However, devastating effect of immobilization on the skeleton in patients with MS underscores the importance of adequate mechanical stimuli for maintaining the bone structure and its mechanical competence. The physical as well as pharmacological interventions which can counteract the bone remodeling imbalance, particularly osteocyte apoptosis, will be promising for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in patients with MS.

  8. Multiple sclerosis and positive lyme serology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Lana-Peixoto

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available As Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB may clinically mimick multiple sclerosis (MS the presence of antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi in serum of patients with a MS-like disease in non-edemic areas for Lyme disease may be troublesome. We report the case of a 45-year-old white female with the diagnosis of relapsing/ remitting form of MS due to a 15-year history of optic neuritis and recurrent episodes of motor and sensation disturbance in the upper right limb and in both lower extremites associated with bladder dysfunction. A magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed multiple high intensity periventricular white matter lesions. The patient had been exposed to ticks but did not recall the presence of erythema migrans. ELISA for Lyme disease was positive in two different laboratories and the positive serology was confirmed by Western blotting. No convincing reponse followed treatment with ceftriaxone. Although it is clear that the patient had been infect by Borrelia burgdorferi the relationship of this spirochetal infection with the neurological disease could not be ascertained.

  9. Comorbidity in US patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards NC

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Natalie C Edwards,1 Michael Munsell,2 Joseph Menzin,2 Amy L Phillips3 1Health Services Consulting Corporation (NCE, Boxborough, MA, USA; 2Boston Health Economics, Inc., Waltham, MA, USA; 3EMD Serono, Inc., Rockland, MA, USA Objective: To assess the trends in the prevalence of comorbidities in US patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, and the association of demographic characteristics with the presence of comorbidities. Study design: A retrospective analysis was conducted from a sample of 5 million patients from the IMS Health Real World Data Adjudicated Claims – US database.Methods: Comorbidity in patients with MS was assessed by year (2006–2014, and logistic regression models evaluated the association of age, sex, and region with select comorbidities.Results: The most common comorbidities from 2006 to 2014 were hyperlipidemia and hypertension (25.9%–29.7% of patients within an individual year, followed by gastrointestinal disease (18.4%–21.2% of patients and thyroid disease (12.9%–17.1% of patients. The proportion with a claim for hyperlipidemia increased from 2006 to 2009, was stable from 2009 to 2011, and then declined from 2011 to 2014. The proportion with a claim for hypertension generally increased from 2006 to 2013, then declined from 2013 to 2014. The proportion with a claim for gastrointestinal disease, thyroid disease, and anxiety generally increased from 2006 to 2014. Claims for comorbidities were statistically significantly more likely among older age groups (p<0.05, with the exception of anxiety and alcohol abuse, which were statistically significantly less likely among older age groups. Claims for gastrointestinal disease (OR=0.75, thyroid disease (OR=0.36, chronic lung disease (OR=0.76, arthritis (OR=0.71, anxiety (OR=0.63, and depression (OR=0.69 were statistically significantly less likely among males versus females (all p<0.05. Claims for hyperlipidemia (OR=1.39, hypertension (OR=1.25, diabetes (OR=1.31, and alcohol

  10. The interaction between smoking and HLA genes in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedström, Anna Karin; Katsoulis, Michail; Hössjer, Ola

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between environment and genetics may contribute to multiple sclerosis (MS) development. We investigated whether the previously observed interaction between smoking and HLA genotype in the Swedish population could be replicated, refined and extended to include other populations. We us...

  11. Persistence of Immunopathological and Radiological Traits in Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenig, Fatima B.; Wildemann, Brigitte; Nessler, Stefan; Zhou, Dun; Hemmer, Bernhard; Metz, Imke; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Brueck, Wolfgang

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. The identification of 4 different immunopathological subtypes of MS raises the question of whether these subtypes represent different patient subgroups that can be distinguished according to

  12. Direct and indirect economic consequences of multiple sclerosis in Ireland

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fogarty, Emer

    2014-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has significant financial consequences for healthcare systems, individual patients and households, and the wider society. This study examines the distribution of MS costs and resource utilisation across cost categories and from various perspectives, as MS disability increases.

  13. Grey matter damage in multiple sclerosis A pathology perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, R.; de Vries, H.E.; Schenk, G.J.; Geurts, J.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, immunohistochemical studies have provided compelling evidence that gray matter (GM) pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) is extensive. Until recently, this GM pathology was difficult to visualize using standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI ) techniques. However, with newly

  14. The Practice of Sport in Multiple Sclerosis: Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donze, Cecile; Massot, Caroline; Hautecoeur, Patrick; Cattoir-Vue, Helene; Guyot, Marc-Alexandre

    The practice of sport by multiple sclerosis patients has long been controversial. Recent studies, however, show that both sport and physical activity are essential for these patients. Indeed, they help to cope with the effects of multiple sclerosis, such as fatigue, reduced endurance, loss of muscle mass, and reduction of muscle strength. The beneficial effects of physical activity on these patients have been underlined in several studies, whereas those of practicing sport have been the subject of fewer evaluations and assessments. The aim of this update is to report on the effects of sport on multiple sclerosis patients. The benefits of sport have been demonstrated in several studies. It helps multiple sclerosis patients to increase their balance, resistance to fatigue, mobility and quality of life. Several biases in these studies do not enable us to recommend the practice of some of these sports on a routine basis.

  15. Fibronectin aggregation in multiple sclerosis lesions impairs remyelination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, J.M.J.; de Jonge, J.C.; Stancic, M.; Nomden, A.; van Strien, M.E.; Ma, D.; Siskova, Z.; Maier, O.; Ffrench-Constant, C.; Franklin, R.J.M.; Hoekstra, D.; Zhao, C.; Baron, W.

    2013-01-01

    Remyelination following central nervous system demyelination is essential to prevent axon degeneration. However, remyelination ultimately fails in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. This failure of remyelination is likely mediated by many factors, including changes in the

  16. Fibronectin aggregation in multiple sclerosis lesions impairs remyelination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Josephine M. J.; de Jonge, Jenny C.; Stancic, Mirjana; Nomden, Anita; van Strien, Miriam E.; Ma, Dan; Siskova, Zuzana; Maier, Olaf; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Franklin, Robin J. M.; Hoekstra, Dick; Zhao, Chao; Baron, Wia

    Remyelination following central nervous system demyelination is essential to prevent axon degeneration. However, remyelination ultimately fails in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. This failure of remyelination is likely mediated by many factors, including changes in the

  17. Nausea, Vomiting and Diarrhea: An Unusual Presentation of Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Szilagyi

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of a young woman who presented with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea is outlined; the etiology turned out to be a first attack of multiple sclerosis. Plausible mechanisms are discussed.

  18. The effect of exercise therapy on fatigue in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A; Stenager, E; Dalgas, U

    2011-01-01

    Fatigue occurs in the majority of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and therapeutic possibilities are few. Exercise therapy is a therapeutic option but no studies have systematically reviewed the existing literature evaluating the effect of exercise therapy on MS fatigue.......Fatigue occurs in the majority of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and therapeutic possibilities are few. Exercise therapy is a therapeutic option but no studies have systematically reviewed the existing literature evaluating the effect of exercise therapy on MS fatigue....

  19. Rasch analysis of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29)

    OpenAIRE

    Ramp, Melina; Khan, Fary; Misajon, Rose Anne; Pallant, Julie F

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a degenerative neurological disease that causes impairments, including spasticity, pain, fatigue, and bladder dysfunction, which negatively impact on quality of life. The Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) is a disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument, developed using the patient's perspective on disease impact. It consists of two subscales assessing the physical (MSIS-29-PHYS) and psychological (MSIS-29-PSYCH) im...

  20. Serum total antioxidant capacity in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almira Hadžović-Džuvo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS. It is characterized by loss of myelin, the fatty tissue that surrounds and protects nerve fibres allowing them to conduct electrical impulses. Recent data indicate that oxidative stress (OS plays a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS. The aim of this study was to estimate level of serum total antioxidative capacity in patients with multiple sclerosis. Our cross-sectional study included 33 patients with MS and 24 age and sex matched control subjects. All our patients had a Poser criteria for definite diagnostic categories of multiple sclerosis. Serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC was measured by quantitative colorimetric determination, using Total antioxidant Capacity-QuantiCromAntioxidant Assay Kit (BioAssay systems, USA; DTAC-100. Mean serum TAC in multiple sclerosis group of patients was 119.2 mM Trolox equivalents and was significantly lower (p<0.001 compared to the control group of subjects (167.1 mM Trolox equivalents. Our results showed that oxidative stress plays an important role in pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. This finding, also, suggests the importance of antioxidants in diet and therapy of MS patients.

  1. Acute form of multiple sclerosis in a child simulation encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niagolova, S.; Karapasheva, V.; Nikolova, M.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered the most common demyelinating process involving the CNS. Although usually considered an adult disease multiple sclerosis can begin to manifest during childhood. The clinical presentation of the disease in early childhood can range from paraesthesias to dramatic presentations, suggesting diffuse encephalopathy with cerebral oedema, meningismus and impaired consciousness. Multiple sclerosis is usually characterized by a typical relapsing-remitting clinical course. But there are acute, clinically fulminant forms with atypical. neurologic symptoms and death in months. MRI has become increasingly relevant in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis in the past years. Yet, the specificity is limited. Atypical forms of MS and other diseases of CNS may show similar patterns on MRI. We report a case of 7 years old boy with clinically fulminant Marburg type of multiple sclerosis that ended with death in two months. The patient was a diagnostic problem despite the certain degree of clinical and radiological suspicion. The postmortem diagnosis is based on pathomorphologic changes (gross pathologic and microscopic features) in CNS.The present case is of clinical, radiological and pathomorphologic interest because of its early onset in childhood, unusual clinical course and acute progression. Awareness of the MRI features of multiple sclerosis and MS-variants (subtypes) may help in such atypical presentations in childhood. (authors)

  2. Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Maria Begoña; Santos, Maria João; Machado, Jorge; Gonçalves, Arminda Manuela; Greten, Henry Johannes

    2017-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.

  3. Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis: Genes, Environment, and a Comprehensive Therapeutic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappa, Ryan; Theroux, Liana; Brenton, J Nicholas

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric multiple sclerosis is an increasingly recognized and studied disorder that accounts for 3% to 10% of all patients with multiple sclerosis. The risk for pediatric multiple sclerosis is thought to reflect a complex interplay between environmental and genetic risk factors. Environmental exposures, including sunlight (ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D levels), infections (Epstein-Barr virus), passive smoking, and obesity, have been identified as potential risk factors in youth. Genetic predisposition contributes to the risk of multiple sclerosis, and the major histocompatibility complex on chromosome 6 makes the single largest contribution to susceptibility to multiple sclerosis. With the use of large-scale genome-wide association studies, other non-major histocompatibility complex alleles have been identified as independent risk factors for the disease. The bridge between environment and genes likely lies in the study of epigenetic processes, which are environmentally-influenced mechanisms through which gene expression may be modified. This article will review these topics to provide a framework for discussion of a comprehensive approach to counseling and ultimately treating the pediatric patient with multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pure spinal multiple sclerosis: A possible novel entity within the multiple sclerosis disease spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schee, Jie Ping; Viswanathan, Shanthi

    2018-05-01

    We identified five female patients retrospectively with relapsing short-segment partial myelitis whose clinical and paraclinical features were suggestive of cord involvement of multiple sclerosis (MS)-type albeit not rigidly fulfilling the 2017 McDonald criteria. Notably, these patients had not developed any typical MS-like brain lesions despite repeated neuroimaging assessments over years. Comprehensive work-up for differential diagnoses of MS and other causes of transverse myelitis particularly neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders had been consistently negative on longitudinal follow-up. Thus, we postulate a possible entity of pure spinal MS which may represent a novel forme fruste within the MS disease spectrum.

  5. [Pegylation and interferons in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Centonze

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pegylation is a procedure used for drug development since the 1970s and consists of the conjugation of a polyethylene glycol molecule (PEG to a drug. PEG has shown to be safe and effective in improving the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of drugs. Recently, a 20 kDa linear chain of PEG was conjugated to interferon beta-1a with the aim to offer a new treatment option to relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS patients. Due to a prolonged bioavailability, this new drug can be administered less frequently (every two weeks than the other interferons beta available, thus allowing to hypothesize a better adherence to the treatment, which, in turn, should result in better clinical and economic outcomes. A phase III clinical trial has proven its effectiveness compared to placebo in RRMS patients, as well as a safety profile comparable to that found in other interferon beta preparations. The immunogenicity of this new molecule is < 1%, thus minimizing the suppression or reduction of interferon beta biological activity that could come from the development of Neutralizing Antibodies (NAbs. [Article in Italian

  6. Cognitive dysfunction in pediatric multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suppiej A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Agnese Suppiej,1 Elisa Cainelli1,2 1Child Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Pediatric University Hospital, Padua, Italy; 2Lifespan Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory (LCNL, Department of General Psychology, University of Padua, Italy Abstract: Cognitive and neuropsychological impairments are well documented in adult ­multiple sclerosis (MS. Research has only recently focused on cognitive disabilities in pediatric cases, highlighting some differences between pediatric and adult cases. Impairments in several functions have been reported in children, particularly in relation to attention, processing speed, visual–motor skills, and language. Language seems to be particularly vulnerable in pediatric MS, unlike in adults in whom it is usually preserved. Deficits in executive functions, which are considered MS-specific in adults, have been inconsistently reported in children. In children, as compared to adults, the relationship between cognitive dysfunctions and the two other main symptoms of MS, fatigue and psychiatric disorders, was poorly explored. Furthermore, data on the correlations of cognitive impairments with clinical and neuroimaging features are scarce in children, and the results are often incongruent; interestingly, involvement of corpus callosum and reduced thalamic volume differentiated patients identified as having a cognitive impairment from those without a cognitive impairment. Further studies about pediatric MS are needed in order to better understand the impact of the disease on brain development and the resulting effect on cognitive functions, particularly with respect to different therapeutic strategies. Keywords: central nervous system, child, deficit, IQ, inflammatory demyelination, neuropsychological

  7. Phototest for neurocognitive screening in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Joana; Lopes, Emanuela; Gonçalves, Gerly; Silva, Ângela; Carnero-Pardo; Peixoto, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common neurological disorders. Cognitive dysfunction is considered a clinical marker of MS, where approximately half of patients with MS have cognitive impairment. Objective: The Phototest (PT) is a brief cognitive test with high diagnostic sensitivity, accuracy and cost-effectiveness for detecting cognitive deterioration. Our aim was to test the utility of the PT as a neurocognitive screening instrument for MS. Methods: The study enrolled 30 patients with different types of MS from an outpatient clinic as well as 19 healthy participants. In conjunction with the PT, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Barthel Index (BI), Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), and Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) were administered. Results: The MS group obtained significantly lower results on all domains of the PT, except for the naming task. The PT showed good concurrent validity with the MoCA. In direct comparison to the MoCA, PT showed a greater area under the curve and higher levels of sensitivity and specificity for MS neurocognitive impairments. A cut-off score of 31 on the Phototest was associated with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 76.7%. Conclusion : The PT is a valid, specific, sensitive and brief test that is not dependent on motor functions. The instrument could be an option for neurocognitive screening in MS, especially in identifying cases for further neuropsychological assessment and intervention. PMID:29213425

  8. Emerging drugs for primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Ram Narendra; Forsthuber, Thomas; Stüve, Olaf

    2018-04-24

    The identification of effective therapies for progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) has remains a priority and challenge for the global MS community. Despite a few proposed mechanisms, a more complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of these MS phenotypes, animal models that incorporate these pathogenic characteristics, novel trial designs, drug repurposing strategies, and new models of collaboration between clinical and basic science personnel may be required in identifying effective therapies. Areas covered: Here, we review the current knowledge on putative pathogenic mechanisms in primary progressive MS (PPMS). Also, the rationale and outcomes of key phase II or III trial initiatives in PPMS are summarized. Future perspectives are outlined. Expert opinion: The recent approval of ocrelizumab is a major milestone forward in the therapy of PPMS. One reason for success of this drug is appropriate patient selection. The ultimate goal in PPMS therapy should be the reversal of disability, and the arrest of disease progression. Our current understanding of PPMS suggests that a combination of immune-modulatory, myelin-restorative, and neuro-regenerative therapies particularly early in the disease course would be a reasonable strategy. Finally, selection of appropriate patients, selection of appropriate outcomes and monitoring therapy is again crucial for success of therapeutic strategies.

  9. Magnetic resonance tomography in confirmed multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlenbrock, D.; Dickmann, E.; Beyer, H.K.; Gehlen, W.; Josef-Hospital, Bochum; Knappschafts-Krankenhaus Bochum

    1985-01-01

    The authors report on 21 cases of confirmed multiple sclerosis examined by both CT and magnetic resonance tomography. To safeguard the results, strict criteria were applied in accordance with the suggestions made by neurological work teams. Pathological lesons were seen in 20 patients; the MR image did not reveal anything abnormal in one case. On the average, 10.3 lesions were seen in the MR tomogram, whereas CT images showed on the average only 2.1 foci. The size and number of lesions in the MR tomogram were independent of the duration of the disease, the presented clinical symptoms, or the type of treatment at the time of examination. Evidently the sensitivity of MR tomography is very high in MS patients, but it has not yet been clarified to what extent this applies also to the specificity. Further research is mandatory. First experiences made by us show that lesions of a similar kind can also occur in diseases such as malignant lymphoma involving the brain, in vitamin B 12 deficiency syndrome, or encephalitis, and can become manifest in the MR tomogram. (orig.) [de

  10. Attributional Style and Depression in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Several etiologic theories have been proposed to explain depression in the general population. Studying these models and modifying them for use in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population may allow us to better understand depression in MS. According to the reformulated learned helplessness (LH) theory, individuals who attribute negative events to internal, stable, and global causes are more vulnerable to depression. This study differentiated attributional style that was or was not related to MS in 52 patients with MS to test the LH theory in this population and to determine possible differences between illness-related and non-illness-related attributions. Patients were administered measures of attributional style, daily stressors, disability, and depressive symptoms. Participants were more likely to list non-MS-related than MS-related causes of negative events on the Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ), and more-disabled participants listed significantly more MS-related causes than did less-disabled individuals. Non-MS-related attributional style correlated with stress and depressive symptoms, but MS-related attributional style did not correlate with disability or depressive symptoms. Stress mediated the effect of non-MS-related attributional style on depressive symptoms. These results suggest that, although attributional style appears to be an important construct in MS, it does not seem to be related directly to depressive symptoms; rather, it is related to more perceived stress, which in turn is related to increased depressive symptoms. PMID:24453767

  11. Cognitive impairment in relapsing remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saška Roškar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to identify changes in cognitive abilities that affect patients with relapsing remitting form of multiple sclerosis (MS and to find out which instrument manifests them best. The performance of MS patients was compared to a matched group of healthy people using three neuropsychological tests: Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST, Stroop color and word test and Trail making test (TMT part B. Results on all three tests indicate general cognitive impairments in the group of patients. Compared to the group of healthy people patients with MS exhibited impaired ability of abstract reasoning (WCST, impaired cognitive flexibility and less resistance to irrelevant stimuli (Stroop color and word test, slowed information processing and impaired ability of shifting attention from one symbol to another (TMT. The largest differences between groups occured in Stroop color and word test as well as in TMT. The estimation of cognitive abilities of MS patients is of high importance and sistematicaly observing of changes in those abilities should be considered.

  12. Activation of Necroptosis in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitry Ofengeim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS, a common neurodegenerative disease of the CNS, is characterized by the loss of oligodendrocytes and demyelination. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine implicated in MS, can activate necroptosis, a necrotic cell death pathway regulated by RIPK1 and RIPK3 under caspase-8-deficient conditions. Here, we demonstrate defective caspase-8 activation, as well as activation of RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL, the hallmark mediators of necroptosis, in the cortical lesions of human MS pathological samples. Furthermore, we show that MS pathological samples are characterized by an increased insoluble proteome in common with other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and Huntington’s disease (HD. Finally, we show that necroptosis mediates oligodendrocyte degeneration induced by TNF-α and that inhibition of RIPK1 protects against oligodendrocyte cell death in two animal models of MS and in culture. Our findings demonstrate that necroptosis is involved in MS and suggest that targeting RIPK1 may represent a therapeutic strategy for MS.

  13. A toolbox for multiple sclerosis lesion segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roura, Eloy; Oliver, Arnau; Valverde, Sergi; Llado, Xavier [University of Girona, Computer Vision and Robotics Group, Girona (Spain); Cabezas, Mariano; Pareto, Deborah; Rovira, Alex [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Dept. of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Magnetic Resonance Center, Girona (Spain); Ramio-Torrenta, Lluis [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Institut d' Investigacio Biomedica de Girona, Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Unit, Girona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Lesion segmentation plays an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up of multiple sclerosis (MS). This task is very time-consuming and subject to intra- and inter-rater variability. In this paper, we present a new tool for automated MS lesion segmentation using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Our approach is based on two main steps, initial brain tissue segmentation according to the gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) performed in T1w images, followed by a second step where the lesions are segmented as outliers to the normal apparent GM brain tissue on the FLAIR image. The tool has been validated using data from more than 100 MS patients acquired with different scanners and at different magnetic field strengths. Quantitative evaluation provided a better performance in terms of precision while maintaining similar results on sensitivity and Dice similarity measures compared with those of other approaches. Our tool is implemented as a publicly available SPM8/12 extension that can be used by both the medical and research communities. (orig.)

  14. B Cells and Autoantibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Katrin Pröbstel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While over the past decades T cells have been considered key players in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS, it has only recently become evident that B cells have a major contributing role. Our understanding of the role of B cells has evolved substantially following the clinical success of B cell-targeting therapies and increasing experimental evidence for significant B cell involvement. Rather than mere antibody-producing cells, it is becoming clear that they are team players with the capacity to prime and regulate T cells, and function both as pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. However, despite tremendous efforts, the target antigen(s of B cells in MS have yet to be identified. The first part of this review summarizes the clinical evidence and results from animal studies pointing to the relevance of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS. The second part gives an overview of the currently known potential autoantigen targets. The third part recapitulates and critically appraises the currently available B cell-directed therapies.

  15. Pattern Recognition of the Multiple Sclerosis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Renee; Healey, Kathleen M.

    2017-01-01

    During recent decades, the autoimmune disease neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), once broadly classified under the umbrella of multiple sclerosis (MS), has been extended to include autoimmune inflammatory conditions of the central nervous system (CNS), which are now diagnosable with serum serological tests. These antibody-mediated inflammatory diseases of the CNS share a clinical presentation to MS. A number of practical learning points emerge in this review, which is geared toward the pattern recognition of optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, brainstem/cerebellar and hemispheric tumefactive demyelinating lesion (TDL)-associated MS, aquaporin-4-antibody and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-antibody NMOSD, overlap syndrome, and some yet-to-be-defined/classified demyelinating disease, all unspecifically labeled under MS syndrome. The goal of this review is to increase clinicians’ awareness of the clinical nuances of the autoimmune conditions for MS and NMSOD, and to highlight highly suggestive patterns of clinical, paraclinical or imaging presentations in order to improve differentiation. With overlay in clinical manifestations between MS and NMOSD, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, orbits and spinal cord, serology, and most importantly, high index of suspicion based on pattern recognition, will help lead to the final diagnosis. PMID:29064441

  16. Symptom overlap in anxiety and multiple sclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Donnchadha, Seán

    2013-02-14

    BACKGROUND: The validity of self-rated anxiety inventories in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) is unclear. However, the appropriateness of self-reported depression scales has been widely examined. Given somatic symptom overlap between depression and MS, research emphasises caution when using such scales. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates symptom overlap between anxiety and MS in a group of 33 individuals with MS, using the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). METHODS: Participants underwent a neurological examination and completed the BAI. RESULTS: A novel procedure using hierarchical cluster analysis revealed three distinct symptom clusters. Cluster one (\\'wobbliness\\' and \\'unsteady\\') grouped separately from all other BAI items. These symptoms are well-recognised MS-related symptoms and we question whether their endorsement in pwMS can be considered to reflect anxiety. A modified 19-item BAI (mBAI) was created which excludes cluster one items. This removal reduced the number of MS participants considered \\'anxious\\' by 21.21% (low threshold) and altered the level of anxiety severity for a further 27.27%. CONCLUSION: Based on these data, it is suggested that, as with depression measures, researchers and clinicians should exercise caution when using brief screening measures for anxiety in pwMS.

  17. A toolbox for multiple sclerosis lesion segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roura, Eloy; Oliver, Arnau; Valverde, Sergi; Llado, Xavier; Cabezas, Mariano; Pareto, Deborah; Rovira, Alex; Vilanova, Joan C.; Ramio-Torrenta, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Lesion segmentation plays an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up of multiple sclerosis (MS). This task is very time-consuming and subject to intra- and inter-rater variability. In this paper, we present a new tool for automated MS lesion segmentation using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Our approach is based on two main steps, initial brain tissue segmentation according to the gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) performed in T1w images, followed by a second step where the lesions are segmented as outliers to the normal apparent GM brain tissue on the FLAIR image. The tool has been validated using data from more than 100 MS patients acquired with different scanners and at different magnetic field strengths. Quantitative evaluation provided a better performance in terms of precision while maintaining similar results on sensitivity and Dice similarity measures compared with those of other approaches. Our tool is implemented as a publicly available SPM8/12 extension that can be used by both the medical and research communities. (orig.)

  18. Effects of Sport Climbing on Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Steimer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS with different types of disease courses (relapsing-remitting, secondary-progressive, primary progressive that leads to physical as well as mental disability. The symptoms comprise paresis or/and paralysis, ataxia, bladder dysfunction, visual problems as well as effects on cognition. There is limited data regarding the possible effects of sport climbing respectively therapeutic climbing on patients with MS. Sport climbing offers many potentially beneficial effects for patients with MS since there are effects on coordination, muscular strength, and cognition to name the most relevant ones. Also, disease models in rodents point toward such positive outcomes of climbing. Therefore, we assessed the currently available research literature on general effects of physical exercise, impact of climbing on body and mind and therapeutic climbing for prevention or therapy for the treatment of MS. The sparse published controlled trials that investigated this sport activity on different groups of patients with neurological or geriatric diseases grossly differ in study design and outcome parameters. Nevertheless, it appears that climbing offers the opportunity to improve some of the symptoms of patients with MS and can contribute to an enhanced quality of life.

  19. Multiple sclerosis in India: Iceberg or volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Insha; Haq, Ehtishamul

    2017-06-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) 1 is a chronic neurodegenerative disease involving destruction of the myelin sheath around axons of the brain, spinal cord and optic nerve. There has been a tremendous transformation in its perspective across globe. In recent years, its prevalence has changed dramatically worldwide and India is no exception. Initially, MS was believed to be more common in the Caucasians of Northern Europe and United States; however, it has been found to be present in Indian subcontinent as well. There has been a considerable shift in MS prevalence in India and this has really changed the notion of considering India as a low risk zone for MS. In this review, a concise overview and latest update on changing scenario of MS in India is presented along with some major challenges regarding it persisting across globe even today. In India, remarkable upsurge is needed in carrying out large scale population-based epidemiological studies to get an idea about the true incidence and prevalence rates of MS viz a viz disease burden. Through this review, we have probably tried to identify the actual picture of MS prevalence in India and this could serve as harbinger for upcoming research and at the same time it would definitely aid in working out future strategies for MS management in the country. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Multiple sclerosis in Kashmir: Where we stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Insha; Haq, Ehtishamul; Asimi, Ravouf

    2017-02-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disabling neurological disorder commonly diagnosed in young adults. Its causes still remain inexplicable and presently it can only be managed by different drug treatments. There has been a remarkable shift in MS perspective across world. One of its peculiar attribute is unstable (changing) prevalence rate across different parts of the world. Earlier MS was believed to be less prevalent in India, however, there has been growing evidence suggesting its increasing prevalence which has changed its perspective from being less prevalent to more prevalent. There is a complete lack of data on the prevalence rate and epidemiological basis of MS in Kashmir Valley of India. By and large MS research in this region seems to be hampered due to lack of proper research infrastructure, absence of MS registry, inadequate funding and more importantly by absence of active local and foreign collaborations between scientists and clinicians. This review tries to raise some key issues encountered while conducting MS research in Kashmir and at the same time highlighting the measures to be adopted for carrying out a large scale molecular epidemiological study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Epidemiology of Multiple Sclerosis in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhofer-Polanyi, Sabine; Cetin, Hakan; Leutmezer, Fritz; Baumgartner, Anna; Blechinger, Stephan; Dal-Bianco, Assunta; Altmann, Patrick; Bajer-Kornek, Barbara; Rommer, Paulus; Guger, Michael; Leitner-Bohn, Doris; Reichardt, Berthold; Alasti, Farideh; Temsch, Wilhelm; Stamm, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    To assess the incidence rate and prevalence ratio of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Austria. Hospital discharge diagnosis and MS-specific immunomodulatory treatment prescriptions from public health insurances, covering 98% of Austrian citizens with health insurance were used to extrapolate incidence and prevalence numbers based on the capture-recapture method. A total of 1,392,629 medication prescriptions and 40,956 hospitalizations were extracted from 2 data sources, leading to a total of 13,205 patients. The incidence rate and prevalence ratio of MS in Austria based on the capture-recapture method were 19.5/100,000 person-years (95% CI 14.3-24.7) and 158.9/100,000 (95% CI 141.2-175.9), respectively. Female to male ratio was 1.6 for incidence and 2.2 for prevalence. Incidence rates and prevalence ratios of MS in our study are within the upper range of comparable studies across many European countries as well as the United States. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Progression of regional grey matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, Razvan V; Young, Alexandra L; Firth, Nicholas C; Jorge Cardoso, M; Tur, Carmen; De Angelis, Floriana; Cawley, Niamh; Brownlee, Wallace J; De Stefano, Nicola; Laura Stromillo, M; Battaglini, Marco; Ruggieri, Serena; Gasperini, Claudio; Filippi, Massimo; Rocca, Maria A; Rovira, Alex; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Vrenken, Hugo; Wottschel, Viktor; Leurs, Cyra E; Uitdehaag, Bernard; Pirpamer, Lukas; Enzinger, Christian; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A; Chard, Declan; Thompson, Alan J; Barkhof, Frederik; Alexander, Daniel C; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2018-01-01

    Abstract See Stankoff and Louapre (doi:10.1093/brain/awy114) for a scientific commentary on this article. Grey matter atrophy is present from the earliest stages of multiple sclerosis, but its temporal ordering is poorly understood. We aimed to determine the sequence in which grey matter regions become atrophic in multiple sclerosis and its association with disability accumulation. In this longitudinal study, we included 1417 subjects: 253 with clinically isolated syndrome, 708 with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, 128 with secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis, 125 with primary-progressive multiple sclerosis, and 203 healthy control subjects from seven European centres. Subjects underwent repeated MRI (total number of scans 3604); the mean follow-up for patients was 2.41 years (standard deviation = 1.97). Disability was scored using the Expanded Disability Status Scale. We calculated the volume of brain grey matter regions and brainstem using an unbiased within-subject template and used an established data-driven event-based model to determine the sequence of occurrence of atrophy and its uncertainty. We assigned each subject to a specific event-based model stage, based on the number of their atrophic regions. Linear mixed-effects models were used to explore associations between the rate of increase in event-based model stages, and T2 lesion load, disease-modifying treatments, comorbidity, disease duration and disability accumulation. The first regions to become atrophic in patients with clinically isolated syndrome and relapse-onset multiple sclerosis were the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus, followed by the middle cingulate cortex, brainstem and thalamus. A similar sequence of atrophy was detected in primary-progressive multiple sclerosis with the involvement of the thalamus, cuneus, precuneus, and pallidum, followed by the brainstem and posterior cingulate cortex. The cerebellum, caudate and putamen showed early atrophy in relapse

  3. Progression of regional grey matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshaghi, Arman; Marinescu, Razvan V; Young, Alexandra L; Firth, Nicholas C; Prados, Ferran; Jorge Cardoso, M; Tur, Carmen; De Angelis, Floriana; Cawley, Niamh; Brownlee, Wallace J; De Stefano, Nicola; Laura Stromillo, M; Battaglini, Marco; Ruggieri, Serena; Gasperini, Claudio; Filippi, Massimo; Rocca, Maria A; Rovira, Alex; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Vrenken, Hugo; Wottschel, Viktor; Leurs, Cyra E; Uitdehaag, Bernard; Pirpamer, Lukas; Enzinger, Christian; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A; Chard, Declan; Thompson, Alan J; Barkhof, Frederik; Alexander, Daniel C; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2018-06-01

    See Stankoff and Louapre (doi:10.1093/brain/awy114) for a scientific commentary on this article.Grey matter atrophy is present from the earliest stages of multiple sclerosis, but its temporal ordering is poorly understood. We aimed to determine the sequence in which grey matter regions become atrophic in multiple sclerosis and its association with disability accumulation. In this longitudinal study, we included 1417 subjects: 253 with clinically isolated syndrome, 708 with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, 128 with secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis, 125 with primary-progressive multiple sclerosis, and 203 healthy control subjects from seven European centres. Subjects underwent repeated MRI (total number of scans 3604); the mean follow-up for patients was 2.41 years (standard deviation = 1.97). Disability was scored using the Expanded Disability Status Scale. We calculated the volume of brain grey matter regions and brainstem using an unbiased within-subject template and used an established data-driven event-based model to determine the sequence of occurrence of atrophy and its uncertainty. We assigned each subject to a specific event-based model stage, based on the number of their atrophic regions. Linear mixed-effects models were used to explore associations between the rate of increase in event-based model stages, and T2 lesion load, disease-modifying treatments, comorbidity, disease duration and disability accumulation. The first regions to become atrophic in patients with clinically isolated syndrome and relapse-onset multiple sclerosis were the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus, followed by the middle cingulate cortex, brainstem and thalamus. A similar sequence of atrophy was detected in primary-progressive multiple sclerosis with the involvement of the thalamus, cuneus, precuneus, and pallidum, followed by the brainstem and posterior cingulate cortex. The cerebellum, caudate and putamen showed early atrophy in relapse-onset multiple

  4. Predictors of vision impairment in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Dalmau, Bernardo; Martinez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Pulido-Valdeolivas, Irene; Zubizarreta, Irati; Llufriu, Sara; Blanco, Yolanda; Sola-Valls, Nuria; Sepulveda, Maria; Guerrero, Ana; Alba, Salut; Andorra, Magi; Camos, Anna; Sanchez-Vela, Laura; Alfonso, Veronica; Saiz, Albert; Villoslada, Pablo

    2018-01-01

    Visual impairment significantly alters the quality of life of people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The objective of this study was to identify predictors (independent variables) of visual outcomes, and to define their relationship with neurological disability and retinal atrophy when assessed by optical coherence tomography (OCT). We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 119 consecutive patients with MS, assessing vision using high contrast visual acuity (LogMar), 2.5% and 1.25% low contrast visual acuity (Sloan charts), and color vision (Hardy-Rand-Rittler plates). Quality of vision is a patient reported outcome based on an individual's unique perception of his or her vision and was assessed with the Visual Functioning Questionnaire-25 (VFQ-25) with the 10 neuro-ophthalmologic items. MS disability was assessed using the expanded disability status scale (EDSS), the MS functional composite (MSFC) and the brief repetitive battery-neuropsychology (BRB-N). Retinal atrophy was assessed using spectral domain OCT, measuring the thickness of the peripapillar retinal nerve fiber layer (pRNFL) and the volume of the ganglion cell plus inner plexiform layer (GCIPL). The vision of patients with MS was impaired, particularly in eyes with prior optic neuritis. Retinal atrophy (pRNFL and GCIPL) was closely associated with impaired low contrast vision and color vision, whereas the volume of the GCIPL showed a trend (p = 0.092) to be associated with quality of vision. Multiple regression analysis revealed that EDSS was an explanatory variable for high contrast vision after stepwise analysis, GCIPL volume for low contrast vision, and GCIPL volume and EDSS for color vision. The explanatory variables for quality of vision were high contrast vision and color vision. In summary, quality of vision in MS depends on the impairment of high contrast visual acuity and color vision due to the disease.

  5. Frontal parenchymal atrophy measures in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Laura; Zivadinov, Robert; Grop, Attilio; Zorzon, Marino

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether, in a cross-sectional study, the normalized measures of whole and regional brain atrophy correlate better with tests assessing the cognitive function than the absolute brain atrophy measures. The neuropsychological performances and disability have been assessed in 39 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). T1- and T2-lesion load (LL) of total brain and frontal lobes (FLs) were measured using a reproducible semiautomated technique. The whole brain volume and the regional brain parenchymal volume (RBPV) of FLs were obtained using a computerized interactive program, which incorporates semiautomated and automated segmentation processes. Normalized measures of brain atrophy, i.e., brain parenchymal fraction (BPF) and regional brain parenchymal fraction (RBPF) of FLs, were calculated. The scan-rescan, inter- and intrarater coefficient of variation (COV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) have been estimated. The RBPF of FLs showed an acceptable level of reproducibility which ranged from 1.7% for intrarater variability to 3.2% for scan-rescan variability. The mean ICC was 0.88 (CI 0.82-0.93). The RBPF of FLs demonstrated stronger magnitudes of correlation with neuropsychological functioning, disability and quantitative MRI lesion measures than RBPV. These differences were statistically significant: PColor Word Interference test, Pcognitive functions, whereas BPAV did not. The correlation analysis results were supported by the results of multiple regression analysis which showed that only the normalized brain atrophy measures were associated with tests exploring the cognitive functions. These data suggest that RBPF is a reproducible and sensitive method for measuring frontal parenchymal atrophy. The normalized measures of whole and regional brain parenchymal atrophy should be preferred to absolute measures in future studies that correlate neuropsychological performances and brain atrophy measures

  6. SUMMIT (Serially Unified Multicenter Multiple Sclerosis Investigation): creating a repository of deeply phenotyped contemporary multiple sclerosis cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Riley; Chitnis, Tanuja; Cree, Bruce Ac; Tintoré, Mar; Naegelin, Yvonne; Uitdehaag, Bernard Mj; Kappos, Ludwig; Khoury, Samia J; Montalban, Xavier; Hauser, Stephen L; Weiner, Howard L

    2017-08-01

    There is a pressing need for robust longitudinal cohort studies in the modern treatment era of multiple sclerosis. Build a multiple sclerosis (MS) cohort repository to capture the variability of disability accumulation, as well as provide the depth of characterization (clinical, radiologic, genetic, biospecimens) required to adequately model and ultimately predict a patient's course. Serially Unified Multicenter Multiple Sclerosis Investigation (SUMMIT) is an international multi-center, prospectively enrolled cohort with over a decade of comprehensive follow-up on more than 1000 patients from two large North American academic MS Centers (Brigham and Women's Hospital (Comprehensive Longitudinal Investigation of Multiple Sclerosis at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (CLIMB; BWH)) and University of California, San Francisco (Expression/genomics, Proteomics, Imaging, and Clinical (EPIC))). It is bringing online more than 2500 patients from additional international MS Centers (Basel (Universitätsspital Basel (UHB)), VU University Medical Center MS Center Amsterdam (MSCA), Multiple Sclerosis Center of Catalonia-Vall d'Hebron Hospital (Barcelona clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) cohort), and American University of Beirut Medical Center (AUBMC-Multiple Sclerosis Interdisciplinary Research (AMIR)). We provide evidence for harmonization of two of the initial cohorts in terms of the characterization of demographics, disease, and treatment-related variables; demonstrate several proof-of-principle analyses examining genetic and radiologic predictors of disease progression; and discuss the steps involved in expanding SUMMIT into a repository accessible to the broader scientific community.

  7. Primary progressive multiple sclerosis in the Polish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Brola

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was the epidemiological analysis and evaluation of selected clinical and sociodemographic factors in Polish patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Methods: The study included patients from 7 provinces in central and eastern Poland registered in the Registry of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis on 31 December 2016. The incidence of various forms of the disease was compared, and clinical, demographic and social disparities between relapsing-remitting and primary progressive multiple sclerosis were analysed. Results: Of 3,199 registered patients, 2,188 persons (66.2% had the relapsing-remitting form of multiple sclerosis, 774 (24.2% had the secondary progressive type and 307 (9.6% suffered from primary progressive disease. The first symptoms of primary progressive multiple sclerosis appeared almost 10 years later than in patients with the relapsing-remitting type (39.2 ± 11.4 vs. 29.8 ± 9.8. The period from the first symptoms to diagnosis was more than twice as long in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (5.8 ± 3.4 as in those with relapsing-remitting disease (2.4 ± 1.6. The average degree of disability in the Expanded Disability Status Scale was similar and amounted to 3.2 ± 2.1 for relapsing-remitting and 3.6 ± 2.4 for primary progressive multiple sclerosis. The relapsing-remitting form was observed more often in women (2.4:1, and the primary progressive form appeared with equal frequency in both sexes (1:1. Disease-modifying treatment was received by 34% of patients with relapsing-remitting and in only 1.9% of patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Conclusions: The primary progressive form affects approximately 10% of Polish patients with multiple sclerosis. The first symptoms appear at about 40 years of age with equal frequency in both sexes, and its diagnosis takes more than twice as much time as in the case of relapsing-remitting multiple

  8. Early detection of multiple sclerosis: MR findings during the initial manifestations of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoerner, W.; Baum, K.; Henkes, H.; Girke, W.; Felix, R.; Klinikum Rudolf Virchow, Berlin

    1988-01-01

    The MR results in 21 patients showing the initial manifestations of multiple sclerosis (MS) were compared with those in 45 patients with a long history of MS. As in the old cases, MR proved a very sensitive technique during the early manifestations, with abnormal findings in 20 out of 21 patients. The relatively characteristic MR findings in long-standing MS (predominant peri-ventricular involvement with a relatively typical pattern) was seen in the early stages is only rare cases. The value of MR during the initial manifestations of MS is in cases where the clinical findings are not conclusive and laboratory diagnosis (evoked potentials, CSF findings) are indefinite. In these patients the finding of multiple lesions in the brain can confirm the suspected diagnosis of MS. (orig.) [de

  9. Informal Caregivers Assisting People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunfeng

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify characteristics of informal caregivers, caregiving, and people with multiple sclerosis (MS) receiving this assistance that are associated with the strength of the care-giver/care recipient relationship. Data were collected in a national survey of informal caregivers and analyzed using an ordered logistic regression model to identify factors associated with caregiver perceptions of the strength of the relationship with the person with MS. The overall health of the person with MS was significantly associated with caregiver perceptions that providing assistance strengthened the caregiver/care recipient relationship, with poor health having a negative impact on the relationship. A spousal relationship between the caregiver and the person with MS was associated with significantly lower perceptions of a strengthened relationship. Conversely, caregiver perceptions that MS symptoms interfered with the independence of the person with MS in daily life were associated with caregiver perceptions of a strengthened relationship. Longer duration of caregiving and more hours per week spent providing assistance also were associated with a stronger relationship. In contrast, we found a significant negative association between caregiver perceptions that assisting the person with MS was burdensome and the strength of the relationship. Similarly, higher levels of education among caregivers tended to have a significantly negative impact on the caregiver/care recipient relationship. Our findings highlight the importance of addressing the needs and concerns of spousal caregivers. Health professionals who treat informal caregivers, as well as those treating people with MS, should be sensitive to the impact caregiving has on caregivers, especially spouses providing assistance. PMID:24453723

  10. Managed care aspects of managing multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Gary M

    2013-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system usually diagnosed in the second or third decade of life; MS is more common among women than men by a ratio of 3 to 1. With its relatively early age of onset and symptoms that impair patients' quality of life, MS requires lifelong, dynamic treatment, and places a substantial economic burden on individuals, healthcare systems, and society. The costs associated with providing benefits for MS therapy are growing rapidly and the increasing complexity of the MS market is impacting disease management for payers. Employers are also increasingly aware of the costs associated with MS and are asking health plans to advise on the most appropriate and cost-effective ways to manage both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies for MS. Health plans, by necessity, must therefore balance appropriate access to treatments for MS with the need to manage rising treatment costs. To meet this goal, payers require population-based solutions, guidelines, and treatment algorithms for the management of MS that can be used in clinical and formulary management decision making in the context of an evolving therapeutic landscape. Further, comparative studies are necessary for payers to determine which agents may work best on a population basis. Due to the current lack of appropriate clinical guidance and insufficient head-to-head data on disease-modifying drugs, strategies for health plans and clinical management have been designed using the best available evidence. Undoubtedly, management of this class will continue to evolve with the launch of newer agents.

  11. Seizure characteristics in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate seizure characteristic among multiple sclerosis patients with coexistent seizure activity compared to control group. Materials and Methods : This study is a cross-sectional study which was conducted by reviewing the clinical records of patients with definite diagnosis of MS according to McDonald′s criteria from March 2007 to June 2011, who referred to the MS clinic of the university. Results : A total of 920 patients with a diagnosis of MS were identified, among whom 29 patients (3.15% with seizure activity (case due to MS with the mean age of 32.6 ± 6.23 years were analyzed. Also, fifty MS patients without any seizure occurrence with the mean age of 33.7 ± 7.4 years were used as our control group. In case group, seizure was general tonic clonic in 23 patients (79.3%, complex partial in four (13.8%, and simple partial in two (5.9%. The 26 available interictal EEGs in MS patients showed abnormal EEG pattern in 22 (84.6% of them, including focal epileptic form discharge or focal slowing in 10 (38.5%, generalized discharge (spike-wave, polyspike, or general paroxysmal fast activity in 10 (38.5%, and general slowing activity in 10 record (38.5%. MRI reviews of the 26 available brain MRIs showed subcortical white mater lesions in 22 (84.6% of patients with seizure. All MRIs were performed within one month after the first seizure episode. Amongst 48 available MRIs in our control group, 91.7% (44 cases showed periventricular lesions and in 8.3% (4 cases subcortical white matter lesions were reported. Conclusion : The result of this study demonstrated the higher rate of subcortical whit matter lesion in MS patients with seizure occurrence compared to control group.

  12. Inflammasome Proteins As Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Keane

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease that affects the brain and spinal cord. The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex that contributes to the innate immune response in animal models of MS as well as in patients with the disease. Important to the care of patients with MS is the need for biomarkers that can predict disease onset, disease exacerbation, as well as response to treatment. In this study, we analyzed serum samples from 32 patients with MS and 120 age-matched controls, and provide receiver operator characteristic (ROC curves with associated confidence intervals following analyses of serum samples from patients with MS, most of which had the relapsing-remitting form of the disease, and from healthy unaffected donors, and determine the sensitivity and specificity of inflammasome proteins as biomarkers of MS. We report that caspase-1 (1.662 ± 0.6024 difference between means, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC (407.5 ± 35.79, and interleukin (IL-18 (78.53 + 17.86 were elevated in the serum of MS patients when compared to controls. Interestingly, the levels of IL-1β (−0.5961 ± 0.265 were lower in the MS cohort. Importantly, the area under the curve (AUC for ASC and caspase-1 were 0.9448 and 0.848, respectively. Taken together, these data suggest that ASC and caspase-1 could be potential candidate biomarkers for MS onset.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was performed in a total of 45 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), comprising 27 with brain symptoms and 18 without it. The results were compared with X-ray computed tomography (CT). Some of the 45 MS patients were also examined by neurophysiological studies for comparison. MRI showed demyelinating plaques of the brain in a total of 31 patients (69%) - 20 symptomatic and 11 asymptomatic patients. For symptomatic patients, MRI was capable of detecting brain lesions in 6 (86%) of 7 acute stage patients and 14 (70%) of 20 non-acute stage patients. It was also capable of detecting brain lesions in 21 (70%) of 30 clinically definite MR patients and 10 (67%) of 15 clinically probable MS patients. Concurrently available X-ray CT revealed brain lesions in 9 symptomatic patients (33%) and one asymptomatic patient (6%). Visual evoked potentials examined in 31 patients showed abnormality in one (11%) of 9 patients without symptoms of optic neuritis and all (100%) of the other 22 patients with symptoms. In 19 evaluable patients, auditory brainstem responses were abnormal in one (11%) of 9 patients without brainstem symptoms and 3 (30%) of 10 patients with symptoms. MRI of the brain was far superior to X-ray CT, visual evoked potentials and auditory brainstem responses in detecting clinically unsuspected lesions. We proposed new diagnostic criteria including MRI findings of the brain in the Japanese MS diagnostic criteria. MRI of the spinal cord was performed in 12 MS patients with spinal cord symptoms by sagittal and coronal images. It demonstrated demyelinating lesions within the cervical and superior thoracic cord in 8 MS acute stage patients. Spinal cord lesions were longitudinally continuous as long as many spinal segments, with swelling in 6 patients and atrophy in 2 patients. MRI of spinal cord was useful in deciding superior and inferior limits of cord lesions and in visualizing cord swelling or atrophy. (Namekawa, K)

  14. Retinal periphlebitis in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenković Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Multiple sclerosis (MS is an immunemediated disorder of the central nervous system (CNS, characterized by inflammation, demyelination and axonal loss. Retinal periphlebitis (RP is often present in MS patients with similar evolution and histopathological changes as MS lesions. The aim of this study was to analyze the presence of RP in MS patients during different clinical phases, and its connection with impairment of blood-brain barrier. Methods. The study included 45 patients (26 females and 19 males with MS. Their average age was 33.2 ± 8.1 years. There were 28 patients with relapsing-remitting (RR form, 7 with primary progresive (PP and 10 with secondary progressive (SP form of MS. There were 27 patients in the relapse and 18 patients in the remission phase. The average MS duration was 7.48 ± 1.3 years. Ophthalmological, neurological and MRI examination were performed in all the patients, as well as cerebrospinal fluid sampling. Albumin ratio and IgG index were calculated in all the patients. Results. There were 9 patients with RP, and 36 without it. MS duration was significantly longer in the RP group. RP was much more common in the progressive form and was not present in the remission phase of MS. Albumin ratio values were increased in the group with RP. IgG index and IgG synthesis according to Tourtellotte formula, were statistically higher in the group of patients with RP. The values of visual evoked potentials (VEP's latency were significantly higher in the group of patients with RP. Conclusion. The presence of RP is a reliable indicator of MS activity and might be considered as a parameter for monitoring the disease activity and effects of the treatment.

  15. Perceived Behavioral Changes in Early Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Souza Lima

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired behavioral changes have essentially been described in advanced multiple sclerosis (MS. The present study was designed to determine whether behavioral modifications specifically related to the MS pathological process could be identified in the initial phase of the disease, as compared to control patients with chronic, relapsing and progressive inflammatory disorders not involving the central nervous system (CNS. Eighty-eight early MS patients (Expanded Disability Status Scale score ≤ 2.5 and 48 controls were tested. Perceived changes by informants in behavioral control, goal-directed behavior, decision making, emotional expression, insight and interpersonal relationships were assessed using the Iowa Scale of Personality Change (ISPC. Executive behavioral disturbances were screened using the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX. The mean change between the premorbid and postmorbid ISPC ratings was similar in the MS [12.2 (SD 15.6] and in the control [11.5 (SD 15.1] group. The perceived behavioral changes (PBCs most frequently reported in both groups were lack of stamina, lability/moodiness, anxiety, vulnerability to stress and irritability. Pathological scores in the DEX were also similar in both groups. Correlations between PBCs and DEX scores were different in MS and control groups. MS patients with cognitive impairment had a marginally higher number of PBCs than control patients (p = 0.056 and a significantly higher DEXp score (p = 0.04. These results suggest that (1 PBCs occurring in early MS patients were not different from those induced by comparable chronic non-CNS disorders, (2 qualitative differences in the relationship between behavioral symptoms and executive-behavioral changes may exist between MS and control groups, and (3 behavioral symptoms seem associated with cognitive deficits in MS. We further plan to assess these observations longitudinally.

  16. Impact of Pilates Exercise in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Whitney R.D.; Andrushko, Justin W.; Renshaw, Doug W.; Chilibeck, Philip D.; Farthing, Jonathan P.; Danielson, Jana

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pilates is a series of exercises based on whole-body movement and may improve mobility in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of Pilates on walking performance in people with MS. Methods: 30 individuals with MS who were not restricted to a wheelchair or scooter (Patient-Determined Disease Steps scale score Pilates (twice weekly) and massage therapy (once weekly) or once-weekly massage therapy only (control group). The Pilates was delivered in a group setting (five to ten participants per session). The primary outcome was change in walking performance (6-Minute Walk Test) after 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included functional ability (Timed Up and Go test), balance (Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale), flexibility (sit and reach test), body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), core endurance (plank-hold test), and muscle strength and voluntary activation (quadriceps). Intention-to-treat analysis was performed using a two-factor repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results: Walking distance increased by a mean (SD) of 52.4 (40.2) m in the Pilates group versus 15.0 (34.1) m in the control group (group × time, P = .01). Mean (SD) time to complete the Timed Up and Go test decreased by 1.5 (2.8) seconds in the Pilates group versus an increase of 0.3 (0.9) seconds in the control group (group × time, P = .03). There were no other significant differences between groups over time. Conclusions: Pilates improved walking performance and functional ability in persons with MS and is a viable exercise option to help manage the disease. PMID:29670495

  17. Societal costs of multiple sclerosis in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Peter; O'Boyle, Derek; Larkin, Aidan; McGuigan, Christopher; O'Rourke, Killian

    2018-05-01

    This paper evaluates the impact of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Ireland, and estimates the associated direct, indirect, and intangible costs to society based on a large nationally representative sample. A questionnaire was developed to capture the demographics, disease characteristics, healthcare use, informal care, employment, and wellbeing. Referencing international studies, standardized survey instruments were included (e.g. CSRI, MFIS-5, EQ-5D) or adapted (EDSS) for inclusion in an online survey platform. Recruitment was directed at people with MS via the MS Society mailing list and social media platforms, as well as in traditional media. The economic costing was primarily conducted using a 'bottom-up' methodology, and national estimates were achieved using 'prevalence-based' extrapolation. A total of 594 people completed the survey in full. The sample had geographic, disease, and demographic characteristics indicating good representativeness. At an individual level, average societal cost was estimated at €47,683; the average annual costs for those with mild, moderate, and severe MS were calculated as €34,942, €57,857, and €100,554, respectively. For a total Irish MS population of 9,000, the total societal costs of MS amounted to €429m. Direct costs accounted for just 30% of the total societal costs, indirect costs amounted to 50% of the total, and intangible or QoL costs represented 20%. The societal cost associated with a relapse in the sample is estimated as €2,438. The findings highlight that up to 70% of the total costs associated with MS are not routinely counted. These "hidden" costs are higher in Ireland than the rest of Europe, due in part to significantly lower levels of workforce participation, a higher likelihood of permanent workforce withdrawal, and higher levels of informal care needs. The relationship between disease progression and costs emphasize the societal importance of managing and slowing the progression of the illness.

  18. Altered thalamic functional connectivity in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yaou; Liang, Peipeng; Duan, Yunyun; Huang, Jing; Ren, Zhuoqiong; Jia, Xiuqin [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Dong, Huiqing; Ye, Jing [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Shi, Fu-Dong [Department of Neurology and Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Butzkueven, Helmut [Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli55@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •We demonstrated decreased connectivity between thalamus and cortical regions in MS. •Increased intra- and inter-thalamic connectivity was also observed in MS. •The increased functional connectivity is attenuated by increasing disease duration. -- Abstract: Objective: To compare thalamic functional connectivity (FC) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls (HC), and correlate these connectivity measures with other MRI and clinical variables. Methods: We employed resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) to examine changes in thalamic connectivity by comparing thirty-five patients with MS and 35 age- and sex-matched HC. Thalamic FC was investigated by correlating low frequency fMRI signal fluctuations in thalamic voxels with voxels in all other brain regions. Additionally thalamic volume fraction (TF), T2 lesion volume (T2LV), EDSS and disease duration were recorded and correlated with the FC changes. Results: MS patients were found to have a significantly lower TF than HC in bilateral thalami. Compared to HC, the MS group showed significantly decreased FC between thalamus and several brain regions including right middle frontal and parahippocampal gyri, and the left inferior parietal lobule. Increased intra- and inter-thalamic FC was observed in the MS group compared to HC. These FC alterations were not correlated with T2LV, thalamic volume or lesions. In the MS group, however, there was a negative correlation between disease duration and inter-thalamic connectivity (r = −0.59, p < 0.001). Conclusion: We demonstrated decreased FC between thalamus and several cortical regions, while increased intra- and inter-thalamic connectivity in MS patients. These complex functional changes reflect impairments and/or adaptations that are independent of T2LV, thalamic volume or presence of thalamic lesions. The negative correlation between disease duration and inter-thalamic connectivity could indicate an adaptive role of thalamus that is

  19. Multiple sclerosis: New insights and trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Mohamed Mohamed Koriem

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most famous autoimmune disease attacking the central nervous system. It attacks people from age 20–50 years old and the females' attacks double than males' attacks. MS is an autoimmune disease affecting principally the central nervous system that cause nerve sheath demyelination followed by axon damage and paralysis. MS symptoms include muscle weakness, weak reflexes, muscle spasm, difficult in move, miss-coordination and unbalance with others. There are many factors may be responsible for MS: microbial, viral, smoking, stress, environmental toxins, contaminated diet, and gout. MS is wide spread in the populations in North Europe and this related to lack of vitamin D due to decrease of sunlight exposure. MS biomarkers include nitric oxide, interleukin-6, nitric oxide synthase, fetuin-A and osteopontin. MS is not a genetic disease where MS occurs when human leukocyte antigen system related genes are changed in chromosome 6. The physiology of MS is monitored by activation of immune-inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress pathways. MS is including two main steps: (1 myelin sheath destruction and formation of lesions and, (2 inflammation. Four types of MS can be distinguished: relapsing-remitting, primary progressive, secondary progressive and progressive relapsing. Nine treatments have been accepted for relapsing-remitting MS type: interferon β-1a, interferon β-1b, mitoxantrone, natalizumab, glatiramer acetate, fingolimod, dimethyl fumarate, teriflunomide, and alemtuzumab, however, the only treatment used is mitoxantrone for progressive MS but many of MS treatments side effects are recorded. Complementary treatments also used in MS treatments such as: vitamin D, Yoga, medicinal plants, oxygen therapy, acupuncture and reflexology.

  20. Multiple sclerosis with predominant, severe cognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staff, Nathan P.; Lucchinetti, Claudia F.; Keegan, B. Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe the characteristics of multiple sclerosis (MS) presenting with severe cognitive impairment as its primary disabling manifestation. Design Retrospective case series. Setting Tertiary referral center. Patients Patients were identified through the Mayo Clinic data retrieval system (1996–2008) with definite MS (McDonald criteria) and severe cognitive impairment as their primary neurological symptom without accompanying significant MS-related impairment or alternative diagnosis for cognitive dysfunction. Twenty-three patients meeting inclusion criteria were compared regarding demographics, clinical course and radiological features. Main Outcome Measures Demographic, clinical, and radiological characteristics of the disease. Results Twelve patients were men. The median age of the first clinical symptom suggestive of CNS demyelination was 33 years, and severe MS-related cognitive impairment developed at a median of 39 years. Cognitive impairment could be dichotomized as subacute fulminant (n=9) or chronic progressive (n=14) in presentation, which corresponded to subsequent relapsing or progressive MS courses. Study patients commonly exhibited psychiatric (65%), mild cerebellar (57%) and cortical symptoms and signs (e.g. seizure, aphasia, apraxia) (39%). Fourteen of 21 (67%), where documented, smoked cigarettes. Brain MRI demonstrated diffuse cerebral atrophy in 16 and gadolinium enhancing lesions in 11. Asymptomatic spinal cord MRI lesions were present in 12 of 16 patients (75%). Immunomodulatory therapies were generally ineffective in improving these patients. Conclusions We describe patients with MS whose clinical phenotype is characterized by severe cognitive dysfunction and prominent cortical and psychiatric signs presenting as a subacute fulminant or chronic progressive clinical course. Cigarette smokers may be over represented in this phenotype. PMID:19752304

  1. Spinal cord normalization in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jiwon; Seigo, Michaela; Saidha, Shiv; Sotirchos, Elias; Zackowski, Kathy; Chen, Min; Prince, Jerry; Diener-West, Marie; Calabresi, Peter A; Reich, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord (SC) pathology is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), and measures of SC-atrophy are increasingly utilized. Normalization reduces biological variation of structural measurements unrelated to disease, but optimal parameters for SC volume (SCV)-normalization remain unclear. Using a variety of normalization factors and clinical measures, we assessed the effect of SCV normalization on detecting group differences and clarifying clinical-radiological correlations in MS. 3T cervical SC-MRI was performed in 133 MS cases and 11 healthy controls (HC). Clinical assessment included expanded disability status scale (EDSS), MS functional composite (MSFC), quantitative hip-flexion strength ("strength"), and vibration sensation threshold ("vibration"). SCV between C3 and C4 was measured and normalized individually by subject height, SC-length, and intracranial volume (ICV). There were group differences in raw-SCV and after normalization by height and length (MS vs. HC; progressive vs. relapsing MS-subtypes, P normalization by length (EDSS:r = -.43; MSFC:r = .33; strength:r = .38; vibration:r = -.40), and height (EDSS:r = -.26; MSFC:r = .28; strength:r = .22; vibration:r = -.29), but diminished with normalization by ICV (EDSS:r = -.23; MSFC:r = -.10; strength:r = .23; vibration:r = -.35). In relapsing MS, normalization by length allowed statistical detection of correlations that were not apparent with raw-SCV. SCV-normalization by length improves the ability to detect group differences, strengthens clinical-radiological correlations, and is particularly relevant in settings of subtle disease-related SC-atrophy in MS. SCV-normalization by length may enhance the clinical utility of measures of SC-atrophy. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  2. Rehabilitation interventions in multiple sclerosis: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Serafin; Khan, Fary; Kesselring, Jürg

    2012-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex, heterogeneous disease associated with long-term disability. Despite the availability of advanced disease-modifying and symptomatic therapies that may decrease activity and progression of disease and alleviate complaints to a certain extent, there is still a need for comprehensive rehabilitation interventions in order to reduce sequels and symptoms of the disease on personal activities and social participation to achieve the highest possible independence and the best quality of life. Timing and setting of rehabilitation interventions should be selected individually depending on disease phase, functional deficits, personal requirements, as well as specific goals. In addition, limitations and disease-specific characteristics that may influence rehabilitation outcome should be noted. Rehabilitation interventions should be considered early for maintaining functional capacity and reducing risk for losing important abilities or independence. Due to gradual failure of adaptive compensatory mechanisms along the course of disease, benefits of rehabilitation interventions are generally higher in earlier phases of MS. Inpatient and outpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation has been shown to be beneficial in improving disability, participation and quality of life despite progression of the disease. Good evidence exists for different specific interventions improving physical and cognitive performance. Other important issues responsible for beneficial effects of comprehensive rehabilitation in MS include education, instruction, and information of patients and caregivers. Comprehensive assessment of health domains in MS patients using standardized framework and common language for describing the impact of disease at different levels, using International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) core sets may increase the knowledge of needs of these patients for more efficient and adapted rehabilitation interventions meeting these

  3. Progressive multiple sclerosis: from pathogenic mechanisms to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correale, Jorge; Gaitán, María I; Ysrraelit, María C; Fiol, Marcela P

    2017-03-01

    During the past decades, better understanding of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis disease mechanisms have led to the development of several disease-modifying therapies, reducing relapse rates and severity, through immune system modulation or suppression. In contrast, current therapeutic options for progressive multiple sclerosis remain comparatively disappointing and challenging. One possible explanation is a lack of understanding of pathogenic mechanisms driving progressive multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, diagnosis is usually retrospective, based on history of gradual neurological worsening with or without occasional relapses, minor remissions or plateaus. In addition, imaging methods as well as biomarkers are not well established. Magnetic resonance imaging studies in progressive multiple sclerosis show decreased blood-brain barrier permeability, probably reflecting compartmentalization of inflammation behind a relatively intact blood-brain barrier. Interestingly, a spectrum of inflammatory cell types infiltrates the leptomeninges during subpial cortical demyelination. Indeed, recent magnetic resonance imaging studies show leptomeningeal contrast enhancement in subjects with progressive multiple sclerosis, possibly representing an in vivo marker of inflammation associated to subpial demyelination. Treatments for progressive disease depend on underlying mechanisms causing central nervous system damage. Immunity sheltered behind an intact blood-brain barrier, energy failure, and membrane channel dysfunction may be key processes in progressive disease. Interfering with these mechanisms may provide neuroprotection and prevent disability progression, while potentially restoring activity and conduction along damaged axons by repairing myelin. Although most previous clinical trials in progressive multiple sclerosis have yielded disappointing results, important lessons have been learnt, improving the design of novel ones. This review discusses mechanisms involved

  4. Association between systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis: lupoid sclerosis; Asociacion de LES y esclerosis multiple: esclerosis lupoide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Yimy F; Martinez, Jose B; Fernandez, Andres R; Quintana, Gerardo; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Rondon, Federico; Gamarra, Antonio Iglesias

    2010-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with/without antiphospholipid syndrome are autoimmune illnesses. It has been described in many occasions the association of these two illnesses and the clinical picture of MS with characteristics of laboratory of SLE. When they affect to the central nervous system they can make it in a defined form for each illness or they can also make it in interposed or combined form of the two illnesses what has been called lupoid sclerosis; making that in some cases difficult the differentiation of the two illnesses and therefore to address the treatment. We present four cases of lupoid sclerosis, discuss the clinical and laboratory characteristics of this entity and we make a differentiation of the multiple sclerosis with the neurological affectation of SLE especially for images and laboratory results.

  5. Fingolimod hydrochloride for the treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Katja; Proschmann, Undine; Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2017-10-01

    Fingolimod was the first oral and the first in class disease modifying treatment in multiple sclerosis that acts as sphingosine-1-phospathe receptor agonist. Since approval in 2010 there is a growing experience with fingolimod use in clinical practice, but also next-generation sphingosin-1-receptor agonists in ongoing clinical trials. Growing evidence demonstrates additional effects beyond impact on lymphocyte circulation, highlighting further promising targets in multiple sclerosis therapy. Areas covered: Here we present a systematic review using PubMed database searching and expert opinion on fingolimod use in clinical practice. Long-term data of initial clinical trials and post-marketing evaluations including long-term efficacy, safety, tolerability and management especially within growing disease modifying treatment options and pre-treatment constellation in multiple sclerosis patients are critically discussed. Furthermore novel findings in mechanism of actions and prospective on additional use in progressive forms in multiple sclerosis are presented. Expert opinion: There is an extensive long-term experience on fingolimod use in clinical practice demonstrating the favorable benefit-risk of this drug. Using a defined risk management approach experienced MS clinicians should apply fingolimod after critical choice of patients and review of clinical aspects. Further studies are essential to discuss additional benefit in progressive forms in multiple sclerosis.

  6. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcer, Laura J.; Miller, David H.; Reingold, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes assessment in clinical practice and therapeutic trials in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25433914

  7. Therapeutic use of sport climbing for patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ožura

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Sport climbing is a form of exercise that requires complex and variable movement. Because of the use of the so-called "top-rope system", this is a safe activity appropriate for individuals with physical disabilities. Therefore, climbing might prove to be an effective form of therapy for patients with multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis is a chronic neurological disease that may include motor and cognitive deficits as well as affective disturbances. The illness is characterized by multifocal areas of brain damage (plaques, as consequence of autoimmune inflammation. Sport climbing might be a potentially useful activity for treating spasticity, improving a person's self image and certain aspects of cognition, such as attention and executive functions, as well as for managing emotional disturbances. All of the above are areas where patients with multiple sclerosis might be in need of assistance. The article also describes the experience of a patient with multiple sclerosis who was enrolled in our climbing program. Future research is needed to evaluate the effect of climbing therapy for patients with multiple sclerosis.

  8. Advances in the management of multiple sclerosis symptoms: pathophysiology and assessment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintoré, Mar

    2015-01-01

    Spasticity is a prevalent and troublesome symptom for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Common instruments to measure MS spasticity include the clinician-rated (modified) Ashworth scale and the patient-rated 0-10 spasticity Numerical Rating Scale (NRS). Current opinion is that measurement of MS spasticity should incorporate the patient's perspective. Other instruments to assess spasticity-associated symptoms such as the Penn spasms frequency scale, sleep quality NRS and pain NRS can assist in tracking MS spasticity evolution and inform management choices. Worsening spasticity reduces patient autonomy, impacts negatively on quality of life and increases health resource utilization and costs. Despite the wide range of issues associated with MS spasticity, undertreatment is common and standard treatment options (physiotherapy and classical oral therapies) often fail to provide adequate symptomatic control.

  9. Treatment for ataxia in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, R J; Yap, L; Young, C A

    2007-01-24

    Disabling tremor or ataxia is common in multiple sclerosis (MS) and up to 80% of patients experience tremor or ataxia at some point during their disease. A variety of treatments are available, ranging from pharmacotherapy or stereotactic neurosurgery to neurorehabilitation. To assess the efficacy and tolerability of both pharmacological and non-pharmacologic treatments of ataxia in patients with MS. The following electronic resources were searched: Cochrane MS Group trials register (June 2006), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2, 2006), National Health Service National Research Register (NRR) including the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Directory (Issue 2, 2006), MEDLINE (January 1996 to June 2006), and EMBASE (Jan 1988 to June 2006). Manual searches of bibliographies of relevant articles, pertinent medical and neurology journals and abstract books of major neurology and MS conferences (2001-2006) were also performed. Direct communication with experts and drug companies was sought. Blinded, randomised trials which were either placebo-controlled or which compared two or more treatments were included. Trials testing pharmacological agents must have had both participant and assessor blinding. Trials testing surgical interventions or effects of physiotherapy, where participants could not have been blinded to the treatment, must have had independent assessors who were blinded to the treatment. Cross-over trials were included. Three independent reviewers extracted data and the findings of the trials were summarised. A meta-analysis was not performed due to the inadequacy of outcome measures and methodological problems with the studies reviewed. Ten randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. Six placebo-controlled studies (pharmacotherapy) and four comparative studies (one stereotactic neurosurgery and three neurorehabilitation) were reviewed. No standardised outcome measures were used across the studies. In

  10. Assessment of patients with multiple sclerosis according to tests of the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anelise Ineu Figueiredo

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC is a scale that evaluates the functional and cognitive aspects of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Objective: To compare the performance of individuals with the relapsing-remitting form of MS (RRMS with a group of healthy subjects using the MSFC. Methods: Twenty subjects were investigated in this study, consisting of 10 patients with clinical diagnosis of RRMS and 10 controls with similar gender and age to the group with the disease. The three tests that comprise the MSFC were used for the evaluation of gait, upper limb motor function and cognition (memory and processing speed. Student's t-test was used to assess data with normal distribution and data with skewed distribution were evaluated using the Mann-Whitney test. Results: The results showed that the patients with RRMS took longer to perform the locomotion test (6.91 ± 2.35 compared to the control group (5.16 ± 1.28. The MS group (22.06 ± 5.44 also showed greater difficulty in performing a task with the dominant upper limb compared to the healthy subjects (17.79 ± 2.96. No statistically significant difference was found between the groups in the performance of cognitive tasks (p = .65. Conclusion: The use of the MSFC tests proved valuable for measuring possible motor and cognitive impairments in patients with RRMS. Thus, it is suggested that this scale is adopted in clinical practice, improving therapies for the treatment of MS patients and thereby providing them a better quality of life.

  11. Dopamine, T cells and multiple sclerosis (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, Mia; Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter that induces critical effects in the nervous system and in many peripheral organs, via 5 dopamine receptors (DRs): D1R-D5R. Dopamine also induces many direct and very potent effects on many DR-expressing immune cells, primarily T cells and dendritic cells. In this review, we focus only on dopamine receptors, effects and production in T cells. Dopamine by itself (at an optimal concentration of~0.1 nM) induces multiple function of resting normal human T cells, among them: T cell adhesion, chemotactic migration, homing, cytokine secretion and others. Interestingly, dopamine activates resting effector T cells (Teffs), but suppresses regulatory T cells (Tregs), and both effects lead eventually to Teff activation. Dopamine-induced effects on T cells are dynamic, context-sensitive and determined by the: T cell activation state, T cell type, DR type, and dopamine concentration. Dopamine itself, and also few dopaminergic molecules/ drugs that are in clinical use for cardiac, neurological and other non-immune indications, have direct effects on human T cells (summarized in this review). These dopaminergic drugs include: dopamine = intropin, L-DOPA, bromocriptine, pramipexole, pergolide, haloperidol, pimozide, and amantadine. Other dopaminergic drugs were not yet tested for their direct effects on T cells. Extensive evidence in multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) show dopaminergic dysregulations in T cells in these diseases: D1-like DRs are decreased in Teffs of MS patients, and dopamine does not affect these cells. In contrast, D1-like DRs are increased in Tregs of MS patients, possibly causing functional Treg impairment in MS. Treatment of MS patients with interferon β (IFN-β) increases D1-like DRs and decreases D2-like DRs in Teffs, decreases D1-like DRs in Tregs, and most important: restores responsiveness of patient's Teffs to dopamine. DR agonists and antagonists confer some benefits in

  12. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balcer, Laura J; Miller, David H; Reingold, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple...... sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique...... of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes...

  13. Infectious mononucleosis and multiple sclerosis - Updated review on associated risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheik-Ali, Sharaf

    2017-05-01

    There has been substantial evidence accumulating on the role of infectious mononucleosis (IM) and the subsequent risk of obtaining Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Up to date studies not previously explored were reviewed by the author to further clarify the association. Medline and Web of Science were searched with no time constraints for articles exploring an association between Multiple Sclerosis and Infectious Mononucleosis. 24 articles were found, totalling 1063 cases and 13,227 cohort/controls. 23/24 (96%) articles reported a significant association of Infectious Mononucleosis on the risk of subsequent multiple sclerosis. Overall, new literature on IM and risk of MS categorically supports the association. Future work should focus on other risk factors such as age and gender on IM and subsequent risk of MS. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-invasive examination of multiple sclerosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weerd, A.W. de.

    1981-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is characterized by a wide range of symptoms and, in many cases, by a highly erratic course. As a result diagnosis is often a problem. Two non-invasive examinations, Computer Tomography (CT scan) and the Evoked Response test (ER), are the subjects of this study which, according to available literature, both can play a role in the establishment of the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Clinical trials have been performed and both methods demonstrated abnormalities of the central nervous system which were not suspected on clinical grounds; as a result both methods of examination can contribute to the early establishment of the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. In addition the diagnosis can be determined with greater certainty when the findings of the CT-scan and the evoked response test are taken into consideration. (Auth.)

  15. Prevalence of multiple sclerosis in Denmark 1950-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Joan; Meulengracht Flachs, Esben; Stenager, Egon

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system of unknown aetiology. Its prevalence varies by ethnicity and place: persons of northern European descent are at increased risk while persons living at lower latitudes appear to be protected against the disease. The Danish...... Multiple Sclerosis Registry is a national registry established in 1956 after a population-based survey which receives information from numerous sources. It is considered to be more than 90% complete, with a validity of 94%. Using data from the Registry, we calculated prevalences per 100,000 inhabitants....... The standardized prevalence of multiple sclerosis increased from 58.8 (95% confidence interval: 54.9-62.7) in 1950 to 154.5 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval: 148.8-160.2) in 2005, and the female to male ratio increased from 1.31 in 1950 to 2.02 in 2005. The increase in prevalence is due to both increased...

  16. Coping strategies and mood profiles in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysel Milanlioglu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the coping strategies, mood characteristics and the association between these aspects in patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and healthy subjects. Method: Fifty consecutive patients who were diagnosed with multiple sclerosis according to McDonald criteria and thirty-one healthy subjects were included in the study. In addition to the sociodemographic form, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS, Coping Orientation for Problem Experiences Scale (COPE, and Profile of Mood States (POMS tests were applied to the participants. Results: Non-functional coping strategies were significantly higher in the secondary-progressive type (p≤0.05. Depression-dejection, fatigue-inertia and total POMS scores were significantly higher in the secondary-progressive type (p≤0.05. Conclusion: The results of our study demonstrate the importance of rehabilitation programs that encourage exercise among patients with multiple sclerosis to increase vigor-activity levels.

  17. Spinal-cord swelling in acute multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Seiji; Tashiro, Kunio; Naganuma, Mutsuo; Hida, Kazutoshi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Abe, Hiroshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    1986-01-01

    Despite the frequent involvement of the spinal cord by multiple sclerosis, reports concerning neuroradiological findings regarding these lesions have been limited; most of them have demonstrated a normal or small spinal cord. Two cases of acute paraparesis showed evidence of spinal-cord swelling on myelography and CT myelography, initially suggesting the diagnosis of an intramedullary tumor. Spinal-cord swelling was demonstrated more clearly on CT myelography than on conventional myelography. The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis was made with the aid of the CSF findings, the clinical course, and the contracting-cord sign. The ''contracting-cord sign'' means the diminution of the spinal-cord diameter in the chronic stage. Since acute multiple sclerosis may produce spinal-cord swelling simulating a tumor, careful investigations are necessary to avoid unwarranted surgical interventions. (author)

  18. Axonal loss in the multiple sclerosis spinal cord revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Natalia; Carassiti, Daniele; Altmann, Daniel R; Baker, David; Schmierer, Klaus

    2018-05-01

    Preventing chronic disease deterioration is an unmet need in people with multiple sclerosis, where axonal loss is considered a key substrate of disability. Clinically, chronic multiple sclerosis often presents as progressive myelopathy. Spinal cord cross-sectional area (CSA) assessed using MRI predicts increasing disability and has, by inference, been proposed as an indirect index of axonal degeneration. However, the association between CSA and axonal loss, and their correlation with demyelination, have never been systematically investigated using human post mortem tissue. We extensively sampled spinal cords of seven women and six men with multiple sclerosis (mean disease duration= 29 years) and five healthy controls to quantify axonal density and its association with demyelination and CSA. 396 tissue blocks were embedded in paraffin and immuno-stained for myelin basic protein and phosphorylated neurofilaments. Measurements included total CSA, areas of (i) lateral cortico-spinal tracts, (ii) gray matter, (iii) white matter, (iv) demyelination, and the number of axons within the lateral cortico-spinal tracts. Linear mixed models were used to analyze relationships. In multiple sclerosis CSA reduction at cervical, thoracic and lumbar levels ranged between 19 and 24% with white (19-24%) and gray (17-21%) matter atrophy contributing equally across levels. Axonal density in multiple sclerosis was lower by 57-62% across all levels and affected all fibers regardless of diameter. Demyelination affected 24-48% of the gray matter, most extensively at the thoracic level, and 11-13% of the white matter, with no significant differences across levels. Disease duration was associated with reduced axonal density, however not with any area index. Significant association was detected between focal demyelination and decreased axonal density. In conclusion, over nearly 30 years multiple sclerosis reduces axonal density by 60% throughout the spinal cord. Spinal cord cross sectional area

  19. Male factor infertility and risk of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glazer, Clara Helene; Tøttenborg, Sandra Søgaard; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2018-01-01

    and prevalent as well as incident MS. METHOD: Our cohort was established by linkage of the Danish National in vitro fertilization (IVF) registry to The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry and consisted of 51,063 men whose partners had undergone fertility treatment in all public and private fertility clinics......BACKGROUND: Gender, possibly due to the influence of gonadal hormones, is presumed to play a role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), but no studies have evaluated whether male infertility is associated with MS. OBJECTIVE: To study the association between male factor infertility...

  20. Can multiple sclerosis as a cognitive disorder influence patients? dreams?

    OpenAIRE

    Moghadasi, Abdorreza Naser; Owji, Mahsa

    2013-01-01

    Dream should be considered as a kind of cognitive ability that is formed parallel to other cognitive capabilities like language. On the other hand, multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease that can involve different aspects of our cognition. Therefore, MS may influence patients’ dreams. In fact, we do not know what the importance of dream is in MS, but further studies may introduce dream and dreaming as a sign of improvement or progression in MS disease.Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a diseas...

  1. Cesarean section and offspring's risk of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nete M; Bager, Peter; Stenager, Egon

    2013-01-01

    Apart from a recent study reporting a 2- to 3-fold increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) among women and men who were delivered by Cesarean section (C-section), little attention has been given to the possible association between mode of delivery and the risk of MS.......Apart from a recent study reporting a 2- to 3-fold increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) among women and men who were delivered by Cesarean section (C-section), little attention has been given to the possible association between mode of delivery and the risk of MS....

  2. Brain atrophy and lesion load predict long term disability in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popescu, Veronica; Agosta, Federica; Hulst, Hanneke E

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether brain atrophy and lesion volumes predict subsequent 10 year clinical evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS).......To determine whether brain atrophy and lesion volumes predict subsequent 10 year clinical evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS)....

  3. Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Multiple Sclerosis Hope Through Research Past Issues / Spring 2012 Table ... that television journalist Neil Cavuto was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) more than 15 years ago. And that ...

  4. Self reported stressful life events and exacerbations in multiple sclerosis: prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Buljevac (Dragan); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); W. Reedeker; A.C.J.W. Janssens (Cécile); F.G.A. van der Meché (Frans); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); R.Q. Hintzen (Rogier)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To study the relation between self reported stressful life events not related to multiple sclerosis and the occurrence of exacerbations in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DESIGN: Longitudinal, prospective cohort study. SETTING: Outpatient clinic of

  5. Effect of 12-Week Pilates Trainning on EDSS in Women Suffering fromMultiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Z Shanazari; SM Marandi; S Samie

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background & aim: Multiple sclerosis is a debilitating disease that strikes the immune system. Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease which debilitates the nervous system. The study was evaluated the effects of Pilates exercise on women with physical disabilities suffering from multiple sclerosis for 12 weeks .The aim of this study was to investigating the effects of Pilates trainning on EDSS of women suffering from Multiple Sclerosis (MS) for 12 weeks. Methods: In the pres...

  6. Cognitive-Linguistic Deficit and Speech Intelligibility in Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Green, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis is a disabling neurological disease with varied symptoms, including dysarthria and cognitive and linguistic impairments. Association between dysarthria and cognitive-linguistic deficit has not been explored in clinical multiple sclerosis studies. Aims: In patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis, the…

  7. Poor sleep quality in patients with multiple sclerosis : gender differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitkova, Marianna; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Gdovinova, Zuzana; Szilasiova, Jarmila; Mikula, Pavol; Groothoff, Johan W.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Most of the psychological and physical factors associated with poor sleep quality in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have a different prevalence in women and men, but whether or not these factors contribute differently to sleep quality in women and men with MS remains unclear. The

  8. Guideline for the diagnosis and management of multiple sclerosis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) represents a particular MS subgroup with unique diagnostic challenges. Due to the narrow window of environmental exposures and clinical disease expression, children with MS may represent an important study population for gaining a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the ...

  9. Multiple sclerosis in South Africa | Modi | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since there are no well-documented epidemiological studies on multiple sclerosis (MS) in South Africa, we devised a questionnaire to determine qualitative data. Responses were obtained from 430 patients: 91% had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, 64% had lumbar punctures and 49% had evoked potentials to ...

  10. The experiences of individuals with Multiple Sclerosis in the Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating and degenerative lifelong neurological disease that seems to be growing increasingly more prevalent in South Africa. Objectives: The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the personal experiences of individuals with MS in the South African context. The focus of this ...

  11. Statistical Analysis of Questionnaire on Physical Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martinková, Patrícia; Řasová, K.

    -, č. 3 (2010), S340 ISSN 1210-7859. [Obnovené neuroimunologickjé a likvorologické dny. 21.05.2010-22.05.2010, Praha] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : questionnaire * physical rehabilitation * multiple sclerosis Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  12. Neurofibromatosis type 1 and multiple sclerosis: Genetically related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder with involvement of both the cutaneous and nervous systems. Patients are susceptible to neurological complication in the form of tumors of the brain and spinal cord. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects the myelinated axons ...

  13. Natalizumab plus interferon beta-1a for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudick, R.A.; Stuart, W.H.; Calabresi, P.A.; Confavreux, C.; Galetta, S.L.; Radue, E.W.; Lublin, F.D.; Weinstock-Guttman, B.; Wynn, D.R.; Lynn, F.; Panzara, M.A.; Sandrock, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interferon beta is used to modify the course of relapsing multiple sclerosis. Despite interferon beta therapy, many patients have relapses. Natalizumab, an alpha4 integrin antagonist, appeared to be safe and effective alone and when added to interferon beta-1a in preliminary studies.

  14. Activation of endogenous neural stem cells for multiple sclerosis therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michailidou, I.; de Vries, H.E.; Hol, E.M.; van Strien, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system, leading to severe neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens, consist of immunomodulatory agents aiming to reduce the rate of relapses. However, these agents are usually insufficient to treat chronic

  15. Intensity ratio to improve black hole assessment in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adusumilli, Gautam; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Sun, Peng; Lancia, Samantha; Viox, Jeffrey D; Wen, Jie; Naismith, Robert T; Cross, Anne H

    2018-01-01

    Improved imaging methods are critical to assess neurodegeneration and remyelination in multiple sclerosis. Chronic hypointensities observed on T1-weighted brain MRI, "persistent black holes," reflect severe focal tissue damage. Present measures consist of determining persistent black holes numbers and volumes, but do not quantitate severity of individual lesions. Develop a method to differentiate black and gray holes and estimate the severity of individual multiple sclerosis lesions using standard magnetic resonance imaging. 38 multiple sclerosis patients contributed images. Intensities of lesions on T1-weighted scans were assessed relative to cerebrospinal fluid intensity using commercial software. Magnetization transfer imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and clinical testing were performed to assess associations with T1w intensity-based measures. Intensity-based assessments of T1w hypointensities were reproducible and achieved > 90% concordance with expert rater determinations of "black" and "gray" holes. Intensity ratio values correlated with magnetization transfer ratios (R = 0.473) and diffusion tensor imaging metrics (R values ranging from 0.283 to -0.531) that have been associated with demyelination and axon loss. Intensity ratio values incorporated into T1w hypointensity volumes correlated with clinical measures of cognition. This method of determining the degree of hypointensity within multiple sclerosis lesions can add information to conventional imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. MtDNA T4216C variation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andalib, Sasan; Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Yousefzadeh-Chabok, Shahrokh

    2016-01-01

    MtDNA T4216C variation has frequently been investigated in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients; nonetheless, controversy has existed about the evidence of association of this variation with susceptibility to MS. The present systematic review and meta-analysis converge the results of the preceding pu...

  17. Cognitive Implications of Deep Gray Matter Iron in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, E; Kmech, J A; Cobzas, D; Sun, H; Seres, P; Blevins, G; Wilman, A H

    2017-05-01

    Deep gray matter iron accumulation is increasingly recognized in association with multiple sclerosis and can be measured in vivo with MR imaging. The cognitive implications of this pathology are not well-understood, especially vis-à-vis deep gray matter atrophy. Our aim was to investigate the relationships between cognition and deep gray matter iron in MS by using 2 MR imaging-based iron-susceptibility measures. Forty patients with multiple sclerosis (relapsing-remitting, n = 16; progressive, n = 24) and 27 healthy controls were imaged at 4.7T by using the transverse relaxation rate and quantitative susceptibility mapping. The transverse relaxation rate and quantitative susceptibility mapping values and volumes (atrophy) of the caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and thalamus were determined by multiatlas segmentation. Cognition was assessed with the Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests. Relationships between cognition and deep gray matter iron were examined by hierarchic regressions. Compared with controls, patients showed reduced memory ( P processing speed ( P = .02) and smaller putamen ( P deep gray matter iron accumulation in the current multiple sclerosis cohort. Atrophy and iron accumulation in deep gray matter both have negative but separable relationships to cognition in multiple sclerosis. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  18. A dam for retrograde axonal degeneration in multiple sclerosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, L.J.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Steenwijk, M.D.; Daams, M.; Tewarie, P.; Killestein, J.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Polman, C.H.; Petzold, A.F.S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Trans-synaptic axonal degeneration is a mechanism by which neurodegeneration can spread from a sick to a healthy neuron in the central nervous system. This study investigated to what extent trans-synaptic axonal degeneration takes place within the visual pathway in multiple sclerosis

  19. Association of autoimmune hepatitis and multiple sclerosis: a coincidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Sofia Mendes Oliveira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic liver inflammation resulting from deregulation of immune tolerance mechanisms. Multiple sclerosis is also an inflammatory disease in which the insulating covers of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are damaged. Here we present a case of an 18 year old female with multiple sclerosis was treated with glatiramer acetate and with interferon beta 1a at our hospital. Seven months after initiating treatment, liver dysfunction occurred. Clinical and laboratory findings were suggestive of drug-induced hepatitis, which led to discontinuation of treatment with interferon. Facing a new episode of acute hepatitis one year later, she was subjected to a liver biopsy, and the analysis of autoantibodies was positive for smooth muscle antibodies. Given the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis she started therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine, with good clinical and analytical response. Besides, the demyelinating lesions of multiple sclerosis became lower. In conclusion, there are only a few cases that describe the association of autoimmune hepatitis with multiple sclerosis, and there is a chance both diseases have the same autoimmune inflammatory origin.

  20. Socioeconomic Factors in Childhood and the Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, N. M.; Jorgensen, K. T.; Bager, P.

    2013-01-01

    In a national cohort comprising 1.5 million Danes born from 1966 to 1992, we studied the association between childhood socioeconomic status (SES) and the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) from 1981 to 2007 using information about household income and parental educational levels at the persons 15th ...

  1. Plasma lipid peroxidation and progression of disability in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, M.; Mostert, J.; Arutjunyan, A. V.; Stepanov, M.; Teelken, A.; Heersema, D.; De Keyser, J.

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS), but its relation to disease progression is uncertain. To evaluate the relationship of plasma lipid peroxidation with progression of disability in MS, we measured blood plasma fluorescent lipid peroxidation

  2. Selective association of multiple sclerosis with infectious mononucleosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaadstra, B.M.; Chorus, A.M.J.; Buuren, S. van; Kalsbeek, H.; Noort, J.M. van

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested an association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and infectious mononucleosis (IM) but data on the exact strength of this association or its selectivity have been conflicting. In this study we have evaluated the association between MS and a variety of common childhood

  3. Progress in the diagnosis and treatment of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-fang HOU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The growing number of disease modifying drugs (DMDs approved for multiple sclerosis (MS treatment is a significant step forward and provides new options for MS patients. This article summarizes the clinical research highlights of MS, including clinical manifestations, accessory examinations, diagnostic criteria and progress of treatment. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.10.004

  4. The role of the cerebellum in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weier, Katrin; Banwell, Brenda; Cerasa, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), cerebellar signs and symptoms as well as cognitive dysfunction are frequent and contribute to clinical disability with only poor response to symptomatic treatment. The current consensus paper highlights the broad range of clinical signs and symptoms of MS patients, which...

  5. Multiple sclerosis following treatment with a cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, B. W.; Killestein, J.; Mathus-Vliegen, E. M. H.; Polman, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    Laboratory research including animal models of human disease suggests that cannabinoids might have therapeutic potential in multiple sclerosis (MS). We have recently seen a 46-year-old woman who developed MS after starting treatment with a cannabinoid receptor antagonist for obesity. The occurrence

  6. The risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peeters, P J H L; Bazelier, M T; Uitdehaag, B M J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), disability and autoinflammatory processes may result in an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of VTE associated with MS. METHODS: We conducted an observational-cohort study within the Clinical Practice...

  7. MR imaging of multiple sclerosis in the cervical cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakudo, Miyuki; Takemoto, Kazumasa; Inoue, Yuichi; Onoyama, Yasuto; Nishimura, Masataka; Fujita, Masayuki.

    1987-01-01

    This is a case of a 34-year-old woman with multiple sclerosis (MS) in whom an enlarged cervical spinal cord with long T 1 and T 2 relaxation times was demonstrated on MR images. This report seems to be the first description of MR imaging of MS with an enlarged spinal cord. (author)

  8. Recognition of Epstein-Barr Virus in Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.P. van Nierop (Gijs)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractMultiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. Symptoms of MS include cognitive, motoric, sensory and visual impairment, pain and fatigue. The genetic background of the host and infection with the herpesvirus family member Epstein-Barr virus

  9. Epstein-Barr virus and disease activity in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Buljevac (Dragan); H.Z. Flach (Zwenneke); J. Groen (Jan); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); F.G.A. van der Meché (Frans); R.Q. Hintzen (Rogier); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.J.J. van Doornum (Gerard)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To study in relapsing-remitting (RR) multiple sclerosis (MS) whether exacerbations and brain activity as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are associated with plasma levels of anti-Epstein Barr (EBV) antibodies and EBV DNA. METHODS: This was a prospective study

  10. Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids in multiple sclerosis patients and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with increased dietary intake of saturated fatty acids. For many years it has been suspected that this disease might be associated with an imbalance between unsaturated and saturated fatty acids. We determined erythrocyte membrane fatty acids levels in Hot ...

  11. Clinical Manifestations of Multiple Sclerosis in Taiwanese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-one patients with multiple sclerosis (MS and onset before 18 years were treated over the past 22 years and their records retrospectively analyzed at the National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, and Min-Sheng General Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

  12. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta). METHODS: The CCR5 Delta32 allele and a CCR5 promoter polymorphism associated with cell surface expression of CCR5 were...

  13. Risk of Multiple Sclerosis in Patients with Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Mallbris, Lotus; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis and multiple sclerosis (MS) are inflammatory disorders with similarities in genetic risk variants and inflammatory pathways. Limited evidence is available on the relationship between the two diseases. We therefore investigated the risk of incident (new-onset) MS in patients with mild...

  14. Childhood body mass index and multiple sclerosis risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munger, Kassandra L; Bentzen, Joan; Laursen, Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity in late adolescence has been associated with an increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS); however, it is not known if body size in childhood is associated with MS risk. METHODS: Using a prospective design we examined whether body mass index (BMI) at ages 7-13 years...

  15. Will the real multiple sclerosis please stand up?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stys, P.K.; Zamponi, G.W.; van Minnen, J.; Geurts, J.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered to be an autoimmune, inflammatory disease of the CNS. In most patients, the disease follows a relapsing - remitting course and is characterized by dynamic inflammatory demyelinating lesions in the CNS. Although on the surface MS may appear consistent with a

  16. Modifiable factors influencing relapses and disability in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'hooghe, M. B.; Nagels, G.; Bissay, V.; De Keyser, J.

    A growing body of literature indicates that the natural course of multiple sclerosis can be influenced by a number of factors. Strong evidence suggests that relapses can be triggered by infections, the postpartum period and stressful life events. Vaccinations against influenza, hepatitis B and

  17. Exercise and Quality of Life in Women with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Dietrich, Frederick; Larson, Rebecca; White, Lesley J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate perceptions of quality of life after a 4-month progressive resistance training program for individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). A second purpose was to examine participants' views about factors that facilitated or impeded exercise behavior. Qualitative interviews were conducted with eight females…

  18. Evaluating Functional Decline in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Sara; Weiss, Patrice L.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disease with a wide-ranging impact on functional status. The aim of the study was to examine the added value of simultaneously evaluating fatigue, personal ADL and handwriting performance as indicators for functional decline among patients with MS. Participants were 50 outpatients with MS and 26 matched healthy…

  19. Why does multiple sclerosis only affect human primates?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hart, Bert A.

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) develops exclusively in humans. Non-human primates are resistant against MS, although they are highly susceptible to the MS animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Unravelling of the cause(s) underlying this discrepancy is highly relevant as

  20. Workflow Management for Multiple Sclerosis Patients: IT and Organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel-Verkerke, Margreet B.; Michel-Verkerke, M.B.; Schuring, R.W.; Spil, Antonius A.M.; Sprague, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    Patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) visit various healthcare providers during the course of their disease. It was suggested that IT might help to orchestrate their care provision. We have applied the USE IT-tool to get insight in the relevant problems, solutions and constraints of the MS-care and

  1. Disability and Fatigue Can Be Objectively Measured in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Motta

    Full Text Available The available clinical outcome measures of disability in multiple sclerosis are not adequately responsive or sensitive.To investigate the feasibility of inertial sensor-based gait analysis in multiple sclerosis.A cross-sectional study of 80 multiple sclerosis patients and 50 healthy controls was performed. Lower-limb kinematics was evaluated by using a commercially available magnetic inertial measurement unit system. Mean and standard deviation of range of motion (mROM, sROM for each joint of lower limbs were calculated in one minute walking test. A motor performance index (E defined as the sum of sROMs was proposed.We established two novel observer-independent measures of disability. Hip mROM was extremely sensitive in measuring lower limb motor impairment, being correlated with muscle strength and also altered in patients without clinically detectable disability. On the other hand, E index discriminated patients according to disability, being altered only in patients with moderate and severe disability, regardless of walking speed. It was strongly correlated with fatigue and patient-perceived health status.Inertial sensor-based gait analysis is feasible and can detect clinical and subclinical disability in multiple sclerosis.

  2. Multiple sclerosis or neurological manifestations of Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS and celiac disease (CD are considered to be T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. We discuss about a known case of CD-showed relapsing - remitting neurological symptoms compatible with MS. In this rare co-occurrence subject, MS-CD patient, the interaction between MS - and CD-related inflammatory processes is open to discussion.

  3. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moutsianas, Loukas; Jostins, Luke; Beecham, Ashley H

    2015-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on 17...

  4. Gender-related differences in functional connectivity in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonheim, M.M.; Hulst, H.E.; Landi, D.; Ciccarelli, O.; Roosendaal, S.D.; Sanz-Arigita, E.J.; Vrenken, H.; Polman, C.H.; Stam, C.J.; Barkhof, F.; Geurts, J.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Gender effects are strong in multiple sclerosis (MS), with male patients showing a worse clinical outcome than female patients. Functional reorganization of neural activity may contribute to limit disability, and possible gender differences in this process may have important clinical

  5. The premenstrual period and exacerbations in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zorgdrager, A; De Keyser, J

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether an association exists between the premenstrual period and exacerbations of multiple sclerosis (MS). The subjects were 56 premenopausal patients with relapsing MS and a regular menstrual cycle. Data over the previous 2 years were gathered from a structured

  6. Prevalence of multiple sclerosis in Lanzarote (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J R; Rodriguez, S; Sosa Henriquez, M; Batista, E; Corujo, E; Font de Mora Turon, A; Hernandez Hernandez, D; Betancor Leon, P

    1989-02-01

    In the island of Lanzarote of the Province of Las Palmas, which is part of the Spanish archipelago of the Canary Islands, the prevalence of multiple sclerosis is 15 per 100,000. The prevalence of MS in Lanzarote seems related more to ethnic conditions than to geography.

  7. Differential diagnosis of suspected multiple sclerosis: a consensus approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, D. H.; Weinshenker, B.G.; Filippi, M.; Banwell, B.L.; Cohen, J.A.; Freedman, M.S.; Galetta, S.L.; Hutchinson, M.; Johnson, R.T.; Kappos, L.; Kira, J.; Lublin, F.D.; McFarland, H.F.; Montalban, X.; Panitch, H.; Richert, J.R.; Reingold, S.C.; Polman, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) requires exclusion of diseases that could better explain the clinical and paraclinical findings. A systematic process for exclusion of alternative diagnoses has not been defined. An International Panel of MS experts developed consensus

  8. Multiple sclerosis : Mechanisms of myelin phagocytosis and lesion expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, D.A.E.

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by immune activation and focal demyelination in the central nervous system. The aim of this thesis was to gain more insight into the mechanisms of myelin phagocytosis by resident microglia and infiltrating macrophages. We first evaluated the expression of the

  9. Risk of cataract and glaucoma in patients with multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marloes Bazelier; Tjeerd van Staa; Bernard Uitdehaag; Sigrid Mueller-Schotte; Hubert Leufkens; Frank de Vries

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with risk of cataract or glaucoma. We conducted a population-based cohort study utilizing the UK General Practice Research Database (1987–2009) linked to the national hospital registry of England (1997–2008). Incident

  10. Menstrually related worsening of symptoms in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zorgdrager, A; DeKeyser, J

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether the menstrual cycle influences multiple sclerosis (MS) symptoms. Seventy-two normally menstruating women (aged 20-50 years) with MS were interviewed. Of the 60 patients with a relapsing-remitting form of MS (RR-MS), 26 (43%) regularly

  11. Low leucocyte myeloperoxidase activity in patients with multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsaransing, G; Teelken, A; Prokopenko, VM; Arutjunyan, AV; De Keyser, J

    The gene for myeloperoxidase (MPO) has been implicated in multiple sclerosis (MS). By measuring H2O2 dependent oxidation of 3,3'5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine with spectrophotometry the authors investigated MPO activity in peripheral blood leucocytes from 42 patients with MS (12 with secondary

  12. Principles of a new treatment algorithm in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Hans-Peter; Montalban, Xavier; Sorensen, Per Soelberg

    2011-01-01

    We are entering a new era in the management of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The first oral treatment (fingolimod) has now gained US FDA approval, addressing an unmet need for patients with MS who wish to avoid parenteral administration. A second agent (cladribine) is currently being...

  13. Physical activity motivation and benefits in people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasczewski, Kimberly S; Gill, Diane L; Rothberger, Sara M

    2018-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a degenerative neurological disease that affects 2.1 million people worldwide. There is no cure, but an expanding body of research supports the positive impact of physical activity and suggests physical activity has benefits for the individual's psychological and physical well-being. Using Self-Determination Theory as a framework, mixed methods with a focus on qualitative interviews were used to explore physical activity motivation and benefits with a sample of highly active people with multiple sclerosis (n = 15). Disability level ranged from not disabled to wheelchair bound with the majority of participants reporting minimal impact from multiple sclerosis. Survey data were collected using a number of open-ended questions along with measures of self-efficacy, self-determined motivation, physical activity, and quality of life. Additionally, eight individuals participated in semistructured telephone interviews focused on (a) motivation and strategies used to maintain physical activity and (b) the benefits and impact of physical activity in their lives. The main findings were consistent with Self-Determination Theory; participants described feelings of accomplishment and competence in both their physical activity and daily life, as well as a sense of independence and autonomy. Similarly, all participants cited benefits, and the main themes were enhanced satisfaction with life and an overall positive outlook on life. Results provide insight into the role of physical activity in a highly active sample and have implications for professionals working in physical activity settings with the multiple sclerosis population. Interventions aimed at increasing long-term physical activity adherence should focus on increasing autonomy and competence for physical activity in the individual and promoting potential increased quality of life outcomes from physical activity participation. Implications for Rehabilitation Multiple sclerosis is a chronic

  14. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: one or multiple causes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Aline Furtado; Orsini, Marco; Machado, Dionis; Mello, Mariana Pimentel; Nader, Sergio; Silva, Júlio Guilherme; da Silva Catharino, Antonio M.; de Freitas, Marcos R.G.; Pereira, Alessandra; Pessoa, Luciane Lacerda; Sztajnbok, Flavio R.; Leite, Marco Araújo; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2011-01-01

    The Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common form of motor neuron disease in the adulthood, and it is characterized by rapid and progressive compromise of the upper and lower motor neurons. The majority of the cases of ALS are classified as sporadic and, until now, a specific cause for these cases still is unknown. To present the different hypotheses on the etiology of ALS. It was carried out a search in the databases: Bireme, Scielo and Pubmed, in the period of 1987 to 2011, using the following keywords: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, motor neuron disease, etiology, causes and epidemiology and its similar in Portuguese and Spanish. It did not have consensus as regards the etiology of ALS. Researches demonstrates evidences as regards intoxication by heavy metals, environmental and occupational causes, genetic mutations (superoxide dismutase 1), certain viral infections and the accomplishment of vigorous physical activity for the development of the disease. There is still no consensus regarding the involved factors in the etiology of ALS. In this way, new research about these etiologies are necessary, for a better approach of the patients, promoting preventive programs for the disease and improving the quality of life of the patients. PMID:21785676

  15. Multiple Sclerosis in Malaysia: Demographics, Clinical Features, and Neuroimaging Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Viswanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS is an uncommon disease in multiracial Malaysia. Diagnosing patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases has been greatly aided by the evolution in diagnostic criterion, the identification of new biomarkers, and improved accessibility to neuroimaging in the country. Objectives. To investigate the spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia. Methods. Retrospective analysis with longitudinal follow-up of patients referred to a single tertiary medical center with neurology services in Malaysia. Results. Out of 245 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease, 104 patients had multiple sclerosis. Female to male ratio was 5 : 1. Mean age at onset was 28.6 ± 9.9 years. The Malays were the predominant racial group affected followed by the Chinese, Indians, and other indigenous groups. Subgroup analysis revealed more Chinese having neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders rather than multiple sclerosis. Positive family history was reported in 5%. Optic neuritis and myelitis were the commonest presentations at onset of disease, and relapsing remitting course was the commonest disease pattern observed. Oligoclonal band positivity was 57.6%. At disease onset, 61.5% and 66.4% fulfilled the 2005 and 2010 McDonald’s criteria for dissemination in space. Mean cord lesion length was 1.86 ± 1.65 vertebral segments in the relapsing remitting group as opposed to 6.25 ± 5.18 vertebral segments in patients with neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders. Conclusion. The spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia has changed over the years. Further advancement in diagnostic criteria will no doubt continue to contribute to the evolution of this disease here.

  16. Multiple Sclerosis in Malaysia: Demographics, Clinical Features, and Neuroimaging Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, S.; Rose, N.; Masita, A.; Dhaliwal, J. S.; Puvanarajah, S. D.; Rafia, M. H.; Muda, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an uncommon disease in multiracial Malaysia. Diagnosing patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases has been greatly aided by the evolution in diagnostic criterion, the identification of new biomarkers, and improved accessibility to neuroimaging in the country. Objectives. To investigate the spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia. Methods. Retrospective analysis with longitudinal follow-up of patients referred to a single tertiary medical center with neurology services in Malaysia. Results. Out of 245 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease, 104 patients had multiple sclerosis. Female to male ratio was 5 : 1. Mean age at onset was 28.6 ± 9.9 years. The Malays were the predominant racial group affected followed by the Chinese, Indians, and other indigenous groups. Subgroup analysis revealed more Chinese having neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders rather than multiple sclerosis. Positive family history was reported in 5%. Optic neuritis and myelitis were the commonest presentations at onset of disease, and relapsing remitting course was the commonest disease pattern observed. Oligoclonal band positivity was 57.6%. At disease onset, 61.5% and 66.4% fulfilled the 2005 and 2010 McDonald's criteria for dissemination in space. Mean cord lesion length was 1.86 ± 1.65 vertebral segments in the relapsing remitting group as opposed to 6.25 ± 5.18 vertebral segments in patients with neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders. Conclusion. The spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia has changed over the years. Further advancement in diagnostic criteria will no doubt continue to contribute to the evolution of this disease here. PMID:24455266

  17. Interest in Providing Multiple Sclerosis Care and Subspecializing in Multiple Sclerosis Among Neurology Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira-Poit, Stephanie; Kane, Heather L.; Frost, A. Corey; Keating, Michael; Olmsted, Murrey

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although detailed knowledge regarding treatment options for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is largely limited to neurologists, shortages in the neurologist workforce, including MS subspecialists, are predicted. Thus, MS patients may have difficulties in gaining access to appropriate care. No systematic evaluation has yet been performed of the number of neurology residents planning to pursue MS subspecialization. This study identifies factors affecting interest in providing MS patient care or MS subspecialization among current neurology residents. Methods: We randomly selected half of all Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education–certified neurology residency programs in the continental United States to receive the neurology resident survey. Completed surveys were received from 218 residents. Results: Residents were significantly more likely to have increased interest in MS care when they participated in MS research, were interested in teaching, and indicated that the “ability to improve patient outcomes and quality of life” was a positive factor influencing their desire to provide MS patient care. Residents who were interested in providing MS care, interested in teaching, and indicated that “research opportunities” was a positive factor for providing MS patient care were significantly more likely to express interest in MS subspecialization. Conclusions: Increasing opportunities to interact with MS patients, learn about MS care, and participate in MS research may increase interest in MS care and subspecialization among neurology residents. Opportunities to educate residents regarding MS patient care may affect residents’ attitudes. PMID:24688352

  18. Perspectives and experiences of Dutch multiple sclerosis patients and multiple sclerosis-specialized neurologists on injectable disease-modifying treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Leo H.; Heerings, Marco A.; Jongen, Peter J.; van der Hiele, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The adherence to treatment with injectable disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) in multiple sclerosis (MS) may benefit from adequate information provision and management of expectations. The communication between patients and physicians is very important in this respect. The current study

  19. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: current perspectives on health behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikes EM

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Morghen Sikes,1 Robert W Motl,1 Jayne M Ness2 1Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Department of Pediatric Neurology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Purpose: Pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (POMS accounts for ~5% of all multiple sclerosis cases, and has a prevalence of ~10,000 children in the USA. POMS is associated with a higher relapse rate, and results in irreversible disability on average 10 years earlier than adult-onset multiple sclerosis. Other manifestations of POMS include mental and physical fatigue, cognitive impairment, and depression. We believe that the health behaviors of physical activity, diet, and sleep may have potential benefits in POMS, and present a scoping review of the existing literature. Methods: We identified papers by searching three electronic databases (PubMed, GoogleScholar, and CINAHL. Search terms included: pediatric multiple sclerosis OR pediatric onset multiple sclerosis OR POMS AND health behavior OR physical activity OR sleep OR diet OR nutrition OR obesity. Papers were included in this review if they were published in English, referenced nutrition, diet, obesity, sleep, exercise, or physical activity, and included pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis as a primary population. Results: Twenty papers were identified via the literature search that addressed health-promoting behaviors in POMS, and 11, 8, and 3 papers focused on diet, activity, and sleep, respectively. Health-promoting behaviors were associated with markers of disease burden in POMS. Physical activity participation was associated with reduced relapse rate, disease burden, and sleep/rest fatigue symptoms. Nutritional factors, particularly vitamin D intake, may be associated with relapse rate. Obesity has been associated with increased risk of developing POMS. POMS is associated with better sleep hygiene, and this may benefit fatigue and quality of life

  20. Characteristics of pediatric multiple sclerosis: The Turkish pediatric multiple sclerosis database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Ünsal; Anlar, Banu; Gücüyener, Kıvılcım

    2017-11-01

    To document the clinical and paraclinical features of pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) in Turkey. Data of MS patients with onset before age 18 years (n = 193) were collected from 27 pediatric neurology centers throughout Turkey. Earlier-onset (<12 years) and later-onset (≥12 years) groups were compared. There were 123 (63.7%) girls and 70 (36.3%) boys aged 4-17 years, median 14 years at disease onset. Family history of MS was 6.5%. The first presentation was polysymptomatic in 55.4% of patients, with brainstem syndromes (50.3%), sensory disturbances (44%), motor symptoms (33.2%), and optic neuritis (26.4%) as common initial manifestations. Nineteen children had facial paralysis and 10 had epileptic seizures at first attack; 21 (11%) were initially diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). Oligoclonal bands were identified in 68% of patients. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed periventricular (96%), cortical/juxtacortical (64.2%), brainstem (63%), cerebellum (51.4%), and spinal cord (67%) involvement. Visual evoked potentials (VEP) were abnormal in 52%; serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were low in 68.5% of patients. The earlier-onset group had a higher rate of infection/vaccination preceding initial attack, initial diagnosis of ADEM, longer interval between first 2 attacks, and more disability accumulating in the first 3 years of the disease. Brainstem and cerebellum are common sites of clinical and radiological involvement in pediatric-onset MS. VEP abnormalities are frequent even in patients without history of optic neuropathy. Vitamin D status does not appear to affect the course in early disease. MS beginning before 12 years of age has certain characteristics in history and course. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cell-based therapeutic strategies for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolding, Neil J; Pasquini, Marcelo; Reingold, Stephen C; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2017-11-01

    The availability of multiple disease-modifying medications with regulatory approval to treat multiple sclerosis illustrates the substantial progress made in therapy of the disease. However, all are only partially effective in preventing inflammatory tissue damage in the central nervous system and none directly promotes repair. Cell-based therapies, including immunoablation followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, mesenchymal and related stem cell transplantation, pharmacologic manipulation of endogenous stem cells to enhance their reparative capabilities, and transplantation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, have generated substantial interest as novel therapeutic strategies for immune modulation, neuroprotection, or repair of the damaged central nervous system in multiple sclerosis. Each approach has potential advantages but also safety concerns and unresolved questions. Moreover, clinical trials of cell-based therapies present several unique methodological and ethical issues. We summarize here the status of cell-based therapies to treat multiple sclerosis and make consensus recommendations for future research and clinical trials. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  2. Role of Proangiogenic Factors in Immunopathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Kabir Magaji; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2016-02-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex and balanced process in which new blood vessels form from preexisting ones by sprouting, splitting, growth and remodeling. This phenomenon plays a vital role in many physiological and pathological processes. However, the disturbance in physiological process can play a role in pathogenesis of some chronic inflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS) in human and its animal model. Although the relation between abnormal blood vessels and MS lesions was established in previous studies, but the role of pathological angiogenesis remains unclear. In this study, the link between proangiogenic factors and multiple sclerosis pathogenesis was examined by conducting a systemic review. Thus we searched the English medical literature via PubMed, ISI web of knowledge, Medline and virtual health library (VHL) databases. In this review, we describe direct and indirect roles of some proangiogenic factors in MS pathogenesis and report the association of these factors with pathological and inflammatory angiogenesis.

  3. Increasing Benefit of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyhtinen, J.; Karttunen, A.; Tikkakoski, T. [Radiologian Klinikka, Oulu (Finland)

    2006-11-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as an essential tool of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and has opened up completely new prospects in MS research and treatment trials. It is a sensitive method that gives direct evidence of tissue pathology and has greatly increased our knowledge of MS. In clinical work, MRI is used to confirm and exclude the diagnosis of MS. The international recommendation is that every suspected MS patient should undergo at least one brain MRI. T2-weighted images are the standard tool in clinical work, and functional imaging methods are mainly used in MS research. The subtypes and the course of the disease cause variation in MRI findings. Here, we present a general overview of MR findings in MS. Brain, magnetic resonance imaging, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in multiple sclerosis: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saharian, M. A.; Shakaouri Rad, A.; Motamedi, M.; Pakdaman, H.; Radue, E. W.

    2007-01-01

    :During the last two decades, magnetic resonance imaging has been widely used In the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of multiple sclerosis. MRI, both conventional and non conventional methods, has transformed all aspects of M S research and clinical practice in recent years. Although advanced imaging methods have added much more to our knowledge about pathogenesis and natural history of the disease but their cost, availability, complexity and lack of validation have limited their use in routine clinical practice. Conventional MR techniques including proton density, T1/T2-Weighted images and fluid- attenuated inversion recovery sequences are now accepted in standard protocols for diagnosis and treatment outcome measures in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis. This review will focus on the type, morphology and evolution of M S lesions regarding conventional MRI and their use for treatment monitoring in daily clinical practice

  5. Increasing Benefit of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyhtinen, J.; Karttunen, A.; Tikkakoski, T.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as an essential tool of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and has opened up completely new prospects in MS research and treatment trials. It is a sensitive method that gives direct evidence of tissue pathology and has greatly increased our knowledge of MS. In clinical work, MRI is used to confirm and exclude the diagnosis of MS. The international recommendation is that every suspected MS patient should undergo at least one brain MRI. T2-weighted images are the standard tool in clinical work, and functional imaging methods are mainly used in MS research. The subtypes and the course of the disease cause variation in MRI findings. Here, we present a general overview of MR findings in MS. Brain, magnetic resonance imaging, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord

  6. T–CELL VACCINE PREPARATION FOR MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Ivanova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A two–stage technology of preparation of T–cell vaccine designated for multiple sclerosis treatment is described. At the first stage myelin–specific lymphocytes undergoe antigen–dependent cultural selection, whereas at the second stage they are grown by means of non–specific stimulation. The vaccine prepared in this way was found to induce specific anti–idiotypic immune response, directed against myelin–reactive T–lymphocytes. The results of 1–year follow–up of 18 vaccinated patients with a cerebral–spinal type of multiple sclerosis indicated the absence of side effects of T–cell vaccination, and suggest the possibility of effective application of this treatment within early stages of disease. (Med. Immunol., 2005, vol.7, № 1, pp 27532

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in clinically-definite multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, J.B.; Herkes, G.K.; Frith, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Forty-two patients with clinically-definite multiple sclerosis were examined by magnetic resonance imaging using a 1.5-T instrument. Magnetic resonance imaging detected an abnormality in 90% of patients. In four patients, no lesions were demonstrated. The number, size and site of the lesions by magnetic resonance imaging were compared with the patients' clinical status and other variables. The Kurtzke disability status scale score increased in patients with corpus callosum atrophy, brainstem and basal ganglia lesions, and correlated with the total number of lesions. No correlation was shown between the findings of magnetic resonance imaging and disease duration, age, sex or pattern-reversal visual-evoked potentials. The variety of magnetic resonance images that could be obtained in patients with clinically-definite multiple sclerosis is highlighted. 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  8. Disability outcome measures in multiple sclerosis clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Jeffrey A; Reingold, Stephen C; Polman, Chris H

    2012-01-01

    Many of the available disability outcome measures used in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis are insensitive to change over time, inadequately validated, or insensitive to patient-perceived health status or quality of life. Increasing focus on therapies that slow or reverse disability...... recommend practical refinements. Conversely, although substantial data support the multiple sclerosis functional composite as an alternative measure, changes to its component tests and scoring method are needed. Novel approaches, including the use of composite endpoints, patient-reported outcomes...... progression makes it essential to refine existing measures or to develop new tools. Major changes to the expanded disability status scale should be avoided to prevent the loss of acceptance by regulators as a measure for primary outcomes in trials that provide substantial evidence of effectiveness. Rather, we...

  9. Multiple Sclerosis and Catastrophic Health Expenditure in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juyani, Yaser; Hamedi, Dorsa; Hosseini Jebeli, Seyede Sedighe; Qasham, Maryam

    2016-09-01

    There are many disabling medical conditions which can result in catastrophic health expenditure. Multiple Sclerosis is one of the most costly medical conditions through the world which encounter families to the catastrophic health expenditures. This study aims to investigate on what extent Multiple sclerosis patients face catastrophic costs. This study was carried out in Ahvaz, Iran (2014). The study population included households that at least one of their members suffers from MS. To analyze data, Logit regression model was employed by using the default software STATA12. 3.37% of families were encountered with catastrophic costs. Important variables including brand of drug, housing, income and health insurance were significantly correlated with catastrophic expenditure. This study suggests that although a small proportion of MS patients met the catastrophic health expenditure, mechanisms that pool risk and cost (e.g. health insurance) are required to protect them and improve financial and access equity in health care.

  10. Experiences of patients with multiple sclerosis from group counseling

    OpenAIRE

    Mazaheri, Mina; Fanian, Nasrin; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Group counseling is one of the most important methods in somatic and psychological rehabilitation of the multiple sclerosis (M.S.) patients. Knowing these patients? experiences, feelings, believes and emotion based on learning in group is necessary to indicate the importance of group discussion on quality of life of the patients. This study was done to achieve experiences of M.S. patients from group training. METHODS: This was a qualitative study using phenomenological method. The...

  11. Effects of applying hydrotherapy on fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Somaiyeh Ghafari; Fazlolah Ahmadi; Masood Nabavi

    2008-01-01

    (Received 10 May, 2008 ; Accepted 3 Oct, 2008) Abstract Background and purpose: Fatigue is a common symptom of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) that is purported to cause significant distress and have detrimental effects on daily living functioning, social and occupational obligations, and overall well-being. Complementary therapies are widely used by people with MS and Progressive Hydrotherapy is a form of complementary therapies. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of applying Hydrotherap...

  12. Increased mitochondrial content in remyelinated axons: implications for multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambonin, Jessica L.; Zhao, Chao; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Campbell, Graham R.; Engeham, Sarah; Ziabreva, Iryna; Schwarz, Nadine; Lee, Sok Ee; Frischer, Josa M.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Trapp, Bruce D.; Lassmann, Hans; Franklin, Robin J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial content within axons increases following demyelination in the central nervous system, presumably as a response to the changes in energy needs of axons imposed by redistribution of sodium channels. Myelin sheaths can be restored in demyelinated axons and remyelination in some multiple sclerosis lesions is extensive, while in others it is incomplete or absent. The effects of remyelination on axonal mitochondrial content in multiple sclerosis, particularly whether remyelination completely reverses the mitochondrial changes that follow demyelination, are currently unknown. In this study, we analysed axonal mitochondria within demyelinated, remyelinated and myelinated axons in post-mortem tissue from patients with multiple sclerosis and controls, as well as in experimental models of demyelination and remyelination, in vivo and in vitro. Immunofluorescent labelling of mitochondria (porin, a voltage-dependent anion channel expressed on all mitochondria) and axons (neurofilament), and ultrastructural imaging showed that in both multiple sclerosis and experimental demyelination, mitochondrial content within remyelinated axons was significantly less than in acutely and chronically demyelinated axons but more numerous than in myelinated axons. The greater mitochondrial content within remyelinated, compared with myelinated, axons was due to an increase in density of porin elements whereas increase in size accounted for the change observed in demyelinated axons. The increase in mitochondrial content in remyelinated axons was associated with an increase in mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity. In vitro studies showed a significant increase in the number of stationary mitochondria in remyelinated compared with myelinated and demyelinated axons. The number of mobile mitochondria in remyelinated axons did not significantly differ from myelinated axons, although significantly greater than in demyelinated axons. Our neuropathological data and findings in

  13. Multiple Sclerosis: associated cardiometabolic risks and impact of exercise therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Jasper

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by complex heterogeneous symptoms, which often leads to a more sedentary lifestyle. This lifestyle increases the likelihood to develop secondary health problems, like cardiometabolic risk (CMR) profile. However, in other population these secondary health problems can be, partly, reversed by exercise therapy. We hypothesized that MS affects the CMR profile, but the outcome can be reversed following exercise therapy. Persons with MS and matched healthy c...

  14. Cell-based therapeutic strategies for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolding, Neil J; Pasquini, Marcelo; Reingold, Stephen C

    2017-01-01

    and none directly promotes repair. Cell-based therapies, including immunoablation followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, mesenchymal and related stem cell transplantation, pharmacologic manipulation of endogenous stem cells to enhance their reparative capabilities......, and transplantation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, have generated substantial interest as novel therapeutic strategies for immune modulation, neuroprotection, or repair of the damaged central nervous system in multiple sclerosis. Each approach has potential advantages but also safety concerns and unresolved...

  15. Insulin resistance in drug naive patients with multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kostić Smiljana; Kolić Ivana; Raičević Ranko; Stojanović Zvezdana; Kostić Dejan; Dinčić Evica

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim. Due to the fact that there is a relatively small number of data related to systemic insulin abnormalities in the multiple sclerosis (MS), the main objective of our study was to determine whether a dysbalance of glucose and insulin metabolism exist in patients with natural course of MS. Our hypothesis was that the metabolic disorder that characterizes state of the insulin resistance (IR) and reduced insulin sensitivity (IS) in untreated patie...

  16. Gender-related differences in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ying-qian

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although multiple sclerosis (MS affects both women and men, women are more susceptible to MS than men with increasing incidence and prevalence. Accumulating evidence indicates that gender appears to play a critical role in the development, efficacy and prognosis of MS, and therefore should be considered as an independent influencing factor. In this review, factors that can potentially explain the gender-biased observations in MS are discussed, which include incidence and prevalence, mechanism, course and prognosis, imaging, treatment principles.

  17. Peripheral Vasculitis, Intermediate Uveitis and Interferon Use in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Esgin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. A 40-year-old female patient with a 12-year history of MS was admitted to our clinic with blurred vision and floaters in her right eye for about 1 month. Here, we share the findings and the management of intermediate uveitis and retinal periphlebitis in an MS case being treated with interferon beta-1a for 7 years.

  18. Serum Homocysteine level in patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ashtari

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS, a chronic demyelinative disease-is unknown. The damage of blood–brain barrier (BBB vasculature is a characteristic of MS and Homocystein (Hcy can damage BBB, then increase in total Hcy may be important in MS pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to compare the serum level of total Hcy in MS patients with control group. Methods: In a case control study, serum level of total Hcy measured in 35 MS patient and compared with 30 healthy matched controls. All patients had definitive MS according to Poser criteria, without history of myocardial infarction, stroke, neuropathy, transient ischemic attack, homocystinuria or renal failure. Results: The serum concentration of total homocystein was significantly higher in multiple sclerosis patients than healthy controls. The mean total Hcy level was 17.92± 6.9 mmol/lit in cases and 14.6±2.92 mmol/lit in controls (P=0.013. Conclusion: Serum total Homocystein may have a role in MS pathogenesis and reduction of it should be studied moreover. Key words: Multiple Sclerosis, Homocystein, Serum level

  19. Prevalence of benign tumors among patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryan Rafiee Zadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS, an inflammatory autoimmune disease, affects almost 1% of world’s population in which myelin sheaths of neurons are targeted by immune cells. Association of different factors and diseases with MS provides new insights into possible pathogenesis and treatment for this disease. In this regard, we investigated the association of benign tumors with MS disease by studying total Isfehan multiple sclerosis (TIMS records for MS patients registered in Isfahan Multiple Sclerosis Society (IMSS who had developed any kind of benign tumors whether before MS diagnosis or after it. This study was performed in Isfahan province, third large province of Iran, with 4,815,863 populations located 1590 meters above sea level between latitudes 30 and 34 degrees north of the equator, and longitude 49-55 east. Among 4950 registered patients, 28 patients were discovered to have three types of benign tumors; pituitary adenoma in 22, meningioma in 5 and lipoma in 1 patient. The incidence rate of developing pituitary adenoma and meningioma were higher than in general population (OR 95%CI: 1.110; range: 0.731-1.685 and 1.035; range: 0.431-2.487 respectively but these findings were not statistically significant (p= 0.624 for pituitary adenoma and p= 0.939 for meningioma. But the incidence rate for lipoma was lower among MS patients (OR 95%CI: 0.020; range: 0.003-0.143 which was statistically significant (p <0.001.

  20. Diffusion weighted MR imaging in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.; Schweigerer-Schroeter, G.; Wellnitz, J.; Wuerstle, T.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is one of the best methods in diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, particularly in disclosure of active demyelinating lesions. Aim of this study was to compare diffusion weighted imaging and contrast enhancement in the detection of active lesions. A MR study with a contrast enhanced T1-weighted pulse sequence with magnetization transfer presaturation and a diffusion weighted echoplanar pulse sequence (b=1000 s/mm 2 ) was performed in 17 patients (11 women, 6 men) with multiple sclerosis. 29 of 239 lesions showed an increased signal intensity in diffusion weighted imaging, 24 lesions a contrast enhancement, but only 16 lesions were visible in both pulse sequences. In patients with short clinical symptomatology significant more lesions could be detected with diffusion-weighted pulse sequence in comparison to patients with long standing symptomatology showing more lesions with contrast enhancement. Hence it is likely, that both pulse sequences detect different histopathologic changes. The early detection of demyelinating lesions in diffusion weighted imaging is attributed to the extracellular edema, however the contrast enhancement is caused by a blood brain barrier abnormality. It can be expected that diffusion weighted imaging will have a high impact on imaging of multiple sclerosis not only in therapeutic trials, but also in clinical routine. (orig.) [de

  1. Meditation as an Adjunct to the Management of Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B. Levin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS disease course is known to be adversely affected by several factors including stress. A proposed mechanism for decreasing stress and therefore decreasing MS morbidity and improving quality of life is meditation. This review aims to critically analyse the current literature regarding meditation and MS. Methods. Four major databases were used to search for English language papers published before March 2014 with the terms MS, multiple sclerosis, meditation, and mindfulness. Results. 12 pieces of primary literature fitting the selection criteria were selected: two were randomised controlled studies, four were cohort studies, and six were surveys. The current literature varies in quality; however common positive effects of meditation include improved quality of life (QOL and improved coping skills. Conclusion. All studies suggest possible benefit to the use of meditation as an adjunct to the management of multiple sclerosis. Additional rigorous clinical trials are required to validate the existing findings and determine if meditation has an impact on disease course over time.

  2. Managing treatment fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis on long-term therapy: the role of multiple sclerosis nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ann Crawford, Sally Jewell,* Holly Mara, Laura McCatty, Regina Pelfrey The Lash Group; Frisco, TX, USA *Sally Jewell is now retired Abstract: This article discusses the many ways that nurses can address the factors that lead to treatment fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS on long-term disease-modifying therapy, ultimately helping to preserve the patient’s health and quality of life. Patients with MS on long-term therapy may suffer from treatment fatigue and poor adherence due to a variety of different factors, including difficulties with injections, anxiety/depression, financial problems, and inaccurate beliefs about the MS disease process. Because MS nurses have regular interactions with patients, they are ideally situated to help patients cope with these and other factors that may limit adherence. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, disease-modifying therapy, injection, nurse

  3. Multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and vitamin D status in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Aliehossadat; Jalilvand, Somayeh; Shoja, Zabihollah; Nejati, Ahmad; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Marashi, Sayed Mahdi

    2017-07-01

    The relationship between infections and autoimmune diseases is complex and there are several reports highlighting the role of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) in these patients. The levels of multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus (MSRV)-type DNA of Env gene was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 52 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and 40 healthy controls using specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis. Furthermore, we analyzed the status of HERV-W/MSRV in these patients with regards to both EBV (DNA load and anti-EBNA1 IgG antibody) and vitamin D concentration. MSRV DNA copy number were significantly higher in RRMS patients than healthy controls (P < 0.0001). Interestingly, an inverse correlation was found between MSRV DNA copy number and serum vitamin D concentration (P < 0.01), but not for EBV load or anti-EBNA-1 IgG antibody. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Multiple sclerosis in women having children by multiple partners. A population-based study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basso, Olga; Campi, Rita; Frydenberg, Morten

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether having children with multiple men is a risk factor for being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied a cohort of 151,328 women, of whom 64,704 had different men fathering their children and 86,624 the same partner for all births. Women were included if they had ...

  5. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: comparison with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Bonaventura; Jarque, Isidro; Gascón, Francisco; Hernández-Boluda, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Miralles, Francisco; de la Rubia, Javier; Alcalá, Carmen; Sanz, Jaime; Mallada, Javier; Cervelló, Angeles; Navarré, Arantxa; Carcelén-Gadea, María; Boscá, Isabel; Gil-Perotin, Sara; Solano, Carlos; Sanz, Miguel Angel; Coret, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    The main objective of our work is to describe the long-term results of myeloablative autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (AHSCT) in multiple sclerosis patients. Patients that failed to conventional therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS) underwent an approved protocol for AHSCT, which consisted of peripheral blood stem cell mobilization with cyclophosphamide and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), followed by a conditioning regimen of BCNU, Etoposide, Ara-C, Melphalan IV, plus Rabbit Thymoglobulin. Thirty-eight MS patients have been transplanted since 1999. Thirty-one patients have been followed for more than 2 years (mean 8.4 years). There were 22 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients and 9 secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) patients. No death related to AHSCT. A total of 10 patients (32.3%) had at least one relapse during post-AHSCT evolution, 6 patients in the RRMS group (27.2%) and 4 in the SPMS group (44.4%). After AHSCT, 7 patients (22.6%) experienced progression of disability, all within SP form. By contrast, no patients with RRMS experienced worsening of disability after a median follow-up of 5.4 years, 60% of them showed a sustained reduction in disability (SRD), defined as the improvement of 1.0 point in the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) sustains for 6 months (0.5 in cases of EDSS ≥ 5.5). The only clinical variable that predicted a poor response to AHSCT was a high EDSS in the year before transplant. AHSCT using the BEAM-ATG scheme is safe and efficacious to control the aggressive forms of RRMS.

  6. Effects of Applying Hydrotherapy on Quality of Life in Women with Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Somayyeh Ghaffari; Fazlollah Ahmadi; Seyyed Masoud Nabavi; Anoushirvan Kazem-Nezhad

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common chronic diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), which causes important changes patient’s life, specially in adults life. MS decreases the quality of life (QOL) of patients severely and led to disability gradually. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of applying hydrotherapy on quality of life of Multiple Sclerosis patients. Materials & Methods: In this Quasi-experimental study, 50 Multiple Sclerosis patients wer...

  7. Circulating antibody to myelin basic protein in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggins, J.A.; Taylor, A.; Caspary, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    Sera from multiple sclerosis patients with relapsing-remitting disease and normal subjects were tested for antibody to myelin basic protein by a sensitive radioimmunoassay. The results showed a marginally decreased titre in multiple sclerosis superimposed on a seasonal variation. There was no correlation with the clinical state of the patients. Results are discussed briefly in relation to humoral antibody function in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalitis. (author)

  8. Oligodendroglial MCT1 and Metabolic Support of Axons in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0524 TITLE:Oligodendroglial MCT1 and Metabolic Support of Axons in Multiple Sclerosis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey D...29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Oligodendroglial MCT1 and Metabolic Support of Axons in Multiple Sclerosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0524...MCT1 in injured oligodendroglia of multiple sclerosis patients contributes to axon neurodegeneration and that increasing MCT1 will be protective in the

  9. Clinical diagnostic criteria of multiple sclerosis: the role of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belair, M.; Girard, M.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this article is to summarize the diagnostic criteria recommended by the International Panel on the Diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis in 2001. The recommendations of another working group, the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers Consensus Meeting, which met in Vancouver in 2001, concerning the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with multiple sclerosis are also presented in an effort to standardize the protocols for magnetic resonance imaging of these patients. (author)

  10. Virtual reality in multiple sclerosis - A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massetti, Thais; Trevizan, Isabela Lopes; Arab, Claudia; Favero, Francis Meire; Ribeiro-Papa, Denise Cardoso; de Mello Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease in which the insulating cover of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are damaged. The methods used for motor rehabilitation of patients with neurological problems require the performance of several rehabilitation exercises. Recently, studies related to the use of video game consoles have proliferated in the field of motor rehabilitation. Virtual reality (VR) has been proposed as a potentially useful tool for motoring assessment and rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the results shown in previous studies on "Multiple Sclerosis" and "Virtual Reality". A bibliographic review was performed without time limitations. The research was carried out using PubMed and BVS databases. Considering keywords, we included articles that showed the terms "Multiple Sclerosis" and "Virtual Reality". The review was according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines The initial search yielded 41 articles. After the duplicates were removed, two authors independently evaluated the title and abstract of each of the articles with the study inclusion criteria. From these, 31 articles were excluded based on the title and abstract. Finally, 10 articles were isolated that met the inclusion criteria. VR represents a motivational and effective alternative to traditional motor rehabilitation for MS patients. The results showed that VR programs could be an effective method of patients with MS rehabilitation in multiple cognitive and / or motor deficits. Additional research is needed to support the rehabilitation protocols with VR and increase the effects of treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. ECTRIMS/ACTRIMS 2017: Closing in on neurorepair in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, David; Küry, Patrick; Hartung, Hans-Peter

    2018-04-01

    While there is now a multitude of potent medications for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), effective therapies targeting neurodegeneration in progressive multiple sclerosis types are still lacking. Stimulation of neurorepair in this disease remains a pathogenetically defined treatment goal. However, therapeutic progress is slowed by the still inadequate tool set to capture "regeneration/repair" in MS and to define appropriate outcomes in clinical trials. In this review, we discuss studies investigating promising regenerative agents for progressive MS which were recently presented during the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS)/Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS) 2017 meeting in Paris.

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels under chronic natalizumab treatment in multiple sclerosis. A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Văcăraş, Vitalie; Major, Zoltán Zsigmond; Buzoianu, Anca Dana

    Our main purpose was to investigate if the chronic treatment with the disease-modifying drug natalizumab shows quantifiable effect on BDNF levels in multiple sclerosis patients. BDNF plasma concentration was evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in healthy individuals, not treated multiple sclerosis patients and patients treated with natalizumab. Multiple sclerosis patients have a significantly lower amount of peripheral BDNF than healthy individuals. Patients treated with natalizumab have significantly higher BDNF levels than not treated patients. Chronic natalizumab treatment is associated with significantly increased plasma BDNF concentration in multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  13. Rhabdomyolysis following interferon-beta treatment in a patient with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalbjerg, Sara Maria; Tsakiri, Anna; Fredriksen, Jette Lautrup

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system for which there is currently no cure. Interferon-beta-1-alpha is worldwide one of the most widely used treatments in multiple sclerosis. To our knowledge there is one previous reported case of rhabdomyolysis...... associated with Interferon-beta treatment. Case presentation We describe a 30 year old man with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis who developed rhabdomyolysis and increased creatine kinase following Interferon-beta-1-alpha therapy. After the medication was discontinued, the patient rapidly improved...... Interferon-beta-1-alpha therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis....

  14. Trigeminal root entry zone involvement in neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Atsuhiko; Mori, Masahiro; Masuda, Hiroki; Uchida, Tomohiko; Muto, Mayumi; Uzawa, Akiyuki; Ito, Shoichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-08-15

    Trigeminal root entry zone abnormality on brain magnetic resonance imaging has been frequently reported in multiple sclerosis patients, but it has not been investigated in neuromyelitis optica patients. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of 128 consecutive multiple sclerosis patients and 46 neuromyelitis optica patients was evaluated. Trigeminal root entry zone abnormality was present in 11 (8.6%) of the multiple sclerosis patients and two (4.3%) of the neuromyelitis optica patients. The pontine trigeminal root entry zone may be involved in both multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. MR spectroscopy of cervical spinal cord in patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendi, Ayse Tuba Karaguelle; Kendi, Mustafa; Tan, Funda Uysal; Tellioglu, Serdar; Huvaj, Sinef

    2004-01-01

    MR spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain in patients with multiple sclerosis has been well studied. However, in vivo MRS of the spinal cord in patients with MR spectroscopy has not been reported to our knowledge. We performed MRS of normal-appearing cervical spinal cords in multiple sclerosis patients and in healthy controls. N-acetyl aspartate was shown to be reduced within the cervical spinal cord of multiple sclerosis patients when compared with healthy controls. This finding supports axonal loss and damage within even normal-appearing spinal cords of multiple sclerosis patients. (orig.)

  16. Evidence-based evaluation of treatment strategy for multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Meng-qiu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To formulate the best treatment plan for multiple sclerosis (MS patients by evaluating the therapeutic efficacy and side effect of various evidence-based programs. Methods Key words were defined as multiple sclerosis, immunomodulatory therapy and therapy, etc. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang data bases for Scientific Journals in China and National Knowledge Infrastructure for Chinese Scientific Journals Database. Additionally, we applied manual searching and screened out conference paper and academic dissertation, etc, from various references. After that we obtained and evaluated by Jadad scales on systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and observational study cases about glucocorticoids, plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, IFN-β, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab, fingolimod. Results After screening, all seventeen selected resources included systematic reviews 6 articles, randomized controlled trials 7 articles, controlled clinical trials 2 articles, observational study cases 2 articles, among which fifteen articles were proved to be high quality (according to Jadad scoring system, five score 4, six score 5, four score 7, two chapters were judged to be low quality scoring 3. Finally, we summerize that: 1 The first choice of treatment for acute relapses is glucocorticoids and we suggest that plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulin may be tried as an alternative therapy in acute MS relapse, especially in case of contraindications to intravenous methylprednisolone. 2 Immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive treatment (IFN-β, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab can be an option to prevent new relapses and progression of disability. 3 Fingolimod is an oral treatment for multiple sclerosis to improve treatment adherence. Conclusion Using evidence-based medicine methods can provide us best clinical evidence on MS treatment.

  17. Treatment adherence in multiple sclerosis: a survey of Belgian neurologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decoo D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Danny Decoo,1 Mathieu Vokaer2 1Department of Neurology and Neurorehab, AZ Alma, Sijsele, Belgium; 2Multiple Sclerosis Clinic, Edith Cavell Hospital, CHIREC group, Brussels, Belgium Background: Poor treatment adherence is common among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. This survey evaluated neurologists’ perception of treatment adherence among MS patients.Materials and methods: This questionnaire-based survey of Belgian neurologists treating MS patients was conducted between June and July 2014. Face-to-face interviews with the neurologists were based on a semistructured questionnaire containing questions regarding the perception of the treatment-adherence level.Results: A total of 41 neurologists participated in the survey. Of these, 88% indicated frequent discussions about treatment adherence as beneficial for treatment efficacy. The mean time spent on the treatment-adherence discussion during the initial consultation was 11 minutes, with 24% of doctors spending 5 minutes and 24% of doctors spending 10 minutes discussing this issue. The majority of neurologists (56% perceived the adherence level in MS as good, and 12% perceived it as excellent. The majority of neurologists (64% indicated intolerance as a main cause of poor adherence, and all neurologists reported insufficient efficacy as a consequence of nonadherence. The importance of adherence in the neurologists’ practice was evaluated on a scale of 1–10, with 1= “not very important” and 10= “very important”: 44% of doctors indicated a score of 10, and the mean score was 9.0.Conclusion: Belgian neurologists consider treatment adherence in MS as essential for the benefits of therapies. However, although neurologists are aware of the consequences of nonadherence, they generally spend limited time discussing the importance of treatment adherence with their patients. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, treatment adherence, physician survey

  18. The role of information system in multiple sclerosis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Sima; Ahmadi, Golchehreh; Etemadifar, Masoud

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of central nervous system. The multiple sclerosis information system (MSIS), such as other information system (IS), depends on identification, collection and processing of data for producing useful information. Lack of the integrated IS for collecting standard data causes undesirable effects on exchanging, comparing, and managing. The aim of this study was to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management and determine the advantages and barriers in implementing of the MSIS. The present study was a nonsystematized review that was done in order to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management. In this study, electronic scientific resources such as scientific magazines and books and published topics at conferences were used. We used key words (IS, chronic disease management, and multiple sclerosis), their combination or their synonyms in title, key words, abstracts, and text of English articles and published reports from 1980 until 2013, and by using search engines such as Google, Google Scholar and scientific databases and electronic issues such as iPubMed, sufficiently important difference, Scopus, Medlib, and Magiran for gathering information. More than 200 articles and reports were collected and assessed and 139 of them. Findings showed that the MSIS can reduce of disease expenses through continuously collecting correct, accurate, sufficient, and timely patients and disease nature information; recoding; editing; processing; exchanging, and distributing among different health care centers. Although the MSIS has many advantages; but, we cannot ignore cultural, economic, technical, organizational, and managerial barriers. Therefore, it is necessary to do studies for preventing, reducing, and controlling them. One of the ways is to recognize the advantages of the MSIS and usage information technology in optimizing disease management.

  19. Endovascular therapy for chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Lazzaro

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have emerged suggesting that multiple sclerosis (MS may be due to abnormal venous outflow from the central nervous system, termed Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI. These reports have generated strong interest and controversy over the prospect of a treatable cause of this chronic debilitating disease. This review aims to describe the proposed association between CCSVI and MS, summarize the current data, and discuss the role of endovascular therapy and the need for rigorous randomized clinical trials to evaluate this association and treatment.

  20. [Multiple sclerosis. Therapeutic nihilism is the wrong approach here].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltz, R; Goebels, N; Jarius, S; Hohlfeld, R

    2002-05-06

    The standard treatment for acute multiple sclerosis relapses continues to be the intravenous administration of high-dose methylprednisolone. For prophylactic purposes, immunomodulatory therapy with interferon beta or glatiramer acetate, immunoglobulins or azathioprine. Studies have shown that interferon beta not only reduces the frequency of relapses by one-third, but also significantly delays the second relapse, provided it is administrated early, that is, immediately following the first relapse. The reduction in the patient's quality of life caused by the illness can be appreciably improved by a whole series of symptomatic treatments. The ideal situation is a cooperative effort by an interdisciplinary team.

  1. Trigeminal Neuralgia and Multiple Sclerosis: A Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, David B; Koehler, Peter J; Boes, Christopher J

    2017-09-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) was first described in Lehrbuch der Nervenkrankheiten für Ärzte und Studirende in 1894 by Hermann Oppenheim, including a pathologic description of trigeminal root entry zone demyelination. Early English-language translations in 1900 and 1904 did not so explicitly state this association compared with the German editions. The 1911 English-language translation described a more direct association. Other later descriptions were clinical with few pathologic reports, often referencing Oppenheim but citing the 1905 German or 1911 English editions of Lehrbuch. This discrepancy in part may be due to the translation differences of the original text.

  2. An observational study of alemtuzumab following fingolimod for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Mark; Pearson, Owen; Illes, Zsolt

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a series of patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) who experienced significant and unexpected disease activity within the first 12 months after switching from fingolimod to alemtuzumab. METHODS: Patients with relapsing MS treated sequentially with fingolimod...... then alemtuzumab who experienced significant subsequent disease activity were identified by personal communication with 6 different European neuroscience centers. RESULTS: Nine patients were identified. Median disease duration to alemtuzumab treatment was 94 (39-215) months and follow-up from time of first...... consideration should be given to mode of action of individual therapies and sequential treatment effects in MS when designing personalized treatment regimens....

  3. Clinical and imaging assessment of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocca, Maria A; Amato, Maria P; De Stefano, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), grey matter damage is widespread and might underlie many of the clinical symptoms, especially cognitive impairment. This relation between grey matter damage and cognitive impairment has been lent support by findings from clinical and MRI studies. However...... that causes clinical symptoms to trigger. Findings on cortical reorganisation support the contribution of brain plasticity and cognitive reserve in limiting cognitive deficits. The development of clinical and imaging biomarkers that can monitor disease development and treatment response is crucial to allow...

  4. Clinical Relevance of Brain Volume Measures in Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Stefano, Nicola; Airas, Laura; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease with an inflammatory and neurodegenerative pathology. Axonal loss and neurodegeneration occurs early in the disease course and may lead to irreversible neurological impairment. Changes in brain volume, observed from the earliest stage of MS...... therefore have important clinical implications affecting treatment decisions, with several clinical trials now demonstrating an effect of disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) on reducing brain volume loss. In clinical practice, it may therefore be important to consider the potential impact of a therapy...

  5. Patient perceptions of multiple sclerosis and its treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Seze J, Borgel F, Brudon F

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Jérôme de Seze1, Florent Borgel2, Frédérique Brudon31Department of Neurology CHRU de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, 2Medical Center, Grenoble, 3Clinique du Tonkin, Villeurbanne, FranceBackground: In order to improve the treatment outcome in multiple sclerosis, it is important to document the factors that influence adherence to therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine patient perceptions and awareness of multiple sclerosis and its treatment, treatment adherence, and impact on quality of life and daily living.Methods: This was a cross-sectional observational study performed in France. Each participating neurologist included the first three patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who consulted after the start of the study. Data on clinical features were collected from a physician questionnaire and on disease and treatment perception and on quality of life from a patient autoquestionnaire.Results: A total of 175 neurologists entered 202 patients in the study. The mean duration of disease was 8.0 ± 7.0 years, and immunomodulatory treatment had been administered for a mean duration of 3.0 ± 2.0 years. A total of 166 patients (82.2% were treated with interferon-ß preparations and 36 patients (17.8% with glatiramer acetate. Eighty-five patients (42.1% reported missing their injections from time to time and 36 patients (17.8% reported “drug holidays”. The most frequently given reason for nonadherence was forgetfulness (38.7% of cases. Eighty-six patients (42.6% and 70 patients (34.7% claimed to be well informed about their disease and treatment, respectively. Adherence was significantly higher in well informed patients (P = 0.035. The majority of patients (176 patients, 87.1% intended continuing their current treatment and 49.5% considered that their current treatment might reduce relapses. The most frequently reported side effect was muscle pain (124 patients, 61.4%.Conclusion: Patient understanding of treatment for disease

  6. Acute and chronic pain syndromes in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    A representative sample of 117 patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) was interviewed on pain syndromes. Chronic syndromes lasting more than one month included dysaestesthesia, low back pain, spasms, tonic seizures, tightening and painful sensations in the extremities. Acute syndromes...... with pain at the time of the examination increased with age and duration of disease. Patients with pain were significantly more often spastic and significantly more often sought alternative treatment forms. No difference was found for mean age, sex, physical impairment, duration of disease from onset of MS...

  7. Serial MRI studies using gadolinium DTPA in active multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.H.; Johnson, G.; Barnes, D.; Rudge, P.; McDonald, W.I.

    1988-01-01

    It has been suggested that blood brain barrier (BBB) impairment is a necessary early event in the pathogenesis of the multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. To evaluate such an hypothesis in vivo would require: (1) serial imaging studies using a modality with high sensitivity for detecting plaques; (2) a contrast enhancing agent which demonstrates BBB impairment. A serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study was undertaken of a group of MS patients using the contrast agent gadolinium-DTPA. As it has been suggested that T 1 and T 2 relaxation times are longer in acute than chronic MS lesions, these were also measured. 3 refs.; 1 figure

  8. Quality of life assessment in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisić-Tepavčević Darija

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disease of central nervous system. The main physiopatological feature of MS is demyelination. Multiple sclerosis is one of three most common causes of severe disability in youngest people. In patients with MS, apart from complete psychophysical status and objective neurologic status, a subjective perception of symptoms and signs, known as quality of life, must be considered, too. The aim of this study was to estimate a health related quality of life (HRQoL in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS and to investigate the correlations between scores of HRQoL and selected demographic and clinical parameters. Methods. A cross-sectional study was performed in patients meeting following inclusion criteria: MS diagnosis (McDonald's criteria, age 18-60 years, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS < 8, and written informed consent. Exclusion criteria were exacerbation of MS in the last month, any preexisting major chronic illness and/or psychiatric disorders and antidepressive and/or corticosteroid therapy in the last month. The quality of life was measured by a disease specific instrument, MSQoL-54 (The Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life. The neurological impairment was assessed using the Expended Disability Status Scale (EDSS and Mini Mental Scale (MMS. The presence and severity of depression was estimated by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS. The presence and severity of fatigue was assessed by the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and correlation analysis. Results. The higher HRQoL score was registered for mental health (56.3 ± 19.5 than for physical one(51.3 ± 17.9, which means that physical disability had more important influence on quality of life deterioration comparing to mental health. The highest values of HRQoL were observed in domains of Cognitive Functioning (77.4 ± 22.5 and Pain (75.7 ± 25.5. The lowest scores of

  9. Multiple sclerosis pathogenesis: missing pieces of an old puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanzadeh, Reza; Brück, Wolfgang; Minagar, Alireza; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali

    2018-06-08

    Traditionally, multiple sclerosis (MS) was considered to be a CD4 T cell-mediated CNS autoimmunity, compatible with experimental autoimmune encephalitis model, which can be characterized by focal lesions in the white matter. However, studies of recent decades revealed several missing pieces of MS puzzle and showed that MS pathogenesis is more complex than the traditional view and may include the following: a primary degenerative process (e.g. oligodendroglial pathology), generalized abnormality of normal-appearing brain tissue, pronounced gray matter pathology, involvement of innate immunity, and CD8 T cells and B cells. Here, we review these findings and discuss their implications in MS pathogenesis.

  10. Two Cases Of Multiple Sclerosis Accompanying Psychiatric Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Şengel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Scientific bacground: It has been reported that; Multiple Sclerosis (MS may be presented with many psychiatric symptoms such as anxiety, depression, mania and psychosis. MS cases, presented with psychiatric symptoms were also reported. Cases: Two MS cases, diagnosed as psychotic and bipolar disorder respectively, were reported in this paper. Both of the cases were responded to the steroid treatment, and neurological and psychiatric examinations were found to be normal after one month. CONCLUSION: MS cases might be presented with psychiatric complaints and symptoms except neurological ones. We conclude that; psychiatric evaluation as well as the neurological evaluation is important in the MS cases presented with psychiatric symptoms

  11. Nitric oxide synthase expression and enzymatic activity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, H; Andersen, B; Wanscher, B

    2004-01-01

    We used post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance to obtain paired biopsies from the brains of four patients with clinical definite multiple sclerosis (MS). Samples were analyzed for the immunoreactivity (IR) of the three nitric oxide (NO) synthase isoforms [inducible, neuronal......NOS expressing cells in active lesions. NOS IR expressing cells were widely distributed in plaques, in white and gray matter that appeared normal macroscopically, and on MR. Endothelial NOS (eNOS) was highly expressed in intraparenchymal vascular endothelial cells of MS patients. A control group matched for age...

  12. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, S.D.; Devereux, C.; Troiano, R.; Hafstein, M.P.; Zito, G.; Hernandez, E.; Lavenhar, M.; Vidaver, R.; Dowling, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI; 1980 cGy) or sham irradiation was given to 40 patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) in a prospective, randomised, double-blind study. During mean follow-up of 21 months, MS patients treated with TLI has less functional decline than sham-irradiated MS patients (p<0.01). A significant relation was noted between absolute blood lymphocyte counts in the first year after TLI and subsequent course, patients with higher lymphocyte counts generally having a worse prognosis (p<0.01). TLI was well tolerated and associated with only mild short-term, and to date, long-term side-effects. (author)

  13. Brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis: therapeutic, cognitive and clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Multiple sclerosis (MS was always considered as a white matter inflammatory disease. Today, there is an important body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that gray matter involvement and the neurodegenerative mechanism are at least partially independent from inflammation. Gray matter atrophy develops faster than white matter atrophy, and predominates in the initial stages of the disease. The neurodegenerative mechanism creates permanent damage and correlates with physical and cognitive disability. In this review we describe the current available evidence regarding brain atrophy and its consequence in MS patients.

  14. Nature plus nurture: the triggering of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekerle, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical and experimental studies indicate that multiple sclerosis develops as consequence of a failed interplay between genetic ("nature") and environmental ("nurture") factors. A large number of risk genes favour an autoimmune response against the body's own brain matter. New experimental data indicate that the actual trigger of this attack is however provided by an interaction of brain-specific immune cells with components of the regular commensal gut flora, the intestinal microbiota. This concept opens the way for new therapeutic approaches involving modulation of the microbiota by dietary or antibiotic regimens.

  15. Nature, nurture, and microbes: The development of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekerle, H

    2017-11-01

    This paper argues that multiple sclerosis (MS) is the result of an autoimmune attack against components of the central nervous system (CNS). The effector cells involved in the pathogenic process are CNS-autoreactive T cells present in the healthy immune system in a resting state. Upon activation, these cells cross the blood-brain barrier and attack the CNS target tissue. Recent evidence indicates that autoimmune activation may happen in the intestine, following an interaction of bacterial components of the gut flora with local CNS autoreactive T cells. The consequences of this concept are discussed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Survival of patients with multiple sclerosis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Hyllested, K

    1994-01-01

    We estimated survival probability and excess death rates for patients with MS on the basis of data from the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry, which includes virtually all patients diagnosed with MS in Denmark (population, five million) since 1948. We reviewed and reclassified all case records...... in women (versus 46 years). The median survival time from diagnosis was 22 years in men (versus 37 years) and 28 years in women (versus 42 years). The excess death rate between onset and follow-up (observed deaths per 1,000 person-years minus the expected number of deaths in a matched general population...

  17. Neonatal vitamin D status and risk of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk Nielsen, Nete; Munger, Kassandra L; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    2017-01-01

    study. Dried blood spots samples (DBSS) belonging to 521 patients with MS were identified in the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank. For every patient with MS, 1-2 controls with the same sex and birth date were retrieved from the Biobank (n = 972). Level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) in the DBSS......OBJECTIVE: As previous research has suggested that exposure to vitamin D insufficiency in utero may have relevance for the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), we aimed to examine the direct association between level of neonatal vitamin D and risk of MS. METHODS: We carried out a matched case-control...

  18. Assessing Information Needs for a Personal Multiple Sclerosis Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonheim, Aleksander Nygård; Babic, Ankica

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a prototype of a mobile application for patient self-management within the field of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Five study subjects provided information needs by suggesting functionalities and evaluating three existing MS applications. Prominent functionalities were to collect data about symptoms, physical activities, mood and goals in a form of a mobile diary. Collected data would be visually presented in a graph to support self-management and motivation. A low-fidelity prototype relies in first hand on four selected modules, two Diary modules, one Visualisation module and a Physical activity module. A high-fidelity prototype is being implemented and will be further evaluated by the experts.

  19. Multiple sclerosis: general features and pharmacologic approach; Esclerosis multiple: aspectos generales y abordaje farmacologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen Lagumersindez, Denis; Martinez Sanchez, Gregorio [Instituto de Farmacia y Alimentos, Universidad de La Habana, La Habana (Cuba)

    2009-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune, inflammatory and desmyelinization disease central nervous system (CNS) of unknown etiology and critical evolution. There different etiological hypotheses talking of a close interrelation among predisposing genetic factors and dissimilar environmental factors, able to give raise to autoimmune response at central nervous system level. Hypothesis of autoimmune pathogeny is based on study of experimental models, and findings in biopsies of affected patients by disease. Accumulative data report that the oxidative stress plays a main role in pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Oxygen reactive species generated by macrophages has been involved as mediators of demyelinization and of axon damage, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and strictly in multiple sclerosis. Disease diagnosis is difficult because of there is not a confirmatory unique test. Management of it covers the treatment of acute relapses, disease modification, and symptoms management. These features require an individualized approach, base on evolution of this affection, and tolerability of treatments. In addition to diet, among non-pharmacologic treatments for multiple sclerosis it is recommended physical therapy. Besides, some clinical assays have been performed in which we used natural extracts, nutrition supplements, and other agents with promising results. Pharmacology allowed neurologists with a broad array of proved effectiveness drugs; however, results of research laboratories in past years make probable that therapeutical possibilities increase notably in future. (Author)

  20. Physical activity and exercise priorities in community dwelling people with multiple sclerosis: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stennett, Andrea; De Souza, Lorraine; Norris, Meriel

    2018-07-01

    Exercise and physical activity have been found to be beneficial in managing disabilities caused by multiple sclerosis. Despite the known benefits, many people with multiple sclerosis are inactive. This study aimed to identify the prioritised exercise and physical activity practices of people with multiple sclerosis living in the community and the reasons why they are engaged in these activities. A four Round Delphi questionnaire scoped and determined consensus of priorities for the top 10 exercise and physical activities and the reasons why people with multiple sclerosis (n = 101) are engaged in these activities. Data were analysed using content analysis, descriptive statistics, and non-parametric tests. The top 10 exercise and physical activity practices and the top 10 reasons why people with multiple sclerosis (n = 70) engaged in these activities were identified and prioritised. Consensus was achieved for the exercise and physical activities (W = 0.744, p multiple sclerosis engaged in exercise and physical activity were diverse. These self-selected activities and reasons highlighted that people with multiple sclerosis might conceptualise exercise and physical activity in ways that may not be fully appreciated or understood by health professionals. Considerations of the views of people with multiple sclerosis may be essential if the goal of increasing physical activity in this population is to be achieved. Implications for Rehabilitation Health professionals should work collaboratively with people with multiple sclerosis to understand how they prioritise activities, the underlying reasons for their prioritisations and embed these into rehabilitation programmes. Health professionals should utilise activities prioritised by people with multiple sclerosis in the community as a way to support, promote, and sustain exercise and physical activity in this population. Rehabilitation interventions should include both the activities people with multiple

  1. Sit less and move more: perspectives of adults with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminian, Saeideh; Ezeugwu, Victor E; Motl, Robert W; Manns, Patricia J

    2017-12-20

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic neurological disease with the highest prevalence in Canada. Replacing sedentary behavior with light activities may be a feasible approach to manage multiple sclerosis symptoms. This study explored the perspectives of adults with multiple sclerosis about sedentary behavior, physical activity and ways to change behavior. Fifteen adults with multiple sclerosis (age 43 ± 13 years; mean ± standard deviation), recruited through the multiple sclerosis Clinic at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, participated in semi-structured interviews. Interview audios were transcribed verbatim and coded. NVivo software was used to facilitate the inductive process of thematic analysis. Balancing competing priorities between sitting and moving was the primary theme. Participants were aware of the benefits of physical activity to their overall health, and in the management of fatigue and muscle stiffness. Due to fatigue, they often chose sitting to get their energy back. Further, some barriers included perceived fear of losing balance or embarrassment while walking. Activity monitoring, accountability, educational and individualized programs were suggested strategies to motivate more movement. Adults with multiple sclerosis were open to the idea of replacing sitting with light activities. Motivational and educational programs are required to help them to change sedentary behavior to moving more. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION One of the most challenging and common difficulties of multiple sclerosis is walking impairment that worsens because of multiple sclerosis progression, and is a common goal in the rehabilitation of people with multiple sclerosis. The deterioration in walking abilities is related to lower levels of physical activity and more sedentary behavior, such that adults with multiple sclerosis spend 8 to 10.5 h per day sitting. Replacing prolonged sedentary behavior with light physical activities, and incorporating education

  2. Multiple Sclerosis in the Contemporary Age: Understanding the Millennial Patient with Multiple Sclerosis to Create Next-Generation Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Madison R; Okuda, Darin T

    2018-02-01

    The average age of onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) is between 20 and 40 years of age. Therefore, most new patients diagnosed with MS within the next 10 to 15 years will be from the millennial generation, representing those born between 1982 and 2000. Certain preferences and trends of this contemporary generation will present new challenges to the MS physician and effective MS care. By first understanding these challenges, relevant and successful solutions can be created to craft a system of care that best benefits the millennial patient with MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, Charbel A.; Zheng Weili; Mark Haacke, E.; Webb, Sam; Nichol, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Material and Methods: Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. Results: MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Conclusion: Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  4. Profile of the Brazilian scientific production in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araujo C.R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the profile of the Brazilian output in the field of multiple sclerosis from 1981 to 2004. The search was conducted through the MEDLINE and LILACS databases, selecting papers in which the term "multiple sclerosis" was defined as the main topic and "Brazil" or "Brasil" as others. The data were analyzed regarding the themes, the state in Brazil and institution where the papers were produced, the journals where the papers were published, journal's impact factor, and language. The search disclosed 141 documents (91 from MEDLINE and LILACS, and 50 from LILACS only published in 44 different journals (23 of them MEDLINE-indexed. A total of 111 documents were produced by 17 public universities, 29 by 3 private medical schools and 1 by a non-governmental organization. There were 65 original contributions, 37 case reports, 20 reviews, 6 PhD dissertations, 5 guidelines, 2 validation studies, 2 clinical trials, 2 chapters in textbooks, 1 Master of Science thesis, and 1 patient education handout. The journal impact factor ranged from 0.0217 to 6.039 (median 3.03. Of 91 papers from MEDLINE, 65 were published by Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria. More than 90% of the papers were written in Portuguese. São Paulo was the most productive state in the country, followed by Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais and Paraná. Eighty-two percent of the Brazilian output came from the Southeastern region.

  5. Insights into the Changing Perspectives of Multiple Sclerosis in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekha Pandit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is being diagnosed in increasing numbers in metropolitan cities of India for which the availability of specialist neurologists and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI facilities are primarily responsible. Epidemiological data are unavailable. Existing data have been obtained from small often retrospective studies from different parts of the country. These earlier studies suggested that optic nerve and spinal cord involvement are considerably high, and that perhaps optic spinal MS was the most prevalent form in India. On this basis it was also speculated that neuromyelitis optica (NMO may be overrepresented in Indians. However in recent times, prospective studies backed by MRI data have shown no distinct differences between MS seen in the west and India. Sero positivity for NMO IgG is low though NMO phenotype disorders constitute nearly 20% of demyelinating disorders in India. Genetic susceptibility for MS among Indians may be similar to that for white populations. In the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, HLA DR1*1501 has been strongly associated with MS in Indians. A recent study that evaluated the established non-MHC multiple sclerosis loci in a small data set of Indian patients suggested a strong similarity with white populations. This review highlights some of the background information available on MS from India and so also some recent studies that unveiled the disease characteristics in Indian patients.

  6. Update on riboflavin and multiple sclerosis: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid Naghashpour

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS. Riboflavin plays an important role in myelin formation, and its deficiency is implicated as a risk factor for multiple sclerosis. Here, we systematically reviewed the literature concerning the health benefits of riboflavin on MS. The literature recorded within four main databases, including relevant clinical trials, experimental, and case-control studies from 1976 to 2017 were considered. Both human and animal studies were included for review, with no restrictions on age, gender, or ethnicity.  Experimental studies demonstrated that riboflavin deficiency triggers neurologic abnormalities related to peripheral neuropathies such as demyelinating neuropathy. Moreover, randomized controlled trials (RCT and case-control studies in which MS patients received riboflavin supplementation or had higher dietary riboflavin intake showed improvements in neurological motor disability. Riboflavin is a cofactor of xanthine oxidase and its deficiency exacerbates low uric acid caused by high copper levels, leading to myelin degeneration. The vitamin additionally plays a significant role in the normal functioning of glutathione reductase (GR as an antioxidant enzyme, and conditions of riboflavin deficiency lead to oxidative damage. Riboflavin promotes the gene and protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the CNS of an animal model of MS, suggesting that BDNF mediates the beneficial effect of riboflavin on neurological motor disability. Research to date generally supports the role of riboflavin in MS outcomes. However, further observational and interventional studies on human populations are warranted to validate the effects of riboflavin.

  7. Allopregnanolone and Neuroinflammation: a Focus on Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid eNoorbakhsh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The progesterone derivative, allopregnanolone (ALLO, is one of the most widely studied compounds among neurosteroids. Through interactions with GABA-A receptors expressed by neurons and glial cells, ALLO has been shown to affect diverse aspects of neural cell physiology, including cell proliferation and survival, migration and gene expression. Recent data point to important roles for ALLO in different neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS. Dysregulation in ALLO biosynthesis pathways has been reported in brain tissue from MS patients as well as in the central nervous system (CNS tissue derived from MS animal models. Administration of ALLO has been shown to ameliorate neurobehavioral deficits together with neuropathology and inflammation in the CNS of animals with autoimmune demyelination. These findings are in line with previous reports indicating growth- and differentiation-promoting actions of ALLO on neurons and glial cells as well as its neuroprotective effects in the context of other CNS diseases. Nonetheless, these findings have also raised the possibility that ALLO might influence leukocyte biology and associated neuroinflammatory mechanisms independent of its neuroregenerative properties. Herein, we review the current knowledge regarding the role of ALLO in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, and discuss the potential cell and molecular pathways that might be influenced by ALLO in the context of disease.

  8. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in a Chronic Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe eFonseca-Kelly

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a naturally-occurring polyphenol that activates SIRT1, an NAD-dependent deacetylase. SRT501, a pharmaceutical formulation of resveratrol with enhanced systemic absorption, prevents neuronal loss without suppressing inflammation in mice with relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a model of multiple sclerosis. In contrast, resveratrol has been reported to suppress inflammation in chronic EAE, although neuroprotective effects were not evaluated. The current studies examine potential neuroprotective and immunomodulatory effects of resveratrol in chronic EAE induced by immunization with myelin oligodendroglial glycoprotein peptide in C57/Bl6 mice. Effects of two distinct formulations of resveratrol administered daily orally were compared. Resveratrol delayed the onset of EAE compared to vehicle-treated EAE mice, but did not prevent or alter the phenotype of inflammation in spinal cords or optic nerves. Significant neuroprotective effects were observed, with higher numbers of retinal ganglion cells found in eyes of resveratrol-treated EAE mice with optic nerve inflammation. Results demonstrate that resveratrol prevents neuronal loss in this chronic demyelinating disease model, similar to its effects in relapsing EAE. Differences in immunosuppression compared with prior studies suggest that immunomodulatory effects may be limited and may depend on specific immunization parameters or timing of treatment. Importantly, neuroprotective effects can occur without immunosuppression, suggesting a potential additive benefit of resveratrol in combination with anti-inflammatory therapies for multiple sclerosis.

  9. Update on riboflavin and multiple sclerosis: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghashpour, Mahshid; Jafarirad, Sima; Amani, Reza; Sarkaki, Alireza; Saedisomeolia, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Riboflavin plays an important role in myelin formation, and its deficiency is implicated as a risk factor for multiple sclerosis. Here, we systematically reviewed the literature concerning the health benefits of riboflavin on MS. The literature recorded within four main databases, including relevant clinical trials, experimental, and case-control studies from 1976 to 2017 were considered. Both human and animal studies were included for review, with no restrictions on age, gender, or ethnicity. Experimental studies demonstrated that riboflavin deficiency triggers neurologic abnormalities related to peripheral neuropathies such as demyelinating neuropathy. Moreover, randomized controlled trials (RCT) and case-control studies in which MS patients received riboflavin supplementation or had higher dietary riboflavin intake showed improvements in neurological motor disability. Riboflavin is a cofactor of xanthine oxidase and its deficiency exacerbates low uric acid caused by high copper levels, leading to myelin degeneration. The vitamin additionally plays a significant role in the normal functioning of glutathione reductase (GR) as an antioxidant enzyme, and conditions of riboflavin deficiency lead to oxidative damage. Riboflavin promotes the gene and protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the CNS of an animal model of MS, suggesting that BDNF mediates the beneficial effect of riboflavin on neurological motor disability. Research to date generally supports the role of riboflavin in MS outcomes. However, further observational and interventional studies on human populations are warranted to validate the effects of riboflavin. PMID:29085589

  10. [A review of multiple sclerosis (2). Diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Altarriba, M C; Ramos-Campoy, O; Luna-Calcaño, I M; Arrieta-Antón, E

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a major demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It has a significant economic and social impact. Its etiology is unclear, although there are several hypotheses, such as infections or genetics. In its pathophysiology, it seems that immune activation attacks the myelin sheath, causing a progressive and irreversible axonal degeneration. The disease produces a variety of symptoms, and diagnosis requires fulfilling a number of criteria and the exclusion of other possible causes. The role of neuroimaging is very important, especially Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Despite the availability of disease-modifying drugs, none of them are able to halt its progress, and the most useful drugs are those designed to alleviate the symptoms of outbreaks. Overall, multiple sclerosis requires a significant effort in research to clarify not only why and how it occurs, as well as the development of new measures to improve quality of life of affected patients. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. [A review of multiple sclerosis (1). Presentation of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Altarriba, M C; Ramos-Campoy, O; Luna-Calcaño, I M; Arrieta-Antón, E

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a major demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It has a significant economic and social impact. Its etiology is unclear, although there are several hypotheses, such as infections or genetics. In its pathophysiology, it seems that immune activation attacks the myelin sheath, causing a progressive and irreversible axonal degeneration. The disease produces a variety of symptoms, and diagnosis requires fulfilling a number of criteria and the exclusion of other possible causes. The role of neuroimaging, especially MRI, is very important. Despite the availability of disease-modifying drugs, none of them are able to halt its progress, and the most useful drugs are those designed to alleviate the symptoms of outbreaks. Overall, multiple sclerosis requires a significant effort in research to clarify not only why and how it occurs, but also to develop of new measures to improve the life of affected patients. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasma Biomarkers Discriminate Clinical Forms of Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera-Alhambra, Marta; Casrouge, Armanda; de Andrés, Clara; Seyfferth, Ansgar; Ramos-Medina, Rocío; Alonso, Bárbara; Vega, Janet; Fernández-Paredes, Lidia; Albert, Matthew L.; Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis, the most common cause of neurological disability in young population after trauma, represents a significant public health burden. Current challenges associated with management of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients stem from the lack of biomarkers that might enable stratification of the different clinical forms of MS and thus prompt treatment for those patients with progressive MS, for whom there is currently no therapy available. In the present work we analyzed a set of thirty different plasma cytokines, chemokines and growth factors present in circulation of 129 MS patients with different clinical forms (relapsing remitting, secondary progressive and primary progressive MS) and 53 healthy controls, across two independent cohorts. The set of plasma analytes was quantified with Luminex xMAP technology and their predictive power regarding clinical outcome was evaluated both individually using ROC curves and in combination using logistic regression analysis. Our results from two independent cohorts of MS patients demonstrate that the divergent clinical and histology-based MS forms are associated with distinct profiles of circulating plasma protein biomarkers, with distinct signatures being composed of chemokines and growth/angiogenic factors. With this work, we propose that an evaluation of a set of 4 circulating biomarkers (HGF, Eotaxin/CCL11, EGF and MIP-1β/CCL4) in MS patients might serve as an effective tool in the diagnosis and more personalized therapeutic targeting of MS patients. PMID:26039252

  13. Multiple Sclerosis Relapses: Epidemiology, Outcomes and Management. A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalincik, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Relapses (episodic exacerbations of neurological signs or symptoms) are a defining feature of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), the most prevalent MS phenotype. While their diagnostic value relates predominantly to the definition of clinically definite MS, their prognostic value is determined by their relatively high associated risk of incomplete remission resulting in residual disability. The mechanisms governing a relapse incidence are unknown, but numerous modifiers of relapse risk have been described, including demographic and clinical characteristics, many of which represent opportunities for improved disease management. Also relapse phenotypes have been associated with patient and disease characteristics and an individual predisposition to certain phenotypic presentations may imply individual neuroanatomical disease patterns. While immunomodulatory therapies and corticosteroids represent the mainstay of relapse prevention and acute management, respectively, their effect has only been partial and further search for more efficient relapse therapies is warranted. Other areas of research include pathophysiology and determinants of relapse incidence, recurrence and phenotypes, including the characteristics of the relapsing and non-relapsing multiple sclerosis variants and their responsiveness to therapies. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Cannabinoids in the management of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Malfitano

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Anna Maria Malfitano, Maria Chiara Proto, Maurizio BifulcoDipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di SalernoAbstract: The endocannabinoid system and cannabinoid-based treatments have been involved in a wide number of diseases. In particular, several studies suggest that cannabinoids and endocannabinoids may have a key role in the pathogenesis and therapy of multiple sclerosis (MS. In this study we highlight the main findings reported in literature about the relevance of cannabinoid drugs in the management and treatment of MS. An increasing body of evidence suggests that cannabinoids have beneficial effects on the symptoms of MS, including spasticity and pain. In this report we focus on the effects of cannabinoids in the relief of spasticity describing the main findings in vivo, in the mouse experimental allergic encephalomyelitis model of MS. We report on the current treatments used to control MS symptoms and the most recent clinical studies based on cannabinoid treatments, although long-term studies are required to establish whether cannabinoids may have a role beyond symptom amelioration in MS.Keywords: cannabinoids, multiple sclerosis, spasticity

  15. Cultivating the Multiple Sclerosis Workforce of the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Gabriele C; Buckle, Guy; Cortese, Irene; Graves, Jennifer S; Halper, June; Newsome, Scott D; Sicotte, Nancy; Ford, Corey C

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex neurologic disorder that affects people with ever-changing needs. The MS health-care field has entered an era of exponential knowledge growth in which better understanding of the immunologic dysregulation of the disease has translated into an expanding array of treatment options. It is estimated that, if it has not already, within the next decade the demands of a growing MS patient population will outstrip the number of professionals dedicated to the management of this chronic, lifelong disease. Therefore, there is a pressing need to attract and retain clinicians in this dynamic field. In response to this need, the Foundation of the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers organized a 2-day colloquium, a Mentorship Forum, on January 23-24, 2015, bringing together talented internal medicine and neurology trainees from across North America with an interest in MS and neuroimmunology. This article highlights the rationale for the MS Mentorship Forum, its structure and content, and its outcomes. We believe that the stage has been set to interest young, promising clinicians in learning more about MS and to encourage them to consider a career in this field. In so doing, we hope to contribute to the development of the next generation of MS experts to make a palpable difference in the lives of those affected by MS.

  16. Treatment of multiple sclerosis with chinese scalp acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jason Jishun; Cheng, Wei; Liu, Ming; Li, He; Lü, Xiaolin; Sun, Zhongren

    2013-01-01

    Chinese scalp acupuncture is a contemporary acupuncture technique with just 40 years of history. It integrates traditional Chinese needling methods with Western medical knowledge of the cerebral cortex and has been proven to be a very effective technique for treating multiple sclerosis (MS) and other central nervous system disorders. A 65-year-old male patient who had had MS for 20 years was treated with Chinese scalp acupuncture. The motor area, sensory area, foot motor and sensory area, balance area, hearing and dizziness area, and tremor area were stimulated once a week for 10 weeks, then once a month for six sessions. After the 16 treatments, the patient showed remarkable improvements. He was able to stand and walk without any problems. The numbness and tingling in his limbs did not bother him anymore. He had more energy and had not experienced incontinence of urine or dizziness after the first treatment. He was able to return to work full time. At this writing, the patient has been in remission for 26 months. This case demonstrates that Chinese scalp acupuncture can be a very effective treatment for patients with MS. Chinese scalp acupuncture holds the potential to expand treatment options for MS in both conventional and complementary or integrative therapies. It can not only relieve symptoms, increase the patient's quality of life, and slow and reverse the progression of physical disability but also reduce the number of relapses and help patients with multiple sclerosis to remain in remission.

  17. High-field MR imaging of spinal cord multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De La Paz, R.L.; Floris, R.; Norman, D.; Enzmann, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty-one high-field MR imaging studies (1.5 T, General Electric Signa) of the spinal cord were performed in 42 patients (27 female, 15 male; mean age, 40 years) with clinically definitive (n = 34) or probable (n = 8) multiple sclerosis and suspected spinal cord lesions. MR imaging showed focal spinal cord abnormalities in 38 (75%) of 51 studies. T2-weighted images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 38 studies, T1-weighted images were abnormal (showing areas of low signal intensity or mass effect) in 16 (42%) of 38, and GRASS images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 9 (82%) of 11 cases. Brain MR imaging showed periventricular lesions typical of multiple sclerosis in 34 (81%) of 42 studies. Spinal cord studies were positive in eight cases with normal brain MR images, and brain studies were positive in 13 instances of normal spinal cord MR images. Four lesions were at the cervicomedullary junction, 44 in the cervical spinal cord, and three in the thoracic cord. Mass effect in cord lesions, simulating neoplasm, was seen in seven patients during the acute symptomatic phase. Serial studies in three patients with decreasing symptoms showed a reduction after 3-4 weeks and resolution of the mass effect after 2-6 months

  18. Anesthetic management of a patient with multiple sclerosis - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Barbin Zuccolotto

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease of the brain and spinal cord, characterized by muscle weakness, cognitive dysfunction, memory loss, and personality disorders. Factors that promote disease exacerbation are stress, physical trauma, infection, surgery, and hyperthermia. The objective is to describe the anesthetic management of a case referred to urological surgery. Case report: A female patient, 44 years of age, with multiple sclerosis, diagnosed with nephrolithiasis, referred for endoscopic ureterolythotripsy. Balanced general anesthesia was chosen, with midazolam, propofol and remifentanil target-controlled infusion; sevoflurane via laryngeal mask airway; and spontaneous ventilation. Because the patient had respiratory difficulty presenting with chest wall rigidity, it was decided to discontinue the infusion of remifentanil. There was no other complication or exacerbation of disease postoperatively. Conclusion: The use of neuromuscular blockers (depolarizing and non-depolarizing is a problem in these patients. As there was no need for muscle relaxation in this case, muscle relaxants were omitted. We conclude that the combination of propofol and sevoflurane was satisfactory, not resulting in hemodynamic instability or disease exacerbation.

  19. New approaches in the management of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie J Barten

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Laurie J Barten1, Douglas R Allington1, Kendra A Procacci2, Michael P Rivey11The University of Montana and Community Medical Center, Missoula, MT, USA; 2The University of Montana School of Pharmacy, Missoula, MT, USAAbstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a central nervous system chronic inflammatory disease that is characterized by an extensive and complex immune response. Scientific advances have occurred in immunology, pathophysiology, and diagnostic and clinical assessment tools, and recent discovery of unique therapeutic targets has spurred numerous Phase II and Phase III clinical trials. Reductions in MS relapse rates and improvements in T2 or gadolinium-enhancing lesion burdens have been reported from Phase III trials that include fingolimod, alemtuzumab, cladribine, and rituximab. Promising Phase II trial data exist for teriflunomide, daclizumab, laquinimod, and fumarate. The optimism created by these favorable findings must be tempered with evaluation of the adverse effect profile produced by these new agents. Given the discovery of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with the use of natalizumab, ongoing vigilance for rare and life-threatening reactions due to new agents should be paramount. Patients with MS often experience difficulty with ambulation, spasticity, and cognition. Recent clinical trial data from two Phase III dalfampridine-SR trials indicate certain patients receive benefits in ambulation. This article provides an overview of data from clinical trials of newer agents of potential benefit in MS.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, Phase II trials, Phase III trials, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, monoclonal antibody

  20. Cognitive status in patients with multiple sclerosis in Lanzarote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Martín, María Yaiza; Eguia-Del Río, Pablo; González-Platas, Montserrat; Jiménez-Sosa, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common feature in multiple sclerosis affecting ~43%-72% of patients, which involves cognitive functions such as memory, processing speed, attention, and executive function. The aim of this study was to describe the extent and pattern of the involvement of cognitive impairment and psychological status in all patients with multiple sclerosis on a small Spanish island. In all, 70 patients and 56 healthy controls were included in the study between February 2013 and May 2013. All participants were assessed using the Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Test. The patients also completed instruments to evaluate the presence of fatigue, perceived cognitive dysfunction, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. All procedures were performed in a single session. Cognitive impairment, defined as a score <1.5 standard deviation on two subtests of the battery, was present in 35% of the participants. The most frequently affected domain was working memory, followed by verbal memory and processing speed. Disease duration showed a moderate correlation with visuospatial memory and processing speed. The Expanded Disability Status Scale score correlated with verbal and processing speed. Verbal memory was correlated with depression symptoms and fatigue. Cognitive impairment was present in 35% of the study population. The most affected domains were working memory and verbal memory. Working memory and verbal fluency deficit are independent factors of disease evolution. Cognitive decline is related to clinical variables and psychological measures such as fatigue or depression but not to anxiety.

  1. Conventional MRI and magnetisation transfer imaging of tumour-like multiple sclerosis in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metafratzi, Z.; Argyropoulou, M.I.; Efremidis, S.C.; Tzoufi, M.; Papadopoulou, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Tumefactive multiple sclerosis is a rare entity in children. Differential diagnosis includes other mass lesions such as neoplasm and abscess. A case of tumefactive multiple sclerosis in a child is presented. The open-ring pattern of enhancement on conventional MRI and magnetisation transfer imaging was important for the initial diagnosis and the evaluation of the course of the disease. (orig.)

  2. Increased osteopontin plasma levels in multiple sclerosis patients correlate with bone-specific markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, M.H.J.; ten Kate, J.; Drent, R.J.M.; Polman, C.H.; Hupperts, R.

    2010-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine osteopontin has been found to be highly expressed in multiple sclerosis lesions and plasma levels are increased during relapses in relapse-onset multiple sclerosis patients. The objective was to determine the relationship between osteopontin plasma and cerebrospinal

  3. Physical Telerehabilitation in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis with Significant Mobility Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-16-1-0704 TITLE: Physical Telerehabilitation in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis with Significant Mobility Impairment...including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing ...29 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Physical Telerehabilitation in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis with Significant Mobility

  4. Lesional-targeting of neuroprotection to the inflammatory penumbra in experimental multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Izki, S.; Pryce, G.; Hankey, D.J.R.; Lidster, K.; von Kutzleben, S.M.; Browne, L.; Clutterbuck, L.; Posada, C.; Chan, A.W.E.; Amor, S.; Perkins, V.; Gerritsen, W.H.; Ummenthum, K.; Peferoen-Baert, R.; van der Valk, P.; Montoya, A.; Joel, S.P.; Garthwaite, J.; Giovannoni, G.; Selwood, D.L.; Baker, D.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive multiple sclerosis is associated with metabolic failure of the axon and excitotoxicity that leads to chronic neurodegeneration. Global sodium-channel blockade causes side effects that can limit its use for neuroprotection in multiple sclerosis. Through selective targeting of drugs to

  5. Use of neuromuscular electrostimulation in the treatment of dysphagia in patients with multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaardt, Hans; van Dam, Danielle; Wever, Nienke M.; Bruggeman, Caroline E.; Koops, Johan; Fokkens, Wytske J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We explored the possible effects of neuromuscular electrostimulation on the swallowing function of patients with multiple sclerosis and swallowing problems. METHODS: Twenty-five patients (average age, 53.1 years; SD, 9.8 years) with multiple sclerosis and swallowing problems were treated

  6. Outpatient physiotherapy and complex inpatient rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis patients: are there any differences?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řasová, K.; Bartušková, T.; Rybníčková, M.; Dobrovodská, G.; Marková, M.; Jandová, D.; Zimová, D.; Bučilová, V.; Štětkářová, I.; Špaňhelová, S.; Kovari, M.; Cichy, B.; Krupová, M.; Vlčková, K.; Martinková, Patrícia

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, 11 Suppl. (2013), s. 116-116 ISSN 1352-4585. [Congress of the European-Committee-for-Treatment-and-Research-in-Multiple-Sclerosis /29./. 02.10.2013-05.10.2013, Copenhagen] Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) Prvouk P34 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : physiotherapy * multiple sclerosis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  7. X-irradiation of thyroid during therapy of patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agte, B.S.; Efimova, A.S.; Kalmykova, T.N.; Bajkova, V.P.

    1985-01-01

    X-radiation of 27 patients with thyroid at acute therapeutically resistant, progradient form of multiple sclerosis has been applied. Indistinct therapeutic effect attributed to depression of auto-aggressive allergic processes in cerebrospinal formations is noted in 20 patients after one or two courses of radiotherapy. The method can be used in complex therapy of progradient forms of multiple sclerosis

  8. Is impaired cerebral vasoreactivity an early marker of cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Aude; Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Deverdun, Jeremy; Molino, François; Maréchal, Bénédicte; Picot, Marie-Christine; Ayrignac, Xavier; Carra, Clarisse; Bauchet, Luc; Krainik, Alexandre; Labauge, Pierre; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    The link between cerebral vasoreactivity and cognitive status in multiple sclerosis remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate a potential decrease of cerebral vasoreactivity in multiple sclerosis patients and correlate it with cognitive status. Thirty-three patients with multiple sclerosis (nine progressive and 24 remitting forms, median age: 39 years, 12 males) and 22 controls underwent MRI with a hypercapnic challenge to assess cerebral vasoreactivity and a neuropsychological assessment. Cerebral vasoreactivity, measured as the cerebral blood flow percent increase normalised by end-tidal carbon dioxide variation, was assessed globally and by regions of interest using the blood oxygen level-dependent technique. Non-parametric statistics tests were used to assess differences between groups, and associations were estimated using linear models. Cerebral vasoreactivity was lower in patients with cognitive impairment than in cognitively normal patients (p=0.004) and was associated with education level in patients (R 2 = 0.35; p = 0.047). There was no decrease in cerebral vasoreactivity between patients and controls. Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis may be mediated through decreased cerebral vasoreactivity. Cerebral vasoreactivity could therefore be considered as a marker of cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis. • Cerebral vasoreactivity does not differ between multiple sclerosis patients and controls. • Cerebral vasoreactivity measure is linked to cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis. • Cerebral vasoreactivity is linked to level of education in multiple sclerosis.

  9. Feasibility of mesenchymal stem cell culture expansion for a phase I clinical trial in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchon, Sarah M; Lingas, Karen T; Reese Koç, Jane; Hooper, Brittney M; Maitra, Basabi; Fox, Robert M; Imrey, Peter B; Drake, Kylie M; Aldred, Micheala A; Lazarus, Hillard M; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system for which therapeutic mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is under study. Published experience of culture-expanding multiple sclerosis patients' mesenchymal stem cells for clinical trials is limited. To determine the feasibility of culture-expanding multiple sclerosis patients' mesenchymal stem cells for clinical use. In a phase I trial, autologous, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from 25 trial participants with multiple sclerosis and eight matched controls, and culture-expanded to a target single dose of 1-2 × 10 6 cells/kg. Viability, cell product identity and sterility were assessed prior to infusion. Cytogenetic stability was assessed by single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of mesenchymal stem cells from 18 multiple sclerosis patients and five controls. One patient failed screening. Mesenchymal stem cell culture expansion was successful for 24 of 25 multiple sclerosis patients and six of eight controls. The target dose was achieved in 16-62 days, requiring two to three cell passages. Growth rate and culture success did not correlate with demographic or multiple sclerosis disease characteristics. Cytogenetic studies identified changes on one chromosome of one control (4.3%) after extended time in culture. Culture expansion of mesenchymal stem cells from multiple sclerosis patients as donors is feasible. However, culture time should be minimized for cell products designated for therapeutic administration.

  10. Is Hypovitaminosis D One of the Environmental Risk Factors for Multiple Sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrot-Deseilligny, Charles; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The role of hypovitaminosis D as a possible risk factor for multiple sclerosis is reviewed. First, it is emphasized that hypovitaminosis D could be only one of the risk factors for multiple sclerosis and that numerous other environmental and genetic risk factors appear to interact and combine to trigger the disease. Secondly, the classical…

  11. Reliability and Clinical Significance of Mobility and Balance Assessments in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learmonth, Yvonne C.; Paul, Lorna; McFadyen, Angus K.; Mattison, Paul; Miller, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish the test-retest reliability, clinical significance and precision of four mobility and balance measures--the Timed 25-Foot Walk, Six-minute Walk, Timed Up and Go and the Berg Balance Scale--in individuals moderately affected by multiple sclerosis. Twenty four participants with multiple sclerosis (Extended…

  12. Multiple sclerosis in children: an update on clinical diagnosis, therapeutic strategies, and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Amy; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bar-Or, Amit; Mikaeloff, Yann; Tardieu, Marc; Banwell, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    The clinical features, diagnostic challenges, neuroimaging appearance, therapeutic options, and pathobiological research progress in childhood—and adolescent—onset multiple sclerosis have been informed by many new insights in the past 7 years. National programmes in several countries, collaborative research efforts, and an established international paediatric multiple sclerosis study group have contributed to revised clinical diagnostic definitions, identified clinical features of multiple sclerosis that differ by age of onset, and made recommendations regarding the treatment of paediatric multiple sclerosis. The relative risks conveyed by genetic and environmental factors to paediatric multiple sclerosis have been the subject of several large cohort studies. MRI features have been characterised in terms of qualitative descriptions of lesion distribution and applicability of MRI aspects to multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria, and quantitative studies have assessed total lesion burden and the effect of the disease on global and regional brain volume. Humoral-based and cell-based assays have identified antibodies against myelin, potassium-channel proteins, and T-cell profiles that support an adult-like T-cell repertoire and cellular reactivity against myelin in paediatric patients with multiple sclerosis. Finally, the safety and efficacy of standard first-line therapies in paediatric multiple sclerosis populations are now appreciated in more detail, and consensus views on the future conduct and feasibility of phase 3 trials for new drugs have been proposed. PMID:25142460

  13. Altered expression patterns of group I and II metabotropic glutamate receptors in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, J. J. G.; Wolswijk, G.; Bö, L.; van der Valk, P.; Polman, C. H.; Troost, D.; Aronica, E.

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a role for glutamate receptors in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we have focused specifically on the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in multiple sclerosis brain tissue. The expression of group I (mGluR1alpha and

  14. Body fluid markers to monitor multiple sclerosis: The assays and the challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laman, J.D.; Thompson, E.J.; Kappos, L.

    1998-01-01

    The need for reliable markers of disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) to better guide basic research, diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapy is well-recognized. A recent European Charcot Foundation Symposium (Body fluid markers for course and activity of disease in multiple sclerosis

  15. Perspective and Experiences of Iranian People With Multiple Sclerosis Regarding Leisure: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ghanbari; Shayanpour

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple Sclerosis, as a progressive disease, influences most of occupational performance areas. Objectives This study was conducted to describe the perspectives and experiences regarding leisure of people with multiple sclerosis in Ahvaz city, Iran. Patients and Methods The study was a descriptive phenomenological study using purposeful sampling. Data saturation was ach...

  16. Vitamin D supplementation reduces relapse rate in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients treated with natalizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Julie Hejgaard; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin D insufficiency is common among multiple sclerosis patients, and hypovitaminosis D has been associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) risk and disease activity.  Objective To investigate how recommendations on vitamin D3 supplements affect 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in ...

  17. Sodium intake and multiple sclerosis activity and progression in BENEFIT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzgerald, Kathryn C; Munger, Kassandra L; Hartung, Hans-Peter

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether a high-salt diet, as measured by urinary sodium concentration, is associated with faster conversion from clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) to multiple sclerosis (MS) and MS activity and disability. METHODS: BENEFIT was a randomized clinical trial comparing early versus...... delayed interferon beta-1b treatment in 465 patients with a CIS. Each patient provided a median of 14 (interquartile range = 13-16) spot urine samples throughout the 5-year follow-up. We estimated 24-hour urine sodium excretion level at each time point using the Tanaka equations, and assessed whether...... in T2 lesion volume: -0.11, 95% CI = -0.25 to 0.04; change in EDSS: -0.01, 95% CI = -0.09 to 0.08; relapse rate: HR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.56-1.07). Results were similar in categorical analyses using quintiles. INTERPRETATION: Our results, based on multiple assessments of urine sodium excretion over 5...

  18. Suppressive effect of glucocorticoids on TNF-alpha production is associated with their clinical effect in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winsen, L.M.L.; Polman, C.H.; Dijkstra, C.D.; Tilders, F.J.H.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.

    2010-01-01

    A reduced sensitivity to glucocorticoids can affect the clinical effect of treatment with high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone in multiple sclerosis. We prospectively studied 27 multiple sclerosis patients who were treated with intravenous methylprednisolone. Before and after treatment in vitro

  19. Application of the 2012 revised diagnostic definitions for paediatric multiple sclerosis and immune-mediated central nervous system demyelination disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pelt, E. Danielle; Neuteboom, Rinze F.; Ketelslegers, Immy A.; Boon, Maartje; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.

    Background Recently, the International Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group (IPMSSG) definitions for the diagnosis of immune-mediated acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) of the central nervous system, including paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS), have been revised. Objective To evaluate the

  20. Epidemiological study of multiple sclerosis in La Rioja.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bártulos Iglesias, M; Marzo Sola, M E; Estrella Ruiz, L A; Bravo Anguiano, Y

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease that causes severe disability in younger patients. Many epidemiology studies have confirmed a variable prevalence. The objective of this study was to analyse the prevalence of this disease in La Rioja (Spain), using such variables as age and sex; type of progression, initial form of the disease, EDSS and number of relapses; disease-modifying treatment and reasons for treatment withdrawal; personal and family history of cancer; and incidence and mortality. Analysis of patients in La Rioja diagnosed with MS (according to Poser criteria or the 2005 McDonald criteria) during a 10-year period (2001-2011). Data were collected from hospital records, multiple sclerosis associations, and personal records kept by neurologists. The MS prevalence rate in La Rioja is 65 patients/100 000 inhabitants with an incidence rate of 3.5 cases/100 000 residents per year. Relapsing-remitting MS is present in 67.6% of the patient total. Mean age of onset is 20-29 years (range, 12 to 70). Most EDSS scores were mostly ≤ 2. Untreated MS cases account for 47.6% of the total and the most commonly used therapy is interferon. We detected 4 haematological tumours and 7 families with multiple members affected by MS. Prevalence and incidence are similar to those found in other regions Spain. The average age at onset age for primary progressive MS is slightly higher than in other papers (40-49 years). In families with multiple patients, MS may be more aggressive. Disability in these patients remains very severe. We require more epidemiology studies with a variety of data gathering methods to support findings for prevalence obtained in different provinces. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. MRI findings of multiple sclerosis involving the brainstem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Hoon; Jeong, Hae Woong; Kim, Hyun Jin; Cho, Jae Kwoeng; Kim, Chang Soo

    2001-01-01

    To describe MRI findings of multiple sclerosis involving the brainstem. Among 35 cases of clinically definite multiple sclerosis, the authors retrospectively analysed 20 in which the brainstem was involved. MR images were analysed with regard to involvement sites in the brainstem or other locations, signal intensity, multiplicity, shape, enhancement pattern, and contiguity of brainstem lesions with cisternal or ventricular CSF space. The brainstem was the only site of involvement in five cases (25%), while simultaneous involvement of the brainstem and other sites was observed in 15 cases (75%). No case involved only the midbrain or medulla oblongata, and simultaneous involvement of the midbrain, pons and medulla oblongata was noted in 12 cases (60%). The most frequently involved region of the brainstem was the medulla oblongata (n=13; 90%), followed by the pons (n=17; 85%) and the midbrain (n=16; 80%). Compared with normal white matter, brainstem lesions showed low signal intensity on T1 weighted images, and high signal intensity on T2 weighted, proton density weighted, and FLAIR images. In 17 cases (85%), multiple intensity was observed, and the shape of lesions varied: oval, round, elliptical, patchy, crescentic, confluent or amorphous were seen on axial MR images, and in 14 cases (82%), coronal or sagittal scanning showed that lesions were long and tubular. Contiguity between brainstem lesions and cisternal or ventricular CSF space was seen in all cases (100%) involving midbrain (16/16) and medulla oblongata (18/18) and in 15 of 17 (88%) involving the pons. Contrast enhancement was apparent in 7 of 12 cases (58%). In the brainstem, MRI demonstrated partial or total contiguity between lesions and cisternal or ventricular CSF space, and coronal or sagittal images showed that lesions were long and tubuler

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis in patients with multiple sclerosis, expert consensus. On behalf of the Colombian Association of Neurology, Committee of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Carlos; Torres-Duque, Carlos A; Munoz-Ceron, Joe; Álvarez, Carlos; García, Juan R; Zarco, Luis; Vélez, Lázaro A; Awad, Carlos; Castro, Carlos Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory and neurodegenerative demyelinating disease. Current treatment of multiple sclerosis focuses on the use of immunomodulatory, immunosuppressant, and selective immunosuppressant agents. Some of these medications may result in high risk of opportunistic infections including tuberculosis. The purpose of this study was to obtain consensus from a panel of neurologists, pulmonologists, infectious disease specialists, and epidemiology experts regarding the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of latent tuberculosis in patients with multiple sclerosis. A panel of experts in multiple sclerosis and tuberculosis was established. The methodological process was performed in three phases: definition of questions, answer using Delphi methodology, and the discussion of questions not agreed. Tuberculosis screening is suggested when multiple sclerosis drugs are prescribed. The recommended tests for latent tuberculosis are tuberculin and interferon gamma release test. When an anti-tuberculosis treatment is indicated, monitoring should be performed to determine liver enzyme values with consideration of age as well as comorbid conditions such as a history of alcoholism, age, obesity, concomitant hepatotoxic drugs, and history of liver disease. Latent tuberculosis should be considered in patients with multiple sclerosis who are going to be treated with immunomodulatory and immunosuppressant medications. Transaminase level monitoring is required on a periodic basis depending on clinical and laboratory characteristics. In addition to the liver impairment, other side effects should be considered when Isoniazid is prescribed.

  3. Differential diagnosis of Mendelian and mitochondrial disorders in patients with suspected multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz Sand, Ilana B.; Honce, Justin M.; Lublin, Fred D.

    2015-01-01

    Several single gene disorders share clinical and radiologic characteristics with multiple sclerosis and have the potential to be overlooked in the differential diagnostic evaluation of both adult and paediatric patients with multiple sclerosis. This group includes lysosomal storage disorders, various mitochondrial diseases, other neurometabolic disorders, and several other miscellaneous disorders. Recognition of a single-gene disorder as causal for a patient’s ‘multiple sclerosis-like’ phenotype is critically important for accurate direction of patient management, and evokes broader genetic counselling implications for affected families. Here we review single gene disorders that have the potential to mimic multiple sclerosis, provide an overview of clinical and investigational characteristics of each disorder, and present guidelines for when clinicians should suspect an underlying heritable disorder that requires diagnostic confirmation in a patient with a definite or probable diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:25636970

  4. The essential role of t cells in multiple sclerosis: A reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cris S Constantinescu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system in which destruction of myelin and nerve axons has been shown to be mediated by immune mechanisms. Although the focus of research has been traditionally on T cells as key mediators of the immunopathology, more recent efforts at understanding this complex disorder have been directed increasingly at other cellular and humoral elements of the immune response. This review is a reappraisal of the crucial role of T cells, in particular the CD4+ helper T-cell subset, in multiple sclerosis. Recent evidence is discussed underlining the predominant contribution of T-cell-associated genes to the genome-wide association study results of multiple sclerosis susceptibility, the loss of T-cell quiescence in the conversion from clinically isolated syndrome to clinically definite multiple sclerosis, and the fact that T cells represent the main target of effective immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive treatments in multiple sclerosis.

  5. The enigma of multiple sclerosis: inflammation and neurodegeneration cause heterogeneous dysfunction and damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor

    2003-01-01

    progression correlate with axonal damage, and that brain atrophy resulting from axonal loss is a feature of early multiple sclerosis, and is not restricted to the secondary progressive forms of the disease. Inflammatory mediators (CD8 T cells and antibodies) are implicated in axonal damage, and treatment...... cells for oligodendrocytes. SUMMARY: Oligodendrocyte precursors are abundant in multiple sclerosis lesions, but fail to remyelinate. Oligodendrocyte growth and regeneration are probably compromised by the action of growth inhibitory signals and lack of growth stimuli. Inflammatory cells and mediators......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis has an autoimmune inflammatory component, which has dominated the description of multiple sclerosis. A degenerative component to multiple sclerosis was always apparent, but was underappreciated until recently. Recent work has brought...

  6. [Effects of nutritional status on the multiple sclerosis disease: systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ródenas Esteve, Irene; Wanden-Berghe, Carmina; Sanz-Valero, Javier

    2018-01-19

    To review the available scientific literature about the effects of nutritional status on the multiple sclerosis disease. A systematic review of the scientific literature in the Medline (PubMed), Scopus, Cochrane Library and Web of Science databases through November 2016. Search equation: ("Multiple Sclerosis"[Mesh] OR "Multiple Sclerosis"[Title/Abstract] OR "Disseminated Sclerosis"[Title/Abstract] OR "Multiple Sclerosis Acute Fulminating"[Title/Abstract]) AND ("Nutritional Status"[Mesh] OR "Nutritional Status"[Title/Abstract] OR "Nutrition Status"[Title/Abstract]). The quality of the selected articles was discussed using the STROBE questionnaire. The search was completed through experts inquiry and additional review of the bibliographic references included in the selected papers. The concordance between authors (Kappa index) had to be higher than 80% for inclusion in this review. Of the 160 references recovered, after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 29 articles were selected for review. Concordance between evaluators was 100.00%. The most studies established vitamin D levels. Others focused their research on finding out which nutrient deficits might be related to the multiple sclerosis development. Vitamin D may influence multiple sclerosis improvement. Sunlight and physical activity would be important factors, with nutritional status, in the course of this disease. It is necessary to produce new specific works that will delve into the subject to find out more about the relationship between nutritional status and multiple sclerosis.

  7. Increasing occurrence of multiple sclerosis in women correlates to hygiene level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Cendrowski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increasing incidence of multiple sclerosis, particularly among women in Europe and North America, has a multifactorial aetiology. Method: The aim of the current study was to ascertain the relation between the hygiene level and occurrence of multiple sclerosis in women in Poland. The study was based on a large cohort of 14,200 multiple sclerosis individuals (male – 6,106, female – 8,094 who died in the years 1981–2010 in Poland. The female to male ratio (the F:M ratio in the multiple sclerosis group was calculated using the number of deaths per year. The rate of late mortality in infants (LMI per 1,000 live births yearly was used as a marker of the hygiene level. A correlation analysis was carried out between the rate of LMI and the F:M ratio in the multiple sclerosis cohort in the years 1981–2010. Demographic data were obtained from the Central Statistical Office in Warsaw. Results: The F:M ratio in the multiple sclerosis group evidently increased (range 1.08–1.79 in the years 1981–2010, showing increasing occurrence of multiple sclerosis in women (p < 0.0001. A significant, strong and inverse correlation was found between the marker of the hygiene level (LMI rate and the F:M ratio in the multiple sclerosis group over three decades: linear correlation coefficient by Pearson: r = –0.693, p < 0.0001. By contrast with this result, no correlation was established between the hygiene level marker and proportion of women to men in the general population on account of extremely low variance of the F:M ratio (0.000025. Conclusion: The improvement of the hygiene level showed association with the increasing occurrence of multiple sclerosis in women in the years 1981–2010. The higher the hygiene level was, the greater the occurrence of female multiple sclerosis in Poland.

  8. Impact on healthcare resource utilization of multiple sclerosis in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicras-Mainar, Antoni; Ruíz-Beato, Elena; Navarro-Artieda, Ruth; Maurino, Jorge

    2017-12-29

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease with a high socioeconomic impact. The aim of this study was to assess healthcare resources utilization and costs in a sample of patients with MS. A retrospective, cohort study was conducted using electronic medical records from 19 primary care centres in Asturias and Catalonia, Spain. Adult patients diagnosed with MS were distributed into two groups according to the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score: 0-3.5 (no-moderate disability) and 4-9.5 (severe disability). Healthcare (direct cost) and non-healthcare costs (work productivity losses) were analysed. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used for correction, p < 0.05. A multiple regression model was performed to obtain the variables associated with costs. A total of 222 patients were analyzed; mean (SD) age: 45.5 (12.5) years, 64.4% female, and 62.2% presented a diagnosis of relapsing-remitting MS. Median EDSS score was 2.5, with 68.5% of the patients with no to moderate disability. The mean annual cost per MS patient was €25,103. For no-moderate and severe disability, the ANCOVA-adjusted mean annual cost was €23,157 and €29,242, respectively (p = 0.013). Direct costs and MS disease-modifying therapy accounted for 39.4% and 31.7% of the total costs, respectively. The total costs were associated with number of relapses (β = 0.135, p = 0.001), time since diagnosis (β = 0.281, p = 0.023), and age (β = 0.198, p = 0.037). Multiple sclerosis imposes a substantial economic burden on the Spanish National Health System, patients and society as a whole. Costs significantly correlated with disease progression.

  9. Disconnection mechanism and regional cortical atrophy contribute to impaired processing of facial expressions and theory of mind in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mike, Andrea; Strammer, Erzsebet; Aradi, Mihaly

    2013-01-01

    performance in multiple sclerosis. Mentalization performance of 49 patients with multiple sclerosis was compared to 24 age- and gender matched healthy controls. T1- and T2-weighted three-dimensional brain MRI images were acquired at 3Tesla from patients with multiple sclerosis and 18 gender- and age matched...

  10. Clinical and MRI features in pediatric multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Cailei; Xie Sheng; Xiao Jiangxi; Wang Shuang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and MRI features of multiple sclerosis in children, including the clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapse. Methods: In total, 16 cases of pediatric multiple sclerosis were included in this study. Of them, 11 patients were female and 5 were male, with the mean onset age of 10.1 years. They were followed up for 4 months to 7 years and found to have 1- 5 relapses. The clinical manifestations of CIS and relapse were analyzed by a pediatric neurologist. An experienced neuroradiologist reviewed the MRI images of CIS and relapse. Information on the location, size, and pattern of the lesions was gathered. The location of lesions included subcortical, central, and periventricular white matter, cortex, deep gray matter, brain stem, and cerebellum. Results: CIS episode presented acute onsets in 13/16 cases, with symptoms of cortices in 10 cases and visual impairment in 6 cases. Relapse occurred in 14/16 cases within one year. The incidence of symptoms of cortices was less frequent and severe in the second episode of MS, whereas the visual impairment had a high incidence. All patients had full recovery after the last episode. MRI of CIS showed confluent subcortical white matter lesions in 13/16 cases, abutting on central white matter lesions. The most frequently involved brain part was the frontal lobe, followed by the parietal lobe. Cortical involvement was observed in 9/16 cases. In 6 cases, periventricular white matter lesions were detected. Bilateral deep gray matter was abnormal in 4 cases. Other abnormalities included brain stem lesions in 5 cases, cerebellum lesions in 3 cases, optic nerve involvement in 3 cases, and pyramidal tract lesions in 2 cases. MRI of relapse revealed more small lesions in the subcortical and periventricular white matter in the patients. In the second episode, only 2 cases presented cortical involvement. Lesions were found in the brain stem in 4 cases and in the cerebellum in 5 cases. Pyramidal tract

  11. Cognitive status in patients with multiple sclerosis in Lanzarote

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Martín MY

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available María Yaiza Pérez-Martín,1 Pablo Eguia-del Río,2 Montserrat González-Platas,1 Alejandro Jiménez-Sosa31Service of Neurology, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, 2Service of Neurology, Doctor José Molina Orosa Hospital, Arrecife, Lanzarote, 3Unit of Research, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, SpainObjectives: Cognitive impairment is a common feature in multiple sclerosis affecting ~43%–72% of patients, which involves cognitive functions such as memory, processing speed, attention, and executive function. The aim of this study was to describe the extent and pattern of the involvement of cognitive impairment and psychological status in all patients with multiple sclerosis on a small Spanish island.Patients and methods: In all, 70 patients and 56 healthy controls were included in the study between February 2013 and May 2013. All participants were assessed using the Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Test. The patients also completed instruments to evaluate the presence of fatigue, perceived cognitive dysfunction, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. All procedures were performed in a single session.Results: Cognitive impairment, defined as a score <1.5 standard deviation on two subtests of the battery, was present in 35% of the participants. The most frequently affected domain was working memory, followed by verbal memory and processing speed. Disease duration showed a moderate correlation with visuospatial memory and processing speed. The Expanded Disability Status Scale score correlated with verbal and processing speed. Verbal memory was correlated with depression symptoms and fatigue.Conclusion: Cognitive impairment was present in 35% of the study population. The most affected domains were working memory and verbal memory. Working memory and verbal fluency deficit are independent factors of disease evolution. Cognitive decline is related to clinical variables and

  12. Leeds under a cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Before 26 April 1986 few people in the west had heard of Chernobyl. Then Chernobyl experienced the world's worst nuclear power station accident. In the wake of the disaster radioactivity fell on Britain and much of Europe. There was confusion and rumour on the television, in the papers and amongst ordinary people. What would the effect of the Chernobyl accident be? Was it safe to go out of doors? Was it safe to eat fresh vegetables? What was a safe level of radiation? What was a becquerel, a milliSievert or any of the other scientific terms with which we were bombarded by scientists and other experts? This booklet sets out to help answer these questions by looking at a hypothetical disaster at the nuclear power station at Heysham, near Morecambe in Lancashire. Using this scenario it shows what the worst consequences of a nuclear accident might be for the citizens of Leeds. It also explains in a straightforward way the meaning of many technical terms which will help you to understand the advice and comments of experts and to make your own judgement of what they say. (author)

  13. Gray Matter Is Targeted in First-Attack Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schutzer, Steven E.; Angel, Thomas E.; Liu, Tao; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Xie, Fang; Bergquist, Jonas P.; Vecsei, Lazlo' ; Zadori, Denes; Camp, David G.; Holland, Bart K.; Smith, Richard D.; Coyle, Patricia K.

    2013-09-10

    The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS), its driving pathogenesis at the earliest stages, and what factors allow the first clinical attack to manifest remain unknown. Some imaging studies suggest gray rather than white matter may be involved early, and some postulate this may be predictive of developing MS. Other imaging studies are in conflict. To determine if there was objective molecular evidence of gray matter involvement in early MS we used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of first-attack MS patients (two independent groups) compared to established relapsing remitting (RR) MS and controls. We found that the CSF proteins in first-attack patients were differentially enriched for gray matter components (axon, neuron, synapse). Myelin components did not distinguish these groups. The results support that gray matter dysfunction is involved early in MS, and also may be integral for the initial clinical presentation.

  14. A level set method for multiple sclerosis lesion segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Guo, Shuxu; Luo, Min; Shi, Xue; Bilello, Michel; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Li, Chunming

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we present a level set method for multiple sclerosis (MS) lesion segmentation from FLAIR images in the presence of intensity inhomogeneities. We use a three-phase level set formulation of segmentation and bias field estimation to segment MS lesions and normal tissue region (including GM and WM) and CSF and the background from FLAIR images. To save computational load, we derive a two-phase formulation from the original multi-phase level set formulation to segment the MS lesions and normal tissue regions. The derived method inherits the desirable ability to precisely locate object boundaries of the original level set method, which simultaneously performs segmentation and estimation of the bias field to deal with intensity inhomogeneity. Experimental results demonstrate the advantages of our method over other state-of-the-art methods in terms of segmentation accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reducing falls and improving mobility in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnoff, Jacob J; Sung, JongHun

    2015-06-01

    Falls are common in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), and are related to physical injury and reduce the quality of life. Mobility impairments are a significant risk factor for falls in persons with MS. Although there is evidence that mobility in persons with MS can be improved with rehabilitation, much less is known about fall prevention. This review focuses on fall prevention in persons with MS. Ten fall prevention interventions consisting of 524 participants with a wide range of disability were systematically identified. Nine of the 10 investigations report a reduction in falls and/or proportion of fallers following treatment. The vast majority observed an improvement in balance that co-occurred with the reduction in falls. Methodological limitations preclude any firm conclusions. Numerous gaps in the understanding of fall prevention in persons with MS are discussed. Well-designed randomized control trials targeting mobility and falls are warranted.

  16. Psychological functioning in primary progressive versus secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vleugels, L; Pfennings, L E; Pouwer, F

    1998-01-01

    Psychological functioning in two types of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is assessed: primary progressive (PP) and secondary progressive (SP) patients. On the basis of differences in clinical course and underlying pathology we hypothesized that primary progressive patients and secondary...... progressive patients might have different psychological functioning. Seventy patients treated in an MS centre were examined cross-sectionally. Forty had an SP course of MS and 30 a PP course. The 33 male and 37 female patients had a mean age of 48.4 years (SD 11.2) and mean age of onset of MS of 30.7 years...... (SD 11.1). Patients completed questionnaires measuring among others the following aspects of psychological functioning: depression (BDI, SCL-90), anxiety (STAI, SCL-90), agoraphobia (SCL-90), somatic complaints (SCL-90), hostility (SCL-90) and attitude towards handicap (GHAS). Patients with a PP...

  17. Prevalence, demographics and clinical characteristics of multiple sclerosis in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleu, Dirk; Mir, Danial; Al Tabouki, Ahmed; Mesraoua, Rim; Mesraoua, Boulenouar; Akhtar, Naveed; Al Hail, Hassan; D'souza, Atlantic; Melikyan, Gayane; Imam, Yahia Z B; Osman, Yasir; Elalamy, Osama; Sokrab, Tageldin; Kamran, Sadaat; Ruiz Miyares, Francisco; Ibrahim, Faiza

    2013-05-01

    No published epidemiologic data on multiple sclerosis (MS) in Qatar exist. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence, demographics and clinical characteristics of MS in the Middle Eastern country of Qatar. We analyzed data for Qatari MS patients fulfilling the McDonald diagnostic criteria. A total of 154 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. On 31 April 2010, the crude prevalence of MS in Qatar was 64.57 per 100,000 inhabitants (95% CI: 58.31-70.37). The female-to-male ratio was 1.33:1. A positive family history was found in 10.4% of included MS patients. We conclude that Qatar is now a medium-to-high risk area for MS, with some important differences in clinical characteristics as compared to other countries in the region.

  18. Monthly oral methylprednisolone pulse treatment in progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratzer, Rikke; Iversen, Pernille; Börnsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a large unmet need for treatments for patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Phase 2 studies with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker outcomes may be well suited for the initial evaluation of efficacious treatments. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of monthly oral...... methylprednisolone pulse treatment on intrathecal inflammation in progressive MS. METHODS: In this open-label phase 2A study, 15 primary progressive and 15 secondary progressive MS patients received oral methylprednisolone pulse treatment for 60 weeks. Primary outcome was changes in CSF concentrations of osteopontin...... no change in the CSF concentration of osteopontin, but we observed significant improvement in clinical scores, MTR, DTI and some secondary CSF outcome measures. Adverse events were well-known side effects to methylprednisolone. CONCLUSION: Monthly methylprednisolone pulse treatment was safe, but had...

  19. Prediction of response to interferon therapy in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Koch-Henriksen, N

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes encoding interferon response factor (IRF)-5, IRF-8 and glypican-5 (GPC5) have been associated with disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with interferon (IFN)-β. We analysed whether SNPs in the IRF5, IRF8 and GPC5...... genes are associated with clinical disease activity in MS patients beginning de novo treatment with IFN-β. METHODS: The SNPs rs2004640, rs3807306 and rs4728142 in IRF5, rs13333054 and rs17445836 in IRF8 and rs10492503 in GPC5 were genotyped in 575 patients with relapsing-remitting MS followed...... prospectively after the initiation of their first treatment with IFN-β. RESULTS: 62% of patients experienced relapses during the first 2 years of treatment, and 32% had disability progression during the first 5 years of treatment. Patients with a pretreatment annualized relapse rate >1 had an increased risk...

  20. Teriflunomide for multiple sclerosis in real-world setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Maria Louise; Molnar, T; Illes, Z

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Teriflunomide 14 mg is a once-daily oral disease-modifying treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. We examined adverse event (AE) profile and efficacy in real life. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this observational cohort study, we retrospectively examined 1521 blood samples...... and data of 102 patients followed for up to 28 months. RESULTS: The number of female patients starting teriflunomide peaked in the fifth decade, 10 years later compared to male patients (Ptreatment...... with interferon-beta. Expanded disability status scale improved in 11% of patients (18.2±3.6 months follow-up) and remained constant in 67.5% (15±5.3 months follow-up). Of ten relapses, three occurred within 6 months after starting treatment. Seventeen patients (16.5%) discontinued teriflunomide: 53% because...

  1. Safety concerns and risk management of multiple sclerosis therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soelberg Sorensen, P.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, more than ten drugs have been approved for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). Newer treatments may be more effective, but have less favorable safety record. Interferon-β preparations and glatiramer acetate treatment require frequent subcutaneous or intramuscular...... disease activity can choose between dimethyl fumarate and teriflunomide or the “old injectable.” Patients with very active MS may choose a more effective drug as the initial treatment. In case of side effects on one drug, switch to another drug can be tried. Suboptimal effect of the first drug indicates...... escalation to a highly efficacious drug. A favorable benefit-risk balance can be maintained by appropriate patient selection and appropriate risk management on therapy. New treatments will within the coming 1-2 years change our current treatment algorithm for relapsing-remitting MS....

  2. Cladribine tablets for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rammohan, Kottil; Giovannoni, Gavin; Comi, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the phase III CLARITY study, treatment with cladribine tablets at cumulative doses of 3.5 or 5.25mg/kg over 96 weeks led to significant reductions in annualized relapse rates (ARR) versus placebo in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Further post hoc analyses...... of CLARITY study data were conducted to determine the efficacy of cladribine tablets across patient subgroups stratified by baseline characteristics. METHODS: Relapse rates over the 96-week CLARITY study were analyzed in cohorts stratified by demographics; disease duration; treatment history and disease...... activity at baseline. RESULTS: In the intent-to-treat population (n=437, 433 and 456 in the placebo, cladribine 3.5 and 5.25mg/kg groups, respectively), treatment with cladribine tablets 3.5 and 5.25mg/kg led to consistent improvements in ARR versus placebo in patients stratified by gender; age (≤40...

  3. Volume measurement of multiple sclerosis lesions with magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, D.A.G.; Tofts, P.S.; Miller, D.H.; Du Boulay, G.H.; Feinstein, A.; Harvey, I.; Brenner, R.; McDonald, W.I.; Sacares, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    The ability to visualise multiple sclerosis lesions in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging suggests an important role in monitoring the course of the disease. In order to help the long-term assessment of prospective treatments, a semi-automated technique for measuring lesion volume has been developed to provide a quantitative index of disease progression. Results are presented from a preliminary study with a single patient and compared to measurements taken from lesion outlines traced by a neuroradiologist, two neurologists and a technician. The semi-automated technique achieved a precision of 6% compared to a range of 12-33% for the manual tracing method. It also reduced the human interaction time from at least 60 min to 15 min. (orig.)

  4. High-dose erythropoietin in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Karen; Magyari, Melinda; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Erythropoietin (EPO) is a part of an endogenous neuroprotective system in the brain and may address pathophysiological mechanisms in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a treatment effect of EPO on progressive MS. METHODS: This was a single-center, randomized......, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial, in which 52 patients with secondary or primary progressive MS were allocated to treatment with recombinant EPO (48,000 IU) or placebo, administered intravenously 17 times during 24 weeks. Patients had an Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS) from 4 to 6......: This study provides class II evidence that treatment with high-dose EPO is not an effective treatment in patients with moderately advanced progressive MS....

  5. The use of valproic acid and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nete Munk; Svanström, Henrik; Stenager, Egon

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animal studies have suggested that drugs inhibiting the enzyme histone deacetylase might have a beneficial effect on multiple sclerosis (MS). Valproic acid (VPA), an anti-epileptic drug, is the only widely used human drug with a histone deacetylase inhibitory effect. OBJECTIVE...... current VPA users nor recent users of VPA, who had ceased VPA treatment within the last year, were at a reduced risk of MS compared with non-users of VPA (HR = 1.30 (95% confidence interval, 0.44-3.80), n = 4, and HR = 1.22 (0.28-5.32), n = 2, respectively). Similarly, in an intention-to-treat analysis...

  6. Multiple sclerosis influences on the augmentation of serum Klotho concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, Mona; Aleagha, Mohammad Sajad Emami; Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    We have already shown that the concentration of secreted form of Klotho decreases in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The current study aimed at assessing possible changes in the serum Klotho concentration of MS patients. Participants involved...... 15 new cases of RRMS patients in the relapse phase, 15 RRMS patients who had been suffering from the disease for more than three years and were under regular treatments (interferon beta-1a) and, finally, 15 non-MS patients who constituted the control group. Beside thorough neurological examinations...... to be higher in MS patients when compared to control group. This finding might be attributed to treatment of MS patients with immunomodulatory drugs or a compensatory response to enhance CNS regeneration and/or vitamin D biosynthesis. Further studies are required to elucidate the role of Klotho in MS...

  7. Evolving concepts in the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comi, Giancarlo; Radaelli, Marta; Soelberg Sørensen, Per

    2017-01-01

    In the past 20 years the treatment scenario of multiple sclerosis has radically changed. The increasing availability of effective disease-modifying therapies has shifted the aim of therapeutic interventions from a reduction in relapses and disability accrual, to the absence of any sign of clinical...... or MRI activity. The choice for therapy is increasingly complex and should be driven by an appropriate knowledge of the mechanisms of action of the different drugs and of their risk-benefit profile. Because the relapsing phase of the disease is characterised by inflammation, treatment should be started...... as early as possible and aim to re-establish the normal complex interactions in the immune system. Before starting a treatment, neurologists should carefully consider the state of the disease, its prognostic factors and comorbidities, the patient's response to previous treatments, and whether the patient...

  8. Bone microarchitecture and bone mineral density in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, A; Oturai, A B; Søndergaard, H B

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are at increased risk of reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures. The aetiology of bone loss in MS is unclear. Trabecular bone score (TBS) is a novel analytical tool that provides a measurement of the bone microarchitecture. Decreased TBS...... included. TBS was calculated using TBS iNsight software (MediMaps® ). Multivariable regression analyses were performed with information on smoking, alcohol, glucocorticoid (GC) treatment, sun exposure, physical activity, vitamin D and BMI. RESULTS: Trabecular bone score was not significantly different from...... an age-matched reference population. Low TBS was associated with high age (P = .014) and smoking (P = .03). Smoking and physical inactivity were associated with low BMD in spine (P = .034, P = .032). GC treatment was not associated with TBS. CONCLUSION: We could not find altered TBS values among MS...

  9. Improved patient-reported health impact of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macdonell, Richard; Nagels, Guy; Laplaud, David-Axel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease that negatively impacts patients' lives. OBJECTIVE: ENABLE assessed the effect of long-term prolonged-release (PR) fampridine (dalfampridine extended release in the United States) treatment on patient-perceived health impact in patients...... with MS with walking impairment. METHODS: ENABLE was a 48-week, open-label, Phase 4 study of PR-fampridine 10 mg twice daily. Patients who showed any improvement in Timed 25-Foot Walk walking speed at weeks 2 and 4 and any improvement in 12-item MS Walking Scale score at week 4 remained on treatment....... The primary endpoint was change from baseline in 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) physical component summary (PCS) score. RESULTS: At week 4, 707/901 (78.5%) patients met the criteria to remain on treatment. Patients on treatment demonstrated significant and clinically meaningful improvements in SF-36...

  10. Principles of a new treatment algorithm in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Hans-Peter; Montalban, Xavier; Sorensen, Per Soelberg

    2011-01-01

    We are entering a new era in the management of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The first oral treatment (fingolimod) has now gained US FDA approval, addressing an unmet need for patients with MS who wish to avoid parenteral administration. A second agent (cladribine) is currently being...... considered for approval. With the arrival of these oral agents, a key question is where they may fit into the existing MS treatment algorithm. This article aims to help answer this question by analyzing the trial data for the new oral therapies, as well as for existing MS treatments, by applying practical...... clinical experience, and through consideration of our increased understanding of how to define treatment success in MS. This article also provides a speculative look at what the treatment algorithm may look like in 5 years, with the availability of new data, greater experience and, potentially, other novel...

  11. Immune activation in multiple sclerosis and interferon-beta therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakauer, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The PhD dissertation emanated from the Danish MS Research Centre, Rigshosptalet, Copenhagen. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the CNS. Inflammatory responses by T helper (Th)-lymphocytes are characterised by distinct cytokine expression profiles. In MS, activated Th1...... of inflammation or secondary lymphatic organs. Chemokine receptors are differentially expressed in T cells in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, indicating their role for in T-cell-recruitment to the CNS. Interferon (IFN)-beta is a first-line treatment for MS. The mechanism of action is unclear, but probably includes...... changes in lymphocyte activation, cytokine secretion, and trafficking. The aim of the studies was to shed more light on T-cell immunology in MS and IFN-beta treatment, as well as identifying putative biomarkers of treatment response and/or disease activity. In one study we identified a Th-cell subset...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in monitoring of treatment of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Walecki, J.; Stelmasiak, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish the value of MR in monitoring of treatment of multiple sclerosis with new drug 2-CDA and placebo. 83 patients (51 women, 32 men) were examined - 81 of them twice, 66 - three times: before and after 6 and 12 courses of treatment. Toshiba MRT50A machine was used. After the first 6 courses of treatment the number of new plaques was twice as big in placebo group than in 2-CDA group. After 12 courses it turned out that a certain inhibitory influence of 2-CDA on new plaques' appearance was more evident after 15 than 3 months after the end of its administration. This may indicate the delayed action of 2-CDA but requires further investigation. (author)

  13. Therapeutic interference with leukocyte recirculation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Sørensen, P S

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease where T cells are thought to initiate an inflammatory reaction in the brain and spinal cord, resulting in demyelination and axonal pathology. Interfering with the activation and recruitment of immune cells reduces disease activity in MS. We...... review the mechanism of action and treatment effects of natalizumab and fingolimod, which interfere with the recruitment of pathogenic immune cells in MS. Fingolimod blocks the egress of activated lymphocytes from lymph nodes by binding to the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor 1, but may also have...... effects on S1P receptor-expressing cells within the central nervous system (CNS). Natalizumab reduces the migration of lymphocytes to the CNS by binding to the α4 integrin very late antigen 4. Fingolimod and natalizumab also have other effects, but these are less well understood. Both treatments...

  14. Fingolimod for the Treatment of Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Altunrende

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system and is characterized by inflammation, demyelination, and axonal loss. Fingolimod is the first oral drug for the treatment of MS approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, European Union countries, and various other countries. The compound exerts its effect via interaction with lysophospholipid receptors known as sphingosine-1 phosphate receptors. Although fingolimod has a very convenient daily oral dosing, it may cause development of bradycardia at the first dose, macular edema, infection, all of which require attention. Randomized double-blind clinical trials have shown that fingolimod significantly reduces relapse rates and is beneficial in brain magnetic resonance imaging measures when compared with both placebo and intramuscular interferon β-1a. This review describes the characteristics of fingolimod concerning its efficacy, safety, and tolerability in the clinical context of the management of MS

  15. Therapeutic Inertia in the New Landscape of Multiple Sclerosis Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Saposnik

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The landscape of multiple sclerosis (MS treatment is constantly changing. Significant heterogeneity exists in the efficacy and risks associated with these therapies. Therefore, clinicians have the challenge to tailor treatment based on several factors (disease activity level, risk of progression, individual patient preferences and characteristics, personal expertise, etc., to identify the optimal balance between safety and efficacy. However, most clinicians have limited education in decision-making and formal training in risk management. Together, these factors may lead to therapeutic inertia (TI; defined as the absence of treatment initiation or intensification when therapeutic goals are unmet. TI may lead to suboptimal treatments choices, worse clinical outcomes, and more disability. This article provides a succinct overview on factors influencing TI in MS care.

  16. The incidence and prevalence of psychiatric disorders in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marrie, Ruth Ann; Reingold, Stephen; Cohen, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    -based studies, the prevalence of anxiety was 21.9% (95% CI: 8.76%-35.0%), while it was 14.8% for alcohol abuse, 5.83% for bipolar disorder, 23.7% (95% CI: 17.4%-30.0%) for depression, 2.5% for substance abuse, and 4.3% (95% CI: 0%-10.3%) for psychosis. CONCLUSION: This review confirms that psychiatric......BACKGROUND: Psychiatric comorbidity is associated with lower quality of life, more fatigue, and reduced adherence to disease-modifying therapy in multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this review are to estimate the incidence and prevalence of selected comorbid psychiatric...... disorders in MS and evaluate the quality of included studies. METHODS: We searched the PubMed, PsychInfo, SCOPUS, and Web of Knowledge databases and reference lists of retrieved articles. Abstracts were screened for relevance by two independent reviewers, followed by full-text review. Data were abstracted...

  17. Disclosing the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis: the Profile Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Vittorio; Ghezzi, A; Montanari, E; Radaelli, M; Comi, G; Bossa, R

    2012-12-01

    Communicating the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) is a challenging task, often undertaken with discomfort by most neurologists. Only a few studies have investigated patients' satisfaction with timing and way of receiving the diagnosis, but surveys regarding physicians' attitude towards diagnosis disclosure are even more limited. The goal of this work was to highlight Italian neurologists' behavioral and emotional approach to MS patients, making them sensitive to their difficulties and to the importance of an empathic relationship. The majority of Italian neurologists participating in our study have a good perception of their ability to manage this difficult communicating process and believe in the great effect this moment may have on a life-long disease experience. Improving communication skills may help the therapeutic alliance, enhancing patients' acceptance of the disease, as well as motivation and adherence to treatment.

  18. [Cystoid macular oedema after fingolimod treatment in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio-Sánchez, V M; Trujillo-Guzmán, L; Ramoa-Osorio, R

    2014-03-01

    A woman, treated with immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive drugs for multiple sclerosis, developed macular oedema 4 months after oral fingolimod administration. The patient was previously seen by an ophthalmologist, with a normal anterior segment and funduscopic examination. Four months after the treatment she referred to decreased visual acuity in both eyes. The funduscopic and OCT examination now revealed cystoid macular oedema (CME). Attention to visual changes and periodic funduscopic examinations are an important part of monitoring while using fingolimod. In our patient early recognition and discontinuation of fingolimod did not result in resolution of the CME. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. [Monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Seco, Victoria Galán; Casanova Peño, Ignacio; Arroyo González, Rafael

    2014-12-01

    Until the mid 1990s, with the appearance of interferon beta and glatiramer acetate, there was no treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). However, due to their moderate therapeutic potential in some patients, a broad search was continued to find new and more effective treatment strategies, largely concentrated on monoclonal antibodies (MOAB). Natalizumab, the first MOAB for the treatment of MS, was approved at the end of 2004, representing a major advance in the field of neuroimmunology. Today, there is broad experience with natalizumab and other MOAB (alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab and anti-lingo-1) that are pending commercialization or are under phase II or III of development with promising results. The present review analyzes the efficacy and safety results of all these drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Malignant multiple sclerosis: clinical and demographic prognostic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Hampshire-Araújo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Patients with malignant multiple sclerosis (MMS reach a significant level of disability within a short period of time (Expanded Disability Status Scale score of 6 within five years. The clinical profile and progression of the disease were analyzed in a Brazilian cohort of 293 patients. Twenty-five (8,53% patients were found to have MMS and were compared with the remaining 268 (91,47%. Women, non-white patients, older age at disease onset, shorter intervals between the first attacks, and more attacks in the first two years of the disease were all more common in the MMS group. These findings could serve as prognostic factors when making therapeutic decisions.

  1. A Case of Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Batur-Caglayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system (CNS. Since a correlation between gluten intake and incidence of MS had been reported, the relationship of antigliadin antibodies and MS was debated. Case Report. We report the case of a 45-year-old female MS patient who is under interferon treatment. After seven years of monitoring, during her routine gastroenterological assessment, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. Conclusion. Beside the neurological manifestations that have been demonstrated in about 10% of celiac disease (CD patients, white-matter abnormalities in brain MRI are uncommon and controversial. But in the literature, MS seems to be associated with CD as in our patient. We suggest that MS patients with gastroenterological complaints should undergo an assessment for CD.

  2. Multiple sclerosis exceptionally presenting as parkinsonism responds to intravenous methylprednisolone.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saidha, S

    2012-01-31

    Parkinsonism due to multiple sclerosis (MS) is rare. In previously reported patients with MS-induced parkinsonism, MS manifested first, followed a typical clinical course, and parkinsonism developed later in the course of the illness. We report a 52-year-old male presenting with parkinsonism as the initial manifestation of MS, in whom a subsequent MS relapse consisted of marked deterioration in parkinsonism, a clinical pattern not previously described in MS. A brain MRI demonstrated involvement of the substantia nigra and basal ganglia. This patient illustrates that the clinical presentation and progression of MS may rarely be characterised by predominating parkinsonian features which are reversible by treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone and interferon beta1a.

  3. Multiple sclerosis exceptionally presenting as parkinsonism responds to intravenous methylprednisolone.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saidha, S

    2010-05-01

    Parkinsonism due to multiple sclerosis (MS) is rare. In previously reported patients with MS-induced parkinsonism, MS manifested first, followed a typical clinical course, and parkinsonism developed later in the course of the illness. We report a 52-year-old male presenting with parkinsonism as the initial manifestation of MS, in whom a subsequent MS relapse consisted of marked deterioration in parkinsonism, a clinical pattern not previously described in MS. A brain MRI demonstrated involvement of the substantia nigra and basal ganglia. This patient illustrates that the clinical presentation and progression of MS may rarely be characterised by predominating parkinsonian features which are reversible by treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone and interferon beta1a.

  4. Mind-Body Medicine for Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Senders

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mind-body therapies are used to manage physical and psychological symptoms in many chronic health conditions. Objective. To assess the published evidence for using mind-body techniques for symptom management of multiple sclerosis. Methods. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Clinical Trials Register were searched from inception to March 24, 2012. Eleven mind-body studies were reviewed (meditation, yoga, biofeedback, hypnosis, relaxation, and imagery. Results. Four high quality trials (yoga, mindfulness, relaxation, and biofeedback were found helpful for a variety of MS symptoms. Conclusions. The evidence for mind-body medicine in MS is limited, yet mind-body therapies are relatively safe and may provide a nonpharmacological benefit for MS symptoms.

  5. The Gas6/TAM System and Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Mattia; Pirisi, Mario; Sainaghi, Pier Paolo

    2016-10-28

    Growth arrest specific 6 (Gas6) is a multimodular circulating protein, the biological actions of which are mediated by the interaction with three transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors: Tyro3, Axl, and MerTK, collectively named TAM. Over the last few decades, many progresses have been done in the understanding of the biological activities of this highly pleiotropic system, which plays a role in the regulation of immune response, inflammation, coagulation, cell growth, and clearance of apoptotic bodies. Recent findings have further related Gas6 and TAM receptors to neuroinflammation in general and, specifically, to multiple sclerosis (MS). In this paper, we review the biology of the Gas6/TAM system and the current evidence supporting its potential role in the pathogenesis of MS.

  6. Breaking down the gut microbiome composition in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhram, Adrian; Parvathy, Seema; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo; Silverman, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The gut microbiome, which consists of a highly diverse ecologic community of micro-organisms, has increasingly been studied regarding its role in multiple sclerosis (MS) immunopathogenesis. This review critically examines the literature investigating the gut microbiome in MS. A comprehensive search was performed of PubMed databases and ECTRIMS meeting abstracts for literature relating to the gut microbiome in MS. Controlled studies examining the gut microbiome in patients with MS were included for review. Identified studies were predominantly case-control in their design and consistently found differences in the gut microbiome of MS patients compared to controls. We examine plausible mechanistic links between these differences and MS immunopathogenesis, and discuss the therapeutic implications of these findings. Review of the available literature reveals potential immunopathogenic links between the gut microbiome and MS, identifies avenues for therapeutic advancement, and emphasizes the need for further systematic study in this emerging field.

  7. SWI enhances vein detection using gadolinium in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggi, Pietro; Mazzoni, Lorenzo N; Moretti, Marco; Grammatico, Matteo; Chiti, Stefano; Massacesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) combined with the FLAIR sequence provides the ability to depict in vivo the perivenous location of inflammatory demyelinating lesions – one of the most specific pathologic features of multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition, in MS white matter (WM) lesions, gadolinium-based contrast media (CM) can increase vein signal loss on SWI. This report focuses on two cases of WM inflammatory lesions enhancing on SWI images after CM injection. In these lesions in fact the CM increased the contrast between the parenchyma and the central vein allowing as well, in one of the two cases, the detection of a vein not visible on the same SWI sequence acquired before CM injection

  8. Increased multiple sclerosis relapses related to lower prevalence of pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vinícius Martins da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective The study aims to investigate the presence of pain amongst multiple sclerosis (MS patients. Method One hundred MS patients responded to questionnaires evaluating neuropathic and nociceptive pain, depression and anxiety. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann–Whitney U, Chi-Square and two-tailed Fisher’s exact tests and multivariate logistic regression. Results Women had a statistically higher prevalence of pain (p = 0.037, and chances of having pain after the age of 50 reduced. Women with pain had a statistically significant lower number of relapses (p = 0.003, restricting analysis to those patients with more than one relapse. After the second relapse, each relapse reduced the chance of having pain by 46%. Presence of pain was independent of Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS anxiety, and depression. Conclusion Our findings suggest a strong inverse association between relapses and pain indicating a possible protective role of focal inflammation in the control of pain.

  9. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andlauer, Till F M; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis.

  10. The importance of communication in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tsantes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent improvements in multiple sclerosis therapy have lead to consequent improvements in its prognosis: however, it still remains a chronic and unpredictable disease. The moment of the diagnosis is the starting point of a durable relationship between the physician and the patient, but, most of all, it is often referred to as the most traumatic experience in patients’ life. Patients’ compliance to prescribed therapies, so important in the course of every chronic condition, particularly hangs on the psychological approach used by the doctor in communicating and explaining the diagnosis for the first time, in addition to the patient’s personality. A brief overview on the main types of physicians’ and patients’ behaviours and communications styles is provided in this article.

  11. Social consequences of multiple sclerosis. Part 2. Divorce and separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfleger, C C H; Flachs, E M; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for follow-up studies of the familial situation of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the probability of MS patients to remain in marriage or relationship with the same partner after onset of MS in comparison with the population. PATIENTS...... AND METHODS: All 2538 Danes with onset of MS 1980-1989, retrieved from the Danish MS-Registry, and 50,760 matched and randomly drawn control persons were included. Information on family status was retrieved from Statistics Denmark. Cox analyses were used with onset as starting point. RESULTS: Five years after...... onset, the cumulative probability of remaining in the same relationship was 86% in patients vs. 89% in controls. The probabilities continued to deviate, and at 24 years, the probability was 33% in patients vs. 53% in the control persons (p

  12. Coronaviruses in brain tissue from patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dessau, R B; Lisby, G; Frederiksen, J L

    2001-01-01

    Brain tissue from 25 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS) and as controls brain tissue from 36 patients without neurological disease was tested for the presence of human coronaviral RNA. Four PCR assays with primers specific for N-protein of human coronavirus strain 229E...... and three PCR assays with primers specific for the nucleocapsid protein of human coronavirus strain OC43 were performed. Sporadic positive PCR assays were observed in both patients and controls in some of the PCR assays. However, these results were not reproducible and there was no difference...... in the proportion of positive signals from the MS patients compared to controls. Evidence for a chronic infection with the human coronaviruses strain 229E or OC43 in brain tissue from patients with MS or controls has not been found in this study....

  13. Orthodontic treatment for a patient with multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakathir, Manal A

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) that affects myelinated axons, destroying the myelin and damaging axons to varying degrees. The course of MS is highly varied and unpredictable. Metals used during orthodontic treatment can negatively affect imaging techniques used to diagnose and monitor the progression of MS, while medications used to treat MS can negatively affect orthodontic tooth movement. The present case report highlights some of the challenges encountered during orthodontic treatment of a patient with MS and how to overcome them. The patient was a 20-year-old woman with complaints of diastema and spacing in the upper arch. Although closing the spaces was challenging due to some of the MS medications, she was treated successfully, without complications, within 20 months using closing loops. PMID:28717636

  14. Psychiatric morbidity develops after onset of pediatric multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangsberg Boesen, Magnus; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Uldall, Peter Vilhelm

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (MS) affects life at a stage vital for social and educational achievements and psychiatric co-morbidity is common after MS onset. Few studies have examined psychiatric morbidity before MS onset. METHODS: In this nationwide study, detailed case...... with psychiatric morbidity as exposure and MS as outcome, and a matched cohort study with MS as exposure and psychiatric co-morbidity as outcome. Hazard ratios (HR) including 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox regression. RESULTS: We identified 212 children with MS and 1060 controls....... No association between psychiatric morbidity and the rate of MS was found before MS onset. After MS onset, children with MS had two times higher hazard for psychiatric co-morbidity compared with children without MS (HR=2.0; 95% CI=1.3-3.1; pPsychiatric morbidity seems to commence after MS...

  15. Orthognathic Surgery in a Patient with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bazie, Saleh A

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper was to report a case of orthognathic surgery successfully done in a patient with multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressive inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system affecting young adults, characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the brain and spinal cord leading to demyelination and focal axonal damage. Clinically, MS patients present with reversible neurological dysfunction in the early stages, which progresses to irreversible neurological disability and deficit. Oral manifestations of MS include facial numbness or pain, neuralgias, facial paralysis, dysarthria and dysphagia. While dental treatment is not contraindicated in MS patients, it is, however, limited to preventive and supportive dental care. A 23-year-old Saudi male patient with a diagnosis of MS since 2008 reported to the oral and maxillo-facial surgery (OMFS) department for correction of dentofacial deformity. The patient was under follow-up with the neurology department and was being treated with interferon beta-1a. Following consent from the neurologist and the patient, a Lefort 1 segmental osteotomy was done under general anesthesia. The patient was stable throughout the surgical procedure and during the postoperative period. The patient was discharged upon complete surgical recovery and no acute exacerbations of MS were reported during the perioperative period. Based on our observations, orthognathic and maxillofacial surgical procedures can be safely carried out in patients with MS, provided a strict perioperative prophylactic regimen for stress reduction and prevention of acute attacks of MS is adhered to. Due to the stressful nature of dental treatment and oral and maxillofacial surgical procedures, acute exacerbations of MS are very much likely. Hence, it is imperative that dental and oral surgical practitioners are aware of the manifestations of MS and are able to manage such patients with suitable treatment modifications.

  16. Color blindness among multiple sclerosis patients in Isfahan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaygannejad, Vahid; Golabchi, Khodayar; Dehghani, Alireza; Ashtari, Fereshteh; Haghighi, Sepehr; Mirzendehdel, Mahsa; Ghasemi, Majid

    2012-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of young and middle aged individuals with a demyelinative axonal damage nature in central nervous system that causes various signs and symptoms. As color vision needs normal function of optic nerve and macula, it is proposed that MS can alter it via influencing optic nerve. In this survey, we evaluated color vision abnormalities and its relationship with history of optic neuritis and abnormal visual evoked potentials (VEPs) among MS patients. The case group was included of clinically definitive MS patients and the same number of normal population was enrolled as the control group. Color vision of all the participants was evaluated by Ishihara test and then visual evoked potential (VEPs) and history of optic neuritis (ON) was assessed among them. Then, frequency of color blindness was compared between the case and the control group. Finally, color blinded patients were compared to those with the history of ON and abnormal VEPs. 63 MS patients and the same number of normal populations were enrolled in this study. 12 patients had color blindness based on the Ishihara test; only 3 of them were among the control group, which showed a significant different between the two groups (P = 0.013). There was a significant relationship between the color blindness and abnormal VEP (R = 0.53, P = 0.023) but not for the color blindness and ON (P = 0.67). This study demonstrates a significant correlation between color blindness and multiple sclerosis including ones with abnormal prolonged VEP latencies. Therefore, in individuals with acquired color vision impairment, an evaluation for potentially serious underlying diseases like MS is essential.

  17. Depressive Symptoms in Bariatric Surgery Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Carolyn J; Heinberg, Leslie J; Lapin, Brittany; Aminian, Ali; Sullivan, Amy B

    2018-04-01

    Bariatric surgery has been shown to be a safe and effective intervention for patients with comorbid obesity and multiple sclerosis (MS); however, this sub-population may be at heightened risk for pre- and postoperative depressive symptoms. This current exploratory study aims to describe the prevalence and nature of depressive symptoms in a sample of patients with MS who undergo bariatric surgery. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who received bariatric surgery and had a diagnosis of MS (n = 31) and a control sample of non-surgical MS patients with severe obesity (n = 828). Longitudinal outcome measures included the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and Multiple Sclerosis Performance Scale (MSPS). There were no significant differences in PHQ-9 total and item scores between groups at baseline. PHQ-9 scores significantly improved at years 1 (p bariatric surgery when compared to non-surgical controls. Higher BMI (p = 0.03) and worse overall quality of life (p bariatric group. When compared to controls, the bariatric group demonstrated improved MSPS scores on a trend level 1 year post-surgery (p = 0.08). Consistent with the literature on more general bariatric surgery populations, current findings highlight the possible early benefits of bariatric surgery for reducing depressive symptoms in this population when compared to controls. Importantly, results should be viewed as preliminary and additional research is needed to examine bariatric surgery and associations with depressive symptoms and performance in the MS population.

  18. Color blindness among multiple sclerosis patients in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a disease of young and middle aged individuals with a demyelinative axonal damage nature in central nervous system that causes various signs and symptoms. As color vision needs normal function of optic nerve and macula, it is proposed that MS can alter it via influencing optic nerve. In this survey, we evaluated color vision abnormalities and its relationship with history of optic neuritis and abnormal visual evoked potentials (VEPs among MS patients. Materials and Methods: The case group was included of clinically definitive MS patients and the same number of normal population was enrolled as the control group. Color vision of all the participants was evaluated by Ishihara test and then visual evoked potential (VEPs and history of optic neuritis (ON was assessed among them. Then, frequency of color blindness was compared between the case and the control group. Finally, color blinded patients were compared to those with the history of ON and abnormal VEPs. Results: 63 MS patients and the same number of normal populations were enrolled in this study. 12 patients had color blindness based on the Ishihara test; only 3 of them were among the control group, which showed a significant different between the two groups (P = 0.013. There was a significant relationship between the color blindness and abnormal VEP (R = 0.53, P = 0.023 but not for the color blindness and ON (P = 0.67. Conclusions: This study demonstrates a significant correlation between color blindness and multiple sclerosis including ones with abnormal prolonged VEP latencies. Therefore, in individuals with acquired color vision impairment, an evaluation for potentially serious underlying diseases like MS is essential.

  19. Disability, depression and suicide ideation in people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, V M; Williams, K; KoKo, C; Woolmore, J; Jones, C; Powell, T

    2017-01-15

    Depressive symptoms occur frequently in people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and rates of suicide ideation are higher than the general population. There is evidence for a direct association between disability and depression, disability and suicide ideation, and depression and suicide ideation in MS. However, the relationship between all three, i.e. the mediating role of depression between disability and suicidal ideation, has not been investigated. Exploring this relationship could highlight risk factors, alerting clinicians to the need for timely intervention. Seventy five people with progressive MS attending two out-patient clinics took part in this cross-sectional study. Participants completed the Beck Suicide Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale and Guy's Neurological Disability Scale. Depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between perceived and actual disability and suicide ideation. Different types of disability were associated with suicidality, including: 'tremors' and 'taking longer to do things'. A small sub-group of participants were identified who reported suicide ideation in the presence of only mild levels of depression. There may be a sample bias in this study as all participants were attending out-patient clinics and receiving support which may not be available to everyone with MS. It is important for clinicians to screen regularly for both depression and suicide ideation, to be alert to specific types of disability for which a higher level of suicide ideation might be present and to consider the possibility of suicidal thoughts being present in people who show minimal or no depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Natalizumab for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Rudick

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Richard A Rudick1, Michael A Panzara21Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Biogen Idec, Inc., Cambridge, MA, USAAbstract: Natalizumab is an α4-integrin antagonist approved as monotherapy for patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS, based on demonstrated efficacy in the pivotal AFFIRM study (N = 942. Natalizumab monotherapy reduced risk of disability progression by 42%–54% and annualized relapse rate by 68% during a period of 2 years. Natalizumab was also associated with significant reductions in number of T2-hyperintense, gadolinium-enhancing, and T1-hypointense lesions and in volume of T2-hyperintense lesions (all p < 0.001 on magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, natalizumab-treated patients in AFFIRM experienced significant improvements from baseline in the physical and mental components of the Short Form-36 (p ≤ 0.01 and a 35% reduction in risk of clinically significant vision loss (p = 0.008 vs placebo. Natalizumab was well tolerated in phase 3 studies. Common adverse events were generally mild and included headache, fatigue, urinary tract infections, and arthralgia. Serious adverse events were similar between treatment groups. The incidence of serious hypersensitivity reactions associated with natalizumab was <1%. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy was a rare complication of treatment, observed in 2 patients with MS who received natalizumab plus interferon β-1a. The robust clinical benefits of natalizumab, including benefits on patient-reported quality of life, make it an important addition to disease-modifying therapies available to patients with relapsing MS.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, natalizumab, α4-integrin antagonist

  1. Benign multiple sclerosis: physical and cognitive impairment follow distinct evolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajofatto, A; Turatti, M; Bianchi, M R; Forlivesi, S; Gobbin, F; Azzarà, A; Monaco, S; Benedetti, M D

    2016-03-01

    Benign multiple sclerosis (BMS) definitions rely on physical disability level but do not account sufficiently for cognitive impairment which, however, is not rare. To study the evolution of physical disability and cognitive performance of a group of patients with BMS followed at an University Hospital Multiple Sclerosis Center. A consecutive sample of 24 BMS cases (diagnosis according to 2005 McDonald's criteria, relapsing-remitting course, disease duration ≥ 10 years, and expanded disability status scale [EDSS] score ≤ 2.0) and 13 sex- and age-matched non-BMS patients differing from BMS cases for having EDSS score 2.5-5.5 were included. Main outcome measures were as follows: (i) baseline and 5-year follow-up cognitive impairment defined as failure of at least two tests of the administered neuropsychological battery; (ii) EDSS score worsening defined as confirmed increase ≥ 1 point (or 0.5 point if baseline EDSS score = 5.5). At inclusion, BMS subjects were 41 ± 8 years old and had median EDSS score 1.5 (range 0-2), while non-BMS patients were 46 ± 8 years old and had median EDSS score 3.0 (2.5-5.5). At baseline 16% of patients in both groups were cognitively impaired. After 5 years, EDSS score worsened in 8% of BMS and 46% of non-BMS patients (P = 0.008), while the proportion of cognitively impaired subjects increased to 25% in both groups. Patients with BMS had better physical disability outcome at 5 years compared to non-BMS cases. However, cognitive impairment frequency and decline over time appeared similar. Neuropsychological assessment is essential in patients with BMS given the distinct pathways followed by disease progression in cognitive and physical domains. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Rasch analysis of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misajon Rose

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a degenerative neurological disease that causes impairments, including spasticity, pain, fatigue, and bladder dysfunction, which negatively impact on quality of life. The Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29 is a disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL instrument, developed using the patient's perspective on disease impact. It consists of two subscales assessing the physical (MSIS-29-PHYS and psychological (MSIS-29-PSYCH impact of MS. Although previous studies have found support for the psychometric properties of the MSIS-29 using traditional methods of scale evaluation, the scale has not been subjected to a detailed Rasch analysis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use Rasch analysis to assess the internal validity of the scale, and its response format, item fit, targeting, internal consistency and dimensionality. Methods Ninety-two persons with definite MS residing in the community were recruited from a tertiary hospital database. Patients completed the MSIS-29 as part of a larger study. Rasch analysis was undertaken to assess the psychometric properties of the MSIS-29. Results Rasch analysis showed overall support for the psychometric properties of the two MSIS-29 subscales, however it was necessary to reduce the response format of the MSIS-29-PHYS to a 3-point response scale. Both subscales were unidimensional, had good internal consistency, and were free from item bias for sex and age. Dimensionality testing indicated it was not appropriate to combine the two subscales to form a total MSIS score. Conclusion In this first study to use Rasch analysis to fully assess the psychometric properties of the MSIS-29 support was found for the two subscales but not for the use of the total scale. Further use of Rasch analysis on the MSIS-29 in larger and broader samples is recommended to confirm these findings.

  3. Rasch analysis of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramp, Melina; Khan, Fary; Misajon, Rose Anne; Pallant, Julie F

    2009-01-01

    Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a degenerative neurological disease that causes impairments, including spasticity, pain, fatigue, and bladder dysfunction, which negatively impact on quality of life. The Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) is a disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument, developed using the patient's perspective on disease impact. It consists of two subscales assessing the physical (MSIS-29-PHYS) and psychological (MSIS-29-PSYCH) impact of MS. Although previous studies have found support for the psychometric properties of the MSIS-29 using traditional methods of scale evaluation, the scale has not been subjected to a detailed Rasch analysis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use Rasch analysis to assess the internal validity of the scale, and its response format, item fit, targeting, internal consistency and dimensionality. Methods Ninety-two persons with definite MS residing in the community were recruited from a tertiary hospital database. Patients completed the MSIS-29 as part of a larger study. Rasch analysis was undertaken to assess the psychometric properties of the MSIS-29. Results Rasch analysis showed overall support for the psychometric properties of the two MSIS-29 subscales, however it was necessary to reduce the response format of the MSIS-29-PHYS to a 3-point response scale. Both subscales were unidimensional, had good internal consistency, and were free from item bias for sex and age. Dimensionality testing indicated it was not appropriate to combine the two subscales to form a total MSIS score. Conclusion In this first study to use Rasch analysis to fully assess the psychometric properties of the MSIS-29 support was found for the two subscales but not for the use of the total scale. Further use of Rasch analysis on the MSIS-29 in larger and broader samples is recommended to confirm these findings. PMID:19545445

  4. Sexual Dysfunction and Incidence of Depression in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavoreo, Iris; Gržinčić, Tihana; Preksavec, Marina; Madžar, Tomislav; Bašić Kes, Vanja

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common diseases of the central nervous system and usually occurs at the age when people would be expected to be in the prime of their sexual lives. In everyday practice, sexual dysfunction is underestimated because clinicians mostly concentrate on the classic neurologic deficits and often overlook symptoms that can seriously affect the quality of life. Our study included 98 patients (42 men and 56 women, mean age 35±12 years) with relapse from our MS register, with established diagnosis of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis according to McDonald criteria. Patients completed the questionnaires (Sexual Satisfaction Scale, SSS and Beck Depression Scale BDS), and underwent neurological assessment (Expanded Disability Status Scale, EDSS). All patients were in the group with EDSS 2 to 4 points (mobile patients). There was no statistically significant difference in BDS and SSS values according to EDSS score. Correlation coefficients were calculated (BDS and SSS) for men (p=0.42) and women (p=0.44), yielding positive correlation. There was no statistically significant difference in BDS and SSS values according to gender, disease duration or immunomodulatory therapy. In our group of patients, despite low EDSS score (fully ambulatory without aid, self sufficient patients) we found positive correlation between sexual dysfunction and depression, showing that even in such patients the quality of life can be decreased. In conclusion, sexual dysfunction and depression are mostly under-recognized by neurologists because they are not part of routine testing; therefore, some additional questionnaires should be used in the evaluation in MS patients, even those with low EDSS score, in order to improve their quality of life.

  5. Comparisons of Latinos, African Americans, and Caucasians with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Robert J; Zuniga, Miguel A; Carrillo-Zuniga, Genny; Chakravorty, Bonnie J; Tyry, Tuula; Moreau, Rachel L; Huang, Chunfeng; Vollmer, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Identify racial/ethnic differences among people with multiple sclerosis (MS) in demographics, MS disease characteristics, and health services received. We analyzed enrollment data from the Registry of the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Project to compare 26,967 Caucasians, 715 Latinos, and 1,313 African Americans with MS. Racial/ethnic analyses of NARCOMS data focused on descriptive characteristics, using ANOVA and chi-square tests to identify significant differences in means and frequencies among Caucasians, Latinos, and African Americans. We identified significant racial/ethnic differences in demographics, MS disease characteristics, and treatments. Caucasians were older when first MS symptoms were experienced (30.1 years) and at MS diagnosis (37.4 years) than Latinos (28.6 years and 34.5 years) or African Americans (29.8 years and 35.8 years). Larger proportions of Latinos reported normal function for mobility and bladder/bowel function compared to Caucasians. Larger proportions of Latinos (44.2 percent) and African Americans (45.8 percent) reported at least mild depression compared to only 38.7 percent of Caucasians. Larger proportions of Latinos never received mental health care or care from rehabilitation specialists than Caucasians or African Americans. A larger proportion of African Americans had never been treated by a neurologist specializing in MS and a smaller proportion of African Americans received care at a MS clinic than Caucasians or Latinos. Our findings highlight the need for future analyses to determine if age, disease duration, MS symptoms, and disability levels provide additional insights into racial/ethic differences in the use of MS-related providers.

  6. The multiple sclerosis visual pathway cohort: understanding neurodegeneration in MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Fraga-Pumar, Elena; Gabilondo, Iñigo; Martínez-Heras, Eloy; Torres-Torres, Ruben; Ortiz-Pérez, Santiago; Llufriu, Sara; Tercero, Ana; Andorra, Magi; Roca, Marc Figueras; Lampert, Erika; Zubizarreta, Irati; Saiz, Albert; Sanchez-Dalmau, Bernardo; Villoslada, Pablo

    2014-12-15

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of the Central Nervous System with two major underlying etiopathogenic processes: inflammation and neurodegeneration. The latter determines the prognosis of this disease. MS is the main cause of non-traumatic disability in middle-aged populations. The MS-VisualPath Cohort was set up to study the neurodegenerative component of MS using advanced imaging techniques by focusing on analysis of the visual pathway in a middle-aged MS population in Barcelona, Spain. We started the recruitment of patients in the early phase of MS in 2010 and it remains permanently open. All patients undergo a complete neurological and ophthalmological examination including measurements of physical and disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale; Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite and neuropsychological tests), disease activity (relapses) and visual function testing (visual acuity, color vision and visual field). The MS-VisualPath protocol also assesses the presence of anxiety and depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), general quality of life (SF-36) and visual quality of life (25-Item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire with the 10-Item Neuro-Ophthalmic Supplement). In addition, the imaging protocol includes both retinal (Optical Coherence Tomography and Wide-Field Fundus Imaging) and brain imaging (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). Finally, multifocal Visual Evoked Potentials are used to perform neurophysiological assessment of the visual pathway. The analysis of the visual pathway with advance imaging and electrophysilogical tools in parallel with clinical information will provide significant and new knowledge regarding neurodegeneration in MS and provide new clinical and imaging biomarkers to help monitor disease progression in these patients.

  7. Health-related quality of life in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis patients during treatment with glatiramer acetate: a prospective, observational, international, multi-centre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrikson Sten

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glatiramer acetate (GA and interferon-beta (INFb are first-line disease modifying drugs for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS. Treatment with INFb is associated with a significant increase in health-related quality of life (HR-QoL in the first 12 months. It is not known whether HR-QoL increases during treatment with GA. Methods 197 RRMS patients, 106 without and 91 with prior immunomodulation/immunosuppression, were studied for HR-QoL (Leeds Multiple Sclerosis-QoL [LMS-QoL] scale, score range 0 - 32, fatigue (Fatigue Impact Scale [FIS] and depressed mood (Beck Depression Inventory-Short Form [BDI-SF] at baseline and 6 and 12 months after start of GA treatment. Results At 6 and 12 months mean LMS-QoL scores were significantly increased in the treatment-naive patient group (p Conclusions In RRMS patients without prior immunomodulation/immunosuppression treatment with GA was associated with an increase in HR-QoL in the first 6 months, that was sustained at 12 months. In 4 out of 10 patients HR-QoL improved. Increase in HR-QoL was associated with decrease in fatigue.

  8. A pilot investigation of the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation upon low back pain in people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Smadi, J; Warke, K; Wilson, I; Cramp, A F L; Noble, G; Walsh, D M; Lowe-Strong, A S

    2003-11-01

    To investigate the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) upon low back pain (LBP) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). A randomized double-blind placebo controlled clinical pilot study. Fifteen people with MS were recruited and randomly allocated to one of the following groups under double blind conditions (n = 5 per group): TENS 1 (4 Hz, 200 micros), TENS 2 (110 Hz, 200 micros), placebo TENS. Treatment was applied for 45 minutes three times a week for six weeks with a four-week follow-up. The following outcome measures were taken at weeks 1, 6, and 10: visual analogue scale (VAS) (for current LBP, right leg pain, left leg pain); Leeds Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life Questionnaire; Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire; Short Form-36 (SF-36) Version 1; and the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). VAS for current LBP, right and left leg pain were also taken before and after treatment, and once a week during the follow-up period. Analysis showed no statistically significant effects for any of the data. However, both active treatment groups showed a trend of improvement in the majority of the outcome measures. Active TENS was more effective than placebo TENS in decreasing VAS scores following each treatment although results were not statistically significant. Further work in this area is warranted and should include a larger number of participants in the form of a randomized controlled clinical trial to determine the efficacy of this modality.

  9. [Effect of preventive treatment on cognitive performance in patients with multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorobura, Maria S

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: cognitive, emotional and psychopathological changes play a significant role in the clinical picture of multiple sclerosis and influence the effectiveness of drug therapy, working capacity, quality of life, and the process of rehabilitation of patients with multiple sclerosis. The aim: investigate the changes in cognitive function in patients with multiple sclerosis, such as information processing speed and working memory of patients before and after treatment with immunomodulating drug. Materials and methods:33 patients examined reliably diagnosed with multiple sclerosis who were treated with preventive examinations and treatment from 2012 to 2016. For all patients with multiple sclerosis had clinical-neurological examination (neurological status using the EDSS scale) and the cognitive status was evaluated using the PASAT auditory test. Patient screening was performed before, during and after the therapy. Statistical analysis of the results was performed in the system Statistica 8.0. We used Student's t-test (t), Mann-Whitney test (Z). Person evaluated the correlation coefficients and Spearman (r, R), Wilcoxon criterion (T), Chi-square (X²). Results: The age of patients with multiple sclerosis affects the growth and EDSS scale score decrease PASAT to treatment. Duration of illness affects the EDSS scale score and performance PASAT. Indicators PASAT not significantly decreased throughout the treatment. Conclusions: glatiramer acetate has a positive effect on cognitive function, information processing speed and working memory patients with multiple sclerosis, which is one of the important components of the therapeutic effect of this drug.

  10. Disease-modifying treatments for early and advanced multiple sclerosis: a new treatment paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannoni, Gavin

    2018-06-01

    The treatment of multiple sclerosis is evolving rapidly with 11 classes of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs). This article provides an overview of a new classification system for DMTs and treatment paradigm for using these DMTs effectively and safely. A summary of research into the use of more active approaches to early and effective treatment of multiple sclerosis with defined treatment targets of no evident disease activity (NEDA). New insights are discussed that is allowing the field to begin to tackle more advanced multiple sclerosis, including people with multiple sclerosis using wheelchairs. However, the need to modify expectations of what can be achieved in more advanced multiple sclerosis are discussed; in particular, the focus on neuronal systems with reserve capacity, for example, upper limb, bulbar and visual function. The review describes a new more active way of managing multiple sclerosis and concludes with a call to action in solving the problem of slow adoption of innovations and the global problem of untreated, or undertreated, multiple sclerosis.

  11. Infectious mononucleosis-linked HLA class I single nucleotide polymorphism is associated with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Naghmeh; Broer, Linda; Hoppenbrouwers, Ilse A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2010-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a presumed autoimmune disease associated with genetic and environmental risk factors such as infectious mononucleosis. Recent research has shown infectious mononucleosis to be associated with a specific HLA class I polymorphism. Our aim was to test if the infectious mononucleosis-linked HLA class I single nucleotide polymorphism (rs6457110) is also associated with multiple sclerosis. Genotyping of the HLA-A single nucleotide polymorphism rs6457110 using TaqMan was performed in 591 multiple sclerosis cases and 600 controls. The association of multiple sclerosis with the HLA-A single nucleotide polymorphism was tested using logistic regression adjusted for age, sex and HLA-DRB1*1501. HLA-A minor allele (A) is associated with multiple sclerosis (OR = 0.68; p = 4.08 × 10( -5)). After stratification for HLA-DRB1*1501 risk allele (T) carrier we showed a significant OR of 0.70 (p = 0.003) for HLA-A. HLA class I single nucleotide polymorphism rs6457110 is associated with infectious mononucleosis and multiple sclerosis, independent of the major class II allele, supporting the hypothesis that shared genetics may contribute to the association between infectious mononucleosis and multiple sclerosis.

  12. Coexistence of multiple sclerosis and ankylosing spondylitis: Report of four cases from Russia and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fominykh, Vera; Shevtsova, Tatyana; Arzumanian, Narine; Brylev, Lev

    2017-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system. There are many cases of multiple sclerosis - like syndrome and demyelinating disorders in systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren disease, Behcet disease and other autoimmune conditions. Coexistence of ankylosing spondylitis and multiple sclerosis usually is rare but in this article we report 4 Russian patients with concomitant multiple sclerosis and ankylosing spondylitis diseases. None of these patients received anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy prior to diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Pathogenesis, diagnostic and treatment challenges are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tuberous sclerosis: Ultrasound, CT and MRI features of two cases with multiple organ involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, A.; Ciftci, E.; Cetin, A.; Selcuk, H.; Demirci, A.

    1998-01-01

    The cases of two patients with tuberous sclerosis with multiple sites of involvement are presented. Both patients had characteristic cerebral lesions of tuberous sclerosis associated with bilateral renal angiomyolipomas and hepatic hamartomas. Additionally there were diffuse pulmonary cystic changes in one patient and cardiac rhabdomyoma in the other. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. Substantial Early, But Nonprogressive Neuronal Loss in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Spinal Cord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirmer, Lucas; Albert, Monika; Buss, Armin; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J.; Antel, Jack P.; Brueck, Wolfgang; Stadelmann, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Research in multiple sclerosis (MS) has recently been focusing on the extent of neuroaxonal damage and its contribution to disease outcome. In the present Study, we examined spinal cord tissue from 30 clinically well-characterized MS patients. MS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and control

  15. Physical and social environment and the risk of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Pfleger, Claudia C.

    2014-01-01

    , or social environmental influence the risk of MS differently in women than in men. Methods: The cohort consists of all 1403 patients (939 women, 464 men) identified through Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry aged 1-55 of years at clinical onset between 2000 and 2004, and up to 25 control persons for each...... case, matched by sex, year of birth and residential municipality. The same cohort was previously used to investigate the influence of the reproductive factors on the risk of MS. Results: By linkage to Danish population registers we found a slight albeit statistically significant excess for 6 female MS...... patients who had been employed in agriculture: OR 3.52; 95% CI 1.38-9.00, p=0.008 (0.046 when corrected for multiple significance) and a trend for exposure to outdoor work in 12 : OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.06-3.55, p=0.03 (0.09 when corrected for multiple significance), but the numbers of cases were small...

  16. Designing an Electronic Patient Management System for Multiple Sclerosis: Building a Next Generation Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Raimar; Haase, Rocco; Eisele, Judith Christina; Thomas, Katja; Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2016-01-08

    Technologies like electronic health records or telemedicine devices support the rapid mediation of health information and clinical data independent of time and location between patients and their physicians as well as among health care professionals. Today, every part of the treatment process from diagnosis, treatment selection, and application to patient education and long-term care may be enhanced by a quality-assured implementation of health information technology (HIT) that also takes data security standards and concerns into account. In order to increase the level of effectively realized benefits of eHealth services, a user-driven needs assessment should ensure the inclusion of health care professional perspectives into the process of technology development as we did in the development process of the Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System 3D. After analyzing the use of information technology by patients suffering from multiple sclerosis, we focused on the needs of neurological health care professionals and their handling of health information technology. Therefore, we researched the status quo of eHealth adoption in neurological practices and clinics as well as health care professional opinions about potential benefits and requirements of eHealth services in the field of multiple sclerosis. We conducted a paper-and-pencil-based mail survey in 2013 by sending our questionnaire to 600 randomly chosen neurological practices in Germany. The questionnaire consisted of 24 items covering characteristics of participating neurological practices (4 items), the current use of network technology and the Internet in such neurological practices (5 items), physicians' attitudes toward the general and MS-related usefulness of eHealth systems (8 items) and toward the clinical documentation via electronic health records (4 items), and physicians' knowledge about the Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System (3 items). From 600 mailed surveys, 74 completed surveys were returned

  17. Total lymphoid irradiation in multiple sclerosis: blood lymphocytes and clinical course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, S.D.; Devereux, C.; Troiano, R.; Zito, G.; Hafstein, M.; Lavenhar, M.; Hernandez, E.; Dowling, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    We have found a significant relationship between blood lymphocyte count and prognosis in 45 patients receiving either total lymphoid irradiation or sham irradiation for chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. Patients with sustained lymphocyte counts less than 900 mm-3 for prolonged periods after treatment showed less rapid progression over the ensuing 3 years than did patients with multiple sclerosis who had lymphocyte counts above this level (p less than 0.01). Our results suggest that a simple laboratory test, the absolute blood lymphocyte count, may serve as a valuable barometer for monitoring the amount of immunosuppressive therapy needed to prevent progression in patients with multiple sclerosis, and possibly other autoimmune diseases

  18. Characteristics and correlates of coping with multiple sclerosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramat Kar, Maryam; Whitehead, Lisa; Smith, Catherine M

    2017-10-10

    The purpose of this systematic review was to examine coping strategies that people with multiple sclerosis use, and to identify factors that influence their coping pattern. This systematic review followed the Joanna Briggs Institute guidelines for synthesizing descriptive quantitative research. The following databases were searched from the inception of databases until December 2016: Ovid (Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO), Science Direct, Web of Science, and Scopus. Manual search was also conducted from the reference lists of retrieved articles. Findings related to the patterns of coping with multiple sclerosis and factors influencing coping with multiple sclerosis were extracted and synthesized. The search of the database yielded 455 articles. After excluding duplicates (n = 341) and studies that did not meet the inclusion criteria (n = 27), 71 studies were included in the full-text review. Following the full-text, a further 21 studies were excluded. Quality appraisal of 50 studies was completed, and 38 studies were included in the review. Synthesis of findings indicated that people with multiple sclerosis use emotional and avoidance coping strategies more than other types of coping, particularly in the early stages of the disease. In comparison to the general population, people with multiple sclerosis were less likely to use active coping strategies and used more avoidance and emotional coping strategies. The pattern of coping with multiple sclerosis was associated with individual, clinical and psychological factors including gender, educational level, clinical course, mood and mental status, attitude, personality traits, and religious beliefs. The findings of this review suggest that considering individual or disease-related factors could help healthcare professionals in identifying those less likely to adapt to multiple sclerosis. This information could also be used to provide client-centered rehabilitation for people living with multiple

  19. The Therapeutic Potential of the Ketogenic Diet in Treating Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithu Storoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, multiple sclerosis has been viewed as an entirely inflammatory disease without acknowledgment of the significant neurodegenerative component responsible for disease progression and disability. This perspective is being challenged by observations of a dissociation between inflammation and neurodegeneration where the neurodegenerative component may play a more significant role in disease progression. In this review, we explore the relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis. We review evidence that the ketogenic diet can improve mitochondrial function and discuss the potential of the ketogenic diet in treating progressive multiple sclerosis for which no treatment currently exists.

  20. Geographical and seasonal correlation of multiple sclerosis to sporadic schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritzsche Markus

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clusters by season and locality reveal a striking epidemiological overlap between sporadic schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis (MS. As the birth excesses of those individuals who later in life develop schizophrenia mirror the seasonal distribution of Ixodid ticks, a meta analysis has been performed between all neuropsychiatric birth excesses including MS and the epidemiology of spirochaetal infectious diseases. Results The prevalence of MS and schizophrenic birth excesses entirely spares the tropical belt where human treponematoses are endemic, whereas in more temperate climates infection rates of Borrelia garinii in ticks collected from seabirds match the global geographic distribution of MS. If the seasonal fluctuations of Lyme borreliosis in Europe are taken into account, the birth excesses of MS and those of schizophrenia are nine months apart, reflecting the activity of Ixodes ricinus at the time of embryonic implantation and birth. In America, this nine months' shift between MS and schizophrenic births is also reflected by the periodicity of Borrelia burgdorferi transmitting Ixodes pacificus ticks along the West Coast and the periodicity of Ixodes scapularis along the East Coast. With respect to Ixodid tick activity, amongst the neuropsychiatric birth excesses only amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS shows a similar seasonal trend. Conclusion It cannot be excluded at present that maternal infection by Borrelia burgdorferi poses a risk to the unborn. The seasonal and geographical overlap between schizophrenia, MS and neuroborreliosis rather emphasises a causal relation that derives from exposure to a flagellar virulence factor at conception and delivery. It is hoped that the pathogenic correlation of spirochaetal virulence to temperature and heat shock proteins (HSP might encourage a new direction of research in molecular epidemiology.