WorldWideScience

Sample records for led team learning

  1. Peer-Led Team Learning Helps Minority Students Succeed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Julia J; Sloane, Jeremy D; Dunk, Ryan D P; Wiles, Jason R

    2016-03-01

    Active learning methods have been shown to be superior to traditional lecture in terms of student achievement, and our findings on the use of Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) concur. Students in our introductory biology course performed significantly better if they engaged in PLTL. There was also a drastic reduction in the failure rate for underrepresented minority (URM) students with PLTL, which further resulted in closing the achievement gap between URM and non-URM students. With such compelling findings, we strongly encourage the adoption of Peer-Led Team Learning in undergraduate Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) courses.

  2. Assessment of Peer-Led Team Learning in Calculus I: A Five-Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, John Conrad; Brania, Abdelkrim

    2015-01-01

    This five-year study of the peer-led team learning (PLTL) paradigm examined its implementation in a Calculus I course at an all-male HBCU institution. For this study we set up a strong control group and measured the effect of PLTL in the teaching and learning of Calculus I through two points of measure: retention and success rates and learning…

  3. Teaching Students to Be Instrumental in Analysis: Peer-Led Team Learning in the Instrumental Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jacob L.; Miller, Martin E.; Avitabile, Brianna C.; Burrow, Dillon L.; Schmittou, Allison N.; Mann, Meagan K.; Hiatt, Leslie A.

    2017-01-01

    Many instrumental analysis students develop limited skills as the course rushes through different instruments to ensure familiarity with as many methodologies as possible. This broad coverage comes at the expense of superficiality of learning and a lack of student confidence and engagement. To mitigate these issues, a peer-led team learning model…

  4. Evaluating Peer-Led Team Learning across the Two Semester General Chemistry Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Yancey D.; Ippolito, Jessica; Lewis, Scott E.

    2012-01-01

    Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) is a widely disseminated pedagogical reform that employs previously successful undergraduate students, peer leaders, to lead sessions of structured group work in the target class. Numerous studies have evaluated the impact of this reform in various post-secondary chemistry classes. Results from these studies suggest…

  5. Implementing and Evaluating a Peer-Led Team Learning Approach in Undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Kevin; Campisi, Jay

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how a Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) program was implemented in a first-year, undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology course sequence to examine the student perceptions of the program and determine the effects of PLTL on student performance.

  6. Leadership Training in an MBA Program Using Peer-Led Team Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Gregory; Frye, Robin; Mantena, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Leadership training is an important part of any MBA program, but is often difficult to provide in an effective way. Over the last three years, we implemented a program of Peer-Led Team Learning in two core courses of our MBA curriculum, which we believe provides a good solution. The program combines leadership training with practical hands-on…

  7. Assessment of students’ satisfaction with a student-led team-based learning course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W. Bouw

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To date, no studies in the literature have examined student delivery of team-based learning (TBL modules in the classroom. We aimed to assess student perceptions of a student-led TBL elective. Methods: Third-year pharmacy students were assigned topics in teams and developed learning objectives, a 15-minute mini-lecture, and a TBL application exercise and presented them to student colleagues. Students completed a survey upon completion of the course and participated in a focus group discussion to share their views on learning. Results: The majority of students (n=23/30 agreed that creating TBL modules enhanced their understanding of concepts, improved their self-directed learning skills (n=26/30, and improved their comprehension of TBL pedagogy (n=27/30. However, 60% disagreed with incorporating student-generated TBL modules into core curricular classes. Focus group data identified student-perceived barriers to success in the elective, in particular the development of TBL application exercises. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that students positively perceived student-led TBL as encouraging proactive learning from peer-to-peer teaching.

  8. Active Learning outside the Classroom: Implementation and Outcomes of Peer-Led Team-Learning Workshops in Introductory Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudish, Philip; Shores, Robin; McClung, Alex; Smulyan, Lisa; Vallen, Elizabeth A.; Siwicki, Kathleen K.

    2016-01-01

    Study group meetings (SGMs) are voluntary-attendance peer-led team-learning workshops that supplement introductory biology lectures at a selective liberal arts college. While supporting all students' engagement with lecture material, specific aims are to improve the success of underrepresented minority (URM) students and those with weaker…

  9. Peer led team learning in introductory biology: effects on peer leader critical thinking skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Julia J; Wiles, Jason R

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated hypothesized effects of the Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) instructional model on undergraduate peer leaders' critical thinking skills. This investigation also explored peer leaders' perceptions of their critical thinking skills. A quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test with control group design was used to determine critical thinking gains in PLTL/non-PLTL groups. Critical thinking was assessed using the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) among participants who had previously completed and been successful in a mixed-majors introductory biology course at a large, private research university in the American Northeast. Qualitative data from open-ended questionnaires confirmed that factors thought to improve critical thinking skills such as interaction with peers, problem solving, and discussion were perceived by participants to have an impact on critical thinking gains. However, no significant quantitative differences in peer leaders' critical thinking skills were found between pre- and post-experience CCTST measurements or between experimental and control groups.

  10. Active Learning Outside the Classroom: Implementation and Outcomes of Peer-Led Team-Learning Workshops in Introductory Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Kudish, Philip; Shores, Robin; McClung, Alex; Smulyan, Lisa; Vallen, Elizabeth A.; Siwicki, Kathleen K.

    2016-01-01

    Study group meetings (SGMs) are voluntary-attendance peer-led team-learning workshops that supplement introductory biology lectures at a selective liberal arts college. While supporting all students? engagement with lecture material, specific aims are to improve the success of underrepresented minority (URM) students and those with weaker backgrounds in biology. Peer leaders with experience in biology courses and training in science pedagogy facilitate work on faculty-generated challenge prob...

  11. Peer Led Team Learning in Introductory Biology: Effects on Peer Leader Critical Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Julia J.; Wiles, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated hypothesized effects of the Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) instructional model on undergraduate peer leaders’ critical thinking skills. This investigation also explored peer leaders’ perceptions of their critical thinking skills. A quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test with control group design was used to determine critical thinking gains in PLTL/non-PLTL groups. Critical thinking was assessed using the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) among participants who had previously completed and been successful in a mixed-majors introductory biology course at a large, private research university in the American Northeast. Qualitative data from open-ended questionnaires confirmed that factors thought to improve critical thinking skills such as interaction with peers, problem solving, and discussion were perceived by participants to have an impact on critical thinking gains. However, no significant quantitative differences in peer leaders’ critical thinking skills were found between pre- and post-experience CCTST measurements or between experimental and control groups. PMID:25629311

  12. Peer led team learning in introductory biology: effects on peer leader critical thinking skills.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia J Snyder

    Full Text Available This study evaluated hypothesized effects of the Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL instructional model on undergraduate peer leaders' critical thinking skills. This investigation also explored peer leaders' perceptions of their critical thinking skills. A quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test with control group design was used to determine critical thinking gains in PLTL/non-PLTL groups. Critical thinking was assessed using the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST among participants who had previously completed and been successful in a mixed-majors introductory biology course at a large, private research university in the American Northeast. Qualitative data from open-ended questionnaires confirmed that factors thought to improve critical thinking skills such as interaction with peers, problem solving, and discussion were perceived by participants to have an impact on critical thinking gains. However, no significant quantitative differences in peer leaders' critical thinking skills were found between pre- and post-experience CCTST measurements or between experimental and control groups.

  13. Peer-led team learning in an online course on controversial medication issues and the US healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittenger, Amy L; LimBybliw, Amy L

    2013-09-12

    To implement peer-led team learning in an online course on controversial issues surrounding medications and the US healthcare system. The course was delivered completely online using a learning management system. Students participated in weekly small-group discussions in online forums, completed 3 reflective writing assignments, and collaborated on a peer-reviewed grant proposal project. In a post-course survey, students reported that the course was challenging but meaningful. Final projects and peer-reviewed assignments demonstrated that primary learning goals for the course were achieved and students were empowered to engage in the healthcare debate. A peer-led team-learning is an effective strategy for an online course offered to a wide variety of student learners. By shifting some of the learning and grading responsibility to students, the instructor workload for the course was rendered more manageable.

  14. Evaluating Peer-Led Team Learning: A Study of Long-Term Effects on Former Workshop Peer Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafney, Leo; Varma-Nelson, Pratibha

    2007-03-01

    Peer-led team learning (PLTL) is a program of small-group workshops, attached to a course, under the direction of trained peer leaders who have completed the course. Peer leaders ensure that team members engage with the materials and with each other, they help build commitment and confidence, and they encourage discussion. Studies of PLTL have found that grades and retention improve, and students value the workshops as important in their learning. With a ten-year history, it was possible to study the impact of PLTL on former leaders as they took subsequent steps into graduate work and careers. A survey was developed, piloted, revised, and placed online. Nearly 600 former leaders from nine institutions were contacted; 119 completed surveys were received. Respondents reported that leading the workshops reinforced the breadth and depth of their own learning, helped them develop personal qualities such as confidence and perseverance, and fostered a variety of presentation and team-related skills. The respondents offered rich insights into issues in implementing workshops. This study contributes to the literature on involvement theory in the academic development of college students.

  15. Active Learning Outside the Classroom: Implementation and Outcomes of Peer-Led Team-Learning Workshops in Introductory Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudish, Philip; Shores, Robin; McClung, Alex; Smulyan, Lisa; Vallen, Elizabeth A; Siwicki, Kathleen K

    2016-01-01

    Study group meetings (SGMs) are voluntary-attendance peer-led team-learning workshops that supplement introductory biology lectures at a selective liberal arts college. While supporting all students' engagement with lecture material, specific aims are to improve the success of underrepresented minority (URM) students and those with weaker backgrounds in biology. Peer leaders with experience in biology courses and training in science pedagogy facilitate work on faculty-generated challenge problems. During the eight semesters assessed in this study, URM students and those with less preparation attended SGMs with equal or greater frequency than their counterparts. Most agreed that SGMs enhanced their comprehension of biology and ability to articulate solutions. The historical grade gap between URM and non-URM students narrowed slightly in Biology 2, but not in other biology and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses. Nonetheless, URM students taking introductory biology after program implementation have graduated with biology majors or minors at the same rates as non-URM students, and have enrolled in postcollege degree programs at equal or greater rates. These results suggest that improved performance as measured by science grade point average may not be necessary to improve the persistence of students from underrepresented groups as life sciences majors. © 2016 P. Kudish et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  16. Evaluating Student Motivation in Organic Chemistry Courses: Moving from a Lecture-Based to a Flipped Approach with Peer-Led Team Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yujuan; Raker, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, Jennifer E.

    2018-01-01

    Academic Motivation Scale-Chemistry (AMS-Chemistry), an instrument based on the self-determination theory, was used to evaluate students' motivation in two organic chemistry courses, where one course was primarily lecture-based and the other implemented flipped classroom and peer-led team learning (Flip-PLTL) pedagogies. Descriptive statistics…

  17. Effect of Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) on Student Achievement, Attitude, and Self-Concept in College General Chemistry in Randomized and Quasi Experimental Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Julia Y. K.; Bauer, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated exam achievement and affective characteristics of students in general chemistry in a fully-randomized experimental design, contrasting Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) participation with a control group balanced for time-on-task and study activity. This study population included two independent first-semester courses with…

  18. Team Learning Ditinjau dari Team Diversity dan Team Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Pohan, Vivi Gusrini Rahmadani; Ancok, Djamaludin

    2010-01-01

    This research attempted to observe team learning from the level of team diversity and team efficacy of work teams. This research used an individual level of analysis rather than the group level. The team members measured the level of team diversity, team efficacy and team learning of the teams through three scales, namely team learning scale, team diversity scale, and team efficacy scale. Respondents in this research were the active team members in a company, PT. Alkindo Mitraraya. The total ...

  19. Team Learning Ditinjau dari Team Diversity dan Team Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Vivi Gusrini Rahmadani Pohan; Djamaludin Ancok

    2015-01-01

    This research attempted to observe team learning from the level of team diversity and team efficacy of work teams. This research used an individual level of analysis rather than the group level. The team members measured the level of team diversity, team efficacy and team learning of the teams through three scales, namely team learning scale, team diversity scale, and team efficacy scale. Respondents in this research were the active team members in a company, PT. Alkindo Mitraraya. The total ...

  20. Toward Learning Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoda, Rashina; Babb, Jeff; Nørbjerg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    to sacrifice learning-focused practices. Effective learning under pressure involves conscious efforts to implement original agile practices such as retrospectives and adapted strategies such as learning spikes. Teams, their management, and customers must all recognize the importance of creating learning teams......Today's software development challenges require learning teams that can continuously apply new engineering and management practices, new and complex technical skills, cross-functional skills, and experiential lessons learned. The pressure of delivering working software often forces software teams...

  1. Toward Learning Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoda, Rashina; Babb, Jeff; Nørbjerg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Today's software development challenges require learning teams that can continuously apply new engineering and management practices, new and complex technical skills, cross-functional skills, and experiential lessons learned. The pressure of delivering working software often forces software teams...... to sacrifice learning-focused practices. Effective learning under pressure involves conscious efforts to implement original agile practices such as retrospectives and adapted strategies such as learning spikes. Teams, their management, and customers must all recognize the importance of creating learning teams...

  2. Speeding Up Team Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Amy; Bohmer, Richard; Pisano, Gary

    2001-01-01

    A study of 16 cardiac surgery teams looked at how the teams adapted to new ways of working. The challenge of team management is to implement new processes as quickly as possible. Steps for creating a learning team include selecting a mix of skills and expertise, framing the challenge, and creating an environment of psychological safety. (JOW)

  3. Fostering teachers' team learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmans, Machiel; Runhaar, Piety; Wesselink, Renate; Mulder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of educational innovations by teachers seems to benefit from a team approach and team learning. The study's goal is to examine to what extent transformational leadership is associated with team learning, and to investigate the mediating roles of participative decision-making,

  4. Team cohesiveness, team size and team performance in team-based learning teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Britta M; Haidet, Paul; Borges, Nicole J; Carchedi, Lisa R; Roman, Brenda J B; Townsend, Mark H; Butler, Agata P; Swanson, David B; Anderson, Michael P; Levine, Ruth E

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among variables associated with teams in team-based learning (TBL) settings and team outcomes. We administered the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Psychiatry Subject Test first to individuals and then to teams of Year three students at four medical schools that used TBL in their psychiatry core clerkships. Team cohesion was analysed using the Team Performance Scale (TPS). Bivariate correlation and linear regression analysis were used to analyse the relationships among team-level variables (mean individual TPS scores for each team, mean individual NBME scores of teams, team size, rotation and gender make-up) and team NBME test scores. A hierarchical linear model was used to test the effects of individual TPS and individual NBME test scores within each team, as well as the effects of the team-level variables of team size, team rotation and gender on team NBME test scores. Individual NBME test and TPS scores were nested within teams and treated as subsampling units. Individual NBME test scores and individual TPS scores were positively and statistically significantly (p team NBME test scores, when team rotation, team size and gender make-up were controlled for. Higher team NBME test scores were associated with teams rotating later in the year and larger teams (p teams at four medical schools suggest that larger teams on later rotations score higher on a team NBME test. Individual NBME test scores and team cohesion were positively and significantly associated with team NBME test scores. These results suggest the need for additional studies focusing on team outcomes, team cohesion, team size, rotation and other factors as they relate to the effective and efficient performance of TBL teams in health science education. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Enabling Team Learning in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boak, George

    2016-01-01

    This paper is based on a study of learning processes within 35 healthcare therapy teams that took action to improve their services. The published research on team learning is introduced, and the paper suggests it is an activity that has similarities with action research and with those forms of action learning where teams address collective…

  6. Measuring Team Learning Behaviours through Observing Verbal Team Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Elisabeth; Boon, Anne; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore, as an answer to the observed lack of knowledge about actual team learning behaviours, the characteristics of the actual observed basic team learning behaviours and facilitating team learning behaviours more in-depth of three project teams. Over time, team learning in an organisational context has been…

  7. Investigating Team Learning in a Military Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veestraeten, Marlies; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2014-01-01

    As teams have become fundamental parts of today's organisations, the need for these teams to function and learn efficiently and effectively is widely emphasised. Also in military contexts team learning is vital. The current article examines team learning behaviour in military teams as it aims to cross-validate a team learning model that was…

  8. Team Learning Beliefs and Behaviours in Response Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Anne; Raes, Elisabeth; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Teams, teamwork and team learning have been the subject of many research studies over the last decades. This article aims at investigating and confirming the Team Learning Beliefs and Behaviours (TLB&B) model within a very specific population, i.e. police and firemen teams. Within this context, the paper asks whether the team's…

  9. Team Leader Structuring for Team Effectiveness and Team Learning in Command-and-Control Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Haar, Selma; Koeslag-Kreunen, Mieke; Euwe, Eline; Segers, Mien

    2017-04-01

    Due to their crucial and highly consequential task, it is of utmost importance to understand the levers leading to effectiveness of multidisciplinary emergency management command-and-control (EMCC) teams. We argue that the formal EMCC team leader needs to initiate structure in the team meetings to support organizing the work as well as facilitate team learning, especially the team learning process of constructive conflict. In a sample of 17 EMCC teams performing a realistic EMCC exercise, including one or two team meetings (28 in sum), we coded the team leader's verbal structuring behaviors (1,704 events), rated constructive conflict by external experts, and rated team effectiveness by field experts. Results show that leaders of effective teams use structuring behaviors more often (except asking procedural questions) but decreasingly over time. They support constructive conflict by clarifying and by making summaries that conclude in a command or decision in a decreasing frequency over time.

  10. Team Leader Structuring for Team Effectiveness and Team Learning in Command-and-Control Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Haar, Selma; Koeslag-Kreunen, Mieke; Euwe, Eline; Segers, Mien

    2017-01-01

    Due to their crucial and highly consequential task, it is of utmost importance to understand the levers leading to effectiveness of multidisciplinary emergency management command-and-control (EMCC) teams. We argue that the formal EMCC team leader needs to initiate structure in the team meetings to support organizing the work as well as facilitate team learning, especially the team learning process of constructive conflict. In a sample of 17 EMCC teams performing a realistic EMCC exercise, including one or two team meetings (28 in sum), we coded the team leader’s verbal structuring behaviors (1,704 events), rated constructive conflict by external experts, and rated team effectiveness by field experts. Results show that leaders of effective teams use structuring behaviors more often (except asking procedural questions) but decreasingly over time. They support constructive conflict by clarifying and by making summaries that conclude in a command or decision in a decreasing frequency over time. PMID:28490856

  11. Team Learning in Teacher Teams: Team Entitativity as a Bridge between Teams-in-Theory and Teams-in-Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangrieken, Katrien; Dochy, Filip; Raes, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate team learning in the context of teacher teams in higher vocational education. As teacher teams often do not meet all criteria included in theoretical team definitions, the construct "team entitativity" was introduced. Defined as the degree to which a group of individuals possesses the quality of being a…

  12. Groups Meet . . . Teams Improve: Building Teams That Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Janet; Dunn-Jensen, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Although most business students participate in team-based projects during undergraduate or graduate course work, the team experience does not always teach team skills or capture the team members' potential: Students complete the task at hand but the explicit process of becoming a team is often not learned. Drawing from organizational learning…

  13. Team Psychological Safety and Team Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauwelier, Peter; Ribière, Vincent M.; Bennet, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if the concept of team psychological safety, a key driver of team learning and originally studied in the West, can be applied in teams from different national cultures. The model originally validated for teams in the West is applied to teams in Thailand to evaluate its validity, and the views team…

  14. Team learning center design principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, B.; Loveland, J.; Whatley, A. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    This is a preliminary report of a multi-year collaboration of the authors addressing the subject: Can a facility be designed for team learning and would it improve the efficiency and effectiveness of team interactions? Team learning in this context is a broad definition that covers all activities where small to large groups of people come together to work, to learn, and to share through team activities. Multimedia, networking, such as World Wide Web and other tools, are greatly enhancing the capability of individual learning. This paper addresses the application of technology and design to facilitate group or team learning. Many organizational meetings need tens of people to come together to do work as a large group and then divide into smaller subgroups of five to ten to work and then to return and report and interact with the larger group. Current facilities were not, in general, designed for this type of meeting. Problems with current facilities are defined and a preliminary design solution to many of the identified problems is presented.

  15. Increasing Student-Learning Team Effectiveness with Team Charters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, Phillip; Pavett, Cynthia; Hunsaker, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Because teams are a ubiquitous part of most organizations today, it is common for business educators to use team assignments to help students experientially learn about course concepts and team process. Unfortunately, students frequently experience a number of problems during team assignments. The authors describe the results of their research and…

  16. Team Learning at Work - Activities, Products, and Antecedents of Team Learning in Organizational Complex Decision-Making Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Wilfried

    2017-01-01

    Teamwork is of major importance for organizational success. Team learning is a key concept to explain the advantage of teamwork for organizational performance. Team learning is especially important for organizational complex decision-making teams. However, team learning is not well understood. The questions arise, how team learning activities and products are related, and which antecedents may lead to team learning. Therefore, relations between activities, products, and antecedents of team le...

  17. The Research of Self-Management Team and Superior-Direction Team in Team Learning Influential Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Team learning is a cure for bureaucracy; it facilitates team innovation and team performance. But team learning occurs only when necessary conditions were met. This research focused on differences of team learning influential factors between self-management team and superior-direction team. Four variables were chosen as predictors of team learning though literature review and pilot interview. The 4 variables are team motivation, team trust, team conflict and team leadership. Selected 54 self ...

  18. Team Learning: Building Shared Mental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bossche, Piet; Gijselaers, Wim; Segers, Mien; Woltjer, Geert; Kirschner, Paul

    2011-01-01

    To gain insight in the social processes that underlie knowledge sharing in teams, this article questions which team learning behaviors lead to the construction of a shared mental model. Additionally, it explores how the development of shared mental models mediates the relation between team learning behaviors and team effectiveness. Analyses were…

  19. Hands Off: Mentoring a Student-Led Robotics Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Nathan R.; Mitchell, Claire E.; Tai, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Mentors play important roles in determining the working environment of out-of-school-time clubs. On robotics teams, they provide guidance in hopes that their protégés progress through an engineering process. This study examined how mentors on one robotics team who defined their mentoring style as "let the students do the work" navigated…

  20. Emotional Intelligence and Learning in Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to investigate the potential role of emotional intelligence (EI) abilities within learning in teams. The research focuses on examining how EI abilities are enacted within team contexts and how these are associated with critical reflection and team processes associated with learning. Design/methodology/approach: A…

  1. Team learning: building shared mental models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossche, van den P.; Gijselaers, W.; Segers, M.; Woltjer, G.B.; Kirschner, P.

    2011-01-01

    To gain insight in the social processes that underlie knowledge sharing in teams, this article questions which team learning behaviors lead to the construction of a shared mental model. Additionally, it explores how the development of shared mental models mediates the relation between team learning

  2. Leadership for Team Learning: The Case of University Teacher Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeslag-Kreunen, Mieke G. M.; Van der Klink, Marcel R.; Van den Bossche, Piet; Gijselaers, Wim H.

    2018-01-01

    Teacher team involvement is considered a key factor in achieving sustainable innovation in higher education. This requires engaging in team learning behaviors that should result in new knowledge and solutions. However, university teachers are not used to discussing their work practices with one another and tend to neglect any innovation in their…

  3. Learning and performance in multidisciplinary teams : The importance of collective team identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegt, Gerben S.; Bunderson, J. Stuart

    2005-01-01

    In multidisciplinary teams in the oil and gas industry, we examined expertise diversity's relationship with team learning and team performance under varying levels of collective team identification. In teams with low collective identification, expertise diversity was negatively related to team

  4. Facilitating Team Learning through Transformational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Elisabeth; Decuyper, Stefan; Lismont, Bart; Van den Bossche, Piet; Kyndt, Eva; Demeyere, Sybille; Dochy, Filip

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates when and how teams engage in team learning behaviours (TLB). More specifically, it looks into how different leadership styles facilitate TLB by influencing the social conditions that proceed them. 498 healthcare workers from 28 nursery teams filled out a questionnaire measuring the concepts leadership style, TLB, social…

  5. Mapping Student-Led Peer Learning in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Peer-led academic learning has increased in importance, but there is little sense of how many institutions support it, how they understand its purposes or what peer-led learning best practice is. This report examines the provision of peer-led learning in the UK. It identifies challenges and opportunities, including international perspectives and…

  6. Student-Led Project Teams: Significance of Regulation Strategies in High- and Low-Performing Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Judith

    2016-01-01

    We studied group and individual co-regulatory and self-regulatory strategies of self-managed student project teams using data from intragroup peer evaluations and a postproject survey. We found that high team performers shared their research and knowledge with others, collaborated to advise and give constructive criticism, and demonstrated moral…

  7. Early Identification of Ineffective Cooperative Learning Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, C .M.; Luo, L. F.; Chung, H. C.

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative learning has many pedagogical benefits. However, if the cooperative learning teams become ineffective, these benefits are lost. Accordingly, this study developed a computer-aided assessment method for identifying ineffective teams at their early stage of dysfunction by using the Mahalanobis distance metric to examine the difference…

  8. What Do Students Experience as Peer Leaders of Learning Teams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erik C.; Robbins, Brett A.; Loui, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    In a course for engineering freshmen, peer leaders facilitated optional study sessions, which implemented peer-led team learning workshops. Some leaders were paid teaching assistants, but most were undergraduate volunteers. To understand the experiences of the peer leaders, we asked them to keep weekly reflective journals. By performing a basic…

  9. New lenses on team learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter

    Team læring er sjældent blevet studeret fra et sociokulturelt perspektiv (vygotskiansk). Denne poster er et teoretisk bidrag til team læring, der fokuserer på dialog, tegn-mediering og kulturel historisk praksis for at udvikle en forståelse af team læring som mere end forøgelse i adfærd, viden og...

  10. Grasping the Dynamic Complexity of Team Learning: An Integrative Model for Effective Team Learning in Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decuyper, Stefan; Dochy, Filip; Van den Bossche, Piet

    2010-01-01

    In this article we present an integrative model of team learning. Literature shows that effective team learning requires the establishment of a dialogical space amongst team members, in which communicative behaviours such as "sharing", "co-construction" and "constructive conflict" are balanced. However, finding this balance is not enough.…

  11. Effective Team Learning in the Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Spoelstra, Howard; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Sloep, Peter; Van de Vrie, Evert

    2018-01-01

    Learning in the cloud can be a lonely activity for self-directing and self-organizing learners. Lack of sustained learner motivation can lead to less effective, less bond-creating learning experiences. By providing collaborative project-based learning opportunities these shortcomings can be overcome. A service design is introduced for the onset of collaborative project-based learning and team formation in the cloud, based on learning materials in the cloud, project definitions and characteris...

  12. Team-based learning for midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Davis, Tonia L; Schorn, Mavis N; Collins, Michelle R; Phillippi, Julia; Holley, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Many US health care and education stakeholder groups, recognizing the need to prepare learners for collaborative practice in complex care environments, have called for innovative approaches in health care education. Team-based learning is an educational method that relies on in-depth student preparation prior to class, individual and team knowledge assessment, and use of small-group learning to apply knowledge to complex scenarios. Although team-based learning has been studied as an approach to health care education, its application to midwifery education is not well described. A master's-level, nurse-midwifery, didactic antepartum course was revised to a team-based learning format. Student grades, course evaluations, and aggregate American Midwifery Certification Board examination pass rates for 3 student cohorts participating in the team-based course were compared with 3 student cohorts receiving traditional, lecture-based instruction. Students had mixed responses to the team-based learning format. Student evaluations improved when faculty added recorded lectures as part of student preclass preparation. Statistical comparisons were limited by variations across cohorts; however, student grades and certification examination pass rates did not change substantially after the course revision. Although initial course revision was time-consuming for faculty, subsequent iterations of the course required less effort. Team-based learning provides students with more opportunity to interact during on-site classes and may spur application of knowledge into practice. However, it is difficult to assess the effect of the team-based learning approach with current measures. Further research is needed to determine the effects of team-based learning on communication and collaboration skills, as well as long-term performance in clinical practice. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional

  13. Team learning: building shared mental models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Bossche, Piet; Gijselaers, Wim; Segers, Mien; Woltjers, Geert; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Van den Bossche, P., Gijselaers, W., Segers, M., Woltjer, G., & Kirschner, P. A. (2011). Team learning: Building shared mental models. Instructional Science, 39, 283-301. doi:10.1007/s11251-010-9128-3.

  14. Harnessing members' positive mood for team-directed learning behaviour and team innovation : The moderating role of perceived team feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, Frank; van der Vegt, Gerben S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the role of individual team members' positive mood and perceived team feedback for their team-directed learning behaviour. Results obtained in a sample of 186 members from 27 work teams showed that positive mood was positively associated with team-directed learning behaviour if

  15. Overcoming asymmetric goals in teams: the interactive roles of team learning orientation and team identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearsall, Matthew J; Venkataramani, Vijaya

    2015-05-01

    Although members of teams share a common, ultimate objective, they often have asymmetric or conflicting individual goals that shape the way they contribute to, and pursue, the shared goal of the team. Compounding this problem, they are frequently unaware of the nature of these goal asymmetries or even the fact that such differences exist. Drawing on, and integrating, social interdependence and representational gaps theories, we identify 2 emergent states that combine interactively to enable teams to overcome asymmetric goals: team identification and team learning orientation. Using data from long-term, real-life teams that engaged in a computer simulation designed to create both asymmetric goals and representational gaps about those goals, we found that teams were most effective when they had a high learning orientation coupled with high team identification and that this effect was mediated by teams' ability to form more accurate team goal mental models and engage in effective planning processes. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Team learning and effectiveness in virtual project teams: the role of beliefs about interpersonal context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Aída; Sánchez-Manzanares, Miriam; Gil, Francisco; Rico, Ramón

    2010-05-01

    There has been increasing interest in team learning processes in recent years. Researchers have investigated the impact of team learning on team effectiveness and analyzed the enabling conditions for the process, but team learning in virtual teams has been largely ignored. This study examined the relationship between team learning and effectiveness in virtual teams, as well as the role of team beliefs about interpersonal context. Data from 48 teams performing a virtual consulting project over 4 weeks indicate a mediating effect of team learning on the relationship between beliefs about the interpersonal context (psychological safety, task interdependence) and team effectiveness (satisfaction, viability). These findings suggest the importance of team learning for developing effective virtual teams.

  17. Exploring the Experiences of Faculty-Led Teams in Conducting Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Amundsen, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Action research has been suggested as a useful way to support university faculty to improve teaching and learning. However, there seems to be little knowledge about how faculty (and those who work with them) experience the process of doing action research. In order to explore team members' in-depth experience about what they learned and how they…

  18. Structured Learning Teams: Reimagining Student Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendvay, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Even in a standards-based curriculum, teachers can apply constructivist practices such as structured learning teams. In this environment, students become invested in the learning aims, triggering the desire in students to awaken, get information, interpret, remix, share, and design scenarios.

  19. Describing team development within a novel GP-led urgent care centre model: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Sarah; Ignatowicz, Agnieszka; Gnani, Shamini; Majeed, Azeem; Greenfield, Geva

    2016-06-23

    Urgent care centres (UCCs) co-located within an emergency department were developed to reduce the numbers of inappropriate emergency department admissions. Since then various UCC models have developed, including a novel general practitioner (GP)-led UCC that incorporates both GPs and emergency nurse practitioners (ENPs). Traditionally these two groups do not work alongside each other within an emergency setting. Although good teamwork is crucial to better patient outcomes, there is little within the literature about the development of a team consisting of different healthcare professionals in a novel healthcare setting. Our aim was therefore to describe staff members' perspectives of team development within the GP-led UCC model. Open-ended semistructured interviews, analysed using thematic content analysis. GP-led urgent care centres in two academic teaching hospitals in London. 15 UCC staff members including six GPs, four ENPs, two receptionists and three managers. Overall participants were positive about the interprofessional team that had developed and recognised that this process had taken time. Hierarchy within the UCC setting has diminished with time, although some residual hierarchical beliefs do appear to remain. Staff appreciated interdisciplinary collaboration was likely to improve patient care. Eight key facilitating factors for the team were identified: appointment of leaders, perception of fair workload, education on roles/skill sets and development of these, shared professional understanding, interdisciplinary working, ED collaboration, clinical guidelines and social interactions. A strong interprofessional team has evolved within the GP-led UCCs over time, breaking down traditional professional divides. Future implementation of UCC models should pro-actively incorporate the eight facilitating factors identified from the outset, to enable effective teams to develop more quickly. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  20. Team-based learning in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofstad, William; Brunner, Lane J

    2013-05-13

    Instructors wanting to engage students in the classroom seek methods to augment the delivery of factual information and help students move from being passive recipients to active participants in their own learning. One such method that has gained interest is team-based learning. This method encourages students to be prepared before class and has students work in teams while in the classroom. Key benefits to this pedagogy are student engagement, improved communication skills, and enhanced critical-thinking abilities. In most cases, student satisfaction and academic performance are also noted. This paper reviews the fundamentals of team-based learning in pharmacy education and its implementation in the classroom. Literature reports from medical, nursing, and pharmacy programs are also discussed.

  1. Teaming up for mutual learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Søren Bolvig; Pedersen, Tanja Aabo; Ovesen, Nis

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this paper is two-folded within the theme of collaboration between education and industry. Firstly it unfolds how learning for design-engineer students can be established and facilitated in a dynamic setting with industrial partners and secondly how industrial partners can benefit from...... student collaboration. The paper is based on research activities carried out in the context of a 3rd semester project at the Industrial Design Msc. program at The School of Architecture, Design & Planning at Aalborg University. Here, the teaching style is Problem Based Learning (PBL). In PBL, student......’s focuses on a complex problem that does not have a single correct answer – in this case the addressed problem was concerned with the innovation approach of a medium-sized company. Traditionally innovation projects and strategic planning has emerged from top managers offices and has been based on i...

  2. [Verification of Learning Effects by Team-based Learning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Shin-Ichi; Ito, Yoshihisa; Ishige, Kumiko; Inokuchi, Norio; Kosuge, Yasuhiro; Asami, Satoru; Izumisawa, Megumi; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Takashi; Kishikawa, Yukinaga; Hata, Harumi; Kose, Eiji; Tabata, Kei-Ichi

    2017-11-01

     It has been recommended that active learning methods, such as team-based learning (TBL) and problem-based learning (PBL), be introduced into university classes by the Central Council for Education. As such, for the past 3 years, we have implemented TBL in a medical therapeutics course for 4-year students. Based upon our experience, TBL is characterized as follows: TBL needs fewer teachers than PBL to conduct a TBL module. TBL enables both students and teachers to recognize and confirm the learning results from preparation and reviewing. TBL grows students' responsibility for themselves and their teams, and likely facilitates learning activities through peer assessment.

  3. Novel clinical learning from a student-led clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, Geoff; Hall, Mark; Miciak, Maxi

    2014-12-01

    Student-led clinics have the potential to meet community rehabilitation needs and provide valuable clinical placement experiences. Student-led clinical learning may offer pedagogical advantages similar to problem-based learning; however, this line of research is new and little is known about student-led clinical learning. The purpose of this study was to describe the novel learning experiences of a clinical placement in a student-led clinic from student perspectives. We conducted a descriptive qualitative focus group study with six participants. The focus group began with an open-ended question: 'What does the student-led clinic mean to you as a learner?' This was followed by a discussion of three topics: (1) the student-led clinic is learner focused; (2) faculty involvement in supervision; and (3) learning in a shared space with other students. A content analysis was used to analyse the data, and a summary of the researcher's interpretations was sent to study participants for further comments. There were two major themes that represented experiences within the student-led clinic. 'Increased responsibility' was viewed as a novel experience, and as reducing the perceived gap between the classroom and the 'real world'. As clinical instructors do not carry their own caseload, the second theme pertained to 'Safety-in-learning'. Although this theme was not viewed as novel, it was perceived to be important in enabling autonomy. Increased responsibility' was viewed and as reducing the perceived gap between the classroom and the 'real world Student-led clinics have clear community benefits by mitigating service gaps while providing experiential learning opportunities. These learning opportunities are perceived to be novel, and may resemble advantages observed in the classroom with problem-based learning. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Learning Patterns of Teams at the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Herman; Govaerts, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: With the intention of detecting and describing a series of team learning patterns within a selection of organisations, an extensive exploratory and qualitative research project was conducted in seven phases. The study at hand aims to report on the most recent phase, namely eight case studies in the public employment service of Flanders…

  5. Team Learning for Healthcare Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukyan, Narine; Eppstein, Margaret J; Horbar, Jeffrey D

    2013-08-28

    In organized healthcare quality improvement collaboratives (QICs), teams of practitioners from different hospitals exchange information on clinical practices with the aim of improving health outcomes at their own institutions. However, what works in one hospital may not work in others with different local contexts because of nonlinear interactions among various demographics, treatments, and practices. In previous studies of collaborations where the goal is a collective problem solving, teams of diverse individuals have been shown to outperform teams of similar individuals. However, when the purpose of collaboration is knowledge diffusion in complex environments, it is not clear whether team diversity will help or hinder effective learning. In this paper, we first use an agent-based model of QICs to show that teams comprising similar individuals outperform those with more diverse individuals under nearly all conditions, and that this advantage increases with the complexity of the landscape and level of noise in assessing performance. Examination of data from a network of real hospitals provides encouraging evidence of a high degree of similarity in clinical practices, especially within teams of hospitals engaging in QIC teams. However, our model also suggests that groups of similar hospitals could benefit from larger teams and more open sharing of details on clinical outcomes than is currently the norm. To facilitate this, we propose a secure virtual collaboration system that would allow hospitals to efficiently identify potentially better practices in use at other institutions similar to theirs without any institutions having to sacrifice the privacy of their own data. Our results may also have implications for other types of data-driven diffusive learning such as in personalized medicine and evolutionary search in noisy, complex combinatorial optimization problems.

  6. Team Learning for Healthcare Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppstein, Margaret J.; Horbar, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    In organized healthcare quality improvement collaboratives (QICs), teams of practitioners from different hospitals exchange information on clinical practices with the aim of improving health outcomes at their own institutions. However, what works in one hospital may not work in others with different local contexts because of nonlinear interactions among various demographics, treatments, and practices. In previous studies of collaborations where the goal is a collective problem solving, teams of diverse individuals have been shown to outperform teams of similar individuals. However, when the purpose of collaboration is knowledge diffusion in complex environments, it is not clear whether team diversity will help or hinder effective learning. In this paper, we first use an agent-based model of QICs to show that teams comprising similar individuals outperform those with more diverse individuals under nearly all conditions, and that this advantage increases with the complexity of the landscape and level of noise in assessing performance. Examination of data from a network of real hospitals provides encouraging evidence of a high degree of similarity in clinical practices, especially within teams of hospitals engaging in QIC teams. However, our model also suggests that groups of similar hospitals could benefit from larger teams and more open sharing of details on clinical outcomes than is currently the norm. To facilitate this, we propose a secure virtual collaboration system that would allow hospitals to efficiently identify potentially better practices in use at other institutions similar to theirs without any institutions having to sacrifice the privacy of their own data. Our results may also have implications for other types of data-driven diffusive learning such as in personalized medicine and evolutionary search in noisy, complex combinatorial optimization problems. PMID:25360395

  7. Team Learning: New Insights Through a Temporal Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale

    2017-04-01

    Team learning is a complex social phenomenon that develops and changes over time. Hence, to promote understanding of the fine-grained dynamics of team learning, research should account for the temporal patterns of team learning behavior. Taking important steps in this direction, this special issue offers novel insights into the dynamics of team learning by advocating a temporal perspective. Based on a symposium presented at the 2016 Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research (INGRoup) Conference in Helsinki, the four empirical articles in this special issue showcase four different and innovative approaches to implementing a temporal perspective in team learning research. Specifically, the contributions highlight team learning dynamics in student teams, self-managing teams, teacher teams, and command and control teams. The articles cover a broad range of methods and designs, including both qualitative and quantitative methodologies, and longitudinal as well as micro-temporal approaches. The contributors represent four countries and five different disciplines in group research.

  8. Enhancing team learning in nursing teams through beliefs about interpersonal context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Aída; Sánchez-Manzanares, Miriam; Gil, Francisco; Rico, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    This article is a report of a study that examines the relationship between team-level learning and performance in nursing teams, and the role of beliefs about the interpersonal context in this relationship. Over recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the learning processes of work teams. Researchers have investigated the impact of team learning on team performance, and the enabling conditions for this learning. However, team learning in nursing teams has been largely ignored. A cross-sectional field survey design was used. The sample comprises a total of 468 healthcare professionals working in 89 nursing teams at different public hospitals throughout Spain. Members of nursing teams participated voluntarily by completing a confidential individual questionnaire. Team supervisors evaluated nursing teams' performance. Data were collected over 2007-2008. The results show a mediating effect of team learning on the relationship between beliefs about interpersonal context (psychological safety, perceived task interdependence, and group potency) and team performance. Our findings suggest that beliefs about interpersonal context and team learning are important to effective nursing team performance. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Diversity, Effort, and Cooperation in Team-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Molly

    2018-01-01

    Student and team performance in 17 sections of an introductory microeconomic theory course taught using team-based learning are analyzed to determine what measurable characteristics of teams influence team and individual outcomes. Results suggest that team performance is positively influenced by the grade point average of the top individual on the…

  10. Leading team learning: what makes interprofessional teams learn to work well?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatalalsingh, Carole; Reeves, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This article describes an ethnographic study focused on exploring leaders of team learning in well-established nephrology teams in an academic healthcare organization in Canada. Employing situational theory of leadership, the article provides details on how well established team members advance as "learning leaders". Data were gathered by ethnographic methods over a 9-month period with the members of two nephrology teams. These learning to care for the sick teams involved over 30 regulated health professionals, such as physicians, nurses, social workers, pharmacists, dietitians and other healthcare practitioners, staff, students and trainees, all of whom were collectively managing obstacles and coordinating efforts. Analysis involved an inductive thematic analysis of observations, reflections, and interview transcripts. The study indicated how well established members progress as team-learning leaders, and how they adapt to an interprofessional culture through the activities they employ to enable day-to-day learning. The article uses situational theory of leadership to generate a detailed illumination of the nature of leaders' interactions within an interprofessional context.

  11. Using Transactivity to Understand Emergence of Team Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoethout, Hildert; Wesselink, Renate; Runhaar, Piety; Mulder, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Team learning is a recurrent topic in research on effective teamwork. However, research about the fact that team learning processes emerge from conversations and the different forms this emergence can take is limited. The aim of this study is to determine whether the extent to which team members act on each other's reasoning (transactivity) can be used to understand how team learning processes emerge. Research on teacher teams was used as the case study: Video recordings of three different teacher teams were used as primary data, and the data were analyzed using qualitative interaction analysis. The analysis shows that the content of team learning processes changes when team members act more closely on each other's reasoning. In particular, team learning processes related to the storage and retrieval of information took place only in sequences in which team members acted closely on each other's reasoning.

  12. Medical students' learning from patient-led teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann-Helen; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    a patient-centred approach, and acknowledged the importance of the PIs' individual perspectives and experiential knowledge. On the other hand, representing the scientific biomedical perspective and traditional step-by step teaching, students expressed unfamiliarity with the unstructured experiential......The aim of this study was to explore how medical students perceive the experience of learning from patient instructors (patients with rheumatism who teach health professionals and students) in the context of coupled faculty-led and patient-led teaching session. This was an explorative study...... learning and scepticism regarding the credibility of the patients' knowledge. This study contributes to the understanding of the complexity of involving patients as teachers in healthcare education and initiates a discussion on how to complement faculty-led teaching with patient-led teaching involving...

  13. Is There a Relationship between Individual Learning, Team Learning, and Organizational Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyaovalaksna, Sumeth; Li, Xiaobin

    2013-01-01

    Scholars suggest that there is a need for more research, particularly quantitative designs, that aim to examine the relationship between individual learning, team learning, and organizational learning. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether there is a relationship between perceived individual learning, team learning, and…

  14. Team Creativity: The Effects of Perceived Learning Culture, Developmental Feedback and Team Cohesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Baek-Kyoo; Song, Ji Hoon; Lim, Doo Hun; Yoon, Seung Won

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of perceived learning culture, developmental feedback and team cohesion on team creativity. The results showed that the demographic variables, the three antecedents and their interactions explained 41 per cent of variance in team creativity. Team creativity was positively correlated with a higher level of…

  15. Replacing Lecture with Peer-led Workshops Improves Student Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Preszler, Ralph W.

    2009-01-01

    Peer-facilitated workshops enhanced interactivity in our introductory biology course, which led to increased student engagement and learning. A majority of students preferred attending two lectures and a workshop each week over attending three weekly lectures. In the workshops, students worked in small cooperative groups as they solved challenging problems, evaluated case studies, and participated in activities designed to improve their general learning skills. Students in the workshop versio...

  16. Does team stability mediate the relationship between leadership and team learning? An empirical study among Dutch project teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelsbergh, Chantal M.J.H.; Poell, Rob F.; van der Heijden, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    An exploratory field study was conducted among 30 project teams in the sectors of building and utilities, engineering and construction, infrastructure, and area decontamination and development in the Netherlands. It examined the influence of leadership on team learning behaviors and included team

  17. Does team stability mediate the relationship between leadership and team learning? An empirical study among Dutch project teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelsbergh, C.M.J.H.; Poell, R.F.; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der

    2015-01-01

    An exploratory field study was conducted among 30 project teams in the sectors of building and utilities, engineering and construction, infrastructure, and area decontamination and development in the Netherlands. It examined the influence of leadership on team learning behaviors and included team

  18. Does team stability mediate the relationship between leadership and team learning? : An empirical study among Dutch project teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelsbergh, C.; Poell, R.F.; van der Heijden, B.

    2015-01-01

    An exploratory field study was conducted among 30 project teams in the sectors of building and utilities, engineering and construction, infrastructure, and area decontamination and development in the Netherlands. It examined the influence of leadership on team learning behaviors and included team

  19. Mediating team effectiveness in the context of collaborative learning: The importance of team and task awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Fransen, Jos; Erkens, Gijsbert; Kirschner, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Learning teams in higher education executing a collaborative assignment are not always effective. To remedy this, there is a need to determine and understand the variables that influence team effectiveness. This study aimed at developing a conceptual framework, based on research in various contexts on team effectiveness and specifically team and task awareness. Core aspects of the framework were tested to establish its value for future experiments on influencing team effectiveness. Results co...

  20. Team Learning: Through the Relational Dynamics of Co-operation and Rivalry in Team Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Lotz, Maja

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I explore the constructive links between co-operation, rivalry, and learning within the structure of team communities. Drawing upon social learning theory, the main purpose of this paper is to argue that both co-operation and rivalry are important triggers for mobilizing learning processes within and between teams. However, social learning theory tends to disregard the positive aspects of rivalry. Consequently, this paper will argue for the need to extend social learning theory ...

  1. Implementation of a team-based learning course: Work required and perceptions of the teaching team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jenny

    2016-11-01

    Team-based learning was selected as a strategy to help engage pre-registration undergraduate nursing students in a second-year evidence-informed decision making course. To detail the preparatory work required to deliver a team-based learning course; and to explore the perceptions of the teaching team of their first experience using team-based learning. Descriptive evaluation. Information was extracted from a checklist and process document developed by the course leader to document the work required prior to and during implementation. Members of the teaching team were interviewed by a research assistant at the end of the course using a structured interview schedule to explore perceptions of first time implementation. There were nine months between the time the decision was made to use team-based learning and the first day of the course. Approximately 60days were needed to reconfigure the course for team-based learning delivery, develop the knowledge and expertise of the teaching team, and develop and review the resources required for the students and the teaching team. This reduced to around 12days for the subsequent delivery. Interview data indicated that the teaching team were positive about team-based learning, felt prepared for the course delivery and did not identify any major problems during this first implementation. Implementation of team-based learning required time and effort to prepare the course materials and the teaching team. The teaching team felt well prepared, were positive about using team-based learning and did not identify any major difficulties. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Building Virtual Teams: Experiential Learning Using Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haihong

    2015-01-01

    Currently, virtual teams are being used exponentially in higher education and business because of the development of technologies and globalization. These teams have become an essential approach for collaborative learning as well as task completion. Team learning, especially in an online format, can be challenging due to lack of effective…

  3. The Influence of Multigenerational Workforce in Effective Informal Team Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roza Marsaulina Sibarani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The urgency of this research arises from the convergence of two dynamics that are transforming the workplace and impacting organization performance. The first is multigenerational workforce work side by side in the same organization even in the same team. The second is informal learning, a major mode of learning in an organization. Therefore, this paper aims to explore the influence of generational background of Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y in relation to informal team learning in the Indonesian business environment. Both, qualitative and quantitative studies were conducted with 21 interviewees and 184 survey respondents representing a total of 191 multigenerational teams participating in this research. The findings suggest that generational background influence informal learner and effective informal team learning, but have no direct impact on team climate. Understanding generational differences will enable individuals to learn informally and create a conducive team climate that will lead to effective informal team learning.

  4. The Preventable Admissions Care Team (PACT): A Social Work-Led Model of Transitional Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso Lipani, Maria; Holster, Kathleen; Bussey, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    In 2010, the Preventable Admissions Care Team (PACT), a social work-led transitional care model, was developed at Mount Sinai to reduce 30-day readmissions among high-risk patients. PACT begins with a comprehensive bedside assessment to identify the psychosocial drivers of readmission. In partnership with the patient and family, a patient-centered action plan is developed and carried out through phone calls, accompaniments, navigations and home visits, as needed, in the first 30 days following discharge. 620 patients were enrolled during the pilot from September 2010-August 2012. Outcomes demonstrated a 43% reduction in inpatient utilization and a 54% reduction in emergency department visits among enrollees. In addition, 93% of patients had a follow-up appointment within 7-10 days of discharge and 90% of patients attended the appointment. The success of PACT has led to additional funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services under the Community-based Care Transitions Program and several managed care companies seeking population health management interventions for high risk members.

  5. Learning Together and Working Apart: Routines for Organizational Learning in Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Research suggests that teaming routines facilitate learning in teams. This paper identifies and details how specific teaming routines, implemented in a virtual team, support its continual learning. The study's focus was to generate authentic and descriptive accounts of the interviewees' experiences with virtual teaming routines.…

  6. Team Learning: Through the Relational Dynamics of Co-operation and Rivalry in Team Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Maja

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the constructive links between cooperation, rivalry, and learning within the structure of team communities. Drawing upon social learning theory and qualitative data from case studies conducted in Danish team-based firms, the main purpose is to argue that both cooperation and rivalry are important triggers for mobilizing…

  7. Instructor-led or Learner-led for Elementary Learners to Learn Computer-based Music Composition?

    OpenAIRE

    Ju-Shih Tseng; Ming-Puu Chen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of instructional strategy (instructor-led vs. learner-led) and grade level (third grade vs. fifth grade) on elementary learners’ music composition performance and attitude with the use of a computer-based music composition software. An experimental learning activity was implemented using 5E learning cycle as a pedagogical framework to facilitate learning. A quasi-experimental design was employed with elementary learners participated ...

  8. Designing Mobile Learning Environments to Support Teacher-Led Field Trips within Informal Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Donald S.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices have become increasingly more visible within classrooms and informal learning spaces. The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the impact of mobile learning (m-learning) tools to support student learning during teacher-led field trips. Specifically, the research questions for this study are: (a) What conditions affect student…

  9. Effects of a pharmacist-led pediatrics medication safety team on medication-error reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Jennifer L; Torowicz, Deborah Lloyd; Yeh, Timothy S

    2007-07-01

    The effects of a pharmacist-led pediatrics medication safety team (PMST) on the frequency and severity of medication errors reported were studied. This study was conducted in a pediatric critical care center (PCCC) in three phases. Phase 1 consisted of retrospective collection of medication-error reports before any interventions were made. Phases 2 and 3 included prospective collection of medication-error reports after several interventions. Phase 2 introduced a pediatrics clinical pharmacist to the PCCC. A pediatrics clinical pharmacist-led PMST (including a pediatrics critical care nurse and pediatrics intensivist), a new reporting form, and educational forums were added during phase 3 of the study. In addition, education focus groups were held for all intensive care unit staff. Outcomes for all phases were measured by the number of medication-error reports processed, the number of incidents, error severity, and the specialty of the reporter. Medication-error reporting increased twofold, threefold, and sixfold between phases 1 and 2, phases 2 and 3, and phases 1 and 3, respectively. Error severity decreased over the three time periods. In phases 1, 2, and 3, 46%, 8%, and 0% of the errors were classified as category D or E, respectively. Conversely, the reporting of near-miss errors increased from 9% in phase 1 to 38% in phase 2 and to 51% in phase 3. An increase in the number of medication errors reported and a decrease in the severity of errors reported were observed in a PCCC after implementation of a PMST, provision of education to health care providers, and addition of a clinical pharmacist.

  10. Improved quality and efficiency after the introduction of physician-led team triage in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burström, Lena; Engström, Marie-Louise; Castrén, Maaret; Wiklund, Tony; Enlund, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) may negatively affect patient outcomes, so different triage models have been introduced to improve performance. Physician-led team triage obtains better results than other triage models. We compared efficiency and quality measures before and after reorganization of the triage model in the ED at our county hospital. We retrospectively compared two study periods with different triage models: nurse triage in 2008 (baseline) and physician-led team triage in 2012 (follow-up). Physician-led team triage was in use during day-time and early evenings on weekdays. Data were collected from electronic medical charts and the National Mortality Register. We included 20,073 attendances in 2008 and 23,765 in 2012. The time from registration to physician presentation decreased from 80 to 33 min (P triage improved the efficiency and quality in EDs.

  11. Interprofessional team meetings: Opportunities for informal interprofessional learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Gillian; Dunn, Stewart; Lincoln, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the potential for workplace interprofessional learning, specifically the learning that occurs between health professionals as part of their attendance at their regular interprofessional team meetings. While most interprofessional learning research to date has focused on formal structured education programs, this study adds to our understanding of the complexities of the learning processes occurring between health professionals as part of everyday practice. Through observations of team meetings and semi-structured interviews, we found that the interprofessional team meeting provided a practical, time-efficient, and relevant means for interprofessional learning, resulting in perceived benefits to individuals, teams, and patients. The learning process, however, was influenced by members' conceptions of learning, participation within the meeting, and medical presence. This study provides a basis for further research to assist health professionals capitalize on informal learning opportunities within the interprofessional meeting.

  12. A Method to Improve Learning Analysing Communication in Team Working

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Miren; Sanchez, Ana; Gutierrez, Julian; Perez, Tomas A.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years learning how to work in teams has become a common subject in higher education. Communication between student team members can be monitored using a bulletin board system, and hence, analyse individual and group role development. The composition and distribution of roles in a team are relevant characteristics that will considerably…

  13. Managing Team Learning in a Spanish Commercial Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doving, Erik; Martin-Rubio, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze how team management affects team-learning activities. Design/methodology/approach: The authors empirically study 68 teams as they operate in the natural business context of a major Spanish bank. Quantitative research utilizing multiple regression analyses is used to test hypotheses. Findings: The…

  14. Assessing Performance and Learning in Interprofessional Health Care Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, Ozgur; Sheingold, Brenda; Plack, Margaret; LeLacheur, Susan; Halvaksz, Jennifer; Lewis, Karen; Schlumpf, Karen; Greenberg, Larrie

    2015-01-01

    Teamwork has become an integral part of health care delivery. Such emphasis on teamwork has generated the need to systematically measure and improve the learning and performance of health care teams. The purpose of this study was to develop a comprehensive assessment instrument, the Interprofessional Education and Practice Inventory (IPEPI), to evaluate learning and performance in interprofessional health care teams. The 12-month study commenced in three 4-month phases: (1) a panel of 25 national and international experts participated in the Delphi process to identify factors influencing team learning and team performance; (2) the research team analyzed the findings from the two Delphi rounds to develop the IPEPI; and (3) a cohort of 27 students at the university engaged in clinical simulations to test and refine the IPEPI. Findings suggest key factors that significantly influence team learning and performance include whether the group is able to foster a climate of mutual respect, adopt effective communication strategies, develop a sense of trust, and invite contributions from others. Additionally, in assessing organizational factors, participants indicated those factors that significantly influence team learning and performance include whether the organization is patient-centered, creates a culture of safety (not blame), and supports individual and team learning. These findings highlight the critical role assessment plays in enhancing not just interprofessional education or interprofessional practice, but in essence advancing interprofessional education and practice--which requires an integrated examination of how health care professionals learn and perform in teams.

  15. Effects of team-based learning on self-regulated online learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Alice A

    2015-04-10

    Online learning requires higher levels of self-regulation in order to achieve optimal learning outcomes. As nursing education moves further into the blended and online learning venue, new teaching/learning strategies will be required to develop and enhance self-regulated learning skills in nursing students. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of team-based learning (TBL) with traditional instructor-led (IL) learning, on self-regulated online learning outcomes, in a blended undergraduate research and evidence-based practice course. The nonrandomized sample consisted of 98 students enrolled in the IL control group and 86 students enrolled in the TBL intervention group. The percentage of total possible online viewing time was used as the measure of self-regulated online learning activity. The TBL group demonstrated a significantly higher percentage (p self-regulated learning activities than the IL control group. The TBL group scored significantly higher on the course examinations (p = 0.003). The findings indicate that TBL is an effective instructional strategy that can be used to achieve the essential outcomes of baccalaureate nursing education by increasing self-regulated learning capabilities in nursing students.

  16. Does an Adequate Team Climate for Learning Predict Team Effectiveness and Innovation Potential? A Psychometric Validation of the Team Climate Questionnaire for Learning in an Organizational Context

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin, Ramírez Heller; Rita, Berger; Felix, C. Brodbeck

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the application and psychometric validation of a multi-dimensional measure of team climate for learning in a multinational organization. The research project aimed at extending previous findings at Aston Business School, using the English 33-item version of Brodbeck's Team Climate questionnaire for Learning to assess the factors that facilitate team learning in a business context and analyze its relationship to group performance, support for innovation and different effecti...

  17. Developing an Instrument to Characterise Peer-Led Groups in Collaborative Learning Environments: Assessing Problem-Solving Approach and Group Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Pilar; Micari, Marina; Light, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative learning is being used extensively by educators at all levels. Peer-led team learning in a version of collaborative learning that has shown consistent success in science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines. Using a multi-phase research study we describe the development of an observation instrument that can be used to…

  18. Enhancing Social Work Education through Team-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Judy

    2012-01-01

    Group learning strategies are used extensively in social work education, despite the challenges and negative outcomes regularly experienced by students and faculty. Building on principles of cooperative learning, team-based learning offers a more structured approach that maximizes the benefits of cooperative learning while also offering…

  19. Social Capital, Team Efficacy and Team Potency: The Mediating Role of Team Learning Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Emmerik, Hetty; Jawahar, I. M.; Schreurs, Bert; de Cuyper, Nele

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Drawing on social capital theory and self-identification theory, this study aims to examine the associations of two indicators of social capital, personal networks and deep-level similarity, with team capability measures of team efficacy and team potency. The central focus of the study is to be the hypothesized mediating role of team…

  20. [Developing team reflexivity as a learning and working tool for medical teams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskin, Arieh; Bamberger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Team reflexivity is a collective activity in which team members review their previous work, and develop ideas on how to modify their work behavior in order to achieve better future results. It is an important learning tool and a key factor in explaining the varying effectiveness of teams. Team reflexivity encompasses both self-awareness and agency, and includes three main activities: reflection, planning, and adaptation. The model of briefing-debriefing cycles promotes team reflexivity. Its key elements include: Pre-action briefing--setting objectives, roles, and strategies the mission, as well as proposing adaptations based on what was previously learnt from similar procedures; Post-action debriefing--reflecting on the procedure performed and reviewing the extent to which objectives were met, and what can be learnt for future tasks. Given the widespread attention to team-based work systems and organizational learning, efforts should be made toward ntroducing team reflexivity in health administration systems. Implementation could be difficult because most teams in hospitals are short-lived action teams formed for a particular event, with limited time and opportunity to consciously reflect upon their actions. But it is precisely in these contexts that reflexive processes have the most to offer instead of the natural impulsive collective logics. Team reflexivity suggests a potential solution to the major problems of iatorgenesis--avoidable medical errors, as it forces all team members to participate in a reflexive process together. Briefing-debriefing technology was studied mainly in surgical teams and was shown to enhance team-based learning and to improve quality-related outcomes and safety.

  1. Mediating team effectiveness in the context of collaborative learning: The importance of team and task awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, Jos; Kirschner, Paul A.; Erkens, Gijsbert

    2010-01-01

    Fransen, J., Kirschner, P. A., & Erkens, G. (2011). Mediating team effectiveness in the context of collaborative learning: The importance of team and task awareness. Computers in Human Behavior, 27(3), 1103-1113. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2010.05.017

  2. Mediating team effectiveness in the context of collaborative learning : The importance of team and task awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul Kirschner; Gijsbert Erkens; Dr. Jos Fransen

    2011-01-01

    Learning teams in higher education executing a collaborative assignment are not always effective. To remedy this, there is a need to determine and understand the variables that influence team effectiveness. This study aimed at developing a conceptual framework, based on research in various contexts

  3. The moderating role of team resources in translating nursing teams' accountability into learning and performance: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashkovits, Sarit; Drach-Zahavy, Anat

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to test the moderated-mediation model suggesting that nursing teams' accountability affects team effectiveness by enhancing team learning when relevant resources are available to the team. Disappointing evidence regarding improvement in nurses' safe and quality care elevate the need in broadening our knowledge regarding the factors that enhance constant learning in nursing teams. Accountability is considered as crucial for team learning and quality of care but empirical findings have shown mixed evidence. A cross-sectional design. Forty-four nursing teams participated in the study. Data were collected in 2013-2014: Head nurses completed validated questionnaires, regarding team resources for learning (time availability, team autonomy and team performance feedback), and nursing teams' effectiveness; and nurses answered questionnaires regarding teams' accountability and learning (answers were aggregated to the team level). The model was tested using a moderated-mediation analysis with resources as moderating variables, and team learning as the mediator in the team accountability-team effectiveness link. The results of a mixed linear regression show that, as expected, nursing teams' accountability was positively linked to nursing teams' learning, when time availability, and team autonomy were high rather than low, and team performance feedback was low rather than high. Nurturing team accountability is not enough for achieving team learning and subsequent team effectiveness. Rather there is a need to provide nursing teams with adequate time, autonomy, and be cautious with performance feedback, as the latter may motivate nurses to repeat routine work strategies rather than explore improved ones. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Replacing lecture with peer-led workshops improves student learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preszler, Ralph W

    2009-01-01

    Peer-facilitated workshops enhanced interactivity in our introductory biology course, which led to increased student engagement and learning. A majority of students preferred attending two lectures and a workshop each week over attending three weekly lectures. In the workshops, students worked in small cooperative groups as they solved challenging problems, evaluated case studies, and participated in activities designed to improve their general learning skills. Students in the workshop version of the course scored higher on exam questions recycled from preworkshop semesters. Grades were higher over three workshop semesters in comparison with the seven preworkshop semesters. Although males and females benefited from workshops, there was a larger improvement of grades and increased retention by female students; although underrepresented minority (URM) and non-URM students benefited from workshops, there was a larger improvement of grades by URM students. As well as improving student performance and retention, the addition of interactive workshops also improved the quality of student learning: Student scores on exam questions that required higher-level thinking increased from preworkshop to workshop semesters.

  5. INVESTIGATING FACTORS INFLUENCING STUDENTS’ LEARNING IN A TEAM TEACHING SETTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Team teaching factors, including mission clarity, affiliation, innovativeness, and fairness, are examined to determine how they influence student learning in a team-taught course. The study involved 184 college students enrolled in an Introduction to Computers course delivered in a team-taught format in a large university located in the United States. The collaborative teaching design followed a traditional team teaching approach with an instructor team teaching the same course collaboratively. Students enrolled in the team-taught course filled out an online survey targeted at identifying key factors that influence student-based outcomes (satisfaction and competency in the course. Results showed that instructor team mission clarity, affiliation, and fairness are significantly related to students’ satisfaction while instructor team mission clarity and fairness are significantly related to students’ competency.

  6. The Joint Influence of Intra- and Inter-Team Learning Processes on Team Performance : A Constructive or Destructive Combination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, Rike; Endedijk, Maaike D.; van Veelen, Ruth; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2018-01-01

    In order for teams to build a shared conception of their task, team learning is crucial. Benefits of intra-team learning have been demonstrated in numerous studies. However, teams do not operate in a vacuum, and interact with their environment to execute their tasks. Our knowledge of the added value

  7. Team-based learning and ethics education in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Susan E; Wocial, Lucia D

    2013-12-01

    This report describes the use of team-based learning concepts in an undergraduate nursing applied ethics course using established reporting guidelines. Team-based learning relies on actively engaging students in the learning process through small-group activities that facilitate the development of skills, including concept analysis, critical thinking, and problem solving. Students are divided into teams of five to seven members who collaborate throughout the semester to work through activities that build on ethics concepts introduced through reading and lectures. Nurse educators are challenged to develop educational approaches that will engage students and help them to apply what they learn from the study of ethics to the lived experience of clinical practice. The ultimate goal is to help students to develop into morally sensitive and competent professionals. Team-based learning represents a novel way to teach these skills to undergraduate nursing students. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Student Teams Learning to Cope with Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Janet; Neal, Joan C.; Waner, Karen K.

    2005-01-01

    Because employers want workers who can successfully run meetings and manage teams with diverse characteristics, conflict management is a skill that every business graduate should possess. The purpose of the study was to identify the most popular and effective ways that students used to manage conflicts when working on team projects. A survey was…

  9. Preparing Students for Flipped or Team-Based Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Peter; Clark, Michele; Restall, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching methods such as Flipped Learning and Team-Based Learning require students to pre-learn course materials before a teaching session, because classroom exercises rely on students using self-gained knowledge. This is the reverse to "traditional" teaching when course materials are presented during a lecture, and students are…

  10. Identification of Dysfunctional Cooperative Learning Teams Using Taguchi Quality Indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Chin-Min

    2011-01-01

    In this study, dysfunctional cooperative learning teams are identified by comparing the Taguchi "larger-the-better" quality index for the academic achievement of students in a cooperative learning condition with that of students in an individualistic learning condition. In performing the experiments, 42 sophomore mechanical engineering…

  11. Instructor-led or Learner-led for Elementary Learners to Learn Computer-based Music Composition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Shih Tseng

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of instructional strategy (instructor-led vs. learner-led and grade level (third grade vs. fifth grade on elementary learners’ music composition performance and attitude with the use of a computer-based music composition software. An experimental learning activity was implemented using 5E learning cycle as a pedagogical framework to facilitate learning. A quasi-experimental design was employed with elementary learners participated in the experiment. The results revealed that (a fifth grader outperformed third graders in creativity, whereas third graders were extrinsically motivated and perceived that the computer-based music composition software was useful in learning music composition more than fifth graders were and did; and (b learners with instructor-led instructional strategy outperformed learners with learned-led instructional strategy in creativity and craftsmanship and held high extrinsic motivation than learners with learner-led. The implementations and suggestions for future study were discussed in the present study.

  12. Effective Team Learning in the Cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Sloep, Peter; Van de Vrie, Evert

    2018-01-01

    Learning in the cloud can be a lonely activity for self-directing and self-organizing learners. Lack of sustained learner motivation can lead to less effective, less bond-creating learning experiences. By providing collaborative project-based learning opportunities these shortcomings can be

  13. Nurses' perceptions of the impact of Team-Based Learning participation on learning style, team behaviours and clinical performance: An exploration of written reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldland, Elizabeth; Currey, Judy; Considine, Julie; Allen, Josh

    2017-05-01

    Team-Based Learning (TBL) is a teaching strategy designed to promote problem solving, critical thinking and effective teamwork and communication skills; attributes essential for safe healthcare. The aim was to explore postgraduate student perceptions of the role of TBL in shaping learning style, team skills, and professional and clinical behaviours. An exploratory descriptive approach was selected. Critical care students were invited to provide consent for the use for research purposes of written reflections submitted for course work requirements. Reflections of whether and how TBL influenced their learning style, teamwork skills and professional behaviours during classroom learning and clinical practice were analysed for content and themes. Of 174 students, 159 participated. Analysis revealed three themes: Deep Learning, the adaptations students made to their learning that resulted in mastery of specialist knowledge; Confidence, in knowledge, problem solving and rationales for practice decisions; and Professional and Clinical Behaviours, including positive changes in their interactions with colleagues and patients described as patient advocacy, multidisciplinary communication skills and peer mentorship. TBL facilitated a virtuous cycle of feedback encouraging deep learning that increased confidence. Increased confidence improved deep learning that, in turn, led to the development of professional and clinical behaviours characteristic of high quality practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Euro-led research team creates first ever reaction between matter and antimatter

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "An EU-funded team of international researchers has produced the first ever reaction between matter and antimatter, creating protonium. Protonium is a unique type of atom that consists of a proton and an antiproton orbiting around each other." (1 page)

  15. IS Learning: The Impact of Gender and Team Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaway, Mary M.

    2013-01-01

    In university settings, dysfunction in teamwork often challenges problem-based learning in IS projects. Researchers of IS Education have largely overlooked Team Emotional Intelligence (TEI), which offers a collective cognitive skill that may benefit the student learning experience. Hypothesized are four dimensions of emotional intelligence (EI)…

  16. Assessing team effectiveness and affective learning in a datathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piza, Felipe Maia de Toledo; Celi, Leo Anthony; Deliberato, Rodrigo Octavio; Bulgarelli, Lucas; de Carvalho, Fabricio Rodrigues Torres; Filho, Roberto Rabello; de La Hoz, Miguel Angel Armengol; Kesselheim, Jennifer Cohn

    2018-04-01

    Datathons are increasingly organized in the healthcare field. The goal is to assemble people with different backgrounds to work together as a team and engage in clinically relevant research or develop algorithms using health-related datasets. Criteria to assess the return of investment on such events have traditionally included publications produced, patents for prediction, classification, image recognition and other types of software, and start-up companies around the application of machine learning in healthcare. Previous studies have not evaluated whether a datathon can promote affective learning and effective teamwork. Fifty participants of a health datathon event in São Paulo, Brazil at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein (HIAE) were divided into 8 groups. A survey with 25 questions, using the Affective Learning Scale and Team-Review Questionnaire, was administered to assess team effectiveness and affective learning during the event. Multivariate regression models and Pearson's correlation tests were performed to evaluate the effect of affective learning on teamwork. Majority of the participants were male 76% (37/49); 32% (16/49) were physicians. The mean score for learning (scale from 1 to 10) was 8.38, while that for relevance of the perceived teamwork was 1.20 (scale from 1 to 5; "1" means most relevant). Pearson's correlation between the learning score and perception of teamwork showed moderate association (r = 0.36, p = 0.009). Five learning and 10 teamwork variables were on average positively graded in the event. The final regression model includes all learning and teamwork variables. Effective leadership was strongly correlated with affective learning (β = -0.27, p learning. It is feasible to enhance affective knowledge and the skill to work in a team during a datathon. We found that teamwork is associated with higher affective learning from participants' perspectives. Effective leadership is essential for teamwork and is a significant

  17. Does Team Formation Impact Student Performance, Effort and Attitudes in a College Course Employing Collaborative Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pociask, Sarah; Gross, David; Shih, Mei-Yau

    2017-01-01

    The literature on team-based learning emphasizes the importance of team composition and team design, and it is recommended that instructors organize teams to ensure diversity of team members and optimal team performance. But does the method of team formation actually impact student performance? The goal of the present study was to examine whether…

  18. Describing team development within a novel GP-led urgent care centre model : a qualitative study.

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, Sarah; Ignatowicz, Agnieszka; Gnani, Shamini; Majeed, Azeem; Greenfield, Geva

    2016-01-01

    Objective:\\ud Urgent care centres (UCCs) co-located within an emergency department were developed to reduce the numbers of inappropriate emergency department admissions. Since then various UCC models have developed, including a novel general practitioner (GP)-led UCC that incorporates both GPs and emergency nurse practitioners (ENPs). Traditionally these two groups do not work alongside each other within an emergency setting. Although good teamwork is crucial to better patient outcomes, there...

  19. Toward Project-based Learning and Team Formation in Open Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Spoelstra, Howard; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Sloep, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Open Learning Environments, MOOCs, as well as Social Learning Networks, embody a new approach to learning. Although both emphasise interactive participation, somewhat surprisingly, they do not readily support bond creating and motivating collaborative learning opportunities. Providing project-based learning and team formation services in Open Learning Environment can overcome these shortcomings. The differences between Open Learning Environments and formal learning settings, in particular wit...

  20. Optimize Knowledge Sharing, Team Effectiveness, and Individual Learning within the Flipped Team-Based Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-Kai; Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Zih-Cin; Wang, Cui; Lin, Chia-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Due to the competitive and fast-changing nature of external business environments, university students should acquire knowledge of how to cooperate, share knowledge, and enhance team effectiveness and individual learning in the future workplace. Consequently, the redesign of business courses in higher education merits more discussion. Based on the…

  1. Self-regulated learning, team learning and project performance in entrepreneurship education: Learning in a lean startup environment

    OpenAIRE

    Harms, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary entrepreneurship education (EE) is often based around a team-based challenge such as creating a new venture or solving a startup problem. A creative and professional solution to such a challenge requires individual and team efforts. At the level of the individual student, self-regulated learning (SRL) is proposed as an effective way to learn in entrepreneurial projects. At the level of a student team, team learning and psychological safety are hypothesized to contribute to group ...

  2. Experts in Teams – An experiential learning method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steffen Kjær

    2017-01-01

    courses. Most of the practical courses are group work along the lines of project based learning. EiT is in a way both. It is a practical course in as much as our students get hands-on experience with interdisciplinary team work and innovation processes. EiT is a theoretical course in as much as our...... students are taught various tools that aid and guide them in the innovation process and in the interdisciplinary team work. The theoretical foundations of EiT viewed as a teaching method is experiential learning and its derivative project based learning. In the beginning of the 12 weeks course period Ei......This study discusses the pedagogical characteristics of the hands-on nterdisciplinary innovation course Experts in Teams (EiT) of the University of Southern Denmark (SDU). EiT is a 10 ECTS course mandatory to all fifth semester students on any engineering program at the Technical Faculty of SDU...

  3. An innovative addition to team-based-learning pedagogy to enhance teaching and learning: Students' perceptions of team exams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khansari, Parto S; Coyne, Leanne

    The study investigates students' perceptions of the value of implementing a team exam to enhance learning prior to a summative assessment. Team exams are similar to midterm exams, except that answering questions is a team effort. Data was collected from second year pharmacy students at California Northstate University College of Pharmacy (CNUCOP) through a self-administered online survey. The survey questions included closed-ended questions to evaluate students' perception on preparedness for a summative assessment and to rank advantages and disadvantages of the team exams. Of the 40 students who completed the survey (38% response rate), 100% of participants agreed that having a team exam prior to a major exam made them feel more prepared for a major summative exam. Ninety-seven percent of students believed that the team exam helped them to identify gaps in their knowledge and 85% agreed that taking a team exam reinforced their knowledge by teaching other students. The survey results did not identify any major disadvantages to holding a team exam. Students perceived that taking a team exam prior to a midterm exam is an effective approach to review the course contents and identify areas of improvement. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Effective Student Teams for Collaborative Learning in an Introductory University Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Jason J. B.; Harrison, David M.; Meyertholen, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the types of student teams that are most effective for collaborative learning in a large freshman university physics course. We compared teams in which the students were all of roughly equal ability to teams with a mix of student abilities, we compared teams with three members to teams with four members, and we examined teams with…

  5. Team-Based Learning: The Importance of Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Krisztina V.; McIlreavy, Megan; Marrs, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Using a quasi-experimental design, the authors examined student performance (i.e., exam scores) in a traditional, lecture-based course (n = 43) and a team-based learning (TBL) course (n = 47). Students from James Madison University, USA--who were unaware that the two sections of the course were taught using different methods--self-selected into…

  6. Making Workers Visible: Unmasking Learning in a Work Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Sharon L.; Carter, Vicki K.; Schied, Fred M.

    2001-01-01

    A case study of a work team in a company using quality management strategies found that training to improve customer service actually served to shape workers' attitudes and control their behavior. The focus of this organizational learning was instrumental and served the interests of the organization, not the workers. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  7. Social Work Students' Perceptions of Team-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macke, Caroline; Taylor, Jessica Averitt; Taylor, James E.; Tapp, Karen; Canfield, James

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to examine social work students' perceptions of Team-Based Learning (N = 154). Aside from looking at overall student perceptions, comparative analyses examined differences in perceptions between BSW and MSW students, and between Caucasian students and students of color. Findings for the overall sample revealed favorable…

  8. Team-Based Learning Improves Course Outcomes in Introductory Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Lisa L.; Hudson, Nathan W.; Henricks-Lepp, Genevieve M.; Street, Whitney S.; Weidenbenner, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of team-based learning (TBL) methods on exam performance and student satisfaction in an introductory psychology class. Fifteen instructors teaching 29 sections (with a combined enrollment of approximately 1,130 students) were randomly assigned to use TBL for 7 of 12 major topics or to use lecture. All students…

  9. Teacher, Team, and School Change through Reciprocal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkowski, Sabre; Schnellert, Leyton

    2018-01-01

    This paper documents the first year of a qualitative case study investigating the experiences of reciprocal learning teams of teachers within a small, rural secondary school. The purpose of this study was to examine how teachers experienced collaborative professional development (PD) and how their experiences contributed to developing the culture…

  10. Student-Faculty Team Teaching--A Collaborative Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardi, Enza; Mach, Calvin; Mo, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aim to gage students' satisfaction, learning outcomes, and experiences with student-faculty team-teaching in an undergraduate quantitative-research-methods course. Three peer tutors co-taught with a faculty instructor each year, receiving pedagogical-placement credits. Data were collected via bi-weekly journals, a focus group,…

  11. Recommendations for e-learning in New Product Development teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Pannekeet, Kees; Rutjens, Marjo

    2009-01-01

    Bitter-Rijpkema, M., Pannekeet, K., & Rutjens, M. (2009). Recommendations for e-learning in New Product Development teams. In S. Hambach, A. Martens, D. Tavangarian & B. Urban (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd International eLBa Science Conference (pp. 135-145). June, 17-19, 2009, Rostock, Germany:

  12. A Team Formation and Project-based Learning Support Service for Social Learning Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Spoelstra, Howard; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Van de Vrie, Evert; Obreza, Matija; Sloep, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Internet affords new approaches to learning. Geographically dispersed self-directed learners can learn in computer-supported communities, forming social learning networks. However, self-directed learners can suffer from a lack of continuous motivation. And surprisingly, social learning networks do not readily support effective, coherence-creating and motivating learning settings. It is argued that providing project-based learning opportunities and team formation services can help overcome...

  13. Team-Based Learning: A New Approach Toward Improving Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Rezaee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available  Team-based learning is designed to provide students with both conceptual and procedural knowledge, aiming to enhance active learning and critical thinking. In the present study, team-based learning and lecture methods in teaching the “hospital organization and management” course among hospital management students were compared. This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 25 undergraduate students of management. Teaching sessions were divided into two parts. The first part was taught with interactive lectures and the second part with team-based learning method. The students' knowledge was measured before, immediately and two months (late post-test after teaching. Finally, the mean scores of the final exam and students' satisfaction towards the methods of teaching were measured. There was an improvement in test scores of the students after the TBL sessions when compared to the test scores after lecture sessions (P<0.001. Also, TBL group had significantly a higher amount of knowledge retention compared to the lecture group (P<0.001, but no significant relationship was found between the mean scores of the final exam in the TBL and lecture groups (P=0.116. Finally, the majority of the respondents were more satisfied with TBL sessions compared to the ones held through lecture (P=0.037. The results indicated that TBL provides a better outcome for students. We found that the TBL approach allowed us to create an active learning environment that contributed to the improvement of the students’ performances.

  14. Team-Based Learning: A New Approach Toward Improving Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Rita; Moadeb, Neda; Shokrpour, Nasrin

    2016-10-01

     Team-based learning is designed to provide students with both conceptual and procedural knowledge, aiming to enhance active learning and critical thinking. In the present study, team-based learning and lecture methods in teaching the "hospital organization and management" course among hospital management students were compared. This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 25 undergraduate students of management. Teaching sessions were divided into two parts. The first part was taught with interactive lectures and the second part with team-based learning method. The students' knowledge was measured before, immediately and two months (late post-test) after teaching. Finally, the mean scores of the final exam and students' satisfaction towards the methods of teaching were measured. There was an improvement in test scores of the students after the TBL sessions when compared to the test scores after lecture sessions (Plecture group (Plecture groups (P=0.116). Finally, the majority of the respondents were more satisfied with TBL sessions compared to the ones held through lecture (P=0.037). The results indicated that TBL provides a better outcome for students. We found that the TBL approach allowed us to create an active learning environment that contributed to the improvement of the students' performances.

  15. Learning styles and team roles – Lessons for Gregorc based teams for effective enterprise development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Kbathgate

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The need to develop robust and coherent models for effective entrepreneurial training and development has never been more relevant than in the contemporary economic and educational milieu. The demand for the promotion of enterprise and enterprise development calls on those entrusted with nurturing entrepreneurial talent to create fecund environments for students and participant is alike to promote sustainable enterprise development. Essential to achieving this are considerations of learning styles and the relationship of these to team roles in business start-up activities. This research exercise attempts to establish linkages between different learning styles with the allocation of roles and responsibilities in teams who have aspirations to create and explore business start-up opportunities, within an educational setting. The context will be explored and a proposed model will be developed with considerations to cost of effective teaching and learning for enterprise development. The model will be used to demonstrate how an integrated and effective learning environment can be created through the use of Gregorc considerations and how this paradigm can contribute to cost effective teaching and learning methodologies.

  16. Why do Team-Based Learning educators use TBL?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Evidence suggests that Team Based Learning (TBL is an effective teaching method for promoting student learning. Many people have also suggested that TBL supports other complex curriculum objectives, such as teamwork and communication skills. However, there is limited rigorous, substantive data to support these claims. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess medical educators’ perceptions of the outcomes affected by TBL, thereby highlighting the specific areas of TBL in need of research. Methods: We reviewed the published research on TBL in medical education, and identified 21 unique claims from authors regarding the outcomes of TBL. The claims centred on 4 domains: learning, behaviours, skills, and wellbeing. We created a questionnaire that asked medical educators to rate their support for each claim. The survey was distributed to the medical educators with experience teaching via TBL and who were active users of the Team Based Learning Collaborative listserv. Results: Fifty responses were received. Respondents strongly supported claims that TBL positively impacts behaviours and skills over traditional, lecture based teaching methods, including the promotion of self-directed learning, active learning, peer-to-peer learning, and teaching. In addition, respondents strongly supported claims that TBL promotes teamwork, collaboration, communication and problem solving. Most participants reported that TBL is more effective in promoting interpersonal, accountability, leadership and teaching skills. Conclusion: Medical educators that use TBL have favourable perceptions of the practice across a variety of domains. Future research should examine the actual effects of TBL on these domains.

  17. Improving Team Performance Through Simulation-Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Mark S

    2017-10-01

    American health care is facing an epidemic of medical errors. A major cause of these errors is poor teamwork. Crisis resource management (CRM) is a set of teamwork principles derived from the airline industry. Medical simulation is an educational tool that affords health care providers a means of improving teamwork by learning and practicing CRM. This article (1) discusses the case for teaching team training, (2) reviews the principles of medical simulation as they pertain to team training, (3) provides practical guidelines for using medical simulation in otolaryngology education, (4) discusses current evidence for the efficacy of medical simulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Implementing Team Based Learning in an Information Literacy Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn Post

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Motivating students to improve their Information Literacy (IL skills can be a challenge. As a pilot, we implemented Team Based Learning (TBL in our IL lessons. TBL is an interactive learning approach based on the “flipped classroom” concept, offering students opportunities to gather skills via immediate feedback during individual and team activities. Moreover, TBL promises to be an attractive and activating way of learning. We were interested if TBL, A indeed activates students and B improves their IL skills more than with lectures and self-tuition. Methods: TBL was implemented in a first year bachelor IL course in the year 2015-2016. Student were asked to study three IL e-learning modules before class. The obtained knowledge was assessed individually during an Individual Readiness Assessment test (IRAT and in a team via a Team Readiness Assessment test (TRAT using “scratch and win cards”. After this, teams were given an IL case and the members had to come to a consensus about the best solution out of a couple options provided. Finally, students took a written exam, which was the same as used in this course in the year 2014-2015, when TBL was not applied yet. We compared the grades of the written exam between the two academic years using a Mann Whitney U test (P<0.05. Students’ opinion about TBL was polled using a 34 question student survey. Results: The mean written exam grades were significantly higher in the TBL year than in the preceding year without TBL (respectively, 7.6 ± 1.42 vs 6.5 ± 1.31, P<0.001. The student survey showed that students were positive about the IRATs and TRATs, but neutral about other TBL parts. Conclusion: TBL seems to be a good didactical method to motivate students and enhance their IL skills.

  19. Online learning in paediatrics: a student-led web-based learning modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Peter; Kitney, Lauren; Kozan, Daniel; Lewis, Melanie

    2010-03-01

    undergraduate medical education is shifting away from traditional didactic methods towards a more self-directed learning environment. E-learning has emerged as a vital learning modality that allows students to apply key principles to practical scenarios in a truly personalised approach.  at the University of Alberta, paediatrics is taught longitudinally, with lectures distributed throughout the preclinical curriculum and concentrated in the 8-week paediatric clinical clerkship. As a result, students entering clerkship lack core foundational knowledge and clinical skills. PedsCases (http://www.pedscases.com) is a student-driven interactive website designed to achieve the learning outcomes identified by the competency-based paediatric curriculum. This open-access e-learning tool is a comprehensive peer-reviewed learning resource that incorporates various learning modalities. Material is student generated and peer reviewed by staff paediatricians to ensure validity, accuracy and usefulness. After 17 months, PedsCases contains 216 questions, 19 cases, 11 flashcard-type quizzes, 11 podcasts and two clinical videos, and has had 2148 unique visitors from 73 different countries. PedsCases is one of the top five references returned by Internet search engines for the phrase 'paediatrics for medical students'. PedsCases is a collaborative resource created for and by medical students that provides an opportunity for active self-directed learning while disseminating knowledge in an evidence-based, interactive and clinically relevant fashion. PedsCases encourages students to take an active role in their education and drive medical education initiatives in response to the evolving curriculum. As the focus of medical education shifts towards independent learning, student-led educational tools such as PedsCases have emerged as essential resources for students. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  20. Global Corporate Priorities and Demand-Led Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dealtry, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to start the process of exploring how to optimise connections between the strategic needs of an organisation as directed by top management and its learning management structures and strategies. Design/methodology/approach: The article takes a broad brush approach to a complex and large subject area that is…

  1. Kinesthetic Language Learning: How an Accident Led to a Revelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Travis; Nam, Roger S.; Benckhuysen, Amanda W.

    2016-01-01

    This essay analyzes a critical incident that took place in a hybrid distance-learning Hebrew language class that was adapting interactive, immersion-style, kinesthetic pedagogy during the week-long face-to-face intensive portion of the class--including Total Physical Response techniques in which students respond to the language with whole-body…

  2. Use of a Dedicated, Non-Physician-led Mental Health Team to Reduce Pediatric Emergency Department Lengths of Stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspal, Neil G; Rutman, Lori E; Kodish, Ian; Moore, Ann; Migita, Russell T

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of emergency departments (EDs) for pediatric mental health (MH) complaints is increasing. These patients require more resources and have higher admission rates than those with nonpsychiatric complaints. A multistage, multidisciplinary process to reduce length of stay (LOS) and improve the quality of care for patients with psychiatric complaints was performed at a tertiary care children's hospital's ED using Lean methodology. This process resulted in the implementation of a dedicated MH team, led by either a social worker or a psychiatric nurse, to evaluate patients, facilitate admissions, and arrange discharge planning. We conducted a retrospective, before-and-after study analyzing data 1 year before through 1 year after new process implementation (March 28, 2011). Our primary outcome was mean ED LOS. After process implementation there was a statistically significant decrease in mean ED LOS (332 minutes vs. 244 minutes, p vs. 204 minutes, p = 0.001), security physical interventions (2.0% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.004), and restraint use (1.7% vs. 0.1%, p safety. Use of quality improvement methodology led to a redesign that was associated with a significant reduction in mean LOS of patients with psychiatric complaints and improved ED staff perception of care. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  3. Team Work and Democratic Learning in Projectmanagement Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidon, Ivan; Rebollar, Ruben; Qvist, Palle

    Project Management is a discipline of a basically professional nature. Training in Project Management must provide students with a series of professional competencies, among which teamwork stands out as one of the most important, since all projects, by definition, must be carried out by teams...... it possible to establish a correlation between a group's decision making process and the quality of its functioning as a team........ The functioning of a team will be characterized, among other things, by the way it is organized and the way decisions are reached within it. A new term has appeared lately to refer to this concept: Democratic Learning. This paper shows the results obtained in an experiment carried out at the Universities...

  4. Learning to fly? First experiences on team learning of Icaros cooperative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvonen, Pasi

    2013-05-01

    Icaros is an information technology (IT) cooperative that was originally owned by 11 IT degree programme students of Saimaa University of Applied Sciences. This article describes experiences and challenges of team building of these students who are called 'teampreneurs' during their first year as team entrepreneurs. The findings provided here are based on theme-based interviews and direct observations. The team learning experiences gained during their first year were related to lack of risks and challenges in team building. Previous studies related to team development suggest that cooperation and conflict, and also openness and confrontation, are essential elements for team development. Based on the findings, teampreneurs of Icaros were avoiding confrontation and conflict. These facts inhibited their development to a potential team and they were stuck in the pseudo-team stage with several parallel challenges. Later, after four teampreneurs decided to leave the Icaros cooperative, it created a crisis within the team and the Icaros was able to further develop as a team. The results suggest that team building needs lots of time and patience and cannot be hurried. Furthermore, the role of team coach is crucial in supporting the teampreneurs to confront their challenges related to relationships between each other within the team.

  5. The Impact of Managerial Coaching on Learning Outcomes within the Team Context: An Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Marcia; Aguilar, Mariya Gavrilova

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between coaching expertise, project difficulty, and team empowerment on team learning outcomes within the context of a high-performance work team. Variables were tested using multiple regression analysis. The data were analyzed for two groups--team leaders and team members--using t-tests, factor analysis,…

  6. Practical Team-Based Learning from Planning to Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Heather P; Bell, Edward; Eng, Marty; Fuentes, David G; Helms, Kristen L; Maki, Erik D; Vyas, Deepti

    2015-12-25

    Team-based learning (TBL) helps instructors develop an active teaching approach for the classroom through group work. The TBL infrastructure engages students in the learning process through the Readiness Assessment Process, problem-solving through team discussions, and peer feedback to ensure accountability. This manuscript describes the benefits and barriers of TBL, and the tools necessary for developing, implementing, and critically evaluating the technique within coursework in a user-friendly method. Specifically, the manuscript describes the processes underpinning effective TBL development, preparation, implementation, assessment, and evaluation, as well as practical techniques and advice from authors' classroom experiences. The paper also highlights published articles in the area of TBL in education, with a focus on pharmacy education.

  7. Learning Team Review 2016-0002 Parking Lot Event 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilburn, Dianne Williams [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bitteker, Leo John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brooks, Melynda Louise [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Romero-Trujillo, Natalie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Currie, Scott Allister [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martin, Joanne Skrivan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sondheim, Walter E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tovesson, Fredrik [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Young, Jennifer S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Crespin, Thomas Joe [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-02

    The purpose of a Learning Team is to transfer and communicate the information into operational feedback and improvement. We want to pay attention to the small things that go wrong because they are often early warning signals and may provide insight into the health of the whole system. The incident involved the collision of a van with a forklift having raised tines in rainy, overcast weather.

  8. TEAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document presents materials covering the television campaign against drunk driving called "TEAM" (Techniques for Effective Alcohol Management). It is noted that TEAM's purpose is to promote effective alcohol management in public facilities and other establishments that serve alcoholic beverages. TEAM sponsors are listed, including…

  9. Engaging Students in Learning: Findings from a Study of Project-Led Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sandra; Mesquita, Diana; Flores, Maria Assunção; Lima, Rui M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from a three-year study of project-based learning implemented in the first year of the Industrial Engineering and Management programme, at the University of Minho, Portugal. This particular model was inspired on project-led education (PLE), following Powell and Weenk's [2003. "Project-Led Engineering…

  10. Flipping my environmental geochemistry classroom using Team-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that active learning disproportionately benefits STEM students from disadvantaged backgrounds and women in male-dominated fields (Lorenzo et al., 2006; Haak et al., 2011). Freeman et al. (2014) went so far as to suggest that increasing the number of STEM graduates could be done, at least in part, by "abandoning traditional lecturing in favor of active learning". Motivated in part by these previous studies and working at a Hispanic-Serving Institution, I decided to flip my environmental geochemistry course, using Team-Based Learning (TBL) - an instructional strategy for using active learning in small groups (Michaelsen et al., 1982). The course is taught over a 3 hour long class period (once a week) with a mix of upper division undergraduate and graduate students from environmental science, geology, engineering, chemistry, and biological sciences. One of the major learning outcomes of my course is that students "will be able to explain and discuss environmental geochemical data and its significance with their peers." This is practiced each class period throughout the course using TBL, where both undergraduate and graduate students learn from each other and uncover misconceptions. It is essentially one version of a flipped classroom where the students' experience changes from acquiring course content in the classroom to applying course content in the classroom in teams. I will share an overview of the teaching and learning strategy and my experience as well as examples of activities done in the classroom. Cited references: Freeman et al. (2014) PNAS 111: 8410-8415; Haak et al. (2011) Science 332: 1213-1216; Lorenzo et al. (2006) Am J Phys 74: 118-122; Michaelsen et al. (1982) Organ Behav Teaching 7: 13-22.

  11. The Learning Curve for a Fetal Cardiac Intervention Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P. Emery

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Multiple technical difficulties are encountered when a multidisciplinary team of subspecialists begins a minimally-invasive fetal cardiac interventional program. We describe the learning curve. Study Design. Ten pregnant sheep underwent ultrasound-guided balloon valvuloplasty of the aortic valve. Team members and their roles remained constant through the trial. The time between needle insertion and entrance of the left ventricle at the aortic root was recorded. F-test was used to assess significance (P≤.05. Results. The time required to accurately position the needle tip at the aortic root decreased significantly over the course of the trial, from 12 minutes with the first attempt to one minute with the last (P=.003. Conclusion. A significant learning curve is encountered when a multidisciplinary team begins a minimally-invasive fetal cardiac intervention program. However, technical proficiency can be achieved with practice. Institutions interested in developing such a program should consider practice in an animal model before proceeding to the human fetus.

  12. Factors influencing learner satisfaction with team-based learning among nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Lee, Suk Jeong; Mennenga, Heidi

    2014-12-01

    In this study, learner satisfaction was described, and factors influencing satisfaction with team-based learning were identified. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive survey study. Two separate 2 h team-based, learning sessions, consisting of preparation, readiness assurance, and application, were given to a cohort of 139 second year nursing students in 2010 and 263 students in 2011, respectively. At the end of the learning sessions, participants completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding their learning experience. Nursing students were generally satisfied with team-based learning. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the learning process significantly affected learner satisfaction compared to pre-assignment, course content, peer evaluation, and team activity. According to these results, team-based learning facilitators should organize and conduct team-based learning activities, while also considering instructional design factors, to help students learn effectively. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. A multi-instructor, team-based, active-learning exercise to integrate basic and clinical sciences content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolluru, Srikanth; Roesch, Darren M; Akhtar de la Fuente, Ayesha

    2012-03-12

    To introduce a multiple-instructor, team-based, active-learning exercise to promote the integration of basic sciences (pathophysiology, pharmacology, and medicinal chemistry) and clinical sciences in a doctor of pharmacy curriculum. A team-based learning activity that involved pre-class reading assignments, individual-and team-answered multiple-choice questions, and evaluation and discussion of a clinical case, was designed, implemented, and moderated by 3 faculty members from the pharmaceutical sciences and pharmacy practice departments. Student performance was assessed using a multiple-choice examination, an individual readiness assurance test (IRAT), a team readiness assurance test (TRAT), and a subjective, objective, assessment, and plan (SOAP) note. Student attitudes were assessed using a pre- and post-exercise survey instrument. Students' understanding of possible correct treatment strategies for depression improved. Students were appreciative of this true integration of basic sciences knowledge in a pharmacotherapy course and to have faculty members from both disciplines present to answer questions. Mean student score on the on depression module for the examination was 80.4%, indicating mastery of the content. An exercise led by multiple instructors improved student perceptions of the importance of team-based teaching. Integrated teaching and learning may be achieved when instructors from multiple disciplines work together in the classroom using proven team-based, active-learning exercises.

  14. Moving towards Optimising Demand-Led Learning: The 2005-2007 ECUANET Leonardo Da Vinci Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dealtry, Richard; Howard, Keith

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the key project learning points and outcomes as a guideline for the future quality management of demand-led learning and development. Design/methodology/approach: The research methodology was based upon a corporate university blueprint architecture and browser toolkit developed by a member of the…

  15. Polyphonic inquiry for team development, learning and knowledge production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Hersted; Madsen, Charlotte Øland

    2018-01-01

    our experience from a constructionist approach to research and social change. Our practice was developed and refined while working together with a team of advisers in an NGO for organic farming and organic food production located in Denmark. In overall terms, and in line with the values......In this chapter we describe how we, as researchers, interacted with practitioners in the field as we co-constructed a polyphonic inquiry for team development, learning and knowledge production, inspired by action research. We build on social constructionist meta-theoretical ideas and write about...... of the organization, a basic principle of this practice was to think and work in terms of sustainability, environmental care, and social responsibility. We undertake research as a form of social action as described by Sheila McNamee (2010), Sheila McNamee and Dian Marie Hosking (2013), and Kenneth J. Gergen (2015...

  16. Successful Group Work: Using Cooperative Learning and Team-Based Learning in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant-Vallone, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    This research study examined student perceptions of group experiences in the classroom. The author used cooperative learning and team-based learning to focus on three characteristics that are critical for the success of groups: structure of activities, relationships of group members, and accountability of group members. Results indicated that…

  17. Facilitating Learning in Large Lecture Classes: Testing the "Teaching Team" Approach to Peer Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F.; Lang, Sarah; Maas, Martha

    2010-01-01

    We tested the effect of voluntary peer-facilitated study groups on student learning in large introductory biology lecture classes. The peer facilitators (preceptors) were trained as part of a Teaching Team (faculty, graduate assistants, and preceptors) by faculty and Learning Center staff. Each preceptor offered one weekly study group to all…

  18. The Role of Faculty Learning Communities in Supporting Team-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rands, Melissa L.; Bender, Holly; Gillette, Meghan T.; Orgler, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe the faculty development initiatives and the role of faculty learning communities (FLCs) in supporting Team-Based Learning (TBL) at a large, research-intensive university. A systematic review of the initiatives found FLCs provided crucial support for both new and seasoned TBL practitioners and fostered…

  19. Learning from Others, Together: Brokerage, Closure and Team Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Uribe, Jose; Wang, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Scholarship on teams has focused on the relationship between a team's performance, however defined, and the network structure among team members. For example, Uzzi and Spiro (2005) find that the creative performance of Broadway musical teams depends heavily on the internal cohesion of team members and their past collaborative experience with individuals outside their immediate teams. In other words, team members' internal cohesion and external ties are crucial to the team's success. How, then...

  20. Do learning collaboratives strengthen communication? A comparison of organizational team communication networks over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunger, Alicia C; Lengnick-Hall, Rebecca

    Collaborative learning models were designed to support quality improvements, such as innovation implementation by promoting communication within organizational teams. Yet the effect of collaborative learning approaches on organizational team communication during implementation is untested. The aim of this study was to explore change in communication patterns within teams from children's mental health organizations during a year-long learning collaborative focused on implementing a new treatment. We adopt a social network perspective to examine intraorganizational communication within each team and assess change in (a) the frequency of communication among team members, (b) communication across organizational hierarchies, and (c) the overall structure of team communication networks. A pretest-posttest design compared communication among 135 participants from 21 organizational teams at the start and end of a learning collaborative. At both time points, participants were asked to list the members of their team and rate the frequency of communication with each along a 7-point Likert scale. Several individual, pair-wise, and team level communication network metrics were calculated and compared over time. At the individual level, participants reported communicating with more team members by the end of the learning collaborative. Cross-hierarchical communication did not change. At the team level, these changes manifested differently depending on team size. In large teams, communication frequency increased, and networks grew denser and slightly less centralized. In small teams, communication frequency declined, growing more sparse and centralized. Results suggest that team communication patterns change minimally but evolve differently depending on size. Learning collaboratives may be more helpful for enhancing communication among larger teams; thus, managers might consider selecting and sending larger staff teams to learning collaboratives. This study highlights key future

  1. Importance of Diversified Leadership Roles in Improving Team Effectiveness in a Virtual Collaboration Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Charlie C.; Wu, Jiinpo; Yang, Samuel C.; Tsou, Hsin-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Virtual teams enabled by information and communications technologies (ICT) are increasingly being adopted not only by for-profit organizations but also by education institutions as well. This study investigates what contributes to the success of virtual learning teams. Specifically, we examine the issue of leadership in virtual learning teams. The…

  2. Academic Learning Teams in Accelerated Adult Programs: Online and On-Campus Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favor, Judy K.; Kulp, Amanda M.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports adult students' (N = 632) perceptions of long-functioning academic learning teams in accelerated online and on-campus business cohort groups in six constructs: attraction to team, performance expectation alignment, workload distribution, intra-team conflict, preference for teamwork, and impact on learning. Comparisons between…

  3. A mixed methods evaluation of team-based learning for applied pathophysiology in undergraduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branney, Jonathan; Priego-Hernández, Jacqueline

    2018-02-01

    It is important for nurses to have a thorough understanding of the biosciences such as pathophysiology that underpin nursing care. These courses include content that can be difficult to learn. Team-based learning is emerging as a strategy for enhancing learning in nurse education due to the promotion of individual learning as well as learning in teams. In this study we sought to evaluate the use of team-based learning in the teaching of applied pathophysiology to undergraduate student nurses. A mixed methods observational study. In a year two, undergraduate nursing applied pathophysiology module circulatory shock was taught using Team-based Learning while all remaining topics were taught using traditional lectures. After the Team-based Learning intervention the students were invited to complete the Team-based Learning Student Assessment Instrument, which measures accountability, preference and satisfaction with Team-based Learning. Students were also invited to focus group discussions to gain a more thorough understanding of their experience with Team-based Learning. Exam scores for answers to questions based on Team-based Learning-taught material were compared with those from lecture-taught material. Of the 197 students enrolled on the module, 167 (85% response rate) returned the instrument, the results from which indicated a favourable experience with Team-based Learning. Most students reported higher accountability (93%) and satisfaction (92%) with Team-based Learning. Lectures that promoted active learning were viewed as an important feature of the university experience which may explain the 76% exhibiting a preference for Team-based Learning. Most students wanted to make a meaningful contribution so as not to let down their team and they saw a clear relevance between the Team-based Learning activities and their own experiences of teamwork in clinical practice. Exam scores on the question related to Team-based Learning-taught material were comparable to those

  4. Reinforcement Learning in Distributed Domains: Beyond Team Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpert, David H.; Sill, Joseph; Turner, Kagan

    2000-01-01

    Distributed search algorithms are crucial in dealing with large optimization problems, particularly when a centralized approach is not only impractical but infeasible. Many machine learning concepts have been applied to search algorithms in order to improve their effectiveness. In this article we present an algorithm that blends Reinforcement Learning (RL) and hill climbing directly, by using the RL signal to guide the exploration step of a hill climbing algorithm. We apply this algorithm to the domain of a constellations of communication satellites where the goal is to minimize the loss of importance weighted data. We introduce the concept of 'ghost' traffic, where correctly setting this traffic induces the satellites to act to optimize the world utility. Our results indicated that the bi-utility search introduced in this paper outperforms both traditional hill climbing algorithms and distributed RL approaches such as team games.

  5. Obstacle of Team Teaching and Collaborative Learning in Information Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marn-Ling Shing

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The field of information security includes diverse contents such as network security and computer forensics which are highly technical-oriented topics. In addition, information forensic requires the background of criminology. The information security also includes non-technical content such as information ethics and security laws. Because the diverse nature of information security, Shing et al. has proposed the use of team teaching and collaborative learning for the information security classes. Although team teaching seems to be efficient in information security, practically it needs a few challenges. The Purdue's case mentioned in Shing's paper has funding support of National Security Agency (NSA. However, a vast amount of resources may not be available for an instructor in a normal university. In addition, many obstacles are related to the administration problems. For example, how are the teaching evaluations computed if there are multiple instructors for a single course? How will instructors in a computer forensics class prepare students (criminal justice majors and information technology majors before taking the same class with diverse background? The paper surveyed approximately 25 students in a university in Virginia concerning the satisfaction of team-teaching. Finally, this paper describes ways to meet those challenges.

  6. Leadership Identity Development Through Reflection and Feedback in Team-Based Learning Medical Student Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Maryam; Mirzazadeh, Azim; Parmelee, Dean X; Peyton, Elizabeth; Mehrdad, Neda; Janani, Leila; Shahsavari, Hooman

    2018-01-01

    Studies on leadership identity development through reflection with Team-Based Learning (TBL) in medical student education are rare. We assumed that reflection and feedback on the team leadership process would advance the progression through leadership identity development stages in medical students within the context of classes using TBL. This study is a quasi-experimental design with pretest-posttest control group. The pretest and posttest were reflection papers of medical students about their experience of leadership during their TBL sessions. In the intervention group, TBL and a team-based, guided reflection and feedback on the team leadership process were performed at the end of all TBL sessions. In the other group, only TBL was used. The Stata 12 software was used. Leadership Identity was treated both as a categorical and quantitative variable to control for differences in baseline and gender variables. Chi-square, t tests, and linear regression analysis were performed. The population was a cohort of 2015-2016 medical students in a TBL setting at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, School of Medicine. Teams of four to seven students were formed by random sorting at the beginning of the academic year (intervention group n = 20 teams, control group n = 19 teams). At baseline, most students in both groups were categorized in the Awareness and Exploration stage of leadership identity: 51 (52%) in the intervention group and 59 (55%) in the control group: uncorrected χ 2 (3) = 15.6, design-based F(2.83, 108) = 4.87, p = .003. In the posttest intervention group, 36 (36%) were in exploration, 33 (33%) were in L-identified, 20 (20%) were in Leadership Differentiated, and 10 (10%) were in the Generativity. None were in the Awareness or Integration stages. In the control group, 3 (20%) were in Awareness, 56 (53%) were in Exploration, 35 (33%) were in Leader Identified, 13 (12%) were in Leadership Differentiated. None were in the Generativity and Integration stages

  7. Exploring the use of student-led simulated practice learning in pre-registration nursing programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jo; Collins, Guy; Gratton, Olivia

    2017-09-20

    Simulated practice learning is used in pre-registration nursing programmes to replicate situations that nursing students are likely to encounter in clinical practice, but in a safe and protected academic environment. However, lecturer-led simulated practice learning has been perceived as detached from contemporary nursing practice by some nursing students. Therefore, a pilot project was implemented in the authors' university to explore the use of student-led simulated practice learning and its potential benefits for nursing students. To evaluate the effectiveness of student-led simulated practice learning in pre-registration nursing programmes. The authors specifically wanted to: enhance the students' skills; improve their critical thinking and reflective strategies; and develop their leadership and management techniques. A literature review was undertaken to examine the evidence supporting student-led simulated practice learning. A skills gap analysis was then conducted with 35 third-year nursing students to identify their learning needs, from which suitable simulated practice learning scenarios and sessions were developed and undertaken. These sessions were evaluated using debriefs following each of the sessions, as well as informal discussions with the nursing students. The pilot project identified that student-led simulated learning: developed nursing students' ability to plan and facilitate colleagues' practice learning; enabled nursing students to develop their mentoring skills; reinforced the nursing students' self-awareness, which contributed to their personal development; and demonstrated the importance of peer feedback and support through the debriefs. Challenges included overcoming some students' resistance to the project and that some lecturers were initially concerned that nursing students may not have the clinical expertise to lead the simulated practice learning sessions effectively. This pilot project has demonstrated how student-led simulated

  8. Relationship between Individual and Organizational Learning: Mediating Role of Team Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Stelmaszczyk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to recognize the relationships between individual and organizational learning while considering team learning as a mediator of these relationships. The research object is a large Polish enterprise specializing in the production of cast-iron items. In order to test assumed research hypotheses, statistical analyses were conducted using the IBM SPSS Statistics Suite, version 20. The suite helped conduct correlation analyses concatenation, line regression analyses and mediation analyses using the PROCESS macro by Hayes and Preacher. The research results show a statistically significant relationship between individual learning and each of the five dimensions of organizational learning [clarity of purpose and mission; leadership commitment and empowerment; knowledge transfer; experimentation and rewards; and teamwork and group problem solving]. What is more, they prove that team learning is a mediator of a relationship between individual and organizational learning. Interestingly, only one full mediation has been observed while researching the mediative effect of team learning in relation to each out of the five dimensions of organizational learning. It occurred in relation to experimentation and rewards. In the remaining cases these were partial mediations.

  9. Medical students' learning from patient-led teaching: experiential versus biomedical knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Ann-Helen; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how medical students perceive the experience of learning from patient instructors (patients with rheumatism who teach health professionals and students) in the context of coupled faculty-led and patient-led teaching session. This was an explorative study with a qualitative approach based on focus group interviews. Analysis was based on a prior developed model of the characteristics of learning from patient instructors. The authors used this model as sensitizing concepts for the analysis of data while at the same time being open to new insights by constant comparison of old and new findings. Results showed a negotiation both between and within the students of the importance of patients' experiential knowledge versus scientific biomedical knowledge. On one hand students appreciated the experiential learning environment offered in the PI-led sessions representing a patient-centred approach, and acknowledged the importance of the PIs' individual perspectives and experiential knowledge. On the other hand, representing the scientific biomedical perspective and traditional step-by step teaching, students expressed unfamiliarity with the unstructured experiential learning and scepticism regarding the credibility of the patients' knowledge. This study contributes to the understanding of the complexity of involving patients as teachers in healthcare education and initiates a discussion on how to complement faculty-led teaching with patient-led teaching involving varying degrees of patient autonomy in the planning and delivering of the teaching.

  10. Systemic Family Therapy Using the Reflecting Team: The Experiences of Adults with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anslow, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to illuminate the experiences of adults with learning disabilities of the reflecting team, in the context of their systemic family therapy. Five adults with learning disabilities were recruited from one community learning disability team. A qualitative design using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was appropriate…

  11. 259 “Team Pair Solo” Cooperative Learning and Personality Type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Team Pair Solo” Cooperative Learning and Personality. Type as Determinants of Students' Achievement and. Attitude to Chemistry. (Pp. 259-276). Ogunleye, B. O. - Department of Teacher ... how to facilitate a positive learning experience of students. One of ..... collaboration in a team to carry out learning activities required.

  12. Student-led learning: a new teaching paradigm for surgical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenes, Jen; Mironova, Polina; Safir, Oleg; McQueen, Sydney A; Abdelbary, Hesham; Drexler, Michael; Nousiainen, Markku; Ferguson, Peter; Kraemer, William; Alman, Benjamin; Reznick, Richard K; Sonnadara, Ranil R

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based education and simulation are being used more frequently in surgical skills curricula. We explored a novel student-led learning paradigm, which allows trainees to become more active participants in the learning process while maintaining expert guidance and supervision. Twelve first-year orthopedic residents were randomized to either a student-led (SL) or a traditional instructor-led group during an intensive, month-long, laboratory-based technical skills training course. A rigorous qualitative-description approach was used for analysis. Four prominent themes emerged: instructional style, feedback, peer and instructor collaboration, and self-efficacy. Compared with the instructor-led group, there was more peer assistance, feedback, collaboration, and hands-on and active learning observed in the SL group. The flexible and socially rich nature of the SL learning environment may aid in development of both technical and nontechnical skills early in residency and ultimately privilege later clinical learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Learning teams and networks: using information technology as a means of managing work process development in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Vesa; Paavilainen, Eija

    2002-01-01

    This article focuses on the introduction of team learning and shared knowledge creation using computer-based learning environments and teams as networks in the development of healthcare organizations. Using computer technology, care units can be considered learning teams and the hospital a network of those learning teams. Team learning requires that the healthcare workers' intellectual capital and personal competence be viewed as an important resource in developing the quality of action of the entire healthcare organization.

  14. Team safety and innovation by learning from errors in long-term care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljac-Samardžić, Martina; van Woerkom, Marianne; Paauwe, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    Team safety and team innovation are underexplored in the context of long-term care. Understanding the issues requires attention to how teams cope with error. Team managers could have an important role in developing a team's error orientation and managing team membership instabilities. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of team member stability, team coaching, and a team's error orientation on team safety and innovation. A cross-sectional survey method was employed within 2 long-term care organizations. Team members and team managers received a survey that measured safety and innovation. Team members assessed member stability, team coaching, and team error orientation (i.e., problem-solving and blaming approach). The final sample included 933 respondents from 152 teams. Stable teams and teams with managers who take on the role of coach are more likely to adopt a problem-solving approach and less likely to adopt a blaming approach toward errors. Both error orientations are related to team member ratings of safety and innovation, but only the blaming approach is (negatively) related to manager ratings of innovation. Differences between members' and managers' ratings of safety are greater in teams with relatively high scores for the blaming approach and relatively low scores for the problem-solving approach. Team coaching was found to be positively related to innovation, especially in unstable teams. Long-term care organizations that wish to enhance team safety and innovation should encourage a problem-solving approach and discourage a blaming approach. Team managers can play a crucial role in this by coaching team members to see errors as sources of learning and improvement and ensuring that individuals will not be blamed for errors.

  15. The Effects of Case-Based Team Learning on Students’ Learning, Self Regulation and Self Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Rita; Mosalanejad, Leili

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The application of the best approaches to teach adults in medical education is important in the process of training learners to become and remain effective health care providers. This research aims at designing and integrating two approaches, namely team teaching and case study and tries to examine the consequences of these approaches on learning, self regulation and self direction of nursing students. Material & Methods: This is aquasi experimental study of 40 students who were taking a course on mental health. The lessons were designed by using two educational techniques: short case based study and team based learning. Data gathering was based on two valid and reliablequestionnaires: Self-Directed Readiness Scale (SDLRS) and the self-regulating questionnaire. Open ended questions were also designed for the evaluation of students’with points of view on educational methods. Results: The Results showed an increase in the students’ self directed learning based on their performance on the post-test. The results showed that the students’ self-directed learning increased after the intervention. The mean difference before and after intervention self management was statistically significant (p=0.0001). Also, self-regulated learning increased with the mean difference after intervention (p=0.001). Other results suggested that case based team learning can have significant effects on increasing students’ learning (p=0.003). Conclusion: This article may be of value to medical educators who wish to replace traditional learning with informal learning (student-centered-active learning), so as to enhance not only the students’ ’knowledge, but also the advancement of long- life learning skills. PMID:25946918

  16. The effects of case-based team learning on students' learning, self regulation and self direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Rita; Mosalanejad, Leili

    2015-01-26

    The application of the best approaches to teach adults in medical education is important in the process of training learners to become and remain effective health care providers. This research aims at designing and integrating two approaches, namely team teaching and case study and tries to examine the consequences of these approaches on learning, self regulation and self direction of nursing students. This is a quasi experimental study of 40 students who were taking a course on mental health. The lessons were designed by using two educational techniques: short case based study and team based learning. Data gathering was based on two valid and reliable questionnaires: Self-Directed Readiness Scale (SDLRS) and the self-regulating questionnaire. Open ended questions were also designed for the evaluation of students' with points of view on educational methods. The Results showed an increase in the students' self directed learning based on their performance on the post-test. The results showed that the students' self-directed learning increased after the intervention. The mean difference before and after intervention self management was statistically significant (p=0.0001). Also, self-regulated learning increased with the mean difference after intervention (p=0.001). Other results suggested that case based team learning can have significant effects on increasing students' learning (p=0.003). This article may be of value to medical educators who wish to replace traditional learning with informal learning (student-centered-active learning), so as to enhance not only the students' knowledge, but also the advancement of long- life learning skills.

  17. The impact on work-related stress of mental health teams following team-based learning on clinical risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, S B; Sharples, A

    2003-02-01

    Risk management is viewed as a systematic process based on multiprofessional and multi-agency decision-making. A learning pack was developed as part of a team-based learning project aiming to encourage and develop collaborative working practice. This brought different professionals and agencies working in mental health together to learn. There is little doubt that mental health practice is a source of stress for practitioners. Apart from the stress associated with managing 'risky' situations, risk management is also a relatively new concept. This can increase stress around ability to cope, both on an individual practitioner level and in teams. This article reports the impact that the learning pack had on team members' stress, specifically work-related stress. A range of scales were used to measure change in stress and results demonstrated reduced work-related pressure in a number of areas following the learning. The implications for team learning in relation to clinical risk management are discussed in light of the findings.

  18. Frontiers of Crystallography: A Project-Based Research-Led Learning Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Chick C.; Parkin, Andrew; Thomas, Lynne H.

    2012-01-01

    A highly interactive research-led learning session for chemistry undergraduates is described, which aims to lead students to an awareness of the applications of crystallography technique through a mentored hands-on crystal structure solution and refinement session. The research-based environment is inherent throughout the 4.5 h program and is…

  19. Peer-Led Learning Communities: Exploring Integrative High-Impact Educational Practices for Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Kerry L.; de Campos Paula, Ana Luiza

    2016-01-01

    The use of high-impact practices is well documented in higher education literature. This brief describes the integrative practice of undergraduate peer-led leadership learning communities as a model of delivery within a large introductory leadership education course for first-year students. Utilizing open-ended questions embedded within…

  20. Team Based Learning (TBL) in Undergraduate Medical Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashmi, N. R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine if modified Team Based Learning (TBL) was more effective than Traditional Didactic Lecture (TDL) in improving knowledge outcomes about Diabetes management in fourth year medical students and to check the students view about the TBL method in comparison with their earlier experience with TDL. Study Design: A comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Lahore Medical and Dental College, Lahore, from January to February 2011 in 4 weeks. Methodology: Modification of the original TBL method as described by Michaelsen was done to accommodate the educational system. A total of 7 sessions were allotted to teach non-communicable diseases to fourth year MBBS students. Session which was scheduled for teaching Diabetes mellitus was conducted first by TDL and three weeks later with the TBL session. MCQ based tests were administered to self paired groups of students first after the TDL session and then after the TBL session. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare post-TDL and post-TBL test scores of the students. Students views about the TBL session compared to the TDL session were checked by using pre-tested questionnaire. Results: Seventy two, fourth year MBBS students participated in this TBL session. Majority were females 49 (68.1%). There was improvement of test scores of students after the TBL session when compared to the test scores after TDL session (p < 0.001). Majority of the respondents noted that TBL session was a better learning strategy compared to TDL. Conclusion: The 72 students included in the study achieved higher mean test scores on test questions that assessed their knowledge of Diabetes mellitus content learned using the TBL strategy compared with TDL method (p < 0.001). TBL learning method was favoured by a majority of medical students compared to the TDL session. (author)

  1. Exploring the links between interdependence, team learning and a shared understanding among team members: the case of teachers facing an educational innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runhaar, Piety; Ten Brinke, Diana; Kuijpers, Marinka; Wesselink, Renate; Mulder, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Teams are increasingly regarded as the building blocks of organizations, for teams of employees are better able to deal with complex problems and ever-changing demands than individual employees. The effectiveness of teams depends, to a large extent, on team members learning together and developing a

  2. The Impact of Individual Ability, Favorable Team Member Scores, and Student Perception of Course Importance on Student Preference of Team-Based Learning and Grading Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Allan Yen-Lun

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the impact of individual ability and favorable team member scores on student preference of team-based learning and grading methods, and examines the moderating effects of student perception of course importance on student preference of team-based learning and grading methods. The author also investigates the relationship…

  3. Team-Based Learning Practices and Principles in Comparison with Cooperative Learning and Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelsen, Larry K.; Davidson, Neil; Major, Claire Howell

    2014-01-01

    The authors address three questions: (1) What are the foundational practices of team-based learning (TBL)? (2) What are the fundamental principles underlying TBL's foundational practices? and (3) In what ways are TBL's foundational practices similar to and/or different from the practices employed by problem-based learning (PBL) and…

  4. Does team learning motivate students' engagement in an evidence-based medicine course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Bee Choo; Koh, Woon Puay

    2008-12-01

    Small group-based instructional methods such as team learning have been shown to produce positive educational outcomes. To motivate students' learning in an evidence-based medicine course, we explore team learning as a teaching strategy, and describe students' engagement and preference for this mode of learning. An adaptation of team learning was implemented in September 2007 for all Year 2 Medical undergraduates attending the Principles in Evidence-Based Medicine course at the National University of Singapore. First, each student attempted a multiple-choice question individually. Next, the student discussed the same question with his/her team and provided a group response. Individual and group answers were recorded using keypads and Turning Point software. Students' engagement and preference for team learning were measured using a self-reported Likert Scale instrument. The pattern of engagement in team learning was compared with conventional tutorial involving the same cohort of students using chi2 trend test. A total of 224 (88%) and 215 (84%) students responded to the surveys on team learning and conventional tutorial respectively. Overall, students reported a higher level of engagement with team learning than conventional tutorial. However, regardless of the mode of instruction, the students were equally likely to pay attention in class. Sixty-nine per cent of students found team learning more enjoyable than conventional tutorial, with 73% preferring this mode of learning. There was a tendency for the percentage of correct responses to improve after group discussion. Team learning is the preferred mode of learning by Year 2 students attending the evidence-based medicine course. It promoted a high level of students' engagement and interaction in class.

  5. The effects of Team-Based Learning on learning behaviors in the maternal-child nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Liou, Shwu-Ru; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Chang, Chia-Hao

    2014-01-01

    The Team-Based Learning (TBL) method has been used as a teaching strategy in many disciplines. It is instructor-led, learner-centered learning with functions similar to those of problem-based learning, but it is more cost-effective. However, little is known about the application of TBL to nursing education. The objectives of the study are to employ the TBL approach in a Maternal-Child Nursing course and to evaluate its effects on learning outcomes. We present one-group pretest-posttest research design with the intervention of the TBL teaching strategy. The study was conducted in one of the nursing universities in Taiwan. One-hundred-four students in 2011 and 103 students in 2012 in an RN-to-BSN program who enrolled in the Maternal-Child Nursing course participated in this study. These students had graduated from a five-year nursing diploma program before enrolling in the RN-BSN program. Data were collected before and after the implementation of the TBL, which included active learning, in-class activities, and application exercises. The Class Engagement Survey (CES), Value of Teams (VTs), Self-Directed Learning Instrument (SDLI), and exam scores were used to measure students' learning outcomes. TBL significantly influenced the students' learning outcomes. Students who expressed that TBL increased their learning interests had a higher score on VT; and students who had high achievement from the current TBL course had higher scores on the CES, VT, and SDLI. The means of the group test scores and the final examination score were significantly higher than the individual scores from the in-class tests in both 2011, 2012, and the combination of 2011 and 2012. The TBL design requires out-of-class preparation before all classes, which requires active and self-directed learning. TBL provides opportunities to foster learner-to-learner interactions, which lead to more active engagement and teamwork among learners. It also promotes the students' class engagement and teamwork

  6. The effect of interprofessional team-based learning among nursing students: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Arkers Kwan Ching; Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Chan, Lap Ki; Chan, Namkiu; Ganotice, Fraide A; Ho, Jacqueline

    2017-06-01

    Although interprofessional education has received attention in recent years as a means of providing opportunities for health-care professionals to learn with, from and about other disciplines and enhance the quality of patient care, evidence of its effectiveness is limited. Interprofessional team-based learning was introduced to make it possible for students in different healthcare disciplines to interact with each other, and to prepare them to function effectively within a team in their future career. To examine the effects of interprofessional team-based learning for undergraduate nursing students in terms of knowledge level, readiness for interprofessional learning, attitude towards various aspects of team learning, and perceived collective efficacy. The study employed a one-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design. An interprofessional education program was given to students from two universities in Hong Kong who were in different healthcare disciplines including medicine, nursing, pharmacy, biomedical science, and Chinese medicine programs. The program was based on four phases of student learning- individual readiness assessment test, ice breaking session, team readiness assessment test, and application exercise. Nursing students involved in the program were invited to complete anonymous questionnaires to evaluate their interprofessional team experience. A total of 40 nursing students (9 male, 31 female) participated in the study. A statistically significant improvement was identified in their knowledge level (pattitude towards readiness for interprofessional learning, team learning, and perceived collective efficacy (plearning can enhance cross-disciplinary learning and outcomes resulting from team efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Power Asymmetry and Learning in Teams : The Moderating Role of Performance Feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegt, Gerben S.; de Jong, Simon B.; Bunderson, J. Stuart; Molleman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Past research suggests that power asymmetry within teams can have a stifling effect on team learning and performance. We argue here that this effect is contingent on whether power advantages within a team are used to advance individual or collective interests. This study considers the moderating

  8. An Implementation of Active Learning: Assessing the Effectiveness of the Team Infomercial Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Alexei V.; Milter, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of the team infomercial assignment as an active learning tool in undergraduate courses. The structure and three phases of the team infomercial assignment, as well as student evaluations and feedback, are presented. We investigated student experiences working on the team infomercial assignment, the common…

  9. Team learning and its association with the implementation of competence-based education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnia, L.; Kunst, E.M.; van Woerkom, M.; Poell, R.F.

    2016-01-01

    Competence-based education (CBE) is the leading paradigm for education reform of Vocational Education and Training in European countries. This study addresses the association of collective team identification, task interdependence, team learning, and team size, with the implementation of CBE (N =

  10. Motivating Proteges' Personal Learning in Teams: A Multilevel Investigation of Autonomy Support and Autonomy Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Fu, Ping-ping

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the roles of 3 multilevel motivational predictors in proteges' personal learning in teams: an autonomy-supportive team climate, mentors' autonomy support, and proteges' autonomy orientation. The authors followed 305 proteges in 58 teams for 12 weeks and found that all 3 predictors were positively related to the proteges'…

  11. Cross-Cultural Management Learning through Innovative Pedagogy: An Exploratory Study of Globally Distributed Student Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel-Radic, Anne; Moos, J. Chris; Long, Suzanna K.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an innovative pedagogy based on student participation in globally distributed project teams. The study questions the link between student learning of intercultural competence and the global teaming experience. Data was collected from 115 students participating in 22 virtual intercultural teams. Results revealed that students…

  12. Physician-led team triage based on lean principles may be superior for efficiency and quality? A comparison of three emergency departments with different triage models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burström Lena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of emergency departments (EDs principally involves maintaining effective patient flow and care. Different triage models are used today to achieve these two goals. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of different triage models used in three Swedish EDs. Using efficiency and quality indicators, we compared the following triage models: physician-led team triage, nurse first/emergency physician second, and nurse first/junior physician second. Methods All data of patients arriving at the three EDs between 08:00- and 21:00 throughout 2008 were collected and merged into a database. The following efficiency indicators were measured: length of stay (LOS including time to physician, time from physician to discharge, and 4-hour turnover rate. The following quality indicators were measured: rate of patients left before treatment was completed, unscheduled return within 24 and 72 hours, and mortality rate within 7 and 30 days. Results Data from 147,579 patients were analysed. The median length of stay was 158 minutes for physician-led team triage, compared with 243 and 197 minutes for nurse/emergency physician and nurse/junior physician triage, respectively (p  Conclusions Physician-led team triage seemed advantageous, both expressed as efficiency and quality indicators, compared with the two other models.

  13. Making international links to further interprofessional learning: a student-led initiative for the homeless population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodier, Robyn; Uppal, Shiv; Ashcroft, Harriet

    2015-05-01

    Supporting homeless people to recovery requires interprofessional collaborative responses. In North America interprofessional student groups have supported traditional services to address the needs of homeless populations. We report on the first two years of designing and developing an interprofessional student-led response to support homeless people in the UK. The project began with working in partnership with local statutory and voluntary services; and was affirmed through interviews with local homeless people. The findings identified that many avoided going to the services provided and 90% would welcome clinical services from interprofessional groups of students. The results have led to the launch of project LIGHT (Leicester Initiative Good Health Team) and today interprofessional student groups run health promotion activities for this population.

  14. Integrative Student Learning: An Effective Team Learning Activity in a Learner-Centered Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Karimi, RPh, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: An Integrative Student Learning (ISL activity was developed with the intent to enhance the dynamic of student teamwork and enhance student learning by fostering critical-thinking skills, self-directed learning skills, and active learning. Case Study: The ISL activity consists of three portions: teambuilding, teamwork, and a facilitator driven “closing the loop” feedback discussion. For teambuilding, a set of clue sheets or manufacturer‘s drug containers were distributed among student pairs who applied their pharmaceutical knowledge to identify two more student pairs with similar clues or drugs, thus building a team of six. For teamwork, each team completed online exams, composed of integrated pharmaceutical science questions with clinical correlates, using only selected online library resources. For the feedback discussion, facilitators evaluated student impressions, opened a discussion about the ISL activity, and provided feedback to teams’ impressions and questions. This study describes three different ISL activities developed and implemented over three days with first year pharmacy students. Facilitators’ interactions with students and three surveys indicated a majority of students preferred ISL over traditional team activities and over 90% agreed ISL activities promoted active learning, critical-thinking, self-directed learning, teamwork, and student confidence in online library searches. Conclusions: The ISL activity has proven to be an effective learning activity that promotes teamwork and integration of didactic pharmaceutical sciences to enhance student learning of didactic materials and confidence in searching online library resources. It was found that all of this can be accomplished in a short amount of class time with a very reasonable amount of preparation.

  15. The Development and Empirical Validation of a Multidimensional Measurement Instrument for Team Learning Behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelsbergh, Chantal M.J.H.; van der Heijden, Beatrice; Poell, Rob F.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of teamwork to organizational success in today’s economy has been emphasized in literature for well over a decade. Effective teamwork can only be sustained, however, if it is supported by a process of team learning. Following Edmondson, the authors regard team learning as a group

  16. Teaching Research to MSW Students: Effectiveness of the Team-Based Learning Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macke, Caroline; Tapp, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Social work students often have been labeled as research-reluctant. Consequently, it is important to identify effective teaching strategies. One innovative strategy is team-based learning. The effectiveness of team-based learning has not yet been evaluated with a social work research class. As a result, the current study compared the effectiveness…

  17. Effects of Cooperative Learning Teams on Student Achievement and Race Relations: Treatment by Race Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvin, Robert E.; Oickle, Eileen

    1981-01-01

    Investigates differences between Black and White students with regard to improvement in academic achievement while working in small, heterogeneous learning teams. Findings indicated that Black students made disproportionately outstanding gains in academic achievement when participating in the team learning approach. (DB)

  18. Conversations about Curriculum Change: Mathematical Thinking and Team-Based Learning in a Discrete Mathematics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Judy; Sneddon, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the learning conversations between a mathematician and a mathematics educator as they worked together to change the delivery model of a third year discrete mathematics course from a traditional lecture mode to team-based learning (TBL). This change prompted the mathematician to create team tasks which increasingly focused…

  19. Defining the learning curve for team-based laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speicher, Paul J; Nussbaum, Daniel P; White, Rebekah R; Zani, Sabino; Mosca, Paul J; Blazer, Dan G; Clary, Bryan M; Pappas, Theodore N; Tyler, Douglas S; Perez, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the learning curves for laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy (LPD) with and without laparoscopic reconstruction, using paired surgical teams consisting of advanced laparoscopic-trained surgeons and advanced oncologic-trained surgeons. All patients undergoing PD without vein resection at a single institution were retrospectively analyzed. LPD was introduced by initially focusing on laparoscopic resection followed by open reconstruction (hybrid) for 18 months prior to attempting a totally LPD (TLPD) approach. Cases were compared with Chi square, Fisher's exact test, and Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance (ANOVA). Between March 2010 and June 2013, 140 PDs were completed at our institution, of which 56 (40 %) were attempted laparoscopically. In 31/56 procedures we planned to perform only the resection laparoscopically (hybrid), of which 7 (23 %) required premature conversion before completion of resection. Following the first 23 of these hybrid cases, a total of 25 TLPDs have been performed, of which there were no conversions to open. For all LPD, a significant reduction in operative times was identified following the first 10 patients (median 478.5 vs. 430.5 min; p = 0.01), approaching open PD levels. After approximately 50 cases, operative times and estimated blood loss were consistently lower than those for open PD. In our experience of building an LPD program, the initial ten cases represent the biggest hurdle with respect to operative times. For an experienced teaching center using a staged and team-based approach, LPD appears to offer meaningful reductions in operative time and blood loss within the first 50 cases.

  20. Ready to learn physics: a team-based learning model for first year university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parappilly, Maria; Schmidt, Lisa; De Ritter, Samantha

    2015-09-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an established model of group work which aims to improve students' ability to apply discipline-related content. TBL consists of a readiness assurance process (RAP), student groups and application activities. While TBL has not been implemented widely in science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines, it has been effective in improving student learning in other disciplines. This paper describes the incorporation of TBL activities into a non-calculus based introductory level physics topic—Physics for the Modern World. Students were given pre-class preparation materials and an individual RAP online test before the workshops. The pre-workshop individual RAP test ensured that all students were exposed to concept-based questions before their workshops and motivated them to use the preparatory materials in readiness for the workshop. The students were placed into random teams and during the first part of the workshop, the teams went through a subset of the quiz questions (team RAP test) and in the remaining time, teams completed an in-class assignment. After the workshop students were allowed another attempt at the individual RAP test to see if their knowledge had improved. The ability of TBL to promote student learning of key concepts was evaluated by experiment using pre- and post- testing. The students’ perception of TBL was monitored by discussion posts and survey responses. Finally, the ability of TBL to support peer-peer interaction was evaluated by video analysis of the class. We found that the TBL process improved student learning; students did interact with each other in class; and the students had a positive view of TBL. To assess the transferability of this model to other topics, we conducted a comparison study with an environmental science topic which produced similar results. Our study supports the use of this TBL model in science topics.

  1. Transformational leadership as a moderator of the relationship between psychological safety and learning behaviour in work teams in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen K. Kumako

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Transformational team leadership is an important variable that influences team members’ perception of the team as psychologically safe enough to engage in learning behaviours.Research purpose: The study was aimed at investigating the relationship between psychological safety and learning behaviour in teams, as well as the moderating role of transformational team leadership in this relationship.Motivation for the study: For a team to be effective, adaptive and innovative and engage in learning behaviours, the transformational team leader must set the right climate in the team, where he or she welcomes the team members’ opinions, questions and feedback at no risk to their image. An understanding of this will be important in team leader selection and training.Research design, approach and method: Using a cross-sectional survey design, 57 work teams comprising 456 respondents in teams of 7–9 members were purposively sampled from five financial institutions in Accra, Ghana. Hierarchical regression and moderation analyses were run on the data at the team level.Main findings: Results indicated a positive relationship between team psychological safety and team learning behaviour, with transformational team leadership moderating this relationship.Practical/managerial implication: Transformational team leadership is important in creating a climate of psychological safety that will enable team members to engage in learning behaviours.Contribution/value-add: The study provided theoretical and empirical evidence that, in organisational contexts, transformational team leadership is an important variable that can facilitate psychological safety and learning behaviour in teams.

  2. Assessments carried out by a child abuse and neglect team in an Amsterdam teaching hospital led to interventions in most of the reported cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeuw, Arianne H; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Aaftink, Daniel; Burgers, Ilsa A V; Vrolijk-Bosschaart, Thekla F; Brilleslijper-Kater, Sonja N; Heymans, Hugo S A; van Rijn, Rick R

    2017-07-01

    This study described cases of child abuse and neglect (CAN) that were reported to the multiagency CAN team at the Emma Children's Hospital in Amsterdam and the resulting interventions. We carried out a retrospective review of all cases that were reported to the CAN team from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2012. There were 27 prenatal cases, 92 referrals based on parental characteristics and 523 children. Overall, 1.2% of the children visiting the emergency department of our hospital, attending the outpatients department or being admitted were reported to the team. More than half of the referrals (55.1%) were confirmed as CAN. The most common diagnoses were as follows: witnessing intimate partner violence, physical neglect and emotional abuse. If CAN was confirmed an intervention was offered in 98.3% of cases. If a CAN diagnosis was undetermined or rejected, the figures were still 83.5% and 64.2%, respectively. Our results showed that CAN affected more than one in every 100 children visiting our hospital, and the expertise of our hospital-based CAN Team led to an intervention in the majority of the reported cases. The broad scope of problems that were encountered underlined the importance of a multidisciplinary CAN team. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Support of the collaborative inquiry learning process: influence of support on task and team regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saab, N.; van Joolingen, W.; van Hout-Wolters, B.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of the learning process is an important condition for efficient and effective learning. In collaborative learning, students have to regulate their collaborative activities (team regulation) next to the regulation of their own learning process focused on the task at hand (task regulation).

  4. The Effect of Cooperative Learning Model of Teams Games Tournament (TGT) and Students' Motivation toward Physics Learning Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadrah; Tolla, Ismail; Ali, Muhammad Sidin; Muris

    2017-01-01

    This research aims at describing the effect of cooperative learning model of Teams Games Tournament (TGT) and motivation toward physics learning outcome. This research was a quasi-experimental research with a factorial design conducted at SMAN 2 Makassar. Independent variables were learning models. They were cooperative learning model of TGT and…

  5. Faculty perception of team-based learning over multiple semesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebodeaux, Clark D; Peters, Golden L; Stranges, Paul M; Woodyard, Jamie L; Vouri, Scott Martin

    2017-11-01

    Perspectives from faculty regarding team-based learning (TBL) are not well understood. Previous studies describe faculty preference for TBL due to increased student interaction despite requiring increased time for design. The perception of changes in faculty workload over multiple semesters has not been measured. This research evaluates faculty workload and perceived student engagement after implementing TBL in a required non-prescription medication course over multiple semesters. TBL was implemented in the non-prescription medication course and continued for three consecutive semesters. Faculty members' perception of TBL was captured using an anonymous survey. The survey was an 11 item questionnaire with five Likert-type response options to identify changes in workload, training, and student interaction using TBL. Twenty-eight total responses were collected from 10 faculty members who taught in at least one of the four semesters. Results were aggregated based on the number of semesters faculty continually taught in the course. More respondents agreed than disagreed that participation from and interactions with students increased with the TBL course compared to traditional lectures. However, more respondents believed the TBL course approach was more difficult and reported increased workload in the initial semester taught. Enjoyment of teaching increased for a majority of respondents. This is the first study to explore the impact of TBL implementation over multiple semesters. These data can be used to help implement TBL in pharmacy school curricula. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Lessons learned from a resident-led clinical trial in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costescu, Dustin J W; Cullimore, Amie J

    2013-08-01

    Completion of a randomised controlled trial is one way by which the resident research requirement can be met in Canadian obstetrics and gynaecology programmes. However, little is known about the specific challenges of performing clinical trials within the specialty, let alone as a resident project. A resident-led randomised controlled trial comparing two methods of labour induction at term was halted due to insufficient patient enrolment. A structured review of the study design and recruitment process was conducted to identify factors contributing to poor recruitment. In addition to completing a literature review and internal review by the research team, we surveyed obstetricians and residents regarding recruitment efforts and barriers to participation. We solicited feedback on trial design and the expectations of clinicians with respect to participation in research studies. Eight obstetricians (67%) and 13 residents (93%) responded to the survey. All were able to identify eligible patients, though only 60% had invited one or more patients to participate during the recruitment period. Failure to consider trial participation and excessive clinical workload were the most commonly cited barriers for clinicians. Resistance to the test intervention was the major barrier to patient participation. Several residents cited a lack of personal incentive to recruit patients as a significant barrier. The research team was unable to contact patients directly, thus limiting the scope of our review to our internal methods and feedback from clinicians. Poor recruitment in a resident-led clinical trial in obstetrics resulted from multiple coexisting factors. A structured review provided valuable insight for the research team. Academic clinicians and trainees in all specialties should be encouraged to share their experiences in the hope of improving the likelihood of success in future research endeavours.

  7. Learning outcomes through the cooperative learning team assisted individualization on research methodology’ course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakpahan, N. F. D. B.

    2018-01-01

    All articles must contain an abstract. The research methodology is a subject in which the materials must be understood by the students who will take the thesis. Implementation of learning should create the conditions for active learning, interactive and effective are called Team Assisted Individualization (TAI) cooperative learning. The purpose of this study: 1) improving student learning outcomes at the course research methodology on TAI cooperative learning. 2) improvement of teaching activities. 3) improvement of learning activities. This study is a classroom action research conducted at the Department of Civil Engineering Universitas Negeri Surabaya. The research subjects were 30 students and lecturer of courses. Student results are complete in the first cycle by 20 students (67%) and did not complete 10 students (33%). In the second cycle students who complete being 26 students (87%) and did not complete 4 students (13%). There is an increase in learning outcomes by 20%. Results of teaching activities in the first cycle obtained the value of 3.15 with the criteria enough well. In the second cycle obtained the value of 4.22 with good criterion. The results of learning activities in the first cycle obtained the value of 3.05 with enough criterion. In the second cycle was obtained 3.95 with good criterion.

  8. Team-based learning in a preclinical removable denture prosthesis module in a United Arab Emirates dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Ali, Reem; Al Quran, Firas

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the implementation of a team-based learning (TBL) approach in a removable denture prosthesis (RDP) module and present the results of students' performance in individual and group TBL activities and exam scores, students' experience with TBL and end of course evaluations, and faculty feedback. Course material at the College of Dentistry, University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, was transformed into seven conventional lectures and seven TBL sessions. Each TBL session consisted of pre-assigned reading (self-directed learning), in-class individual and group readiness tests (accountability), team problem-solving of patient RDP cases, and faculty-led class discussion (knowledge application). The course was assessed through scores from TBL session activities and course examinations, student satisfaction survey, and faculty feedback. Course grades were found to be higher using the TBL method then the traditional lecture-based method. Student evaluation data and faculty response indicated strong support for TBL as it was implemented in the course. The faculty noted a higher level of student engagement with team learning than in conventional class lecturing. TBL is an active-learning instructional strategy for courses with high student-to-faculty ratios. This approach provides regular feedback and the opportunity for students to develop higher reasoning skills.

  9. Innovative health care delivery teams: learning to be a team player is as important as learning other specialised skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Anneke; Davison, Graydon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to show that free flowing teamwork depends on at least three aspects of team life: functional diversity, social cohesion and superordinate identity. The paper takes the approach of a discussion, arguing for a strong need to understand multidisciplinary and cross-functional barriers for achieving team goals in the context of health care. These barriers include a strong medically dominated business model, historically anchored delineations between professional identities and a complex organisational environment where individuals may have conflicting goals. The paper finds that the complexity is exacerbated by the differences between and within health care teams. It illustrates the differences by presenting the case of an operating theatre team. Whilst the paper recommends some ideas for acquiring these skills, further research is needed to assess effectiveness and influence of team skills training on optimising multidisciplinary interdependence in the health care environment. The paper shows that becoming a team member requires team membership skills.

  10. Peer-Led Team Learning in Physics: NSF National Dissemination Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narode, Ronald

    2001-05-01

    The physics initiative of PLTL dissemination is fashioned after the successes of Workshop Chemistry. The two-hour, weekly workshops are taught exclusively by undergraduates who have taken the course before and have been trained to lead/facilitate between 6 to 8 students throughout the term. Faculty meet with workshop leaders weekly to review curriculum and to get feedback about student progress. Workshop leaders are encouraged to consider teaching as a career. A research-informed curriculum is available in Introductory Physics for workshops and for training workshop leaders at www.lclark.edu/ ~kolitch. Also, Workshop Project Associate [WPA] minigrants are available for up to 5000 dollars for faculty who wish to pilot PLTL on their campuses. Application and project description at www.pltl.org The model will be described with reference to supportive data from previous PLTL courses.

  11. The impact of team-based learning on a foundational pharmacokinetics course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persky, Adam M

    2012-03-12

    To assess the impact of team-based learning (TBL) in a foundational pharmacokinetics course. The course was arranged into 5 modules based on the TBL format. Each module contained preclass preparation; readiness-assurance process; and in-class, clinical cases. Survey instruments on professionalism and attitudes of team learning were administered pre- and post-course. Examination grades focused at the evaluation/creation level were significantly higher in the TBL format compared with the previous year. Professionalism scores increased over the course of the semester, particularly in altruism and honesty. Other measures of team-learning attitudes significantly increased over time, although there was no change in major subscales. End-of-semester course evaluations showed improvements in active engagement and in various areas of skill development. The TBL format can be used successfully in a foundational pharmacokinetics course to increase higher levels of learning, team-learning skills, and professionalism in pharmacy students.

  12. Participative Work Design in Lean Production: A Strategy for Dissolving the Paradox between Standardized Work and Team Proactivity by Stimulating Team Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Annika; Hansen, Niklas; Antoni, Conny

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore job design mechanisms that enhance team proactivity within a lean production system where autonomy is uttermost restricted. We propose and test a model where the team learning process of building shared meaning of work mediates the relationship between team participative decision-making, inter team…

  13. Study of connectivity in student teams by observation of their learning processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Patricio H.; Correa, Rafael D.

    2016-05-01

    A registration procedure based data tracking classroom activities students formed into teams, which are immersed in basic learning processes, particularly physical sciences is presented. For the analysis of the data various mathematical tools to deliver results in numerical indicators linking their learning, performance, quality of relational nexus to transformation their emotions. The range of variables under observation and further study, which is influenced by the evolution of the emotions of the different teams of students, it also covers the traditional approach to information delivery from outside (teaching in lecture) or from inside each team (abilities of pupils) to instructional materials that enhance learning inquiry and persuasion.

  14. The Business of Teaching and Learning through Multicultural Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Christina; Zander, Lena

    2008-01-01

    Team working is a key skill students need in this era of global complexity. Here we combine research with practice to develop a model for working in multicultural teams which can be used in International Business curricula. We formulate the 4 Cs model focusing on two areas: composition and communication. These two Cs have been chosen because they…

  15. Learning to evaluate multidisciplinary crisis-management team exercises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlo, M.P.W. van; Dommele, R. van; Schneider, P.; Veerdonk, I. van de; Braakhekke, E.; Hendriks van de Weem, N.; Dijkman, E. van; Wartna, S.

    2007-01-01

    Training of multidisciplinary crisis management teams is becoming more common practice. Nevertheless, the value of these trainings and exercises is questionable. Scenarios are quite often realistic and challenging to the trainees: the team members are heavily engaged in doing their jobs in a

  16. Geophysics field school: A team-based learning experience for students and faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchewski, B.; Innanen, K. A.; Lauer, R. M.; Pidlisecky, A.

    2016-12-01

    The core challenge facing a modern science educator is to deliver a curriculum that reaches broadly and deeply into the technical domain, while also helping students to develop fundamental scientific skills such as inquiry, critical thinking and technical communication. That is, our aim is for students to achieve significant learning at all levels summarized by Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. It is not always clear how to achieve the full spectrum of goals, with much debate over which component is more important in a science education. Team-based and experiential learning are research-supported approaches that aim to reach across the spectrum by placing students in a setting where they solve practical problems in teams of peers. This learning mode modifies the role of the instructor to a guide or facilitator, and students take a leadership role in their own education. We present a case study of our team's implementation of team-based learning in a geophysics field school, an inherently experiential learning environment. The core philosophies behind our implementation are to present clearly defined learning outcomes, to recognize that students differ in their learning modalities and to strive to engage students through a range of evidence-based learning experiences. We discuss the techniques employed to create functional teams, the key learning activities involved in a typical day of field school and data demonstrating the learning activities that showed the strongest correlation to overall performance in the course. In the process, we also realized that our team-based approach to course design and implementation also enhanced our skillsets as educators, and our institution recently recognized our efforts with a team teaching award. Therefore, we conclude with some of our observations of best practices for team teaching in a field setting to initiate discussions with colleagues engaged in similar activities.

  17. Concept mapping to improve team work, team learning and care of the person with dementia and behavioural and psychological symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberdeen, Suzanne M; Byrne, Graeme

    2018-04-01

    The incidence of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia in residential aged care facilities is high. Effective team work and knowledgeable staff are cited as important facilitators of appropriate care responses to clients with these symptoms, but to achieve this within a resource-poor workplace can be challenging. In the study reported in this paper, concept mapping was trialled to enhance multifocal person-centred assessment and care planning as well as team learning. The outcomes of team concept mapping were evaluated using a quasi-experimental design with pre- and post-testing in 11 selected Australian residential aged care facilities , including two control residential aged care facilities , over a nine-month period. It was demonstrated that use of concept mapping improved team function, measured as effectiveness of care planning, as well as enhancing learning, with increased knowledge of dementia care even amongst staff who were not directly involved with the process. It is suggested that these results may be generalizable to other countries and care settings.

  18. Are real teams healthy teams?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buljac, M.; van Woerkom, M.; van Wijngaarden, P.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the impact of real-team--as opposed to a team in name only--characteristics (i.e., team boundaries, stability of membership, and task interdependence) on team processes (i.e., team learning and emotional support) and team effectiveness in the long-term care sector. We employed a

  19. Mixed Methods Study Using Constructive Learning Team Model for Secondary Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Kristy L.

    2010-01-01

    The constructive learning team model for secondary mathematics teachers (CLTM) was created to provide students with learning opportunities and experiences that address deficiencies in oral and written communication, logical processes and analysis, mathematical operations, independent learning, teamwork, and technology utilization. This study…

  20. An exploratory analysis of personality, attitudes, and study skills on the learning curve within a team-based learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persky, Adam M; Henry, Teague; Campbell, Ashley

    2015-03-25

    To examine factors that determine the interindividual variability of learning within a team-based learning environment. Students in a pharmacokinetics course were given 4 interim, low-stakes cumulative assessments throughout the semester and a cumulative final examination. Students' Myers-Briggs personality type was assessed, as well as their study skills, motivations, and attitudes towards team-learning. A latent curve model (LCM) was applied and various covariates were assessed to improve the regression model. A quadratic LCM was applied for the first 4 assessments to predict final examination performance. None of the covariates examined significantly impacted the regression model fit except metacognitive self-regulation, which explained some of the variability in the rate of learning. There were some correlations between personality type and attitudes towards team learning, with introverts having a lower opinion of team-learning than extroverts. The LCM could readily describe the learning curve. Extroverted and introverted personality types had the same learning performance even though preference for team-learning was lower in introverts. Other personality traits, study skills, or practice did not significantly contribute to the learning variability in this course.

  1. Scrutinizing and Assessing the Performance of the German and U.S.-Led Provincial Reconstruction Teams in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    land, with strong winters and hot summers, to establish and consolidate his empire against the Persians. He learned about the Hindukush and the tribes...independence and against internal and external authorities who intended to subdue them. The Mughals as well as the Safavids in the early eighteenth...Ahmed Khan Abdali declared the Durrani empire in 1747 and the Durranis proved their ability to create state structures as well as an effective Pashtun

  2. The effects of team-based learning on learning outcomes in a course of rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faezi, Seyedeh Tahereh; Moradi, Kamran; Ghafar Rahimi Amin, Ali; Akhlaghi, Massoomeh; Keshmiri, Fatemeh

    2018-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of implementing Team-Based Learning (TBL) on student engagement, accountability, satisfaction, and preference for lecture or team-based learning. Moreover, we assessed the effect of TBL on knowledge retention and application over time through short answer questions based on clinical scenarios addressing history taking and diagnosis skills in medical students. The study was conducted in a quasi-experimental design. The study population were all of the third-year medical students (n = 84) participating in a course of rheumatology in Shariati Hospital, which is a teaching hospital affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. We compared TBL with the conventional lecture-based method. The assessments were performed after implementation of TBL by the Classroom Engagement Survey (CES) and Team-Based Learning Student Assessment Instrument (TBL-SAI). The assessment for application of knowledge was conducted in 3 time-points through short answer questions on rheumatic diseases. The comparison of results was made by Student's t-test and repeated-measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA) using SPSS software, version 16. The CES scores indicated a high level of engagement in TBL (Mean±SD=26.7±3.70, p=0.0001) but not in the lecture-based sessions (Mean±SD=23.80±4.35, p=0.09). The total mean score (SD) for TBL-SAI was 159.68 (14.14) for TBL sessions indicating a favorable outcome (p=0.0001). The student scores obtained from the short answer questions showed that over time the students' scores had declined significantly less for the TBL sessions in comparison to the lecture-based sessions, F (2, 166) = 4.624, p=0.011. The results indicated higher student engagement, satisfaction and long term learning by TBL.

  3. The effects of team-based learning on learning outcomes in a course of rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEYEDEH TAHEREH FAEZI

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We evaluated the effects of implementing Team- Based Learning (TBL on student engagement, accountability, satisfaction, and preference for lecture or team-based learning. Moreover, we assessed the effect of TBL on knowledge retention and application over time through short answer questions based on clinical scenarios addressing history taking and diagnosis skills in medical students. Methods: The study was conducted in a quasi-experimental design. The study population were all of the third-year medical students (n=84 participating in a course of rheumatology in Shariati Hospital, which is a teaching hospital affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. We compared TBL with the conventional lecture-based method. The assessments were performed after implementation of TBL by the Classroom Engagement Survey (CES and Team-Based Learning Student Assessment Instrument (TBL-SAI. The assessment for application of knowledge was conducted in 3 time-points through short answer questions on rheumatic diseases. The comparison of results was made by Student’s t-test and repeated-measures analysis of variance (RMANOVA using SPSS software, version 16. Results: The CES scores indicated a high level of engagement in TBL (Mean±SD=26.7±3.70, p=0.0001 but not in the lecture-based sessions (Mean±SD=23.80±4.35, p=0.09. The total mean score (SD for TBL-SAI was 159.68 (14.14 for TBL sessions indicating a favorable outcome (p=0.0001. The student scores obtained from the short answer questions showed that over time the students’ scores had declined significantly less for the TBL sessions in comparison to the lecture-based sessions, F (2, 166=4.624, p=0.011. Conclusion: The results indicated higher student engagement, satisfaction and long term learning by TBL.

  4. A Randomized Crossover Comparison of Team-based Learning and Lecture Format on Learning Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleske, Barry E; Remington, Tami L; Wells, Trisha D; Klein, Kristin C; Guthrie, Sally K; Tingen, Jeffrey M; Marshall, Vincent D; Dorsch, Michael P

    2016-09-25

    Objective. To compare learning outcomes and student confidence between team-based learning (TBL) and lecture. Methods. A crossover study was conducted with 30 students divided into two sections. Each section was taught six therapeutic topics (three TBL and three lecture). There were two assessments of 24 questions each. A survey (Likert scale) assessing student confidence and attitudes was administered at the end. Results. A significantly higher overall examination score was observed for TBL as compared to lecture. Students were more confident in providing therapeutic recommendations following TBL. Higher survey scores favoring TBL were also seen related to critical-thinking skills and therapeutic knowledge. Conclusion. Learning outcomes and student confidence in performing higher-order tasks were significantly higher with TBL. The findings of this novel crossover type design showed that TBL is an effective pedagogy.

  5. Gender-related differences in learning in student-led PBL tutorials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassab, Salah; Abu-Hijleh, Marwan; Al-Shboul, Qasim; Hamdy, Hossam

    2005-07-01

    Male and female students behave differently in problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials. However, these differences could be partly attributed to faculty tutor behavior in male and female tutorials. This study aims to examine the gender differences in learning outcomes between medical students when peer tutors facilitate PBL tutorials. A questionnaire-based study conducted in single-gender student-led (SLT) and faculty-led (FLT) tutorials. The study involved third year medical students (n = 91) divided into ten groups (five groups each). The SLT groups consisted of 16 male and 28 female students, while the FLT group consisted of 20 male and 27 female students. Students evaluated their individual and group performance in tutorials and also skills of tutors. Student performance in end-unit examinations and their perceptions about peer tutoring were also analyzed. A total of 290 questionnaires (response rate = 63.7%) were collected over the five-week period of the study. Although individual performance in tutorials and achievement in examinations were comparable in both groups, there was significantly higher group performance in female compared with male student-led tutorials (p < 0.01). This difference between male and female groups was not attributed to improvement in the performance of female groups, but rather to a decline in performance of the male SLT groups. In addition, both male and female students expressed facing difficulties in discussion and analysis of the problem in the first tutorial session. Understanding the gender differences in the group behavior in student-led tutorials is important for PBL programs adopting this approach.

  6. Tackling student neurophobia in neurosciences block with team-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khurshid Anwar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traditionally, neurosciences is perceived as a difficult course in undergraduate medical education with literature suggesting use of the term “Neurophobia” (fear of neurology among medical students. Instructional strategies employed for the teaching of neurosciences in undergraduate curricula traditionally include a combination of lectures, demonstrations, practical classes, problem-based learning and clinico-pathological conferences. Recently, team-based learning (TBL, a student-centered instructional strategy, has increasingly been regarded by many undergraduate medical courses as an effective method to assist student learning. Methods: In this study, 156 students of year-three neuroscience block were divided into seven male and seven female groups, comprising 11–12 students in each group. TBL was introduced during the 6 weeks of this block, and a total of eight TBL sessions were conducted during this duration. We evaluated the effect of TBL on student learning and correlated it with the student's performance in summative assessment. Moreover, the students’ perceptions regarding the process of TBL was assessed by online survey. Results: We found that students who attended TBL sessions performed better in the summative examinations as compared to those who did not. Furthermore, students performed better in team activities compared to individual testing, with male students performing better with a more favorable impact on their grades in the summative examination. There was an increase in the number of students achieving higher grades (grade B and above in this block when compared to the previous block (51.7% vs. 25%. Moreover, the number of students at risk for lower grades (Grade B- and below decreased in this block when compared to the previous block (30.6% vs. 55%. Students generally elicited a favorable response regarding the TBL process, as well as expressed satisfaction with the content covered and felt that such

  7. Tackling student neurophobia in neurosciences block with team-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Khurshid; Shaikh, Abdul A; Sajid, Muhammad R; Cahusac, Peter; Alarifi, Norah A; Al Shedoukhy, Ahlam

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, neurosciences is perceived as a difficult course in undergraduate medical education with literature suggesting use of the term "Neurophobia" (fear of neurology among medical students). Instructional strategies employed for the teaching of neurosciences in undergraduate curricula traditionally include a combination of lectures, demonstrations, practical classes, problem-based learning and clinico-pathological conferences. Recently, team-based learning (TBL), a student-centered instructional strategy, has increasingly been regarded by many undergraduate medical courses as an effective method to assist student learning. In this study, 156 students of year-three neuroscience block were divided into seven male and seven female groups, comprising 11-12 students in each group. TBL was introduced during the 6 weeks of this block, and a total of eight TBL sessions were conducted during this duration. We evaluated the effect of TBL on student learning and correlated it with the student's performance in summative assessment. Moreover, the students' perceptions regarding the process of TBL was assessed by online survey. We found that students who attended TBL sessions performed better in the summative examinations as compared to those who did not. Furthermore, students performed better in team activities compared to individual testing, with male students performing better with a more favorable impact on their grades in the summative examination. There was an increase in the number of students achieving higher grades (grade B and above) in this block when compared to the previous block (51.7% vs. 25%). Moreover, the number of students at risk for lower grades (Grade B- and below) decreased in this block when compared to the previous block (30.6% vs. 55%). Students generally elicited a favorable response regarding the TBL process, as well as expressed satisfaction with the content covered and felt that such activities led to improvement in communication and

  8. Transformational leadership as a moderator of the relationship between psychological safety and learning behaviour in work teams in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen K. Kumako

    2013-07-01

    Research purpose: The study was aimed at investigating the relationship between psychological safety and learning behaviour in teams, as well as the moderating role of transformational team leadership in this relationship. Motivation for the study: For a team to be effective, adaptive and innovative and engage in learning behaviours, the transformational team leader must set the right climate in the team, where he or she welcomes the team members’ opinions, questions and feedback at no risk to their image. An understanding of this will be important in team leader selection and training. Research design, approach and method: Using a cross-sectional survey design, 57 work teams comprising 456 respondents in teams of 7–9 members were purposively sampled from five financial institutions in Accra, Ghana. Hierarchical regression and moderation analyses were run on the data at the team level. Main findings: Results indicated a positive relationship between team psychological safety and team learning behaviour, with transformational team leadership moderating this relationship. Practical/managerial implication: Transformational team leadership is important in creating a climate of psychological safety that will enable team members to engage in learning behaviours. Contribution/value-add: The study provided theoretical and empirical evidence that, in organisational contexts, transformational team leadership is an important variable that can facilitate psychological safety and learning behaviour in teams.

  9. STEM-related, Student-led Service Learning / Community Engagement Projects: Examples and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swap, R. J.; Wayland, K.

    2015-12-01

    Field-based, STEM-related service learning / community engagement projects present an opportunity for undergraduate students to demonstrate proficiencies related to the process of inquiry. These proficiencies include: appreciation of the larger project context, articulation of an informed question/hypothesis, project proposal development, interdisciplinary collaboration, project management (including planning, implementation reconfiguration and synthesis) and lastly the generation and handing off of acquired knowledge. Calls for these types of proficiencies have been expressed by governmental, non-governmental as well as the private sector. Accordingly, institutions of higher learning have viewed such activities as opportunities for enriching the learning experience for undergraduate students and for making such students more marketable, especially those from STEM-related fields. This institutional interest has provided an opportunity to support and expand field-based learning. Here we present examples of student-led/faculty-mentored international service learning and community engagement projects along the arc of preparation, implementation and post-field process. Representative examples that draw upon environmental science and engineering knowledge have been selected from more than 20 international undergraduate student projects over past decade and include: slow-sand water filtration, rainwater harvesting, methane biodigesters, water reticulation schemes and development and implementation of rocket stoves for communal cooking. We discuss these efforts in terms of the development of the aforementioned proficiencies, the utility of such proficiencies to the larger enterprise of STEM and the potential for transformative student learning outcomes. We share these experiences and lessons learned with the hope that others may intelligently borrow from our approach in a manner appropriate for their particular context.

  10. Self and Others in Team-Based Learning: Acquiring Teamwork Skills for Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betta, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) was applied within a third-year unit of study about ethics and management with the aim of enhancing students' teamwork skills. A survey used to collect students' opinions about their experience with TBL provided insights about how TBL helped students to develop an appreciation for teamwork and team collaboration. The team…

  11. Working in a youth offending team: the learning disability nurse's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Karina

    This article highlights the importance of learning disability nurses' skills to youth offending teams. Through the use of a case study, it explains why this role is making a difference in one location in the U.K. and how it could and should make a difference in other youth offending teams.

  12. Full Day Early Learning Kindergarten Program Team: Perspectives from the Principal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Sara; Salinitri, Geri

    2016-01-01

    The Full Day Early Learning Kindergarten (FDK) Program has expanded the role of the principal and has altered the teaching dynamics of the classroom with the introduction of an early years team. The early years team consists of a certified teacher with the Ontario College of Teachers and a registered early childhood educator from the College of…

  13. Problem-Based Service Learning: The Evolution of a Team Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor-Greene, Patricia A.

    2002-01-01

    In this article, I describe the evolution of a problem-based service learning project in an undergraduate Abnormal Psychology course. Students worked in teams on a semester-long project to locate and evaluate information and treatment for specific psychiatric disorders. As part of the project, each team selected relevant bibliographic materials,…

  14. Team-Based Learning in a Physical Therapy Gross Anatomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killins, Anita M.

    2015-01-01

    As medical knowledge grows exponentially and healthcare systems continue to utilize interdisciplinary care, it is essential that physical therapy (PT) graduates be prepared to practice efficiently and effectively on healthcare teams. Team-based learning (TBL) is a teaching pedagogy used in medicine to improve academic performance and teamwork…

  15. Assessing Teamwork Skills for Assurance of Learning Using CATME Team Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughry, Misty L.; Ohland, Matthew W.; Woehr, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Colleges of business must meet assurance of learning requirements to gain or maintain AACSB accreditation under the new standards adopted April 8, 2013. Team skills are among the most important skills desired by recruiters, yet employers and scholars perceive that team skills are frequently deficient in college graduates. This article describes…

  16. Distant yet Near: Promoting Interdisciplinary Learning in Significantly Diverse Teams through Socially Responsible Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adya, Monica; Temple, Bryan K.; Hepburn, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    With global specialization of work units within organizations, interdisciplinary work practices comprised of collaborative efforts between technical and business teams are increasingly common in today's workplace. While higher education has responded by creating opportunities for remote teams to learn from collaborative work, occasions for…

  17. Understanding the impact of eating disorders: using the reflecting team as a learning strategy for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfellow, Alicia; Evans, Nicola; Evans, Anne-Marie

    2018-02-08

    This article outlines how the application of a reflecting team from systemic family therapy practice was used as a learning strategy for a postgraduate programme for healthcare students. The programme was designed to increase the students' skills, knowledge and awareness of the needs of people with eating disorders, and their families. There were some benefits to this learning strategy. Students reported that the use of a reflecting team enabled them to gain a deep understanding of the emotional impact of eating disorders on individuals and their carers. However, as this method of learning was new to the students, they needed some initial instruction on the approach. During the programme of study, it became evident that the health professionals were deeply affected by the experiences of people with eating disorders. This would suggest that possibly it was the presence of the sufferers themselves as part of the reflecting team that provided the pivotal learning opportunity, rather than the reflecting team per se.

  18. Team effectiveness and team development in computer-supported collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul Kirschner; Dr. Jos Fransen; Armin Weinberger

    2013-01-01

    There is a wealth of research on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) that is neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) research. CSCW research is concerned with contextual factors, however, that may strongly influence collaborative learning processes as well, such as task

  19. Performance and Learning in Virtual Work Teams: Comparing Brazilians and Argentineans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Guedes-Gondim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze virtual teams from Brazil and Argentina. 181 Brazilians and 84 Argentineans responded to an electronic survey. Differences were found regarding the use of learning strategies, the need for training, and the perceived quality of interactions and effectiveness of virtual teams. The belief that the differences are more easily overcome in virtual teams than in traditional (co-located teams explains to a greater extent the variance in the responses of Brazilians than Argentineans.

  20. Best practices for implementing team-based learning in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farland, Michelle Z; Sicat, Brigitte L; Franks, Andrea S; Pater, Karen S; Medina, Melissa S; Persky, Adam M

    2013-10-14

    Colleges and schools of pharmacy are incorporating more team-based learning (TBL) into their curriculum. Published resources are available to assist instructors with implementing TBL and describing it in the health professions literature. The 7 core elements include: team formation, readiness assurance, immediate feedback, sequencing of in-class problem solving, the 4 "S" structure for developing team application exercises (significant problem, same problem, specific answer choice, simultaneous reporting), incentive structure, and peer evaluation. This paper summarizes best practices related to implementation of TBL in pharmacy education, including courses taught using teaching teams.

  1. Enhancing Simulation Learning with Team Mental Model Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltz, Sonia M.

    2017-01-01

    Simulations have been developed for many business courses because of enhanced student engagement and learning. A challenge for instructors using simulations is how to take this learning to the next level since student reflection and learning can vary. This article describes how to use a conceptual mapping game at the beginning and end of a…

  2. Cooperative Learning: Student Teams. What Research Says to the Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Robert E.

    This monograph presents descriptions of six extensively researched and widely used cooperative learning methods and discusses research on the effects of cooperative learning. The term "cooperative learning" refers to instructional methods in which students of all levels of performance work together in small groups toward a common goal.…

  3. Influence of a quality improvement learning collaborative program on team functioning in primary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotecha, Jyoti; Brown, Judith Belle; Han, Han; Harris, Stewart B; Green, Michael; Russell, Grant; Roberts, Sharon; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Fournie, Meghan; Thind, Amardeep; Reichert, Sonja M; Birtwhistle, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Quality improvement (QI) programs are frequently implemented to support primary healthcare (PHC) team development and to improve care outcomes. In Ontario, Canada, the Quality Improvement and Innovation Partnership (QIIP) offered a learning collaborative (LC) program to support the development of interdisciplinary team function and improve chronic disease management, disease prevention, and access to care. A qualitative study using a phenomenological approach was conducted as part of a mixed-method evaluation to explore the influence of the program on team functioning in participating PHC teams. A purposive sampling strategy was used to identify PHC teams (n = 10), from which participants of different professional roles were selected through a purposeful recruitment process to reflect maximum variation of team roles. Additionally, QI coaches working with the interview participants and the LC administrators were also interviewed. Data were collected through semistructured telephone interviews that were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was conducted through an iterative and interpretive approach. The shared experience of participating in the program appeared to improve team functioning. Participants described increased trust and respect for each other's clinical and administrative roles and were inspired by learning about different approaches to interdisciplinary care. This appeared to enhance collegial relationships, collapse professional silos, improve communication, and increase interdisciplinary collaboration. Teamwork involves more than just physically grouping healthcare providers from multiple disciplines and mandating them to work together. The LC program provided opportunities for participants to learn how to work collaboratively, and participation in the LC program appeared to enhance team functioning. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Project-Based Learning with an Online Peer Assessment System in a Photonics Instruction for Enhancing LED Design Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Hsuan; Wu, Tsung-Chih; Kuo, Yen-Kuang; You, Li-Chih

    2012-01-01

    This study proposed a novel instructional approach, a two-stage LED simulation of Project-based learning (PBL) course with online peer assessment (OPA), and explored how to apply OPA to the different structured problems in a PBL course to enhance students' professional skills in LED design as well as meta-cognitive thinking. The participants of…

  5. Development and Evaluation of vetPAL, a Student-Led, Peer-Assisted Learning Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Lucy S W; Warman, Sheena; Pither, Zoe; Baillie, Sarah

    Based on an idea from a final-year student, Bristol Veterinary School introduced vetPAL, a student-led, peer-assisted learning program. The program involved fifth-year (final-year) students acting as tutors and leading sessions for fourth-year students (tutees) in clinical skills and revision (review) topics. The initiative aimed to supplement student learning while also providing tutors with opportunities to further develop a range of skills. All tutors received training and the program was evaluated using questionnaires collected from tutees and tutors after each session. Tutees' self-rated confidence increased significantly in clinical skills and for revision topics. Advantages of being taught by students rather than staff included the informal atmosphere, the tutees' willingness to ask questions, and the relatability of the tutors. The small group size and the style of learning in the revision sessions (i.e., group work, discussions, and interactivity) were additional positive aspects identified by both tutees and tutors. Benefits for tutors included developing their communication and teaching skills. The training sessions were considered key in helping tutors feel prepared to lead sessions, although the most difficult aspects were the lack of teaching experience and time management. Following the successful pilot of vetPAL, plans are in place to make the program permanent and sustainable, while incorporating necessary changes based on the evaluation and the student leader's experiences running the program. A vetPAL handbook has been created to facilitate organization of the program for future years.

  6. Is Information Technology Education Betters Learned in Teams? An Exploratory Study of Teamwork Effectiveness at a Higher Education Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine if the effectiveness of technology education can be significantly increased through use of team-based activities including both real-time team encounters and results-driven team assignments. The research addresses this purpose by examining perceptions regarding effectiveness of team-based learning in…

  7. Team-based learning to improve learning outcomes in a therapeutics course sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleske, Barry E; Remington, Tami L; Wells, Trisha D; Dorsch, Michael P; Guthrie, Sally K; Stumpf, Janice L; Alaniz, Marissa C; Ellingrod, Vicki L; Tingen, Jeffrey M

    2014-02-12

    To compare the effectiveness of team-based learning (TBL) to that of traditional lectures on learning outcomes in a therapeutics course sequence. A revised TBL curriculum was implemented in a therapeutic course sequence. Multiple choice and essay questions identical to those used to test third-year students (P3) taught using a traditional lecture format were administered to the second-year pharmacy students (P2) taught using the new TBL format. One hundred thirty-one multiple-choice questions were evaluated; 79 tested recall of knowledge and 52 tested higher level, application of knowledge. For the recall questions, students taught through traditional lectures scored significantly higher compared to the TBL students (88%±12% vs. 82%±16%, p=0.01). For the questions assessing application of knowledge, no differences were seen between teaching pedagogies (81%±16% vs. 77%±20%, p=0.24). Scores on essay questions and the number of students who achieved 100% were also similar between groups. Transition to a TBL format from a traditional lecture-based pedagogy allowed P2 students to perform at a similar level as students with an additional year of pharmacy education on application of knowledge type questions. However, P3 students outperformed P2 students regarding recall type questions and overall. Further assessment of long-term learning outcomes is needed to determine if TBL produces more persistent learning and improved application in clinical settings.

  8. Peer-Led Guided in Calculus at University of South Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénéteau, Catherine; Fox, Gordon; Xu, Xiaoying; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Ramachandran, Kandethody; Campbell, Scott; Holcomb, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a Peer-Led Guided Inquiry (PLGI) program for teaching calculus at the University of South Florida. This approach uses the POGIL (Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning) teaching strategy and the small group learning model PLTL (Peer-Led Team Learning). The developed materials used a learning cycle based on…

  9. The Link between Self-Managed Work Teams and Learning Organisations Using Performance Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Joe; Waddell, Di

    2004-01-01

    Both the learning organization literature and the self-managed work team literature have alluded to the potential links between teamwork and learning. However, as yet the link between these two concepts remains undeveloped. This study uses a survey of a random sample of 200 Australian organizations to empirically examine the relationships between…

  10. A Modified Approach to Team-Based Learning in Linear Algebra Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanes, Kalman M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper documents the author's adaptation of team-based learning (TBL), an active learning pedagogy developed by Larry Michaelsen and others, in the linear algebra classroom. The paper discusses the standard components of TBL and the necessary changes to those components for the needs of the course in question. There is also an empirically…

  11. Team-Based Learning Reduces Attrition in a First-Semester General Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeford, Lorrie

    2016-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an instructional method that has been shown to reduce attrition and increase student learning in a number of disciplines. TBL was implemented in a first-semester general chemistry course, and its effect on attrition was assessed. Attrition from sections before implementing TBL (fall 2008 to fall 2009) was compared with…

  12. Tension, Risk and Conflict: Action-Learning Journeys with Four Public-Sector Partnership Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the learning gained from facilitating four action-learning sets whose members were drawn from management teams of local authority, health, education and police, working in partnership. Facilitation posed a series of difficult choices which impacted on personal and organizational dynamics within and between the partnership…

  13. Adventure Learning: Influence of Collectivism on Team and Organizational Attitudinal Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, H. Alvin

    2001-01-01

    For 345 Asian participants in adventure learning, the cultural value of collectivism was negatively related to changes in task participation and social support. Changes in these two teamwork attitudes predicted similar changes in team spirit and organizational identification. Adventure learning might produce higher attitude changes in Western…

  14. Team Members' Perceptions of Online Teamwork Learning Experiences and Building Teamwork Trust: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hung Wei; Yeh, Hsin-Te

    2013-01-01

    Teamwork factors can facilitate team members, committing themselves to the purposes of maximizing their own and others' contributions and successes. It is important for online instructors to comprehend students' expectations on learning collaboratively. The aims of this study were to investigate online collaborative learning experiences and to…

  15. Undergraduate Students' Self-Efficacy and Cognitive Behaviors for Learning in Multidisciplinary Project Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate individual students' learning from the perspectives of self-efficacy and cognitive learning expressions in multidisciplinary project teams. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected to address the major research questions, which are aimed at understanding individual students'…

  16. Modified Use of Team-Based Learning for Effective Delivery of Medical Gross Anatomy and Embryology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasan, Nagaswami S.; DeFouw, David O.; Holland, Bart K.

    2008-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an instructional strategy that combines independent out-of-class preparation for in-class discussion in small groups. This approach has been successfully adopted by a number of medical educators. This strategy allowed us to eliminate anatomy lectures and incorporate small-group active learning. Although our strategy is…

  17. Maximize a Team-Based Learning Gallery Walk Experience: Herding Cats Is Easier than You Think

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbaugh, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an instructional strategy that promotes small group learning and peer instruction in a large class environment. TBL is structured to include the following steps: 1) student preparation, e.g., reading/reviewing course lectures, and 2) readiness assurance testing. Preparation and foundational knowledge is assessed on an…

  18. Team Learning Systems as a Collaborative Technology for Rapid Knowledge Creation. Whitepaper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Robert; Findlay, John

    2006-01-01

    This whitepaper outlines the development and use of the Zing team learning system (TLS) and suggests this tool represents a new breed of collaborative tool for the development of useable knowledge arising from group learning and problem solving. A key feature of this tool is that it scaffolds the learner's use of the thinking and decision making…

  19. Impact of the team effectiveness design of teaching on critical thinking, self-confidence and learning of nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Raoufi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Using modern methods of teaching can increase critical thinking skills and confidence of students. This study aims to assess 'team effectiveness design' on critical thinking, confidence and learning of nursing students. Methods: In this study 52 students of the first two semesters of Nursing and Midwifery School of Khoramabad were studied over two semesters. Before and after implementation of teaching method a questionnaire was used to measure student’s confidence, performance and critical thinking. Results: In both groups, the mean score of critical thinking after the intervention increased. The score of critical thinking before and after lecture was significantly correlated (P=0.001. The confidence score after conduction of team performance was enhanced. There was no significant relationship between the scores before and after intervention in terms of performance (P=0.5. Test score increase after the intervention (P=0.001 .( Conclusion: Modern methods of teaching, learning and deepening it, is possible through ''team effectiveness design". The method led to the development of critical thinking, increase confidence and satisfaction.

  20. Physician-led team triage based on lean principles may be superior for efficiency and quality? A comparison of three emergency departments with different triage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The management of emergency departments (EDs) principally involves maintaining effective patient flow and care. Different triage models are used today to achieve these two goals. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of different triage models used in three Swedish EDs. Using efficiency and quality indicators, we compared the following triage models: physician-led team triage, nurse first/emergency physician second, and nurse first/junior physician second. Methods All data of patients arriving at the three EDs between 08:00- and 21:00 throughout 2008 were collected and merged into a database. The following efficiency indicators were measured: length of stay (LOS) including time to physician, time from physician to discharge, and 4-hour turnover rate. The following quality indicators were measured: rate of patients left before treatment was completed, unscheduled return within 24 and 72 hours, and mortality rate within 7 and 30 days. Results Data from 147,579 patients were analysed. The median length of stay was 158 minutes for physician-led team triage, compared with 243 and 197 minutes for nurse/emergency physician and nurse/junior physician triage, respectively (p triage, 5.3% for nurse/emergency physician, and 9.6% for nurse/junior physician triage (p triage, 1.0%, compared with 2.1%, and 2.5% for nurse/emergency physician, and nurse/junior physician, respectively (p triage and 1.0% for the two other triage models (p triage seemed advantageous, both expressed as efficiency and quality indicators, compared with the two other models. PMID:22905993

  1. The effect of team accelerated instruction on students’ mathematics achievement and learning motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri Purnami, Agustina; Adi Widodo, Sri; Charitas Indra Prahmana, Rully

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to know the improvement of achievement and motivation of learning mathematics by using Team Accelerated Instruction. The research method used was the experiment with descriptive pre-test post-test experiment. The population in this study was all students of class VIII junior high school in Jogjakarta. The sample was taken using cluster random sampling technique. The instrument used in this research was questionnaire and test. Data analysis technique used was Wilcoxon test. It concluded that there was an increase in motivation and student achievement of class VII on linear equation system material by using the learning model of Team Accelerated Instruction. Based on the results of the learning model Team Accelerated Instruction can be used as a variation model in learning mathematics.

  2. Peer-led problem-based learning in interprofessional education of health professions students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Lehrer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of peer teachers in interprofessional education has not been extensively studied. This study is designed to determine if peer-teacher-led problem-based seminars can influence medical and pharmacy students’ perceptions of interprofessional education. Methods: Undergraduate medical and pharmacy students participated in one-hour problem-based learning seminars held over the course of 16 weeks. A case–control study design was used to compare perceptions of interprofessional education between students who participated in seminars and students who did not participate in seminars. The validated Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS was used to assess perceptions of interprofessional education and was distributed to medical and pharmacy students at the conclusion of 16 weeks of seminars. A two-tailed t-test was used to determine significance between groups. A survey was also distributed to all students regarding perceived barriers to involvement in interprofessional education training. Results: In total, 97 students responded to IEPS (62 medical, 35 pharmacy. Data showed significantly higher perception of professional cooperation among medical students (p=0.006 and pharmacy students (p=0.02 who attended interprofessional seminars compared to those who did not attend. One hundred and nine students responded to the survey regarding perceived barriers to interprofessional education, with the two most common barriers being: ‘I am not aware of interprofessional education opportunities’ (61.5% and ‘I do not have time to participate’ (52.3%. Conclusion: Based on this data we believe peer-teacher-led problem-based interprofessional seminars can be used to increase medical and pharmacy students’ perceived need for professional cooperation. Currently, major barriers to interprofessional education involvement are awareness and time commitment. Undergraduate health professions education can incorporate student-led

  3. Peer-led problem-based learning in interprofessional education of health professions students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Michael D; Murray, Samuel; Benzar, Ruth; Stormont, Ryan; Lightfoot, Megan; Hafertepe, Michael; Welch, Gabrielle; Peters, Nicholas; Maio, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The role of peer teachers in interprofessional education has not been extensively studied. This study is designed to determine if peer-teacher-led problem-based seminars can influence medical and pharmacy students' perceptions of interprofessional education. Undergraduate medical and pharmacy students participated in one-hour problem-based learning seminars held over the course of 16 weeks. A case-control study design was used to compare perceptions of interprofessional education between students who participated in seminars and students who did not participate in seminars. The validated Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) was used to assess perceptions of interprofessional education and was distributed to medical and pharmacy students at the conclusion of 16 weeks of seminars. A two-tailed t-test was used to determine significance between groups. A survey was also distributed to all students regarding perceived barriers to involvement in interprofessional education training. In total, 97 students responded to IEPS (62 medical, 35 pharmacy). Data showed significantly higher perception of professional cooperation among medical students (p=0.006) and pharmacy students (p=0.02) who attended interprofessional seminars compared to those who did not attend. One hundred and nine students responded to the survey regarding perceived barriers to interprofessional education, with the two most common barriers being: 'I am not aware of interprofessional education opportunities' (61.5%) and 'I do not have time to participate' (52.3%). Based on this data we believe peer-teacher-led problem-based interprofessional seminars can be used to increase medical and pharmacy students' perceived need for professional cooperation. Currently, major barriers to interprofessional education involvement are awareness and time commitment. Undergraduate health professions education can incorporate student-led seminars to improve interprofessional education.

  4. The Rise of Student-to-Student Learning: Youth-led Programs Impacting Engineering Education Globally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian O'Shea

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Around the globe, students and young engineers are playing an increasing role in the coordination and delivery of engineering education programs. Many youth-led initiatives are now conducted with students involved in all aspects of their creation, organisation and delivery. This trend presents an exciting opportunity for the education of engineering students, both those involved in delivery of the courses and for participants. This paper profiles four leading youth-led engineering education programs and analyses their structure and growth in recent years. Profiled are initiatives coordinated by Engineers Without Borders – Australia (EWB-A; the Board of European Students of Technology (BEST; the Electrical Engineering Students’ European Association (EESTEC; and the Student Platform for Engineering Education Development (SPEED. Each case study includes a brief history of the organisation, program overview, growth analysis and future projections. The common features amongst these programs were analysed, as were the aspects which made them distinct from traditional university offerings. Key findings about the initiatives include: an international focus; the mixture of formal learning and social aspects; an integral role of volunteers within the organisation; the use of residential programs; and the role of internal professional development of committee members and volunteers. Additionally, this paper outlines the benefits for universities and provides a guide for how engineering faculties can support and nurture these initiatives and effectively create partnerships.

  5. Student-led tutorials in problem-based learning: educational outcomes and students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassab, Salah; Abu-Hijleh, Marwan F; Al-Shboul, Qasim; Hamdy, Hossam

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of using students as tutors in a problem-based learning (PBL) medical curriculum. Ninety-one third-year medical students were divided into ten tutorial groups. The groups were randomly allocated into student-led tutorials (SLT) (five groups, n = 44 students) and faculty-led tutorials (FLT) (five groups, n = 47 students). Outcome measurements included assessment of students' performance in tutorials individually and as a group, end-unit examinations scores, assessment of tutoring skills and identifying students' perceptions about peer tutoring. Student tutors were perceived better in providing feedback and in understanding the difficulties students face in tutorials. Tutorial atmosphere, decision-making and support for the group leader were better in SLT compared with FLT groups. Self-assessment of student performance in SLT was not different from FLT. Student scores in the written and practical examinations were comparable in both groups. However, SLT groups found difficulties in analysis of problems presented in the first tutorial session. We conclude that the impact of peer tutoring on student performance in tutorials, group dynamics, and student achievement in examinations is positive overall. However, student tutors require special training before adopting this approach in PBL programs.

  6. Socio-material perspectives on interprofessional team and collaborative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtry, Angus; Rohse, Shanta; Kilgour, Kelly N

    2016-02-01

    Interprofessional teamwork and collaboration have become important parts of health care practice and education. Most of the literature on interprofessional learning, however, assumes that learning is something acquired by individuals and readily transferred to other contexts. This assumption severely limits the ways in which interprofessional educators and researchers can conceptualise and support learning related to collaborative interprofessional health care. Socio-material theories provide an alternative to individualistic, acquisition-oriented notions by reconceiving learning in terms of collective dynamics, participation in social communities and active engagement with material contexts. Socio-material literature and theories were reviewed to identify concepts relevant to interprofessional learning. After briefly summarising the origins and key principles of socio-material approaches, the authors draw upon specific socio-material theories--including complexity theory, cultural-historical activity theory and actor-network theory--in order to reconceive how learning happens in interprofessional contexts. This reframing of interprofessional learning focuses less on individuals and more on collective dynamics and the actual social and material relations involved in practice. The paper proposes five ways in which learning may be enacted in interprofessional teamwork and collaboration from a socio-material perspective: (i) diverse contributions; (ii) social interactions and relationships; (iii) synthesis of professional ideas; (iv) integration of material elements, and (v) connections to large-scale organisations. For each of these categories, the paper provides practical illustrations to assist educators and researchers who wish to identify and assess this learning. Although more exploratory than comprehensive, this paper articulates many key aspects of socio-material learning theories and offers practical guidance for those who wish to employ and assess them in

  7. DEVELOPING FINAL COURSE MONOGRAPHS USING A TEAM-BASED LEARNING METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Mari Hartz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an experience with the Team-Based Learning (TBL methodology in courses designed to support the planning and execution of final course monographs. It contains both professors’ and students’ perceptions, through observation and assessment. A qualitative approach using observation techniques and desk research was used in conjunction with a quantitative approach based on a questionnaire. The sample consisted of 49 students from a higher education institution, 27 of them in a Communication Course and the remaining 22 in a Business Administration course. Qualitative data analysis was performed through simple categorization with back-defined categories, while the quantitative data analysis employed descriptive statistics and cluster analysis using Minitab 17.1 software. The main findings include the identification of: three student profiles (designated as traditional, collaborative and practical; a preference for guidance and feedback from the professor rather than other students; and a need for a professor-led closing discussion when applying the TBL method. As regards the main benefits to students, they recognized that discussion in groups allowed them to realize how much they really know about the subject studied. Finally, most students seemed to like the TBL approach.

  8. Applying Action Process to Improve Team Learning Effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Cordes, Christopher Sean

    2013-01-01

    Prior to advances in communication technology, organizational teams typically operated in face-to-face (FTF) configurations (Lojeski, et al., 2006). Changes in business requirements and advances in technology over the last 25 years have contributed to a shift in work structures. (Guzzo & Dickson, 1996). Along with this, advances in technology such as high speed internet connection, virtual communication, and collaboration tools have supported the move to the virtual work environment. This has...

  9. A Case-Study for Life-Long Learning and Adaptation in Cooperative Robot Teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, L.E.

    1999-01-01

    While considerable progress has been made in recent years toward the development of multi-robot teams, much work remains to be done before these teams are used widely in real-world applications. Two particular needs toward this end are the development of mechanisms that enable robot teams to generate cooperative behaviors on their own, and the development of techniques that allow these teams to autonomously adapt their behavior over time as the environment or the robot team changes. This paper proposes the use of the Cooperative Multi-Robot Observation of Multiple Moving Targets (CMOMMT) application as a rich domain for studying the issues of multi-robot learning and adaptation. After discussing the need for learning and adaptation in multi-robot teams, this paper describes the CMOMMT application and its relevance to multi-robot learning. We discuss the results of the previously- developed, hand-generated algorithm for CMOMMT and the potential for learning that was discovered from the hand-generated approach. We then describe the early work that has been done (by us and others) to generate multi- robot learning techniques for the CMOMMT application, as well as our ongoing research to develop approaches that give performance as good, or better, than the hand-generated approach. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop techniques for multi-robot learning and adaptation in the CMOMMT application domain that will generalize to cooperative robot applications in other domains, thus making the practical use of multi-robot teams in a wide variety of real-world applications much closer to reality

  10. Effects of team-based learning on perceived teamwork and academic performance in a health assessment subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung-Ran; Kim, Chun-Ja; Park, Jee-Won; Park, Eunyoung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of team-based learning (a well-recognized learning and teaching strategy), applied in a health assessment subject, on nursing students' perceived teamwork (team-efficacy and team skills) and academic performance (individual and team readiness assurance tests, and examination scores). A prospective, one-group, pre- and post-test design enrolled a convenience sample of 74 second-year nursing students at a university in Suwon, Korea. Team-based learning was applied in a 2-credit health assessment subject over a 16-week semester. All students received written material one week before each class for readiness preparation. After administering individual- and team-readiness assurance tests consecutively, the subject instructor gave immediate feedback and delivered a mini-lecture to the students. Finally, students carried out skill based application exercises. The findings showed significant improvements in the mean scores of students' perceived teamwork after the introduction of team-based learning. In addition, team-efficacy was associated with team-adaptability skills and team-interpersonal skills. Regarding academic performance, team readiness assurance tests were significantly higher than individual readiness assurance tests over time. Individual readiness assurance tests were significantly related with examination scores, while team readiness assurance tests were correlated with team-efficacy and team-interpersonal skills. The application of team-based learning in a health assessment subject can enhance students' perceived teamwork and academic performance. This finding suggests that team-based learning may be an effective learning and teaching strategy for improving team-work of nursing students, who need to collaborate and effectively communicate with health care providers to improve patients' health.

  11. Advancing the Promotion of Information Literacy Through Peer-led Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamsin Bolton

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Two new courses at the University of Windsor are opening the door to thinking about information literacy and curricular integration in very different ways. The courses, Ways of Knowing and Mentorship & Learning, were originally designed to help with retention and transition issues. They were also founded on the concept of peer-led learning at the university level. In this model students are able to connect with their peers in an organic way that is not always possible with faculty and librarians. It did not take long to see the potential in using peer mentors as potential conduits in the transfer of information literacy skills. This article tells the story behind the development of two courses and the mistakes that had to be made before the connection between mentors and information literacy could be seen. It also shows that by involving faculty and students in the design and delivery of an information literacy-integrated curriculum the library can accomplish far more than any one-shot, tool-based session.

  12. Building an Undergraduate STEM Team Using Team-Based Learning Leading to the Production of a Storyboard Appropriate for Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutright, Teresa J.; Evans, Edward; Brantner, Justin S.

    2014-01-01

    A unique undergraduate team that spans five different engineering disciplines, chemistry, biology, and mathematics was formed. The team was formed to promote cross-disciplinary learning, to improve retention, and to prepare the students for the kind of problems they will face in their careers. This paper describes the variety of activities used…

  13. Pioneering the Transdisciplinary Team Science Approach: Lessons Learned from National Cancer Institute Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Amanda L; Stipelman, Brooke A; Hall, Kara L; Nebeling, Linda; Stokols, Daniel; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute has been a leader in supporting transdisciplinary (TD) team science. From 2005-2010, the NCI supported Transdisciplinary Research on Energetic and Cancer I (TREC I), a center initiative fostering the TD integration of social, behavioral, and biological sciences to examine the relationships among obesity, nutrition, physical activity and cancer. In the final year of TREC I, we conducted qualitative in-depth-interviews with 31 participating investigators and trainees to learn more about their experiences with TD team science, including challenges, facilitating factors, strategies for success, and impacts. Five main challenges emerged: (1) limited published guidance for how to engage in TD team science, when TREC I was implemented; (2) conceptual and scientific challenges inherent to efforts to achieve TD integration; (3) discipline-based differences in values, terminology, methods, and work styles; (4) project management challenges involved in TD team science; and (5) traditional incentive and reward systems that do not recognize or reward TD team science. Four main facilitating factors and strategies for success emerged: (1) beneficial attitudes and beliefs about TD research and team science; (2) effective team processes; (3) brokering and bridge-building activities by individuals holding particular roles in a research center; and (4) funding initiative characteristics that support TD team science. Broad impacts of participating in TD team science in the context of TREC I included: (1) new positive attitudes about TD research and team science; (2) new boundary-crossing collaborations; (3) scientific advances related to research approaches, findings, and dissemination; (4) institutional culture change and resource creation in support of TD team science; and (5) career advancement. Funding agencies, academic institutions, and scholarly journals can help to foster TD team science through funding opportunities, institutional policies on

  14. Pioneering the Transdisciplinary Team Science Approach: Lessons Learned from National Cancer Institute Grantees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Amanda L; Stipelman, Brooke A; Hall, Kara L; Nebeling, Linda; Stokols, Daniel; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute has been a leader in supporting transdisciplinary (TD) team science. From 2005-2010, the NCI supported Transdisciplinary Research on Energetic and Cancer I (TREC I), a center initiative fostering the TD integration of social, behavioral, and biological sciences to examine the relationships among obesity, nutrition, physical activity and cancer. In the final year of TREC I, we conducted qualitative in-depth-interviews with 31 participating investigators and trainees to learn more about their experiences with TD team science, including challenges, facilitating factors, strategies for success, and impacts. Five main challenges emerged: (1) limited published guidance for how to engage in TD team science, when TREC I was implemented; (2) conceptual and scientific challenges inherent to efforts to achieve TD integration; (3) discipline-based differences in values, terminology, methods, and work styles; (4) project management challenges involved in TD team science; and (5) traditional incentive and reward systems that do not recognize or reward TD team science. Four main facilitating factors and strategies for success emerged: (1) beneficial attitudes and beliefs about TD research and team science; (2) effective team processes; (3) brokering and bridge-building activities by individuals holding particular roles in a research center; and (4) funding initiative characteristics that support TD team science. Broad impacts of participating in TD team science in the context of TREC I included: (1) new positive attitudes about TD research and team science; (2) new boundary-crossing collaborations; (3) scientific advances related to research approaches, findings, and dissemination; (4) institutional culture change and resource creation in support of TD team science; and (5) career advancement. Funding agencies, academic institutions, and scholarly journals can help to foster TD team science through funding opportunities, institutional policies on

  15. Integrating TeamSTEPPS®into ambulatory reproductive health care: Early successes and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Maureen E; Dodge, Laura E; Intondi, Evelyn; Ozcelik, Guzey; Plitt, Ken; Hacker, Michele R

    2017-04-01

    Most medical teamwork improvement interventions have occurred in hospitals, and more efforts are needed to integrate them into ambulatory care settings. In 2014, Affiliates Risk Management Services, Inc. (ARMS), the risk management services organization for a large network of reproductive health care organizations in the United States, launched a voluntary 5-year initiative to implement a medical teamwork system in this network using the TeamSTEPPS model. This article describes the ARMS initiative and progress made during the first 2 years, including lessons learned. The ARMS TeamSTEPPS program consists of the following components: preparation of participating organizations, TeamSTEPPS master training, implementation of teamwork improvement programs, and evaluation. We used self-administered questionnaires to assess satisfaction with the ARMS program and with the master training course. In the first 2 years, 20 organizations enrolled. Participants found the preparation phase valuable and were highly satisfied with the master training course. Although most attendees felt that the course imparted the knowledge and tools critical for TeamSTEPPS implementation, they identified time restraints and competing initiatives as potential barriers. The project team has learned valuable lessons about obtaining buy-in, consolidating the change teams, making the curriculum relevant, and evaluation. Ambulatory care settings require innovative approaches to integration of teamwork improvement systems. Evaluating and sharing lessons learned will help to hone best practices as we navigate this new frontier in the field of patient safety. © 2017 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  16. Using team-based learning to prepare medical students for future problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkhalek, Nahed; Hussein, Amal; Gibbs, Trevor; Hamdy, Hossam

    2010-01-01

    The original concept of problem-based learning (PBL) was built upon an acceptance that its participants would be of a more mature age, and with personal and potential qualities that would equip them for problem solving as part of their learning process. However, despite global acceptance for the use of PBL in medical and health sciences education, and knowledge of the diverse background of students about to embark upon PBL, structured programs preparing medical students for such an educational activity are not common. The primary aim of this study is to describe the experience in adopting and adapting an educational approach analogous to PBL, team-based learning (TBL), in preparing medical students to later study in a PBL environment and secondarily, to measure the students' reaction to this experience. At the University of Sharjah, 363 students were enrolled over four semesters in the 'Introduction to Medical Sciences Education (IMSE)' course. They were divided into groups of 25-27 students per class, where their learning was facilitated through a TBL approach. The course was evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively and appropriate statistical analysis was applied to their responses. Out of 363 students, 304 (84%) responded to a 28-item closed-ended questionnaire. Their mean scores and consensus measurements indicated a high degree of students' satisfaction. Eighty-two students (65%) responded to the open-ended questions providing 139 comments. Content analysis of the responses supported the quantitative results. This study demonstrated a high degree of students' satisfaction from the course in acquiring skills preparing them for future PBL. Although this represents an evaluation of the TBL effects upon the early exposures to PBL, TBL was considered to be a feasible, efficient and cost-effective educational approach in preparing the students for their new educational experience.

  17. The effect of web quest and team-based learning on students' self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiyepeymaie Jahromi, Zohreh; Mosalanejad, Leili; Rezaee, Rita

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the authors aimed to examine the effects of cooperative learning methods using Web Quest and team-based learning on students' self-direction, self-regulation, and academic achievement. This is a comparative study of students taking a course in mental health and psychiatric disorders. In two consecutive years, a group of students were trained using the WebQuest approach as a teaching strategy (n = 38), while the other group was taught using team-based learning (n=39). Data gathering was based on Guglielmino's self-directed learning readiness scale (SDLRS) and Buford's self-regulation questionnaire. The data were analyzed by descriptive test using M (IQR), Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and the Mann-Whitney U-test in SPSS software, version 13. pself- directed (self-management) and self-regulated learning differed between the two groups (p=0.04 and p=0.01, respectively). Wilcoxon test revealed that self-directed learning indices (self-control and self-management) were differed between the two strategies before and after the intervention. However, the scores related to learning (students' final scores) were higher in the WebQuest approach than in team-based learning. By employing modern educational approaches, students are not only more successful in their studies but also acquire the necessary professional skills for future performance. Further research to compare the effects of new methods of teaching is required.

  18. Building social capital with interprofessional student teams in rural settings: A service-learning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Pippa L; Phillips, Christine; Hall, Sally

    2016-08-01

    To describe outcomes of a model of service learning in interprofessional learning (IPL) aimed at developing a sustainable model of training that also contributed to service strengthening. A total of 57 semi-structured interviews with key informants and document review exploring the impacts of interprofessional student teams engaged in locally relevant IPL activities. Six rural towns in South East New South Wales. Local facilitators, staff of local health and other services, health professionals who supervised the 89 students in 37 IPL teams, and academic and administrative staff. Perceived benefits as a consequence of interprofessional, service-learning interventions in these rural towns. Reported outcomes included increased local awareness of a particular issue addressed by the team; improved communication between different health professions; continued use of the team's product or a changed procedure in response to the teams' work; and evidence of improved use of a particular local health service. Given the limited workforce available in rural areas to supervise clinical IPL placements, a service-learning IPL model that aims to build social capital may be a useful educational model. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  19. Small-team active learning in an integrated pharmacokinetics course series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Curtis E; Dyar, S Craig; McKeever, Andrea L

    2012-10-12

    To implement a pharmacokinetics curriculum that used small-team active learning and assess students' perceptions. The course design and delivery were based on delivery of Student Team lecture followed by concept reinforcement through problem-based learning sessions. Course faculty members facilitated classroom and problem-based learning discussions to promote an active-learning environment. An anonymous survey instrument was administered to students prior to and following completion of the pharmacokinetics course. Students reported a significant decrease in anxiety from 67% to 44% related to working in small teams upon completion of the course. However, students maintained negative perceptions related to peer teaching, with 80% of students reporting anxiety related to receipt of course information from peers. The course had a positive impact on students' ability to apply concepts to case-based scenarios, but little impact on their perceived ability to identify and critically evaluate new material and present that material to their peer team. The team-based structure defined herein for delivery of a pharmacokinetics curriculum offers students a tangible method to increase their comfort and confidence in the application of pharmacokinetic concepts in therapy.

  20. Interprofessional Education and Team-Based Learning in a Research Methods Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Vicki; Finch-Guthrie, Patricia; Benz, Janet

    2017-12-18

    This article describes team-based pedagogical strategies for a hybrid, four-credit research methods course with students from nursing, exercise, and nutrition science. The research problem of concussion in football, a socially relevant and controversial topic, was used to explore interprofessional perspectives and develop shared problem solving. The course was designed using permanent teams, readiness assurance, application exercises, and peer evaluation to facilitate student achievement of competencies related to interprofessional collaboration and research application. Feedback from students, faculty, and the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale was used to evaluate the learning innovation.

  1. Exploring Teachers' Perceptions of Professional Development in Virtual Learning Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, Courtney Paschal

    2012-01-01

    The demand for virtual education is rapidly increasing due to the proliferation of legislation demanding class size limitations, funding cuts, and school choice across the United States. Virtual education leaders are discovering new ways to enhance and develop teachers to become more efficient and increase quality of learning online. Learning…

  2. Using Survey Data to Improve Student Learning: A Team Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Darlene

    2009-01-01

    "What did you do in school today?" is about reflecting on thoughtful questions and using data to make improvements. It is a multi-year research and development initiative of the Canadian Education Association (CEA), funded through collaboration with the Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) and a number of Canadian school districts.…

  3. Employee participation and cleaner technology: learning processes in environmental teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remmen, Arne; Lorentzen, Børge

    2000-01-01

    in the Implementation of Cleaner Technology” was to develop a more active role for employees in the environmental activities of companies. Based on practical experiments in five Danish firms within different industrial sectors, the project concluded that employee participation can have a strong effect on changing......The approach to pollution prevention in Danish industries in the late-1980s and in the beginning of the 1990s met criticism, because the cleaner technology projects focused too narrowly on technical solutions implemented by experts. The objective of the project “Employee Participation...... working routines, affecting behaviour and increasing environmental consciousness. The project found that the firms' employees had a comprehensive understanding of environmental problems and solutions, including health and safety aspects. Furthermore, the employees in the environmental teams were able...

  4. An international internship on social development led by Canadian nursing students: empowering learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Margareth; Schwind, Jasna; Aksenchuk, Kateryna; Gorospe, Franklin F; Santiago, Lira

    2013-07-01

    A Canadian nursing student-led knowledge dissemination project on health promotion for social development was implemented with local professionals and communities in Brazil. (a) to identify how student-interns contrasted Canadian and Brazilian cultural and social realities within a primary healthcare context from a social development perspective; (b) to examine how philosophical underpinnings, including social critical theory and notions of social justice, guided student-interns in acknowledging inequalities in primary healthcare in Brazil; and (c) to participate in the debate on the contribution of Canadian nursing students to the global movement for social development. A qualitative appraisal of short-term outcomes of an international internship in the cities of Birigui & Araçatuba (São Paulo-Brazil). Four Canadian fourth-year undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a metropolitan university program. Recruitment was through an email invitation to the student-interns, who accepted, and signed informed consent forms. Their participation was unpaid and voluntary. One-time individual interviews were conducted at the end of their internships. Transcriptions of the audio-recorded interviews were coded using the qualitative software program ATLAS ti 6.0. The findings were analyzed using thematic analysis. Student-interns' learning unfolded from making associations among concepts, new ideas, and their previous experiences, leading to a personal transformation through which they established new conceptual and personal connections. The two main themes revealed by the thematic analysis were dichotomizing realities, that is, acknowledging the existence of "two sides of each situation," and discovering an unexpected reciprocity between global and urban health. Furthermore, the student-interns achieved personal and professional empowerment. The knowledge gained from the international experience helped the student-interns learn how to collaborate with Brazilian society

  5. Uncover it, students would learn leadership from Team-Based Learning (TBL): The effect of guided reflection and feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Maryam; Mirzazadeh, Azim; Parmelee, Dean X; Peyton, Elizabeth; Janani, Leila; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2017-04-01

    Little is known about best practices for teaching and learning leadership through Team-Based learning™ (TBL™) with medical students. We hypothesized that guided reflection and feedback would improve shared leadership and shared leadership capacity, and enhance team decision quality in TBL teams. We used the Kolb experiential learning theory as the theoretical framework. The study was conducted at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Three TBL sessions with 206 students (39 teams) participated in the study. Using a quasi-experimental design, one batch received guided reflection and feedback on their team leadership processes (n = 20 teams) and the other received only TBL (n = 19 teams). Observers measured shared leadership using a checklist. Shared leadership capacity was measured using a questionnaire. Scores on a team application exercise were used to assess quality of team decisions. Evidence did not support our first hypothesis that reflection and feedback enhance shared leadership in TBL teams. Percentages of teams displaying shared leadership did not differ between intervention and control groups in sessions 1 (p = 0.6), 2 (p = 1) or 3 (p = 1). The results did not support the second hypothesis. We found no difference in quality of decision making between the intervention and control groups for sessions 1 (p = 0.77), 2 (p = 0.23), or 3 (p = 0.07). The third hypothesis that the reflection and feedback would have an effect on shared leadership capacity was supported (T = -8.55, p > 0.001 adjusted on baseline; T = -8.55, p > 0.001 adjusted on gender). We found that reflection and feedback improved shared leadership capacity but not shared leadership behaviors or team decision quality. We propose medical educators who apply TBL, should provide guided exercise in reflection and feedback so that students may better understand the benefits of working in teams as preparation for their future roles as leaders and

  6. Implementation of team-based learning on a large scale: Three factors to keep in mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalingam, Preman; Rotgans, Jerome I; Zary, Nabil; Ferenczi, Michael Alan; Gagnon, Paul; Low-Beer, Naomi

    2018-03-23

    Team-based learning (TBL) is a structured form of small group learning that can be scaled up for delivery in large classes. The principles of successful TBL implementation are well established. TBL has become widely practiced in medical schools, but its use is typically limited to certain courses or parts of courses. Implementing TBL on a large scale, across different courses and disciplines, is the next logical step. The Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine (LKCMedicine), a partnership between Nanyang Technological University, Singapore and Imperial College London, admitted its first students in 2013. This new undergraduate medical program, developed collaboratively by faculty at both institutions, uses TBL as its main learning and teaching strategy, replacing all face-to-face lectures. TBL accounts for over 60% of the curriculum in the first two years, and there is continued learning through TBL during campus teaching in the remaining years. This paper describes our experience of rolling out TBL across all years of the medical curriculum, focusing on three success factors: (1) "team-centric" learning spaces, to foster active, collaborative learning; (2) an e-learning ecosystem, seamlessly integrated to support all phases of the TBL process and (3) teaching teams in which experts in pedagogical process (TBL Facilitators) co-teach with experts in subject matter (Content Experts).

  7. Evidence of Self-Directed Learning on a High School Robotics Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan R. Dolenc

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-directed learning is described as an individual taking the initiative to engage in a learning experience while assuming responsibility to follow through to its conclusion. Robotics competitions are examples of informal environments that can facilitate self-directed learning. This study examined how mentor involvement, student behavior, and physical workspace contributed to self-directed learning on one robotics competition team. How did mentors transfer responsibility to students? How did students respond to managing a team? Are the physical attributes of a workspace important? The mentor, student, and workplace factors captured in the research showed mentors wanting students to do the work, students assuming leadership roles, and the limited workspace having a positive effect on student productivity.

  8. Team-based learning, a learning strategy for clinical reasoning, in students with problem-based learning tutorial experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Yumiko; Ishiguro, Naoko; Suganuma, Taiyo; Nishikawa, Toshio; Takubo, Toshio; Kojimahara, Noriko; Yago, Rie; Nunoda, Shinichi; Sugihara, Shigetaka; Yoshioka, Toshimasa

    2012-05-01

    Acquiring clinical reasoning skills in lectures may be difficult, but it can be learnt through problem-solving in the context of clinical practice. Problem finding and solving are skills required for clinical reasoning; however, students who underwent problem-based learning (PBL) still have difficulty in acquiring clinical reasoning skills. We hypothesized that team-based learning (TBL), a learning strategy that provides the opportunity to solve problems by repeatedly taking tests, can enhance the clinical reasoning ability in medical students with PBL experiences during the pre-clinical years. TBL courses were designed for 4(th) year students in a 6-year program in 2008, 2009, and 2010. TBL individual scores, consisting of a combination of individual and group tests, were compared with scores of several examinations including computer-based testing (CBT), an original examination assessing clinical reasoning ability (problem-solving ability test; P-SAT), term examinations, and Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). CBT, OSCE and P-SAT scores were compared with those of students who learned clinical reasoning only through PBL tutorials in 2005, 2006, and 2007 (non-TBL students). Individual TBL scores of students did not correlate with scores of any other examination. Assessments on clinical reasoning ability, such as CBT, OSCE, and P-SAT scores, were significantly higher in TBL students compared with non-TBL students. Students found TBL to be effective, particularly in areas of problem solving by both individuals and teams, and feedback from specialists. In conclusion, TBL for clinical reasoning is useful in improving clinical reasoning ability in students with PBL experiences with limited clinical exposure.

  9. Conceptualization and Support of the Role of Teachers Serving as Team Leaders in a Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordin, Lanelle

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the results of a phenomenological qualitative investigation into the new role of teachers serving as team leaders in a professional learning community, as well as the support team leaders need from members and principals to be effective. Collaborative teacher teams in 6 schools that have been developing as professional learning…

  10. Modelling Ball Circulation in Invasion Team Sports: A Way to Promote Learning Games through Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grehaigne, Jean-Francis; Caty, Didier; Godbout, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sport Education and "Tactical decision learning model" (TDLM) are two curriculum models used by physical education teachers in France to help students in the development of a tactical intelligence of game play in the didactics of team sports. Purpose: Identify prototypic configurations of play in the sense that they represent…

  11. Team-Based Learning: Perceptions of Instructors and Students in Thai Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovajassatakul, Thanongsak; Jitgarun, Kalayanee; Shinatrakool, Raveewan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study reported on in this paper was to identify and compare instructors' and students' perceptions of Team-Based Learning (TBL). Participants were 270 instructors and 288 fourth year students from the faculties of Industrial Education at six universities in Bangkok. The data were analyzed using factor analysis and structural…

  12. Team-Based Learning: Moderating Effects of Metacognitive Elaborative Rehearsal and Middle School History Content Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Greg; Scammacca, Nancy; Osman, David J.; Hall, Colby; Mohammed, Sarojani S.; Vaughn, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Promoting Acceleration of Comprehension and Content through Text (PACT) and similar team-based models directly engage and support students in learning situations that require cognitive elaboration as part of the processing of new information. Elaboration is subject to metacognitive control, as well (Karpicke, "Journal of Experimental…

  13. The role of VET Colleges in stimulating teachers’ engagement in team learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmans, Machiel

    2018-01-01

    The necessity of VET teachers’ engagement in team learning Secondary vocational education and training, here abbreviated as VET, has a central position in the Dutch education system. It is the second largest education sector and qualifies large numbers of students for many

  14. Project team formation support for self-directed learners in social learning networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Sloep, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Spoelstra, H., Van Rosmalen, P., & Sloep, P. B. (2012). Project team formation support for self-directed learners in social learning networks. In P. Kommers, P. Isaias, & N. Bessis (Eds.), Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference on Web Based Communities and Social Media (ICWBC & SM 2012)

  15. Tagclouds and Group Cognition: Effect of Tagging Support on Students' Reflective Learning in Team Blogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ying; Lin, Shu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of supported tagging (a prompting mechanism for students to stop and think about their writing) for team blogging on undergraduate students' reflective learning and the relationship between tagclouds and group cognition. Thirty-nine students were randomly assigned to six groups and blogged for 5 weeks. Three groups were…

  16. E-learning course design in teacher design teams. Experiences in the Open University of Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nihuka, Kassimu A.; Voogt, Joke

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative course design in teacher design teams (TDTs) has proved to be a promising professional development arrangement. This study explored the potential of TDTs in orienting teachers on course redesign for e-learning delivery at the context of Open University of Tanzania (OUT). Three teachers

  17. The role of VET Colleges in stimulating teachers’ engagement in team learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmans, Machiel

    2018-01-01

    The necessity of VET teachers’ engagement in team learning

    Secondary vocational education and training, here abbreviated as VET, has a central position in the Dutch education system. It is the second largest education sector and qualifies large numbers of students for

  18. Student Pedagogical Teams: Students as Course Consultants Engaged in Process of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Lorna; Ventura, Susan; Schuldt, Hilary; Donlan, Pamela

    2018-01-01

    Faculty engage in "pedagogical solitude," in which they plan, teach, and assess their work alone. To optimize teaching environments and learning outcomes, students can serve as "student pedagogical teams" (SPT) and provide feedback on instructor performance, course structure, and content. Using self-determination theory, this…

  19. Balancing Autonomy and Comparability: State Approaches to Assessment Selection for Student Learning Objectives. Ask the Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Ellen; Meyer, Cassandra

    2014-01-01

    States take a wide range of approaches to Student Learning Objectives (SLO) assessment selection. This "Ask the Team" brief helps states consider the trade-offs between approaches that offer more teacher choice and those that offer better comparability across SLOs. The brief identifies four common approaches to selecting SLO assessments:…

  20. Towards a Competence Profile for Inter-Organizational Learning in Open Innovation Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Chatenier, Elise; Verstegen, Jos; Biemans, Harm; Mulder, Martin

    2008-01-01

    While inter-organizational learning in open innovation teams has received much attention lately, research into its human dimension is lacking. This paper, therefore, explores the competencies professionals need for this process. Three studies were executed: a theoretical study, explorative interviews and focus groups. A competence profile was…

  1. Measuring Responsibility and Cooperation in Learning Teams in the University Setting: Validation of a Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Del-Barco, Benito; Mendo-Lázaro, Santiago; Felipe-Castaño, Elena; Fajardo-Bullón, Fernando; Iglesias-Gallego, Damián

    2018-01-01

    Cooperative learning are being used increasingly in the university classroom, in order to promote teamwork among students, improve performance and develop interpersonal competences. Responsibility and cooperation are two fundamental pillars of cooperative learning. Team members' responsibility is a necessary condition for the team's success in the assigned tasks. Students must be aware that they depend on each other and should make their maximum effort. On the other hand, in efficient groups, the members cooperate and pool their efforts to achieve the proposed goals. In this research, we propose to create a Questionnaire of Group Responsibility and Cooperation in Learning Teams (CRCG) . Participants in this work were 375 students from the Faculty of Teacher Training of the University of Extremadura (Spain). The CRCG has very acceptable psychometric characteristics, good internal consistency, and temporal reliability. Moreover, structural equation analysis allowed us to verify that the latent variables in the two factors found are well defined and, therefore, their assessment is adequate. Besides, we found high significant correlations between the Learning Team Potency Questionnaire (CPEA) and the total score and the factors of the CRCG. This tool will evaluate cooperative skills and offer faculty information in order to prepare students for teamwork and conflict resolution.

  2. Evaluating a Team-Based Learning Method for Detecting Dental Caries in Dental Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang E.; Kim, Junhyck; Anderson, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether the team-based learning environment facilitated the competency of third year dental students in caries detection and activity assessment. Corresponding data were achieved using digital radiographs to determine the carious lesions in three clinical cases. The distribution of the caries evaluations…

  3. The Effect of Team-Based Learning as an Instructional Strategy on Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniewel, Marla Dawn

    2012-01-01

    National bodies of nursing have identified that nurse educators in undergraduate nursing education need to incorporate student-centered and evidenced-based instructional strategies to promote application of nursing concepts. Team-based learning (TBL) has been identified as an effective method of fostering a deeper understanding of content and…

  4. Implementing Team-Based Learning in Middle School Social Studies Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanzek, Jeanne; Kent, Shawn C.; Vaughn, Sharon; Swanson, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Greg; Haynes, Martha

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of team-based learning (TBL) implemented in Grade 8 social studies classes on student content acquisition. Twenty-four classes were randomly assigned to treatment or comparison blocking on teacher. In the treatment classes teachers integrated TBL practices in the content instruction. The authors examined teacher…

  5. Learning Games and Student Teams: Their Effects on Student Attitudes and Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Keith J.; DeVries, David L.

    A 2x2x3 randomized block design was employed with 117 seventh grade students to investigate the independent and combined effects of a learning game and student teams on students' attitudes and achievement in mathematics. Multivariate and univariate analyses of variance revealed that students in classes using games were more positive toward math…

  6. Making Pedagogy Tangible: Developing Skills and Knowledge Using a Team Teaching and Blended Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Renée; Jenkins, Louise E.

    2018-01-01

    In an era of accountability government and industry bodies are mandating that teacher education programs provide evidence of their impact. This paper provides an example of evidence-based practice, exploring how a team teaching and blended learning approach influenced the development of pre-service teachers (PSTs) competency skills and knowledge.…

  7. Survey compare team based learning and lecture teaching method, on learning-teaching process nursing student\\'s, in Surgical and Internal Diseases course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Vaezi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effect of teaching methods on learning process of students will help teachers to improve the quality of teaching by selecting an appropriate method. This study aimed to compare the team- based learning and lecture teaching method on learning-teaching process of nursing students in surgical and internal diseases courses. Method: This quasi-experimental study was carried on the nursing students in the School of Nursing and Midwifery in Yazd and Meybod cities. Studied sample was all of the students in the sixth term in the Faculty of Nursing in Yazd (48 persons and the Faculty of Nursing in Meybod (28 persons. The rate of students' learning through lecture was measured using MCQ tests and teaching based on team-based learning (TBL method was run using MCQ tests (IRAT, GRAT, Appeals and Task group. Therefore, in order to examine the students' satisfaction about the TBL method, a 5-point Likert scale (translated questionnaire (1=completely disagree, 2= disagree, 3=not effective, 4=agree, and 5=completely agree consisted of 22 items was utilized. The reliability and validity of this translated questionnaire was measured. The collected data were analyzed through SPSS 17.0 using descriptive and analytical statistic. Result: The results showed that the mean scores in team-based learning were meaningful in individual assessment (17±84 and assessment group (17.2±1.17. The mean of overall scores in TBL method (17.84±0.98% was higher compared with the lecture teaching method (16±2.31. Most of the students believed that TBL method has improved their interpersonal and group interaction skills (100%. Among them, 97.7% of students mentioned that this method (TBL helped them to understand the course content better. The lowest levels of the satisfaction have related to the continuous learning during lifelong (51.2%. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the TBL method led to improving the communication skills, understanding

  8. A systematic review examining the effectiveness of blending technology with team-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    River, Jo; Currie, Jane; Crawford, Tonia; Betihavas, Vasiliki; Randall, Sue

    2016-10-01

    Technological advancements are rapidly changing nursing education in higher education settings. Nursing academics are enthusiastically blending technology with active learning approaches such as Team Based Learning (TBL). While the educational outcomes of TBL are well documented, the value of blending technology with TBL (blended-TBL) remains unclear. This paper presents a systematic review examining the effectiveness of blended-TBL in higher education health disciplines. This paper aimed to identify how technology has been incorporated into TBL in higher education health disciplines. It also sought to evaluate the educational outcomes of blended-TBL in terms of student learning and preference. A review of TBL research in Medline, CINAHL, ERIC and Embase databases was undertaken including the search terms, team based learning, nursing, health science, medical, pharmaceutical, allied health education and allied health education. Papers were appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program (CASP). The final review included 9 papers involving 2094 student participants. A variety of technologies were blended with TBL including interactive eLearning and social media. There is limited evidence that blended-TBL improved student learning outcomes or student preference. Enthusiasm to blend technology with TBL may not be as well founded as initially thought. However, few studies explicitly examined the value of incorporating technology into TBL. There is a clear need for research that can discern the impact of technology into TBL on student preference and learning outcomes, with a particular focus on barriers to student participation with online learning components. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An Investigation of the Impact of Research-Led Education on Student Learning and Understandings of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fuming; Roberts, Pamela J.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of two approaches to research-led education on students' learning and their understandings of research in the context of two university courses in international business involving third year undergraduate and graduate students. One approach involved the lecturer using his research as the basis for a case-study…

  10. Youth-Led Community Arts Hubs: Self-Determined Learning in an Out-of-School Time (OST) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauseman, David Cameron

    2016-01-01

    This article reports findings from qualitative case studies of three youth-led community arts hubs, a program that is rooted in, and utilizes a self-determined learning approach. Qualitative case studies of three program sites sought to generate meaningful data that could lead to rapid ongoing program development and inform the development and…

  11. Enhancing Student Learning in Knowledge-Based Courses: Integrating Team-Based Learning in Mass Communication Theory Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gang; Newell, Jay

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the adoption of the team-based learning (TBL) method in knowledge-based and theory-oriented journalism and mass communication (J&MC) courses. It first reviews the origin and concept of TBL, the relevant theories, and then introduces the TBL method and implementation, including procedures and assessments, employed in an…

  12. Learning Cell Biology as a Team: A Project-Based Approach to Upper-Division Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robin; Boggs, James

    2002-01-01

    To help students develop successful strategies for learning how to learn and communicate complex information in cell biology, we developed a quarter-long cell biology class based on team projects. Each team researches a particular human disease and presents information about the cellular structure or process affected by the disease, the cellular…

  13. Team Development of Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooyoung

    2004-01-01

    Advanced technologies, globalization, the competitiveness of business, flexible working practices, and other rapid changes in the nature of work have all led to the booming of "virtual teams." This paper will provide an overview of virtual teams, including a description of their emergence, a definition and typology of the term "virtual team," an…

  14. The effect of web quest and team-based learning on students’ self-regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    BADIYEPEYMAIE JAHROMI, ZOHREH; MOSALANEJAD, LEILI; REZAEE, RITA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In this study, the authors aimed to examine the effects of cooperative learning methods using Web Quest and team-based learning on students’ self-direction, self-regulation, and academic achievement. Method This is a comparative study of students taking a course in mental health and psychiatric disorders. In two consecutive years, a group of students were trained using the WebQuest approach as a teaching strategy (n = 38), while the other group was taught using team-based learning (n=39). Data gathering was based on Guglielmino’s self-directed learning readiness scale (SDLRS) and Buford’s self-regulation questionnaire. The data were analyzed by descriptive test using M (IQR), Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and the Mann–Whitney U-test in SPSS software, version 13. pWebQuest approach than in team-based learning. Conclusion By employing modern educational approaches, students are not only more successful in their studies but also acquire the necessary professional skills for future performance. Further research to compare the effects of new methods of teaching is required. PMID:27104202

  15. PENGARUH MODEL COOPERATIVE LEARNING TIPE TEAMS GAMES TOURNAMENT (TGT TERHADAP KECERDASAN INTERPERSONAL PADA MATA PELAJARAN IPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari anti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal intelligence is one of the goals in elementary school education. Interpersonal intelligence is a key element in the adaptation of children in their social relationships. SDN Kebon Jeruk 11 Pagi West Jakarta found a number of 19 students of 30 children (63% have barriers Interpersonal intelligence. Quantitative Research with One Shot Case Study Experiment using sample saturated with size 30 in research influence influence model cooperative learning type Teams Games Tournament (TGT to interpersonal intelligence. The results of this study prove that: The more effective the steps of cooperative learning model type TGT done then the better the interpersonal intelligence. So in this research result that model Cooperative Learning type Teams Games Tournament (TGT have positive effect to interpersonal intelligence.

  16. Analysis of the Team-Based Learning Literature: TBL Comes of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidet, Paul; Kubitz, Karla; McCormack, Wayne T

    Team-based learning, or TBL, is an application-oriented teaching method that combines small- and large-group learning by incorporating multiple small groups into a large group setting. It has been increasingly used in postsecondary and professional education over the past two decades. Given this increasing usage, many faculty wonder about the effects TBL has on learning outcomes. The authors performed a review and synthesis on the educational literature with respect to TBL to examine the quality of their descriptions of core TBL elements, then constructed narrative summaries of these selected articles. Their analysis demonstrated early evidence of positive educational outcomes in terms of knowledge acquisition, participation and engagement, and team performance. The authors conclude that the TBL literature is at an important maturation point, where more rigorous testing and study of additional questions relating to the method are needed, as well as more accurate reporting of TBL implementation.

  17. Toward Project-based Learning and Team Formation in Open Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Sloep, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Open Learning Environments, MOOCs, as well as Social Learning Networks, embody a new approach to learning. Although both emphasise interactive participation, somewhat surprisingly, they do not readily support bond creating and motivating collaborative learning opportunities. Providing project-based

  18. How Multi-Levels of Individual and Team Learning Interact in a Public Healthcare Organisation: A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Louise; Kelliher, Felicity; Harrington, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature on organisational learning and offer a preliminary conceptual framework as a basis to explore how the multi-levels of individual learning and team learning interact in a public healthcare organisation. The organisational learning literature highlights a need for further understanding of…

  19. Learning through "huddles" for health care leaders: why do some work teams learn as a result of huddles and others do not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    The health care industry embraces the concept that collective learning occurs through group social interactions and has been initiating huddles as an avenue for collaborative learning. During change of shift or prior to beginning daily tasks, a huddle is initiated and facilitated by the manager or frontline supervisor. Given that "shared knowledge is obtained through group-based learning," why are some teams learning and others are not? The phenomenon is perplexing, given that the same resources are provided to all teams. Based on the findings in the literature review on learning in groups, teams learn from huddles and others do not because of the following: communication style and dialogue among the group members, communication style and dialogue facilitated by the leader, team and member perceptions, and team membership. Teams that learn from huddles do so because of the elements within the dialogue between team members (reflexive questioning, redundancy of information, metaphors, analogies, dramatic dialogue, strategic meaning) and because the huddle team exhibits higher levels of collegiality, tenure, heterogeneity, team identification, and collective efficacy. Facilitators must encourage a conversation in order to encourage reframing of cognitive maps that encourage learning by huddle members.

  20. The effect of web quest and team-based learning on students’ self-regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZOHREH BADIYEPEYMAIE JAHROMI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this study, the authors aimed to examine the effects of cooperative learning methods using Web Quest and team-based learning on students’ self-direction, self-regulation, and academic achievement. Methods: This is a comparative study of students taking a course in mental health and psychiatric disorders. In two consecutive years, a group of students were trained using the Web Quest approach as a teaching strategy (n=38, while the other group was taught using team-based learning (n=39. Data gathering was based on Guglielmino’s self-directed learning readiness scale (SDLRS and Buford’s self-regulation questionnaire. The data were analyzed by descriptive test using M (IQR, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and the Mann–Whitney U-test in SPSS software, version 13. p<0.05 was considered as the significance level. Results: The results of the Mann–Whitney U test showed that the participants’ self- directed (self-management and self-regulated learning differed between the two groups (p=0.04 and p=0.01, respectively. Wilcoxon test revealed that self-directed learning indices (self-control and self-management were differed between the two strategies before and after the intervention. However, the scores related to learning (students’ final scores were higher in the WebQuest approach than in team-based learning. Conclusion: By employing modern educational approaches, students are not only more successful in their studies but also acquire the necessary professional skills for future performance. Further research to compare the effects of new methods of teaching is required.

  1. THE ANALYSIS OF STUDENTS’ TEAM ACHIEVEMENT DIVISIONS (STAD USED IN LEARNING PRACTICE OF TRANSLATING AND INTERPRETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Rakhman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with The Analysis of Student Teams Achievement Division (STAD used in Learning Practice of Translating and Interpreting. This research explores the implementation of STAD and find out the advantages and disadvantages of STAD used in learning Practice of Translating and Interpreting. The objective of the research was to motivate students and encourage them to be active in learning, to accelerate student achievement, to improve behavior in learning, and to find out the students’ ability with STAD method. Data collection technique focused on participant observation, interviews, and documentation. STAD is one type of cooperative learning model using small groups with a number of members of each group of 4-5 students in heterogenic way. It begins by delivering the objectives of learning, delivering of material, group activities, quizzes and group rewards. STAD method also is an effective method of cooperative learning. As with other learning methods, STAD method also has advantages and disadvantages. In the learning process there are good interactions among students, good attitude, increased interpersonal skills. It’s effective in increasing student participation and can train students to be more focus, more concentrate in answering questions from the teacher. It can make students eager to learn. But if the chief of the group can not resolve conflicts that arise constructively, it will be less effective in a group work. And if the number of groups is not considered, that is less than four, it would tend to withdraw and less active during the discussion. And if the number of groups of more than five, then chances for them to be passive in task completion   Keywords: Student Team Achievement Division (STAD, Cooperative Learning.

  2. Development of emotional intelligence in a team-based learning internal medicine clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nicole J; Kirkham, Karen; Deardorff, Adam S; Moore, Jeremy A

    2012-01-01

    Although increasing number of articles have been published on team-based learning (TBL), none has explored team emotional intelligence. We extend the literature by examining changes in team emotional intelligence during a third year clerkship where TBL is a primary instructional strategy. We hypothesized that team emotional intelligence will change in a positive direction (i.e., increase) during the clerkship. With IRB approval, during the 2009-2010 academic year third-year students in their internal medicine clerkship (N = 105, 100% response rate) completed the Workgroup Emotional Intelligence Profile - Short Version (WEIP-S) at the beginning and at the end of their 12-week clerkship. TBL is an instructional strategy utilized during the internal medicine clerkship. Paired t-tests showed that team emotional intelligence increased significantly pre to post clerkship for three of the four areas: awareness of own emotions (p = 0.018), recognizing emotions in others (p = 0.031), and ability to manage other's emotions (p = 0.013). There was no change for ability to control own emotions (p = 0.570). In an internal medicine clerkship, where TBL is utilized as an instructional strategy, team emotional intelligence increases. This supports TBL as an adjunctive tool to traditional medical education pedagogy.

  3. Teaming up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warhuus, Jan; Günzel-Jensen, Franziska; Robinson, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Questions we care about (Objectives): When students have to work on challenging tasks, as it is often the case in entrepreneurship classrooms that leverage experiential learning, team success becomes central to the students learning. Yet, the formation of teams is often left up to the students...... or pre-arranged at random. Therefore we investigate the importance of team formation in the entrepreneurial classroom and ask: (i) What are the underlying factors that influence outcomes of teamwork in student groups? (ii) How does team formation influence student perception of learning?, and (iii) Do...... functioning entrepreneurial student teams as most teams lack personal chemistry which makes them anchor their work too much in a pre-defined project. In contrast, we find that students that can form their own teams aim for less diverse teams than what is achieved by random assignment. However, the homophily...

  4. Experiential Learning as a Constraint-Led Process: An Ecological Dynamics Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brymer, Eric; Davids, Keith

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present key ideas for an ecological dynamics approach to learning that reveal the importance of learner-environment interactions to frame outdoor experiential learning. We propose that ecological dynamics provides a useful framework for understanding the interacting constraints of the learning process and for designing learning…

  5. Measuring Responsibility and Cooperation in Learning Teams in the University Setting: Validation of a Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-del-Barco, Benito; Mendo-Lázaro, Santiago; Felipe-Castaño, Elena; Fajardo-Bullón, Fernando; Iglesias-Gallego, Damián

    2018-01-01

    Cooperative learning are being used increasingly in the university classroom, in order to promote teamwork among students, improve performance and develop interpersonal competences. Responsibility and cooperation are two fundamental pillars of cooperative learning. Team members’ responsibility is a necessary condition for the team’s success in the assigned tasks. Students must be aware that they depend on each other and should make their maximum effort. On the other hand, in efficient groups, the members cooperate and pool their efforts to achieve the proposed goals. In this research, we propose to create a Questionnaire of Group Responsibility and Cooperation in Learning Teams (CRCG). Participants in this work were 375 students from the Faculty of Teacher Training of the University of Extremadura (Spain). The CRCG has very acceptable psychometric characteristics, good internal consistency, and temporal reliability. Moreover, structural equation analysis allowed us to verify that the latent variables in the two factors found are well defined and, therefore, their assessment is adequate. Besides, we found high significant correlations between the Learning Team Potency Questionnaire (CPEA) and the total score and the factors of the CRCG. This tool will evaluate cooperative skills and offer faculty information in order to prepare students for teamwork and conflict resolution. PMID:29593622

  6. Measuring Responsibility and Cooperation in Learning Teams in the University Setting: Validation of a Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito León-del-Barco

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative learning are being used increasingly in the university classroom, in order to promote teamwork among students, improve performance and develop interpersonal competences. Responsibility and cooperation are two fundamental pillars of cooperative learning. Team members’ responsibility is a necessary condition for the team’s success in the assigned tasks. Students must be aware that they depend on each other and should make their maximum effort. On the other hand, in efficient groups, the members cooperate and pool their efforts to achieve the proposed goals. In this research, we propose to create a Questionnaire of Group Responsibility and Cooperation in Learning Teams (CRCG. Participants in this work were 375 students from the Faculty of Teacher Training of the University of Extremadura (Spain. The CRCG has very acceptable psychometric characteristics, good internal consistency, and temporal reliability. Moreover, structural equation analysis allowed us to verify that the latent variables in the two factors found are well defined and, therefore, their assessment is adequate. Besides, we found high significant correlations between the Learning Team Potency Questionnaire (CPEA and the total score and the factors of the CRCG. This tool will evaluate cooperative skills and offer faculty information in order to prepare students for teamwork and conflict resolution.

  7. Team-based learning as a teaching strategy for first-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punja, Dhiren; Kalludi, Shivananda N; Pai, Kirtana M; Rao, Raghavendra K; Dhar, Murali

    2014-01-01

    Teaching programmes in medical education are now routinely employing active learning strategies to enhance the learning process and engage students in higher levels of learning. Team-based learning (TBL) is one active learning strategy that builds on individuals' strengths by allowing them to collaborate and work as a team to achieve a common learning objective. The present study aims to evaluate the impact of TBL on student performance. It also aims to assess students' attitudes towards TBL and the feasibility of its incorporation into the course curriculum. From a class of 241 students, 128 who agreed to participate in the study underwent two sessions of TBL each consisting of Individual and Group Readiness Assurance Tests (IRATs and GRATs). The readiness assurance tests each had 13 multiple choice questions (MCQ). To analyse the impact of TBL supplementation, the median sessional MCQ scores of students who underwent TBL supplementation (group 1) were compared with those who did not undergo the session (group 2). Students' experiences with TBL and their attitudes towards incorporation of TBL into the course curriculum were analysed using a feedback questionnaire that was given to students who underwent TBL. Students belonging to the TBL group performed significantly better than the students who did not undergo TBL (pgroup was seven and non-TBL group was six. The overall mean attitude score obtained from feedback questionnaires was 3.57, which indicates a positive attitude towards TBL. The team-based learning session improved student engagement with course content. The majority of the students felt that TBL supplementation enhanced their understanding of course content and believe that it will help them perform better in their exams.

  8. The implementation of e-learning with team builder at vocational high schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmud Al Haq Patwary

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at: (1 producing an appropriate e-learning for English language studies in vocational high school, (2 evaluating the suitability of the developed e-learning in terms of appropriateness, accuracy and clarity, screen presentation and design, and appropriateness of the team builder module aspect, and (3 evaluating the effectiveness of the e-learning in practical application. This research and development (R&D study used Alessi and Trollip’s model rearranged following ADDIE model, where the development of instruction followed Dick and Carey’s model and the need assessment procedures were adapted from Lee & Owens. Overall appropriateness and quality of the e-learning from alpha testing is ‘very appropriate’ and from beta testing is ‘excellent’. Alpha testing reveals that, the Team Builder Module is ‘very appropriate’ and beta testing reveals that, its overall quality is ‘excellent’. The e-learning is highly effective. The average score of the students raises 3.82 points (or 42.44% in the post-test from pre-test score. The minimum score of the post-test (i.e. 8 is more than the maximum score of the pre-test (i.e. 7, so it is concluded that the use of e-learning does not deteriorate the performance of the students, but improves their performance.

  9. Lesson Study with Mathematical Resources: A Sustainable Model for Locally-Led Teacher Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catherine; Perry, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Teams of educators conducted lesson study independently, supported by a resource kit that included mathematical tasks, curriculum materials, lesson videos and plans, and research articles, as well as protocols to support lesson study. The mathematical resources focused on linear measurement interpretation of fractions. This report examines the…

  10. Using Team-based Learning to Teach a Hybrid Pharmacokinetics Course Online and in Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Ann Snyder; Markowsky, Susan; De Leo, Justin; Normann, Sven; Black, Erik

    2016-12-25

    Objective. To compare the effectiveness of face-to-face and online team-based learning (TBL) to teach phenytoin pharmacokinetics. Design. A TBL format was used to teach an online cohort of 222 pharmacy students and two face-to-face cohorts (Tampa and Las Vegas) of pharmacy students. Students in all cohorts completed individual and team readiness tests (iRATs and tRATs), and a self-assessment survey to determine teamwork and content understanding. Knowledge retention questions also were added to the final examination. Assessment. Mean scores on iRATs were: 54% for the Tampa group; 72% for the Las Vegas group; and 58% for the online. Mean tRAT scores were 78.5% for the Tampa cohort and 82.2% for the Las Vegas cohort, compared to 89.5% for the online cohort. The mean tRAT scores for the online cohorts were significantly higher than those of the face-to-face cohorts. Data from the teamwork survey provided evidence of positive interactions among teams for all cohorts. Conclusion. Team-based learning can be an effective method for teaching applied pharmacokinetics in both face-to-face and online classes.

  11. Reliability assessment of a peer evaluation instrument in a team-based learning course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahawisan J

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the reliability of a peer evaluation instrument in a longitudinal team-based learning setting. Methods: Student pharmacists were instructed to evaluate the contributions of their peers. Evaluations were analyzed for the variance of the scores by identifying low, medium, and high scores. Agreement between performance ratings within each group of students was assessed via intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC. Results: We found little variation in the standard deviation (SD based on the score means among the high, medium, and low scores within each group. The lack of variation in SD of results between groups suggests that the peer evaluation instrument produces precise results. The ICC showed strong concordance among raters. Conclusions: Findings suggest that our student peer evaluation instrument provides a reliable method for peer assessment in team-based learning settings.

  12. The role of VET Colleges in stimulating teachers’ engagement in team learning

    OpenAIRE

    Bouwmans, Machiel

    2018-01-01

    The necessity of VET teachers’ engagement in team learning Secondary vocational education and training, here abbreviated as VET, has a central position in the Dutch education system. It is the second largest education sector and qualifies large numbers of students for many professions. To ensure the smooth transition of students to the labour market, VET colleges have implemented competence-based education (CBE) programmes, which are designed to develop relevant professional competenci...

  13. Student outbreak response teams: lessons learned from a decade of collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogreba-Brown, K; Weiss, J; Briggs, G; Taylor, A; Schumacher, M; England, B; Harris, R B

    2017-08-01

    Student response teams within colleges of public health effectively address important concerns for two stakeholders. For universities, students learn the fundamentals of field epidemiology and provide popular training and networking opportunities. For health departments, students serve as surge capacity as trained workforce available during outbreak investigations and potentially for routine tasks. This paper describes the interaction between a student response team and several health departments utilizing specific examples to demonstrate the various roles and activities students can fulfill. Lessons learned from both University team leaders and the various health departments are also included. The program evolved over time, beginning with a needs assessment of local health departments and a determination of student training needs, collection, and confidential transmission of data, and interviewing techniques. Over the last decade students have worked on outbreak investigations, case-control studies, program evaluations, and in-field responses. Since 2005, over 200 public health graduate students have contributed more than 1800 h investigating 62 separate disease outbreaks in Arizona. In addition, over the past four years students also worked an additional 2500 h to assist county health departments in routine enteric investigations, specifically for Campylobacter and Salmonella. Best practices and lessons learned found that communication, preplanning and a willingness to collaborate increased the learning opportunities for students and ability for health departments to increase their capacity both during an emergency and for routine work. Establishment of a student response team (1) trains students in field experiences; (2) creates trained surge capacity for health departments; (3) increases collaboration between schools of public health and state/local health departments; (4) establishes a way to share funding with a local health department; and (5) increases

  14. Project-based Modules from two STEM Learning Teams in Howard County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, L. N.; Bradley, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2009, two Maryland school districts-Howard County Public School System and Prince George's County Public Schools-and the Goddard Space Flight Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) partnered with the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future (NCTAF) to develop NASA 21st Century Learning Studios. In 2010, NCTAF expanded the program to include Learning Studios at two additional Maryland school districts (Anne Arundel County Public Schools and Baltimore County Public Schools), partnering with the United States Naval Academy and the University of Maryland. Overall, the focus of these Learning Studios is to combine the expertise of scientists with that of educators through Learning Teams to improve teaching and learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, while delivering project-based modules to be implemented in other school districts. The focus of this paper is to summarize the experience and outcomes from two Learning Teams from the Howard County Public School System. STEM Learning Teams were established at Centennial High School and Hammond High School in Maryland. Each Team worked together for two years to create interdisciplinary units of study for their students with a focus on Earth Science. To maximize student interest, teachers worked with NASA scientists five times a year to develop four learning modules using practical examples and incorporating real scientific observations. A weathering and erosion module challenges students to collect appropriate field observations and determine erosion and deposition rates in a nearby lake. A plate tectonics module requires students to use measures of plate motion from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to estimate rates of convergence in southern Asia. A third module for lessons in climate change requires students to find open source climate data, determine changes in the atmosphere and estimate anthropogenic impacts. A follow

  15. Trust and Conflicts in Distance Learning Higher Education Courses Tutor Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Aline Pereira; Nakayama, Marina Keiko; Silveira, Ricardo Azambuja; Pacheco, Andressa Sasaki Vasques; de Sá Freire, Patrícia; Benetti, Kelly

    This study reports on research carried out on 105 tutors working on distance graduate courses at the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC) to assess the relationship between the level of trust and the conflict management in tutors of distance learning based graduate courses at UFSC on the AVEA - Virtual Environment of Learning. The research uses descriptive and quantitative methodology. It should be highlighted that the level of trust of the whole team prevails in the relationships, which explains the adoption of the Integration style, considered the most appropriate for creative solutions in moments of conflict.

  16. Improving learning competencies in the context of radical innovation: a team perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Jacob; Lauridsen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    This study widens the current state-of-the-art for improving teamwork in practice by enhancing personal and interpersonal learning competencies. The foundation for the study is obtained by conducting eight months of action research at five Lithuanian SMEs who followed Brix and Jakobsen’s (2013......) radical innovation method the ‘Creative Idea Solution (CIS) framework’. As part of the authors’ intervention, Lauridsen’s (2012) updated version of the Building Excellence (BE) learning styles model (Rundle and Dunn, 2007) was implemented in the five innovation teams. The results represent important...

  17. Medical student-developed obesity education program uses modified team-based learning to motivate adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Sarah; Jackman, Carina; Sisto, Paola Palma

    2012-01-01

    Childhood obesity is reaching epidemic proportions and requires intervention. To educate high school (HS) students on the effects of obesity and implement small healthy changes. Train medical students to educate and motivate adolescents and utilize a modified team-based learning format. A medical student-created HS-based module was developed to educate adolescents on obesity's effects on health. Over 2 years, 25 medical students from each semester were trained and presented to 1590 freshmen and sophomores at suburban HSs in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The program included an interactive power point and a 30-day challenge to make small measurable changes in their current health behaviors. A modified team-based learning format was included to engage students and increase classroom interaction. Medical students reported the program improved their ability to communicate with adolescents and enhanced their training as future physicians. Teachers felt students had sustained retention of knowledge at the end of 30 days and the majority of students fulfilled their self-imposed challenge. A student-run HS obesity education module using a portion of team-based learning was successfully implemented into HS health science curriculums, exposed medical students to community advocacy while educating and motivating adolescents to improve health behaviors.

  18. Implementation Of Management Strategic To Team Learning Cohesion In Study Program Of Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Susila Sumartiningsih

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The purpose of this research is to analyze the empiric of management strategic Driving Factor DF and Pull Factor PF to team learning cohesion among nursing program in Banten Provinsion. The study was designed in the quantitative descriptive correlational study and the method was a cross sectional. The total sampling n192 were manager n3 lecturers n45 and students n144 at nursing program study among Banten provice in Indonesia. The data were analyzed by using the Chi-Square.Theresults were showngood category 83.33 in DF and PF of Management Stratgict Implementataion and high category 59.72 in Team Learning Cohesion. There was not a statistically significant relationship p 0.543 p amp8805 0.05 between the DF and PF of team learning cohesion in implementation of Management Stratgic. In view of this it can be concluded that the nursing lecturer should be able to be a good motivator in order to encourage the student academic achievement.

  19. A Team Formation and Project-based Learning Support Service for Social Learning Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Van de Vrie, Evert; Obreza, Matija; Sloep, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Internet affords new approaches to learning. Geographically dispersed self-directed learners can learn in computer-supported communities, forming social learning networks. However, self-directed learners can suffer from a lack of continuous motivation. And surprisingly, social learning networks

  20. Learning Analytics in Small-Scale Teacher-Led Innovations: Ethical and Data Privacy Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Triana, María Jesús; Martínez-Monés, Alejandra; Villagrá-Sobrino, Sara

    2016-01-01

    As a further step towards maturity, the field of learning analytics (LA) is working on the definition of frameworks that structure the legal and ethical issues that scholars and practitioners must take into account when planning and applying LA solutions to their learning contexts. However, current efforts in this direction tend to be focused on…

  1. The importance of relational coordination and reciprocal learning for chronic illness care within primary care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Polly Hitchcock; Lanham, Holly J; Palmer, Ray F; Leykum, Luci K; Parchman, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Recent research from a complexity theory perspective suggests that implementation of complex models of care, such as the Chronic Care Model (CCM), requires strong relationships and learning capacities among primary care teams. Our primary aim was to assess the extent to which practice member perceptions of relational coordination and reciprocal learning were associated with the presence of CCM elements in community-based primary care practices. We used baseline measures from a cluster randomized controlled trial testing a practice facilitation intervention to implement the CCM and improve risk factor control for patients with Type 2 diabetes in small primary care practices. Practice members (i.e., physicians, nonphysician providers, and staff) completed baseline assessments, which included the Relational Coordination Scale, Reciprocal Learning Scale, and the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC) survey, along with items assessing individual and clinic characteristics. To assess the association between Relational Coordination, Reciprocal Learning, and ACIC, we used a series of hierarchical linear regression models accounting for clustering of individual practice members within clinics and controlling for individual- and practice-level characteristics and tested for mediation effects. A total of 283 practice members from 39 clinics completed baseline measures. Relational Coordination scores were significantly and positively associated with ACIC scores (Model 1). When Reciprocal Learning was added, Relational Coordination remained a significant yet notably attenuated predictor of ACIC (Model 2). The mediation effect was significant (z = 9.3, p < .01); 24% of the association between Relational Coordination and ACIC scores was explained by Reciprocal Learning. Of the individual- and practice-level covariates included in Model 3, only the presence of an electronic medical record was significant; Relational Coordination and Reciprocal Learning remained significant

  2. Towards a team-based, collaborative approach to embedding e-learning within undergraduate nursing programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiteley, Robin J; Ormrod, Graham

    2009-08-01

    E-learning approaches are incorporated in many undergraduate nursing programmes but there is evidence to suggest that these are often piecemeal and have little impact on the wider, nurse education curriculum. This is consistent with a broader view of e-learning within the higher education (HE) sector, which suggests that higher education institutions (HEIs) are struggling to make e-learning a part of their mainstream delivery [HEFCE, 2005. HEFCE Strategy for E-Learning 2005/12. Bristol, UK, Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE). [online] Available at: Accessed: 30 May 07]. This article discusses some of the challenges that face contemporary nurse education and seeks to account for reasons as to why e-learning may not be fully embedded within the undergraduate curriculum. These issues are considered within a wider debate about the need to align e-learning approaches with a shift towards a more student focused learning and teaching paradigm. The article goes on to consider broader issues in the literature on the adoption, embedding and diffusion of innovations, particularly in relation to the value of collaboration. A collaborative, team-based approach to e-learning development is considered as a way of facilitating sustainable, responsive and multidisciplinary developments within a field which is constantly changing and evolving.

  3. Education and Training of Emergency Medical Teams: Recommendations for a Global Operational Learning Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat Camacho, Nieves; Hughes, Amy; Burkle, Frederick M.; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Ragazzoni, Luca; Redmond, Anthony; Norton, Ian; von Schreeb, Johan

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of international emergency medical teams are deployed to assist disaster-affected populations worldwide. Since Haiti earthquake those teams have been criticised for ill adapted care, lack of preparedness in addition to not coordinating with the affected country healthcare system. The Emergency Medical Teams (EMTs) initiative, as part of the Word Health Organization’s Global Health Emergency Workforce program, aims to address these shortcomings by improved EMT coordination, and mechanisms to ensure quality and accountability of national and international EMTs. An essential component to reach this goal is appropriate education and training. Multiple disaster education and training programs are available. However, most are centred on individuals’ professional development rather than on the EMTs operational performance. Moreover, no common overarching or standardised training frameworks exist. In this report, an expert panel review and discuss the current approaches to disaster education and training and propose a three-step operational learning framework that could be used for EMTs globally. The proposed framework includes the following steps: 1) ensure professional competence and license to practice, 2) support adaptation of technical and non-technical professional capacities into the low-resource and emergency context and 3) prepare for an effective team performance in the field. A combination of training methodologies is also recommended, including individual theory based education, immersive simulations and team training. Agreed curriculum and open access training materials for EMTs need to be further developed, ideally through collaborative efforts between WHO, operational EMT organizations, universities, professional bodies and training agencies.  Keywords: disasters; education; emergencies; global health; learning PMID:27917306

  4. Comparison of Two Team Learning and Team Entrepreneurship Models at a Finnish University of Applied Sciences. Setting the Scene for Future Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi Juvonen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This team learning and team entre-preneurship model of education has been deployed at the Bachelor’s level in the degree programmes of IT and Business Administration (BA. In BA studies the students who take part in team learning have specialized in marketing since 2009 at the Saimaa University of Applied Sciences (SUAS. The model called ICT entrepreneurship study path (ICT-ESP has been developed for IT education. The ICT-ESP has been built on the theory of experien-tal learning and theories of knowledge creation and knowledge management. The students study and complete their degree as team entrepreneurs. The model has been further developed in the Business Administration Degree Programme with students who specialize in marketing. The Degree Programme in IT at the Bachelor’s level was terminated in 2011 by Finnish Min-istry of Education and Culture. Cur-rently, there are severe discussions on bringing it back – not as an IT but as an ICT Degree Programme. This article makes a cross-section of what has already been explored with the team learning and team entrepreneurship model and what the next steps will be. It makes a comparison of two originally sep-arately developed models and dis-cusses their best practices. The arti-cle also argues whether the upcom-ing ICT education should be orga-nized in a conventional way – as curriculum of courses, or as expan-sion of the current team learning and team entrepreneurship model. The data consists of field notes, meeting memos, and dozens of un-official discussions with colleagues and company representatives. Liter-ature studies made during the ongo-ing research, development, and in-novation (RDI projects offered an extra view of how the business con-text is changing and what should be done to make benefit out of the change. The results suggest that the up-coming ICT Degree Programme at SUAS should be integrated into the existing deployment of team learning and team entrepreneurship learning

  5. Compute-to-Learn: Authentic Learning via Development of Interactive Computer Demonstrations within a Peer-Led Studio Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mina; Welden, Alicia Rae; Williams, Kyle L.; Winograd, Blair; Mulvihill, Ellen; Hendrickson, Heidi P.; Lenard, Michael; Gottfried, Amy; Geva, Eitan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the implementation of a novel compute-to-learn pedagogy, which is based upon the theories of situated cognition and meaningful learning. The "compute-to-learn" pedagogy is designed to simulate an authentic research experience as part of the undergraduate curriculum, including project development, teamwork,…

  6. The personalisation of a learning environment: student-led connections online and offline

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Hugh; White, Su

    2011-01-01

    Rapidly evolving technological change is necessarily accompanied by matched evolution of individual practice amongst users. In a connected world, the users are universal, and students entering universities may arrive with a mix of sophisticated and naïve approaches to using technology to support their learning. The University of Southampton has designed and is implementing a holistic learning environment radically different from the VLEs which have gained widespread usage since the late 1990s...

  7. Challenges in interdisciplinary weight management in primary care: lessons learned from the 5As Team study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, J; Osunlana, A M; Ogunleye, A A; Sharma, A M; Campbell-Scherer, D

    2016-04-01

    Increasingly, research is directed at advancing methods to address obesity management in primary care. In this paper we describe the role of interdisciplinary collaboration, or lack thereof, in patient weight management within 12 teams in a large primary care network in Alberta, Canada. Qualitative data for the present analysis were derived from the 5As Team (5AsT) trial, a mixed-method randomized control trial of a 6-month participatory, team-based educational intervention aimed at improving the quality and quantity of obesity management encounters in primary care practice. Participants (n = 29) included in this analysis are healthcare providers supporting chronic disease management in 12 family practice clinics randomized to the intervention arm of the 5AsT trial including mental healthcare workers (n = 7), registered dietitians (n = 7), registered nurses or nurse practitioners (n = 15). Participants were part of a 6-month intervention consisting of 12 biweekly learning sessions aimed at increasing provider knowledge and confidence in addressing patient weight management. Qualitative methods included interviews, structured field notes and logs. Four common themes of importance in the ability of healthcare providers to address weight with patients within an interdisciplinary care team emerged, (i) Availability; (ii) Referrals; (iii) Role perception and (iv) Messaging. However, we find that what was key to our participants was not that these issues be uniformly agreed upon by all team members, but rather that communication and clinic relationships support their continued negotiation. Our study shows that firm clinic relationships and deliberate communication strategies are the foundation of interdisciplinary care in weight management. Furthermore, there is a clear need for shared messaging concerning obesity and its treatment between members of interdisciplinary teams. © 2016 World Obesity.

  8. Student Perceptions of and Confidence in Self-Care Course Concepts Using Team-based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Tracy R; Gryka, Rebecca; Kiersma, Mary E; Todt, Abby L; Cailor, Stephanie M; Chen, Aleda M H

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To evaluate changes in student perceptions of and confidence in self-care concepts after completing a team-based learning (TBL) self-care course. Methods. Team-based learning was used at two universities in first professional year, semester-long self-care courses. Two instruments were created and administered before and after the semester. The instruments were designed to assess changes in student perceptions of self-care using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) domains and confidence in learning self-care concepts using Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to evaluate pre/post changes, and Mann Whitney U tests were used to evaluate university differences. Results. Fifty-three Cedarville University and 58 Manchester University students completed both instruments (100% and 92% response rates, respectively). Student self-care perceptions with TPB decreased significantly on nine of 13 items for Cedarville and decreased for one of 13 items for Manchester. Student confidence in self-care concepts improved significantly on all questions for both universities. Conclusion. Data indicate TBL self-care courses were effective in improving student confidence about self-care concepts. Establishing students' skill sets prior to entering the profession is beneficial because pharmacists will use self-directed learning to expand their knowledge and adapt to problem-solving situations.

  9. Evaluating Self-Efficacy After a Team-Based Learning Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Camille; West, Holly

    2017-06-01

    Evidence suggests that confidence in learning may improve academic performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) physician assistant (PA) student's self-efficacy for learning end-of-life (EOL) care after a team-based learning (TBL) activity. Confidence in the PA student's critical thinking skills after a TBL activity was also assessed. This research used a pretest-posttest 2-group design. Eighty-seven UTMB didactic-year PA students were randomly assigned to a TBL group (n = 43) or non-TBL group (n = 44). All students completed online modules on EOL care. Self-efficacy of learning was measured in both groups using a modified general self-efficacy survey given before and after the instructional approach. In the TBL group, results indicated a statistically significant increase in the student's confidence level in learning EOL care in the posttest compared with the pretest (p confidence in critical thinking skills. No statistically significant difference in confidence in critical thinking was observed in the non-TBL group (p = .208). The results indicated a statistically significant increase in the student's confidence in learning EOL care and in the student's critical thinking skills in the TBL group. The study findings allow UTMB PA faculty to continue to investigate self-efficacy for learning after a TBL activity in content areas other than EOL care; therefore, the results of this study indicate that further research is warranted.

  10. Multidisciplinary Team Dynamics in the Production of Problem-Based-Learning Cases in Issues Related to Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Sylvia; Turley, Catherine; Smith, Carol; Laird, Johanna; Majewski, Theresa; Maguire, Brian; Orndorff, Jon; Rice, Linda; Vowels, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Despite logistical disadvantages of geographic distance and scheduling, using multidisciplinary allied health teams to develop problem-based cases related to older adults has several advantages: increasing cross-disciplinary awareness, building a cadre with team experience, and expanding knowledge of the problem-based learning method. (SK)

  11. Effects of Role Division, Interaction, and Shared Mental Model on Team Performance in Project-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Il-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cognitive mechanism of project-based learning teams of college students on the basis of the Shared Mental Model (SMM) theory. The study participants were 237 female college students in Korea organized into 51 project teams. To test the study hypotheses, a structural equation modeling was employed.…

  12. Motivating protégés' personal learning in teams: a multilevel investigation of autonomy support and autonomy orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Fu, Ping-Ping

    2011-11-01

    This study examined the roles of 3 multilevel motivational predictors in protégés' personal learning in teams: an autonomy-supportive team climate, mentors' autonomy support, and protégés' autonomy orientation. The authors followed 305 protégés in 58 teams for 12 weeks and found that all 3 predictors were positively related to the protégés' personal learning in teams and that an autonomy-supportive team climate augmented the effects of mentors' autonomy support and protégés' autonomy orientation on protégés' personal learning in teams. Protégés' personal learning in teams mediated the interactive effects of an autonomy-supportive team climate with mentors' autonomy support or protégés' autonomy orientation on protégés' behavioral and attitudinal outcomes, including their organizational citizenship behaviors and job involvement. The findings of this study provide business researchers and practitioners with valuable insights into the management of autonomy. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. A learning curve-based method to implement multifunctional work teams in the Brazilian footwear sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, L B de M; Anzanello, M J; Renner, J S

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a method for implementing multifunctional work teams in a footwear company that followed the Taylor/Ford system for decades. The suggested framework first applies a Learning Curve (LC) modeling to assess whether rotation between tasks of different complexities affects workers' learning rate and performance. Next, the Macroergonomic Work Analysis (MA) method (Guimarães, 1999, 2009) introduces multifunctional principles in work teams towards workers' training and resources improvement. When applied to a pilot line consisting of 100 workers, the intervention-reduced work related accidents in 80%, absenteeism in 45.65%, and eliminated work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), medical consultations, and turnover. Further, the output rate of the multifunctional team increased average 3% compared to the production rate of the regular lines following the Taylor/Ford system (with the same shoe model being manufactured), while the rework and spoilage rates were reduced 85% and 69%, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Should we choose between problem-based learning and team-based learning? No, combine the best of both worlds!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, Diana; Michaelsen, Larry; van Merriënboer, Jeroen; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2015-04-01

    To meet changes in society and health care, medical curricula require continuous improvement. A relatively new development in medical education is team-based learning (TBL). In the previous century, problem-based learning (PBL) emerged as an exciting new method. What are the similarities and differences between PBL and TBL? How do both approaches fit with current design principles? How might PBL and TBL benefit from each other's unique strengths? Analysis of the literature. The overall similarities between PBL and TBL relate to the use of professionally relevant problems and small group learning, both fitting well with current instructional design principles. The main difference is that one teacher in TBL can run twenty or even more study teams, whereas in PBL each small group is run by one teacher. In this paper we advocate for a joining of forces. By combining elements of PBL and TBL, we could create varied instructional approaches that are in keeping with current instructional design principles, thereby combining the best of both worlds to optimize student learning.

  15. Assessment of first-year medical students' perceptions of teaching and learning through team-based learning sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obad, Adam S; Peeran, Ahmed A; Shareef, Mohammad Abrar; Alsheikh, Wissal J; Kalagi, Dana A; AlAmodi, Abdulhadi A; Khan, Tehreem A; Shaikh, Abdul Ahad; Ganguly, Paul; Yaqinuddin, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an emerging teaching and learning strategy being employed in medical schools. The College of Medicine at Alfaisal University has adopted a TBL approach as an instructional method for first-year medical students. The aim of the present study was to describe the TBL method employed at Alfaisal University College of Medicine and to assess first-year medical students' perceptions of this learning modality for the anatomy- and physiology-based blocks/courses in organ systems form of curriculum. A five-point Likert scale questionnaire was structured based on Kirkpatrick's theory and assessed three major domains: reaction, learning, and behavior. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Cronbach's α-coefficient tests were used to assess the validity and reliability of the construct, respectively. CFA showed an adequate validity of the survey and Cronbach's α revealed an acceptable internal uniformity (0.69). A total of 185 respondents rated reaction, learning, and behavior toward introduction of TBL as 3.53 ± 1.01, 3.59 ± 1.12, and 3.57 ± 1.12, respectively. Excellent students rated TBL highly in all major domains compared with borderline students (reaction, behavior, and learning domains with P values of teaching and learning strategy for functional anatomy, and prior involvement in teamwork and academic performance correlates with higher ratings of TBL. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Optimisation of simulated team training through the application of learning theories: a debate for a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Martin; Burmester, Margarita; Allen, Meredith

    2014-04-03

    As a conceptual review, this paper will debate relevant learning theories to inform the development, design and delivery of an effective educational programme for simulated team training relevant to health professionals. Kolb's experiential learning theory is used as the main conceptual framework to define the sequence of activities. Dewey's theory of reflective thought and action, Jarvis modification of Kolb's learning cycle and Schön's reflection-on-action serve as a model to design scenarios for optimal concrete experience and debriefing for challenging participants' beliefs and habits. Bandura's theory of self-efficacy and newer socio-cultural learning models outline that for efficient team training, it is mandatory to introduce the social-cultural context of a team. The ideal simulated team training programme needs a scenario for concrete experience, followed by a debriefing with a critical reflexive observation and abstract conceptualisation phase, and ending with a second scenario for active experimentation. Let them re-experiment to optimise the effect of a simulated training session. Challenge them to the edge: The scenario needs to challenge participants to generate failures and feelings of inadequacy to drive and motivate team members to critical reflect and learn. Not experience itself but the inadequacy and contradictions of habitual experience serve as basis for reflection. Facilitate critical reflection: Facilitators and group members must guide and motivate individual participants through the debriefing session, inciting and empowering learners to challenge their own beliefs and habits. To do this, learners need to feel psychological safe. Let the group talk and critical explore. Motivate with reality and context: Training with multidisciplinary team members, with different levels of expertise, acting in their usual environment (in-situ simulation) on physiological variables is mandatory to introduce cultural context and social conditions to the

  17. On knowledge transfer management as a learning process for ad hoc teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliescu, D.

    2017-08-01

    Knowledge management represents an emerging domain becoming more and more important. Concepts like knowledge codification and personalisation, knowledge life-cycle, social and technological dimensions, knowledge transfer and learning management are integral parts. Focus goes here in the process of knowledge transfer for the case of ad hoc teams. The social dimension of knowledge transfer plays an important role. No single individual actors involved in the process, but a collective one, representing the organisation. It is critically important for knowledge to be managed from the life-cycle point of view. A complex communication network needs to be in place to supports the process of knowledge transfer. Two particular concepts, the bridge tie and transactive memory, would eventually enhance the communication. The paper focuses on an informational communication platform supporting the collaborative work on knowledge transfer. The platform facilitates the creation of a topic language to be used in knowledge modelling, storage and reuse, by the ad hoc teams.

  18. A Comparison between Learning Style Preferences, Gender, Sport and Achievement in Elite Team Sport Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Braakhuis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Athletes have preferences for the way in which they internalize and process information, whether that is visual, aural, by-doing (kinesthetic, reading or a mixture of preferences. Health professionals that interact with athletes rarely consider the individual learning style prior to any communication or education, despite mounting evidence for the benefits of learning-style tailored education. The aim of this study was to characterize athletes with regards to their preferred learning style. Athletes (n = 93 from 24 sports and various sport achievement levels completed a questionnaire, including the visual (V, auditory (A, reading/writing (R, kinesthetic (K/(VARK Questionnaire for Athletes. Questionnaire outcomes were analysed by X2 analysis on SPSS. The main findings were: (1 very few athletes have a visual learning-style preference; (2 there was a significant relationship between gender and VARK preference (X2 = 13.84, p = 0.003; (3 and between athletic status and VARK preference (X2 = 9.2, p = 0.025; (4 there was a trivial association between individual/ team sport athletes and assessed VARK preference (X2 = 3.95, p = 0.265. Our findings show significant variation in learning-style preference between males and females, and those of different athletic status. Health professionals should be aware of the inadequacy of visual information presentation when working with athletes. Furthermore, health professionals working with elite and female athletes should be comfortable using a mixture of learning styles (multi-modal.

  19. Use of Team-Based Learning Pedagogy for Internal Medicine Ambulatory Resident Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balwan, Sandy; Fornari, Alice; DiMarzio, Paola; Verbsky, Jennifer; Pekmezaris, Renee; Stein, Joanna; Chaudhry, Saima

    2015-12-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is used in undergraduate medical education to facilitate higher-order content learning, promote learner engagement and collaboration, and foster positive learner attitudes. There is a paucity of data on the use of TBL in graduate medical education. Our aim was to assess resident engagement, learning, and faculty/resident satisfaction with TBL in internal medicine residency ambulatory education. Survey and nominal group technique methodologies were used to assess learner engagement and faculty/resident satisfaction. We assessed medical learning using individual (IRAT) and group (GRAT) readiness assurance tests. Residents (N = 111) involved in TBL sessions reported contributing to group discussions and actively discussing the subject material with other residents. Faculty echoed similar responses, and residents and faculty reported a preference for future teaching sessions to be offered using the TBL pedagogy. The average GRAT score was significantly higher than the average IRAT score by 22%. Feedback from our nominal group technique rank ordered the following TBL strengths by both residents and faculty: (1) interactive format, (2) content of sessions, and (3) competitive nature of sessions. We successfully implemented TBL pedagogy in the internal medicine ambulatory residency curriculum, with learning focused on the care of patients in the ambulatory setting. TBL resulted in active resident engagement, facilitated group learning, and increased satisfaction by residents and faculty. To our knowledge this is the first study that implemented a TBL program in an internal medicine residency curriculum.

  20. eProblem-Based Learning: Problem-Based Learning Using Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, L. M.

    2009-01-01

    Literature on engineering education stresses the need for graduates to have skills such as working globally in a multicultural environment; working in interdisciplinary teams; sharing of tasks on a global, around the clock basis; working with digital communication tools and in a virtual environment. In addition, accreditation criteria include…

  1. Teaming up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warhuus, Jan; Günzel-Jensen, Franziska; Robinson, Sarah

    or pre-arranged at random. Therefore we investigate the importance of team formation in the entrepreneurial classroom and ask: (i) What are the underlying factors that influence outcomes of teamwork in student groups? (ii) How does team formation influence student perception of learning?, and (iii) Do...... different team formation strategies produce different teamwork and learning outcomes? Approach: We employed a multiple case study design comprising of 38 student teams to uncover potential links between team formation and student perception of learning. This research draws on data from three different....... A rigorous coding and inductive analysis process was undertaken. Pattern and relationship coding were used to reveal underlying factors, which helped to unveil important similarities and differences between student in different teams’ project progress and perception of learning. Results: When students...

  2. Reflecting Team as an Evaluation/learning Instrument for Self-reflection of Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michling Malgorzata D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Reflecting Team (RT is a method derived from systemic therapy in the 1980s by the social psychiatrist Tom Andersen. It is increasingly being used in training and evaluation contexts. The aim of the method is to create a space for the development of diverse perspectives and appropriate ideas and solutions in which the integrity of the students/customers/clients is preserved and the acceptance of proposals is facilitated. To this end, the systems involved (advice seekers, consultants, and observers enter a common process of alternately directed and non-directed communication. The RT is not only suitable to address communication problems in group work and other educational situations, but it can also help to consider the traditional teaching and learning processes in a reflective way. Reflecting teams can also significantly improve the feedback and quality of teaching and learning. The article deals with the use of RT in the context of the collective exchange of teaching staff with their students. It uses a problem as an evaluation form and learning instrument to reflect on their pedagogical approach and, at the same time, their relationship with students during the lessons. This is to present the RT method for collegial exchange (Process Flow: Advice-seeker, teacher, Interviewer, RT and their need for teacher reflection as well as the experience of self-efficacy (empowerment and self-sufficiency.

  3. Applying established guidelines to team-based learning programs in medical schools: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette W; McGregor, Deborah M; Mellis, Craig M

    2014-04-01

    Team-based learning (TBL), a structured form of small-group learning, has gained popularity in medical education in recent years. A growing number of medical schools have adopted TBL in a variety of combinations and permutations across a diversity of settings, learners, and content areas. The authors conducted this systematic review to establish the extent, design, and practice of TBL programs within medical schools to inform curriculum planners and education designers. The authors searched the MEDLINE, PubMed, Web of Knowledge, and ERIC databases for articles on TBL in undergraduate medical education published between 2002 and 2012. They selected and reviewed articles that included original research on TBL programs and assessed the articles according to the seven core TBL design elements (team formation, readiness assurance, immediate feedback, sequencing of in-class problem solving, the four S's [significant problem, same problem, specific choice, and simultaneous reporting], incentive structure, and peer review) described in established guidelines. The authors identified 20 articles that satisfied the inclusion criteria. They found significant variability across the articles in terms of the application of the seven core design elements and the depth with which they were described. The majority of the articles, however, reported that TBL provided a positive learning experience for students. In the future, faculty should adhere to a standardized TBL framework to better understand the impact and relative merits of each feature of their program.

  4. Team-based learning from theory to practice: faculty reactions to the innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Stephanie; Bahramifarid, Nasim; Jalali, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Limited studies have examined the factors associated with the implementation of team-based learning (TBL). The purpose of this study was to identify faculty reactions (successes and challenges) associated with the implementation of a modified TBL in undergraduate anatomy teaching. To obtain faculty reactions to the TBL approach, data collection included focus groups, observations, and document analysis. Using the constant comparative method, our analysis yielded four key themes. Four themes based on faculty reactions to the implementation of TBL included transportability and local adaptations, faculty/tutor role confusion, student preparedness, and teacher-targeted bullying. Future physicians will need educational programs that embrace the theory and practice of teamwork. Schools adopting team-based learning approaches will need to carefully consider their local environments so as to successfully transport innovative practices alongside local adaptations. As front-line implementers faculty will require initial and ongoing professional development. The TBL method is amenable to local modifications and holds promise as a pedagogical strategy to garner increased student engagement and student achievement in their learning.

  5. The Relative Effect of Team-Based Learning on Motivation and Learning: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeno, Lucas M.; Raaheim, Arild; Kristensen, Sara Madeleine; Kristensen, Kjell Daniel; Hole, Torstein Nielsen; Haugland, Mildrid J.; Mæland, Silje

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effects of team-based learning (TBL) on motivation and learning in a quasi-experimental study. The study employs a self-determination theory perspective to investigate the motivational effects of implementing TBL in a physiotherapy course in higher education. We adopted a one-group pretest–posttest design. The results show that the students’ intrinsic motivation, identified regulation, perceived competence, and perceived autonomy support significantly increased going from lectures to TBL. The results further show that students’ engagement and perceived learning significantly increased. Finally, students’ amotivation decreased from pretest to posttest; however, students reported higher external regulation as a function of TBL. Path analysis shows that increases in intrinsic motivation, perceived competence, and external regulation positively predict increases in engagement, which in turn predict increases in perceived learning. We argue that the characteristics of TBL, as opposed to lectures, are likely to engage students and facilitate feelings of competence. TBL is an active-learning approach, as opposed to more passive learning in lectures, which might explain the increase in students’ perception of teachers as autonomy supportive. In contrast, the greater demands TBL puts on students might account for the increase in external regulation. Limitations and practical implications of the results are discussed. PMID:29146665

  6. Are High Achievers Successful in Collaborative Learning? An Explorative Study of College Students' Learning Approaches in Team Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Jung; Kim, Hyekyung; Byun, Hyunjung

    2017-01-01

    This study analyses how high-achieving students approach team project-based learning (TPBL) and aims to identify the implications and challenges of TPBL practice in higher education. After interviewing 32 high-achieving students and surveying 1022 additional students at a South Korean university, we found that four factors were particularly…

  7. Team-based learning instruction for responsible conduct of research positively impacts ethical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Wayne T; Garvan, Cynthia W

    2014-01-01

    Common practices for responsible conduct of research (RCR) instruction have recently been shown to have no positive impact on and possibly to undermine ethical decision-making (EDM). We show that a team-based learning (TBL) RCR curriculum results in some gains in decision ethicality, the use of more helpful metacognitive reasoning strategies in decision-making, and elimination of most negative effects of other forms of RCR instruction on social-behavioral responses. TBL supports the reasoning strategies and social mechanisms that underlie EDM and ethics instruction, and may provide a more effective method for RCR instruction than lectures and small group discussion.

  8. Collective Machine Learning: Team Learning and Classification in Multi-Agent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the collaboration of multiple heterogeneous, intelligent agents (hardware or software) which collaborate to learn a task and are capable of sharing knowledge. The concept of collaborative learning in multi-agent and multi-robot systems is largely under studied, and represents an area where further research is needed to…

  9. The Impacts of Team Learning on the Development of a Learning Organisation: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao-Hua; Su, Kun-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Generalisability of a learning organisation (LO) for cross-cultural applications is doubtful. Some cultural values may be opposed to the nature in a LO which calls for voluntary participation in learning activities by all employees. The study reveals a dynamic analysis of a LO with the sense of the difficulties organisations typically face and how…

  10. The Use of Team-Based Learning as an Approach to Increased Engagement and Learning for Marketing Students: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chad, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Marketing educators are often faced with poor preclass preparation by students, declining student interest in attending classes as the semester progresses, and student complaints regarding previous bad experiences with team assessment activities. Team-based learning (TBL) is an innovative teaching strategy using semiformalized guidelines aimed to…

  11. Effectiveness of Team-Based Learning in teaching Medical Genetics to Medical Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Noor Akmal Shareela

    2016-03-01

    This study explores the experience of both learners and a teacher during a team-based learning (TBL) session. TBL involves active learning that allows medical students to utilise their visual, auditory, writing and kinetic learning styles in order to strengthen their knowledge and retain it for longer, which is important with regard to applying basic sciences in clinical settings. This pilot study explored the effectiveness of TBL in learning medical genetics, and its potential to replace conventional lectures. First-year medical students (n = 194) studying at Universiti Kebangsaan, Malaysia, during 2014/2015 were selected to participate in this study. The topic of 'Mutation and Mutation Analysis' was selected, and the principles of TBL were adhered to during the study. It was found that the students' performance in a group readiness test was better than in individual readiness tests. The effectiveness of TBL was further shown in the examination, during which the marks obtained were tremendously improved. Collective commentaries from both the learners and the teacher recommended TBL as another useful tool in learning medical genetics. Implementation strategies should be advanced for the benefit of future learners and teachers.

  12. Self-regulated learning, team learning and project performance in entrepreneurship education: Learning in a lean startup environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harms, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary entrepreneurship education (EE) is often based around a team-based challenge such as creating a new venture or solving a startup problem. A creative and professional solution to such a challenge requires individual and team efforts. At the level of the individual student, self-regulated

  13. Role-Playing and Problem-Based Learning: The Use of Cross-Functional Student Teams in Business Application Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Jacqueline C.; Spangler, William; Williams, Valerie; Kollar, Robert

    2017-01-01

    To create a learning experience which replicates the process by which consultants, systems developers and business end users collaborate to design and implement a business application, a cross-functional student team project was developed and is described. The overall learning experience was distinguished by specific components and characteristics…

  14. The Effect of Team-Based Learning on Conventional Pathology Education to Improve Students' Mastery of Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bin; Yang, Xuesong

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, traditional pathology education methodologies have been noticeably affected by new teaching approaches, including problem-based learning (PBL) and team-based learning (TBL). However, lack of outcome-based studies has hindered the extensive application of the TBL approach in the teaching of pathology in Chinese medical schools.…

  15. Team-Based Learning in the Gross Anatomy Laboratory Improves Academic Performance and Students' Attitudes toward Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huitt, Tiffany W.; Killins, Anita; Brooks, William S.

    2015-01-01

    As the healthcare climate shifts toward increased interdisciplinary patient care, it is essential that students become accomplished at group problem solving and develop positive attitudes toward teamwork. Team-based learning (TBL) has become a popular approach to medical education because of its ability to promote active learning, problem-solving…

  16. Problem based Learning versus Design Thinking in Team based Project work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denise J. Stokholm, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    the PBL to update the educations to meet today’s competitive global society. In order to create an informed basis for discussing and updating the historic approach to project work at Aalborg University, this paper will try to unfold and compare PBL and DBL and the competences they create through team...... project based learning issues, which has caused a need to describe and compare the two models; in specific the understandings, approaches and organization of learning in project work. The PBL model viewing the process as 3 separate project stages including; problem analysis, problem solving and project...... based project work. The paper will exemplify how projects work is organized, supervised, staged and reported. It will investigate the practical organization of the teamwork and process as well as the dominating mindsets and methods used during the process. Comparing the two models concerning...

  17. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF JOBSHEET-BASED STUDENT TEAMS ACHIEVEMENT DIVISION LEARNING MODEL TO IMPROVE STUDENTS LEARNING OUTCOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadek Dodi Permana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to improve the Information and Communications Technology (ICT learning outcomes of the students in SMA N 2 Singaraja through the learning model of Job sheet-based Student Team Achievement Division (STAD. This is a classroom action research. The data analysis reveals that learning outcomes in cycle I gain a mean score of 80. 51 and a classical provisions of 15%. There are three students who pass with a minimum score of 85 in cycle I. From these categories, the students’ learning outcomes in the first cycle have not met the criterion of 85%. The mean score of cycle II is 88. 57 and the classical provisions is 90%. In the second cycle, there are 18 students who gain a minimum score of 85. Based on the success criterion, a research study is successful if the minimum completeness criterion reaches 85 and the minimum classical completeness criterion reaches 85%. From the categories, the students’ learning outcomes have been successfully improved since the percentage of classical completeness in the second cycle has reached its expected results.

  18. The applicability of a validated team-based learning student assessment instrument to assess United Kingdom pharmacy students’ attitude toward team-based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It aimed at testing the validity and reliability of a validated team-based learning student assessment instrument (TBL-SAI) to assess United Kingdom pharmacy students’ attitude toward TBL. Methods TBL-SAI, consisting of 33 items, was administered to undergraduate pharmacy students from two schools of pharmacy each at University of Wolverhampton and University of Bradford were conducted on the data, along with comparison between the two schools. Results Students’ response rate was 80.0% (138/173) in completion of the instrument. Overall, the instrument demonstrated validity and reliability when used with pharmacy students. Sub-analysis between schools of pharmacy did, however, show that four items from Wolverhampton data, had factor loadings of less than 0.40. No item in the Bradford data had factor loadings less than 0.40. Cronbach’s alpha score was reliable at 0.897 for the total instrument: Wolverhampton, 0.793 and Bradford, 0.902. Students showed preference to TBL, with Bradford’s scores being statistically higher (P<0.005). Conclusion This validated instrument has demonstrated reliability and validity when used with pharmacy students. Furthermore students at both schools preferred TBL compared to traditional teaching. PMID:27568493

  19. Validity of Peer Evaluation for Team-Based Learning in a Dental School in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigawa, Keisuke; Hayama, Rika; Omoto, Katsuhiro; Okura, Kazuo; Tajima, Toyoko; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Hosoki, Maki; Ueda, Mayu; Inoue, Miho; Rodis, Omar Marianito Maningo; Matsuka, Yoshizo

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the validity of peer evaluation for team-based learning (TBL) classes in dental education in comparison with the term-end examination records and TBL class scores. Examination and TBL class records of 256 third- and fourth-year dental students in six fixed prosthodontics courses from 2013 to 2015 in one dental school in Japan were investigated. Results of the term-end examination during those courses, individual readiness assurance test (IRAT), group readiness assurance test (GRAT), group assignment projects (GAP), and peer evaluation of group members in TBL classes were collected. Significant positive correlations were found between all combinations of peer evaluation, IRAT, and term-end examination. Individual scores also showed a positive correlation with group score (total of GRAT and GAP). From the investigation of the correlations in the six courses, significant positive correlations between peer evaluation and individual score were found in four of the six courses. In this study, peer evaluation seemed to be a valid index for learning performance in TBL classes. To verify the effectiveness of peer evaluation, all students have to realize the significance of scoring the team member's performance. Clear criteria and detailed instruction for appropriate evaluation are also required.

  20. Team-based learning in US colleges and schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rondall E; Copeland, Jeffrey; Franks, Andrea S; Karimi, Reza; McCollum, Marianne; Riese, David J; Lin, Anne Y F

    2013-08-12

    To characterize the use of team-based learning (TBL) in US colleges and schools of pharmacy, including factors that may affect implementation and perceptions of faculty members regarding the impact of TBL on educational outcomes. Respondents identified factors that inhibit or enable TBL use and its impact on student learning. Results were stratified by type of institution (public/private), class size, and TBL experience. Sixty-nine of 100 faculty members (69%) representing 43 (86%) institutions responded. Major factors considered to enable TBL implementation included a single campus and student and administration buy-in. Inhibiting factors included distant campuses, faculty resistance, and lack of training. Compared with traditional lectures, TBL is perceived to enhance student engagement, improve students' preparation for class, and promote achievement of course outcomes. In addition, TBL is perceived to be more effective than lectures at fostering learning in all 6 domains of Bloom's Taxonomy. Despite potential implementation challenges, faculty members perceive that TBL improves student engagement and learning.

  1. Learning in style: Investigation of factors impacting student success in chemical engineering at individual and team-levels with a focus on student learning styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskioglu, Elif Eda

    Our three studies examine the factors of learning styles, student self-efficacy, collective (team) efficacy, attitudes, perceptions, and performance at individual and team levels. Each study addresses a different environment: (i) Individual Level-we are interested in how variability in learning styles engaged by specific exam problems may correlate with student learning styles, self-efficacy, and performance in our introductory chemical engineering course, Process Fundamentals (i.e., mass and energy or material balances); (ii) Team Level-we are interested in understanding how team composition with respect to learning styles (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous teams) may influence these factors in the upper level Unit Operations course; (iii) Combinatorial Level-we are interested in understanding how collective efficacy may influence individual self-efficacy and again if there are any correlations with learning styles and performance in the senior level Process Design and Development course. Some of the most interesting results of these studies have stemmed from the study on individual students, which has shown correlations between learning style preferences and performance in specific instances. Even more interesting, evaluating and characterizing the learning styles that exam problems engage has shown strong variations in problem types by instructor. This presents new questions regarding how these variations may affect student understanding and subsequent performance. Also included are details regarding a course developed in Technical and Professional Communication (for Chemical Engineers) that was offered Spring 2014 and Spring 2015.

  2. Evaluation of Team-Based Learning and Traditional Instruction in Teaching Removable Partial Denture Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeto, Luisa F; Sposetti, Venita; Childs, Gail; Aguilar, Maria L; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Rueda, Luis; Nimmo, Arthur

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of team-based learning (TBL) methodology on dental students' retention of knowledge regarding removable partial denture (RPD) treatment. The process of learning RPD treatment requires that students first acquire foundational knowledge and then use critical thinking skills to apply that knowledge to a variety of clinical situations. The traditional approach to teaching, characterized by a reliance on lectures, is not the most effective method for learning clinical applications. To address the limitations of that approach, the teaching methodology of the RPD preclinical course at the University of Florida was changed to TBL, which has been shown to motivate student learning and improve clinical performance. A written examination was constructed to compare the impact of TBL with that of traditional teaching regarding students' retention of knowledge and their ability to evaluate, diagnose, and treatment plan a partially edentulous patient with an RPD prosthesis. Students taught using traditional and TBL methods took the same examination. The response rate (those who completed the examination) for the class of 2013 (traditional method) was 94% (79 students of 84); for the class of 2014 (TBL method), it was 95% (78 students of 82). The results showed that students who learned RPD with TBL scored higher on the examination than those who learned RPD with traditional methods. Compared to the students taught with the traditional method, the TBL students' proportion of passing grades was statistically significantly higher (p=0.002), and 23.7% more TBL students passed the examination. The mean score for the TBL class (0.758) compared to the conventional class (0.700) was statistically significant with a large effect size, also demonstrating the practical significance of the findings. The results of the study suggest that TBL methodology is a promising approach to teaching RPD with successful outcomes.

  3. Team-based learning (TBL) in the medical curriculum: better than PBL?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; Bleasel, Jane; Haq, Inam; Roberts, Chris; Garsia, Roger; Robertson, Tomas; Mellis, Craig

    2017-12-08

    Internationally, medical schools have long used a variety of approaches to develop hybrid Problem based learning (PBL) curricula. However, Team-based learning (TBL), has gained recent popularity in medical education. TBL maintains the advantages of small group teaching and learning, but in contrast to Problem-based learning (PBL), does not require large numbers of tutors. In 2016, TBL was introduced to Year 1 of the Sydney Medical Program (SMP).This study sought to compare students' perceptions of using TBL in place of PBL. Year 1 students (n = 169) completed three PBL and three TBL sessions during one of the following teaching blocks: Musculoskeletal (n = 56), Respiratory (n = 59) or Cardiovascular (n = 54). Student feedback following completion of each block of teaching was collected by questionnaire, using closed and open ended items. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. In total, 144/169 (85%) of participants completed a questionnaire regarding PBL, and 152/169 (90%) completed a similar questionnaire regarding TBL. The students found positive aspects of their TBL experience to include the smaller group size, the use of readiness assurance tests, immediate feedback from senior clinicians, and time efficiency. In PBL, students reported that variable expertise of tutors; limited direction; and large group size hindered their learning. Overwhelmingly, students preferred TBL over PBL, as the optimal teaching strategy. Students found the structure and format of the TBL sessions more conducive to learning, engagement and participation than PBL sessions. Although the use of TBL required an instructional approach, needing direction from the tutor, it remained student-centred, generating a range of positive outcomes. Study results provide confidence to change from PBL to TBL within Year 1 and Year 2 of the SMP in 2017.

  4. [Practical chemistry education provided by team-based learning (TBL) and peer evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Tomohisa; Konishi, Motomi; Nishida, Takahiro; Kushihata, Taro; Sone, Tomomichi; Kurio, Wasako; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nishikawa, Tomoe; Yanada, Kazuo; Nakamura, Mitsutaka

    2014-01-01

    Learning chemistry is cumulative: basic knowledge and chemical calculation skills are required to gain understanding of higher content. However, we often suffer from students' lack of learning skills to acquire these concepts. One of the reasons is the lack of adequate training in the knowledge and skills of chemistry, and one of the reasons for this lack is the lack of adequate evaluation of training procedures and content. Team-based learning (TBL) is a strong method for providing training in the knowledge and skills of chemistry and reaffirms the knowledge and skills of students of various levels. In our faculty, TBL exercises are provided for first-year students concurrently with lectures in physical chemistry and analytical chemistry. In this study, we researched the adoption of a peer evaluation process for this participatory learning model. Questionnaires taken after TBL exercises in the previous year showed a positive response to TBL. Further, a questionnaire taken after TBL exercises in the spring semester of the current year also yielded a positive response not only to TBL but also to peer evaluation. In addition, a significant correlation was observed between the improvement of students' grades in chemistry classes and the feeling the percentage (20%) of peer evaluation in overall evaluation low (logistic regression analysis, p=0.022). On the basis of the findings, we argue that TBL provides a generic, practical learning environment including an effective focus on learning strategy and evaluation of knowledge, skills, and attitudes, and studies on the educational effects of TBL and peer evaluation.

  5. Assessing Team Climate by Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches: Building the Learning Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Pamela; Loo, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This study used the team climate inventory (TCI) to create awareness of the multidimensional nature of team climate, to diagnose the climate of teams, and to present specific actions to improve team climate. Management undergraduates from 81, four-person teams completed the TCI and an open-ended question at week 3 and week 12 of their team…

  6. Why turnover matters in self-managing work teams : Learning, social integration, and task flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, G.S.; Bunderson, S.; Kuipers, B.

    This study considers how turnover in self-managing work teams influences the team interaction processes that promote effective task accomplishment. Drawing from research on self-managing work teams and group process, the authors propose that team turnover affects performance in self-managing teams

  7. Teaching clinical pharmacology using team-based learning: a comparison between third- and fourth-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Akl, Imad; Ghaddar, Fatima; Sabra, Ramzi; Parmelee, Dean; Simaan, Joseph A; Kanafani, Zeina A; Zgheib, Nathalie K

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to formulate evidence-based recommendations on whether to deliver the team-based learning (TBL)-designed clinical pharmacology course at the American University of Beirut Faculty of Medicine (AUBFM) during the third year instead of the fourth and final year of the medical curriculum. Between June 2010 and May 2011, AUBFM offered the course to both classes simultaneously to compare their performance. The findings of this endeavor supported the introduction of the course during the third year, first because fourth-year students did not outperform third-year students despite having the advantage of an additional year of clinical experience, and second, third-year teams seemed more likely to develop into better functioning teams. The findings also suggested that simultaneous delivery of TBL sessions to both third- and fourth-year teams was less favorably recommended because of the varying learning pace of both student groups.

  8. Effectiveness of team-based learning in microbiology: a non-randomized control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harakuni, Sheetal U; Nagamoti, Jyoti M; Mallapur, Maheshwar D

    2015-01-01

    As per the present curriculum in India, pre- and paraclinical subjects are taught away from the clinical setting. Therefore, students fail to connect the subject taught through didactic lectures to the clinical setting. Team-based learning (TBL) can be used in conjunction with lectures to teach applied microbiology. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of TBL sessions in conjunction with lectures to enhance learning of applied microbiology, among Indian students. All students enrolled in the study were taught systemic bacteriology through lectures. Of the 88 students, 49 students (study group) attended TBL sessions on the topics of diarrhea, fever of unknown origin, urinary tract infection and 39 students (control group) preferred self-study on the topics without attending the TBL sessions. Students' feedback on their perception on TBL sessions was collected using a questionnaire of 10 items. The performance of both the groups on the pre- and post-test were analyzed using unpaired t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Gender-wise performance within the teams was analyzed by paired t-test using SPSS version 12. The TBL group outperformed the self-study group on the post-test [F 1 = 5.521, P = 0.021]. Female students as a whole performed better than males on the pre-test, scoring higher within both the TBL and self-study groups. Male students in the TBL group performed significantly better on the post-test than female students who participated in TBL sessions (P = 0.013). Students generally enjoyed and appreciated the TBL sessions. TBL sessions can be used judiciously in combination with the lectures to enhance learning of applied microbiology in India. In this study, TBL improved the performance of male students over self-study, but performance for female students following TBL was no better than when they simply studied by themselves.

  9. Is a Team-based Learning Approach to Anatomy Teaching Superior to Didactic Lecturing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Naghme; Karbalay-Doust, Saied; Noorafshan, Ali

    2014-02-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is used in the medical field to implement interactive learning in small groups. The learning of anatomy and its subsequent application requires the students to recall a great deal of factual content. The aims of this study were to evaluate the students' satisfaction, engagement and knowledge gain in anatomy through the medium of TBL in comparison to the traditional lecture method. This study, carried out from February to June 2012, included 30 physical therapy students of the Shiraz University of Medical Science, School of Rehabilitation Sciences. Classic TBL techniques were modified to cover lower limb anatomy topics in the first year of the physical therapy curriculum. Anatomy lectures were replaced with TBL, which required the preparation of assigned content, specific discussion topics, an individual self-assessment test (IRAT) and the analysis of discussion topics. The teams then subsequently retook the assessment test as a group (GRAT). The first eight weeks of the curriculum were taught using traditional didactic lecturing, while during the second eight weeks the modified TBL method was used. The students evaluated these sessions through a questionnaire. The impact of TBL on student engagement and educational achievement was determined using numerical data, including the IRAT, GRAT and final examination scores. Students had a higher satisfaction rate with the TBL teaching according to the Likert scale. Additionally, higher scores were obtained in the TBL-based final examination in comparison to the lecture-based midterm exam. The students' responses showed that the TBL technique could be used alone or in conjunction with traditional didactic lecturing in order to teach anatomy more effectively.

  10. The Relative Effect of Team-Based Learning on Motivation and Learning: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeno, Lucas M; Raaheim, Arild; Kristensen, Sara Madeleine; Kristensen, Kjell Daniel; Hole, Torstein Nielsen; Haugland, Mildrid J; Mæland, Silje

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effects of team-based learning (TBL) on motivation and learning in a quasi-experimental study. The study employs a self-determination theory perspective to investigate the motivational effects of implementing TBL in a physiotherapy course in higher education. We adopted a one-group pretest-posttest design. The results show that the students' intrinsic motivation, identified regulation, perceived competence, and perceived autonomy support significantly increased going from lectures to TBL. The results further show that students' engagement and perceived learning significantly increased. Finally, students' amotivation decreased from pretest to posttest; however, students reported higher external regulation as a function of TBL. Path analysis shows that increases in intrinsic motivation, perceived competence, and external regulation positively predict increases in engagement, which in turn predict increases in perceived learning. We argue that the characteristics of TBL, as opposed to lectures, are likely to engage students and facilitate feelings of competence. TBL is an active-learning approach, as opposed to more passive learning in lectures, which might explain the increase in students' perception of teachers as autonomy supportive. In contrast, the greater demands TBL puts on students might account for the increase in external regulation. Limitations and practical implications of the results are discussed. © 2017 L. M. Jeno et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Creating learning environments for compassionate care: a programme to promote compassionate care by health and social care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Jackie; Fuller, Alison

    2015-03-01

    The consistent delivery of compassionate health and social care to older people is a matter of global concern to the nursing profession and the public it serves. The development and evaluation of effective interventions to address this concern is of prime importance. This paper draws on findings from previous research to propose the use of a novel implementation programme designed to improve and support the delivery of compassionate care by health and social care teams. Creating Learning Environments for Compassionate Care (CLECC) is a 4-month implementation programme designed for hospital ward nursing teams caring for older people, but relevant to other teams working with other client groups. The programme focuses on using workplace learning to promote change at unit/ward/team level by enabling the development of leadership and team relational practices which are also designed to enhance the capacity of individual team members to relate to older people. Existing research evidence suggests that optimising relational capacity in this way will support the delivery of compassionate care. This evidence-based intervention is designed to develop and sustain the relational work required by managers and team members to support care delivery and has the potential to address widely documented variations in care quality. Attention should now be paid to establishing the feasibility of the intervention in practice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Team based learning in nursing and midwifery higher education; a systematic review of the evidence for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearnley, Chris; Rhodes, Christine; Roberts, Peter; Williams, Pam; Prenton, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the evidence in relation to the experiences and outcomes of students on nursing and/or midwifery higher education programmes, who experience team based learning. To examine the relationship between team based learning and attainment for nursing and midwifery students in professional higher education. To examine the relationship between team based learning and student satisfaction for nurses and midwifery students in higher education. To identify and report examples of good practice in the implementation of team based learning in Nursing and Midwifery higher education. A systematic Review of the literature was undertaken. The population were nurses and midwives studying on higher education pre and post registration professional programmes. The intervention was learning and teaching activities based on a team-based learning approach. Data sources included CINAHL and MEDLINE. ERIC and Index to Theses were also searched. International research papers published in English between 2011 and 2017 that met the inclusion criteria were included in the study. Papers that met the criteria were subjected to quality appraisal and agreement amongst authors for inclusion in the review. A total of sixteen papers were reviewed and four themes emerged for discussion. These were Student Engagement, Student Satisfaction, Attainment and Practice Development and Transformational Teaching and Learning. There is a tentative, though growing body of evidence to support TBL as a strategy that can impact on student engagement, student satisfaction, attainment, practice development and transformative teaching and learning. The literature indicates that implementing TBL within the curriculum is not without challenge and requires a sustained and structured approach. Staff and students need to understand the processes involved, and why they should be adhered to, in the pursuit of enhanced student experiences and outcomes for nurses and midwives in Higher Education

  13. Team-based learning: a novel approach to medical student education in family planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Sheila K; Kiley, Jessica; Gawron, Lori; Garcia, Patricia; Hammond, Cassing

    2013-08-01

    Medical schools are increasingly using team-based learning (TBL). We compared medical student satisfaction and understanding of key concepts in family planning following TBL and traditional lectures. During the OB/GYN clinical rotation orientation, third year medical students completed a pretest in family planning. Students in the odd-numbered clerkships participated in TBL, and students in the even-numbered clerkships participated in lectures. Both groups of students completed a posttest and satisfaction survey. A total of 130 students participated in this study. Sixty-nine students were in the TBL group, and 61 students were in the lecture group. The TBL group reported higher scores when asked if the learning style was a valuable experience (p=.045), helped them learn the course material (p=.01) and improved problem-solving skills (p=.04). Both groups gained significant amount of knowledge (plearning strategy for family planning, TBL resulted in high student satisfaction. This is the first study to evaluate this innovative teaching style for medical student education in family planning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Integration of team-based learning strategies into a cardiovascular module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Susan E; Johnson, Jeremy L; Ripley, Toni L

    2010-03-10

    To integrate components of team-based learning (TBL) into a cardiovascular module to increase students' responsibility for their own learning and actively engage students across 2 campuses in patient cases. An existing cardiovascular course module was modified by replacing 8 hours of lectures with self-directed learning (SDL) assignments and transforming case discussion sessions using TBL methodologies. Case discussions were delivered using TBL methods to increase engagement of all students across both campuses while maintaining a low faculty-to-student ratio in the classrooms. Readiness assurance quizzes were performed with each SDL assignment and TBL case session. Student and faculty satisfaction improved with the addition of SDL assignments and TBL cases without adverse effects on grades in the wake of the 14% decrease in lecture time. Total faculty time required increased primarily in the first year because of development of course materials. A modified TBL format was successfully integrated into a lecture-based cardiovascular module, resulting in improved student and faculty satisfaction with the course and no adverse effect on student performance.

  15. How do primary health care teams learn to integrate intimate partner violence (IPV) management? A realist evaluation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicolea, Isabel; Vives-Cases, Carmen; San Sebastian, Miguel; Marchal, Bruno; Kegels, Guy; Hurtig, Anna-Karin

    2013-03-23

    Despite the existence of ample literature dealing, on the one hand, with the integration of innovations within health systems and team learning, and, on the other hand, with different aspects of the detection and management of intimate partner violence (IPV) within healthcare facilities, research that explores how health innovations that go beyond biomedical issues-such as IPV management-get integrated into health systems, and that focuses on healthcare teams' learning processes is, to the best of our knowledge, very scarce if not absent. This realist evaluation protocol aims to ascertain: why, how, and under what circumstances primary healthcare teams engage (if at all) in a learning process to integrate IPV management in their practices; and why, how, and under what circumstances team learning processes lead to the development of organizational culture and values regarding IPV management, and the delivery of IPV management services. This study will be conducted in Spain using a multiple-case study design. Data will be collected from selected cases (primary healthcare teams) through different methods: individual and group interviews, routinely collected statistical data, documentary review, and observation. Cases will be purposively selected in order to enable testing the initial middle-range theory (MRT). After in-depth exploration of a limited number of cases, additional cases will be chosen for their ability to contribute to refining the emerging MRT to explain how primary healthcare learn to integrate intimate partner violence management. Evaluations of health sector responses to IPV are scarce, and even fewer focus on why, how, and when the healthcare services integrate IPV management. There is a consensus that healthcare professionals and healthcare teams play a key role in this integration, and that training is important in order to realize changes. However, little is known about team learning of IPV management, both in terms of how to trigger such learning

  16. Problem-based learning: facilitating multiple small teams in a large group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyams, Jennifer H; Raidal, Sharanne L

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is often described as resource demanding due to the high staff-to-student ratio required in a traditional PBL tutorial class where there is commonly one facilitator to every 5-16 students. The veterinary science program at Charles Sturt University, Australia, has developed a method of group facilitation which readily allows one or two staff members to facilitate up to 30 students at any one time while maintaining the benefits of a small PBL team of six students. Multi-team facilitation affords obvious financial and logistic advantages, but there are also important pedagogical benefits derived from uniform facilitation across multiple groups, enhanced discussion and debate between groups, and the development of self-facilitation skills in students. There are few disadvantages to the roaming facilitator model, provided that several requirements are addressed. These requirements include a suitable venue, large whiteboards, a structured approach to support student engagement with each disclosure, a detailed facilitator guide, and an open, collaborative, and communicative environment.

  17. Modified Team-Based Learning in an Ophthalmology Clerkship in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zheqian; Li, Miaoling; Zhou, Yuxian; Ao, Yong; Xin, Wei; Jia, Yu; Yang, Ying; Cai, Yu; Xu, Chaochao; Yang, Yangfan; Lin, Haotian

    2016-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an increasingly popular teaching method in medical education. However, TBL hasn't been well-studied in the ophthalmology clerkship context. This study was to examine the impact of modified TBL in such context and to assess the student evaluations of TBL. Ninety-nine students of an 8-year clinical medicine program from Zhongshan Ophthalmic Centre, Sun Yat-sen University, were randomly divided into four sequential units and assigned to six teams with the same faculty. The one-week ophthalmology clerkship module included traditional lectures, gross anatomy and a TBL module. The effects of the TBL module on student performance were measured by the Individual Readiness Assurance Test (IRAT), the Group Readiness Assurance Test (GRAT), the Group Application Problem (GAP) and final examination scores (FESs). Students' evaluations of TBL were measured by a 16-item questionnaire. IRAT and GRAT scores were compared using a paired t-test. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and subgroup analysis compared the effects among quartiles that were stratified by the Basic Ophthalmology Levels (BOLs). The BOLs were evaluated before the ophthalmology clerkship. In TBL classes, the GRAT scores were significantly higher than the IRAT scores in both the full example and the BOL-stratified groups. It highlighted the advantages of TBL compared to the individual learning. Quartile-stratified ANOVA comparisons showed significant differences at FES scores (P groups. The FES scores of the first three groups are significantly higher than the fourth group. Gender-specific differences were significant in FES but not the IRAT. Overall, 57.65% of student respondents agreed that TBL was helpful. Male students tended to rate TBL higher than female students. The application of modified TBL to the ophthalmology clerkship curriculum improved students' performance and increased students' engagement and satisfaction. TBL should be further optimized and developed to enhance the

  18. The use of team-based, guided inquiry learning to overcome educational disadvantages in learning human physiology: a structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathner, Joseph A; Byrne, Graeme

    2014-09-01

    The study of human bioscience is viewed as a crucial curriculum in allied health. Nevertheless, bioscience (and particularly physiology) is notoriously difficult for undergraduates, particularly academically disadvantaged students. So endemic are the high failure rates (particularly in nursing) that it has come to be known as "the human bioscience problem." In the present report, we describe the outcomes for individual success in studying first-year human physiology in a subject that emphasises team-based active learning as the major pedagogy for mastering subject learning outcomes. Structural equation modeling was used to develop a model of the impact team learning had on individual performance. Modeling was consistent with the idea that students with similar academic abilities (as determined by tertiary entrance rank) were advantaged (scored higher on individual assessment items) by working in strong teams (teams that scored higher in team-based assessments). Analysis of covariance revealed that students who studied the subject with active learning as the major mode of learning activities outperformed students who studied the subject using the traditional didactic teaching format (lectures and tutorials, P = 0.000). After adjustment for tertiary entrance rank (via analysis of covariance) on two individual tests (the final exam and a late-semester in-class test), individual student grades improved by 8% (95% confidence interval: 6-10%) and 12% (95% confidence interval: 10-14%) when students engaged in team-based active learning. These data quantitatively support the notion that weaker students working in strong teams can overcome their educational disadvantages. Copyright © 2014 The American Physiological Society.

  19. Optimisation of simulated team training through the application of learning theories: a debate for a conceptual framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background As a conceptual review, this paper will debate relevant learning theories to inform the development, design and delivery of an effective educational programme for simulated team training relevant to health professionals. Discussion Kolb’s experiential learning theory is used as the main conceptual framework to define the sequence of activities. Dewey’s theory of reflective thought and action, Jarvis modification of Kolb’s learning cycle and Schön’s reflection-on-action serve as a model to design scenarios for optimal concrete experience and debriefing for challenging participants’ beliefs and habits. Bandura’s theory of self-efficacy and newer socio-cultural learning models outline that for efficient team training, it is mandatory to introduce the social-cultural context of a team. Summary The ideal simulated team training programme needs a scenario for concrete experience, followed by a debriefing with a critical reflexive observation and abstract conceptualisation phase, and ending with a second scenario for active experimentation. Let them re-experiment to optimise the effect of a simulated training session. Challenge them to the edge: The scenario needs to challenge participants to generate failures and feelings of inadequacy to drive and motivate team members to critical reflect and learn. Not experience itself but the inadequacy and contradictions of habitual experience serve as basis for reflection. Facilitate critical reflection: Facilitators and group members must guide and motivate individual participants through the debriefing session, inciting and empowering learners to challenge their own beliefs and habits. To do this, learners need to feel psychological safe. Let the group talk and critical explore. Motivate with reality and context: Training with multidisciplinary team members, with different levels of expertise, acting in their usual environment (in-situ simulation) on physiological variables is mandatory to introduce

  20. [Effectiveness of Team-Based Learning (TBL) as a new teaching approach for pharmaceutical care education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suno, Manabu; Yoshida, Toshiko; Koyama, Toshihiro; Zamami, Yoshito; Miyoshi, Tomoko; Mizushima, Takaaki; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2013-01-01

    The concept of Team-Based Learning (TBL) was developed in the late 1970s by Larry Michaelsen, who wanted students to enjoy the benefits of small group learning within large classes in the business school environment. In contrast to problem-based learning (PBL), which is student centered, TBL is typically instructor centered. Recently, TBL is being used as a teaching method in over 60 health science professional schools in the US and other countries. In the present study, the impact of adopting TBL in teaching pharmaceutical care practices to students was evaluated. Students were required to answer a set of multiple-choice questions individually in individual readiness assessment test (IRAT) before the TBL sessions to assess their level of preparation. The same set of questions was then reattempted by the group readiness assessment test (GRAT) during TBL. Comparing the scores obtained in the GRAT and IRAT before the first TBL session, the scores from the GRAT were always higher than those of the IRAT, indicating that TBL has encouraged active learning. In addition, students were surveyed about their level of satisfaction with TBL and written comments about TBL were solicited. The results of the questionnaire showed that 87.3±9.3% of the students were satisfied. Moreover, no student commented that TBL was in any way inferior to the PBL. Implementation of a TBL approach was successfully integrated into the pharmaceutical care education course. In order to further improve the usefulness of TBL in teaching pharmaceutical care, a hybrid teaching approach that also comprises PBL and a lecture-based course is desirable.

  1. Assessment of Chinese Students’ Progression and Perceptions in Blended Team-Based Learning Approach at an International College in China

    OpenAIRE

    Malekigorji, Maryam; Corbett, Dan; Rooney, David; Hanna, Lezley-Anne; Hall, Maurice

    2018-01-01

    Blended team-based learning (TBL) as a major component of an undergraduate course was implemented at a UK joint college in China. The core components of TBL were introduced in the course for Chinese students and their academic performance and course evaluation data with blended TBL approach was compared with solely flipped classroom and traditional lecture-based courses. Students’ perceptions regarding traditional learning and TBL were investigated and compared through the use of an online pe...

  2. Learning from Katrina: environmental health observations from the SWCPHP response team in Houston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elledge, Brenda L; Boatright, Daniel T; Woodson, Paul; Clinkenbeard, Rodney E; Brand, Michael W

    2007-09-01

    Hurricane Katrina provided an opportunity to observe the public health and medical care response system in practice and provided vital lessons about identifying and learning critical response measures as well as about ineffective investments of time and effort. The Southwest Center for Public Health Preparedness (SWCPHP) response team, while working among evacuees housed at Reliant Park in Houston, Texas, made a number of observations related to environmental public health. This summary reports firsthand observations which are, to a great extent, supported by the Federal Response to Hurricane Katrina: Lessons Learned report, and it provides a contextual backdrop for improvement in the areas of volunteer and citizen preparedness training and education. Katrina provided an opportunity to see public health in a highly stressed practice setting and to identify and reinforce the fundamental tenets of public health with which all individuals responding to an event should be familiar. Knowledge gained from Katrina should be integrated into future efforts related to disaster response planning; specifically, it is imperative that volunteers receive standardized training in the areas of incident command systems (ICS), basic hygiene, transmission of disease, and food and water safety principles.

  3. The effect of team-based learning in medical ethics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun-Kyung; Rhee, Jung-Ae; Baik, Young-Hong; A, Oh-Sun

    2009-11-01

    Although now an important aspect of medical education, teaching medical ethics presents challenges, including a perceived lack of value or relevance by students and a dearth of effective teaching methods for faculty. Team-based learning (TBL) was introduced into our medical ethics course to respond to these needs. We evaluated the impact of TBL on student engagement and satisfaction and assessed educational achievements. The medical ethics education using TBL consisted of four 2 h sessions for first-year medical students of Chonnam National University Medical School. The impact of TBL on student engagement and the educational achievements was based on numerical data, including scores from IRAT, GRAT, application exercise and final examination, and the students' perception of medical ethics education using TBL. Most students perceived TBL activities to be more engaging, effective and enjoyable than conventional didactics. The GRAT scores were significantly higher than the IRAT scores, demonstrating the effect of cooperative learning. In addition, TBL improved student performance, especially that of academically weaker students. The application of TBL to medical ethics education improved student performance and increased student engagement and satisfaction. The TBL method should be considered for broader application in medical education.

  4. Effects of team-based learning on fixed prosthodontic education in a Japanese School of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hisahiro; Omoto, Katsuhiro; Okura, Kazuo; Tajima, Toyoko; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Hosoki, Maki; Koori, Motoharu; Shigemoto, Shuji; Ueda, Mayu; Nishigawa, Keisuke; Rodis, Omar Marianito Maningo; Matsuka, Yoshizo

    2015-04-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the quality of team-based learning (TBL) in prosthodontics education for fourth-year dental students at Tokushima University School of Dentistry and to compare this teaching method with traditional lecture-based delivery. Participants in the study were 36 students (22 males and 14 females) who attended the TBL-style fixed prosthodontics course. Ten 60-minute classes were held. The first three were traditional lecture-style classes and were followed by one class introducing the TBL style. The remaining six classes constituted the TBL-format fixed prosthodontics course. The effectiveness of TBL was evaluated through student questionnaires at the end of each class and the results of the term-end examination. The questionnaire revealed high student approval for TBL-style learning, and active group discussion among students during TBL was a key factor in these ratings. In the results of the term-end examination, there were significantly higher scores on the questions that covered TBL-taught material than those covering traditional lecture-taught topics. The results of this study suggest that TBL-style lecture was more effective than traditional-style lecture for teaching fixed prosthodontics and that TBL was a more efficient mode of delivering dental education than traditional lecture-based teaching.

  5. Teaching neurology to medical students with a simplified version of team-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brich, Jochen; Jost, Meike; Brüstle, Peter; Giesler, Marianne; Rijntjes, Michel

    2017-08-08

    To compare the effect of a simplified version of team-based learning (sTBL), an active learning/small group instructional strategy, with that of the traditionally used small group interactive seminars on the acquisition of knowledge and clinical reasoning (CR) skills. Third- and fourth-year medical students (n = 122) were randomly distributed into 2 groups. A crossover design was used in which 2 neurologic topics were taught by sTBL and 2 by small group interactive seminars. Knowledge was assessed with a multiple-choice question examination (MCQE), CR skills with a key feature problem examination (KFPE). Questionnaires were used for further methodologic evaluation. No group differences were found in the MCQE results. sTBL instruction of the topic "acute altered mental status" was associated with a significantly better student performance in the KFPE ( p = 0.008), with no differences in the other 3 topics covered. Although both teaching methods were highly rated by the students, a clear majority voted for sTBL as their preferred future teaching method. sTBL served as an equivalent alternative to small group interactive seminars for imparting knowledge and teaching CR skills, and was particularly advantageous for teaching CR in the setting of a complex neurologic topic. Furthermore, students reported a strong preference for the sTBL approach, making it a promising tool for effectively teaching neurology. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Team-Based Learning: Successful Experience in a Public Health Graduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Bezerra da Silva Junior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: In the review of curriculum matrices, the elaboration of learning strategies that combine theory and practice is extremely important, allowing the building of new concepts and learning methods by the students. Team-based learning (TBL is growing in academic centers and refers to the pedagogic strategy grounded in constructivism. The aim of this research was to describe the application of TBL in a Public Health graduate program. Methods: TBL was applied in a class with 22 students in the discipline “Quantitative Research in Health” of the Public Health graduate program (Master degree at the University of Fortaleza, Brazil, in 2016. The discipline was structured in 8 lessons, approaching the thematic of quantitative research. Before each class the students were required to study the contents at home, a test was done for each subject in the beginning of each class (individually and then in teams of 5 or 6 students and then a brief review was performed by the professor, where the students could ask questions and solve any doubt. At the end of the semester an evaluation questionnaire was applied with objective questions and a qualitative survey. Results: The application of TBL was done in a class with 22 students of the Public health Master Program, aged 22 to 36 years, and 83.3% were female. The method was well received by the students. All the evaluations and discussions went on without any problem. There were some complaints about the requirement to study at home prior to the classes. Students’ evaluation of the discipline and the TBL method was satisfactory with answers’ average score of 4.7 (scale 0-5. The lowestscore was achieved by the question number 11 (4.3 about the students motivation for their study at home. The comparison with the evaluation of the previous semester (where a traditional method was applied evidenced higher scores for the TBL method. Conclusions: The application of TBL was satisfactory and the

  7. Cooperative Learning and Dyadic Interactions: Two Modes of Knowledge Construction in Socio-Constructivist Settings for Team-Sport Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnis, Florence; Lafont, Lucile

    2015-01-01

    Background: Within a socio-constructivist perspective, this study is situated at the crossroads of three theoretical approaches. First, it is based upon team sport and the tactical act model in games teaching. Second, it took place in dyadic or small group learning conditions with verbal interaction. Furthermore, these interventions were based on…

  8. Modified Use of Team-Based Learning in an Ophthalmology Course for Fifth-Year Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Levent; Altintas, Ozgul; Caglar, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an interactive and analytic teaching strategy. TBL is a learner-centered strategy that uses a very structured individual and group accountability process and requires small groups to work together to solve problems. This study served to investigate whether the TBL concept could be modified and adopted to the fifth-year…

  9. Issues and Strategies for Establishing Work-Integrated Learning for Multidisciplinary Teams: A Focus on Degrees in Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robyn Fay

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify challenges and potential strategies to streamline work-integrated learning placements for multidisciplinary teams of students undertaking degrees in sustainability. Face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire were conducted with 15 academics and senior university staff, from four universities…

  10. Teaching Note--An Exploration of Team-Based Learning and Social Work Education: A Natural Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michael A.; Robinson, Michelle Bachelor; McCaskill, Gina M.

    2013-01-01

    The literature on team-based learning (TBL) as a pedagogical methodology in social work education is limited; however, TBL, which was developed as a model for business, has been successfully used as a teaching methodology in nursing, business, engineering, medical school, and many other disciplines in academia. This project examines the use of TBL…

  11. An e-Learning Team's Life on and Offline: A Collaborative Self-Ethnography in Postgraduate Education Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Alison

    2017-01-01

    This paper primarily discusses the methodology of a case study into interactions and working practices of an elearning team, on and offline. Although several ethnographies have been published on online learning, there are apparently none involving communities developing courses. This is a unique insight, bringing a new view of course and staff…

  12. Transitioning from Faculty-Led Lecture to Student-Centered Field Learning Facilitated by Near-Peer Mentors: Preliminary Findings from the GeoFORCE/ STEMFORCE Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M.; Wright, V. D.; Ellins, K. K.; Browder, M. G. J.; Castillo, R.; Kotowski, A. J.; Libarkin, J. C.; Lu, J.; Maredia, N.; Butler, N.

    2017-12-01

    GeoFORCE Texas, a geology-based outreach program in the Jackson School of Geosciences, offers weeklong summer geology field based courses to secondary students from minority-serving high schools in Texas and the Bahamas. Students transitioning from eighth to ninth grade are recruited into the program and ideally remain in GeoFORCE for four years. The program aims to empower underrepresented students by exposing them to experiences intended to inspire them to pursue geoscience or other STEM careers. Since the program's inception in 2005, GeoFORCE Texas has relied on a mix of classroom lectures delivered by a geoscience faculty member and time in the field. Early research findings from a National Science Foundation-sponsored GeoPaths-IMPACT project are influencing the evolution of field instruction away from the faculty-led lecture model to student-centered learning that may improve students' grasp of key geological concepts. The eleventh and twelfth grade programs are shifting towards this strategy. Each trip is facilitated by a seven-person team comprised of a geoscience graduate student, master teachers, four undergraduate geology students, and preservice teachers. Members of the instructional team reflected the racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity that the geoscience strives to achieve; all are excellent role models for GeoFORCE students. The outcome of the most recent Central Texas twelfth grade trip, which used a student-centered, project-based approach, was especially noteworthy. Each group was given a topic to apply to what they saw in the field, such as fluvial systems, cultural significance, or geohazards, etc., and present in any manner in front of peers and a panel of geoscience experts. Students used the latest presentation technology available to them (e.g. Prezi, iMovies) and sketches and site notes from field stops. The final presentations were clear, informative, and entertaining. It can be concluded that the students were more engaged with the

  13. A controlled study of team-based learning for undergraduate clinical neurology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Nigel C K; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Chan, Yiong Huak; Umapathi, Thirugnanam; Lee, Sze Haur; Tan, Kevin

    2011-10-30

    Team-based learning (TBL), a new active learning method, has not been reported for neurology education. We aimed to determine if TBL was more effective than passive learning (PL) in improving knowledge outcomes in two key neurology topics - neurological localization and neurological emergencies. We conducted a modified crossover study during a nine-week internal medicine posting involving 49 third-year medical undergraduates, using TBL as the active intervention, compared against self-reading as a PL control, for teaching the two topics. Primary outcome was the mean percentage change in test scores immediately after (post-test 1) and 48 hours after TBL (post-test 2), compared to a baseline pre-test. Student engagement was the secondary outcome. Mean percentage change in scores was greater in the TBL versus the PL group in post-test 1 (8.8% vs 4.3%, p = 0.023) and post-test 2 (11.4% vs 3.4%, p = 0.001). After adjustment for gender and second year examination grades, mean percentage change in scores remained greater in the TBL versus the PL group for post-test 1 (10.3% vs 5.8%, mean difference 4.5%,95% CI 0.7 - 8.3%, p = 0.021) and post-test 2 (13.0% vs 4.9%, mean difference 8.1%,95% CI 3.7 - 12.5%, p = 0.001), indicating further score improvement 48 hours post-TBL. Academically weaker students, identified by poorer examination grades, showed a greater increase in scores with TBL versus strong students (p undergraduates.

  14. A controlled study of team-based learning for undergraduate clinical neurology education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umapathi Thirugnanam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Team-based learning (TBL, a new active learning method, has not been reported for neurology education. We aimed to determine if TBL was more effective than passive learning (PL in improving knowledge outcomes in two key neurology topics - neurological localization and neurological emergencies. Methods We conducted a modified crossover study during a nine-week internal medicine posting involving 49 third-year medical undergraduates, using TBL as the active intervention, compared against self-reading as a PL control, for teaching the two topics. Primary outcome was the mean percentage change in test scores immediately after (post-test 1 and 48 hours after TBL (post-test 2, compared to a baseline pre-test. Student engagement was the secondary outcome. Results Mean percentage change in scores was greater in the TBL versus the PL group in post-test 1 (8.8% vs 4.3%, p = 0.023 and post-test 2 (11.4% vs 3.4%, p = 0.001. After adjustment for gender and second year examination grades, mean percentage change in scores remained greater in the TBL versus the PL group for post-test 1 (10.3% vs 5.8%, mean difference 4.5%,95% CI 0.7 - 8.3%, p = 0.021 and post-test 2 (13.0% vs 4.9%, mean difference 8.1%,95% CI 3.7 - 12.5%, p = 0.001, indicating further score improvement 48 hours post-TBL. Academically weaker students, identified by poorer examination grades, showed a greater increase in scores with TBL versus strong students (p Conclusions Compared to PL, TBL showed greater improvement in knowledge scores, with continued improvement up to 48 hours later. This effect is larger in academically weaker students. TBL is an effective method for improving knowledge in neurological localization and neurological emergencies in undergraduates.

  15. Physical therapy students’ perceptions of team-based learning in gross anatomy using the Team-Based Learning Student Assessment Instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beven Livingston

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The physical therapy students reported an overall positive experience in using TBL to learn gross anatomy in terms of accountability, preference for learning mode, and satisfaction. This positive experience with TBL was accompanied by their successful academic performance. Given the traits and learning preferences in this generation of graduate students, TBL could be a teaching method that is received positively elsewhere and results in successful academic performance and learning.

  16. Professional and pre-professional pharmacy students' perceptions of team based learning (TBL) at a private research-intensive university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Danielle M; Khalil, Karen; Iskaros, Olivia; Van Amburgh, Jenny A

    2017-07-01

    Pharmacy students need to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills as well as be a valuable team member. The use of team based learning (TBL) fosters effective team collaboration, enables continuous active and self-directed learning, and requires both individual and team accountability. The purpose was to evaluate pharmacy students' perceptions and experiences related to TBL in different years of the pharmacy curriculum. Two classes, Introduction to the Profession of Pharmacy (intro), a required course, and Self-Care/Non-Prescription Medications (self-care), an elective course, utilize the TBL approach. Students enrolled in both courses were recruited to complete a validated questionnaire during the last class. There was 100% participation; the majority of students, regardless of course, expressed positive attitudes towards TBL. Variations, relevance of TBL activities and the use of TBL as a learning strategy, between the required intro class and the elective self-care class were observed using a Mann-Whitney U test (peffectiveness. It's important to consider the differences in professional development in these students and how this may impact their perceptions of TBL. TBL imparts more responsibility and accountability on the individual student allowing for the development of self-directed learners. Students, regardless of their year, found TBL to be an effective learning strategy. Third professional year (P3) pharmacy students further along in the curriculum are more accepting of TBL and are better able to appreciate the benefits of active and self-directed learning as well as working within a team. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Qualitative Analysis of Student Perceptions Comparing Team-based Learning and Traditional Lecture in a Pharmacotherapeutics Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Tami L; Bleske, Barry E; Bartholomew, Tracy; Dorsch, Michael P; Guthrie, Sally K; Klein, Kristin C; Tingen, Jeffrey M; Wells, Trisha D

    2017-04-01

    Objective. To qualitatively compare students' attitudes and perceptions regarding team-based learning (TBL) and lecture. Design. Students were exposed to TBL and lecture in an elective pharmacotherapeutics course in a randomized, prospective, cross-over design. After completing the course, students provided their attitudes and perceptions through a written self-reflection and narrative questions on the end-of-course evaluation. Student responses were reviewed using a grounded theory coding method. Assessment. Students' responses yielded five major themes: impact of TBL on learning, perceptions about TBL learning methods, changes in approaches to learning, building skills for professional practice, and enduring challenges. Overall, students report TBL enhances their learning of course content (knowledge and application), teamwork skills, and lifelong learning skills. Conclusion. Students' attitudes and perceptions support TBL as a viable pedagogy for teaching pharmacotherapeutics.

  18. To reflect or not to reflect: Prior team performance as a boundary condition of the effects of reflexivity on learning and final team performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, M.; Homan, A.C.; van Knippenberg, D.

    2013-01-01

    A small but growing body of literature adds to our understanding of the role of team reflexivity (i.e., reflecting upon team functioning) in predicting team performance. Although many studies conclude that reflexivity is an asset for teams, the contingencies of team reflexivity have received far

  19. Modified Team-Based Learning in an Ophthalmology Clerkship in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheqian Huang

    Full Text Available Team-based learning (TBL is an increasingly popular teaching method in medical education. However, TBL hasn't been well-studied in the ophthalmology clerkship context. This study was to examine the impact of modified TBL in such context and to assess the student evaluations of TBL.Ninety-nine students of an 8-year clinical medicine program from Zhongshan Ophthalmic Centre, Sun Yat-sen University, were randomly divided into four sequential units and assigned to six teams with the same faculty. The one-week ophthalmology clerkship module included traditional lectures, gross anatomy and a TBL module. The effects of the TBL module on student performance were measured by the Individual Readiness Assurance Test (IRAT, the Group Readiness Assurance Test (GRAT, the Group Application Problem (GAP and final examination scores (FESs. Students' evaluations of TBL were measured by a 16-item questionnaire. IRAT and GRAT scores were compared using a paired t-test. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and subgroup analysis compared the effects among quartiles that were stratified by the Basic Ophthalmology Levels (BOLs. The BOLs were evaluated before the ophthalmology clerkship.In TBL classes, the GRAT scores were significantly higher than the IRAT scores in both the full example and the BOL-stratified groups. It highlighted the advantages of TBL compared to the individual learning. Quartile-stratified ANOVA comparisons showed significant differences at FES scores (P < 0.01. In terms to IRAT, GRAT and GAP scores, there was no significant result. Moreover, IRAT scores only significantly differed between the first and fourth groups. The FES scores of the first three groups are significantly higher than the fourth group. Gender-specific differences were significant in FES but not the IRAT. Overall, 57.65% of student respondents agreed that TBL was helpful. Male students tended to rate TBL higher than female students.The application of modified TBL to the

  20. How teacher educators learn to use data in a data team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, E.D.

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation is about a data team in a Teacher Education College in the Netherlands, and how a data team can contribute to de development of data skills, a more positive attitude towards data use and the use of data in practice. In order to study the research question, How does a data team

  1. The Influence of Complexity and Uncertainty on Self-Directed Team Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David

    2012-01-01

    To help increase the effectiveness of self-directed teams, this paper studies the attitudes and behaviour of self-directed team members during the course of a computer simulated marketing strategy game. Self-directed teams are used widely throughout organisations yet receive little scrutiny when they undertake a task which is subject to conditions…

  2. Project Leader's Dual Socialization and Its Impact on Team Learning and Performance: A Diagnostic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Tanvi

    2009-01-01

    One of the important challenges for leadership in project teams is the ability to manage the knowledge, communication and coordination related activities of team. In cross-team collaboration, different boundaries contribute to the situated nature of knowledge and hamper the flow of knowledge and prevent shared understanding with those on the other…

  3. A Model to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Collaborative Online Learning Teams – Self-Disclosure and Social Exchange Theory Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chieh Liu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative online learning teams (COLTs are teams that are comprised of groups of online students. Accompanying the popularity of online learning, both on campuses and as professional development within many industries, learning in groups has been attracting much attention. However, there is little research constructing intact frameworks to evaluate the effectiveness of COLTs. This study built a framework by incorporating six constructs: self-disclosure, social exchange, trust, cohesion, performance and satisfaction, and validated it by analyzing data from a five-week experiment. The results showed that social exchange had a significant impact on trust, but self-disclosure did not. Trust was significantly related to cohesion and cohesion was significantly related to performance and satisfaction. This study suggests that instructors should incorporate the number of students’ posts into parts of evaluation to facilitate self-disclosure, and to stop “social loafing” behaviors while encouraging social exchange activities.

  4. Comparison between flipped classroom and team-based learning in fixed prosthodontic education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigawa, Keisuke; Omoto, Katsuhiro; Hayama, Rika; Okura, Kazuo; Tajima, Toyoko; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Hosoki, Maki; Shigemoto, Shuji; Ueda, Mayu; Rodis, Omar Marianito Maningo; Matsuka, Yoshizo

    2017-04-01

    We previously investigated the effects of team-based learning (TBL) on fixed prosthodontic education and reported that TBL could have higher efficiency with high student satisfaction than traditional lecture. In the current report, we introduced flipped classroom to the fixed prosthodontic education and compared their effectiveness based on the final examination score in addition to TBL. Participants were 41 students from Tokushima University School of Dentistry who attended a fixed prosthodontics course. The first six classes adopted the flipped classroom style while the latter eight classes adopted TBL. To evaluate the relationship between learning styles and their effectiveness, we compared results from the term-end examination between the curriculum covered by flipped classroom and TBL-style classes. To draw comparisons, a referential examination with the same questions was conducted to eight faculty members who had not attended any of these classes. Term-end examination results showed that TBL classes had slightly higher scores than flipped classroom classes. Referential examination results also showed higher scores for the same curriculum and no significant interaction was found between class formats and the term-end and referential examination scores. Analysis revealed no noticeable difference in the effectiveness of the class formats. Our previous study reported that TBL had higher efficiency than traditional style lecture. In the current study, there was no statistical difference in the examination score between flipped classroom and TBL. Therefore, we conclude that both styles are highly effective than traditional style lecture and constitute valid formats for clinical dental education. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Team-based learning methods in teaching topographical anatomy by dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette W; Ramsey-Stewart, George; May, James; Mellis, Craig

    2012-06-01

      While the effectiveness of teaching human topographical anatomy by groups of medical students carrying out embalmed cadaver dissections has been recognized for centuries, the mechanisms by which this teaching is so effective have not been well described.   In the recently reintroduced 7-week elective anatomy by whole body dissection course for senior medical students at Sydney Medical School, team-based learning (TBL) principles were used in the course design and implementation. In the 2011 course, 42 senior medical students participated. The effectiveness of TBL pedagogy was assessed by knowledge acquisition and retention and by administration of a questionnaire to evaluate the impact of the principles of this pedagogy.   The course produced a marked increase in topographical anatomical knowledge. The median pre-course assessment score was 9/20 (interquartile range 5) and the median post-course assessment score was 19.5/20 (interquartile range 1.75). The difference was statistically significant (P application of TBL methodology to teaching human anatomy by dissection enables a large group of students to have small group experiences without a large number of teachers. It results in effective acquisition of topographical anatomical knowledge and appears to provide better acquisition of such knowledge than the previous methods of anatomy teaching to which these students had been exposed. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  6. Learning Team Review 2016-0001: Installing Outlets for Programmatic Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunwoody, John Tyler [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Obrey, Kimberly Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bridgewater, Jon S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Griego, Frank X. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brenner, Andrew Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lopez, Ted T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henderson, Kevin C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gordon, Lloyd Baumgardner [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Blumberg, Paul A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wilburn, Dianne Williams [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-08

    The purpose of a Learning Team is to transfer and communicate the information into operational feedback and improvement. We want to pay attention to the small things that go wrong because they are often early warning signals and may provide insight into the health of the whole system. An ESR was placed in the October of 2015 to move/install a number of 120V and 208V outlets in 455-104B to support programmatic furnace needs. Electrical design review was completed for ESR 22217 on February 22, 2016 and a Design Change Form completed describing the modification needed as: demolish 1 existing receptacle and circuit leaving conduit and jbox for use to install new receptacle and 5 new receptacles/circuits are required and one existing receptacle is to be relocated, listed under FSR 149229. The FSR scope of work was written:: Please have the Electricians come out to perform demolition (1ea.), installation (6ea.)& relocation (1ea.) of receptacles / circuits. ESR 22217 & DCF-16-35-0455-1281 is in place for this work. Coordinate final receptacle locations with Laboratory Resident. Contact John Dunwoody or O-MC for this information. WO# 545580-01 was signed on April 20, 2016.: Electricians to perform demolition, installation, & relocation of receptacles / circuits PER attached DCF-16-0455-1281-SK-1.

  7. Modified Team-Based Learning Strategy to Improve Human Anatomy Learning: A Pilot Study at the Universidad Del Norte in Barranquilla, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Emilio G.; Tuesca, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    As part of an institutional program sponsored by the Centre for Teaching Excellence at the Universidad del Norte, Barranquilla, Colombia, we developed an educational research study on two sessions of human anatomy in which we combined team-based learning (TBL) and the use of iPads. Study data included the TBL, assessments applied during the…

  8. Educational Preparation for Learning Disability Nursing: Outcomes Evaluation of the Contribution of Learning Disability Nurses within the Multi-Professional, Multi-Agency Team. Research Highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English National Board for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting, London.

    A research project examined the current roles of learning disability nurses within multi-professional and multi-agency teams in a range of care settings in the United Kingdom (UK). It also studied the effectiveness of current educational provision for this branch of nursing, in terms of current roles and activities, and the perceived needs of…

  9. Can Hybrid Educational Activities of Team and Problem Based Learning Program be Effective for Japanese Medical Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Kentaro; Doi, Asako

    2017-11-10

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the medical students'perceptions of the Hybrid Educational Activities between team based learning (TBL) and problem based learning (PBL) Program (HEATAPP), a novel educational program that combines characteristics of PBL and TBL. A five-day HEATAPP on infectious diseases was provided to 4th year medical students at Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan. After the program, a focus group discussion was held among 6 medical students who participated in HEATAPP. We qualitatively analyzed the recorded data to delineate the effectiveness of, and the perceptions on, HEATAPP. Some students considered HEATAPP being effective as an active learning, and in developing questions. However, some students found active learning difficult to execute, since they were so familiar with passive learning such as lectures and examinations. They also found it difficult to identify important points by reading authentic textbooks on given issues, particularly English textbooks. Even though active learning and group discussion are underscored as important in medicine, some Japanese medical students may be reluctant to shift towards these since they are so used to passive learning since childhood. English language is another barrier to active learning. The introduction of active learning in the earlier stages of education might be an effective solution. Teachers at medical schools in Japan should be mindful of the students'potentially negative attitudes towards active learning, which is claimed to be successful in western countries.

  10. Initial impressions from the Northern California 2008 lightning siege: A report by a Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center Information Collection Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonetta T. Holt; David Christenson; Anne Black; Brett Fay; Kim Round

    2009-01-01

    This event in NorCal is another of the major events we have experienced in fire management. In line with our desire to learn, we ought to line up a team to help us capture lessons learned from this event." This statement, and a regional delegation, was the impetus for an information collection team from the Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center to visit with...

  11. Engaging Parents in Reproductive Health Education: Lessons Learned Implementing a Parent Designed, Peer-Led Educational Model for Parents of Preteens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Cherie L.; Anderson, Frances R.

    2012-01-01

    Engaging and supporting parents to provide sexuality education to their children is successful when parents take ownership of the intervention. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the lessons learned from implementing a parent-designed, parent-led sexuality education curriculum for parents of preteens (10-14 year olds). The parents…

  12. Expanded partnerships between medical faculty and medical students: Developing a Global Health curriculum as an example of 'student-led learning' at the University of Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merridew, Nancy; Wilkinson, David

    2010-01-01

    Reflecting trends in medical education from didactic teaching to student-centred learning, the novel approach of student-led learning was applied at the University of Queensland (UQ) School of Medicine. This article examines the benefits, risks and limitations of curriculum development led by students. The Project aimed to trial student-led development of a Global Health curriculum module for the UQ medical programme, as part of an international collaboration with related Health Sciences activities of Universitas 21 (U21). The Head (Dean) of the UQ School of Medicine instigated the Project. A student Convenor was appointed to lead it and, in conjunction with faculty, to design curriculum Learning Objectives and supporting resources. The initial vision of the Project was greatly expanded, from an optional elective to a compulsory curriculum module with inbuilt prospective outcome measures. The module was established in less than 12 months and is now being delivered throughout the 4-year medical programme. A process for ongoing student leadership of the Project was established. Student-led learning can be effective if given adequate support by faculty. The UQ School of Medicine's new curriculum module and collaboration with U21 promote the teaching of Global Health.

  13. MODEL PEMBELAJARAN TEAM ASSISTED INDIVIDUALIZATION BERBASIS ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING PADA PERSAMAAN GARIS LURUS DITINJAU DARI KARAKTERISTIK CARA BERPIKIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    author Naning Sutriningsih

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research are to find out the different effect of each categories of cooperative learning model, characteristics of mind style and their interaction towards students mathematics learning results on equation of straight line. The research used to quasi experimental with 2x4 factorial design. The population was all of the students in Grade VIII of the State Junior High Schools of the district Pringsewu in academic year 2013-2014. The samples of the research were taken by stratified cluster random sampling technique. Based on hypothesis test, it can be conclude that: 1 the cooperative learning model of TAI type on the basis of the AfL gives a better mathematics learning results than TAI type; 2 the mathematics learning result of student abstract sequential (AS type have a better than student concrete sequential (CS type, student concrete random (CR type, and student abstract random (AR type; whereas student CS type have the same result of student CR type and student AR type; 3 at each of characteristics of mind style students (CS, AS, CR. and AR, the cooperative learning model of TAI type on the basis of the AfL gives a better mathematics learning results than TAI type.Keywords: Team Assisted Individualization (TAI, Assessment for Learning (AfL, The Characteristics of Mind Style, Learning Result in Mathematitcs.

  14. Using team-based learning to teach clinical pharmacology in medical school: student satisfaction and improved performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgheib, N K; Simaan, J A; Sabra, R

    2011-07-01

    Formal teaching in clinical pharmacology was never part of the curriculum at the American University of Beirut Faculty of Medicine. Based on feedback from students and on recommendations of academic bodies, we have introduced, since June 2008, twice-monthly "rational prescribing" sessions during the required internal medicine rotation in year 4 of medical school. All sessions were designed according to the innovative Team-based Learning format and concluded by having the students practice prescription writing and personal formulary development based on the World Health Organization criteria. Our 18-month experience showed that students were very satisfied with the course and the teaching approach, and that their performance on prescription writing and formulary development had improved. Although further studies are needed to explore the impact of team-based learning on additional performance measures, we recommend it as an effective alternative for teaching clinical pharmacology in medical schools.

  15. LED lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, Miguel; Grossman, Kenneth; Betts, David

    2013-11-12

    There is herein described a lamp for providing white light comprising a plurality of light sources positioned on a substrate. Each of said light sources comprises a blue light emitting diode (LED) and a dome that substantially covers said LED. A first portion of said blue light from said LEDs is transmitted through said domes and a second portion of said blue light is converted into a red light by a first phosphor contained in said domes. A cover is disposed over all of said light sources that transmits at least a portion of said red and blue light emitted by said light sources. The cover contains a second phosphor that emits a yellow light in response to said blue light. The red, blue and yellow light combining to form the white light and the white light having a color rendering index (CRI) of at least about 80.

  16. A pilot randomised controlled trial of community-led ANtipsychotic Drug REduction for Adults with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Rachel; Randell, Elizabeth; Gillespie, David; Wood, Fiona; Felce, David; Romeo, Renee; Angel, Lianna; Espinasse, Aude; Hood, Kerry; Davies, Amy; Meek, Andrea; Addison, Katy; Jones, Glyn; Deslandes, Paul; Allen, David; Knapp, Martin; Thapar, Ajay; Kerr, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Data suggest that approximately 50,000 adults with learning disabilities (LDs) in England and Wales are currently prescribed antipsychotic medication. Illness in this population is common, including significant rates of challenging behaviour and mental illness, but there is particular concern over the use of antipsychotics prescribed for reasons other than the treatment of psychosis. Control of challenging behaviour is the primary reason why such medications are prescribed despite the absence of good evidence for any therapeutic effect for this purpose. To assess the feasibility of recruitment and retention and to explore non-efficacy-based barriers to a blinded antipsychotic medication withdrawal programme for adults with LDs without psychosis compared with treatment as usual. A secondary objective was to compare trial arms regarding clinical outcomes. A two-arm individually randomised double-blind placebo-controlled drug reduction trial. Recruitment was through community learning disability teams (CLDTs) in south Wales and south-west England. Adults with LDs who are prescribed risperidone for treatment of challenging behaviour with no known current psychosis or previous recurrence of psychosis following prior drug reduction. A double-blind drug reduction programme leading to full withdrawal within 6 months. Treatment in the intervention group was gradually reduced over a 6-month period and then maintained at the same level for a further 3 months, still under blind conditions. In the control group, the baseline level of medication was maintained throughout the 9-month period. The blind was broken at 9 months, following final data collection. Feasibility outcomes were (1) the number and proportion of general practices/CLDTs that progressed from initial approach to recruitment of participants and (2) the number and proportion of recruited participants who progressed through the various stages of the study. Trial arms were also compared regarding clinical outcomes

  17. An action-learning model to assist Circuit Teams to support School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the role that properly constructed school improvement plans, developed by schools, and circuit improvement plans, developed by the Circuit Team, plays in effective district/circuit support to schools. We report on the construction of a theoretical model to assist Circuit Teams to support School ...

  18. Assisting School Management Teams to Construct Their School Improvement Plans: An Action Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Voort, Geoffrey; Wood, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a first cycle of a larger action research study conducted to determine how Circuit Teams could support School Management Teams of underperforming high schools towards whole-school development. Although it is a mandated requirement by the Department of Education, none of the four schools involved in the study had developed a…

  19. The Army Family Team Building Program: Facilitating a Transformative Learning Process--An Intrinsic Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to understand how the Army Family Team Building program influences self-reliance and self-sufficiency in Army spouses as they integrate into the Army community. The purpose of the Army Family Team Building program is to empower Army spouses with knowledge and skills, which foster well-being and improve quality of life. The…

  20. Enhancing Intercultural Communication and Understanding: Team Translation Project as a Student Engagement Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects on a team translation project on Aboriginal culture designed to enhance university students' intercultural communication competence and understanding through engaging in an interactive team translation project funded by the Australia-China Council. A selected group of Chinese speaking translation students participated in the…

  1. Learning through Online Collaboration by SME Staff: A Scoping Investigation into Likely Team-Role Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, John; Lawless, Naomi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to research the stress caused to small to medium-sized enterprise (SME) staff by online collaboration. It aims to investigate online team roles as possible stressors. Design/Methodology/Approach: The paper is based on research carried out on online collaborative teams by the authors in the Open University…

  2. Virtual Teams and International Business Teaching and Learning: The Case of the Global Enterprise Experience (GEE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Maria Alejandra; Velez-Calle, Andres; Cathro, Virginia; Caprar, Dan V.; Taras, Vasyl

    2014-01-01

    The increasing importance of global virtual teams in business is reflected in the classroom by the increased adoption of activities that facilitate real-time cross-cultural interaction. This article documents the experience of students from two Colombian universities who participated in a collaborative international project using virtual teams as…

  3. An action-learning model to assist Circuit Teams to support School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EAOSA

    2016-11-17

    Nov 17, 2016 ... If the role of the Education District and Circuit Officers in South Africa is to work collaboratively with schools ... research was to develop a theoretical model to assist. Circuit Teams to support School Management. Teams. This paper builds on work previously ..... At the meeting, the participants sat in groups,.

  4. Sense of Classroom Community and Team Development Process in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem Aydin, Irem; Gumus, Salih

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is a relationship between Turkish online learners' sense of classroom community, perceptions of success in team development process and their preferences of studying in teams. A survey instrument included the Sense of Classroom Community Scale, Tuckman's Teamwork Questionnaire and some other…

  5. Are Primary Health Care Staff Aware of the Role of Community Learning Disability Teams in Relation to Health Promotion and Health Facilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hames, Annette; Carlson, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    Research has identified that while people with learning disabilities often have greater health needs than the general population, they access primary care at the same rate or lower. Valuing people recommends that members of learning disability teams should take on a key role in supporting people with learning disabilities to access mainstream…

  6. A Comparative Study of Instructor and Student-Led Learning in a Large Nonmajors Biology Course: Student Performance and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernot, Melody J.; Metzler, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Traditional lectures have come under increasing criticism as research indicates lectures may be less effective in achieving learning outcomes than other teaching methods. Student engagement and success can potentially be improved by changing traditional lectures to instructional methods using active learning techniques. Active learning refers to…

  7. Team Effectiveness and Team Development in CSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Jos; Weinberger, Armin; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a wealth of research on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) that is neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) research. CSCW research is concerned with contextual factors, however, that may strongly influence collaborative learning processes as well, such as task characteristics, team formation, team members'…

  8. Team effectiveness and team development in CSCL

    OpenAIRE

    Fransen, Jos; Weinberger, Armin; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    There is a wealth of research on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) that is neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) research. CSCW research is concerned with contextual factors, however, that may strongly influence collaborative learning processes as well, such as task characteristics, team formation, team members’ abilities and characteristics, and role assignment within a team. Building on a critical analysis of the degree to which research on CSCW translates t...

  9. The implementation of an elementary STEM learning team and the effect on teacher self-efficacy: An action research study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jennifer F.

    Science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education is part of a national movement to prepare students for the demands of a 21st century workforce. STEM uses an integrated, real-world problem solving approach to increase the levels of collaboration, communication, critical, and creative thinking in students. If expectations for students have increased to stay competitive in a global market, teachers must be equipped to meet the needs of the new 21st century learners in their classrooms. To that end, professional learning for educators is essential to ensure they are equipped with the tools necessary for success. While there are many approaches to teacher development, professional learning teams, based on the work of Garmston and Wellman, focus on teachers' instructional delivery, targeted student learning needs, planning, implementing new strategies, collaboration, and reflective dialogue. The purpose of the study is to improve instructional practice providing quality STEM instruction to students and increase teacher self-efficacy---a teachers' perception of his or her ability to instruct students in the STEM disciplines. Theoretical implications of a study on an elementary STEM learning team could affect the way schools deliver STEM professional learning opportunities to teachers and the way students are delivered a quality STEM education. Research has shown that Model I behavior would limit the change process of professional learning through a surface inspection of the issues; however model II behaviors would benefit the teachers, students and organization because teachers would be collaborating on specific objectives to develop a knowledge base and skill set to meet students' needs. Extending professional development by engaging stakeholders in a collaborative process to build model II behaviors will create an organizational structure that facilitates learning.

  10. "Just working in a team was a great experience…" - Student perspectives on the learning experiences of an interprofessional education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Rebecca; Cottrell, Neil; Moran, Monica

    2013-07-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) programs aim to improve collaboration between health- and social-care professionals and to optimize clinical outcomes. Such programs are complex to design, and evaluation of effectiveness is difficult. Combining qualitative and quantitative data may provide greater understanding of how a program affects participants and what aspects are influential on attitudes and behavior. This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews and interpretative phenomenological analysis to explore undergraduate student perspectives on what attributes of a 4-week IPE program they considered contributed to a successful learning experience. Due to the fact that the students were not formally assessed, the realistic context of the activities and the quality of the facilitators created an environment where the students felt empowered to interact freely without fear of reproach. Learning the roles of other professions and their contribution to a healthcare team broadened the students' perspectives on healthcare and increased their sense of self-worth and pride in their professions. In addition, being able to identify the relevance of the learning experience to their future practice motivated the students. This information can be used to create optimal learning environments for facilitating the development of successful future healthcare teams.

  11. Blending Problem-Based Learning and Peer-Led Team Learning, in an Open Ended "Home-Grown" Pharmaceutical Chemistry Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Clinton G. L.; Krause, Rui W. M.; Sewry, Joyce D.

    2018-01-01

    Pharmaceutical chemistry, medicinal chemistry and the drug discovery process require experienced practitioners to employ reasoned speculation in generating creative ideas, which can be used to evolve promising molecules into drugs. The ever-evolving world of pharmaceutical chemistry requires university curricula that prepare graduates for their…

  12. Of rocks and safe channels: learning to navigate as an interprofessional team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Hilarie; Bailey, Peter; McLellan, Hilary

    2003-05-01

    A new interprofessional primary care team was established in a greenfield site. Using anethnographic approach, significant experiences in the formation of the team were documented and specific problem areas were defined and addressed using action research principles. The nature of the problems experienced and the processes used in their resolution are described and related to current policy recommendations and to existing literature on the theory and practice of team development. Problems include: the potentially varied expectations and managerial requirements of collaborating partners, the lack of clarity over professional roles and associated essential competencies, and the appropriate management and development of specialist professional roles. Conclusions drawn concern the complexity of the issues raised by interprofessional team working, and the value of existing techniques and models in this setting, such as the viable systems model, 360 degree appraisal and action research.

  13. Peer Evaluation Instrument Development, Administration, and Assessment in a Team-based Learning Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fete, Matthew G; Haight, Robert C; Clapp, Peter; McCollum, Marianne

    2017-05-01

    Objective. To design and implement an instrument capable of providing students with valuable peer feedback on team behaviors and to provide results of the administration of the instrument. Methods. A three-part instrument was designed that requires teammate rankings with justification on attributes aligned with school outcomes and team functioning, reporting of student behaviors, and provision of feedback on the value of peer contributions to their team. Score results after three years of administration were analyzed. Results. Six evaluations per year were completed by members of four different professional classes over a three-year time period. Mean scores increased slightly as students progressed through the program. Students were able to differentially score peers on attributes and behaviors. Conclusion. The peer evaluation instrument presented here provides formative and summative feedback through qualitative and quantitative scores that allow students to acknowledge differential contributions of individual team members.

  14. Implementation of team-based learning in year 1 of a PBL based medical program: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; Ayton, Tom; Mellis, Craig

    2016-02-04

    A traditional and effective form of teaching within medical education has been Problem Based Learning (PBL). However, this method of teaching is resource intensive, normally requiring one tutor for every ten students. Team-based learning (TBL) has gained recent popularity in medical education, and can be applied to large groups of up to 100 students. TBL makes use of the advantages of small group teaching and learning, but in contrast to PBL, does not need large numbers of teachers. This study sought to explore the efficacy of using TBL in place of PBL in Year 1 of a medical program. In Year 1 of the medical program, two iterations of TBL, with 20 students, were run following four iterations of PBL within the Cardiology teaching block. Student feedback following PBL and TBL was collected by questionnaire, using closed and open ended questions. Additionally, individual and team tests were held at the beginning of each TBL class, and results of each week were compared. All students (n = 20) participated in the test in week 1, and 18/20 students participated in week 2. In total, 19/20 (95%) of students completed the questionnaires regarding their PBL and TBL experiences. The use of small groups, the readiness assurance tests, immediate feedback from an expert clinician, as well as time efficiency were all aspects of the TBL experience that students found positive. The clinical problem-solving activity, however, was considered to be less effective with TBL. There was a significant improvement (p = 0.004) in students' score from the week 1 assessment (median = 2) to the week 2 (median = 3.5) assessment. Interestingly, all teams but one (Team 1) achieved a lower score on their second week assessment than on their first. However, the lowest performing team in week 1 outperformed all other teams in week 2. Students favoured many aspects of the TBL process, particularly motivation to do the pre-reading, and better engagement in the process. Additionally, the

  15. Crew Resource Management (CRM) video storytelling project: a team-based learning activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Maggie Jiao; Denando, John

    2011-01-01

    This Crew Resource Management (CRM) video storytelling project asks students to work in a team (4-5 people per team) to create (write and produce) a video story. The story should demonstrate lacking and ill practices of CRM knowledge and skills, or positive skills used to create a successful scenario in aviation (e. g. , flight training, commercial aviation, airport management). The activity is composed of two parts: (1) creating a video story of CRM in aviation, and (2) delivering a group pr...

  16. How to Collaborate through Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conderman, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Teachers are spending more of their time and making more decisions within teams. Effective teacher-based teams provide academic and behavioral support for students as well as professional development for teachers. Learn how the best teams function.

  17. The Romance of Learning from Disagreement. The Effect of Cohesiveness and Disagreement on Knowledge Sharing Behavior and Individual Performance Within Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Woerkom, Marianne; Sanders, Karin

    2010-03-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of disagreement and cohesiveness on knowledge sharing in teams, and on the performance of individual team members. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Data were obtained from a survey among 1,354 employees working in 126 teams in 17 organizations. FINDINGS: The results show that cohesiveness has a positive effect on the exchange of advice between team members and on openness for sharing opinions, whereas disagreement has a negative effect on openness for sharing opinions. Furthermore, the exchange of advice in a team has a positive effect on the performance of individual team members and acts as a mediator between cohesiveness and individual performance. IMPLICATIONS: Managers who want to stimulate knowledge sharing processes and performance within work teams may be advised to take measures to prevent disagreement between team members and to enhance team cohesiveness. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Although some gurus in organizational learning claim that disagreement has a positive effect on group processes such as knowledge sharing and team learning, this study does not support this claim.

  18. JGME-ALiEM Hot Topics in Medical Education: Analysis of a Multimodal Online Discussion About Team-Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Jeff; Patocka, Catherine; Lin, Michelle; Sherbino, Jonathan

    2017-02-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an instructional method that is being increasingly incorporated in health professions education, although use in graduate medical education (GME) has been more limited. To curate and describe themes that emerged from a virtual journal club discussion about TBL in GME, held across multiple digital platforms, while also evaluating the use of social media in online academic discussions. The Journal of Graduate Medical Education ( JGME ) and the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine blog facilitated a weeklong, open-access, virtual journal club on the 2015 JGME article "Use of Team-Based Learning Pedagogy for Internal Medicine Ambulatory Resident Teaching." Using 4 stimulus questions (hosted on a blog as a starting framework), we facilitated discussions via the blog, Twitter, and Google Hangouts on Air platforms. We evaluated 2-week web analytics and performed a thematic analysis of the discussion. The virtual journal club reached a large international audience as exemplified by the blog page garnering 685 page views from 241 cities in 42 countries. Our thematic analysis identified 4 domains relevant to TBL in GME: (1) the benefits and barriers to TBL; (2) the design of teams; (3) the role of assessment and peer evaluation; and (4) crowdsourced TBL resources. The virtual journal club provided a novel forum across multiple social media platforms, engaging authors, content experts, and the health professions education community in a discussion about the importance, impediments to implementation, available resources, and logistics of adopting TBL in GME.

  19. The use of team-based learning in a second year undergraduate pre-registration nursing course on evidence-informed decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jenny

    2016-11-01

    More engaging teaching and learning strategies are needed to teach research-related courses to pre-registration nursing students. Team-based learning was implemented within a second year pre-registration nursing evidence-informed decision making course. Results from a questionnaire survey indicated that 70% believed team-based learning was appropriate for the course, 60% that it was an effective and motivating learning strategy, and 54% recommended using team-based learning in other courses. The results from ten student interviews illustrated the positive way in which team-based learning was perceived, and how the students thought it contributed to their learning. Test results were improved with an increase in the numbers of students achieving 70% or higher; and higher scores for students in the lowest quartile. Team-based learning was shown to be an effective strategy that preserved the benefits of small group teaching with large student groups. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of a nurse-led intervention to improve screening for cardiovascular risk factors in people with severe mental illnesses. Phase-two cluster randomised feasibility trial of community mental health teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazareth Irwin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with severe mental illnesses (SMI are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Clinical guidelines recommend regular screening for CVD risk factors. We evaluated a nurse led intervention to improve screening rates across the primary-secondary care interface. Methods Six community mental health teams (CMHTs were randomised to receive either the nurse led intervention plus education pack (n = 3 or education pack only (n = 3. Intervention (6 months: The nurse promoted CVD screening in primary care and then in CMHTs. Patients who remained unscreened were offered screening by the nurse. After the intervention participants with SMI were recruited from each CMHT to collect outcome data. Main outcome: Numbers screened during the six months, confirmed in General Practice notes. Results All six CMHTs approached agreed to randomisation. 121 people with SMI participated in outcome interviews during two waves of recruitment (intervention arm n = 59, control arm n = 62. Participants from both arms of the trial had similar demographic profiles and rates of previous CVD screening in the previous year, with less than 20% having been screened for each risk factor. After the trial, CVD screening had increased in both arms but participants from the intervention arm were significantly more likely to have received screening for blood pressure (96% vs 68%; adjusted Odds Ratio (OR 13.6; 95% CI: 3.5-38.4, cholesterol (66.7% vs 26.9%, OR 6.1; 3.2-11.5, glucose (66.7% vs 36.5% OR 4.4; 2.7-7.1, BMI (92.5% vs 65.2% OR 6.5; 2.1-19.6, and smoking status (88.2% vs 57.8% OR 5.5; 3.2-9.5 and have a 10 year CVD risk score calculated (38.2% vs 10.9% OR 5.2 1.8-15.3. Within the intervention arm approximately half the screening was performed in general practice and half by the trial nurse. Conclusions The nurse-led intervention was superior, resulting in an absolute increase of approximately 30% more people with SMI receiving screening for each

  1. Effects of Simulation With Problem-Based Learning Program on Metacognition, Team Efficacy, and Learning Attitude in Nursing Students: Nursing Care With Increased Intracranial Pressure Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Nam; Nam, Kyung-Dong; Kim, Hyeon-Young

    2017-03-01

    Nursing care for patients with central nervous system problems requires advanced professional knowledge and care skills. Nursing students are more likely to have difficulty in dealing with adult patients who have severe neurological problems in clinical practice. This study investigated the effect on the metacognition, team efficacy, and learning attitude of nursing students after an integrated simulation and problem-based learning program. A real scenario of a patient with increased intracranial pressure was simulated for the students. The results showed that this method was effective in improving the metacognitive ability of the students. Furthermore, we used this comprehensive model of simulation with problem-based learning in order to assess the consequences of student satisfaction with the nursing major, interpersonal relationships, and importance of simulation-based education in relation to the effectiveness of the integrated simulation with problem-based learning. The results can be used to improve the design of clinical practicum and nursing education.

  2. Positive Effects of Peer-Led Reflection on Undergraduates' Concept Integration and Synthesis during Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudsonm Monika; Hunter, Keith O.

    2014-01-01

    Service learning that features mutually constructed community-based service can enhance the understanding of a range of concepts (Butin, 2006). However, such service is often seen as "charity" as opposed to a dually constructed experience that is central to real learning (Howard, 2000; Tellis, 2011). This project was designed to…

  3. Preparing nursing students to be competent for future professional practice: applying the team-based learning-teaching strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Liou, Shwu-Ru; Hsu, Tsui-Hua; Pan, Mei-Yu; Liu, Hsiu-Chen; Chang, Chia-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) has been used for many years in business and science, but little research has focused on its application in nursing education. This quasi-experimental study was to apply the TBL in four nursing courses at a university in Taiwan and to evaluate its effect on students' learning outcomes and behaviors. Adult health nursing, maternal-child nursing, community health nursing, and medical-surgical nursing were the 4 designated courses for this study. Three hundred ninety-nine students in 2-year registered nurse-bachelor of science in nursing, and regular 4-year nursing programs enrolled in the designated courses were contacted. Three hundred eighty-seven students agreed to participate in the data collection. Results showed that the TBL significantly improved the learning behaviors of students in both programs, including class engagement (p learning (p learning behaviors and academic performance. These learning behaviors are important and beneficial for the students' future professional development. The TBL method can be considered for broader application in nursing education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Physics Learning using Inquiry-Student Team Achievement Division (ISTAD and Guided Inquiry Models Viewed by Students Achievement Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Sulistijo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the differences in learning outcomes of between students that are given the Physics learning models of Inquiry-Student Team Achievement Division (ISTAD and guided inquiry, between students who have high achievement motivation and low achievement motivation. This study was an experimental study with a 2x2x2 factorial design. The study population was the students of class X of SMAN 1 Toroh Grobogan of academic year 2016/2017. Samples were obtained by cluster random sampling technique consists of two classes, class X IPA 3 is used as an experimental class using ISTAD model and class X IPA 4 as the control class using guided inquiry model. Data collection techniques using test techniques for learning outcomes, and technical questionnaire to obtain the data of students' achievement motivation. Analysis of data using two-way ANOVA. The results showed that: (1 there is a difference between the learning outcomes of students with the ISTAD Physics models and with the physics model of guided inquiry. (2 There are differences in learning outcomes between students who have high achievement motivation and low achievement motivation. (3 There is no interaction between ISTAD and guided inquiry Physics models learning and achievement motivation of students.

  5. Building a multidisciplinary team for burn treatment - Lessons learned from the Montreal tendon transfer experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, E; Lévesque, M C; Jacquemin, G; Delure, A; Robidoux, I; Laramée, M T; Odobescu, A; Harris, P G; Danino, A M

    2014-03-31

    Multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) represent a recognized component of care in the treatment of complex conditions such as burns. However, most institutions do not provide adequate support for the formation of these teams. Furthermore, the majority of specialists lack the managerial skills required to create a team and have difficulties finding the proper tools. Our objective is to provide an insight for health care professionals, who wish to form a MDT for burn treatment, on the challenges that are likely to be faced, and to identify key elements that may facilitate the establishment of such a project. The setting for this was a plastic surgery department and rehabilitation center at a national reference center. A qualitative analysis was performed on all correspondences related to our tetraplegia project, from 2006 to 2008. To guide our thematic analysis, we used a form of systems theory known as the complexity theory. The qualitative analysis was performed using the NVivo software (Version 8.0 QSR International Melbourne, Australia). Lastly, the data was organized in chronologic order. Three main themes emerged from the results: knowledge acquisition, project organizational setup and project steps design. These themes represented respectively 24%, 50% and 26% of all correspondences. Project steps design and knowledge acquisition correspondences increased significantly after the introduction of the mentor team to our network. We conclude that an early association with a mentor team is beneficial for the establishment of a MDT.

  6. Flipping Business Education: Transformative Use of Team-Based Learning in Human Resource Management Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-Kai; Lin, Chun-Yu

    2017-01-01

    With the globalization of macro-economic environments, it is important to think about how to use instructional design and web-based digital technologies to enhance students' self-paced learning, stir up learning motivation and enjoyment, build up knowledge-sharing channels, and enhance individual learning. This study experimented with the flipped…

  7. Blended Learning and Team Teaching: Adapting Pedagogy in Response to the Changing Digital Tertiary Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Renée; Jenkins, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Increased accessibility of advanced technology, the targeted use of online learning platforms, student flexible learning expectations and the pressures of faculty budget constraints and priorities have called into question the effectiveness of traditional tertiary teaching and learning models. The tertiary education context must evolve at a pace…

  8. Incorporating Health Information Technology and Pharmacy Informatics in a Pharmacy Professional Didactic Curriculum -with a Team-based Learning Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapie, Ana L; Cutler, Timothy W; Fingado, Amanda R

    2016-08-25

    Objective. To incorporate a pharmacy informatics program in the didactic curriculum of a team-based learning institution and to assess students' knowledge of and confidence with health informatics during the course. Design. A previously developed online pharmacy informatics course was adapted and implemented into a team-based learning (TBL) 3-credit-hour drug information course for doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students in their second didactic year. During a period of five weeks (15 contact hours), students used the online pharmacy informatics modules as part of their readiness assurance process. Additional material was developed to comply with the TBL principles. Online pre/postsurveys were administered to evaluate knowledge gained and students' perceptions of the informatics program. Assessment. Eighty-three second-year students (84% response rate) completed the surveys. Participants' knowledge of electronic health records, computerized physician order entry, pharmacy information systems, and clinical decision support was significantly improved. Additionally, their confidence significantly improved in terms of describing health informatics terminology, describing the benefits and barriers of using health information technology, and understanding reasons for systematically processing health information. Conclusion. Students responded favorably to the incorporation of pharmacy informatics content into a drug information course using a TBL approach. Students met the learning objectives of seven thematic areas and had positive attitudes toward the course after its completion.

  9. Re-Configuring Inclusion, Decolonising Practice: Digital Participation and Learning in Black Women's Community-Led Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Rachel; Lewis, Rosie M.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores an innovative model of adult education within museums developed from a Black feminist approach. BAM! Sistahood! is a community-led project with regional heritage organisations, universities and women's centres in the UK, that offers a holistic approach to heritage development. The ethos is to challenge the perpetuation of…

  10. Empathy and Dignity through Technology: Using Lifeworld-Led Multimedia to Enhance Learning about the Head, Heart and Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulman, Andy; Galvin, Kathleen; Hutchings, Maggie; Todres, Les; Quinney, Anne; Ellis-Hill, Caroline; Atkins, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A person's sense of dignity is a complex phenomenon and is intertwined with their sense of feeling human and being respected as a human being. In 2010, the School of Health and Social Care developed a collaborative lifeworld led transprofessional curriculum for health and social work disciplines harnessing technology to connect learners to a wider…

  11. Instructor Influence on Student Intercultural Gains and Learning during Instructor-Led, Short-Term Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christine L.; Lorenz, Karl; White, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In the United States post 9/11, there is increasing interest by the government and by institutions of higher education in educating students and citizens to more successfully navigate difference and interact in an increasingly connected world. This has led to a rise in the number of U.S. American students studying abroad especially on…

  12. Modeling Evidence-Based Application: Using Team-Based Learning to Increase Higher Order Thinking in Nursing Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget Moore

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nursing practice is comprised of knowledge, theory, and research [1]. Because of its impact on the profession, the appraisal of research evidence is critically important. Future nursing professionals must be introduced to the purpose and utility of nursing research, as early exposure provides an opportunity to embed evidence-based practice (EBP into clinical experiences. The AACN requires baccalaureate education to include an understanding of the research process to integrate reliable evidence to inform practice and enhance clinical judgments [1]. Although the importance of these knowledge competencies are evident to healthcare administrators and nursing leaders within the field, undergraduate students at the institution under study sometimes have difficulty understanding the relevance of nursing research to the baccalaureate prepared nurse, and struggle to grasp advanced concepts of qualitative and quantitative research design and methodologies. As undergraduate nursing students generally have not demonstrated an understanding of the relationship between theoretical concepts found within the undergraduate nursing curriculum and the practical application of these concepts in the clinical setting, the research team decided to adopt an effective pedagogical active learning strategy, team-based learning (TBL. Team-based learning shifts the traditional course design to focus on higher thinking skills to integrate desired knowledge [2]. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the impact of course design with the integration of TBL in an undergraduate nursing research course on increasing higher order thinking. [1] American Association of Colleges of Nursing, The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice, Washington, DC: American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2008. [2] B. Bloom, Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Handbook I: Cognitive Domain, New York: McKay, 1956.

  13. Perceptions and Attitudes of First-Year Medical Students on a Modified Team-Based Learning (TBL) Strategy in Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inuwa, Ibrahim M

    2012-08-01

    Although team-based learning (TBL) is widely used in medical education, its evaluation from the perspectives of the students exposed to it has been limited. This paper reports on a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of perceptions of first year medical students towards TBL. Lectures in an anatomy course were transformed into a series of TBL sessions for two cohorts of first-year medical students. Each session consisted of pre-class reading, in-class readiness assurance tests, and problem-solving of clinical cases by student teams. At the end of each course, students were surveyed using qualitative and quantitative instruments to assess their perceptions of the strategy. Internal consistency of questionnaire items was determined by a reliability analysis (Cronbach's alpha). Principal component factor analysis and correspondence analysis were conducted on the quantitative data. Open-ended questions were explored by thematic analysis. Students' evaluations indicated that TBL is a welcome alternative to lecture-based teaching; as implemented in this study, it encouraged clinical problem solving and fruitful in-class discussion. Principal component factor analysis identified five factors (Cronbach's alpha 0.602-0.875). However, the majority of students disapproved of mixed gender TBL teams. Most students agreed that the strategy facilitated consistency in their study, generated an increased awareness about self-directed learning, and had a positive impact on their learning attitudes. TBL is a welcome instructional strategy as reported by our first-year medical students. It was perceived to be a better approach compared to content-based lectures. The effect on actual student performance is currently being investigated.

  14. Technique adaptation, strategic replanning, and team learning during implementation of MR-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skliarenko, Julia; Carlone, Marco; Tanderup, Kari; Han, Kathy; Beiki-Ardakani, Akbar; Borg, Jette; Chan, Kitty; Croke, Jennifer; Rink, Alexandra; Simeonov, Anna; Ujaimi, Reem; Xie, Jason; Fyles, Anthony; Milosevic, Michael

    MR-guided brachytherapy (MRgBT) with interstitial needles is associated with improved outcomes in cervical cancer patients. However, there are implementation barriers, including magnetic resonance (MR) access, practitioner familiarity/comfort, and efficiency. This study explores a graded MRgBT implementation strategy that included the adaptive use of needles, strategic use of MR imaging/planning, and team learning. Twenty patients with cervical cancer were treated with high-dose-rate MRgBT (28 Gy in four fractions, two insertions, daily MR imaging/planning). A tandem/ring applicator alone was used for the first insertion in most patients. Needles were added for the second insertion based on evaluation of the initial dosimetry. An interdisciplinary expert team reviewed and discussed the MR images and treatment plans. Dosimetry-trigger technique adaptation with the addition of needles for the second insertion improved target coverage in all patients with suboptimal dosimetry initially without compromising organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. Target and OAR planning objectives were achieved in most patients. There were small or no systematic differences in tumor or OAR dosimetry between imaging/planning once per insertion vs. daily and only small random variations. Peer review and discussion of images, contours, and plans promoted learning and process development. Technique adaptation based on the initial dosimetry is an efficient approach to implementing MRgBT while gaining comfort with the use of needles. MR imaging and planning once per insertion is safe in most patients as long as applicator shifts, and large anatomical changes are excluded. Team learning is essential to building individual and programmatic competencies. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Performance and Perceptions of Pharmacy Students using Team-based Learning (TBL within a Global Health Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Addo-Atuah, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Team-based learning (TBL has been shown to be a very useful active learning tool in a variety of disciplines and educational settings. The objectives of this study in a Global Health elective course within a PharmD curriculum were to (1 determine whether TBL contributes to performance (as measured by iRAT scores, tRAT scores, and grades; and (2 evaluate students’ perceptions of TBL as an instructional strategy. Case Study: TBL sessions were incorporated into a new elective course in Global Health along with other teaching methodologies. Student performance was evaluated during the TBL sessions and course team projects, among others. An anonymous student qualitative survey explored their perceptions of and experiences with TBL at the end of the course. Students’ performance in the TBL sessions improved as reflected in the comparison of individual Readiness Assurance Tests (iRATs and the team Readiness Assurance Tests (tRATs scores. Overall students’ performance in the course resulted in over 88% earning the letter grade A. Students’ performance in the TBL sessions, especially their iRATs, was reflected in their overall course grades. Over 75% of the students believed that TBL increased their analytical skills and nearly 50% believed that learning utilizing TBL would have the most lasting effect on their careers. Conclusion: TBL was successfully implemented in a Global Health elective course in a PharmD curriculum and students perceived it as a beneficial instructional strategy. This study adds to the TBL literature by providing some evidence of the applicability of TBL in a course not traditionally taught in the PharmD curriculum (i.e., Global Health. Future research and intervention(s leading to the development and growth of TBL in pharmacy education are recommended.

  16. Performance and Perceptions of Pharmacy Students using Team-based Learning (TBL within a Global Health Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Addo-Atuah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Team-based learning (TBL has been shown to be a very useful active learning tool in a variety of disciplines and educational settings. The objectives of this study in a Global Health elective course within a PharmD curriculum were to (1 determine whether TBL contributes to performance (as measured by iRAT scores, tRAT scores, and grades; and (2 evaluate students' perceptions of TBL as an instructional strategy. Case Study: TBL sessions were incorporated into a new elective course in Global Health along with other teaching methodologies. Student performance was evaluated during the TBL sessions and course team projects, among others. An anonymous student qualitative survey explored their perceptions of and experiences with TBL at the end of the course. Students' performance in the TBL sessions improved as reflected in the comparison of individual Readiness Assurance Tests (iRATs and the team Readiness Assurance Tests (tRATs scores. Overall students' performance in the course resulted in over 88% earning the letter grade A. Students' performance in the TBL sessions, especially their iRATs, was reflected in their overall course grades. Over 75% of the students believed that TBL increased their analytical skills and nearly 50% believed that learning utilizing TBL would have the most lasting effect on their careers. Conclusion: TBL was successfully implemented in a Global Health elective course in a PharmD curriculum and students perceived it as a beneficial instructional strategy. This study adds to the TBL literature by providing some evidence of the applicability of TBL in a course not traditionally taught in the PharmD curriculum (i.e., Global Health. Future research and intervention(s leading to the development and growth of TBL in pharmacy education are recommended.   Type: Case Study

  17. Evaluation of a modified team based learning method for teaching general embryology to 1st year medical graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Nachiket; Roopa, R

    2009-01-01

    To encourage student participation in the learning process, the authors introduced a modified team based learning (TBL) method to cover two general embryology topics in the 1st year MBBS curriculum. The aim of this study was to evaluate students' perception of this method vis-à-vis the lecture method of teaching. A questionnaire was used to survey and evaluate the perceptions of 1st year MBBS students at the Department of Anatomy at our medical college in India. A total of eight classes were allotted to cover General Embryology. Six of these classes were conducted using the traditional didactic lecture method. Two topics were covered using the modified TBL method. Five teams of students were constituted, and each team was given handouts which contained basic factual material, four clinical case histories, and previous university exam questions from the topic. On the day of the session, these were discussed in the presence of the faculty facilitator. Students evaluated these sessions through a questionnaire. A majority of students felt that the modified TBL sessions were better at fulfilling learning objectives (46 students, 85%), enabled better understanding (43 students, 79%), were more interesting (43 students, 81%), ensured greater student participation (51 students, 94%) and involved greater effort on the part of students (53 students, 98%), as compared to traditional teaching methods. Most of the students (43 students, 79%) opined that more such sessions should be organized in the future. Responses from students show that the modified TBL classes could be utilized judiciously along with the traditional didactic lectures for teaching embryology.

  18. Innovative Team Training for Patient Safety: Comparing Classroom Learning to Experiential Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiss, Fran; Thomas, Lily; Fricke, Madeline M

    2017-12-01

    This study compared two different means of retraining staff in TeamSTEPPS ® in an effort to determine whether experiential training might be more effective than a classroom experience. A randomized, controlled pretest-posttest repeated measures design was used for the study. The hypothesis that experiential classes would result in improvements in attitude, perceptions, and knowledge of TeamSTEPPS was not borne out, but several important implications for further study were discovered. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(12):563-569. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Team designing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denise J. Stokholm, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    more attention to the underlying models, information management and shared goals. Simple machine understanding and obvious goals are not suitable to explain present states or how to reach a better state` (1). `Design is a universal method in the Age of Information` (2). Education of interdisciplinary...... in relation to a design-engineering education at Aalborg University. It will exemplify how the model has been used in workshops on team designing, challenged design learning and affected design competence. In specific it will investigate the influence of visual models of the perception of design, design...... thinking and communication in design. Trying to answer the question: How can visual system models facilitate learning in design thinking and team designing?...

  20. The potential improvement of team-working skills in Biomedical and Natural Science students using a problem-based learning approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forough L. Nowrouzian

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Teamwork has become an integral part of most organisations today, and it is clearly important in Science and other disciplines. In Science, research teams increase in size while the number of single-authored papers and patents decline. Team-work in laboratory sciences permits projects that are too big or complex for one individual to be tackled. This development requires that students gain experience of team-work before they start their professional career. Students working in teams this may increase productivity, confidence, innovative capacity and improvement of interpersonal skills. Problem-based learning (PBL is an instructional approach focusing on real analytical problems as a means of training an analytical scientist. PBL may have a positive impact on team-work skills that are important for undergraduates and postgraduates to enable effective collaborative work. This survey of the current literature explores the development of the team-work skills in Biomedical Science students using PBL.

  1. Computational prediction of multidisciplinary team decision-making for adjuvant breast cancer drug therapies: a machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Frank P Y; Pokorny, Adrian; Teng, Christina; Dear, Rachel; Epstein, Richard J

    2016-12-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are used to optimise expert decision-making about treatment options, but such expertise is not digitally transferable between centres. To help standardise medical decision-making, we developed a machine learning model designed to predict MDT decisions about adjuvant breast cancer treatments. We analysed MDT decisions regarding adjuvant systemic therapy for 1065 breast cancer cases over eight years. Machine learning classifiers with and without bootstrap aggregation were correlated with MDT decisions (recommended, not recommended, or discussable) regarding adjuvant cytotoxic, endocrine and biologic/targeted therapies, then tested for predictability using stratified ten-fold cross-validations. The predictions so derived were duly compared with those based on published (ESMO and NCCN) cancer guidelines. Machine learning more accurately predicted adjuvant chemotherapy MDT decisions than did simple application of guidelines. No differences were found between MDT- vs. ESMO/NCCN- based decisions to prescribe either adjuvant endocrine (97%, p = 0.44/0.74) or biologic/targeted therapies (98%, p = 0.82/0.59). In contrast, significant discrepancies were evident between MDT- and guideline-based decisions to prescribe chemotherapy (87%, p machine learning models. A machine learning approach based on clinicopathologic characteristics can predict MDT decisions about adjuvant breast cancer drug therapies. The discrepancy between MDT- and guideline-based decisions regarding adjuvant chemotherapy implies that certain non-clincopathologic criteria, such as patient preference and resource availability, are factored into clinical decision-making by local experts but not captured by guidelines.

  2. Effects of team-based learning on problem-solving, knowledge and clinical performance of Korean nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae-Ran; Song, Yeoungsuk; Lindquist, Ruth; Kang, Hee-Young

    2016-03-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) has been used as a learner-centered teaching strategy in efforts to improve students' problem-solving, knowledge and practice performance. Although TBL has been used in nursing education in Korea for a decade, few studies have studied its effects on Korean nursing students' learning outcomes. To examine the effects of TBL on problem-solving ability and learning outcomes (knowledge and clinical performance) of Korean nursing students. Randomized controlled trial. 63 third-year undergraduate nursing students attending a single university were randomly assigned to the TBL group (n=32), or a control group (n=31). The TBL and control groups attended 2h of class weekly for 3weeks. Three scenarios with pulmonary disease content were employed in both groups. However, the control group received lectures and traditional case study teaching/learning strategies instead of TBL. A questionnaire of problem-solving ability was administered at baseline, prior to students' exposure to the teaching strategies. Students' problem-solving ability, knowledge of pulmonary nursing care, and clinical performance were assessed following completion of the three-week pulmonary unit. After the three-week educational interventions, the scores on problem-solving ability in the TBL group were significantly improved relative to that of the control group (t=10.89, presearch on other specific learning outcomes of TBL for nursing students is recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Creating an Enterprise Culture in a University: The Role of an Entrepreneurial Learning Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, David; Gee, Simon; Moon, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The "entrepreneurial university" is considered a desirable and achievable goal, but how do universities become entrepreneurial? The role of the enterprising academic in stimulating cultural change is often overlooked. This article presents as a case study the teaching team at the University of Derby, UK, who "acted as…

  4. Learning to Argue with Intermediate Macro Theory: A Semester-Long Team Writing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Georg; Wolfe, Marketa Halova

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe their experience with integrating a semester-long economic analysis project into an intermediate macroeconomic theory course. Students work in teams of "economic advisors" to write a series of nested reports that analyze the current state of the economy, and propose and evaluate policies for a decision-maker. The…

  5. Growing the Top Management Team: Supporting Mental Growth as a Vehicle for Promoting Organizational Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laske, Otto E.; Maynes, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    The Developmental Structure/Process Tool was used to explore differences between theories in use and espoused theories of two executives and a six-member work team. Theories of action were shown to be developmentally based and thus open to maturation and developmental coaching. (Contains 39 references.) (SK)

  6. Team learning for innovation in higher education: a mixed methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, Rike; Endedijk, Maaike Dorine; Sleegers, P.J.C.

    2015-01-01

    In Higher Education, many changes towards more student-centred and interdisciplinary education are designed and implemented. In order to design such educational innovations, teachers in higher education have to work together in teams. In this research we study these teacher collaboration processes

  7. The Challenge of Leading Work Teams: Creating a Case Study to Enhance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraeder, Mike; Bandow, Diane

    2016-01-01

    The competitive success of organizations is heavily dependent on the quality of leadership within those organizations. Among the growing list of skills required for effective leadership is the need for leaders to promote the deployment of effective teams in the workplace. There are numerous strategies and methods that have been utilized to prepare…

  8. Student Perceptions of Cognitive and Social Learning in Global Virtual Teams: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohut, Gary F.; Yon, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    The global work environment requires graduates to have skills to work collaboratively over distance and time. This pilot study presents the findings of a survey of student perceptions concerning a global virtual team (GVT) experience that used both synchronous and asynchronous collaboration. Our findings revealed that while students experienced…

  9. Perceived Learning Outcomes in Entrepreneurship Education: The Impact of Student Motivation and Team Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hytti, Ulla; Stenholm, Pekka; Heinonen, Jarna; Seikkula-Leino, Jaana

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to address the impact of a person's motivation to study entrepreneurship on their subsequent levels of performance in terms of the generation of business ideas, while taking into account the effect of student team behaviour. Design/methodology/approach: The paper hypothesises that both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation as…

  10. Accelerating and Braking in Times of Economic Crisis: Organisational Learning in a Top Management Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallo, Andreas; Kock, Henrik; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to present the results of a study of an industrial company's top management team (TMT) that fought to survive an economic crisis. Specifically, the article seeks to focus on describing the TMT's composition, group processes, and work during a period of high external pressure; analysing the TMT's work in…

  11. Understanding Soccer Team Supporters' Behavior and Culture in a Globalized Society from Social Learning Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungbum; Han, Keunsu

    2012-01-01

    Whereas there have been many academic studies on European soccer team supporters, relatively few studies have looked at supporters in Asia, especially regarding their supporting behavior and culture. Broadly, the purpose of this paper is to describe the behavior and culture of supporters of the Korean professional soccer league (K-League).…

  12. Crew Resource Management (CRM video storytelling project: a team-based learning activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma, Maggie Jiao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This Crew Resource Management (CRM video storytelling project asks students to work in a team (4-5 people per team to create (write and produce a video story. The story should demonstrate lacking and ill practices of CRM knowledge and skills, or positive skills used to create a successful scenario in aviation (e. g. , flight training, commercial aviation, airport management. The activity is composed of two parts: (1 creating a video story of CRM in aviation, and (2 delivering a group presentation. Each tem creates a 5-8 minute long video clip of its story. The story must be originally created by the team to educate pilot and/or aviation management students on good practices of CRM in aviation. Accidents and incidents can be used as a reference to inspire ideas. However, this project is not to re-create any previous CRM accidents/incidents. The video story needs to be self-contained and address two or more aspects of CRM specified in the Federal Aviation Administration’s Advisory Circular 120-51. The presentation must include the use of PowerPoint or similar software and additional multimedia visual aids. The presentation itself will last no more than 17 minutes in length; including the actual video story (each group has additional 3 minutes to set up prior to the presentation. During the presentation following the video each team will discuss the CRM problems (or invite audience to identify CRM problems and explain what CRM practices were performed, and should have been performed. This presentation also should describe how each team worked together in order to complete this project (i. e. , good and bad CRM practiced

  13. What and how do students learn in an interprofessional student-run clinic? An educational framework for team-based care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Désirée A.; Forest, Christopher P.; Walsh, Anne; Banzali, Yvonne; Lohenry, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background The student-run clinic (SRC) has the potential to address interprofessional learning among health professions students. Purpose To derive a framework for understanding student learning during team-based care provided in an interprofessional SRC serving underserved patients. Methods The authors recruited students for a focus group study by purposive sampling and snowballing. They constructed two sets of semi-structured questions for uniprofessional and multiprofessional groups. Sessions were audiotaped, and transcripts were independently coded and adjudicated. Major themes about learning content and processes were extracted. Grounded theory was followed after data synthesis and interpretation to establish a framework for interprofessional learning. Results Thirty-six students from four professions (medicine, physician assistant, occupational therapy, and pharmacy) participated in eight uniprofessional groups; 14 students participated in three multiprofessional groups (N = 50). Theme saturation was achieved. Six common themes about learning content from uniprofessional groups were role recognition, team-based care appreciation, patient experience, advocacy-/systems-based models, personal skills, and career choices. Occupational therapy students expressed self-advocacy, and medical students expressed humility and self-discovery. Synthesis of themes from all groups suggests a learning continuum that begins with the team huddle and continues with shared patient care and social interactions. Opportunity to observe and interact with other professions in action is key to the learning process. Discussion Interprofessional SRC participation promotes learning ‘with, from, and about’ each other. Participation challenges misconceptions and sensitizes students to patient experiences, health systems, advocacy, and social responsibility. Learning involves interprofessional interactions in the patient encounter, reinforced by formal and informal communications

  14. What and how do students learn in an interprofessional student-run clinic? An educational framework for team-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Désirée A; Forest, Christopher P; Walsh, Anne; Banzali, Yvonne; Lohenry, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background The student-run clinic (SRC) has the potential to address interprofessional learning among health professions students. Purpose To derive a framework for understanding student learning during team-based care provided in an interprofessional SRC serving underserved patients. Methods The authors recruited students for a focus group study by purposive sampling and snowballing. They constructed two sets of semi-structured questions for uniprofessional and multiprofessional groups. Sessions were audiotaped, and transcripts were independently coded and adjudicated. Major themes about learning content and processes were extracted. Grounded theory was followed after data synthesis and interpretation to establish a framework for interprofessional learning. Results Thirty-six students from four professions (medicine, physician assistant, occupational therapy, and pharmacy) participated in eight uniprofessional groups; 14 students participated in three multiprofessional groups (N = 50). Theme saturation was achieved. Six common themes about learning content from uniprofessional groups were role recognition, team-based care appreciation, patient experience, advocacy-/systems-based models, personal skills, and career choices. Occupational therapy students expressed self-advocacy, and medical students expressed humility and self-discovery. Synthesis of themes from all groups suggests a learning continuum that begins with the team huddle and continues with shared patient care and social interactions. Opportunity to observe and interact with other professions in action is key to the learning process. Discussion Interprofessional SRC participation promotes learning 'with, from, and about' each other. Participation challenges misconceptions and sensitizes students to patient experiences, health systems, advocacy, and social responsibility. Learning involves interprofessional interactions in the patient encounter, reinforced by formal and informal communications

  15. Making Teamwork Work: Team Knowledge for Team Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchait, Priyanko; Lei, Puiwa; Tews, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of two types of team knowledge on team effectiveness. The study assessed the impact of taskwork knowledge and teamwork knowledge on team satisfaction and performance. A longitudinal study was conducted with 27 service-management teams involving 178 students in a real-life restaurant setting. Teamwork knowledge was found to impact both team outcomes. Furthermore, team learning behavior was found to mediate the relationships between teamwork knowledge and team outcomes. Educators and managers should therefore ensure these types of knowledge are developed in teams along with learning behavior for maximum effectiveness.

  16. Competitive Team-Based Learning versus Group Investigation with Reference to the Language Proficiency of Iranian EFL Intermediate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Hassan Hosseini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a report on an experimental study which intended to look into the possible effects of Competitive Team-Based Learning (CTBL vis-à-vis Group Investigation (GI method of Cooperative Learning (CL on the language proficiency of Iranian EFL intermediate students. Seventy homogeneous Iranian intermediate students were selected out of a total population of 110 to serve the present study. The results of the study indicated the advantage of CTBL over GI in terms of its effect on improving the target group’s language proficiency. The results of the study were in contrast to the reports of researchers like Ab-Raza (2007, an Israeli language specialist, who have argued that students in Islamic countries “do not value diversity of ideas, beliefs, and perspectives” (p. 5 and so cannot be taught through modern methods like those of CL.

  17. School Graduation Project in Robot Design: A Case Study of Team Learning Experiences and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verner, Igor M.; Hershko, Eyal

    2003-01-01

    A study of 46 Israeli high school students' graduation projects involving robot design focused on engineering knowledge and skills needed, learning through reflective practice, and individual assessment of learning. Analysis of teacher logbooks and student portfolios indicated that all students completed projects, were motivated, devoted extra…

  18. Team formation instruments to enhance learner interactions in open learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Houtmans, Tilly; Sloep, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Open learning environments, such as Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), often lack adequate learner collaboration possibilities; they are also plagued by high levels of drop-out. Introducing project-based learning (PBL) can enhance learner collaboration and motivation, but PBL does not easily

  19. Experiences of Two Multidisciplinary Team Members of Systemic Consultations in a Community Learning Disability Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Clair; Viljoen, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Background: Systemic approaches can be useful in working with people with learning disabilities and their network. The evidence base for these approaches within the field of learning disabilities, however, is currently limited. Materials and Methods: This article presents part of a service evaluation of systemic consultations in a Community…

  20. A Case Study of Cooperative Learning and Communication Pedagogy: Does Working in Teams Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Mina; Brady, Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Cooperative learning has increasingly become a popular form of active pedagogy employed in academic institutions. This case study explores the relationship between cooperative learning and academic performance in higher education, specifically in the field of communication. Findings from a questionnaire administered to undergraduate students in a…