WorldWideScience

Sample records for led light-emitting diode

  1. Blue laser diode (LD) and light emitting diode (LED) applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, Arpad A.

    2004-01-01

    The family of blue LEDs, edge emitting and surface emitting lasers, enable a number of applications. Blue lasers are used in digital applications such as optical storage in high density DVDs. The resolution of the spot size and hence the storage density is diffraction limited and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser. Other applications include printing, optical scanners, and high-resolution photo-lithography. As light emitters, blue LEDs are used for signaling and in direct view large area emissive displays. They are also making inroads into signage and LCD back-lighting, mobile platforms, and decorative accent lighting in curtains, furniture, etc. Blue LEDs produce white light either with phosphor wavelength converters or in combination with red and green LEDs. The full potential of LED light sources will require three devices to enable complete control over color and intensity. Sensing and medical/bio applications have a major impact on home security, on monitoring the environment, and on health care. New emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications will improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Blue laser diode (LD) and light emitting diode (LED) applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergh, Arpad A [Optoelectronics Industry Development Association (OIDA), 1133 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036-4329 (United States)

    2004-09-01

    The family of blue LEDs, edge emitting and surface emitting lasers, enable a number of applications. Blue lasers are used in digital applications such as optical storage in high density DVDs. The resolution of the spot size and hence the storage density is diffraction limited and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser. Other applications include printing, optical scanners, and high-resolution photo-lithography. As light emitters, blue LEDs are used for signaling and in direct view large area emissive displays. They are also making inroads into signage and LCD back-lighting, mobile platforms, and decorative accent lighting in curtains, furniture, etc. Blue LEDs produce white light either with phosphor wavelength converters or in combination with red and green LEDs. The full potential of LED light sources will require three devices to enable complete control over color and intensity. Sensing and medical/bio applications have a major impact on home security, on monitoring the environment, and on health care. New emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications will improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Best practices : bus signage for persons with visual impairments : light-emitting diode (LED) signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This best-practices report provides key information regarding the use of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) sign technologies to present destination and route information on transit vehicles. It will assist managers and engineers in the acquisition and use o...

  4. Light Emitting Diode (LED) circular traffic signal lifetime management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this research is to build lifetime curves for red, yellow, and green LED circular traffic signals through 20,000-hr. accelerated stress testing of samples operating under Louisianas environmental conditions.

  5. Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) - Light Emitting Diode (LED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Howard G.; Caron, Allison

    2016-01-01

    The Biological Research in Canisters - LED (BRIC-LED) is a biological research system that is being designed to complement the capabilities of the existing BRIC-Petri Dish Fixation Unit (PDFU) for the Space Life and Physical Sciences (SLPS) Program. A diverse range of organisms can be supported, including plant seedlings, callus cultures, Caenorhabditis elegans, microbes, and others. In the event of a launch scrub, the entire assembly can be replaced with an identical back-up unit containing freshly loaded specimens.

  6. Novel Coatings for Enhancement of Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-28

    quantum efficiency of LEDs. SAIC’s strength is this area is a proprietary nonimaging optics code. In consultation with Lumileds, SAIC developed designs for...five different optical ele- ments that collect and project light from a LED. The simulations showed that the designs achieve a significant improvement... optical microscope at 100x power the coating is not visible. Fire sample 6DecO4P1 in tube furnace As a first test, sample 6Dec04P1 was progressively

  7. Light emitting diodes (LED): applications in forest and native plant nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas D. Landis; Jeremiah R. Pinto; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2013-01-01

    It was quotes like this that made us want to learn more about light emitting diodes (LED). Other than knowing that LEDs were the latest innovation in artificial lighting, we knew that we had a lot to learn. So we started by reviewing some of the basics. The following review is a brief synopsis of how light affects plants and some discussion about LED lighting. If you...

  8. Continuous light-emitting Diode (LED) lighting for improving food quality

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, C; Bian, Z

    2016-01-01

    Lighting-emitting diodes (LEDs) have shown great potential for plant growth and development, with higher luminous efficiency and positive impact compared with other artificial lighting. The combined effects of red/blue or/and green, and white LED light on plant growth and physiology, including chlorophyll fluorescence, nitrate content and phytochemical concentration before harvest, were investigated. The results showed that continuous light (CL)\\ud exposure at pre-harvest can effectively redu...

  9. Solid State pH Sensor Based on Light Emitting Diodes (LED) As Detector Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, King Tong; Shepherd, R.; Diamond, Danny; Diamond, Dermot

    2006-01-01

    A low-power, high sensitivity, very low-cost light emitting diode (LED)-based device developed for low-cost sensor networks was modified with bromocresol green membrane to work as a solid-state pH sensor. In this approach, a reverse-biased LED functioning as a photodiode is coupled with a second LED configured in conventional emission mode. A simple timer circuit measures how long (in microsecond) it takes for the photocurrent generated on the detector LED to discharge its capacitance from lo...

  10. White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) using (oxy)nitride phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, R-J; Hirosaki, N; Sakuma, K; Kimura, N

    2008-01-01

    (Oxy)nitride phosphors have attracted great attention recently because they are promising luminescent materials for phosphor-converted white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). This paper reports the luminescent properties of (oxy)nitride phosphors in the system of M-Si-Al-O-N (M = Li, Ca or Sr), and optical properties of white LEDs using a GaN-based blue LED and (oxy)nitride phosphors. The phosphors show high conversion efficiency of blue light, suitable emission colours and small thermal quenching. The bichromatic white LEDs exhibit high luminous efficacy (∼55 lm W -1 ) and the multi-phosphor converted white LEDs show high colour rendering index (Ra 82-95). The results indicate that (oxy)nitride phosphors demonstrate their superior suitability to use as down-conversion luminescent materials in white LEDs

  11. Stolephorus sp Behavior in Different LED (Light Emitting Diode) Color and Light Intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitri Aristi, D. P.; Ramadanita, I. A.; Hapsari, T. D.; Susanto, A.

    2018-02-01

    This research aims to observe anchovy (Stolephorus sp) behavior under different LED light intensities that affect eye physiology (cell cone structure). The materials used were Stolephorus sp taken from the waters off Jepara and 13 and 10 watt light emitting diode (LED). The research method was an experiment conducted from March through August 2015 in the waters off Jepara. Data analysis of visual histology and fish respond was carried out at the fishing gear material laboratory, anatomy and cultivate. Cone cell structure (mosaic cone) of Stolephorus sp forms a connected regular square pattern with every single cone surrounded by four double cones, which indicate that anchovies are sensitive to light. The 13 watt LED (628 lux) has faster response than the 10 watt LED (531 lux) as it has wider and higher emitting intensity, which also attracts fish to gather quicker.

  12. Luminescence and the light emitting diode the basics and technology of leds and the luminescence properties of the materials

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, E W; Pamplin, BR

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence and the Light Emitting Diode: The Basics and Technology of LEDS and the Luminescence Properties of the Materials focuses on the basic physics and technology of light emitting diodes (LEDS) and pn junction lasers as well as their luminescence properties. Optical processes in semiconductors and the useful devices which can be made are discussed. Comprised of 10 chapters, this book begins with an introduction to the crystal structure and growth, as well as the optical and electrical properties of LED materials. The detailed fabrication of the LED is then considered, along with the lu

  13. Protocol for Determining Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diode (UV-LED) Fluence for Microbial Inactivation Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheyrandish, Ataollah; Mohseni, Madjid; Taghipour, Fariborz

    2018-06-15

    Determining fluence is essential to derive the inactivation kinetics of microorganisms and to design ultraviolet (UV) reactors for water disinfection. UV light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) are emerging UV sources with various advantages compared to conventional UV lamps. Unlike conventional mercury lamps, no standard method is available to determine the average fluence of the UV-LEDs, and conventional methods used to determine the fluence for UV mercury lamps are not applicable to UV-LEDs due to the relatively low power output, polychromatic wavelength, and specific radiation profile of UV-LEDs. In this study, a method was developed to determine the average fluence inside a water suspension in a UV-LED experimental setup. In this method, the average fluence was estimated by measuring the irradiance at a few points for a collimated and uniform radiation on a Petri dish surface. New correction parameters were defined and proposed, and several of the existing parameters for determining the fluence of the UV mercury lamp apparatus were revised to measure and quantify the collimation and uniformity of the radiation. To study the effect of polychromatic output and radiation profile of the UV-LEDs, two UV-LEDs with peak wavelengths of 262 and 275 nm and different radiation profiles were selected as the representatives of typical UV-LEDs applied to microbial inactivation. The proper setup configuration for microorganism inactivation studies was also determined based on the defined correction factors.

  14. Technology Analysis of Global Smart Light Emitting Diode (LED Development Using Patent Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangsung Park

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Technological developments related to smart light emitting diode (LED systems have progressed rapidly in recent years. In this paper, patent documents related to smart LED technology are collected and analyzed to understand the technology development of smart LED systems. Most previous studies of the technology were dependent on the knowledge and experience of domain experts, using techniques such as Delphi surveys or technology road-mapping. These approaches may be subjective and lack robustness, because the results can vary according to the selected expert groups. We therefore propose a new technology analysis methodology based on statistical modeling to obtain objective and relatively stable results. The proposed method consists of visualization based on Bayesian networks and a linear count model to analyze patent documents related to smart LED technology. Combining these results, a global hierarchical technology structure is created that can enhance the sustainability in smart LED system technology. In order to show how this methodology could be applied to real-world problems, we carry out a case study on the technology analysis of smart LED systems.

  15. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Post-Top Lighting at Central Park in New York City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myer, Michael; Goettel, Russell T.; Kinzey, Bruce R.

    2012-09-30

    A review of five post-top light-emitting diode (LED) pedestrian luminaires installed in New York City's Central Park for possible replacement to the existing metal halide post-top luminaire. This report reviews the energy savings potential and lighting delivered by the LED post-top luminaires.

  16. A Simple, Small-Scale Lego Colorimeter with a Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Used as Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asheim, Jonas; Kvittingen, Eivind V.; Kvittingen, Lise; Verley, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how to construct a simple, inexpensive, and robust colorimeter from a few Lego bricks, in which one light-emitting diode (LED) is used as a light source and a second LED as a light detector. The colorimeter is suited to various grades and curricula.

  17. The Use of Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) as Green and Red/Far-Red Light Sources in Plant Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The use of green, red, and far-red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources for plant physiological studies is outlined and evaluated. Indicates that LED lamps have the advantage over conventional light sources in that they are lightweight, low-cost, portable, easily constructed, and do not require color filters. (Author/DH)

  18. Solid State pH Sensor Based on Light Emitting Diodes (LED) As Detector Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, King Tong; Shepherd, R.; Diamond, Danny; Diamond, Dermot

    2006-01-01

    A low-power, high sensitivity, very low-cost light emitting diode (LED)-based device developed for low-cost sensor networks was modified with bromocresol green membrane to work as a solid-state pH sensor. In this approach, a reverse-biased LED functioning as a photodiode is coupled with a second LED configured in conventional emission mode. A simple timer circuit measures how long (in microsecond) it takes for the photocurrent generated on the detector LED to discharge its capacitance from logic 1 (+5 V) to logic 0 (+1.7 V). The entire instrument provides an inherently digital output of light intensity measurements for a few cents. A light dependent resistor (LDR) modified with similar sensor membrane was also used as a comparison method. Both the LED sensor and the LDR sensor responded to various pH buffer solutions in a similar way to obtain sigmoidal curves expected of the dye. The pKa value obtained for the sensors was found to agree with the literature value.

  19. Solid State pH Sensor Based on Light Emitting Diodes (LED As Detector Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dermot Diamond

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A low-power, high sensitivity, very low-cost light emitting diode (LED-baseddevice developed for low-cost sensor networks was modified with bromocresol greenmembrane to work as a solid-state pH sensor. In this approach, a reverse-biased LEDfunctioning as a photodiode is coupled with a second LED configured in conventionalemission mode. A simple timer circuit measures how long (in microsecond it takes for thephotocurrent generated on the detector LED to discharge its capacitance from logic 1 ( 5 Vto logic 0 ( 1.7 V. The entire instrument provides an inherently digital output of lightintensity measurements for a few cents. A light dependent resistor (LDR modified withsimilar sensor membrane was also used as a comparison method. Both the LED sensor andthe LDR sensor responded to various pH buffer solutions in a similar way to obtainsigmoidal curves expected of the dye. The pKa value obtained for the sensors was found toagree with the literature value.

  20. Potential environmental impacts of light-emitting diodes (LEDs): metallic resources, toxicity, and hazardous waste classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Kang, Daniel; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Schoenung, Julie M

    2011-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are advertised as environmentally friendly because they are energy efficient and mercury-free. This study aimed to determine if LEDs engender other forms of environmental and human health impacts, and to characterize variation across different LEDs based on color and intensity. The objectives are as follows: (i) to use standardized leachability tests to examine whether LEDs are to be categorized as hazardous waste under existing United States federal and California state regulations; and (ii) to use material life cycle impact and hazard assessment methods to evaluate resource depletion and toxicity potentials of LEDs based on their metallic constituents. According to federal standards, LEDs are not hazardous except for low-intensity red LEDs, which leached Pb at levels exceeding regulatory limits (186 mg/L; regulatory limit: 5). However, according to California regulations, excessive levels of copper (up to 3892 mg/kg; limit: 2500), Pb (up to 8103 mg/kg; limit: 1000), nickel (up to 4797 mg/kg; limit: 2000), or silver (up to 721 mg/kg; limit: 500) render all except low-intensity yellow LEDs hazardous. The environmental burden associated with resource depletion potentials derives primarily from gold and silver, whereas the burden from toxicity potentials is associated primarily with arsenic, copper, nickel, lead, iron, and silver. Establishing benchmark levels of these substances can help manufacturers implement design for environment through informed materials substitution, can motivate recyclers and waste management teams to recognize resource value and occupational hazards, and can inform policymakers who establish waste management policies for LEDs.

  1. Development and future of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes: UV-LED will replace the UV lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramoto, Yoshihiko; Kimura, Masahiro; Nouda, Suguru

    2014-06-01

    Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) have started replacing UV lamps. The power per LED of high-power LED products has reached 12 W (14 A), which is 100 times the values observed ten years ago. In addition, the cost of these high-power LEDs has been decreasing. In this study, we attempt to understand the technologies and potential of UV-LEDs.

  2. Development and future of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes: UV-LED will replace the UV lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramoto, Yoshihiko; Kimura, Masahiro; Nouda, Suguru

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) have started replacing UV lamps. The power per LED of high-power LED products has reached 12 W (14 A), which is 100 times the values observed ten years ago. In addition, the cost of these high-power LEDs has been decreasing. In this study, we attempt to understand the technologies and potential of UV-LEDs. (invited article)

  3. Polymer light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier-Thianche, Emmmanuelle

    1998-01-01

    We study sandwich type semiconducting polymer light emitting diodes; anode/polymer/cathode. ITO is selected as anode, this polymer is a blend of a commercially available polymer with a high hole transport ability: polyvinyl-carbazole and a laser dye: coumarin-515. Magnesium covered with silver is chosen for the anode. We study the influence of polymer thickness and coumarin doping ratio on electroluminescence spectrum, electric characteristics and quantum efficiency. An important drawback is that diodes lifetime remains low. In the second part of our study we determine degradations causes with X-Ray reflectivity experiments. It may be due to ITO very high roughness. We realize a new type of planar electroluminescent device: a channel type electroluminescent device in which polymer layer is inserted into an aluminium channel. Such a device is by far more stable than using classical sandwich structures with the same polymer composition: indeed, charges are generated by internal-field ionization and there is no injection from the electrode to the polymer. This avoids electrochemical reactions at electrodes, thus reducing degradations routes. (author) [fr

  4. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting in Leavenworth, KS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Curry, Ku' uipo

    2011-05-06

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a commercial parking lot lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Technology GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The parking lot is for customers and employees of a Walmart Supercenter in Leavenworth, Kansas and this installation represents the first use of the LED Parking Lot Performance Specification developed by the DOE’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance. The application is a parking lot covering more than a half million square feet, lighted primarily by light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Metal halide wall packs were installed along the building facade. This site is new construction, so the installed baseline(s) were hypothetical designs. It was acknowledged early on that deviating from Walmart’s typical design would reduce the illuminance on the site. Walmart primarily uses 1000W pulse-start metal halide (PMH) lamps. In order to provide a comparison between both typical design and a design using conventional luminaires providing a lower illuminance, a 400W PMH design was also considered. As mentioned already, the illuminance would be reduced by shifting from the PMH system to the LED system. The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) provides recommended minimum illuminance values for parking lots. All designs exceeded the recommended illuminance values in IES RP-20, some by a wider margin than others. Energy savings from installing the LED system compared to the different PMH systems varied. Compared to the 1000W PMH system, the LED system would save 63 percent of the energy. However, this corresponds to a 68 percent reduction in illuminance as well. In comparison to the 400W PMH system, the LED system would save 44 percent of the energy and provide similar minimum illuminance values at the time of relamping. The LED system cost more than either of the PMH systems when comparing initial costs

  5. Light Converting Inorganic Phosphors for White Light-Emitting Diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lei; Lin, Chun-Che; Yeh, Chiao-Wen; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2010-01-01

    White light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) have matched the emission efficiency of florescent lights and will rapidly spread as light source for homes and offices in the next 5 to 10 years. WLEDs provide a light element having a semiconductor light emitting layer (blue or near-ultraviolet (nUV) LEDs) and photoluminescence phosphors. These solid-state LED lamps, rather than organic light emitting diode (OLED) or polymer light-emitting diode (PLED), have a number of advantages over conventional incand...

  6. Monochromic radiation through light-emitting diode (LED positively augments in vitro shoot regeneration in Orchid (Dendrobium sonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandita Billore

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Monochromatic lights emitted by light-emitting diodes (LEDs have generated great interest for efficient and controlled growth in vitro, especially of plants which are endangered or require specific intensity and wavelength of light. In the present study, we have evaluated the effect of monochromatic LEDs on in vitro morphogenesis: growth, proliferation of shoot cultures, and rooting of Dendrobium sonia. Different light sources viz. white LEDs (W, blue LEDs (B, yellow LEDs (Y and red LEDs (R were tested under photoperiod of 16 h of exposure and 8 h of dark. The frequency of morphogenesis depended on the wavelength of the applied monochromatic light. Higher wavelength monochromatic light (yellow light was observed to induce higher shoot proliferation (98%, early PLB (protocorm-like bodies formation, differentiation into green buds and shoot initiation as compared to red, blue and white light treatments. Yellow light also yielded higher number of shoots per explants (29 shoots/explant than red, blue and white light treatments. The results suggest that the monochromatic light sources stimulate morphogenic effects on in vitro culture of Dendrobium sonia, and that yellow light treatment can be used to enhance the efficiency of micropropagation.

  7. An engineering method to estimate the junction temperatures of light-emitting diodes in multiple LED application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Xing; Hu, Run; Luo, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    Acquiring the junction temperature of light emitting diode (LED) is essential for performance evaluation. But it is hard to get in the multiple LED applications. In this paper, an engineering method is presented to estimate the junction temperatures of LEDs in multiple LED applications. This method is mainly based on an analytical model, and it can be easily applied with some simple measurements. Simulations and experiments were conducted to prove the feasibility of the method, and the deviations among the results obtained by the present method with those by simulation as well as experiments are less than 2% and 3%, respectively. In the final part of this study, the engineering method was used to analyze the thermal resistances of a street lamp. The material of lead frame was found to affect the system thermal resistance mostly, and the choice of solder material strongly depended on the material of the lead frame.

  8. Highly efficient silicon light emitting diode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Minh, P.; Holleman, J.; Wallinga, Hans

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the fabrication, using standard silicon processing techniques, of silicon light-emitting diodes (LED) that efficiently emit photons with energy around the silicon bandgap. The improved efficiency had been explained by the spatial confinement of charge carriers due to a

  9. Comparative Study of Lettuce and Radish Grown Under Red and Blue Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) and White Fluorescent Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickens, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Growing vegetable crops in space will be an essential part of sustaining astronauts during long-term missions. To drive photosynthesis, red and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have attracted attention because of their efficiency, longevity, small size, and safety. In efforts to optimize crop production, there have also been recent interests in analyzing the subtle effects of green light on plant growth, and to determine if it serves as a source of growth enhancement or suppression. A comparative study was performed on two short cycle crops of lettuce (Outredgeous) and radish (Cherry Bomb) grown under two light treatments. The first treatment being red and blue LEDs, and the second treatment consisting of white fluorescent lamps which contain a portion of green light. In addition to comparing biomass production, physiological characterizations were conducted on how the light treatments influence morphology, water use, chlorophyll content, and the production of A TP within plant tissues.

  10. New Framework of Sustainable Indicators for Outdoor LED (Light Emitting Diodes Lighting and SSL (Solid State Lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika K. Jägerbrand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Light emitting diodes (LEDs and SSL (solid state lighting are relatively new light sources, but are already widely applied for outdoor lighting. Despite this, there is little available information allowing planners and designers to evaluate and weigh different sustainability aspects of LED/SSL lighting when making decisions. Based on a literature review, this paper proposes a framework of sustainability indicators and/or measures that can be used for a general evaluation or to highlight certain objectives or aspects of special interest when choosing LED/SSL lighting. LED/SSL lighting is reviewed from a conventional sustainable development perspective, i.e., covering the three dimensions, including ecological, economic and social sustainability. The new framework of sustainable indicators allow prioritization when choosing LED/SSL products and can thereby help ensure that short-term decisions on LED/SSL lighting systems are in line with long-term sustainability goals established in society. The new framework can also be a beneficial tool for planners, decision-makers, developers and lighting designers, or for consumers wishing to use LED/SSL lighting in a sustainable manner. Moreover, since some aspects of LED/SSL lighting have not yet been thoroughly studied or developed, some possible future indicators are suggested.

  11. Practical, reliable and inexpensive assay of lycopene in tomato products based on the combined use of light emitting diode (LED) and the optothermal window

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicanic, D.D.; Cuypers, R.; Luterotti, S.; Sporec, M.; Zoppi, A.; Vugec, J.

    2008-01-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) combined with the concept of optothermal window (OW) is proposed as a new approach (LED-OW) to detect lycopene in a wide range of tomato-based products (tomato juice, tomato ketchup, tomato passata and tomato puree). Phytonutrient lycopene is a dominant antioxidant in

  12. Time Effectiveness of Ultraviolet C Light (UVC Emitted by Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs in Reducing Stethoscope Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Messina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Today it is well demonstrated that stethoscopes can be as contaminated as hands, which are a recognized source of Health-Care Associated Infections (HCAIs. Ultraviolet C (UVC light has proven disinfection capacity and the innovative UVC technology of Light Emitting Diode (LED shows several potential benefits. To verify whether the use of UVC LEDs is effective and reliable in stethoscope membrane disinfection after prolonged use, a pre-post intervention study was conducted. A total of 1668 five-minute cycles were performed on two UVC LEDs to simulate their use; thereafter, their disinfection capacity was tested on stethoscope membranes used on a previously auscultated volunteer. Then, a further 1249 cycles were run and finally the LEDs were tested to assess performance in reducing experimental contamination by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli on the stethoscope membrane. Baseline volunteer contamination identified 104 Colony Forming Units (CFUs while treated Petri dishes had 12 and 15 CFUs (p < 0.001. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.001 were also found relating to the reduction of specific bacteria: in particular, after treatment no CFU were observed for S. aureus and E. coli. UVC LEDs demonstrated the capacity to maintain high levels of disinfection after more than 240 h of use and they were effective against common microorganisms that are causative agents of HCAIs.

  13. Time Effectiveness of Ultraviolet C Light (UVC) Emitted by Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in Reducing Stethoscope Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Gabriele; Fattorini, Mattia; Nante, Nicola; Rosadini, Daniele; Serafini, Andrea; Tani, Marco; Cevenini, Gabriele

    2016-09-23

    Today it is well demonstrated that stethoscopes can be as contaminated as hands, which are a recognized source of Health-Care Associated Infections (HCAIs). Ultraviolet C (UVC) light has proven disinfection capacity and the innovative UVC technology of Light Emitting Diode (LED) shows several potential benefits. To verify whether the use of UVC LEDs is effective and reliable in stethoscope membrane disinfection after prolonged use, a pre-post intervention study was conducted. A total of 1668 five-minute cycles were performed on two UVC LEDs to simulate their use; thereafter, their disinfection capacity was tested on stethoscope membranes used on a previously auscultated volunteer. Then, a further 1249 cycles were run and finally the LEDs were tested to assess performance in reducing experimental contamination by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli on the stethoscope membrane. Baseline volunteer contamination identified 104 Colony Forming Units (CFUs) while treated Petri dishes had 12 and 15 CFUs (p < 0.001). Statistically significant differences (p < 0.001) were also found relating to the reduction of specific bacteria: in particular, after treatment no CFU were observed for S. aureus and E. coli. UVC LEDs demonstrated the capacity to maintain high levels of disinfection after more than 240 h of use and they were effective against common microorganisms that are causative agents of HCAIs.

  14. A Single-Stage High-Power-Factor Light-Emitting Diode (LED Driver with Coupled Inductors for Streetlight Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-An Cheng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and implements a single-stage high-power-factor light-emitting diode (LED driver with coupled inductors, suitable for streetlight applications. The presented LED driver integrates an interleaved buck-boost power factor correction (PFC converter with coupled inductors and a half-bridge-type series-resonant converter cascaded with a full-bridge rectifier into a single-stage power conversion circuit. Coupled inductors inside the interleaved buck-boost PFC converter sub-circuit are designed to operate in discontinuous conduction mode (DCM for achieving input-current shaping, and the half-bridge-type series resonant converter cascaded with a full-bridge rectifier is designed for obtaining zero-voltage switching (ZVS on two power switches to reduce their switching losses. Analysis of operational modes and design equations for the presented LED driver are described and included. In addition, the presented driver features a high power factor, low total harmonic distortion (THD of input current, and soft switching. Finally, a prototype driver is developed and implemented to supply a 165-W-rated LED streetlight module with utility-line input voltages ranging from 210 to 230 V. Experimental results demonstrate that high power factor (>0.99, low utility-line current THD (<7%, low-output voltage ripples (<1%, low-output current ripples (<10%, and high circuit efficiency (>90% are obtained in the presented single-stage driver for LED streetlight applications.

  15. Safety of light emitting diodes in toys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higlett, M P; O'Hagan, J B; Khazova, M

    2012-03-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are increasingly being used in toys. An assessment methodology is described for determining the accessible emission limits for the optical radiation from the toys, which takes account of expected use and reasonably foreseeable misuse of toys. Where data are available, it may be possible to assess the toy from the data sheet alone. If this information is not available, a simple measurement protocol is proposed.

  16. Safety of light emitting diodes in toys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higlett, M P; O'Hagan, J B; Khazova, M

    2012-01-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are increasingly being used in toys. An assessment methodology is described for determining the accessible emission limits for the optical radiation from the toys, which takes account of expected use and reasonably foreseeable misuse of toys. Where data are available, it may be possible to assess the toy from the data sheet alone. If this information is not available, a simple measurement protocol is proposed.

  17. Compressive strength measurements of hybrid dental composites treated with dry heat and light emitting diodes (LED post cure treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Krisnawaty

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid composites are mostly used on large cavities as restorative dental materials, whether it is used directly or indirectly. The mechanical properties of composite resin shall increase if it is treated with post cure treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate compressive strength differences between dry heat and Light Emitting Diodes (LED treatment on the hybrid dental composite. A quasi-experimental was applied on this research with a total of 30 samples that were divided into two groups. Each sample was tested using LLOYD Universal Testing Machine with 1 mm/min speed to evaluate the compressive strength. The compressive strength results were marked when the sample was broken. The results of two groups were then analyzed using t-test statistical calculation. The results of this study show that post cure treatment on hybrid composite using LED light box (194.138 MPa was lower than dry heat treatment (227.339 MPa, which was also significantly different from statistical analysis. It can be concluded that compressive strength of LED light box was lower than dry heat post-cure treatment on the hybrid composite resin.

  18. Development of constant-power driving control for light-emitting-diode (LED) luminaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Bin-Juine; Chen, Chun-Wei; Ong, Chin-Dian; Du, Bo-Han; Hsu, Po-Chien

    2013-01-01

    The illumination of an LED may be affected by operating temperature even under constant-current condition. A constant-power driving technique is proposed in the present study for LED luminaire. A linear system dynamics model of LED luminaire is first derived and used in the design of the feedback control system. The PI controller was designed and tuned taking into account the control accuracy and robust properties with respect to plant uncertainty and variation of operating conditions. The control system was implemented on a microprocessor and used to control a 150W LED luminaire. The test result shows that the feedback system accurately controls the input power of LED luminaire to within 1.3 per cent error. As the ambient temperature changes from 0 to 40 °C, the LED illumination varies slightly (−1.7%) for constant-power driving, as compared to that of constant-current driving (−12%) and constant-voltage driving (+50%). The constant-power driving has revealed advantage in stabilizing the illumination of LED under large temperature variation. - Highlights: ► A constant-power driving technique is proposed for LED luminaire. ► A linear system dynamics model of LED luminaire is used in the control system design. ► The test shows that the feedback system accurately controls the input power. ► The LED illumination varies slightly (−1.7%) for constant-power driving.

  19. Investigation of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Point Light Source Color Visibility against Complex Multicolored Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    authors. Statistical analyses and analysis plots were obtained using IBM SPSS Statistics.* 5.1 Threshold Visible Illuminance by LED Color and...LED Visibility vs. Outdoor Background Illuminance Across all camouflage materials, the outdoor distances of visibility are plotted with SPSS in Fig

  20. Quantification of lycopene in the processed tomato-based products by means of the light-emitting diode (LED) and compact photoacoustic (PA) detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicanic, D.D.; Skenderovic, H.; Markovic, K.; Doka, O.; Pichler, L.; Pichler, G.; Luterotti, S.

    2010-01-01

    The combined use of a high power light emitting diode (LED) and the compact photoacoustic (PA) detector offers the possibility for a rapid (no extraction needed), accurate (precision 1.5%) and inexpensive quantification of lycopene in different products derived from the thermally processed tomatoes.

  1. The use of light-emitting diodes (LED in commercial layer production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Borille

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Artificial lighting is one of the most powerful management tools available to commercial layer producers. Artificial light allows anticipating or delaying the beginning of lay, improving egg production, and optimizing feed efficiency. This study aimed at comparing the performance of commercial layers submitted to lighting using different LED colors or conventional incandescent lamps. The study was carried out in a layer house divided in isolated environments in order to prevent any influenced from the neighboring treatments. In total, 360 Isa Brown layers, with an initial age of 56 weeks, were used. The following light sources were used: blue LED, yellow LED, green LED, red LED, white LED, and 40W incandescent light. Birds in all treatment were submitted to a 17-h continuous lighting program, and were fed a corn and soybean meal-based diet. A completely randomized experimental design with subplots was applied, with 24 treatments (six light sources and four periods of three replicates. Egg production (% was significantly different (p0.05 by light source. It was concluded that the replacement of incandescent light bulbs by white and red LEDs does not cause any negative effect on the egg production of commercial layers.

  2. Development of constant-power driving control for light-emitting-diode (LED) luminaire

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Bin-Juine

    2013-01-01

    The illumination of an LED may be affected by operating temperature even under constant-current condition. A constant-power driving technique is proposed in the present study for LED luminaire. A linear system dynamics model of LED luminaire is first derived and used in the design of the feedback control system. The PI controller was designed and tuned taking into account the control accuracy and robust properties with respect to plant uncertainty and variation of operating conditions. The control system was implemented on a microprocessor and used to control a 150W LED luminaire. The test result shows that the feedback system accurately controls the input power of LED luminaire to within 1.3 per cent error. As the ambient temperature changes from 0 to 40 °C, the LED illumination varies slightly (-1.7%) for constant-power driving, as compared to that of constant-current driving (-12%) and constant-voltage driving (+50%). The constant-power driving has revealed advantage in stabilizing the illumination of LED under large temperature variation. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. PRODUKSI DAN KANDUNGAN NUTRISI Spirulina fusiformis YANG DIKULTUR DENGAN PENCAHAYAAN MONOKROMATIS LIGHT EMITTING DIODES (LEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Firdaus

    2015-06-01

    yang bersumber dari LED dengan cahaya monokromatis merah (M, biru (B, dan biru-merah (BM, serta cahaya dari lampu fluoresens sebagai kontrol (K. Puncak kepadatan sel terjadi pada hari ke-18 dengan kepadatan masing-masing sebanyak 5,56 x 104 sel/mL (M; 1,65 x 104 sel/mL (B; 4,15 x 104 sel/mL (BM; dan 4,56 x 104 sel/mL (K. Perlakuan pencahayaan LED dengan cahaya monokromatis merah mencapai biomassa panen tertinggi sebesar 3,91 mg/mL dengan kandungan protein 49,77%; lemak 19,61%; karbohidrat 6,15%; serat kasar 0,00%; dan abu 24,48%. Pencahayaan dengan LED merah berpotensi diaplikasikan sebagai sumber cahaya dalam produksi Spirulina.

  4. Development of constant-power driving control for light-emitting-diode (LED) luminaire

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Bin-Juine; Chen, Chun-Wei; Ong, Chin-Dian; Du, Bo-Han; Hsu, Po-Chien

    2013-01-01

    changes from 0 to 40 °C, the LED illumination varies slightly (-1.7%) for constant-power driving, as compared to that of constant-current driving (-12%) and constant-voltage driving (+50%). The constant-power driving has revealed advantage in stabilizing

  5. Development of Key Technologies for White Lighting Based on Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner Goetz; Bill Imler; James Kim; Junko Kobayashi; Andrew Kim; Mike Krames; Rick Mann; Gerd Mueller-Mach; Anneli Munkholm; Jonathan Wierer

    2004-03-31

    This program was organized to focus on materials development issues critical to the acceleration of solid-state lighting, and was split into three major thrust areas: (1) study of dislocation density reduction for GaN grown on sapphire using 'cantilever epitaxy', and the impact of dislocation density on the performance of state-of-the-art high-power LEDs; (2) the evaluation of in situ techniques for monitoring gas phase chemistry and the properties of GaN-based layers during metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD), and (3) feasibility for using semiconductor nanoparticles ('quantum dots') for the down-conversion of blue or ultraviolet light to generate white light. The program included a partnership between Lumileds Lighting (epitaxy and device fabrication for high power LEDs) and Sandia National Laboratories (cantilever epitaxy, gas phase chemistry, and quantum dot synthesis). Key findings included: (1) cantilever epitaxy can provide dislocation density reduction comparable to that of more complicated approaches, but all in one epitaxial growth step; however, further improvements are required to realize significant gains in LED performance at high drive currents, (2) in situ tools can provide detailed knowledge about gas phase chemistry, and can be used to monitor and control epitaxial layer composition and temperature to provide improved yields (e.g., a fivefold increase in color targeting is demonstrated for 540nm LEDs), and (3) quantum efficiency for quantum dots is improved and maintained up to 70% in epoxy thin films, but further work is necessary to increase densification (absorption) and robustness before practical application to LEDs.

  6. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting on Lija Loop in Portland, OR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a residential street lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting Technology Demonstration Program. In this project, eight 100W (nominal) high-pressure sodium cobra head fixtures were replaced with a like number of LED street light luminaires manufactured by Leotek, Inc. The Leotek product achieved an estimated payback in the Lija Loop installation of about 20 years for replacement scenarios and a much shorter 7.6 years for new installations. Much of the associated energy savings (55%) supporting these payback periods, however, were achieved by reducing average horizontal photopic illuminance a similar amount (53%). Examined from a different perspective, the measured performance suggests that the Leotek product is at approximate parity with the HPS cobra head in terms of average delivered photopic illumination for a given power consumption. HPS comprises the second most efficacious street lighting technology available, exceeded only by low pressure sodium (LPS). LPS technology is not considered suitable for most street lighting applications due to its monochromatic spectral output and poor color rendering ability; therefore, this LED product is performing at an efficiency level comparable to its primary competition in this application.

  7. Monochromatic light-emitting diode (LED source in layers hens during the second production cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Borille

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTLight is an important environmental factor for birds, allowing not only their vision, but also influencing their physiological responses, such as behavioral and reproductive activity. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the impact of different colors of monochromatic light (LED sources in laying hens production during the second laying cycle. The study was conducted in an experimental laying house during 70 days. A total of 300 laying hens Isa Brown® genetic strain, aged 95 weeks, in the second laying cycle were used in the study. The artificial light sources used were blue, yellow, green, red and white. The light regimen was continuous illumination of 17 h per day (12 h natural and 5 h artificial in a daily light regimen of 17L:5D (light: dark. The Latin Square design was adopted with five treatments (five colors divided into five periods, and five boxes, with six replicates of ten birds in each box. The production and egg quality were evaluated. The different colors of light source did not affect production parameters or egg quality (p > 0.05. The monochromatic light source may be considered as an alternative to artificial lighting in laying hens during the second production cycle.

  8. LED-FISH: Fluorescence microscopy based on light emitting diodes for the molecular analysis of Her-2/neu oncogene amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vollmer Ekkehard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Light emitting diodes (LED, which are available as small monochromatic light sources with characteristic features such as maximum illumination power combined with minimum energy consumption and extremely long lifespan have already proved as a highly potential low-cost alternative for specific diagnostic applications in clinical medicine such as tuberculosis fluorescence microscopy. Likewise, the most reliable evaluation of Her-2/neu (c-erbB2 gene amplification, which has been established in the last few years for routine diagnosis in clinical pathology as determinant towards Herceptin-based treatment of patients with breast cancer, is based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and corresponding high priced fluorescence equipment. In order to test the possibility to utilize the advantages of low-cost LED technology on FISH analysis of c-erbB2 gene expression for routine diagnostic purposes, the applicability of a standard bright field Carl Zeiss Axiostar Plus microscope equipped with a Fraen AFTER* LED Fluorescence Microscope Kit for the detection of Her-2/neu gene signals was compared to an advanced Nikon Eclipse 80i fluorescence microscope in combination with a conventional 100W mercury vapor lamp. Both microscopes were fitted with the same Quicam FAST CCD digital camera to unequivocally compare the quality of the captured images. C-erbB2 gene expression was analyzed in 30 different human tissue samples of primary invasive breast cancer, following formalin fixation and subsequent paraffin-embedding. The Her2/neu gene signals (green were identifiable in the tumor cells in all cases and images of equal quality were captured under almost identical conditions by 480 nm (blue LED module equipped standard Axiostar microscope as compared to conventional fluorescence microscopy. In this first attempt, these monochromatic LED elements proved in principle to be suitable for the detection of Her-2/neu gene expression by FISH. Thus, our own

  9. All-Quantum-Dot Infrared Light-Emitting Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zhenyu; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Liu, Mengxia; Yuan, Mingjian; Ip, Alexander H.; Ahmed, Osman S.; Levina, Larissa; Kinge, Sachin; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are promising candidates for infrared electroluminescent devices. To date, CQD-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have employed a CQD emission layer sandwiched between carrier transport

  10. Evaluation of light-emitting diode beacon light fixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Rotating beacons containing filament light sources have long been used on highway maintenance trucks : to indicate the presence of the truck to other drivers. Because of advances in light-emitting diode (LED) : technologies, flashing lights containin...

  11. Quantification of lycopene in the processed tomato-based products by means of the light-emitting diode (LED) and compact photoacoustic (PA) detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicanic, D.; Skenderović, H.; Marković, K.; Dóka, O.; Pichler, L.; Pichler, G.; Luterotti, S.

    2010-03-01

    The combined use of a high power light emitting diode (LED) and the compact photoacoustic (PA) detector offers the possibility for a rapid (no extraction needed), accurate (precision 1.5%) and inexpensive quantification of lycopene in different products derived from the thermally processed tomatoes. The concentration of lycopene in selected products ranges from a few mg to several tens mg per 100 g fresh weight. The HPLC was used as the well established reference method.

  12. Quantification of lycopene in the processed tomato-based products by means of the light-emitting diode (LED) and compact photoacoustic (PA) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicanic, D; Skenderovic, H; Pichler, L; Pichler, G; Markovic, K; Doka, O; Luterotti, S

    2010-01-01

    The combined use of a high power light emitting diode (LED) and the compact photoacoustic (PA) detector offers the possibility for a rapid (no extraction needed), accurate (precision 1.5%) and inexpensive quantification of lycopene in different products derived from the thermally processed tomatoes. The concentration of lycopene in selected products ranges from a few mg to several tens mg per 100 g fresh weight. The HPLC was used as the well established reference method.

  13. Coherence characteristics of light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Dalip Singh; Saxena, Kanchan; Dubey, Satish Kumar; Shakher, Chandra

    2010-01-01

    We report the measurement of coherence characteristics of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Experiments were performed using red and green color LEDs directly illuminating the Young's double slit kept in the far-zone. Fourier transform fringe analysis technique was used for the measurement of the visibility of interference fringes from which the modulus of degree of spectral coherence was determined. Low degree of spectral coherence, typically 0.4 for red and 0.2 for green LED with double-slit separation of 400 μm was observed. A variable slit was then kept in front of the LEDs and the double slit was illuminated with the light coming out of the slit. Experiments were performed with various slit sizes and the visibility of the interference fringes was observed. It was found that visibility of the interference fringes changes drastically in presence of variable slit kept in front of LEDs and a high degree of spectral coherence, typically 0.85 for red and 0.8 for green LED with double-slit separation of 400 μm and rectangular slit opening of 500 μm was observed. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical counterparts. Coherence lengths of both the LEDs were also determined and it was obtained 5.8±2 and 24±4 μm for green and red LEDs, respectively.

  14. Operation of AC Adapters Visualized Using Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regester, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    A bridge rectifier is a diamond-shaped configuration of diodes that serves to convert alternating current(AC) into direct current (DC). In our world of AC outlets and DC electronics, they are ubiquitous. Of course, most bridge rectifiers are built with regular diodes, not the light-emitting variety, because LEDs have a number of disadvantages. For…

  15. Nanoengineering of organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupton, J.M.

    2000-11-01

    This thesis reports nanoengineerging of the emission and transport properties of organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs). This is achieved by a control of the electronic material properties and the photonic device properties. A novel class of conjugated materials for electroluminescence (EL) applications is presented, based on successively branching, or dendritic, materials comprising an emissive core and a shielding dendritic architecture. Exciton localisation at the centre of these dendrimers is observed in both luminescence and absorption. A detailed quantum chemical investigation using an exciton model supports these findings and accurately describes the energies and oscillator strengths of transitions in the core and branches. The dendrimer generation describes the degree of branching and gives a direct measure of the separation and interaction between chromophores. Increasing generation is found to lead to a reduction in red tail emission. This correlates with an increase in operating field and LED efficiency. Dendrimer blends with triplet harvesting dendritic phosphors are also investigated and found to exhibit unique emission properties. A numerical device model is presented, which is used to describe the temperature dependence of single layer polymer LEDs by fitting the field-dependent mobility and the barrier to hole injection. The device model is also used to obtain mobility values for the dendrimer materials, which are in excellent agreement with results obtained from time-of-flight measurements. The dendrimer generation is shown to provide a direct control of hopping mobility, which decreases by two orders of magnitude as the dendrimer generation increases from 0 to 3. The photonic properties and spontaneous emission of an LED are modified by incorporating a periodic wavelength scale microstructure into the emitting film. This is found to double the amount of light emitted with no effect on the device current. An investigation of the angular dependence

  16. Beyond conventional c-plane GaN-based light emitting diodes: A systematic exploration of LEDs on semi-polar orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monavarian, Morteza

    Despite enormous efforts and investments, the efficiency of InGaN-based green and yellow-green light emitters remains relatively low, and that limits progress in developing full color display, laser diodes, and bright light sources for general lighting. The low efficiency of light emitting devices in the green-to-yellow spectral range, also known as the "Green Gap", is considered a global concern in the LED industry. The polar c-plane orientation of GaN, which is the mainstay in the LED industry, suffers from polarization-induced separation of electrons and hole wavefunctions (also known as the "quantum confined Stark effect") and low indium incorporation efficiency that are the two main factors that contribute to the Green Gap phenomenon. One possible approach that holds promise for a new generation of green and yellow light emitting devices with higher efficiency is the deployment of nonpolar and semi-polar crystallographic orientations of GaN to eliminate or mitigate polarization fields. In theory, the use of other GaN planes for light emitters could also enhance the efficiency of indium incorporation compared to c-plane. In this thesis, I present a systematic exploration of the suitable GaN orientation for future lighting technologies. First, in order to lay the groundwork for further studies, it is important to discuss the analysis of processes limiting LED efficiency and some novel designs of active regions to overcome these limitations. Afterwards, the choice of nonpolar orientations as an alternative is discussed. For nonpolar orientation, the (1100)-oriented (mo-plane) structures on patterned Si (112) and freestanding m-GaN are studied. The semi-polar orientations having substantially reduced polarization field are found to be more promising for light-emitting diodes (LEDs) owing to high indium incorporation efficiency predicted by theoretical studies. Thus, the semi-polar orientations are given close attention as alternatives for future LED technology

  17. Power saving regulated light emitting diode circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haville, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    A power saving regulated light source circuit, comprising a light emitting diode (LED), a direct current source and a switching transistor connected in series with the LED, a control voltage producing resistor connected in series with the LED to produce a control voltage corresponding to the current through the LED, a storage capacitor connected in parallel with the series combination of the LED and the resistor, a comparator having its output connected to the input of the transistor, the comparator having a reference input and a control input, a stabilized biasing source for supplying a stabilized reference voltage to the reference input, the control input of the comparator being connected to the control voltage producing resistor, the comparator having a high output state when the reference voltage exceeds the control voltage while having a low output state when the control voltage exceeds the reference voltage, the transistor being conductive in response to the high state while being nonconductive in response to the low state, the transistor when conductive being effective to charge the capacitor and to increase the control voltage, whereby the comparator is cycled between the high and low output states while the transistor is cycled between conductive and nonconductive states

  18. Fluorescence lifetime imaging using light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Gordon T; Munro, Ian; Poher, Vincent; French, Paul M W; Neil, Mark A A [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Elson, Daniel S [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hares, Jonathan D [Kentech Instruments Ltd, Unit 9, Hall Farm Workshops, South Moreton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 9AG (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gordon.kennedy@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-05-07

    We demonstrate flexible use of low cost, high-power light emitting diodes as illumination sources for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques have been implemented at wavelengths spanning the range 450-640 nm. Additionally, we demonstrate optically sectioned fluorescence lifetime imaging by combining structured illumination with frequency-domain FLIM.

  19. Electrically driven surface plasmon light-emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadil, Ahmed; Ou, Yiyu; Iida, Daisuke

    We investigate device performance of GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with a 30-nm p-GaN layer. The metallization used to separate the p-contact from plasmonic metals, reveals limitations on current spreading which reduces surface plasmonic enhancement.......We investigate device performance of GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with a 30-nm p-GaN layer. The metallization used to separate the p-contact from plasmonic metals, reveals limitations on current spreading which reduces surface plasmonic enhancement....

  20. Degradation of light emitting diodes: a proposed methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Sau; Vam Driel, Willem; Zhang, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    Due to their long lifetime and high efficacy, light emitting diodes have the potential to revolutionize the illumination industry. However, self heat and high environmental temperature which will lead to increased junction temperature and degradation due to electrical overstress can shorten the life of the light emitting diode. In this research, a methodology to investigate the degradation of the LED emitter has been proposed. The epoxy lens of the emitter can be modelled using simplified Eyring methods whereas an equation has been proposed for describing the degradation of the LED emitters. (semiconductor devices)

  1. The Light-Emitting Diode as a Light Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, William H.; Hack, W. Nathan; Tran, Kiet; Vira, Zeeshan; Pickett, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    A light-emitting diode (LED) and operational amplifier can be used as an affordable method to provide a digital output indicating detection of an intense light source such as a laser beam or high-output LED. When coupled with a microcontroller, the combination can be used as a multiple photogate and timer for under $50. A similar circuit is used…

  2. Tuning the colour of white polymer light emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.M. de; Sarfert, W.; Paetzold, R.

    2010-01-01

    Colour tuning of white polymer light emitting diode (LED) light sources can be attained by various methods at various stages in the production process of the lamps and/or by the design of the active material incorporated in the LEDs. In this contribution we will describe the methods and discuss the

  3. Hybrid Light-Emitting Diode Enhanced With Emissive Nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopylov, Oleksii

    This thesis investigates a new type of white light emitting hybrid diode, composed of a light emitting GaN/InGaN LED and a layer of semiconductor nanocrystals for color conversion. Unlike standard white LEDs, the device is configured to achieve high color conversion efficiency via non-radiative e......This thesis investigates a new type of white light emitting hybrid diode, composed of a light emitting GaN/InGaN LED and a layer of semiconductor nanocrystals for color conversion. Unlike standard white LEDs, the device is configured to achieve high color conversion efficiency via non...... of the hybrid diode fabrication including process techniques for GaN LED and incorporation of the nanocrystals are presented with the emphasis on the differences with standard LED processing. Results and analysis of optical and electrical characterization including photoluminescence (PL), micro-PL, time......-resolved PL and electroluminescence (EL) together with current-voltage characteristics are presented to evaluate the device performance. A clear evidence of non-radiative energy transfer was seen in the carrier dynamics of both the LED and the nanocrystals when the quantum well – nanocrystals separation...

  4. Liquid metals as electrodes in polymer light emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, G.G.; Gommans, H.H.P.; Denier van der Gon, A.W.; Brongersma, H.H.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that liquid metals can be used as cathodes in light emitting diodes (pLEDs). The main difference between the use of liquid cathodes and evaporated cathodes is the sharpness of the metal–polymer interface. Liquid metal cathodes result in significantly sharper metal–organic interfaces

  5. Light Converting Inorganic Phosphors for White Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiao-Wen Yeh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available White light-emitting diodes (WLEDs have matched the emission efficiency of florescent lights and will rapidly spread as light source for homes and offices in the next 5 to 10 years. WLEDs provide a light element having a semiconductor light emitting layer (blue or near-ultraviolet (nUV LEDs and photoluminescence phosphors. These solid-state LED lamps, rather than organic light emitting diode (OLED or polymer light-emitting diode (PLED, have a number of advantages over conventional incandescent bulbs and halogen lamps, such as high efficiency to convert electrical energy into light, reliability and long operating lifetime. To meet with the further requirement of high color rendering index, warm light with low color temperature, high thermal stability and higher energy efficiency for WLEDs, new phosphors that can absorb excitation energy from blue or nUV LEDs and generate visible emissions efficiently are desired. The criteria of choosing the best phosphors, for blue (450-480 nm and nUV (380-400 nm LEDs, strongly depends on the absorption and emission of the phosphors. Moreover, the balance of light between the emission from blue-nUV LEDs and the emissions from phosphors (such as yellow from Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ is important to obtain white light with proper color rendering index and color temperature. Here, we will review the status of phosphors for LEDs and prospect the future development.

  6. Light Converting Inorganic Phosphors for White Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Lin, Chun-Che; Yeh, Chiao-Wen; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2010-01-01

    White light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) have matched the emission efficiency of florescent lights and will rapidly spread as light source for homes and offices in the next 5 to 10 years. WLEDs provide a light element having a semiconductor light emitting layer (blue or near-ultraviolet (nUV) LEDs) and photoluminescence phosphors. These solid-state LED lamps, rather than organic light emitting diode (OLED) or polymer light-emitting diode (PLED), have a number of advantages over conventional incandescent bulbs and halogen lamps, such as high efficiency to convert electrical energy into light, reliability and long operating lifetime. To meet with the further requirement of high color rendering index, warm light with low color temperature, high thermal stability and higher energy efficiency for WLEDs, new phosphors that can absorb excitation energy from blue or nUV LEDs and generate visible emissions efficiently are desired. The criteria of choosing the best phosphors, for blue (450−480 nm) and nUV (380−400 nm) LEDs, strongly depends on the absorption and emission of the phosphors. Moreover, the balance of light between the emission from blue-nUV LEDs and the emissions from phosphors (such as yellow from Y3Al5O12:Ce3+) is important to obtain white light with proper color rendering index and color temperature. Here, we will review the status of phosphors for LEDs and prospect the future development.

  7. Recent developments in white light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohe, P. P.; Nandanwar, D. V.; Belsare, P. D.; Moharil, S. V.

    2018-05-01

    because they can emit visible light strongly under blue light irradiation. These are chemically, thermally and mechanically stable materials with high efficiency to down convert blue radiation into green and red. Efficient white light can be generated by coating these phosphors on blue LED.CRI of white emitting LED lamp can be improved significantly if green and red emitting phosphors are coated on efficient blue emitting LED chips. In this approach CRI will be maintained if appropriate combination of red, green along with blue emission is used. This article reviews some recent developments in phosphors for white light emitting diodes.

  8. Light emitting diodes for today's energy conscious world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanier, J

    2000-10-01

    The role played by light emitting diodes in back lighting, decorative illumination, emergency lighting, and automated signage are described as indicators of the many benefits and advantages of LED technology. The basic principles underlying the functioning of LEDs are explained, including the reasons behind their high efficiency in applications requiring colour. The difference between wattage and lumens is clarified; wattage refers to power consumption, whereas lumens measure brightness or light output, the measure most significant in the case of LEDs.

  9. Effect of the laser and light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy on midpalatal suture bone formation after rapid maxilla expansion: a Raman spectroscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Cristiane Becher; Habib, Fernando Antonio Lima; de Araújo, Telma Martins; Aragão, Juliana Silveira; Gomes, Rafael Soares; Barbosa, Artur Felipe Santos; Silveira, Landulfo; Pinheiro, Antonio L B

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of laser or light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy on the bone formation at the midpalatal suture after rapid maxilla expansion. Twenty young adult male rats were divided into four groups with 8 days of experimental time: group 1, no treatment; group 2, expansion; group 3, expansion and laser irradiation; and group 4, expansion and LED irradiation. In groups 3 and 4, light irradiation was in the first, third, and fifth experimental days. In all groups, the expansion was accomplished with a helicoid 0.020" stainless steel orthodontic spring. A diode laser (λ780 nm, 70 mW, spot of 0.04 cm(2), t = 257 s, spatial average energy fluence (SAEF) of 18 J/cm(2)) or a LED (λ850 nm, 150 mW ± 10 mW, spot of 0.5 cm(2), t = 120 s, SAEF of 18 J/cm(2)) were used. The samples were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy carried out at midpalatal suture and at the cortical area close to the suture. Two Raman shifts were analyzed: ∼ 960 (phosphate hydroxyapatite) and ∼ 1,450 cm(-1) (lipids and protein). Data was submitted to statistical analysis. Significant statistical difference (p ≤ 0.05) was found in the hydroxyapatite (CHA) peaks among the expansion group and the expansion and laser or LED groups. The LED group presented higher mean peak values of CHA. No statistical differences were found between the treated groups as for collagen deposition, although LED also presented higher mean peak values. The results of this study using Raman spectral analysis indicate that laser and LED light irradiation improves deposition of CHA in the midpalatal suture after orthopedic expansion.

  10. Efficient organic light emitting-diodes (OLEDs)

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Yi-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Following two decades of intense research globally, the organic light-emitting diode (OLED) has steadily emerged as the ultimate display technology of choice for the coming decades. Portable active matrix OLED displays have already become prevalent, and even large-sized ultra-high definition 4K TVs are being mass-produced. More exotic applications such as wearable displays have been commercialized recently. With the burgeoning success in displays, researchers are actively bringing the technology forward into the exciting solid-state lighting market. This book presents the knowledge needed for

  11. High power light emitting diode (LED) arrays versus halogen light polymerization of oral biomaterials: Barcol hardness, compressive strength and radiometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Robin W; Uhl, Alexander; Blackwell, Gordon B; Jandt, Klaus D

    2002-07-01

    The clinical performance of light polymerized dental composites is greatly influenced by the quality of the light curing unit (LCU) used. Commonly used halogen LCUs have some specific drawbacks such as decreasing light output with time. This may result in a low degree of monomer conversion of the composites with negative clinical implications. Previous studies have shown that blue light emitting diode (LED) LCUs have the potential to polymerize dental composites without having the drawbacks of halogen LCUs. Since these studies were carried out LED technology has advanced significantly and commercial LED LCUs are now becoming available. This study investigates the Barcol hardness as a function of depth, and the compressive strength of dental composites that had been polymerized for 40 or 20s with two high power LED LCU prototypes, a commercial LED LCU, and a commercial halogen LCU. In addition the radiometric properties of the LCUs were characterized. The two high power prototype LED LCUs and the halogen LCU showed a satisfactory and similar hardness-depth performance whereas the hardness of the materials polymerized with the commercial LED LCU rapidly decreased with sample depth and reduced polymerization time (20 s). There were statistically significant differences in the overall compressive strengths of composites polymerized with different LCUs at the 95% significance level (p = 0.0016) with the two high power LED LCU prototypes and the halogen LCU forming a statistically homogenous group. In conclusion, LED LCU polymerization technology can reach the performance level of halogen LCUs. One of the first commercial LED LCUs however lacked the power reserves of the high power LED LCU prototypes.

  12. Implantable wireless powered light emitting diode (LED) for near-infrared photoimmunotherapy: device development and experimental assessment in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kohei; Kimura, Toshihiro; Takakura, Hideo; Yoshikawa, Yasuo; Kameda, Atsushi; Shindo, Takayuki; Sato, Kazuhide; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Ogawa, Mikako

    2018-04-13

    The aim of this study was to develop and assess a novel implantable, wireless-powered, light-emitting diode (LED) for near-infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT). NIR-PIT is a recently developed cancer therapy that uses NIR light and antibody-photosensitizer conjugates and is able to induce cancer-specific cell death. Due to limited light penetration depth it is currently unable to treat tumors in deep tissues. Use of implanted LED might potentially overcome this limitation. The wireless LED system was able to emit NIR light up to a distance of 20 cm from the transmitter coil by using low magnetic fields as compliant with limits for use in humans. Results indicated that the LED system was able to kill tumor cells in vitro and to suppress tumor growth in implanted tumor-bearing mice. Results indicated that the proposed implantable wireless LED system was able to suppress tumor growth in vivo . These results are encouraging as wireless LED systems such as the one here developed might be a possible solution to treat tumors in deep regions in humans. Further research in this area would be important. An implantable LED system was developed. It consisted of a LED capsule including two LED sources and a receiver coil coupled with an external coil and power source. Wireless power transmission was guaranteed by using electromagnetic induction. The system was tested in vitro by using EGFR-expressing cells and HER2-expressing cells. The system was also tested in vivo in tumor-bearing mice.

  13. Effects of light emitting diode (LED) therapy and cold water immersion therapy on exercise-induced muscle damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Mariana Zingari; Siqueira, Cláudia Patrícia Cardoso Martins; Preti, Maria Carla Perozim; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo; de Lima, Franciele Mendes; Dias, Ivan Frederico Lupiano; Toginho Filho, Dari de Oliveira; Ramos, Solange de Paula

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effects of LED therapy at 940 nm or cold water immersion therapy (CWI) after an acute bout of exercise on markers of muscle damage and inflammation. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were allocated into four groups: animals kept at rest (control), exercised animals (E), exercised + CWI (CWI), and exercised + LED therapy (LED). The animals swam for 100 min, after which blood samples were collected for lactate analysis. Animals in the E group were returned to their cages without treatment, the CWI group was placed in cold water (10°C) for 10 min and the LED group received LED irradiation on both gastrocnemius muscles (4 J/cm(2) each). After 24 h, the animals were killed and the soleus muscles were submitted to histological analysis. Blood samples were used for hematological and CK analyses. The results demonstrated that the LED group presented fewer areas of muscle damage and inflammatory cell infiltration and lower levels of CK activity than the E group. Fewer areas of damaged muscle fiber were observed in the LED group than in CWI. CWI and LED did not reduce edema areas. Hematological analysis showed no significant effect of either treatment on leukocyte counts. The results suggest that LED therapy is more efficient than CWI in preventing muscle damage and local inflammation after exercise.

  14. In vitro effect of 470 nm LED (Light Emitting Diode in keloid fibroblasts Efeito in vitro do LED (Light Emitting Diode de 470 nm em fibroblastos de quelóide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvilena Bonatti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To quantify keloid fibroblasts after irradiation with 470nm blue LED, in vitro. Methods: Fibroblasts from keloid and adjacent skin have been obtained from 6 patients. Cells have been cultivated and maintained in DMEM culture medium. In Petri dishes, they were irradiated with energy doses of 6J, 12J and 18J. After 24 h, counting was done by the average of the triplicates for each sample. Results: There were no significant differences in the number of irradiated keloid fibroblasts at the studied doses (p=0.261. In adjacent skin fibroblasts, differences were observed (p=0.025 concerning the doses of 18 J and 6 J (p=0.03. Conclusions: There was a reduction in the number of adjacent skin fibroblasts irradiated with 470nm blue LED at the energy dose of 18 J compared to the ones irradiated at the energy dose of 6 J. There were no changes in keloid fibroblasts counting at any of the doses applied, 24 h after irradiation.Objetivo: Quantificar fibroblastos de quelóide após irradiação com LED azul de 470nm, in vitro. Métodos: Foram obtidos fibroblastos de quelóide e pele adjacente, de seis pacientes. As células foram cultivadas e mantidas em meio de cultura DMEM. Em placas de Petri, receberam irradiação com doses de energia de 6J, 12J e 18J. Após 24 horas a contagem foi feita pela média da triplicata para cada amostra. Resultados: Não houve diferença na quantidade de fibroblastos de quelóide irradiados nas doses estudadas (p=0,261. Observou-se diferença nos fibroblastos de pele adjacente (p=0,025, com relação às doses de 18 J e 6 J (p=0,03. Conclusões: Houve redução dos fibroblastos de pele adjacente irradiados com LED azul de 470 nm na dose de energia de 18 J em relação à dose de 6 J. Não houve alteração na quantidade de fibroblastos de quelóide nas doses aplicadas após 24 horas da irradiação.

  15. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting, I-35W Bridge, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Phase I Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, B. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Myer, M. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-08-01

    On the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the GATEWAY program conducted a two-phase demonstration of LED roadway lighting on the main span, which is one of the country's oldest continuously operated exterior LED lighting installations. The Phase I report provides an overview of initial project results including lighting performance, economic performance, and potential energy savings.

  16. Photoresponse of poly(para-phenylenevinylene) light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, X.; Raikh, M.; Vardeny, Z.V.; Yang, Y.; Moses, D.

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the photoresponses of poly(para-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) light-emitting diodes (LED's) with PPV derivatives sandwiched between tin oxide (ITO) and metals including calcium, aluminum, and copper. Under illumination all diodes exhibit relatively large photoconductive I(V) responses which cross the dark I(V) curve at a forward-bias voltage V 0 that scales with the difference in work functions between the ITO and metal electrodes, the open-circuit voltage saturates at V 0 and is temperature independent, and the enhanced electroluminescence intensity of the illuminated LED's correlates with the photocurrent

  17. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting at the I-35W Bridge, Minneapolis, MN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2009-08-31

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology conducted in 2009 at the recently reconstructed I-35W bridge in Minneapolis, MN. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting GATEWAY Technology Demonstration Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included the Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT), Federal Highways Administration (FHWA), and BetaLED™ (a division of Ruud Lighting). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the measurements and analysis of the results. DOE has implemented a three-year evaluation of the LED luminaires in this installation in order to develop new longitudinal field data on LED performance in a challenging, real-world environment. This document provides information through the initial phase of the I-35W bridge project, up to and including the opening of the bridge to the public and the initial feedback received on the LED lighting installation from bridge users. Initial findings of the evaluation are favorable, with minimum energy savings level of 13% for the LED installation relative to the simulated base case using 250W high-pressure sodium (HPS) fixtures. The LEDs had an average illuminance level of 0.91 foot candles compared to 1.29 fc for the HPS lamps. The LED luminaires cost $38,000 more than HPS lamps, yielding a lengthy payback period, however the bridge contractor had offered to include the LED luminaires as part of the construction package at no additional cost. One potentially significant benefit of the LEDs in this installation is avoiding rolling lane closures on the heavily-traveled interstate bridge for the purpose of relamping the HPS fixtures. Rolling lane closures involve multiple crew members and various maintenance and safety vehicles, diversion of traffic, as well as related administrative tasks (e.g., approvals, scheduling, etc.). Mn/DOT records show an average cost of

  18. Light-emitting diodes - Their potential in biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Naichia Gary; Wu, Chia-Hao [College of Applied Sciences, MingDao University, 369 Wen-Hua Road, Peetou, Changhua 52345 (China); Cheng, Ta Chih [Department of Tropical Agriculture and International Cooperation, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, 1 Hseuh-Fu Rd., Nei-Pu Hsiang, Pingtung 91201 (China)

    2010-10-15

    The rapid development of high brightness light-emitting diodes (LEDs) makes feasible the use of LEDs, among other light sources (such as laser, intense pulse light and other incoherent light systems), for medical treatment and light therapy. This paper provides a general review on red, green, blue, ultraviolet LED applications in photo rejuvenation and medical treatments of a variety of physical abnormalities, as well as the relief of stress, circadian rhythm disorders, and seasonal affective disorder. The review, concentrated in the papers published after 1990, intends to show that LEDs are well qualified to succeed its more energy demanding counterparts in the named areas and beyond. (author)

  19. High efficient white organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Stefan; Krause, Ralf [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Kozlowski, Fryderyk; Schmid, Guenter; Hunze, Arvid [Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Winnacker, Albrecht [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Due to the rapid progress in the last years the performance of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) has reached a level where general lighting presents a most interesting application target. We demonstrate, how the color coordinates of the emission spectrum can be adjusted using a combinatorial evaporation tool to lie on the desired black body curve representing cold and warm white, respectively. The evaluation includes phosphorescent and fluorescent dye approaches to optimize lifetime and efficiency, simultaneously. Detailed results are presented with respect to variation of layer thicknesses and dopant concentrations of each layer within the OLED stack. The most promising approach contains phosphorescent red and green dyes combined with a fluorescent blue one as blue phosphorescent dopants are not yet stable enough to achieve long lifetimes.

  20. High Intensity Organic Light-emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiangfei

    This thesis is dedicated to the fabrication, modeling, and characterization to achieve high efficiency organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for illumination applications. Compared to conventional lighting sources, OLEDs enabled the direct conversion of electrical energy into light emission and have intrigued the world's lighting designers with the long-lasting, highly efficient illumination. We begin with a brief overview of organic technology, from basic organic semiconductor physics, to its application in optoelectronics, i.e. light-emitting diodes, photovoltaics, photodetectors and thin-film transistors. Due to the importance of phosphorescent materials, we will focus on the photophysics of metal complexes that is central to high efficiency OLED technology, followed by a transient study to examine the radiative decay dynamics in a series of phosphorescent platinum binuclear complexes. The major theme of this thesis is the design and optimization of a novel architecture where individual red, green and blue phosphorescent OLEDs are vertically stacked and electrically interconnected by the compound charge generation layers. We modeled carrier generation from the metal-oxide/doped organic interface based on a thermally assisted tunneling mechanism. The model provides insights to the optimization of a stacked OLED from both electrical and optical point of view. To realize the high intensity white lighting source, the efficient removal of heat is of a particular concern, especially in large-area devices. A fundamental transfer matrix analysis is introduced to predict the thermal properties in the devices. The analysis employs Laplace transforms to determine the response of the system to the combined effects of conduction, convection, and radiation. This perspective of constructing transmission matrices greatly facilitates the calculation of transient coupled heat transfer in a general multi-layer composite. It converts differential equations to algebraic forms, and

  1. All-Quantum-Dot Infrared Light-Emitting Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zhenyu

    2015-12-22

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are promising candidates for infrared electroluminescent devices. To date, CQD-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have employed a CQD emission layer sandwiched between carrier transport layers built using organic materials and inorganic oxides. Herein, we report the infrared LEDs that use quantum-tuned materials for each of the hole-transporting, the electron-transporting, and the light-emitting layers. We successfully tailor the bandgap and band position of each CQD-based component to produce electroluminescent devices that exhibit emission that we tune from 1220 to 1622 nm. Devices emitting at 1350 nm achieve peak external quantum efficiency up to 1.6% with a low turn-on voltage of 1.2 V, surpassing previously reported all-inorganic CQD LEDs.

  2. The electronics in fluorescent bulbs and light emitting diodes (LED), rather than ultraviolet radiation, cause increased malignant melanoma incidence in indoor office workers and tanning bed users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milham, Samuel; Stetzer, Dave

    2018-07-01

    The epidemiology of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) has a number of facets that do not fit with sunlight and ultraviolet light as the primary etiologic agents. Indoor workers have higher incidence and mortality rates of CMM than outdoor workers; CMM occurs in body locations never exposed to sunlight; CMM incidence is increasing in spite of use of UV blocking agents and small changes in solar radiation. Installation of two new fluorescent lights in the milking parlor holding area of a Minnesota dairy farm in 2015 caused an immediate drop in milk production. This lead to measurement of body amperage in humans exposed to modern non-incandescent lighting. People exposed to old and new fluorescent lights, light emitting diodes (LED) and compact fluorescent lights (CFL) had body amperage levels above those considered carcinogenic. We hypothesize that modern electric lighting is a significant health hazard, a carcinogen, and is causing increasing CMM incidence in indoor office workers and tanning bed users. These lights generate dirty electricity (high frequency voltage transients), radio frequency (RF) radiation, and increase body amperage, all of which have been shown to be carcinogenic. This could explain the failure of ultraviolet blockers to stem the malignant melanoma pandemic. Tanning beds and non-incandescent lighting could be made safe by incorporating a grounded Faraday cage which allows passage of ultraviolet and visible light frequencies and blocks other frequencies. Modern electric lighting should be fabricated to be electrically clean. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Research on the Effect of Electrical Signals on Growth of Sansevieria under Light-Emitting Diode (LED Lighting Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguo Tian

    Full Text Available The plant electrical signal has some features, e.g. weak, low-frequency and time-varying. To detect changes in plant electrical signals, LED light source was used to create a controllable light environment in this study. The electrical signal data were collected from Sansevieria leaves under the different illumination conditions, and the data was analyzed in time domain, frequency domain and time-frequency domain, respectively. These analyses are helpful to explore the relationship between changes in the light environment and electrical signals in Sansevieria leaves. The changes in the plant electrical signal reflected the changes in the intensity of photosynthesis. In this study, we proposed a new method to express plant photosynthetic intensity as a function of the electrical signal. That is, the plant electrical signal can be used to describe the state of plant growth.

  4. Research on the Effect of Electrical Signals on Growth of Sansevieria under Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Lighting Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Liguo; Meng, Qinghao; Wang, Liping; Dong, Jianghui; Wu, Hai

    2015-01-01

    The plant electrical signal has some features, e.g. weak, low-frequency and time-varying. To detect changes in plant electrical signals, LED light source was used to create a controllable light environment in this study. The electrical signal data were collected from Sansevieria leaves under the different illumination conditions, and the data was analyzed in time domain, frequency domain and time–frequency domain, respectively. These analyses are helpful to explore the relationship between changes in the light environment and electrical signals in Sansevieria leaves. The changes in the plant electrical signal reflected the changes in the intensity of photosynthesis. In this study, we proposed a new method to express plant photosynthetic intensity as a function of the electrical signal. That is, the plant electrical signal can be used to describe the state of plant growth. PMID:26121469

  5. Doping of nano structures for light emitting diode applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, S. W.; Yoo, H. J.; Jeong, E. S.; Park, S. H.

    2006-04-01

    Lighting Emitting Diodes (LED) have been widely studied and developed for practical applications and the LED market in the world have been dramatically expended. GaN-based LEDs are mostly used. However, for diverse application, we should first solved several problems in the GaN-based LEDs, thermal heating effects and low light emitting efficiency. The thermal heating effects reduce the life time of LEDs and the low light emitting efficiency are disadvantageous in competition with electric lights. In this project, we studied the possibility of ZnO nanomaterials as LEDs. We have developed a techniques to fabricated reproducible ZnO nanorod arrays on various substrates with 40 - 100 nm diameters. We have successfully fabricated two-dimensional ZnO film growth on one-dimensional nanorods. We have also systematically studied ZnO nanorod growth on GaN and Al 2 O 3 substrated with different proton treatments to understand the ZnO nanorod growth mechanism. These techniques will be used to develop p-ZnO/n-ZnO nanomaterials as LEDs

  6. Light emitting diodes as a plant lighting source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bula, R.J.; Tennessen, D.J.; Morrow, R.C. [Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics, Madison, WI (United States); Tibbitts, T.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Electroluminescence in solid materials is defined as the generation of light by the passage of an electric current through a body of solid material under an applied electric field. A specific type of electroluminescence, first noted by Lossew in 1923, involves the generation of photons when electrons are passed through a p-n junction of certain solid materials (junction of a n-type semiconductor, an electron donor, and a p-type semiconductor, an electron acceptor). Development efforts to translate these observations into visible light emitting devices, however, was not undertaken until the 1950s. The term, light emitting diode (LEDs), was first used in a report by Wolfe, et al., in 1955. The development of this light emitting semiconductor technology dates back less than 30 years. During this period of time, the LED has evolved from a rare and expensive light generating device to one of the most widely used electronic components. The most popular applications of the LED are as indicators or as optoelectronic switches. However, several recent advances in LED technology have made possible the utilization of LEDs for applications that require a high photon flux, such as for plant lighting in controlled environments. The new generation of LEDs based on a gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAS) semiconductor material fabricated as a double heterostructure on a transparent substrate has opened up many new applications for these LEDs.

  7. Determination of illuminants representing typical white light emitting diodes sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jost, S.; Ngo, M.; Ferrero, A.

    2017-01-01

    is to develop LED-based illuminants that describe typical white LED products based on their Spectral Power Distributions (SPDs). Some of these new illuminants will be recommended in the update of the CIE publication 15 on colorimetry with the other typical illuminants, and among them, some could be used......Solid-state lighting (SSL) products are already in use by consumers and are rapidly gaining the lighting market. Especially, white Light Emitting Diode (LED) sources are replacing banned incandescent lamps and other lighting technologies in most general lighting applications. The aim of this work...... to complement the CIE standard illuminant A for calibration use in photometry....

  8. Photobiomodulation versus light-emitting diode (LED) therapy in the treatment of temporomandibular disorder: study protocol for a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langella, Luciana G; Silva, Paula F C; Costa-Santos, Larissa; Gonçalves, Marcela L L; Motta, Lara J; Deana, Alessandro M; Fernandes, Kristianne P S; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel A; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2018-01-26

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is described as a subgroup of orofacial pain with a set of signs and symptoms that involve the temporomandibular joint, masticatory muscles, ears, and neck. TMD can occur unilaterally or bilaterally and approximately 70% of the population is affected with at least one sign. The disorder progresses with orofacial pain, muscle pain involving the masticatory and cervical muscles, joint noises (clicks and pops), joint block, mandibular dysfunction, and headache. The etiology can be abnormal occlusion and/or posture, trauma involving local tissues, repetitive microtrauma, parafunctional habits, and an increase in emotional stress. Studies have demonstrated that phototherapy is an efficient option for the treatment of TMD, leading to improvements in pain and orofacial function. The aim of the proposed study is to compare the effects of two sources of photobiomodulation in individuals with TMD. A randomized, controlled, double-blind, clinical trial is proposed, which will involve 80 individuals aged 18-65 years allocated to either a laser group or light-emitting diode (LED) group submitted to 12 sessions of phototherapy. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMDs will be used to evaluate all participants. Pain will be measured using the visual analog scale and maximum vertical mandibular movement will be determined with the aid of digital calipers. This study compares the effects of two modalities of laser therapy on the pain and orofacial function of patients with TMD dysfunction. Photobiomodulation and LED therapy are treatment options for reducing the inflammatory process and pain as well as inducing the regeneration of the target tissue. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03257748 . Registered on 8 August 2017.

  9. Material and device studies for the development of ultra-violet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) along polar, non-polar and semi-polar directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Ramya

    Over the past few years, significant effort was dedicated to the development of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) for a variety of applications. Such applications include chemical and biological detection, water purification and solid-state lighting. III-Nitride LEDs based on multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown along the conventional [0001] (polar) direction suffer from the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), due to the existence of strong electric fields that arise from spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization. Thus, there is strong motivation to develop MQW-based III-nitride LED structures grown along non-polar and semi-polar directions. The goal of this dissertation is to develop UV-LEDs along the [0001] polar and [11 2¯ 0] non-polar directions by the method of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). The polar and non-polar LEDs were grown on the C-plane and R-plane sapphire substrates respectively. This work is a combination of materials science studies related to the nucleation, growth and n- and p-type doping of III-nitride films on these two substrates, as well as device studies related to fabrication and characterization of UV-LEDs. It was observed that the crystallographic orientation of the III-nitride films grown on R-plane sapphire depends strongly on the kinetic conditions of growth of the Aluminum Nitride (AIN) buffer. Specifically, growth of the AIN buffer under group III-rich conditions leads to nitride films having the (11 2¯ 0) non polar planes parallel to the sapphire surface, while growth of the buffer under nitrogen rich conditions leads to nitride films with the (11 2¯ 6) semi-polar planes parallel to the sapphire surface. The electron concentration and mobility for the films grown along the polar, non-polar and semi-polar directions were investigated. P-type doping of Gallium Nitride (GaN) films grown on the nonpolar (11 2¯ 0) plane do not suffer from polarity inversion and thus the material was doped p-type with a hole concentration

  10. Laterally injected light-emitting diode and laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-06-16

    A p-type superlattice is used to laterally inject holes into an III-nitride multiple quantum well active layer, enabling efficient light extraction from the active area. Laterally-injected light-emitting diodes and laser diodes can enable brighter, more efficient devices that impact a wide range of wavelengths and applications. For UV wavelengths, applications include fluorescence-based biological sensing, epoxy curing, and water purification. For visible devices, applications include solid state lighting and projection systems.

  11. Trapping of Rift Valley Fever (RVF vectors using Light Emitting Diode (LED CDC traps in two arboviral disease hot spots in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tchouassi David P

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes’ response to artificial lights including color has been exploited in trap designs for improved sampling of mosquito vectors. Earlier studies suggest that mosquitoes are attracted to specific wavelengths of light and thus the need to refine techniques to increase mosquito captures following the development of super-bright light-emitting diodes (LEDs which emit narrow wavelengths of light or very specific colors. Therefore, we investigated if LEDs can be effective substitutes for incandescent lamps used in CDC light traps for mosquito surveillance, and if so, determine the best color for attraction of important Rift Valley Fever (RFV vectors. Methods The efficiency of selected colored LED CDC light traps (red, green, blue, violet, combination of blue-green-red (BGR to sample RVF vectors was evaluated relative to incandescent light (as control in a CDC light trap in two RVF hotspots (Marigat and Ijara districts in Kenya. In field experiments, traps were baited with dry ice and captures evaluated for Aedes tricholabis, Ae. mcintoshi, Ae. ochraceus, Mansonia uniformis, Mn. africana and Culex pipiens, following Latin square design with days as replicates. Daily mosquito counts per treatment were analyzed using a generalized linear model with Negative Binomial error structure and log link using R. The incidence rate ratios (IRR that mosquito species chose other treatments instead of the control, were estimated. Results Seasonal preference of Ae.mcintoshi and Ae. ochraceus at Ijara was evident with a bias towards BGR and blue traps respectively in one trapping period but this pattern waned during another period at same site with significantly low numbers recorded in all colored traps except blue relative to the control. Overall results showed that higher captures of all species were recorded in control traps compared to the other LED traps (IRR  Conclusion Based on our trapping design and color, none of the LEDs

  12. Aggregation in organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Abigail

    Organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology has great potential for becoming a solid state lighting source. However, there are inefficiencies in OLED devices that need to be understood. Since these inefficiencies occur on a nanometer scale there is a need for structural data on this length scale in three dimensions which has been unattainable until now. Local Electron Atom Probe (LEAP), a specific implementation of Atom Probe Tomography (APT), is used in this work to acquire morphology data in three dimensions on a nanometer scale with much better chemical resolution than is previously seen. Before analyzing LEAP data, simulations were used to investigate how detector efficiency, sample size and cluster size affect data analysis which is done using radial distribution functions (RDFs). Data is reconstructed using the LEAP software which provides mass and position data. Two samples were then analyzed, 3% DCM2 in C60 and 2% DCM2 in Alq3. Analysis of both samples indicated little to no clustering was present in this system.

  13. Assessing the use of Low Voltage UV-light Emitting Miniature LEDs for Marine Biofouling Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    of that required to drive traditional UV mercury lamps . Secondly, given their small size and relatively low cost, UV LEDs provide ease of maintenance...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Assessing the use of Low Voltage UV -light Emitting Miniature LEDs for Marine Biofouling Control Richard...settling organisms. The introduction of miniature UV light emitting diodes ( LEDs ) as a light source enables them to be embedded into thin, flexible

  14. Evaluation of light-emitting diode beacon light fixtures : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Rotating beacons containing filament light sources have long been used on highway maintenance trucks : to indicate the presence of the truck to other drivers. Because of advances in light-emitting diode (LED) : technologies, flashing lights containin...

  15. A controlled trial of the Litebook light-emitting diode (LED light therapy device for treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telner John

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent research has emphasized that the human circadian rhythm system is differentially sensitive to short wavelength light. Light treatment devices using efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs whose output is relatively concentrated in short wavelengths may enable a more convenient effective therapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD. Methods The efficacy of a LED light therapy device in the treatment of SAD was tested in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center trial. Participants aged 18 to 65 with SAD (DSM-IV major depression with seasonal pattern were seen at Baseline and Randomization visits separated by 1 week, and after 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks of treatment. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores (SIGH-SAD were obtained at each visit. Participants with SIGH-SAD of 20 or greater at Baseline and Randomization visits were randomized to active or control treatment: exposure to the Litebook LED treatment device (The Litebook Company Ltd., Alberta, Canada which delivers 1,350 lux white light (with spectral emission peaks at 464 nm and 564 nm at a distance of 20 inches or to an inactivated negative ion generator at a distance of 20 inches, for 30 minutes a day upon awakening and prior to 8 A.M. Results Of the 26 participants randomized, 23 completed the trial. Mean group SIGH-SAD scores did not differ significantly at randomization. At trial end, the proportions of participants in remission (SIGH-SAD less than 9 were significantly greater (Fisher's exact test, and SIGH-SAD scores, as percent individual score at randomization, were significantly lower (t-test, with active treatment than with control, both in an intent-to-treat analysis and an observed cases analysis. A longitudinal repeated measures ANOVA analysis of SIGH-SAD scores also indicated a significant interaction of time and treatment, showing superiority of the Litebook over the placebo condition. Conclusion The results of this pilot study support

  16. III-nitride based light emitting diodes and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Jung; Amano, Hiroshi; Morkoç, Hadis

    2013-01-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are already used in traffic signals, signage lighting, and automotive applications. However, its ultimate goal is to replace traditional illumination through LED lamps since LED lighting significantly reduces energy consumption and cuts down on carbon-dioxide emission. Despite dramatic advances in LED technologies (e.g., growth, doping and processing technologies), however, there remain critical issues for further improvements yet to be achieved for the realization of solid-state lighting. This book aims to provide the readers with some contemporary LED issues, which have not been comprehensively discussed in the published books and, on which the performance of LEDs is seriously dependent. For example, most importantly, there must be a breakthrough in the growth of high-quality nitride semiconductor epitaxial layers with a low density of dislocations, in particular, in the growth of Al-rich and and In-rich GaN-based semiconductors. The materials quality is directly dependent on th...

  17. III-nitride based light emitting diodes and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Jung; Amano, Hiroshi; Morkoç, Hadis

    2017-01-01

    The revised edition of this important book presents updated and expanded coverage of light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on heteroepitaxial GaN on Si substrates, and includes new chapters on tunnel junction LEDs, green/yellow LEDs, and ultraviolet LEDs. Over the last two decades, significant progress has been made in the growth, doping and processing technologies of III-nitride based semiconductors, leading to considerable expectations for nitride semiconductors across a wide range of applications. LEDs are already used in traffic signals, signage lighting, and automotive applications, with the ultimate goal of the global replacement of traditional incandescent and fluorescent lamps, thus reducing energy consumption and cutting down on carbon-dioxide emission. However, some critical issues must be addressed to allow the further improvements required for the large-scale realization of solid-state lighting, and this book aims to provide the readers with details of some contemporary issues on which the performanc...

  18. Highly Efficient Spectrally Stable Red Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu; Zhou, Chenkun; Worku, Michael; Wang, Xi; Ling, Yichuan; Gao, Hanwei; Zhou, Yan; Miao, Yu; Guan, Jingjiao; Ma, Biwu

    2018-05-01

    Perovskite light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have recently attracted great research interest for their narrow emissions and solution processability. Remarkable progress has been achieved in green perovskite LEDs in recent years, but not blue or red ones. Here, highly efficient and spectrally stable red perovskite LEDs with quasi-2D perovskite/poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) composite thin films as the light-emitting layer are reported. By controlling the molar ratios of organic salt (benzylammonium iodide) to inorganic salts (cesium iodide and lead iodide), luminescent quasi-2D perovskite thin films are obtained with tunable emission colors from red to deep red. The perovskite/polymer composite approach enables quasi-2D perovskite/PEO composite thin films to possess much higher photoluminescence quantum efficiencies and smoothness than their neat quasi-2D perovskite counterparts. Electrically driven LEDs with emissions peaked at 638, 664, 680, and 690 nm have been fabricated to exhibit high brightness and external quantum efficiencies (EQEs). For instance, the perovskite LED with an emission peaked at 680 nm exhibits a brightness of 1392 cd m -2 and an EQE of 6.23%. Moreover, exceptional electroluminescence spectral stability under continuous device operation has been achieved for these red perovskite LEDs. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Fabrication of organic light emitting diode using Molybdenum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    65

    out by measuring sheet resistance, optical transmittance and surface ... role in the organic light-emitting diode (OLED) performance because it determines the .... coated glass by thermal vacuum deposition method and optimize it by using ...

  20. Current path in light emitting diodes based on nanowire ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limbach, F; Hauswald, C; Lähnemann, J; Wölz, M; Brandt, O; Trampert, A; Hanke, M; Jahn, U; Calarco, R; Geelhaar, L; Riechert, H

    2012-01-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been fabricated using ensembles of free-standing (In, Ga)N/GaN nanowires (NWs) grown on Si substrates in the self-induced growth mode by molecular beam epitaxy. Electron-beam-induced current analysis, cathodoluminescence as well as biased μ-photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electrical measurements indicate that the electroluminescence of such LEDs is governed by the differences in the individual current densities of the single-NW LEDs operated in parallel, i.e. by the inhomogeneity of the current path in the ensemble LED. In addition, the optoelectronic characterization leads to the conclusion that these NWs exhibit N-polarity and that the (In, Ga)N quantum well states in the NWs are subject to a non-vanishing quantum confined Stark effect. (paper)

  1. Dr. Harry Whelan With the Light Emitting Diode Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The red light from the Light Emitting Diode (LED) probe shines through the fingers of Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Whelan uses the long waves of light from the LED surgical probe to activate special drugs that kill brain tumors. Laser light previously has been used for this type of surgery, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of tumors that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. Also, it can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program grant. The program is part of NASA's Technology Transfer Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  2. Organic light emitting diode with surface modification layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basil, John D.; Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry; Arbab, Mehran; Marietti, Gary J.

    2017-09-12

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (12) having a first surface (14) and a second surface (16), a first electrode (32), and a second electrode (38). An emissive layer (36) is located between the first electrode (32) and the second electrode (38). The organic light emitting diode (10) further includes a surface modification layer (18). The surface modification layer (18) includes a non-planar surface (30, 52).

  3. Organic light emitting diode with light extracting electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry

    2017-04-18

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (20), a first electrode (12), an emissive active stack (14), and a second electrode (18). At least one of the first and second electrodes (12, 18) is a light extracting electrode (26) having a metallic layer (28). The metallic layer (28) includes light scattering features (29) on and/or in the metallic layer (28). The light extracting features (29) increase light extraction from the organic light emitting diode (10).

  4. Perovskite Materials for Light-Emitting Diodes and Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Sjoerd A; Boix, Pablo P; Yantara, Natalia; Li, Mingjie; Sum, Tze Chien; Mathews, Nripan; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G

    2016-08-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have cemented their position as an exceptional class of optoelectronic materials thanks to record photovoltaic efficiencies of 22.1%, as well as promising demonstrations of light-emitting diodes, lasers, and light-emitting transistors. Perovskite materials with photoluminescence quantum yields close to 100% and perovskite light-emitting diodes with external quantum efficiencies of 8% and current efficiencies of 43 cd A(-1) have been achieved. Although perovskite light-emitting devices are yet to become industrially relevant, in merely two years these devices have achieved the brightness and efficiencies that organic light-emitting diodes accomplished in two decades. Further advances will rely decisively on the multitude of compositional, structural variants that enable the formation of lower-dimensionality layered and three-dimensional perovskites, nanostructures, charge-transport materials, and device processing with architectural innovations. Here, the rapid advancements in perovskite light-emitting devices and lasers are reviewed. The key challenges in materials development, device fabrication, operational stability are addressed, and an outlook is presented that will address market viability of perovskite light-emitting devices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. New Optoelectronic Technology Simplified for Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre F. S. Guedes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED, using an optically transparent substrate material and organic semiconductor materials, has been widely utilized by the electronic industry when producing new technological products. The OLED are the base Poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene, PEDOT, and Polyaniline, PANI, were deposited in Indium Tin Oxide, ITO, and characterized by UV-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Vis, Optical Parameters (OP and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. In addition, the thin film obtained by the deposition of PANI, prepared in perchloric acid solution, was identified through PANI-X1. The result obtained by UV-Vis has demonstrated that the Quartz/ITO/PEDOT/PANI-X1 layer does not have displacement of absorption for wavelengths greaters after spin-coating and electrodeposition. Thus, the spectral irradiance of the OLED informed the irradiance of 100 W/m2, and this result, compared with the standard Light Emitting Diode (LED, has indicated that the OLED has higher irradiance. After 1000 hours of electrical OLED tests, the appearance of nanoparticles visible for images by SEM, to the migration process of organic semiconductor materials, was present, then. Still, similar to the phenomenon of electromigration observed in connections and interconnections of microelectronic devices, the results have revealed a new mechanism of migration, which raises the passage of electric current in OLED.

  6. Origin of electrophosphorescence from a doped polymer light emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, P. A.; Palilis, L. C.; O'Brien, D. F.; Giebeler, C.; Cadby, A. J.; Lidzey, D. G.; Campbell, A. J.; Blau, W.; Bradley, D. D. C.

    2001-01-01

    The origin of electrophosphorescence from a doped polymer light emitting diode (LED) has been investigated. A luminescent polymer host, poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO), was doped with a red phosphorescent dye, 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethyl-21H,23H-porphyrin platinum(II) (PtOEP). The maximum external quantum efficiency of 3.5% was obtained at a concentration of 4% PtOEP by weight. Energy transfer mechanisms between PFO and PtOEP were studied by absorption, photoluminescence, and photoinduced absorption spectroscopy. Even though electroluminescence spectra were dominated by PtOEP at a concentration of only 0.2 wt% PtOEP, Forster transfer of singlet excitons was weak and there was no evidence for Dexter transfer of triplet excitons. We conclude that the dominant emission mechanism in doped LED's is charge trapping followed by recombination on PtOEP molecules

  7. Applications of Light Emitting Diodes in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jianfei; Xiong, Daxi

    2017-11-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) have become the main light sources for general lighting, due to their high lumen efficiency and long life time. Moreover, their high bandwidth and the availability of diverse wavelength contents ranging from ultraviolet to infrared empower them with great controllability in tuning brightness, pulse durations and spectra. These parameters are the essential ingredients of the applications in medical imaging and therapies. Despite the fast advances in both LED technologies and their applications, few reviews have been seen to link the controllable emission properties of LEDs to these applications. The objective of this paper is to bridge this gap by reviewing the main control techniques of LEDs that enable creating enhanced lighting patterns for imaging and generating effective photon doses for photobiomodulation. This paper also provides the basic mechanisms behind the effective LED therapies in treating cutaneous and neurological diseases. The emerging field of optogenetics is also discussed with a focus on the application of LEDs. The multidisciplinary topics reviewed in this paper can help the researchers in LEDs, imaging, light therapy and optogenetics better understand the basic principles in each other's field; and hence to stimulate the application of LEDs in health care.

  8. Application of Surface Plasmonics for Semiconductor Light-Emitting Diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadil, Ahmed

    This thesis addresses the lack of an efficient semiconductor light source at green emission colours. Considering InGaN based quantum-well (QW) light-emitters and light-emitting diodes (LEDs), various ways of applying surface plasmonics and nano-patterning to improve the efficiency, are investigated....... By placing metallic thin films or nanoparticles (NPs) in the near-field of QW light-emitters, it is possible to improve their internal quantum efficiency (IQE) through the Purcell enhancement effect. It has been a general understanding that in order to achieve surface plasmon (SP) coupling with QWs......-QW coupling does not necessarily lead to emission enhancement. The findings of this work show that the scattering and absorption properties of NPs play a crucial role in determining whether the implementation will improve or degrade the optical performance. By applying these principles, a novel design...

  9. Light emitting diode excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sean J; JiJi, Renée D

    2002-12-01

    An excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence instrument has been developed using a linear array of light emitting diodes (LED). The wavelengths covered extend from the upper UV through the visible spectrum: 370-640 nm. Using an LED array to excite fluorescence emission at multiple excitation wavelengths is a low-cost alternative to an expensive high power lamp and imaging spectrograph. The LED-EEM system is a departure from other EEM spectroscopy systems in that LEDs often have broad excitation ranges which may overlap with neighboring channels. The LED array can be considered a hybrid between a spectroscopic and sensor system, as the broad LED excitation range produces a partially selective optical measurement. The instrument has been tested and characterized using fluorescent dyes: limits of detection (LOD) for 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl)-anthracene and rhodamine B were in the mid parts-per-trillion range; detection limits for the other compounds were in the low parts-per-billion range (LED-EEMs were analyzed using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), which allowed the mathematical resolution of the individual contributions of the mono- and dianion fluorescein tautomers a priori. Correct identification and quantitation of six fluorescent dyes in two to six component mixtures (concentrations between 12.5 and 500 ppb) has been achieved with root mean squared errors of prediction (RMSEP) of less than 4.0 ppb for all components.

  10. Usability of light-emitting diodes in precision approach path indicator systems by individuals with marginal color vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    To save energy, the FAA is planning to convert from incandescent lights to light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in : precision approach path indicator (PAPI) systems. Preliminary work on the usability of LEDs by color vision-waivered pilots (Bullough, Skinne...

  11. Organic light emitting diodes with spin polarized electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arisi, E.; Bergenti, I.; Dediu, V.; Loi, M.A.; Muccini, M.; Murgia, M.; Ruani, G.; Taliani, C.; Zamboni, R.

    2003-01-01

    Electrical and optical properties of Alq3 based organic light emitting diodes with normal and spin polarized electrodes are presented. Epitaxial semitransparent highly spin polarized La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 were used as hole injector, substituting the traditional indium tin oxide electrode. A comparison of

  12. Improvement in light-extraction efficiency of light emitting diode ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of various microlens parameters such as diameter and area fraction on light-extraction efficiency was systematically studied. Improvement of 4% in extraction efficiency was obtained by employing it on white light emitting diode. The area fraction of microlenses was increased up to 0.34 by reducing the spin speed.

  13. Atom probe tomography of a commercial light emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D J; Prosa, T J; Olson, D; Lawrence, D; Clifton, P H; Kelly, T F; Lefebvre, W

    2013-01-01

    The atomic-scale analysis of a commercial light emitting diode device purchased at retail is demonstrated using a local electrode atom probe. Some of the features are correlated with transmission electron microscopy imaging. Subtle details of the structure that are revealed have potential significance for the design and performance of this device

  14. Performance of injection-limited polymer light-emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, P.W.M.; Woudenberg, T.V.; Huiberts, H.; Jabbour, GE; Carter, SA; Kido, J; Lee, ST; Sariciftci, NS

    2002-01-01

    The electro-optical characteristics of a polymer light emitting diode (PLED) with a strongly reduced hole injection have been investigated. The device consists of a poly-p-phenylene vinylene semiconductor with a Ag hole injecting contact, which has an injection barrier of about 1 eV. It is observed

  15. Light extraction efficiency enhancement for fluorescent SiC based white light-emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Ou, Yiyu; Argyraki, Aikaterini

    Fluorescent SiC based white light-emitting diodes(LEDs) light source, as an innovative energy-efficient light source, would even have longer lifetime, better light quality and eliminated blue-tone effect, compared to the current phosphor based white LED light source. In this paper, the yellow...

  16. Influence of a partially oxidized calcium cathode on the performance of polymeric light emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, G.G.; Jong, de M.P.; Janssen, F.J.J.; Sturm, J.M.; IJzendoorn, van L.J.; Denier van der Gon, A.W.; Voigt, de M.J.A.; Brongersma, H.H.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the presence of oxygen during the deposition of the calcium cathode on the structure and on the performance of polymeric light emitting diodes (pLEDs). The oxygen background pressure during deposition of the calcium cathode of polymeric LEDs was varied. Subsequently,

  17. Medical Applications of Space Light-Emitting Diode Technology--Space Station and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, H.T.; Houle, J.M.; Donohoe, D.L.; Bajic, D.M.; Schmidt, M.H.; Reichert, K.W.; Weyenberg, G.T.; Larson, D.L.; Meyer, G.A.; Caviness, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Space light-emitting diode (LED) technology has provided medicine with a new tool capable of delivering light deep into tissues of the body, at wavelengths which are biologically optimal for cancer treatment and wound healing. This LED technology has already flown on Space Shuttle missions, and shows promise for wound healing applications of benefit to Space Station astronauts.

  18. Hand-Drawn Resistors and a Simple Tester Using a Light-Emitting Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Abe, Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    A thick line drawn on a sheet of paper with a 6B pencil is electrically conductive and its resistance can be roughly estimated using a simple tester made of a light-emitting diode (LED) and a lithium coin-type cell. Using this hand-drawn resistor and the LED tester, we developed teaching materials that help students to understand how electrical…

  19. Molecular Engineering of UV/Vis Light-Emitting Diode (LED)-Sensitive Donor-π-Acceptor-Type Sulfonium Salt Photoacid Generators: Design, Synthesis, and Study of Photochemical and Photophysical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingyu; Jin, Ming; Xie, Jianchao; Malval, Jean-Pierre; Wan, Decheng

    2017-11-07

    A series of donor-π-acceptor-type sulfonium salt photoacid generators (PAGs) were designed and synthesized by systematically changing electron-donating groups, π-conjugated systems, electron-withdrawing groups, and the number of branches through molecular engineering. These PAGs can effectively decompose under UV/Vis irradiation from a light-emitting diode (LED) light source because of the matching absorption and emitting spectra of the LEDs. The absorption and acid-generation properties of these sulfonium salts were elucidated by UV/Vis spectroscopy and so forth. Results indicated that the PAG performance benefited from the introduction of strong electron-donating groups, specific π-conjugated structures, certain electron-withdrawing groups, or two-branched structures. Most sulfonium salts showed potential as photoinitiators under irradiation by a wide variety of UV and visible LEDs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Instense red phosphors for UV light emitting diode devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fa-Bin; Tian, Yan-Wen; Chen, Yong-Jie; Xiao, Lin-Jiu; Liu, Yun-Yi

    2010-03-01

    Ca(x)Sr1-x-1.5y-0.5zMoO4:yEu3+ zNa+ red phosphors were prepared by solid-state reaction using Na+ as charge supply for LEDs (light emitting diodes). The content of charge compensator, Ca2+ concentration, synthesis temperature, reaction time, and Eu3+ concentration were the keys to improving the properties of luminescence and crystal structure of red phosphors. The photoluminescence spectra shows the red phosphors are effectively excited at 616 nm by 311 nm, 395 nm, and 465 nm light. The wavelengths of 395 and 465 nm nicely match the widely applied emission wavelengths of ultraviolet or blue LED chips. Its chromaticity coordinates (CIE) are calculated to be x = 0.65, y = 0.32. Bright red light can be observed by the naked eye from the LED-based Ca0.60Sr0.25MoO4:0.08Eu3+ 0.06Na+.

  1. Device model investigation of bilayer organic light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crone, B. K.; Davids, P. S.; Campbell, I. H.; Smith, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    Organic materials that have desirable luminescence properties, such as a favorable emission spectrum and high luminescence efficiency, are not necessarily suitable for single layer organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) because the material may have unequal carrier mobilities or contact limited injection properties. As a result, single layer LEDs made from such organic materials are inefficient. In this article, we present device model calculations of single layer and bilayer organic LED characteristics that demonstrate the improvements in device performance that can occur in bilayer devices. We first consider an organic material where the mobilities of the electrons and holes are significantly different. The role of the bilayer structure in this case is to move the recombination away from the electrode that injects the low mobility carrier. We then consider an organic material with equal electron and hole mobilities but where it is not possible to make a good contact for one carrier type, say electrons. The role of a bilayer structure in this case is to prevent the holes from traversing the device without recombining. In both cases, single layer device limitations can be overcome by employing a two organic layer structure. The results are discussed using the calculated spatial variation of the carrier densities, electric field, and recombination rate density in the structures. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  2. GaN-Based Multiple-Quantum-Well Light-Emitting Diodes Employing Nanotechnology for Photon Management

    KAUST Repository

    Hsiao, Yu Hsuan; Tsai, Meng Lin; He, Jr-Hau

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructures have been proved to be an efficient way of modifying/improving the performance of GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The achievements in photon management include strain relaxation, light extraction enhancement, radiation pattern

  3. Efficient light harvesting from flexible perovskite solar cells under indoor white light-emitting diode illumination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucarelli, G.; Di Giacomo, F.; Zardetto, V.; Creatore, M.; Brown, T.M.

    2017-01-01

    This is the first report of an investigation on flexible perovskite solar cells for artificial light harvesting by using a white light-emitting diode (LED) lamp as a light source at 200 and 400 lx, values typically found in indoor environments. Flexible cells were developed using either

  4. Non-radiative recombination losses in polymer light-emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuik, M.; Koster, L. J. A.; Dijkstra, A. G.; Wetzelaer, G. A. H.; Blom, P. W. M.

    We present a quantitative analysis of the loss of electroluminescence in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) due to the combination of non-radiative trap-assisted recombination and exciton quenching at the metallic cathode. It is

  5. Color Shift Modeling of Light-Emitting Diode Lamps in Step-Loaded Stress Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Miao; Yang, Daoguo; Huang, J.; Zhang, Maofen; Chen, Xianping; Liang, Caihang; Koh, S.W.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2017-01-01

    The color coordinate shift of light-emitting diode (LED) lamps is investigated by running three stress-loaded testing methods, namely step-up stress accelerated degradation testing, step-down stress accelerated degradation testing, and constant stress accelerated degradation testing. A power

  6. Printable candlelight-style organic light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, J. H.; Singh, M.; Song, W. C.; Liu, S. H.

    2017-06-01

    Candles or oil lamps are currently the most friendly lighting source to human eyes, physiology, ecosystems, artifacts, environment, and night skies due to their blue light-less emission. Candle light also exhibits high light-quality that provides visual comfort. However, they are relatively low in power efficacy (0.3 lm/W), making them energy-wasting, besides having problems like scorching hot, burning, catching fire, flickering, carbon blacking, oxygen consuming, and release of green house gas etc. In contrast, candlelight organic light-emitting diode (OLED) can be made blue-hazard free and energy-efficient. The remaining challenges are to maximize its light-quality and enable printing feasibility, the latter of which would pave a way to cost-effective manufacturing. We hence demonstrate herein the design and fabrication of a candlelight OLED via wet-process. From retina protection perspective, its emission is 13, 12 and 8 times better than those of the blue-enriched white CFL, LED and OLED. If used at night, it is 9, 6 and 4 times better from melatonin generation perspective.

  7. Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes in water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhunen, Sari; Särkkä, Heikki; Sillanpää, Mika

    2009-06-01

    The novel system of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV LEDs) was studied in water disinfection. Conventional UV lamps, like mercury vapor lamp, consume much energy and are considered to be problem waste after use. UV LEDs are energy efficient and free of toxicants. This study showed the suitability of LEDs in disinfection and provided information of the effect of two emitted wavelengths and different test mediums to Escherichia coli destruction. Common laboratory strain of E. coli (K12) was used and the effects of two emitted wavelengths (269 and 276 nm) were investigated with two photolytic batch reactors both including ten LEDs. The effects of test medium were examined with ultrapure water, nutrient and water, and nutrient and water with humic acids. Efficiency of reactors was almost the same even though the one emitting higher wavelength had doubled optical power compared to the other. Therefore, the effect of wavelength was evident and the radiation emitted at 269 nm was more powerful. Also, the impact of background was studied and noticed to have only slight deteriorating effect. In the 5-min experiment, the bacterial reduction of three to four log colony-forming units (CFU) per cubic centimeter was achieved, in all cases. When turbidity of the test medium was greater, part of the UV radiation was spent on the absorption and reactions with extra substances on liquid. Humic acids can also coat the bacteria reducing the sensitivity of the cells to UV light. The lower wavelength was distinctly more efficient when the optical power is considered, even though the difference of wavelengths was small. The reason presumably is the greater absorption of DNA causing more efficient bacterial breakage. UV LEDs were efficient in E. coli destruction, even if LEDs were considered to have rather low optical power. The effect of wavelengths was noticeable but the test medium did not have much impact. This study found UV LEDs to be an optimal method for bacterial

  8. Investigation of organic light emitting diodes for interferometric purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakula, Anna; Zimak, Marzena; Sałbut, Leszek

    2011-05-01

    Recently the new type of light source has been introduced to the market. Organic light emitting diode (OLED) is not only interesting because of the low applying voltage, wide light emitting areas and emission efficiency. It gives the possibility to create a light source of a various shape, various color and in the near future very likely even the one that will change shape and spectrum in time in controlled way. Those opportunities have not been in our reach until now. In the paper authors try to give an answer to the question if the new light source -OLED - is suitable for interferometric purposes. Tests cover the short and long term spectrum stability, spectrum changes due to the emission area selection. In the paper the results of two OLEDs (red and white) are shown together with the result of an attempt to use them in an interferometric setup.

  9. Electrical pulse burnout testing of light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalma, A.H.; Fischer, C.J.

    1975-01-01

    Electrical pulse burnout thresholds were measured in GaAs, GaAsP, and GaP light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by studying the degradation in light output and the change in I-V characteristics both during the pulse and in the steady state. Pulse widths ranging from a few hundred nsec to 100 μsec were used. Light output degradation was the most sensitive parameter and was used to determine the thresholds. Just above threshold, damage is caused by an increase in generation-recombination current in the space-charge retion. This current is non-radiative and the light output drops, but the damage is not catastrophic. At higher power, the junction burns through and shunt resistance paths are formed which more drastically degrade the light output. The experimental data match reasonably with the theoretical Wunsch--Bell/Tasca model if a burnout area of 1 / 10 the junction area is assumed. Both the adiabatic term (At -1 ) and the heat flow term (Bt - /sup 1 / 2 /) contribute in all devices, and the equilibrium term (C) contributes in some GaAsP devices. The scatter in the data for GaAs devices is greater than that for GaAsP devices, apparently because the former types have a significant fraction of mavericks with lower-than-normal thresholds. The use of LEDs to examine electrical pulse burnout is advantageous because the light output is quite sensitive to damage and the combined measurement of optical and electrical properties provides additional information about the mechanisms involved

  10. Topology optimisation of passive coolers for light-emitting diode lamps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    2015-01-01

    This work applies topology optimisation to the design of passive coolers for light-emitting diode (LED) lamps. The heat sinks are cooled by the natural convection currents arising from the temperature difference between the LED lamp and the surrounding air. A large scale parallel computational....... The optimisation results show interesting features that are currently being incorporated into industrial designs for enhanced passive cooling abilities....

  11. Color Shift Modeling of Light-Emitting Diode Lamps in Step-Loaded Stress Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Miao; Yang, Daoguo; Huang, J.; Zhang, Maofen; Chen, Xianping; Liang, Caihang; Koh, S.W.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2017-01-01

    The color coordinate shift of light-emitting diode (LED) lamps is investigated by running three stress-loaded testing methods, namely step-up stress accelerated degradation testing, step-down stress accelerated degradation testing, and constant stress accelerated degradation testing. A power model is proposed as the statistical model of the color shift (CS) process of LED products. Consequently, a CS mechanism constant is obtained for detecting the consistency of CS mechanisms among various s...

  12. Amber light-emitting diode comprising a group III-nitride nanowire active region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Koleske, Daniel

    2014-07-22

    A temperature stable (color and efficiency) III-nitride based amber (585 nm) light-emitting diode is based on a novel hybrid nanowire-planar structure. The arrays of GaN nanowires enable radial InGaN/GaN quantum well LED structures with high indium content and high material quality. The high efficiency and temperature stable direct yellow and red phosphor-free emitters enable high efficiency white LEDs based on the RGYB color-mixing approach.

  13. Design of passive coolers for light-emitting diode lamps using topology optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Sigmund, Ole; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2018-01-01

    Topology optimised designs for passive cooling of light-emitting diode (LED) lamps are investigated through extensive numerical parameter studies. The designs are optimised for either horizontal or vertical orientations and are compared to a lattice-fin design as well as a simple parameter......, while maintaining low sensitivity to orientation. Furthermore, they exhibit several defining features and provide insight and general guidelines for the design of passive coolers for LED lamps....

  14. Improved emission spectrum from quantum dot superluminescent light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.H.; Rossetti, M.; Fiore, A. [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Electronics, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Occhi, L.; Velez, C. [EXALOS AG, Technoparkstrasse 1, 8005 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2006-12-15

    The size dispersion of InAs quantum dots (QD) was optimized to broaden the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. A broad PL spectral width up to 96 nm is achieved from a single QD layer with InAs thickness smaller than 2.4 monolayers at a growth temperature of 510 C. QD Superluminescent light emitting diodes with an ultrawide (115 nm), smooth output spectrum are obtained by incorporating this QD layer into chirped stacked structures. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Simone; Thomschke, Michael; Lüssem, Björn; Leo, Karl

    2011-11-07

    We review top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), which are beneficial for lighting and display applications, where non-transparent substrates are used. The optical effects of the microcavity structure as well as the loss mechanisms are discussed. Outcoupling techniques and the work on white top-emitting OLEDs are summarized. We discuss the power dissipation spectra for a monochrome and a white top-emitting OLED and give quantitative reports on the loss channels. Furthermore, the development of inverted top-emitting OLEDs is described.

  16. Investigation of phosphorescent blue organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chien-Shu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Krause, Ralf [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Kozlowski, Fryderyk; Hunze, Arvid [Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Kowalsky, Wolfgang [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Recently, rapid development of phosphorescent materials has significantly improved the efficiency of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). By using efficient phosphorescent emitter materials white OLEDs with high power efficiency values could be demonstrated. But especially blue phosphorescent devices, due to stability issues, need to be further investigated und optimized. In this work, blue OLED devices based on the phosphorescent emitter FIrpic were investigated. Single-carrier hole-only as well as electron-only devices were fabricated and characterized to study the impact of charge carriers on device performance.

  17. Optimization of freeform lightpipes for light-emitting-diode projectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Florian; Rolland, Jannick

    2008-03-01

    Standard nonimaging components used to collect and integrate light in light-emitting-diode-based projector light engines such as tapered rods and compound parabolic concentrators are compared to optimized freeform shapes in terms of transmission efficiency and spatial uniformity. We show that the simultaneous optimization of the output surface and the profile shape yields transmission efficiency within the étendue limit up to 90% and spatial uniformity higher than 95%, even for compact sizes. The optimization process involves a manual study of the trends for different shapes and the use of an optimization algorithm to further improve the performance of the freeform lightpipe.

  18. Benzoporphyrin derivative and light-emitting diode for use in photodynamic therapy: Applications of space light-emitting diode technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, Harry T.; Houle, John M.; Bajic, Dawn M.; Schmidt, Meic H.; Reichert, Kenneth W. II; Meyer, Glenn A.

    1998-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment modality that recently has been applied as adjuvant therapy for brain tumors. PDT consists of intravenously injecting a photosensitizer, which preferentially accumulates in tumor cells, into a patient and then activating the photosensitizer with a light source. This results in free radical generation followed by cell death. The development of more effective light sources for PDT of brain tumors has been facilitated by applications of space light-emitting diode array technology; thus permitting deeper tumor penetration of light and use of better photosensitizers. Currently, the most commonly used photosensitizer for brain tumor PDT is Photofrin registered . Photofrin registered is a heterogeneous mixture of compounds derived from hematoporphyrin. Photofrin registered is activated with a 630 nm laser light and does destroy tumor cells in animal models and humans. However, treatment failure does occur using this method. Most investigators attribute this failure to the limited penetration of brain tissue by a 630 nm laser light and to the fact that Photofrin registered has only a minor absorption peak at 630 nm, meaning that only a small fraction of the chemical is activated. Benzoporphyrin Derivative Monoacid Ring A (BPD) is a new, second generation photosensitizer that can potentially improve PDT for brain tumors. BPD has a major absorption peak at 690 nm, which gives it two distinct advantages over Photofrin registered . First, longer wavelengths of light penetrate brain tissue more easily so that larger tumors could be treated, and second, the major absorption peak means that a larger fraction of the drug is activated upon exposure to light. In the first part of this project we have studied the tumoricidal effects of BPD in vitro using 2A9 canine glioma and U373 human glioblastoma cell cultures. Using light emitting diodes (LED) with a peak emission of 688 nm as a light source, cell kill of up to 86 percent was

  19. The Use of Ultra-Violet (UV) Light Emitting Diodes (LEDS) in an Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) with Brilliant Blue FCF as an Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    LEDs have the potential to replace mercury lamps in many UV processes, as well as open the door to new applications of UV light based on their unique...al. 2007, Autin, Romelot, et al. 2013). UV LEDs in AOPs While most data on AOP experimentation are based on experiments that use mercury lamps ...metaldehyde in solution. Their experiments found that similar UV light exposure levels from UV LEDs and traditional mercury lamps produced similar

  20. A tunable lighting system integrated by inorganic and transparent organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-jing; Zhang, Tao; Jin, Ya-fang; Liu, Shi-shen; Yuan, Shi-dong; Cui, Zhao; Zhang, Li; Wang, Wei-hui

    2014-05-01

    A tunable surface-emitting integrated lighting system is constructed using a combination of inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and transparent organic LEDs (OLEDs). An RB two-color LED is used to supply red and blue light emission, and a green organic LED is used to supply green light emission. Currents of the LED and OLED are tuned to produce a white color, showing different Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates and correlated color temperatures with a wide adjustable range. Such an integration can compensate for the lack of the LED's luminance uniformity and the transparent OLED's luminance intensity.

  1. Broadband mid-infrared superlattice light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, R. J.; Provence, S. R.; Norton, D. T.; Boggess, T. F.; Prineas, J. P.

    2017-05-01

    InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice light-emitting diodes were fabricated to form a device that provides emission over the entire 3-5 μm mid-infrared transmission window. Variable bandgap emission regions were coupled together using tunnel junctions to emit at peak wavelengths of 3.3 μm, 3.5 μm, 3.7 μm, 3.9 μm, 4.1 μm, 4.4 μm, 4.7 μm, and 5.0 μm. Cascading the structure recycles the electrons in each emission region to emit several wavelengths simultaneously. At high current densities, the light-emitting diode spectra broadened into a continuous, broadband spectrum that covered the entire mid-infrared band. When cooled to 77 K, radiances of over 1 W/cm2 sr were achieved, demonstrating apparent temperatures above 1000 K over the 3-5 μm band. InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices are capable of emitting from 3 μm to 30 μm, and the device design can be expanded to include longer emission wavelengths.

  2. Analytic formalism for current crowding in light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu-Seok

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytic approach to simulating current crowding (CC) in light-emitting diodes with parallel p- and n-contacts. The electrical potential difference across the p-i-n layers is derived from the Laplace equation, whereas the current density through the p-i-n layers is obtained from the current density - voltage relation of a single-diode model. Since these two properties influence each other, they are calculated iteratively. It is found that CC depends on the applied voltage (or the average current density), the sheet resistances of the p- and the n-contact layers, the width of the active region, and the specific series resistance and ideality factor of the p-i-n layers. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Manufacturing polymer light emitting diode with high luminance efficiency by solution process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miyoung; Jo, SongJin; Yang, Ho Chang; Yoon, Dang Mo; Kwon, Jae-Taek; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Choi, Ju Hwan; Lee, Bum-Joo; Shin, Jin-Koog

    2012-06-01

    While investigating polymer light emitting diodes (polymer-LEDs) fabricated by solution process, surface roughness influences electro-optical (E-O) characteristics. We expect that E-O characteristics such as luminance and power efficiency related to surface roughness and layer thickness of emitting layer with poly-9-Vinylcarbazole. In this study, we fabricated polymer organic light emitting diodes by solution process which guarantees easy, eco-friendly and low cost manufacturing for flexible display applications. In order to obtain high luminescence efficiency, E-O characteristics of these devices by varying parameters for printing process have been investigated. Therefore, we optimized process condition for polymer-LEDs by adjusting annealing temperatures of emission, thickness of emission layer showing efficiency (10.8 cd/A) at 10 mA/cm2. We also checked wavelength dependent electroluminescence spectrum in order to find the correlation between the variation of efficiency and the thickness of the layer.

  4. The influence of melt purification and structure defects on mid-infrared light emitting diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Krier, A

    2003-01-01

    Mid-infrared light emitting diodes which exhibit more than 7 mW (pulsed) and 0.35 mW dc output power at 3.3 mu m and at room temperature have been fabricated by liquid phase epitaxy using Pb as a neutral solvent. Using Pb solution an increase in pulsed output power of between two and three times was obtained compared with InAs light emitting diodes (LEDs) made using rare-earth gettering. The performance improvements were attributed to a reduction in residual carrier concentration arising from the removal of un-intentional donors and structure defects in the InAs active region material. These LEDs are well matched to the CH sub 4 absorption spectrum and potentially could form the basis of a practical infrared CH sub 4 gas sensor.

  5. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting at T.J.Maxx in Manchester, NH Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myer, Michael; Goettel, Russell T.

    2010-06-29

    A report describing the process and results of replacing existing parking lot lighting, looking at a LED option with occupancy sensors, and conventional alternates. Criteria include payback, light levels, occupant satisfaction. This report is Phase I of II. Phase I deals with initial installation.

  6. Enhanced Performance of Bipolar Cascade Light Emitting Diodes by Doping the Aluminum Oxide Apertures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siskaninetz, William

    2004-01-01

    Performance improvements in multiple-stage, single-cavity bipolar cascade light emitting diodes including reduced operating voltages, enhanced light generation, and reduced device heating are obtained...

  7. Recycling of Gallium from End-of-Life Light Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy S.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs are widely utilized. They are applied as backlighting in Liquid Crystal Displays (LCD and TV sets or as lighting equipments in homes, cars, instruments and street-lightning. End of life equipments are containing more and more LEDs. The recovery of valuable materials – such as Ga, Au, Cu etc. – from the LEDs is essential for the creating the circular economy. First task is the development of a proper recycling technology. Most of the researchers propose fully chemical or thermal-chemical pathway for the recycling of LEDs.

  8. Light-Emitting Diode-Based Illumination System for In Vitro Photodynamic Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Defu Chen; Huifen Zheng; Zhiyong Huang; Huiyun Lin; Zhidong Ke; Shusen Xie; Buhong Li

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a light-emitting diode- (LED-) based illumination system that can be used as an alternative light source for in vitro photodynamic therapy (PDT). This illumination system includes a red LED array composed of 70 LEDs centered at 643 nm, an air-cooling unit, and a specific-designed case. The irradiance as a function of the irradiation distance between the LED array and the sample, the homogeneity and stability of irradiation, and the effect of long-time irrad...

  9. Light emitting diodes as an alternative ambient illumination source in photolithography environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corell, Dennis Dan; Ou, Haiyan; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    We explored an alternative light emitting diode (LED) - based solution to replace the existing yellow fluorescent light tubes (YFT) used in photolithography rooms. A no-blue LED lamp was designed and a prototype was fabricated. For both solutions, the spectral power distribution (SPD) was measured......, the colorimetric values were calculated, and a visual comparison using Gretagmacbeth colorcharts was performed. The visual comparison showed that the LED bulb was better to render colors despite a low color rendering index (CRI). Furthermore, the LED bulb was tested in a photolithography room...... and there was no exposure to the photoresist even after 168 hours illumination....

  10. Luminescence and squeezing of a superconducting light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlobil, Patrik; Orth, Peter P.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate a semiconductor p -n junction in contact with superconducting leads that is operated under forward bias as a light-emitting diode. The presence of superconductivity results in a significant increase of the electroluminescence in a sharp frequency window. We demonstrate that the tunneling of Cooper pairs induces an additional luminescence peak on resonance. There is a transfer of superconducting to photonic coherence that results in the emission of entangled photon pairs and squeezing of the fluctuations in the quadrature amplitudes of the emitted light. We show that the squeezing angle can be electrically manipulated by changing the relative phase of the order parameters in the superconductors. We finally derive the conditions for lasing in the system and show that the laser threshold is reduced due to superconductivity. This reveals how the macroscopic coherence of a superconductor can be used to control the properties of light.

  11. Cooling analysis of a light emitting diode automotive fog lamp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zadravec Matej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of cooling fins inside of a light emitting diode fog lamp is studied using computational fluid dynamics. Diffusion in heat sink, natural convection and radiation are the main principles of the simulated heat transfer. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved by the computational fluid dynamics code, including Monte Carlo radiation model and no additional turbulence model was needed. The numerical simulation is tested using the existing lamp geometry and temperature measurements. The agreement is excellent inside of few degrees at all measured points. The main objective of the article is to determine the cooling effect of various heat sink parts. Based on performed simulations, some heat sink parts are found to be very ineffective. The geometry and heat sink modifications are proposed. While radiation influence is significant, compressible effects are found to be minor.

  12. Quantum key distribution with an entangled light emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzurnak, B.; Stevenson, R. M.; Nilsson, J.; Dynes, J. F.; Yuan, Z. L.; Skiba-Szymanska, J.; Shields, A. J. [Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-28

    Measurements performed on entangled photon pairs shared between two parties can allow unique quantum cryptographic keys to be formed, creating secure links between users. An advantage of using such entangled photon links is that they can be adapted to propagate entanglement to end users of quantum networks with only untrusted nodes. However, demonstrations of quantum key distribution with entangled photons have so far relied on sources optically excited with lasers. Here, we realize a quantum cryptography system based on an electrically driven entangled-light-emitting diode. Measurement bases are passively chosen and we show formation of an error-free quantum key. Our measurements also simultaneously reveal Bell's parameter for the detected light, which exceeds the threshold for quantum entanglement.

  13. Kinetics of transient electroluminescence in organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Manju; Kumar, Pankaj; Chand, Suresh; Brahme, Nameeta; Kher, R. S.; Khokhar, M. S. K.

    2008-08-01

    Mathematical simulation on the rise and decay kinetics of transient electroluminescence (EL) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) is presented. The transient EL is studied with respect to a step voltage pulse. While rising, for lower values of time, the EL intensity shows a quadratic dependence on (t - tdel), where tdel is the time delay observed in the onset of EL, and finally attains saturation at a sufficiently large time. When the applied voltage is switched off, the initial EL decay shows an exponential dependence on (t - tdec), where tdec is the time when the voltage is switched off. The simulated results are compared with the transient EL performance of a bilayer OLED based on small molecular bis(2-methyl 8-hydroxyquinoline)(triphenyl siloxy) aluminium (SAlq). Transient EL studies have been carried out at different voltage pulse amplitudes. The simulated results show good agreement with experimental data. Using these simulated results the lifetime of the excitons in SAlq has also been calculated.

  14. Quantum dot superluminescent light emitting diodes: Ideal blackbody radiators?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazek, Martin; Elsaesser, Wolfgang [Institute of Applied Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology (Germany); Hopkinson, Mark [Dept. E and E.E, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Krakowski, Michel [Alcatel Thales, III-V Lab. (France)

    2008-07-01

    Quantum dot (QD) superluminescent light emitting diodes (SLEDs) provide large optical bandwidths at desired wavelengths and are therefore promising devices for incoherent light application. The intensity noise behavior of QD SLEDs is of fundamental physical interest as it provides insight into the photon emission process. We performed high precision intensity noise measurements over several decades of optical output power. For low driving currents spontaneous emission leads to Shot Noise. For high currents we find excess noise behavior with Amplified Spontaneous Emission acting as the dominant source of noise. The QD SLEDs' noise can be described as blackbody radiation noise with a limited number of optical modes. It is therefore possible to identify the SLEDs' relevant intensity noise parameters.

  15. Surface displacement imaging by interferometry with a light emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilhaire, Stefan; Grauby, Stephane; Jorez, Sebastien; Lopez, Luis David Patino; Rampnoux, Jean-Michel; Claeys, Wilfrid

    2002-01-01

    We present an imaging technique to measure static surface displacements of electronic components. A device is supplied by a transient current that creates a variation of temperature, thus a surface displacement. To measure the latter, a setup that is based on a Michelson interferometer is used. To avoid the phenomenon of speckle and the drawbacks inherent to it, we use a light emitting diode as the light source for the interferometer. The detector is a visible CCD camera that analyzes the optical signal containing the information of surface displacement of the device. Combining images, we extract the amplitude of the surface displacement. Out-of-plane surface-displacement images of a thermoelectric device are presented

  16. Degradation of phosphorescent blue organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chien-Shu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Steinbacher, Frank [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Krause, Ralf; Hunze, Arvid [Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Kowalsky, Wolfgang [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Development of phosphorescent materials has significantly improved the efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). By using efficient red, green and blue phosphorescent emitter materials high efficient white OLEDs can be achieved. However, due to low stability of blue phosphorescent materials the lifetime of phosphorescent white OLEDs remains an issue. As a result, degradation of blue phosphorescent materials needs to be further investigated and improved. In this work, blue OLED devices based on the phosphorescent emitter FIrpic were investigated. Single-carrier hole-only as well as electron-only devices were fabricated. For investigation of degradation process the devices were stressed with electrical current and UV-light to study the impact of charge carriers as well as excitons and exciton-polaron quenching on the stability of the blue dye.

  17. High-quality uniaxial In(x)Ga(1-x)N/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) nanowires (NWs) on Si(111) grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and light-emitting diode (LED) fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Yong-Ho; Navamathavan, R; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2013-03-01

    This article describes the growth and device characteristics of vertically aligned high-quality uniaxial p-GaN/InxGa1-xN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQW)/n-GaN nanowires (NWs) on Si(111) substrates grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. The resultant nanowires (NWs), with a diameter of 200-250 nm, have an average length of 2 μm. The feasibility of growing high-quality NWs with well-controlled indium composition MQW structure is demonstrated. These resultant NWs grown on Si(111) substrates were utilized for fabricating vertical-type light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The steep and intense photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra are observed, based on the strain-free NWs on Si(111) substrates. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) analysis revealed that the MQW NWs are grown along the c-plane with uniform thickness. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of these NWs exhibited typical p-n junction LEDs and showed a sharp onset voltage at 2.75 V in the forward bias. The output power is linearly increased with increasing current. The result indicates that the pulsed MOCVD technique is an effective method to grow uniaxial p-GaN/InxGa1-xN/GaN MQW/n-GaN NWs on Si(111), which is more advantageous than other growth techniques, such as molecular beam epitaxy. These results suggest the uniaxial NWs are promising to allow flat-band quantum structures, which can enhance the efficiency of LEDs.

  18. Background story of the invention of efficient blue InGaN light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Shuji [University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Shuji Nakamura discovered p-type doping in Gallium Nitride (GaN) and developed blue, green, and white InGaN based light emitting diodes (LEDs) and blue laser diodes (LDs). His inventions made possible energy efficient, solid-state lighting systems and enabled the next generation of optical storage. Together with Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano, he is one of the three recipients of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics. In his Nobel lecture, Shuji Nakamura gives an overview of this research and the story of his inventions. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Noniterative algorithm for improving the accuracy of a multicolor-light-emitting-diode-based colorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pao-Keng

    2012-05-01

    We present a noniterative algorithm to reliably reconstruct the spectral reflectance from discrete reflectance values measured by using multicolor light emitting diodes (LEDs) as probing light sources. The proposed algorithm estimates the spectral reflectance by a linear combination of product functions of the detector's responsivity function and the LEDs' line-shape functions. After introducing suitable correction, the resulting spectral reflectance was found to be free from the spectral-broadening effect due to the finite bandwidth of LED. We analyzed the data for a real sample and found that spectral reflectance with enhanced resolution gives a more accurate prediction in the color measurement.

  20. Accuracy Improvement for Light-Emitting-Diode-Based Colorimeter by Iterative Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pao-Keng

    2011-09-01

    We present a simple algorithm, combining an interpolating method with an iterative calculation, to enhance the resolution of spectral reflectance by removing the spectral broadening effect due to the finite bandwidth of the light-emitting diode (LED) from it. The proposed algorithm can be used to improve the accuracy of a reflective colorimeter using multicolor LEDs as probing light sources and is also applicable to the case when the probing LEDs have different bandwidths in different spectral ranges, to which the powerful deconvolution method cannot be applied.

  1. Efficient Flexible Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Graphene Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Hobeom; Lee, Jaeho; Park, Min-Ho; Jeong, Su-Hun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kwon, Sung-Joo; Han, Tae-Hee; Yoo, Seunghyup; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2017-03-01

    Highly efficient organic/inorganic hybrid perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs) based on graphene anode are developed for the first time. Chemically inert graphene avoids quenching of excitons by diffused metal atom species from indium tin oxide. The flexible PeLEDs with graphene anode on plastic substrate show good bending stability; they provide an alternative and reliable flexible electrode for highly efficient flexible PeLEDs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Optimization of light quality from color mixing light-emitting diode systems for general lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders

    2012-01-01

    are simulated using radiometrically measured single LED spectra. The method uses electrical input powers as input parameters and optimizes the resulting spectral power distribution with regard to color rendering index, correlated color temperature and chromaticity distance. The results indicate Pareto optimal......To address the problem of spectral light quality from color mixing light-emitting diode systems, a method for optimizing the spectral output of multicolor LED system with regards to standardized quality parameters has been developed. The composite spectral power distribution from the LEDs...

  3. Compact light-emitting diode lighting ring for video-assisted thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Kuan; Chang, Feng-Chen; Wang, Wen-Zhe; Hsieh, Chih-Cheng; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a foldable ring-shaped light-emitting diode (LED) lighting assembly, designed to attach to a rubber wound retractor, is realized and tested through porcine animal experiments. Enabled by the small size and the high efficiency of LED chips, the lighting assembly is compact, flexible, and disposable while providing direct and high brightness lighting for more uniform background illumination in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). When compared with a conventional fiber bundle coupled light source that is usually used in laparoscopy and endoscopy, the much broader solid angle of illumination enabled by the LED assembly allows greatly improved background lighting and imaging quality in VATS.

  4. Compact light-emitting diode lighting ring for video-assisted thoracic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Kuan; Chang, Feng-Chen; Wang, Wen-Zhe; Hsieh, Chih-Cheng; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2014-10-01

    In this work, a foldable ring-shaped light-emitting diode (LED) lighting assembly, designed to attach to a rubber wound retractor, is realized and tested through porcine animal experiments. Enabled by the small size and the high efficiency of LED chips, the lighting assembly is compact, flexible, and disposable while providing direct and high brightness lighting for more uniform background illumination in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). When compared with a conventional fiber bundle coupled light source that is usually used in laparoscopy and endoscopy, the much broader solid angle of illumination enabled by the LED assembly allows greatly improved background lighting and imaging quality in VATS.

  5. Spin-polarized light-emitting diodes based on organic bipolar spin valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardeny, Zeev Valentine; Nguyen, Tho Duc; Ehrenfreund, Eitan Avraham

    2017-10-25

    Spin-polarized organic light-emitting diodes are provided. Such spin-polarized organic light-emitting diodes incorporate ferromagnetic electrodes and show considerable spin-valve magneto-electroluminescence and magneto-conductivity responses, with voltage and temperature dependencies that originate from the bipolar spin-polarized space charge limited current.

  6. Light emitting diode package element with internal meniscus for bubble free lens placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarsa, Eric; Yuan, Thomas C.; Becerra, Maryanne; Yadev, Praveen

    2010-09-28

    A method for fabricating a light emitting diode (LED) package comprising providing an LED chip and covering at least part of the LED chip with a liquid encapsulant having a radius of curvature. An optical element is provided having a bottom surface with at least a portion having a radius of curvature larger than the liquid encapsulant. The larger radius of curvature portion of the optical element is brought into contact with the liquid encapsulant. The optical element is then moved closer to the LED chip, growing the contact area between said optical element and said liquid encapsulant. The liquid encapsulant is then cured. A light emitting diode comprising a substrate with an LED chip mounted to it. A meniscus ring is on the substrate around the LED chip with the meniscus ring having a meniscus holding feature. An inner encapsulant is provided over the LED chip with the inner encapsulant having a contacting surface on the substrate, with the meniscus holding feature which defines the edge of the contacting surface. An optical element is included having a bottom surface with at least a portion that is concave. The optical element is arranged on the substrate with the concave portion over the LED chip. A contacting encapsulant is included between the inner encapsulant and optical element.

  7. Heat transfer and structure stress analysis of micro packaging component of high power light emitting diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Chih-Neng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the heat transfer and structural stress analysis of the micro- scale packaging structure of a high-power light emitting diode. The thermal-effect and thermal-stress of light emitting diode are determined numerically. Light emitting diode is attached to the silicon substrate through the wire bonding process by using epoxy as die bond material. The silicon substrate is etched with holes at the bottom and filled with high conductivity copper material. The chip temperature and structure stress increase with input power consumption. The micro light emitting diode is mounted on the heat sink to increase the heat dissipation performance, to decrease chip temperature, to enhance the material structure reliability and safety, and to avoid structure failure as well. This paper has successfully used the finite element method to the micro-scale light emitting diode heat transfer and stress concentration at the edges through etched holes.

  8. Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes Implementing Platinum Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecton, Jeremy Exton

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are a promising approach for display and solid state lighting applications. However, further work is needed in establishing the availability of efficient and stable materials for OLEDs with high external quantum efficiency's (EQE) and high operational lifetimes. Recently, significant improvements in the internal quantum efficiency or ratio of generated photons to injected electrons have been achieved with the advent of phosphorescent complexes with the ability to harvest both singlet and triplet excitons. Since then, a variety of phosphorescent complexes containing heavy metal centers including Os, Ni, Ir, Pd, and Pt have been developed. Thus far, the majority of the work in the field has focused on iridium based complexes. Platinum based complexes, however, have received considerably less attention despite demonstrating efficiency's equal to or better than their iridium analogs. In this study, a series of OLEDs implementing newly developed platinum based complexes were demonstrated with efficiency's or operational lifetimes equal to or better than their iridium analogs for select cases. In addition to demonstrating excellent device performance in OLEDs, platinum based complexes exhibit unique photophysical properties including the ability to form excimer emission capable of generating broad white light emission from a single emitter and the ability to form narrow band emission from a rigid, tetradentate molecular structure for select cases. These unique photophysical properties were exploited and their optical and electrical properties in a device setting were elucidated. Utilizing the unique properties of a tridentate Pt complex, Pt-16, a highly efficient white device employing a single emissive layer exhibited a peak EQE of over 20% and high color quality with a CRI of 80 and color coordinates CIE(x=0.33, y=0.33). Furthermore, by employing a rigid, tetradentate platinum complex, PtN1N, with a narrow band emission into a

  9. Enhancement of mosquito trapping efficiency by using pulse width modulated light emitting diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yu-Nan; Liu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yi-Chian; Ma, Hsin-Yi; Lee, Hsiao-Yi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a light-driving bug zapper is presented for well controlling the diseases brought by insects, such as mosquitoes. In order to have the device efficient to trap the insect pests in off-grid areas, pulse width modulated light emitting diodes (PWM-LED) combined with a solar power module are proposed and implemented. With specific PWM electric signals to drive the LED, it is found that no matter what the ability of catching insects or the consumed power efficiency can be enhanced t...

  10. An aluminium nitride light-emitting diode with a wavelength of 210 nanometres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniyasu, Yoshitaka; Kasu, Makoto; Makimoto, Toshiki

    2006-05-18

    Compact high-efficiency ultraviolet solid-state light sources--such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes--are of considerable technological interest as alternatives to large, toxic, low-efficiency gas lasers and mercury lamps. Microelectronic fabrication technologies and the environmental sciences both require light sources with shorter emission wavelengths: the former for improved resolution in photolithography and the latter for sensors that can detect minute hazardous particles. In addition, ultraviolet solid-state light sources are also attracting attention for potential applications in high-density optical data storage, biomedical research, water and air purification, and sterilization. Wide-bandgap materials, such as diamond and III-V nitride semiconductors (GaN, AlGaN and AlN; refs 3-10), are potential materials for ultraviolet LEDs and laser diodes, but suffer from difficulties in controlling electrical conduction. Here we report the successful control of both n-type and p-type doping in aluminium nitride (AlN), which has a very wide direct bandgap of 6 eV. This doping strategy allows us to develop an AlN PIN (p-type/intrinsic/n-type) homojunction LED with an emission wavelength of 210 nm, which is the shortest reported to date for any kind of LED. The emission is attributed to an exciton transition, and represents an important step towards achieving exciton-related light-emitting devices as well as replacing gas light sources with solid-state light sources.

  11. Hybrid daylight/light-emitting diode illumination system for indoor lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Aiming; Qiu, Peng; Cai, Jinlin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Junwei

    2014-03-20

    A hybrid illumination method using both daylight and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for indoor lighting is presented in this study. The daylight can be introduced into the indoor space by a panel-integration system. The daylight part and LEDs are combined within a specific luminaire that can provide uniform illumination. The LEDs can be turned on and dimmed through closed-loop control when the daylight illuminance is inadequate. We simulated the illumination and calculated the indoor lighting efficiency of our hybrid daylight and LED lighting system, and compared this with that of LED and fluorescent lighting systems. Simulation results show that the efficiency of the hybrid daylight/LED illumination method is better than that of LED and traditional lighting systems, under the same lighting conditions and lighting time; the method has hybrid lighting average energy savings of T5 66.28%, and that of the LEDs is 41.62%.

  12. Avaliação da eficácia clínica de uma nova modalidade de fototerapia utilizando diodos emissores de luz Efficacy of new microprocessed phototherapy system with five high intensity light emitting diodes (Super LED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca M. R. Martins

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a eficácia terapêutica de um sistema de fototerapia microprocessada que utiliza diodos emissores de luz (Super LED de alta intensidade no tratamento da hiperbilirrubinemia em recém-nascidos prematuros. MÉTODOS: Ensaio clínico, randomizado e controlado, utilizando a fototerapia Super LED no grupo experimental e duas fototerapias halógenas no grupo controle. A randomização foi realizada em blocos e estratificada por peso de nascimento. A duração da fototerapia e a queda nos níveis séricos de bilirrubina total nas primeiras 24 horas de tratamento foram os principais desfechos analisados. RESULTADOS: Foram estudados 88 recém-nascidos, 44 no grupo da fototerapia Super LED e 44 no grupo da fototerapia halógena. As características demográficas da população foram semelhantes nos dois grupos. O nível sérico médio inicial de bilirrubina no grupo do Super LED (10,1±2,4 mg% foi semelhante ao do grupo que recebeu fototerapia halógena (10,9±2,0 mg%. A queda percentual na concentração sérica de bilirrubina total nas primeiras 24 horas de tratamento foi significativamente maior (27,9 versus 10,7%, p OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of a microprocessed phototherapy (PT system with five high intensity light emitting diodes (Super LED for the treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia of premature infants. METHODS: Randomized clinical trial using Super LED phototherapy in the study group and twin halogen spotlight phototherapy in the control group. A stratified blocked randomization, based on birth weight, was performed. The duration of phototherapy and the rate of decrease of total serum bilirubin (TSB concentration in the first 24 hours of treatment were the main outcome measures. RESULTS: We studied 88 infants, 44 in the Super LED group and 44 in the halogen spotlight PT group. The demographic characteristics of the patients in both groups were similar. Infants in the Super LED group had a similar mean initial

  13. The thermal management of high power light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ming-Seng; Huang, Jen-Wei; Shyu, Feng-Lin

    2012-10-01

    Thermal management had an important influence not only in the life time but also in the efficiency of high power light emitting diodes (HPLEDs). 30 watts in a single package have become standard to the industrial fabricating of HPLEDs. In this study, we fabricated both of the AlN porous films, by vacuum sputtering, soldered onto the HPLEDs lamp to enhance both of the heat transfer and heat dissipation. In our model, the ceramic enables transfer the heat from electric device to the aluminum plate quickly and the porous increase the quality of the thermal dissipation between the PCB and aluminum plate, as compared to the industrial processing. The ceramic films were characterized by several subsequent analyses, especially the measurement of real work temperature. The X-Ray diffraction (XRD) diagram analysis reveals those ceramic phases were successfully grown onto the individual substrates. The morphology of ceramic films was investigated by the atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show those porous films have high thermal conduction to the purpose. At the same time, they had transferred heat and limited work temperature, about 70°, of HPLEDs successfully.

  14. High efficiency electrophosphorescence from bilayer organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Minghang; Lin, Ming-Te; Shepherd, Nigel D [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Chen, Wei-Hsuan; Oswald, Iain; Omary, Mohammad [Department of Chemeistry, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)

    2011-09-14

    An electron mobility of 2.7 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} was measured for the phosphorescent emitter bis[3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazolato]platinum(II)(Pt(ptp)2), which prompted its evaluation as both the emissive layer and electron transport layer in organic light emitting diodes with a simple bilayer structure. Power and external quantum efficiencies of 54.0 {+-} 0.2 lm W{sup -1} and 15.9% were obtained, which as far as we could ascertain are amongst the highest reported values for bilayer devices. We ascribe the high device efficiency to the combination of the high electron mobility, short excited-state lifetime (117 ns) and high luminescence quantum yield (60%) of the bis[3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazolato]platinum(II). The colour temperature of the devices was 2855 K at 5 V, which places the emission in the 'warm' light spectral region.

  15. Multilayer polymer light-emitting diodes by blade coating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shin-Rong; Meng, Hsin-Fei; Lee, Kuan-Chen; Horng, Sheng-Fu

    2008-10-01

    Multilayer polymer light-emitting diodes fabricated by blade coating are presented. Multilayer of polymers can be easily deposited by blade coating on a hot plate. The multilayer structure is confirmed by the total thickness and the cross section view in the scanning electron microscope. The film thickness variation is only 3.3% in 10cm scale and the film roughness is about 0.3nm in the micron scale. The efficiency of single layer poly(para-phenylene vinylene) copolymer Super Yellow and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO, deep blue) devices are 9 and 1.7cd/A, respectively, by blade coating. The efficiency of the PFO device is raised to 2.9cd/A with a 2-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-5-(4-biphenylyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PBD) hole-blocking layer and to 2.3cd/A with a poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(4,4'-(N-(4-sec-butylphenyl))diphenylamine)] elec-tron-blocking layer added by blade coating.

  16. Emerging Transparent Conducting Electrodes for Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze-Bin Song

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs have attracted much attention in recent years as next generation lighting and displays, due to their many advantages, including superb performance, mechanical flexibility, ease of fabrication, chemical versatility, etc. In order to fully realize the highly flexible features, reduce the cost and further improve the performance of OLED devices, replacing the conventional indium tin oxide with better alternative transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs is a crucial step. In this review, we focus on the emerging alternative TCE materials for OLED applications, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs, metallic nanowires, conductive polymers and graphene. These materials are selected, because they have been applied as transparent electrodes for OLED devices and achieved reasonably good performance or even higher device performance than that of indium tin oxide (ITO glass. Various electrode modification techniques and their effects on the device performance are presented. The effects of new TCEs on light extraction, device performance and reliability are discussed. Highly flexible, stretchable and efficient OLED devices are achieved based on these alternative TCEs. These results are summarized for each material. The advantages and current challenges of these TCE materials are also identified.

  17. Thin film Encapsulations of Flexible Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Fa-Ta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various encapsulated films for flexible organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs were studied in this work, where gas barrier layers including inorganic Al2O3 thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition, organic Parylene C thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition, and their combination were considered. The transmittance and water vapor transmission rate of the various organic and inorgabic encapsulated films were tested. The effects of the encapsulated films on the luminance and current density of the OLEDs were discussed, and the life time experiments of the OLEDs with these encapsulated films were also conducted. The results showed that the transmittance are acceptable even the PET substrate were coated two Al2O3 and Parylene C layers. The results also indicated the WVTR of the PET substrate improved by coating the barrier layers. In the encapsulation performance, it indicates the OLED with Al2O3 /PET, 1 pair/PET, and 2 pairs/PET presents similarly higher luminance than the other two cases. Although the 1 pair/PET encapsulation behaves a litter better luminance than the 2 pairs/PET encapsulation, the 2 pairs/PET encapsulation has much better life time. The OLED with 2 pairs/PET encapsulation behaves near double life time to the 1 pair encapsulation, and four times to none encapsulation.

  18. Carrier Modulation Layer-Enhanced Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jwo-Huei Jou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic light-emitting diode (OLED-based display products have already emerged in the market and their efficiencies and lifetimes are sound at the comparatively low required luminance. To realize OLED for lighting application sooner, higher light quality and better power efficiency at elevated luminance are still demanded. This review reveals the advantages of incorporating a nano-scale carrier modulation layer (CML, also known as a spacer, carrier-regulating layer, or interlayer, among other terms, to tune the chromaticity and color temperature as well as to markedly improve the device efficiency and color rendering index (CRI for numerous OLED devices. The functions of the CML can be enhanced as multiple layers and blend structures are employed. At proper thickness, the employment of CML enables the device to balance the distribution of carriers in the two emissive zones and achieve high device efficiencies and long operational lifetime while maintaining very high CRI. Moreover, we have also reviewed the effect of using CML on the most significant characteristics of OLEDs, namely: efficiency, luminance, life-time, CRI, SRI, chromaticity, and the color temperature, and see how the thickness tuning and selection of proper CML are crucial to effectively control the OLED device performance.

  19. Kinetics of transient electroluminescence in organic light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Manju; Brahme, Nameeta; Kumar, Pankaj; Chand, Suresh; Kher, R S; Khokhar, M S K

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical simulation on the rise and decay kinetics of transient electroluminescence (EL) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) is presented. The transient EL is studied with respect to a step voltage pulse. While rising, for lower values of time, the EL intensity shows a quadratic dependence on (t - t del ), where t del is the time delay observed in the onset of EL, and finally attains saturation at a sufficiently large time. When the applied voltage is switched off, the initial EL decay shows an exponential dependence on (t - t dec ), where t dec is the time when the voltage is switched off. The simulated results are compared with the transient EL performance of a bilayer OLED based on small molecular bis(2-methyl 8-hydroxyquinoline)(triphenyl siloxy) aluminium (SAlq). Transient EL studies have been carried out at different voltage pulse amplitudes. The simulated results show good agreement with experimental data. Using these simulated results the lifetime of the excitons in SAlq has also been calculated

  20. Infrared Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Carbon Nanotube Emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Arko; Murawski, Caroline; Zakharko, Yuriy; Zaumseil, Jana; Gather, Malte C

    2018-03-01

    While organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) covering all colors of the visible spectrum are widespread, suitable organic emitter materials in the near-infrared (nIR) beyond 800 nm are still lacking. Here, the first OLED based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the emitter is demonstrated. By using a multilayer stacked architecture with matching charge blocking and charge-transport layers, narrow-band electroluminescence at wavelengths between 1000 and 1200 nm is achieved, with spectral features characteristic of excitonic and trionic emission of the employed (6,5) SWCNTs. Here, the OLED performance is investigated in detail and it is found that local conduction hot-spots lead to pronounced trion emission. Analysis of the emissive dipole orientation shows a strong horizontal alignment of the SWCNTs with an average inclination angle of 12.9° with respect to the plane, leading to an exceptionally high outcoupling efficiency of 49%. The SWCNT-based OLEDs represent a highly attractive platform for emission across the entire nIR. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Time-dependent simulation of organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifi, M J

    2009-01-01

    Several methods to simulate the behavior of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been proposed in the past. In this paper, we develop a previous method, based on the master equation, in order to allow the simulation of time-dependent behavior and transient states. The calculation algorithm of the program that we have written is described. The time-dependent behaviors of two simple monolayer devices and of a more complicated three-layer device were simulated by means of this program, and the results are discussed. The results show that the turn-off speed of an OLED might be very slow, especially in the case of a multilayer device. This behavior is related to the low mobility of the organic material in weak electric fields. An interesting feature of the time behavior is pointed out, whereby the recombination rate may become considerably larger after the falling edge of an applied voltage pulse. Moreover, the validity of the transient electro-luminescent method for measuring carrier mobility in organic material has been examined by means of simulation. The results show that there is some inconsistency especially in high electric fields

  2. White organic light-emitting diodes with fluorescent tube efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineke, Sebastian; Lindner, Frank; Schwartz, Gregor; Seidler, Nico; Walzer, Karsten; Lüssem, Björn; Leo, Karl

    2009-05-14

    The development of white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) holds great promise for the production of highly efficient large-area light sources. High internal quantum efficiencies for the conversion of electrical energy to light have been realized. Nevertheless, the overall device power efficiencies are still considerably below the 60-70 lumens per watt of fluorescent tubes, which is the current benchmark for novel light sources. Although some reports about highly power-efficient white OLEDs exist, details about structure and the measurement conditions of these structures have not been fully disclosed: the highest power efficiency reported in the scientific literature is 44 lm W(-1) (ref. 7). Here we report an improved OLED structure which reaches fluorescent tube efficiency. By combining a carefully chosen emitter layer with high-refractive-index substrates, and using a periodic outcoupling structure, we achieve a device power efficiency of 90 lm W(-1) at 1,000 candelas per square metre. This efficiency has the potential to be raised to 124 lm W(-1) if the light outcoupling can be further improved. Besides approaching internal quantum efficiency values of one, we have also focused on reducing energetic and ohmic losses that occur during electron-photon conversion. We anticipate that our results will be a starting point for further research, leading to white OLEDs having efficiencies beyond 100 lm W(-1). This could make white-light OLEDs, with their soft area light and high colour-rendering qualities, the light sources of choice for the future.

  3. A white organic light emitting diode with improved stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhilin; Jiang Xueyin; Zhu Wenqing; Zhang Buxin; Xu Shaohong

    2001-01-01

    A white organic light emitting diode (OLED) has been constructed by employing a new blue material and a red dye directly doped in the blue emitting layer. For comparison, another white cell with a blocking layer has also been made. The configurations of the devices are ITO/CuPc/NPB/JBEM(P):DCJT/Alq/MgAg (device 1) and ITO/CuPc/NPB/TPBi:DCJT/Alq/MgAg (device 2) where copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) is the buffer layer, N,N'-bis-(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-1.1'bipheny1-4-4'-diamine (NPB) is the hole transporting layer, 9,10-bis(3'5'-diaryl)phenyl anthracene doped with perylene (JBEM(P)) is the new blue emitting material, N,arylbenzimidazoles (TPBi) is the hole blocking layer, tris(8-quinolinolato)aluminium complex (Alq) is the electron transporting layer, and DCJT is a red dye. A stable and current independent white OLED has been obtained in device 1, which has a maximum luminance of 14 850 cd m -2 , an efficiency of 2.88 Lm W -1 , Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of x=0.32, y=0.38 between 4-200 mA cm -2 , and a half lifetime of 2860 h at the starting luminance of 100 cd m -2 . Device 1 has a stability more than 50 times better than that of device 2. (author)

  4. Organic light emitting diodes on ITO-free polymer anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehse, Karsten; Schwartz, Gregor; Walzer, Karsten; Leo, Karl [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, TU Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The high material cost of indium, being the main component of the commonly used indium-tin-oxide anodes (ITO) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), is an obstacle for the production of efficient low-cost OLEDs. Therefore, new anode materials are needed for large scale OLED production. Recently, we demonstrated that the polymer PEDOT:PSS can substitute ITO as anode. Another highly conductive polymer is polyaniline (PANI) that provides 200 S/cm with a work function of 4.8 eV. In this study, we use PANI as anode for OLEDs (without ITO layer underneath the polymer) with electrically doped hole- and electron transport layers and intrinsic materials in between. Fluorescent blue (Spiro-DPVBi) as well as phosphorescent green (Ir(ppy){sub 3}) and red emitters (Ir(MDQ){sub 2}(acac)) were used for single colour and white OLEDs. Green single and double emission OLEDs achieve device efficiencies of 34 lm/W and 40.7 lm/W, respectively. The white OLED shows a power efficiency of 8.9 lm/W at 1000 cd/m{sup 2} with CIE coordinates of (0.42/0.39).

  5. Near-field photometry for organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Harikumar, Krishnan; Isphording, Alexandar; Venkataramanan, Venkat

    2013-03-01

    Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) technology is rapidly maturing to be ready for next generation of light source for general lighting. The current standard test methods for solid state lighting have evolved for semiconductor sources, with point-like emission characteristics. However, OLED devices are extended surface emitters, where spatial uniformity and angular variation of brightness and colour are important. This necessitates advanced test methods to obtain meaningful data for fundamental understanding, lighting product development and deployment. In this work, a near field imaging goniophotometer was used to characterize lighting-class white OLED devices, where luminance and colour information of the pixels on the light sources were measured at a near field distance for various angles. Analysis was performed to obtain angle dependent luminous intensity, CIE chromaticity coordinates and correlated colour temperature (CCT) in the far field. Furthermore, a complete ray set with chromaticity information was generated, so that illuminance at any distance and angle from the light source can be determined. The generated ray set is needed for optical modeling and design of OLED luminaires. Our results show that luminance non-uniformity could potentially affect the luminaire aesthetics and CCT can vary with angle by more than 2000K. This leads to the same source being perceived as warm or cool depending on the viewing angle. As OLEDs are becoming commercially available, this could be a major challenge for lighting designers. Near field measurement can provide detailed specifications and quantitative comparison between OLED products for performance improvement.

  6. Improving the Stability of Metal Halide Perovskite Materials and Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Himchan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Wolf, Christoph; Lee, Hyeon-Dong; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2018-01-25

    Metal halide perovskites (MHPs) have numerous advantages as light emitters such as high photoluminescence quantum efficiency with a direct bandgap, very narrow emission linewidth, high charge-carrier mobility, low energetic disorder, solution processability, simple color tuning, and low material cost. Based on these advantages, MHPs have recently shown unprecedented radical progress (maximum current efficiency from 0.3 to 42.9 cd A -1 ) in the field of light-emitting diodes. However, perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs) suffer from intrinsic instability of MHP materials and instability arising from the operation of the PeLEDs. Recently, many researchers have devoted efforts to overcome these instabilities. Here, the origins of the instability in PeLEDs are reviewed by categorizing it into two types: instability of (i) the MHP materials and (ii) the constituent layers and interfaces in PeLED devices. Then, the strategies to improve the stability of MHP materials and PeLEDs are critically reviewed, such as A-site cation engineering, Ruddlesden-Popper phase, suppression of ion migration with additives and blocking layers, fabrication of uniform bulk polycrystalline MHP layers, and fabrication of stable MHP nanoparticles. Based on this review of recent advances, future research directions and an outlook of PeLEDs for display applications are suggested. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Micro-light-emitting-diode array with dual functions of visible light communication and illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yong; Guo Zhi-You; Sun Hui-Qing; Huang Hong-Yong

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate high-speed blue 4 × 4 micro-light-emitting-diode (LED) arrays with 14 light-emitting units (two light-emitting units are used as the positive and negative electrodes for power supply, respectively) comprising multiple quantum wells formed of GaN epitaxial layers grown on a sapphire substrate, and experimentally test their applicability for being used as VLC transmitters and illuminations. The micro-LED arrays provide a maximum −3-dB frequency response of 60.5 MHz with a smooth frequency curve from 1 MHz to 500 MHz for an optical output power of 165 mW at an injection current of 30 mA, which, to our knowledge, is the highest response frequency ever reported for blue GaN-based LEDs operating at that level of optical output power. The relationship between the frequency and size of the device single pixel diameter reveals the relationship between the response frequency and diffusion capacitance of the device. (paper)

  8. Organic light-emitting diodes with direct contact-printed red, green, blue, and white light-emitting layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sun-Zen; Peng, Shiang-Hau; Ting, Tzu-Yu; Wu, Po-Shien; Lin, Chun-Hao; Chang, Chin-Yeh; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Jou, Jwo-Huei

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using direct contact-printing in the fabrication of monochromatic and polychromatic organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Bright devices with red, green, blue, and white contact-printed light-emitting layers with a respective maximum luminance of 29 000, 29 000, 4000, and 18 000 cd/m2 were obtained with sound film integrity by blending a polymeric host into a molecular host. For the red OLED as example, the maximum luminance was decreased from 29 000 to 5000 cd/m2 as only the polymeric host was used, or decreased to 7000 cd/m2 as only the molecular host was used. The markedly improved device performance achieved in the devices with blended hosts may be attributed to the employed polymeric host that contributed a good film-forming character, and the molecular host that contributed a good electroluminescence character.

  9. Effect of Dopant Activation on Device Characteristics of InGaN-based Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroce, Nicholas; Liu, Guangyu; Tan, Chee-Keong; Arif, Ronald A.; Lee, Soo Min; Tansu, Nelson

    2015-03-01

    Achieving high uniformity in growths and device characteristics of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is important for large scale manufacturing. Dopant activation and maintaining control of variables affecting dopant activation are critical steps in the InGaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) fabrication process. In the epitaxy of large scale production LEDs, in-situ post-growth annealing is used for activating the Mg acceptor dopant in the p-AlGaN and p-GaN of the LEDs. However, the annealing temperature varies with respect to position in the reactor chamber, leading to severe uniform dopant activation issue across the devices. Thus, it is important to understand how the temperature gradient and the resulting variance in Mg acceptor activation will alter the device properties. In this work, we examine the effect of varying p-type doping levels in the p-GaN layers and AlGaN electron blocking layer of the GaN LEDs on the optoelectronic properties including the band profile, carrier concentration, current density, output power and quantum efficiency. By understanding the variations and its effect, the identification of the most critical p-type doping layer strategies to address this variation will be clarified.

  10. Improvement in light-extraction efficiency of light emitting diode ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-02

    Feb 2, 2018 ... emitting diode (OLED) can be enhanced by using light- extraction ... to grow, ω should posses a positive value, which is possible only when ∂φ/∂h < 0, .... To detect small changes, first, the source LED was sta- bilized by ...

  11. Enhanced Emission Efficiency of Size-Controlled InGaN/GaN Green Nanopillar Light-Emitting Diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Iida, Daisuke; Fadil, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Nanopillar InGaN/GaN green light-emitting diode (LED) arrays were fabricated by self-assembled Au nanoparticles patterning and dry etching process. Structure size and density of the nanopillar arrays have been modified by varying the Au film thickness in the nanopatterning process. Fabricated...

  12. A Strategy for Architecture Design of Crystalline Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes with High Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yifei; Wu, Wen; Dong, Hua; Li, Guangru; Xi, Kai; Divitini, Giorgio; Ran, Chenxin; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Min; Jiao, Bo; Hou, Xun; Wu, Zhaoxin

    2018-06-01

    All present designs of perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs) stem from polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) or perovskite solar cells. The optimal structure of PeLEDs can be predicted to differ from PLEDs due to the different fluorescence dynamics and crystallization between perovskite and polymer. Herein, a new design strategy and conception is introduced, "insulator-perovskite-insulator" (IPI) architecture tailored to PeLEDs. As examples of FAPbBr 3 and MAPbBr 3 , it is experimentally shown that the IPI structure effectively induces charge carriers into perovskite crystals, blocks leakage currents via pinholes in the perovskite film, and avoids exciton quenching simultaneously. Consequently, as for FAPbBr 3 , a 30-fold enhancement in the current efficiency of IPI-structured PeLEDs compared to a control device with poly(3,4ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) as hole-injection layer is achieved-from 0.64 to 20.3 cd A -1 -while the external quantum efficiency is increased from 0.174% to 5.53%. As the example of CsPbBr 3 , compared with the control device, both current efficiency and lifetime of IPI-structured PeLEDs are improved from 1.42 and 4 h to 9.86 cd A -1 and 96 h. This IPI architecture represents a novel strategy for the design of light-emitting didoes based on various perovskites with high efficiencies and stabilities. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. High-power light-emitting diode based facility for plant cultivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamulaitis, G [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Duchovskis, P [Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, Babtai, LT-54333 Kaunas District (Lithuania); Bliznikas, Z [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Breive, K [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Ulinskaite, R [Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, Babtai, LT-54333 Kaunas District (Lithuania); Brazaityte, A [Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, Babtai, LT-54333 Kaunas District (Lithuania); Novickovas, A [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Zukauskas, A [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2005-09-07

    Based on perspectives of the development of semiconductor materials systems for high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs), an illumination facility for greenhouse plant cultivation was designed with the dominating 640 nm photosynthetically active component delivered by AlGaInP LEDs and supplementary components from AlGaN (photothropic action, 455 nm) and AlGaAs (photosynthetic 660 nm and photomorphogenetic 735 nm) LEDs. Photosynthesis intensity, photosynthetic productivity and growth morphology as well as chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations were investigated in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under the LED-based illuminators and under high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps with an equivalent photon flux density. Advantages of the high-power LED-based illuminators over conventional HPS lamps, applicability of AlGaInP LEDs for photosynthesis and control of plant growth by circadian manipulation of a relatively weak far-red component were demonstrated.

  14. Light-Emitting Diode-Based Illumination System for In Vitro Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defu Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to develop a light-emitting diode- (LED- based illumination system that can be used as an alternative light source for in vitro photodynamic therapy (PDT. This illumination system includes a red LED array composed of 70 LEDs centered at 643 nm, an air-cooling unit, and a specific-designed case. The irradiance as a function of the irradiation distance between the LED array and the sample, the homogeneity and stability of irradiation, and the effect of long-time irradiation on culture medium temperature were characterized. Furthermore, the survival rate of the CNE1 cells that sensitized with 5-aminolevulinic acid after PDT treatment was evaluated to demonstrate the efficiency of the new LED-based illumination system. The obtained results show that the LED-based illumination system is a promising light source for in vitro PDT that performed in standard multiwell plate.

  15. High-power light-emitting diode based facility for plant cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamulaitis, G; Duchovskis, P; Bliznikas, Z; Breive, K; Ulinskaite, R; Brazaityte, A; Novickovas, A; Zukauskas, A

    2005-01-01

    Based on perspectives of the development of semiconductor materials systems for high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs), an illumination facility for greenhouse plant cultivation was designed with the dominating 640 nm photosynthetically active component delivered by AlGaInP LEDs and supplementary components from AlGaN (photothropic action, 455 nm) and AlGaAs (photosynthetic 660 nm and photomorphogenetic 735 nm) LEDs. Photosynthesis intensity, photosynthetic productivity and growth morphology as well as chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations were investigated in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under the LED-based illuminators and under high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps with an equivalent photon flux density. Advantages of the high-power LED-based illuminators over conventional HPS lamps, applicability of AlGaInP LEDs for photosynthesis and control of plant growth by circadian manipulation of a relatively weak far-red component were demonstrated

  16. Electrical and Optical Enhancement in Internally Nanopatterned Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fina, Michael Dane

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have made tremendous technological progress in the past two decades and have emerged as a top competitor for next generation light-emitting displays and lighting. State-of-the-art OLEDs have been reported in literature to approach, and even surpass, white fluorescent tube efficiency. However, despite rapid technological progress, efficiency metrics must be improved to compete with traditional inorganic light-emitting diode (LED) technology. Organic materials possess specialized traits that permit manipulations to the light-emitting cavity. Overall, as demonstrated within, these modifications can be used to improve electrical and optical device efficiencies. This work is focused at analyzing the effects that nanopatterned geometric modifications to the organic active layers play on device efficiency. In general, OLED efficiency is complicated by the complex, coupled processes which contribute to spontaneous dipole emission. A composite of three sub-systems (electrical, exciton and optical) ultimately dictate the OLED device efficiency. OLED electrical operation is believed to take place via a low-mobility-modified Schottky injection process. In the injection-limited regime, geometric effects are expected to modify the local electric field leading to device current enhancement. It is shown that the patterning effect can be used to enhance charge carrier parity, thereby enhancing overall recombination. Current density and luminance characteristics are shown to be improved by OLED nanopatterning from both the model developed within and experimental techniques. Next, the optical enhancement effects produced by the nanopatterned array are considered. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations are used to determine positional, spectral optical enhancement for the nanopatterned device. The results show beneficial effects to the device performance. The optical enhancements are related to the reduction in internal radiative

  17. Blue light emitting diodes for optical stimulation of quartz in retrospective dosimetry and dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Duller, G.A.T.; Murray, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    Recently developed blue light emitting diodes (LEDs) for the optical stimulation of quartz for use in routine optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating and retrospective dosimetry have been tested. For similar power densities, it was found that the higher energy light provided by the blue LE......, preliminary results from ramping the blue light power output with time are demonstrated. It is shown that this technique enables the separation of OSL components with differing stimulation rates.......Recently developed blue light emitting diodes (LEDs) for the optical stimulation of quartz for use in routine optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating and retrospective dosimetry have been tested. For similar power densities, it was found that the higher energy light provided by the blue LEDs...... (470 nm) gives order of magnitude greater rate of stimulation in quartz than that from conventional blue-green light filtered from a halogen lamp. A practical blue LED OSL configuration is described. From comparisons of OSL decay curves produced by green and blue light sources, and by examination...

  18. Irradiation Pattern Analysis for Designing Light Sources-Based on Light Emitting Diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, E.; Stolik, S.; La Rosa, J. de; Valor, A.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays it is possible to design light sources with a specific irradiation pattern for many applications. Light Emitting Diodes present features like high luminous efficiency, durability, reliability, flexibility, among others as the result of its rapid development. In this paper the analysis of the irradiation pattern of the light emitting diodes is presented. The approximation of these irradiation patterns to both, a Lambertian, as well as a Gaussian functions for the design of light sources is proposed. Finally, the obtained results and the functionality of bringing the irradiation pattern of the light emitting diodes to these functions are discussed. (Author)

  19. White organic light-emitting diodes from three emitter layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M.S. [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, SungKyunKwan University, Suwon, Gyonggi-Do, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, J.T. [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, SungKyunKwan University, Suwon, Gyonggi-Do, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, C.H. [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, SungKyunKwan University, Suwon, Gyonggi-Do, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J.H. [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, SungKyunKwan University, Suwon, Gyonggi-Do, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, G.Y. [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, SungKyunKwan University, Suwon, Gyonggi-Do, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: gyyeom@skku.edu

    2006-11-23

    Three-wavelength white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) were fabricated using two doped layers, which were obtained by separating the recombination zones into three emitter layers. A sky blue emission originated from the 4,4'-bis(2,2'-diphenylethen-1-yl)biphenyl (DPVBi) layer. A green emission originated from a tris(8-quinolinolato)aluminum (III) (Alq{sub 3}) host doped with a green fluorescent 10-(2-benzothiazolyl)-1,1,7,7-tetramethyl-2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-1H,5H,11H-[1] benz opyrano [6,7,8-ij]-quinolizin-11-one (C545T) dye. An orange emission was obtained from the N,N'-bis(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPB) host doped with a red fluorescent dye, 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tert-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4 H-pyran (DCJTB). A white light resulted from the partial excitations of these three emitter layers by controlling the layer thickness and concentration of the fluorescent dyes in each emissive layer simultaneously. The electroluminescent spectrum of the device was not sensitive to the driving voltage of the device. The white light device showed a maximum luminance of approximately 53,000 cd/m{sup 2}. The external quantum and power efficiency at a luminance of approximately 100 cd/m{sup 2} were 2.62% and 3.04 lm/W, respectively.

  20. Efficient and bright organic light-emitting diodes on single-layer graphene electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Oida, Satoshi; Tulevski, George S.; Han, Shu-Jen; Hannon, James B.; Sadana, Devendra K.; Chen, Tze-Chiang

    2013-08-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes are emerging as leading technologies for both high quality display and lighting. However, the transparent conductive electrode used in the current organic light-emitting diode technologies increases the overall cost and has limited bendability for future flexible applications. Here we use single-layer graphene as an alternative flexible transparent conductor, yielding white organic light-emitting diodes with brightness and efficiency sufficient for general lighting. The performance improvement is attributed to the device structure, which allows direct hole injection from the single-layer graphene anode into the light-emitting layers, reducing carrier trapping induced efficiency roll-off. By employing a light out-coupling structure, phosphorescent green organic light-emitting diodes exhibit external quantum efficiency >60%, while phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes exhibit external quantum efficiency >45% at 10,000 cd m-2 with colour rendering index of 85. The power efficiency of white organic light-emitting diodes reaches 80 lm W-1 at 3,000 cd m-2, comparable to the most efficient lighting technologies.

  1. Improvement of quantum efficiency in green light-emitting diodes with pre-TMIn flow treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ya-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ching; Lu, Tien-Chang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of pre-trimethlyindium (TMIn) flow on the improved electrical characteristics and highly stable temperature properties of InGaN green light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are discussed. For the LED sample with a pre-TMIn flow treatment, the tunnelling of injected carriers associated with threading defects is significantly reduced, which promotes the diffusion-recombination of injected carriers, as well as the overall emission efficiency of the LED. In addition, the pre-TMIn flow treatment evidently reduces the dependence of external quantum efficiency on temperature and efficiency droop of green LEDs. As a result, we conclude that the pre-TMIn flow treatment is a promising scheme for the improvement of output performance of InGaN-based green LEDs.

  2. Perspective: Toward efficient GaN-based red light emitting diodes using europium doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Brandon; Dierolf, Volkmar; Gregorkiewicz, Tom; Fujiwara, Yasufumi

    2018-04-01

    While InGaN/GaN blue and green light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are commercially available, the search for an efficient red LED based on GaN is ongoing. The realization of this LED is crucial for the monolithic integration of the three primary colors and the development of nitride-based full-color high-resolution displays. In this perspective, we will address the challenges of attaining red luminescence from GaN under current injection and the methods that have been developed to circumvent them. While several approaches will be mentioned, a large emphasis will be placed on the recent developments of doping GaN with Eu3+ to achieve an efficient red GaN-based LED. Finally, we will provide an outlook to the future of this material as a candidate for small scale displays such as mobile device screens or micro-LED displays.

  3. APPLICATION OF LIGHT EMITTING DIODE IRRADIATION IN SURGERY AND OTHER FIELDS OF MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskander Mukhamedovich Baybekov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Goal. To study the experience of using Light Emitting Diode (LED in surgery and other areas of medicine. Methods and methodology. The methodological basis is the analysis of literature, synthesis of the results of experimental and clinical studies, as well as a modern interpretation of the mechanisms of action of low-intensity laser radiation and LED effects on the body. Special attention is paid to the experience of clinical and morphological studies LED of impacts at the Republican specialized center of surgery named academician V. Vahidov of the Ministry of health of the Republic of Uzbekistan. Results. Comparative features of LED and lasers, such as stimulation of reparative processes, their influence on healing of skin wounds and sternum after sternotomy, red blood cells and microcirculation are discussed. Conclusion. It has been suggested that LED is a worthy alternative to lasers. Their use is advisable in complex treatment of surgical diseases.

  4. Color optimization of conjugated-polymer/InGaN hybrid white light emitting diodes by incomplete energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chi-Jung; Lai, Chun-Feng; Madhusudhana Reddy, P.; Chen, Yung-Lin; Chiou, Wei-Yung; Chang, Shinn-Jen

    2015-01-01

    By using the wavelength conversion method, white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) were produced by applying mixtures of polysiloxane and fluorescent polymers on InGaN based light emitting diodes. UV curable organic–inorganic hybrid materials with high refractive index (1.561), compromised optical, thermal and mechanical properties was used as encapsulants. Red light emitting fluorescent FABD polymer (with 9,9-dioctylfluorene (F), anthracene (A) and 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (B), and 4,7-bis(2-thienyl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (D) repeating units) and green light emitting fluorescent FAB polymer were used as wavelength converters. The encapsulant/fluorescent polymer mixture and InGaN produce the white light by incomplete energy transfer mechanism. WLEDs with high color rendering index (CRI, about 93), and tunable correlated color temperature (CCT) properties can be produced by controlling the composition and chemical structures of encapsulating polymer and fluorescent polymer in hybrid materials, offering cool-white and neutral-white LEDs. - Highlights: • Highly efficient white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) were produced. • Conjugated-polymer/InGaN hybrid WLEDs by incomplete energy transfer mechanism. • WLEDs with high color-rendering index and tunable correlated color temperature. • Polysiloxane encapsulant with superior optical, mechanical and thermal properties

  5. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes on Solution-Processed Graphene Transparent Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junbo; Agrawal, Mukul; Becerril, Héctor A.; Bao, Zhenan; Liu, Zunfeng; Chen, Yongsheng; Peumans, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical estimates indicate that graphene thin films can be used as transparent electrodes for thin-film devices such as solar cells and organic light-emitting diodes, with an unmatched combination of sheet resistance and transparency. We

  6. Evaluation of inorganic and organic light-emitting diode displays for signage application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pratibha; Kwok, Harry

    2006-08-01

    High-brightness, inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been successfully utilized for edge-lighting of large displays for signage. Further interest in solid-state lighting technology has been fueled with the emergence of small molecule and polymer-based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). In this paper, edgelit inorganic LED-based displays and state-of-the-art OLED-based displays are evaluated on the basis of electrical and photometric measurements. The reference size for a signage system is assumed to be 600 mm x 600mm based on the industrial usage. With the availability of high power light-emitting diodes, it is possible to develop edgelit signage systems of the standard size. These displays possess an efficacy of 18 lm/W. Although, these displays are environmentally friendly and efficient, they suffer from some inherent limitations. Homogeneity of displays, which is a prime requirement for illuminated signs, is not accomplished. A standard deviation of 3.12 lux is observed between the illuminance values on the surface of the display. In order to distribute light effectively, reflective gratings are employed. Reflective gratings aid in reducing the problem but fail to eliminate it. In addition, the overall cost of signage is increased by 50% with the use of these additional components. This problem can be overcome by the use of a distributed source of light. Hence, the organic-LEDs are considered as a possible contender. In this paper, we experimentally determine the feasibility of using OLEDs for signage applications and compare their performance with inorganic LEDs. Passive matrix, small-molecule based, commercially available OLEDs is used. Design techniques for implementation of displays using organic LEDs are also discussed. It is determined that tiled displays based on organic LEDs possess better uniformity than the inorganic LED-based displays. However, the currently available OLEDs have lower light-conversion efficiency and higher costs than the

  7. Origin of the Electroluminescence from Annealed-ZnO/GaN Heterojunction Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chiang Hsu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper addressed the effect of post-annealed treatment on the electroluminescence (EL of an n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunction light-emitting diode (LED. The bluish light emitted from the 450 °C-annealed LED became reddish as the LED annealed at a temperature of 800 °C under vacuum atmosphere. The origins of the light emission for these LEDs annealed at various temperatures were studied using measurements of electrical property, photoluminescence, and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES depth profiles. A blue-violet emission located at 430 nm was associated with intrinsic transitions between the bandgap of n-ZnO and p-GaN, the green-yellow emission at 550 nm mainly originating from the deep-level transitions of native defects in the n-ZnO and p-GaN surfaces, and the red emission at 610 nm emerging from the Ga-O interlayer due to interdiffusion at the n-ZnO/p-GaN interface. The above-mentioned emissions also supported the EL spectra of LEDs annealed at 700 °C under air, nitrogen, and oxygen atmospheres, respectively.

  8. Single nanowire green InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guogang; Li, Ziyuan; Yuan, Xiaoming; Wang, Fan; Fu, Lan; Zhuang, Zhe; Ren, Fang-Fang; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Rong; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2016-10-01

    Single nanowire (NW) green InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were fabricated by top-down etching technology. The electroluminescence (EL) peak wavelength remains approximately constant with an increasing injection current in contrast to a standard planar LED, which suggests that the quantum-confined Stark effect is significantly reduced in the single NW device. The strain relaxation mechanism is studied in the single NW LED using Raman scattering analysis. As compared to its planar counterpart, the EL peak of the NW LED shows a redshift, due to electric field redistribution as a result of changes in the cavity mode pattern after metallization. Our method has important implication for single NW optoelectronic device applications.

  9. Sidewall passivation for InGaN/GaN nanopillar light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Won Hyuck; Abraham, Michael; Yu, Shih-Ying [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); You, Guanjun; Liu, Jie; Wang, Li; Xu, Jian, E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Mohney, Suzanne E., E-mail: mohney@ems.psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    We studied the effect of sidewall passivation on InGaN/GaN multiquantum well-based nanopillar light emitting diode (LED) performance. In this research, the effects of varying etch rate, KOH treatment, and sulfur passivation were studied for reducing nanopillar sidewall damage and improving device efficiency. Nanopillars prepared under optimal etching conditions showed higher photoluminescence intensity compared with starting planar epilayers. Furthermore, nanopillar LEDs with and without sulfur passivation were compared through electrical and optical characterization. Suppressed leakage current under reverse bias and four times higher electroluminescence (EL) intensity were observed for passivated nanopillar LEDs compared with unpassivated nanopillar LEDs. The suppressed leakage current and EL intensity enhancement reflect the reduction of non-radiative recombination at the nanopillar sidewalls. In addition, the effect of sulfur passivation was found to be very stable, and further insight into its mechanism was gained through transmission electron microscopy.

  10. Optimization of light quality from color mixing light-emitting diode systems for general lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorseth, Anders

    2012-03-01

    Given the problem of metamerisms inherent in color mixing in light-emitting diode (LED) systems with more than three distinct colors, a method for optimizing the spectral output of multicolor LED system with regards to standardized light quality parameters has been developed. The composite spectral power distribution from the LEDs are simulated using spectral radiometric measurements of single commercially available LEDs for varying input power, to account for the efficiency droop and other non-linear effects in electrical power vs. light output. The method uses electrical input powers as input parameters in a randomized steepest decent optimization. The resulting spectral power distributions are evaluated with regard to the light quality using the standard characteristics: CIE color rendering index, correlated color temperature and chromaticity distance. The results indicate Pareto optimal boundaries for each system, mapping the capabilities of the simulated lighting systems with regard to the light quality characteristics.

  11. On the Hole Injection for III-Nitride Based Deep Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luping; Zhang, Yonghui; Xu, Shu; Bi, Wengang; Zhang, Zi-Hui; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2017-10-24

    The hole injection is one of the bottlenecks that strongly hinder the quantum efficiency and the optical power for deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (DUV LEDs) with the emission wavelength smaller than 360 nm. The hole injection efficiency for DUV LEDs is co-affected by the p-type ohmic contact, the p-type hole injection layer, the p-type electron blocking layer and the multiple quantum wells. In this report, we review a large diversity of advances that are currently adopted to increase the hole injection efficiency for DUV LEDs. Moreover, by disclosing the underlying device physics, the design strategies that we can follow have also been suggested to improve the hole injection for DUV LEDs.

  12. Pulsed operation of high-power light emitting diodes for imaging flow velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willert, C; Klinner, J; Moessner, S; Stasicki, B

    2010-01-01

    High-powered light emitting diodes (LED) are investigated for possible uses as light sources in flow diagnostics, in particular, as an alternative to laser-based illumination in particle imaging flow velocimetry in side-scatter imaging arrangements. Recent developments in solid state illumination resulted in mass-produced LEDs that provide average radiant power in excess of 10 W. By operating these LEDs with short duration, pulsed currents that are considerably beyond their continuous current damage threshold, light pulses can be generated that are sufficient to illuminate and image micron-sized particles in flow velocimetry. Time-resolved PIV measurements in water at a framing rate of 2kHz are presented. The feasibility of LED-based PIV measurements in air is also demonstrated

  13. Dislocation related droop in InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes investigated via cathodoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozina, Galia [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Ciechonski, Rafal [GLO AB, Scheelevägen 22, SE-22363 Lund (Sweden); Bi, Zhaoxia [Solid State Physics, Lund University, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Samuelson, Lars [GLO AB, Scheelevägen 22, SE-22363 Lund (Sweden); Solid State Physics, Lund University, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Monemar, Bo [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Solid State Physics, Lund University, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); TokyoUniversity of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2015-12-21

    Today's energy saving solutions for general illumination rely on efficient white light emitting diodes (LEDs). However, the output efficiency droop experienced in InGaN based LEDs with increasing current injection is a serious limitation factor for future development of bright white LEDs. We show using cathodoluminescence (CL) spatial mapping at different electron beam currents that threading dislocations are active as nonradiative recombination centers only at high injection conditions. At low current, the dislocations are inactive in carrier recombination due to local potentials, but these potentials are screened by carriers at higher injection levels. In CL images, this corresponds to the increase of the dark contrast around dislocations with the injection (excitation) density and can be linked with droop related to the threading dislocations. Our data indicate that reduction of droop in the future efficient white LED can be achieved via a drastic reduction of the dislocation density by using, for example, bulk native substrates.

  14. The effects of light-emitting diode lighting on greenhouse plant growth and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Olle

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present the light emitting diode (LED technology for greenhouse plant lighting and to give an overview about LED light effects on photosynthetic indices, growth, yield and nutritional value in green vegetables and tomato, cucumber, sweet pepper transplants. The sole LED lighting, applied in closed growth chambers, as well as combinations of LED wavelengths with conventional light sources, fluorescent and high pressure sodium lamp light, and natural illumination in greenhouses are overviewed. Red and blue light are basal in the lighting spectra for green vegetables and tomato, cucumber, and pepper transplants; far red light, important for photomorphogenetic processes in plants also results in growth promotion. However, theoretically unprofitable spectral parts as green or yellow also have significant physiological effects on investigated plants. Presented results disclose the variability of light spectral effects on different plant species and different physiological indices.

  15. Developing Quantum Dot Phosphor-Based Light-Emitting Diodes for Aviation Lighting Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengbing Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the feasibility of employing quantum dot (QD phosphor-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs in aviation applications that request Night Vision Imaging Systems (NVIS compliance. Our studies suggest that the emerging QD phosphor-based LED technology could potentially be superior to conventional aviation lighting technology by virtue of the marriage of tight spectral control and broad wavelength tunability. This largely arises from the fact that the optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystal QDs can be tailored by varying the nanocrystal size without any compositional changes. It is envisioned that the QD phosphor-based LEDs hold great potentials in cockpit illumination, back light sources of monitor screens, as well as the LED indicator lights of aviation panels.

  16. Developing Quantum Dot Phosphor-Based Light-Emitting Diodes for Aviation Lighting Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, F.; Dawei, Z.; Shuzhen, S.; Yiming, Z.; Songlin, Z.; Jian, X.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of employing quantum dot (QD) phosphor-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in aviation applications that request Night Vision Imaging Systems (NVIS) compliance. Our studies suggest that the emerging QD phosphor-based LED technology could potentially be superior to conventional aviation lighting technology by virtue of the marriage of tight spectral control and broad wavelength tunability. This largely arises from the fact that the optical properties of semiconductor nano crystal QDs can be tailored by varying the nano crystal size without any compositional changes. It is envisioned that the QD phosphor-based LEDs hold great potentials in cockpit illumination, back light sources of monitor screens, as well as the LED indicator lights of aviation panels.

  17. Fabrication of InGaN/GaN nanopillar light-emitting diode arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Fadil, Ahmed; Ou, Haiyan

    Nanopillar InGaN/GaN green light-emitting diode arrays were fabricated by using self-assembled nanopatterning and dry etching process. Both internal and external quantum efficiency were increased due to strain relaxation and enhanced light extraction.......Nanopillar InGaN/GaN green light-emitting diode arrays were fabricated by using self-assembled nanopatterning and dry etching process. Both internal and external quantum efficiency were increased due to strain relaxation and enhanced light extraction....

  18. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazan, Guillermo; Mikhailovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work was to develop the fundamental understanding and practical techniques for enhancement of Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes (PhOLEDs) performance by utilizing radiative decay control technology. Briefly, the main technical goal is the acceleration of radiative recombination rate in organometallic triplet emitters by using the interaction with surface plasmon resonances in noble metal nanostructures. Increased photonic output will enable one to eliminate constraints imposed on PhOLED efficiency by triplet-triplet annihilation, triplet-polaron annihilation, and saturation of chromophores with long radiative decay times. Surface plasmon enhanced (SPE) PhOLEDs will operate more efficiently at high injection current densities and will be less prone to degradation mechanisms. Additionally, introduction of metal nanostructures into PhOLEDs may improve their performance due to the improvement of the charge transport through organic layers via multiple possible mechanisms ('electrical bridging' effects, doping-like phenomena, etc.). SPE PhOLED technology is particularly beneficial for solution-fabricated electrophosphorescent devices. Small transition moment of triplet emitters allows achieving a significant enhancement of the emission rate while keeping undesirable quenching processes introduced by the metal nanostructures at a reasonably low level. Plasmonic structures can be introduced easily into solution-fabricated PhOLEDs by blending and spin coating techniques and can be used for enhancement of performance in existing device architectures. This constitutes a significant benefit for a large scale fabrication of PhOLEDs, e.g. by roll-to-roll fabrication techniques. Besides multieexciton annihilation, the power efficacy of PhOLEDs is often limited by high operational bias voltages required for overcoming built-in potential barriers to injection and transport of electrical charges through a device. This problem is especially

  19. Magnetic field effect in organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedermeier, Ulrich

    2009-12-14

    The discovery of a magnetic field dependent resistance change of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) in the year 2003 has attracted considerable scientific and industrial research interest. However, despite previous progress in the field of organic spin-electronics, the phenomenon of the ''organic magnetoresistance (OMR) effect'' is not yet completely understood. In order to improve the understanding of the microscopic mechanisms which ultimately cause the OMR effect, experimental investigations as well as theoretical considerations concerning the OMR are addressed in this thesis. In polymer-based OLED devices the functional dependencies of the OMR effect on relevant parameters like magnetic field, operating voltage, operating current and temperature are investigated. Based on these results, previously published models for potential OMR mechanisms are critically analyzed and evaluated. Finally, a concept for the OMR effect is favored which suggests magnetic field dependent changes of the spin state of electron-hole pairs as being responsible for changes in current flow and light emission in OLEDs. In the framework of this concept it is possible to explain all results from own measurements as well as results from literature. Another important finding made in this thesis is the fact that the value of the OMR signal in the investigated OLED devices can be enhanced by appropriate electrical and optical conditioning processes. In particular, electrical conditioning causes a significant enhancement of the OMR values, while at the same time it has a negative effect on charge carrier transport and optical device characteristics. These results can be explained by additional results from charge carrier extraction measurements which suggest that electrical conditioning leads to an increase in the number of electronic trap states inside the emission layer of the investigated OLED devices. The positive influence of trap states on the OMR effect is

  20. Simulations of charge transport in organic light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Simon James

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis, two approaches to the modelling of charge transport in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are presented. The first is a drift-diffusion model, normally used when considering conventional crystalline inorganic semiconductors (e.g. Si or lll-V's) which have well defined energy bands. In this model, electron and hole transport is described using the current continuity equations and the drift-diffusion current equations, and coupled to Poisson's equation. These equations are solved with the appropriate boundary conditions, which for OLEDs are Schottky contacts; carriers are injected by thermionic emission and tunnelling. The disordered nature of the organic semiconductors is accounted for by the inclusion of field-dependent carrier mobilities and Langevin optical recombination. The second approach treats the transport of carriers in disordered organic semi-conductors as a hopping process between spatially and energetically disordered sites. This method has been used previously to account for the observed temperature and electric field dependence of carrier mobilities in disordered organic semiconductors. A hopping transport model has been developed which accounts explicitly for the structure in highly ordered films of rigid rod liquid-crystalline conjugated polymers. Chapter 2 discusses the formation of metal-semiconductor contacts, and current injection processes in OLEDs. If the barrier to carrier injection at a metal-semiconductor contact is small, or the contact is Ohmic, then the current may be space charge limited; this second limiting regime of current flow for OLEDs is also described. The remainder of Chapter 2 describes the drift-diffusion model used in this work in some detail. Chapter 3 contains results obtained from modelling the J-V characteristics of single-layer OLEDs, which are compared to experimental data in order to validate the drift-diffusion model. Chapter 4 contains results of simulating bi-layer OLEDs; rather than examining J

  1. Organometal halide perovskite light-emitting diodes with laminated carbon nanotube electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xin; Bade, Sri Ganesh R.; Geske, Thomas; Davis, Melissa; Smith, Rachel; Yu, Zhibin

    2017-08-01

    Organometal halide perovskite light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with laminated carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes are reported. The LEDs have an indium tin oxide (ITO) bottom electrode, a screen printed methylammonium lead tribromide (MAPbBr3)/polymer composite thin film as the emissive layer, and laminated CNT as the top electrode. The devices can be turned on at 2.2 V, reaching a brightness of 4,960 cd m-2 and a current efficiency of 1.54 cd A-1 at 6.9 V. The greatly simplified fabrication process in this work can potentially lead to the scalable manufacturing of large size and low cost LED panels in the future.

  2. Indwelling Stent Embedded with Light-Emitting Diodes for Photodynamic Therapy of Malignant Biliary Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baran, Timothy M., E-mail: timothy.baran@rochester.edu [University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Imaging Sciences (United States); Mironov, Oleg, E-mail: oleg.mironov@uhn.ca [University Health Network, The Joint Department of Medical Imaging (Canada); Sharma, Ashwani K., E-mail: Ashwani-Sharma@URMC.Rochester.edu; Foster, Thomas H., E-mail: thomas.foster@rochester.edu [University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Imaging Sciences (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PurposeWe describe the design and preliminary characterization of a stent incorporating light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignant biliary obstruction.MethodsA prototype was constructed with red (640 nm) LEDs embedded in a 14.5 French polyurethane tube. The device was evaluated for optical power and subjected to physical and electrical tests. PDT-induced reactive oxygen species were imaged in a gel phantom.ResultsThe stent functioned at a 2.5-cm bend radius and illuminated for 6 months in saline. No stray currents were detected, and it was cool after 30 minutes of operation. Optical power of 5–15 mW is applicable to PDT. Imaging of a reactive oxygen indicator showed LED-stent activation of photosensitizer.ConclusionsThe results motivate biological testing and design optimization.

  3. Indwelling Stent Embedded with Light-Emitting Diodes for Photodynamic Therapy of Malignant Biliary Obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, Timothy M.; Mironov, Oleg; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Foster, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeWe describe the design and preliminary characterization of a stent incorporating light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignant biliary obstruction.MethodsA prototype was constructed with red (640 nm) LEDs embedded in a 14.5 French polyurethane tube. The device was evaluated for optical power and subjected to physical and electrical tests. PDT-induced reactive oxygen species were imaged in a gel phantom.ResultsThe stent functioned at a 2.5-cm bend radius and illuminated for 6 months in saline. No stray currents were detected, and it was cool after 30 minutes of operation. Optical power of 5–15 mW is applicable to PDT. Imaging of a reactive oxygen indicator showed LED-stent activation of photosensitizer.ConclusionsThe results motivate biological testing and design optimization.

  4. Modulation response, mixed-mode oscillations and chaotic spiking in quantum dot light emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Husseini, Hussein B.; Al Naimee, Kais A.; Al Khursan, Amin H.; Abdalah, Sora F.; Khedir, Ali H.; Meucci, Riccardo; Arecchi, F. Tito

    2015-01-01

    In this work quantum dot light emitting diode (QD-LED) was modeled in a dimensionless rate equations system where it is not done earlier. The model was examined first under bias current without any external perturbation where it exhibits chaotic phenomena since the model has multi-degrees of freedom. Then, it is perturbed by both small signal and direct current modulations (DCM), separately. The system exhibits mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) under DCM. This behavior was reasoned to continuous states of two dimensional wetting layer (WL) which works as a reservoir to quantum dot (QD) states. QD capture was the dominant rate controlling the dynamic behavior in QD-LED. The nonlinear dynamic behavior of our model is compared very well to the experimental observations in the QD-LED

  5. Using Pre-TMIn Treatment to Improve the Optical Properties of Green Light Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of pre-TMIn treatment on the optical properties of green light emitting diodes (LEDs. Although pre-TMIn treatment did not affect the epitaxial structure of quantum wells, it significantly improved the quality of the surface morphology relative to that of the untreated sample. Indium cluster can be seen by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, which is the explanation for the red-shift of photoluminescence (PL. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements indicated that the sample prepared with pre-TMIn treatment had a shorter radiative decay time. As a result, the light output power of the treated green LED was higher than that of the conventional untreated one. Thus, pre-TMIn treatment appears to be a simple and efficient means of improving the performance of green LEDs.

  6. Is it viable to improve light output efficiency by nano-light-emitting diodes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao-Hung; Huang, Yu-Wen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Wu, Shang-En [Genesis Photonics Incorporation, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chuan-Pu, E-mail: cpliu@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-02

    Nanopillar arrays with InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-disks (MQDs) are fabricated by focused-ion-beam milling with surface damage layer removed by KOH wet etching. Nano-light-emitting diodes (Nano-LEDs) made of the InGaN/GaN MQD nanopillars are found to have 19.49% less output power than that of a conventional LED. The reasons are analyzed in detail and considering their current-voltage and electroluminescence characteristics, internal quantum efficiency, external quantum efficiency, light extraction, and wall-plug efficiency. Our results suggest that nanopillar-LED can outperform if the density can be increased to 2.81 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2} with the size unchanged or the size can be increased to 854.4 nm with the density unchanged.

  7. Al x Ga1‑ x N-based semipolar deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Ryota; Ichikawa, Shuhei; Funato, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2018-06-01

    Deep ultraviolet (UV) emission from Al x Ga1‑ x N-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated on semipolar (1\\bar{1}02) (r-plane) AlN substrates is presented. The growth conditions are optimized. A high NH3 flow rate during metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy yields atomically flat Al y Ga1‑ y N (y > x) on which Al x Ga1‑ x N/Al y Ga1‑ y N multiple quantum wells with abrupt interfaces and good periodicity are fabricated. The fabricated r-Al x Ga1‑ x N-based LED emits at 270 nm, which is in the germicidal wavelength range. Additionally, the emission line width is narrow, and the peak wavelength is stable against the injection current, so the semipolar LED shows promise as a UV emitter.

  8. Light-emitting diodes based on nontoxic zinc-alloyed silver-indium-sulfide (AIZS) nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Saikat; Guchhait, Asim; Pal, Amlan J.

    2014-04-01

    We report solution-processed growth of zinc-alloyed silver-indium-sulfide (AIZS) nanocrystals followed by fabrication and characterization of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on such nanostructures. While growing the low dimensional crystals, we vary the ratio between the silver and zinc contents that in turn tunes the bandgap and correspondingly their photoluminescence (PL) emission. We also dope the AIZS nanocrystals with manganese, so that their PL emission, which appears due to a radiative transition between the d-states of the dopants, becomes invariant in energy when the diameter of the quantum dots or the dopant concentration in the nanostructures varies. The LEDs fabricated with such undoped and manganese-doped AIZS nanocrystals emit electroluminescence (EL) that matches the PL spectrum of the respective nanomaterial. The results demonstrate examples of quantum dot LEDs (QDLEDs) based on nontoxic AIZS nanocrystals.

  9. Enhancement of mosquito trapping efficiency by using pulse width modulated light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Nan; Liu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yi-Chian; Ma, Hsin-Yi; Lee, Hsiao-Yi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a light-driving bug zapper is presented for well controlling the diseases brought by insects, such as mosquitoes. In order to have the device efficient to trap the insect pests in off-grid areas, pulse width modulated light emitting diodes (PWM-LED) combined with a solar power module are proposed and implemented. With specific PWM electric signals to drive the LED, it is found that no matter what the ability of catching insects or the consumed power efficiency can be enhanced thus. It is demonstrated that 40% of the UV LED consumed power and 25.9% of the total load power consumption can be saved, and the trapped mosquitoes are about 250% increased when the PWM method is applied in the bug zapper experiments.

  10. Optical design of adjustable light emitting diode for different lighting requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jia-Ning; Yu Jie; Tong Yu-Zhen; Zhang Guo-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) sources have been widely used for illumination. Optical design, especially freedom compact lens design is necessary to make LED sources applied in lighting industry, such as large-range interior lighting and small-range condensed lighting. For different lighting requirements, the size of target planes should be variable. In our paper we provide a method to design freedom lens according to the energy conservation law and Snell law through establishing energy mapping between the luminous flux emitted by a Lambertian LED source and a certain area of the target plane. The algorithm of our design can easily change the radius of each circular target plane, which makes the size of the target plane adjustable. Ray-tracing software Tracepro is used to validate the illuminance maps and polar-distribution maps. We design lenses for different sizes of target planes to meet specific lighting requirements. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  11. GaN-Based Multiple-Quantum-Well Light-Emitting Diodes Employing Nanotechnology for Photon Management

    KAUST Repository

    Hsiao, Yu Hsuan

    2015-03-01

    Nanostructures have been proved to be an efficient way of modifying/improving the performance of GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The achievements in photon management include strain relaxation, light extraction enhancement, radiation pattern control, and white-light devices. In this paper, we discuss the impact and the underlying physics of applying nanotechnology on LEDs. A variety of nanostructures are introduced, as well as the fabrication techniques. © 1972-2012 IEEE.

  12. Design of micro, flexible light-emitting diode arrays and fabrication of flexible electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Dan; Wang, Weibiao; Liang, Zhongzhu; Liang, Jingqiu; Qin, Yuxin; Lv, Jinguang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we design micro, flexible light-emitting diode (LED) array devices. Using theoretical calculations and finite element simulations, we analyze the deformation of the conventional single electrode bar. Through structure optimization, we obtain a three-dimensional (3D), chain-shaped electrode structure, which has a greater bending degree. The optimized electrodes not only have a bigger bend but can also be made to spin. When the supporting body is made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), the maximum bending degree of the micro, flexible LED arrays (4  ×  1 arrays) was approximately 230 µ m; this was obtained using the finite element method. The device (4  ×  1 arrays) can stretch to 15%. This paper describes the fabrication of micro, flexible LED arrays using microelectromechancial (MEMS) technology combined with electroplating technology. Specifically, the isolated grooves are made by dry etching which can isolate and protect the light-emitting units. A combination of MEMS technology and wet etching is used to fabricate the large size spacing. (paper)

  13. Fast Postmoisture Treatment of Luminescent Perovskite Films for Efficient Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoran; Li, Xiaomin; Yuan, Mingjian; Yang, Xuyong

    2018-04-01

    Despite the recent advances in the performance of perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs), the effects of water on the perovskite emissive layer and its electroluminescence are still unclear, even though it has been previously demonstrated that moisture has a significant impact on the quality of perovskite films in the fabrication process of perovskite solar cells and is a prerequisite for obtaining high-performance PeLEDs. Here, the effects of postmoisture on the luminescent CH 3 NH 3 PbBr 3 (MAPbBr 3 ) perovskite films are systematically investigated. It is found that postmoisture treatment can efficiently control the morphology and growth of perovskite films and only a fast moisture exposure at a 60% high relative humidity results in significantly improved crystallinity, carrier lifetime, and photoluminescence quantum yield of perovskite films. With the optimized moisture-treated perovskite films, a high-performance PeLED is fabricated, exhibiting a maximum current efficiency of 20.4 cd A -1 , which is an almost 20-fold enhancement when compared with perovskite films without moisture treatment. The results provide valuable insights into the moisture-assisted growth of luminescent perovskite films and will aid in the development of high-performance perovskite light-emitting devices. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. MOLED: Simulation of multilayer organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houili, H.; Tutiš, E.; Lütjens, H.; Bussac, M. N.; Zuppiroli, L.

    2003-12-01

    MOLED solves the dynamics of electrons and holes in multilayer Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLED). The carriers are injected on the positive and negative electrodes of the device by tunneling through a potential barrier. Thermal excitation processes across the barrier are also included. In the interior of the device the electron-hole recombination occurs when the two carriers are close enough, according to a model inspired from the one of Langevin. A fraction of these recombined pairs gives photons. The charge transport inside the organic material occurs through hopping. Several choices of mobility formulae are available in the code. MOLED can be used for OLEDs with an arbitrary number of layers. The output consists of numerous fields that describe the device performance. For example, there are the current, the recombination and the charge density distributions, the electric field distribution, the current-voltage characteristics and the device internal quantum efficiency. Program summaryTitle of program: MOLED Catalogue identifier: ADSG Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSG Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Operating systems under which the program has been tested: Unix, Linux Programming language used: FORTRAN 90 Memory required to execute with typical data: 2 MB No. of bytes in distributed program: 26 942 No. of bits in a word: 64 Peripherals used: permanent disk storage No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3695 Distribution format: tar gzip file Nature of the physical problem: Injection of electrons and holes into an organic electroluminescent material occurs through tunneling from metal electrodes. The transport of carriers inside the molecular medium proceeds by hopping from one molecule to another. The emission of light is a result of their radiative Langevin recombination (for a review see [Scott et al., Synthetic Metals 111-112 (2000) 289; Friend et al

  15. Fabrication of white light-emitting diodes based on UV light-emitting diodes with conjugated polymers-(CdSe/ZnS) quantum dots as hybrid phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyunchul; Chung, Wonkeun; Lee, Chang Hun; Kim, Sung Hyun

    2012-07-01

    White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were fabricated using GaN-based 380-nm UV LEDs precoated with the composite of blue-emitting polymer (poly[(9,9-dihexylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(2-methoxy-5-{2-ethylhexyloxy)-1 ,4-phenylene)]), yellow green-emitting polymer (poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(1,4-benzo-{2,1',3}-thiadiazole)]), and 605-nm red-emitting quantum dots (QDs). CdSe cores were obtained by solvothermal route using CdO, Se precursors and ZnS shells were synthesized by using diethylzinc, and hexamethyldisilathiane precursors. The optical properties of CdSe/ZnS QDs were characterized by UV-visible and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The structural data and composition of the QDs were transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and EDX technique. The quantum yield and size of the QDs were 58.7% and about 6.7 nm, respectively. Three-band white light was generated by hybridizing blue (430 nm), green (535 nm), and red (605 nm) emission. The color-rendering index (CRI) of the device was extremely improved by introducing the QDs. The CIE-1931 chromaticity coordinate, color temperature, and CRI of a white LED at 20 mA were (0.379, 0.368), 3969 K, and 90, respectively.

  16. Electroluminescence enhancement for near-ultraviolet light emitting diodes with graphene/AZO-based current spreading layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Li; Ou, Yiyu; Zhu, Xiaolong

    LEDs) have attracted significant research interest due to their intensive applications in various areas where indium tin oxide (ITO) is one of the most widely employed transparent conductive materials for NUV LEDs. Compared to ITO, indium-free aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) has similar electrical......Near-ultraviolet light emitting diodes with different aluminum-doped zinc oxide-based current spreading layers were fabricated and electroluminescence (EL) was compared. A 170% EL enhancement was achieved by using a graphene-based interlayer. GaN-based near-ultraviolet light emitting diodes (NUV...... with a new type of current spreading layer (CSL) which combines AZO and a single-layer graphene (SLG) as an effective transparent CSL [1]. In the present work, LEDs with solo AZO CSL in Fig.1(a) and SLG/Ni/AZO-based CSL in Fig.1(b) were both fabricated for EL comparison. Standard mesa fabrication including...

  17. UV light-emitting-diode photochemical mercury vapor generation for atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaoling; Ai, Xi; Jiang, Xiaoming; Deng, Pengchi; Zheng, Chengbin; Lv, Yi

    2012-02-07

    A new, miniaturized and low power consumption photochemical vapor generation (PVG) technique utilizing an ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV-LED) lamp is described, and further validated via the determination of trace mercury. In the presence of formic acid, the mercury cold vapor is favourably generated from Hg(2+) solutions by UV-LED irradiation, and then rapidly transported to an atomic fluorescence spectrometer for detection. Optimum conditions for PVG and interferences from concomitant elements were investigated in detail. Under optimum conditions, a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.01 μg L(-1) was obtained, and the precision was better than 3.2% (n = 11, RSD) at 1 μg L(-1) Hg(2+). No obvious interferences from any common ions were evident. The methodology was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in National Research Council Canada DORM-3 fish muscle tissue and several water samples.

  18. Graphene as current spreading layer on AlGaInP light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xia; Feng, Yajie; Liu, Qiaoli; Hu, Anqi; He, Xiaoying; Hu, Zonghai

    2018-05-01

    Due to high transmittance and high mobility, graphene is one of the promising candidates for a current spreading layer, which is crucial to light emitting diode (LED) performance. In this paper, improved AlGaInP LED performance was reported after graphene was applied on the GaP surface. Due to its lowered work function difference than with the GaN material, the electrical properties remain the same without additional voltage bias. The light output power is enhanced by about 40% under the current injection of 5 mA at room temperature, which was confirmed by the light emission profile analysis in this study. Such results indicate that raphene is a promising candidate as a current spreading layer under low current injection.

  19. Room temperature current injection polariton light emitting diode with a hybrid microcavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tien-Chang; Chen, Jun-Rong; Lin, Shiang-Chi; Huang, Si-Wei; Wang, Shing-Chung; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2011-07-13

    The strong light-matter interaction within a semiconductor high-Q microcavity has been used to produce half-matter/half-light quasiparticles, exciton-polaritons. The exciton-polaritons have very small effective mass and controllable energy-momentum dispersion relation. These unique properties of polaritons provide the possibility to investigate the fundamental physics including solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics, and dynamical Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Thus far the polariton BEC has been demonstrated using optical excitation. However, from a practical viewpoint, the current injection polariton devices operating at room temperature would be most desirable. Here we report the first realization of a current injection microcavity GaN exciton-polariton light emitting diode (LED) operating under room temperature. The exciton-polariton emission from the LED at photon energy 3.02 eV under strong coupling condition is confirmed through temperature-dependent and angle-resolved electroluminescence spectra.

  20. Sensor fabrication method for in situ temperature and humidity monitoring of light emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Su, Ay; Liu, Yin-Chieh; Chan, Pin-Cheng; Lin, Chia-Hung

    2010-01-01

    In this work micro temperature and humidity sensors are fabricated to measure the junction temperature and humidity of light emitting diodes (LED). The junction temperature is frequently measured using thermal resistance measurement technology. The weakness of this method is that the timing of data capture is not regulated by any standard. This investigation develops a device that can stably and continually measure temperature and humidity. The device is light-weight and can monitor junction temperature and humidity in real time. Using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), this study minimizes the size of the micro temperature and humidity sensors, which are constructed on a stainless steel foil substrate (40 μm-thick SS-304). The micro temperature and humidity sensors can be fixed between the LED chip and frame. The sensitivities of the micro temperature and humidity sensors are 0.06±0.005 (Ω/°C) and 0.033 pF/%RH, respectively.

  1. High-quality vertical light emitting diodes fabrication by mechanical lift-off technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Po-Min; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2011-10-01

    We report the fabrication of mechanical lift-off high quality thin GaN with Hexagonal Inversed Pyramid (HIP) structures for vertical light emitting diodes (V-LEDs). The HIP structures were formed at the GaN/sapphire substrate interface under high temperature during KOH wet etching process. The average threading dislocation density (TDD) was estimated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found the reduction from 2×109 to 1×108 cm-2. Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the compressive stress of GaN epilayer was effectively relieved in the thin-GaN LED with HIP structures. Finally, the mechanical lift-off process is claimed to be successful by using the HIP structures as a sacrificial layer during wafer bonding process.

  2. External modes in quantum dot light emitting diode with filtered optical feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Husseini, Hussein B.; Al Naimee, Kais A.; Al-Khursan, Amin H.; Khedir, Ali. H.

    2016-01-01

    This research reports a theoretical investigation on the role of filtered optical feedback (FOF) in the quantum dot light emitting diode (QD-LED). The underlying dynamics is affected by a sidle node, which returns to an elliptical shape when the wetting layer (WL) is neglected. Both filter width and time delay change the appearance of different dynamics (chaotic and mixed mode oscillations, MMOs). The results agree with the experimental observations. Here, the fixed point analysis for QDs was done for the first time. For QD-LED with FOF, the system transits from the coherence collapse case in conventional optical feedback to a coherent case with a filtered mode in FOF. It was found that the WL washes out the modes which is an unexpected result. This may attributed to the longer capture time of WL compared with that between QD states. Thus, WL reduces the chaotic behavior.

  3. A hole accelerator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Tan, Swee Tiam; Ji, Yun; Wang, Liancheng; Zhu, Binbin; Zhang, Yiping; Lu, Shunpeng; Zhang, Xueliang; Hasanov, Namig; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2014-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has been significantly limited by the insufficient hole injection, and this is caused by the inefficient p-type doping and the low hole mobility. The low hole mobility makes the holes less energetic, which hinders the hole injection into the multiple quantum wells (MQWs) especially when a p-type AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) is adopted. In this work, we report a hole accelerator to accelerate the holes so that the holes can obtain adequate kinetic energy, travel across the p-type EBL, and then enter the MQWs more efficiently and smoothly. In addition to the numerical study, the effectiveness of the hole accelerator is experimentally shown through achieving improved optical output power and reduced efficiency droop for the proposed InGaN/GaN LED.

  4. Quantum mechanical modeling the emission pattern and polarization of nanoscale light emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rulin; Zhang, Yu; Bi, Fuzhen; Frauenheim, Thomas; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2016-07-21

    Understanding of the electroluminescence (EL) mechanism in optoelectronic devices is imperative for further optimization of their efficiency and effectiveness. Here, a quantum mechanical approach is formulated for modeling the EL processes in nanoscale light emitting diodes (LED). Based on non-equilibrium Green's function quantum transport equations, interactions with the electromagnetic vacuum environment are included to describe electrically driven light emission in the devices. The presented framework is illustrated by numerical simulations of a silicon nanowire LED device. EL spectra of the nanowire device under different bias voltages are obtained and, more importantly, the radiation pattern and polarization of optical emission can be determined using the current approach. This work is an important step forward towards atomistic quantum mechanical modeling of the electrically induced optical response in nanoscale systems.

  5. Note: A flexible light emitting diode-based broadband transient-absorption spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Sean M.; Corley, Scott C.; Madsen, Dorte; Larsen, Delmar S.

    2012-05-01

    This Note presents a simple and flexible ns-to-ms transient absorption spectrometer based on pulsed light emitting diode (LED) technology that can be incorporated into existing ultrafast transient absorption spectrometers or operate as a stand-alone instrument with fixed-wavelength laser sources. The LED probe pulses from this instrument exhibit excellent stability (˜0.5%) and are capable of producing high signal-to-noise long-time (>100 ns) transient absorption signals either in a broadband multiplexed (spanning 250 nm) or in tunable narrowband (20 ns) operation. The utility of the instrument is demonstrated by measuring the photoinduced ns-to-ms photodynamics of the red/green absorbing fourth GMP phosphodiesterase/adenylyl cyclase/FhlA domain of the NpR6012 locus of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

  6. Electrical aging effect of ZnS based quantum dots for white light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yohan; Ippen, Christian; Greco, Tonino; Jang, Ilwan; Park, Sungkyu; Oh, Min Suk; Han, Chul Jong; Lee, Jeongno; Wedel, Armin; Kim, Jiwan

    2014-03-01

    The present work reports cadmium-free colloidal ZnS:Al quantum dot (QD) based white quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs). The device was fabricated with a structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/PVK/QDs/TPBi/LiF/Al using synthesized ZnS:Al QDs which has 393 nm of peak wavelength and sub peaks in visible wavelength. White emission with high color rending index (CRI) was achieved by the combination of blue emission from PVK and ZnS:Al QDs, electroplex emission at the interface between PVK and ZnS:Al QDs, and Al traps/defects emission, which are controlled by electrical aging effect. The characteristic of our device shows the potential for spectrum tunable and Cd-free white QD-LEDs in the near future.

  7. The efficiency challenge of nitride light-emitting diodes for lighting

    KAUST Repository

    Weisbuch, Claude

    2015-03-13

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. We discuss the challenges of light-emitting diodes in view of their application to solid-state lighting. The requirement is to at least displace the quite efficient fluorescent, sodium, and high intensity discharge lamps used today in the main energy consuming lighting sectors, industrial, commercial and outdoors, with more efficient and better light quality lamps. We show that both from the point of view of cost of ownership and carbon emissions reduction, the relevant metric is efficiency, more than the cost of lumens. Then, progress from present performance requires identification of the loss mechanisms in light emission from LEDs, and solutions competing with mainstream c-plane LEDS grown on sapphire need to be on par with these. Special attention is devoted to a discussion of the efficiency droop mechanisms, and of a recent direct measurement of Auger generated electrons which appear to be responsible for droop.

  8. Azimuthal anisotropy of light extraction from photonic crystal light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chun-Feng; Lu, T.C.; Wang, S.C. [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chao, C.H.; Hsueh, H.T.; Wang, J.F.T.; Yeh, W.Y.; Chi, J.Y. [Electronics and Optoelectronics Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 310, Taiwan (China); Kuo, H.C.

    2008-07-01

    Photonic crystal (PhC) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) exhibiting anisotropic light extraction have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. It is found that the anisotropic light extraction strongly depends on the lattice constant and orientation. Optical images of the anisotropy in the azimuthal direction are obtained using annular structure with triangular lattice. 6-fold symmetric light extraction patterns with varying number of petals are observed. More petals in multiple of 6 appear in the observed image with lattice constant increasing. This anisotropic behavior suggests a new means to optimize the PhC design of GaN LED for light extraction. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Advanced Oxidation of Tartrazine and Brilliant Blue with Pulsed Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert; Mudimbi, Patrick; Miller, Michael E; Magnuson, Matthew; Willison, Stuart; Phillips, Rebecca; Harper, Willie F

    2017-01-01

      This study investigated the effect of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UVLEDs) coupled with hydrogen peroxide as an advanced oxidation process (AOP) for the degradation of two test chemicals. Brilliant Blue FCF consistently exhibited greater degradation than tartrazine, with 83% degradation after 300 minutes at the 100% duty cycle compared with only 17% degradation of tartrazine under the same conditions. These differences are attributable to the structural properties of the compounds. Duty cycle was positively correlated with the first-order rate constants (k) for both chemicals but, interestingly, negatively correlated with the normalized first-order rate constants (k/duty cycle). Synergistic effects of both hydraulic mixing and LED duty cycle were manifested as novel oscillations in the effluent contaminant concentration. Further, LED output and efficiency were dependent upon duty cycle and less efficient over time perhaps due to heating effects on semiconductor performance.

  10. Effect of 670-nm Light-Emitting Diode Light On Neuronal Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Riley, Margaret T. T.; Whelan, Harry T.

    2002-01-01

    Light close to and within the near infrared range has documented benefits for promoting wound healing in human and animal studies. Our preliminary results using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in this range have also demonstrated two-to five-fold increases in growth-phase-specific DNA synthesis in normal fibroblasts, muscle cells, osteoblasts, and mucosal epithelial cells in tissue cultures. However, the mechanisms of action of such light on cells are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the therapeutic effects of such light result from the stimulation of cellular events associated with increases in cytochrome oxidase activity. As a first step in testing our hypothesis, we subjected primary neuronal cultures to impulse blockade by tetrodotoxin (TTX), a voltage-dependent sodium channel blocker, and applied LED light at 670 nm to determine if it could partially or fully reverse the reduction of cytochrome oxidase activity by TTX. The wavelength and parameters were previously tested to be beneficial for wound healing.

  11. Plasmonic Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes Based on the Ag-CsPbBr3 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Xu, Bing; Wang, Weigao; Liu, Sheng; Zheng, Yuanjin; Chen, Shuming; Wang, Kai; Sun, Xiao Wei

    2017-02-08

    The enhanced luminescence through semiconductor-metal interactions suggests the great potential of device performance improvement via properly tailored plasmonic nanostructures. Surface plasmon enhanced electroluminescence in an all-inorganic CsPbBr 3 perovskite light-emitting diode (LED) is fabricated by decorating the hole transport layer with the synthesized Ag nanorods. An increase of 42% and 43.3% in the luminance and efficiency is demonstrated for devices incorporated with Ag nanorods. The device with Ag introduction indicates identical optoelectronic properties to the controlled device without Ag nanostructures. The increased spontaneous emission rate caused by the Ag-induced plasmonic near-field effect is responsible for the performance enhancement. Therefore, the plasmonic Ag-CsPbBr 3 nanostructure studied here provides a novel strategy on the road to the future development of perovskite LEDs.

  12. Highly stable cesium lead iodide perovskite quantum dot light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chen; Huang, Chun-Ying; Sanehira, Erin M.; Luther, Joseph M.; Lin, Lih Y.

    2017-11-01

    Recently, all-inorganic perovskites such as CsPbBr3 and CsPbI3, have emerged as promising materials for light-emitting applications. While encouraging performance has been demonstrated, the stability issue of the red-emitting CsPbI3 is still a major concern due to its small tolerance factor. Here we report a highly stable CsPbI3 quantum dot (QD) light-emitting diode (LED) with red emission fabricated using an improved purification approach. The device achieved decent external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 0.21% at a bias of 6 V and outstanding operational stability, with a L 70 lifetime (EL intensity decreases to 70% of starting value) of 16 h and 1.5 h under a constant driving voltage of 5 V and 6 V (maximum EQE operation) respectively. Furthermore, the device can work under a higher voltage of 7 V (maximum luminance operation) and retain 50% of its initial EL intensity after 500 s. These findings demonstrate the promise of CsPbI3 QDs for stable red LEDs, and suggest the feasibility for electrically pumped perovskite lasers with further device optimizations.

  13. White polymer light-emitting diode based on polymer blending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Kyun; Kwon, Soon Kab; Kim, Jun Young; Park, Tae Jin; Song, Dae Ho; Kwon, Jang Hyuk; Choo, Dong Jun; Jang, Jin; Jin, Jae Kyu; You, Hong

    2006-01-01

    A series of white polymer light emitting devices have been fabricated by using a polymer blending system of polyfluorene-based blue and MEH-PPV red polymers. A device structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/polymer/LiF/Al was employed. The white polymer device exhibited a current efficiency of 4.33 cd/A (4,816 cd/m 2 , Q.E. = 1.9 %) and a maximum luminance of 21,430 cd/m 2 at 9.2 V. The CIE coordinates were (0.35, 0.37) at 5 V and (0.29, 0.30) at 9 V.

  14. Sliding Mode Pulsed Averaging IC Drivers for High Brightness Light Emitting Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Anatoly Shteynberg, PhD

    2006-08-17

    This project developed new Light Emitting Diode (LED) driver ICs associated with specific (uniquely operated) switching power supplies that optimize performance for High Brightness LEDs (HB-LEDs). The drivers utilize a digital control core with a newly developed nonlinear, hysteretic/sliding mode controller with mixed-signal processing. The drivers are flexible enough to allow both traditional microprocessor interface as well as other options such as “on the fly” adjustment of color and brightness. Some other unique features of the newly developed drivers include • AC Power Factor Correction; • High power efficiency; • Substantially fewer external components should be required, leading to substantial reduction of Bill of Materials (BOM). Thus, the LED drivers developed in this research : optimize LED performance by increasing power efficiency and power factor. Perhaps more remarkably, the LED drivers provide this improved performance at substantially reduced costs compared to the present LED power electronic driver circuits. Since one of the barriers to market penetration for HB-LEDs (in particular “white” light LEDs) is cost/lumen, this research makes important contributions in helping the advancement of SSL consumer acceptance and usage.

  15. Light-emitting diode street lights reduce last-ditch evasive manoeuvres by moths to bat echolocation calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Andrew; Stone, Emma L.; Jones, Gareth; Harris, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The light-emitting diode (LED) street light market is expanding globally, and it is important to understand how LED lights affect wildlife populations. We compared evasive flight responses of moths to bat echolocation calls experimentally under LED-lit and -unlit conditions. Significantly, fewer moths performed ‘powerdive’ flight manoeuvres in response to bat calls (feeding buzz sequences from Nyctalus spp.) under an LED street light than in the dark. LED street lights reduce the anti-predator behaviour of moths, shifting the balance in favour of their predators, aerial hawking bats. PMID:26361558

  16. Production of poinsettia (Euphorbia Pulcherrima) with light emitting diodes compared with the traditional high pressure sodium lamp

    OpenAIRE

    Thapa, Sabir

    2017-01-01

    Use of chemical are commonly used as tools for the commercial pot plant producers to grow strong, dwarfed, and compact plants. Although, these growth regulators have adverse effects on human health and the environment. So, this issue has motivated researchers to search for alternative methods for growth regulation. The aim of this study was to test light emitting diodes (LEDs) with different light qualities alone or in combination with high pressure sodium lamps (HPSs), to investigate their e...

  17. Multicolor fluorescent light-emitting diodes based on cesium lead halide perovskite quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Bai, Xue, E-mail: baix@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: yuzhang@jlu.edu.cn; Sun, Chun; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yu, E-mail: baix@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: yuzhang@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang, Tieqiang [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2016-08-08

    High quantum yield, narrow full width at half-maximum and tunable emission color of perovskite quantum dots (QDs) make this kind of material good prospects for light-emitting diodes (LEDs). However, the relatively poor stability under high temperature and air condition limits the device performance. To overcome this issue, the liquid-type packaging structure in combination with blue LED chip was employed to fabricate the fluorescent perovskite quantum dot-based LEDs. A variety of monochromatic LEDs with green, yellow, reddish-orange, and red emission were fabricated by utilizing the inorganic cesium lead halide perovskite quantum dots as the color-conversion layer, which exhibited the narrow full width at half-maximum (<35 nm), the relatively high luminous efficiency (reaching 75.5 lm/W), and the relatively high external quantum efficiency (14.6%), making it the best-performing perovskite LEDs so far. Compared to the solid state LED device, the liquid-type LED devices exhibited excellent color stability against the various working currents. Furthermore, we demonstrated the potential prospects of all-inorganic perovskite QDs for the liquid-type warm white LEDs.

  18. Multicolor fluorescent light-emitting diodes based on cesium lead halide perovskite quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Peng; Bai, Xue; Sun, Chun; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Tieqiang

    2016-01-01

    High quantum yield, narrow full width at half-maximum and tunable emission color of perovskite quantum dots (QDs) make this kind of material good prospects for light-emitting diodes (LEDs). However, the relatively poor stability under high temperature and air condition limits the device performance. To overcome this issue, the liquid-type packaging structure in combination with blue LED chip was employed to fabricate the fluorescent perovskite quantum dot-based LEDs. A variety of monochromatic LEDs with green, yellow, reddish-orange, and red emission were fabricated by utilizing the inorganic cesium lead halide perovskite quantum dots as the color-conversion layer, which exhibited the narrow full width at half-maximum (<35 nm), the relatively high luminous efficiency (reaching 75.5 lm/W), and the relatively high external quantum efficiency (14.6%), making it the best-performing perovskite LEDs so far. Compared to the solid state LED device, the liquid-type LED devices exhibited excellent color stability against the various working currents. Furthermore, we demonstrated the potential prospects of all-inorganic perovskite QDs for the liquid-type warm white LEDs.

  19. Development and evaluation of a light-emitting diode endoscopic light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Neil T.; Li, Rui; Rogers, Kevin; Driscoll, Paul; Excel, Peter; Yandle, Ron; Hanna, George; Copner, Nigel; Elson, Daniel S.

    2012-03-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) based endoscopic illumination devices have been shown to have several benefits over arclamp systems. LEDs are energy-efficient, small, durable, and inexpensive, however their use in endoscopy has been limited by the difficulty in efficiently coupling enough light into the endoscopic light cable. We have demonstrated a highly homogenised lightpipe LED light source that combines the light from four Luminus LEDs emitting in the red, green, blue and violet using innovative dichroics that maximise light throughput. The light source spectrally combines light from highly divergent incoherent sources that have a Lambertian intensity profile to provide illumination matched to the acceptance numerical aperture of a liquid light guide or fibre bundle. The LED light source was coupled to a standard laparoscope and performance parameters (power, luminance, colour temperature) compared to a xenon lamp. Although the total illuminance from the endoscope was lower, adjustment of the LEDs' relative intensities enabled contrast enhancement in biological tissue imaging. The LED light engine was also evaluated in a minimally invasive surgery (MIS) box trainer and in vivo during a porcine MIS procedure where it was used to generate 'narrowband' images. Future work using the violet LED could enable photodynamic diagnosis of bladder cancer.

  20. Inhibitory effect of blue light emitting diode on migration and invasion of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Phil-Sun; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Eun-Mi; Hwang, Hyosook; Ryu, Hyang Hwa; Lim, SeokTae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects and molecular mechanism of blue light emitting diode (LED) in tumor cells. A migration and invasion assay for the metastatic behavior of mouse colon cancer CT-26 and human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells was performed. Cancer cell migration-related proteins were identified by obtaining a 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in total cellular protein profile of blue LED-irradiated cancer cells, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis of proteins. Protein levels were examined by immunoblotting. Irradiation with blue LED inhibited CT-26 and HT-1080 cell migration and invasion. The anti-metastatic effects of blue LED irradiation were associated with inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression. P38 MAPK phosphorylation was increased in blue LED-irradiated CT-26 and HT-1080 cells, but was inhibited after pretreatment with SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK. Inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation by SB203580 treatment increased number of migratory cancer cells in CT-26 and HT-1080 cells, indicating that blue LED irradiation inhibited cancer cell migration via phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Additionally blue LED irradiation of mice injected with CT-26 cells expressing luciferase decreased early stage lung metastasis compared to untreated control mice. These results indicate that blue LED irradiation inhibits cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A new integrating sphere design for spectral radiant flux determination of light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanselaer, P.; Keppens, A.; Forment, S.; Ryckaert, W. R.; Deconinck, G.

    2009-09-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) technology is developing very quickly and may be considered an alternative for traditional light sources. However, at this moment, manufacturers and end users of LEDs are facing a rather basic but major problem. The lack of standardization regarding optical and electrical characterization of LEDs appears to compromise a successful implementation. In particular, numbers quoted for the luminous flux, and consequently for the efficacy of LEDs, are very sensitive data because they are used to impress and push the LED market. In this paper, the most was made of the typical hemispherical radiation of high-power LEDs to increase the accuracy of the flux determination using a custom-made integrating sphere. Recently developed measurement techniques such as the use of an external spectral irradiance standard and an optimized spectral irradiance detection head are combined with a very particular port geometry and a minimized baffle area. This results in a uniform spatial response distribution function (SRDF), which guarantees an accurate radiant and luminous flux determination, irrespective of the spatial intensity distribution of the LED package or luminaire. The effect of the directional response of the detector head on the SRDF has been explored. Measurements on LED devices with and without external optics are presented, illustrating the possibilities of the measurement setup.

  2. A new integrating sphere design for spectral radiant flux determination of light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanselaer, P; Keppens, A; Forment, S; Ryckaert, W R; Deconinck, G

    2009-01-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) technology is developing very quickly and may be considered an alternative for traditional light sources. However, at this moment, manufacturers and end users of LEDs are facing a rather basic but major problem. The lack of standardization regarding optical and electrical characterization of LEDs appears to compromise a successful implementation. In particular, numbers quoted for the luminous flux, and consequently for the efficacy of LEDs, are very sensitive data because they are used to impress and push the LED market. In this paper, the most was made of the typical hemispherical radiation of high-power LEDs to increase the accuracy of the flux determination using a custom-made integrating sphere. Recently developed measurement techniques such as the use of an external spectral irradiance standard and an optimized spectral irradiance detection head are combined with a very particular port geometry and a minimized baffle area. This results in a uniform spatial response distribution function (SRDF), which guarantees an accurate radiant and luminous flux determination, irrespective of the spatial intensity distribution of the LED package or luminaire. The effect of the directional response of the detector head on the SRDF has been explored. Measurements on LED devices with and without external optics are presented, illustrating the possibilities of the measurement setup

  3. Electron irradiation of near-UV GaN/InGaN light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In-Hwan; Cho, Han-Su [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Polyakov, Alexander Y.; Smirnov, N.B.; Shchemerov, I.V.; Zinovyev, R.A.; Didenko, S.I.; Lagov, P.B. [National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shmidt, N.M.; Shabunina, E.I. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tal' nishnih, N.A. [Submicron Heterostructures for Microelectronics Research and Engineering Center, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Hwang, Sung-Min [Soft-Epi, Inc., Opo-ro 240, Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Pearton, S.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Irradiation with 6 MeV electrons of near-UV (peak wavelength 385-390 nm) multi-quantum-well (MQW) GaN/InGaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) causes an increase in density of deep electron traps near E{sub c} -0.8 and E{sub c} -1 eV, and correlates to a 90% decrease of electroluminescence (EL) efficiency after a fluence of 1.1 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The likely origin of the EL efficiency decrease is this increase in concentration of the E{sub c} -0.8 eV and E{sub c} -1 eV traps. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes Efficiency Dependence on Bipolar Charge Traps Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Morgado

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of light-emitting diodes (LEDs based on poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl-alt-1,4-benzo-{2,1′-3}-thiadiazole], F8BT, is optimized upon simultaneous doping with a hole and an electron trapping molecule, namely, N,N′-Bis(3-methylphenyl-N,N′-diphenylbenzidine and 2-(4-biphenylyl-5-(4-tert-butylphenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole, respectively. It is shown that, for devices with poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene doped with polystyrene sulfonic acid as hole-injection layer material and magnesium cathodes, the efficiency is nearly doubled (from ca. 2.5 to 3.7 cd/A upon doping with ca. 0.34% by weight of both compounds.

  5. Transparent conductive graphene electrode in GaN-based ultra-violet light emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Jae; Mastro, Michael A; Hite, Jennifer; Eddy, Charles R; Kim, Jihyun

    2010-10-25

    We report a graphene-based transparent conductive electrode for use in ultraviolet (UV) GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs). A few-layer graphene (FLG) layer was mechanically deposited. UV light at a peak wavelength of 368 nm was successfully emitted by the FLG layer as transparent contact to p-GaN. The emission of UV light through the thin graphene layer was brighter than through the thick graphene layer. The thickness of the graphene layer was characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Our results indicate that this novel graphene-based transparent conductive electrode holds great promise for use in UV optoelectronics for which conventional ITO is less transparent than graphene.

  6. Tunable photoluminescence of CsPbBr3 perovskite quantum dots for light emitting diodes application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiwei; Xin, Xing; Zang, Zhigang; Tang, Xiaosheng; Li, Cunlong; Hu, Wei; Zhou, Miao; Du, Juan

    2017-11-01

    All-inorganic cesium lead halide (CsPbBr3) perovskite quantum dots (QDs), as one kind of promising materials, have attracted considerable attention in optoelectronic applications. Herein, we synthesized the colloidal CsPbBr3 QDs with tunable photoluminescence (PL) (493-531 nm) by adjusting the reaction temperatures, which revealed narrow emission bandwidths of about 25 nm. The average diameters of the QDs could be adjusted from 7.1 to 12.3 nm as the temperature increased from 100 °C to 180 °C. Moreover, the radiative lifetimes of CsPbBr3 QDs were measured to be 2 ns, and the single QD fluorescence intensity time trace results demonstrated its suppressed blinking emission. Moreover, green light emitting diodes by using CsPbBr3 QDs casted on blue LED chips were further fabricated, which provided potential applications in the field of display and lighting technology.

  7. Oxidation of tartrazine with ultraviolet light emitting diodes: pH and duty cycles effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brandon M; Miller, Michael E; Kempisty, David M; Stubbs, John; Harper, Willie F

    2018-03-01

    The presence of tartrazine (TAR) in the water cycle poses serious threats to human health. This study investigated the used of light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the advanced oxidation of TAR under different pH and duty cycle (DC) conditions. The first order reaction rate constant for TAR oxidation was positively correlated with DC, negatively correlated with pH, and typically greatest at pH 6. Chemical byproduct analysis indicated that OH addition, H abstraction, and electron transfer without molecule transfer were among the relevant reaction mechanisms for TAR degradation. Six byproducts were identified, four were reported for the first time, and two demonstrated that TAR rings were cleaved. This research is the first to determine the optimal pH for UVLED-driven oxidation of TAR and the first to identify new TAR-related byproducts from UVLED-based water treatment.

  8. Characteristics of organic light emitting diodes with copper iodide as injection layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stakhira, P., E-mail: stakhira@polynet.lviv.u [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera, 12, Lviv, 79013 (Ukraine); Cherpak, V.; Volynyuk, D.; Ivastchyshyn, F. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera, 12, Lviv, 79013 (Ukraine); Hotra, Z. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera, 12, Lviv, 79013 (Ukraine); Rzeszow University of Technology, W. Pola 2, Rzeszow, 35-959 (Poland); Tataryn, V. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera, 12, Lviv, 79013 (Ukraine); Luka, G. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-09-30

    We have studied the use of a thin copper iodide (CuI) film as an efficient injection layer of holes from indium tin oxide (ITO) anode in a light-emitting diode structure based on tris-8-hydroxyquinoline aluminium (Alq3). The results of impedance analysis of two types of diode structures, ITO/CuI/Alq3/poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether/Al and ITO/Alq3/poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether/Al, are presented. Comparative analysis of their current density-voltage, luminance-voltage and impedance characteristics shows that presence of CuI layer facilitates injection of holes from ITO anode into the light-emitting layer Alq3 and increases electroluminescence efficiency of the organic light emitting diodes.

  9. Silicon light-emitting diodes and lasers photon breeding devices using dressed photons

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on a novel phenomenon named photon breeding. It is applied to realizing light-emitting diodes and lasers made of indirect-transition-type silicon bulk crystals in which the light-emission principle is based on dressed photons. After presenting physical pictures of dressed photons and dressed-photon phonons, the principle of light emission by using dressed-photon phonons is reviewed. A novel phenomenon named photon breeding is also reviewed. Next, the fabrication and operation of light emitting diodes and lasers are described The role of coherent phonons in these devices is discussed. Finally, light-emitting diodes using other relevant crystals are described and other relevant devices are also reviewed.

  10. Ultra-bright and highly efficient inorganic based perovskite light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liuqi; Yang, Xiaolei; Jiang, Qi; Wang, Pengyang; Yin, Zhigang; Zhang, Xingwang; Tan, Hairen; Yang, Yang (Michael); Wei, Mingyang; Sutherland, Brandon R.; Sargent, Edward H.; You, Jingbi

    2017-06-01

    Inorganic perovskites such as CsPbX3 (X=Cl, Br, I) have attracted attention due to their excellent thermal stability and high photoluminescence quantum efficiency. However, the electroluminescence quantum efficiency of their light-emitting diodes was CsPbBr3 lattice and by depositing a hydrophilic and insulating polyvinyl pyrrolidine polymer atop the ZnO electron-injection layer to overcome these issues. As a result, we obtained light-emitting diodes exhibiting a high brightness of 91,000 cd m-2 and a high external quantum efficiency of 10.4% using a mixed-cation perovskite Cs0.87MA0.13PbBr3 as the emitting layer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the brightest and most-efficient green perovskite light-emitting diodes reported to date.

  11. Fluorescence digital photography of acne using a light-emitting diode illuminator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyo Hyun; Kim, Soo Nam; Kye, Young Chul

    2006-11-01

    The fluorescence findings of several dermatological diseases, such as erythrasma, tinea versicolor, and acne are helpful for diagnosis and follow-up. However, many experience difficulty taking photographic images of fluorescence. The aim of this study was to develop a 405 nm light-emitting diode (LED) system for fluorescence digital photography of acne and to determine whether such a diode can be used to evaluate acne. Eight healthy acne patients were compared with controls by fluorescence digital photography using a digital camera equipped with a 405 nm LED illuminator. Digital photographs were taken by two different ways of exposure, i.e. appropriate exposure level and longer exposure. One side of the nose, cheek, and glabella was compared. The numbers and extents of fluorescence dots were counted and measured. As normal controls, seven individuals with apparent oiliness and no acne were enrolled. Red fluorescent facial dots were observed and photographed digitally using the 405 nm LED illuminator. These were more numerous and extensive on the glabella and cheeks of acne patients. Fluorescence digital photography of acne was successfully performed using a 405 nm LED illuminator. This illuminator could be used for acne evaluations.

  12. Systematic investigation of the effects of organic film structure on light emitting diode performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joswick, M. D.; Campbell, I. H.; Barashkov, N. N.; Ferraris, J. P.

    1996-09-01

    We present a systematic investigation of the effects of organic film structure on light emitting diode (LED) performance. Metal/organic film/metal LEDs were fabricated using a five ring, poly(phenylene vinylene) related oligomer as the active layer. The structure of the vacuum evaporated oligomer films was varied from amorphous to polycrystalline by changing the substrate temperature during deposition. The intrinsic properties of the oligomer films and the LED performance were measured. The measured intrinsic film properties include: optical absorption, photoluminescence (PL) spectra, PL lifetime, PL efficiency, and effective carrier mobility. The measured device characteristics include current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, electroluminescence (EL) efficiency, and the contact metal/organic film Schottky barrier heights. The optical absorption and PL properties of the films are weakly dependent on film structure but the effective carrier mobility decreases with increasing crystallinity. The EL quantum efficiency decreases by more than one order of magnitude, the drive voltage at a fixed current increases, and the electron Schottky barrier height increases as the crystallinity of the film is increased. The diode current-voltage characteristic is determined by the dominant hole current and the electroluminescence efficiency is controlled by the contact limited electron injection. These results demonstrate significant effects of organic film structure on the performance of organic LEDs.

  13. Systematic investigation of the effects of organic film structure on light emitting diode performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joswick, M.D.; Campbell, I.H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Barashkov, N.N.; Ferraris, J.P. [The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    1996-09-01

    We present a systematic investigation of the effects of organic film structure on light emitting diode (LED) performance. Metal/organic film/metal LEDs were fabricated using a five ring, poly(phenylene vinylene) related oligomer as the active layer. The structure of the vacuum evaporated oligomer films was varied from amorphous to polycrystalline by changing the substrate temperature during deposition. The intrinsic properties of the oligomer films and the LED performance were measured. The measured intrinsic film properties include: optical absorption, photoluminescence (PL) spectra, PL lifetime, PL efficiency, and effective carrier mobility. The measured device characteristics include current{endash}voltage, capacitance{endash}voltage, electroluminescence (EL) efficiency, and the contact metal/organic film Schottky barrier heights. The optical absorption and PL properties of the films are weakly dependent on film structure but the effective carrier mobility decreases with increasing crystallinity. The EL quantum efficiency decreases by more than one order of magnitude, the drive voltage at a fixed current increases, and the electron Schottky barrier height increases as the crystallinity of the film is increased. The diode current{endash}voltage characteristic is determined by the dominant hole current and the electroluminescence efficiency is controlled by the contact limited electron injection. These results demonstrate significant effects of organic film structure on the performance of organic LEDs. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Blue fluorescent organic light emitting diodes with multilayered graphene anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Joohyun; Choi, Hong Kyw; Moon, Jaehyun; Shin, Jin-Wook; Joo, Chul Woong; Han, Jun-Han; Cho, Doo-Hee; Huh, Jin Woo; Choi, Sung-Yool; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Chu, Hye Yong

    2012-01-01

    As an innovative anode for organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), we have investigated graphene films. Graphene has importance due to its huge potential in flexible OLED applications. In this work, graphene films have been catalytically grown and transferred to the glass substrate for OLED fabrications. We have successfully fabricated 2 mm × 2 mm device area blue fluorescent OLEDs with graphene anodes which showed 2.1% of external quantum efficiency at 1000 cd/m 2 . This is the highest value reported among fluorescent OLEDs using graphene anodes. Oxygen plasma treatment on graphene has been found to improve hole injections in low voltage regime, which has been interpreted as oxygen plasma induced work function modification. However, plasma treatment also increases the sheet resistance of graphene, limiting the maximum luminance. In summary, our works demonstrate the practical possibility of graphene as an anode material for OLEDs and suggest a processing route which can be applied to various graphene related devices.

  15. InGaN/AlGaInN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with indium gallium tin oxide electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sukwon; Kim, Tae Geun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, In- and Sn-doped GaO (IGTO) is proposed as an alternative transparent conductive electrode for indium tin oxide (ITO) to improve the performance of InGaN/AlGaInN-based near ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (NUV LEDs). IGTO films were prepared by co-sputtering the ITO and Ga_2O_3 targets under various target power ratios. Among those, IGTO films post-annealed at 700 °C under a hydrogen environment gave rise to a transmittance of 94% at 385 nm and a contact resistance of 9.4 × 10"−"3 Ω-cm"2 with a sheet resistance of 124 Ω/ϒ. Compared to ITO-based NUV LEDs, the IGTO-based NUV LED showed a 9% improvement in the light output power, probably due to IGTO's higher transmittance, although the forward voltage was still higher by 0.23 V. - Highlights: • Indium gallium tin oxide (IGTO) for near-ultraviolet light-emitting diode is proposed. • IGTO is fabricated by co-sputtering the ITO and Ga_2O_3 targets and hydrogen annealing. • IGTO shows a 94% transmittance at 385 nm and a 9.4 × 10"−"3 Ω-cm"2 contact resistance. • Near-ultraviolet light-emitting diode with IGTO shows improved optical performance.

  16. InGaN/AlGaInN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with indium gallium tin oxide electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sukwon; Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.kr

    2015-09-30

    In this study, In- and Sn-doped GaO (IGTO) is proposed as an alternative transparent conductive electrode for indium tin oxide (ITO) to improve the performance of InGaN/AlGaInN-based near ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (NUV LEDs). IGTO films were prepared by co-sputtering the ITO and Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} targets under various target power ratios. Among those, IGTO films post-annealed at 700 °C under a hydrogen environment gave rise to a transmittance of 94% at 385 nm and a contact resistance of 9.4 × 10{sup −3} Ω-cm{sup 2} with a sheet resistance of 124 Ω/ϒ. Compared to ITO-based NUV LEDs, the IGTO-based NUV LED showed a 9% improvement in the light output power, probably due to IGTO's higher transmittance, although the forward voltage was still higher by 0.23 V. - Highlights: • Indium gallium tin oxide (IGTO) for near-ultraviolet light-emitting diode is proposed. • IGTO is fabricated by co-sputtering the ITO and Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} targets and hydrogen annealing. • IGTO shows a 94% transmittance at 385 nm and a 9.4 × 10{sup −3} Ω-cm{sup 2} contact resistance. • Near-ultraviolet light-emitting diode with IGTO shows improved optical performance.

  17. Novel recycle technology for recovering rare metals (Ga, In) from waste light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Lu; Xia, Fafa; Ye, Qiuyu; Xiang, Xishu; Xie, Bing, E-mail: bxie@des.ecnu.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Rare metals (Ga, In) are separated and recycled from waste light-emitting diodes. • Pyrolysis, physical disaggregation and vacuum metallurgy separation are proposed. • There is no hazardous materials produced in this process. - Abstract: This work develops a novel process of recycling rare metals (Ga, In) from waste light-emitting diodes using the combination of pyrolysis, physical disaggregation methods and vacuum metallurgy separation. Firstly, the pure chips containing InGaN/GaN are adopted to study the vacuum separation behavior of rare metals, which aims to provide the theoretical foundation for recycling gallium and indium from waste light-emitting diodes. In order to extract the rare-metal-rich particles from waste light-emitting diodes, pyrolysis and physical disaggregation methods (crushing, screening, grinding and secondly screening) are studied respectively, and the operating parameters are optimized. With low boiling points and high saturation vapor pressures under vacuum, gallium and indium are separated from rare-metal-rich particles by the process of evaporation and condensation. By reference to the separating parameters of pure chips, gallium and indium in waste light-emitting diodes are recycled with the recovery efficiencies of 93.48% and 95.67% under the conditions as follows: heating temperature of 1373 K, vacuum pressure of 0.01–0.1 Pa, and holding time of 60 min. There are no secondary hazardous materials generated in the whole processes. This work provides an efficient and environmentally friendly process for recycling rare metals from waste light-emitting diodes.

  18. Monolithic Flexible Vertical GaN Light-Emitting Diodes for a Transparent Wireless Brain Optical Stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Eol; Choi, JeHyuk; Lee, Seung Hyun; Jeong, Minju; Shin, Jung Ho; Joe, Daniel J; Kim, DoHyun; Kim, Chang Wan; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jae Hee; Kim, Daesoo; Shin, Chan-Soo; Lee, Keon Jae

    2018-05-18

    Flexible inorganic-based micro light-emitting diodesLEDs) are emerging as a significant technology for flexible displays, which is an important area for bilateral visual communication in the upcoming Internet of Things era. Conventional flexible lateral µLEDs have been investigated by several researchers, but still have significant issues of power consumption, thermal stability, lifetime, and light-extraction efficiency on plastics. Here, high-performance flexible vertical GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are demonstrated by silver nanowire networks and monolithic fabrication. Transparent, ultrathin GaN LED arrays adhere to a human fingernail and stably glow without any mechanical deformation. Experimental studies provide outstanding characteristics of the flexible vertical μLEDs (f-VLEDs) with high optical power (30 mW mm -2 ), long lifetime (≈12 years), and good thermal/mechanical stability (100 000 bending/unbending cycles). The wireless light-emitting system on the human skin is successfully realized by transferring the electrical power f-VLED. Finally, the high-density GaN f-VLED arrays are inserted onto a living mouse cortex and operated without significant histological damage of brain. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Technology of Wide Color Gamut Backlight with Light-Emitting Diode for Liquid Crystal Display Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinuma, Koichiro

    2006-05-01

    The development of light-emitting diode (LED) backlight a wide-color-gamut and mercury-free has become active in liquid crystal display (LCD) industry. Reports on the development of backlights, such as a direct illumination-type back-light and a guided light illumination-type LED backlight were published. The fabrication of an actual commercial product has been progressing under this active development. Sony Corporation launched an LED-backlit LCD television (TV) model, dubbed QUALIA 005, the world’s first home-use television featuring LED backlighting. This product offers a very wide color reproduction range, delivering a color gamut of 150% of that typically achieved by conventional televisions. In this paper, the background of the development of the LED backlight system “TriluminosTM” and the technologies used to realize the wide color gamut are discussed. The main issues to be solved for the commercialization were how to reduce the brightness/color non uniformity of the backlight and how to treat heat generation from the LED. The standardization of wide color space definition xvYCC and LED backlight LCD television combination is expected to result in a more vivid and correct color expression, and a forecast that extends to the market in the future.

  20. Recycled Thermal Energy from High Power Light Emitting Diode Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jae-Hoon; Jo, GaeHun; Ha, Jae-Geun; Koo, Sang-Mo; Kamiko, Masao; Hong, JunHee; Koh, Jung-Hyuk

    2018-09-01

    In this research, the recycled electrical energy from wasted thermal energy in high power Light Emitting Diode (LED) system will be investigated. The luminous efficiency of lights has been improved in recent years by employing the high power LED system, therefore energy efficiency was improved compared with that of typical lighting sources. To increase energy efficiency of high power LED system further, wasted thermal energy should be re-considered. Therefore, wasted thermal energy was collected and re-used them as electrical energy. The increased electrical efficiency of high power LED devices was accomplished by considering the recycled heat energy, which is wasted thermal energy from the LED. In this work, increased electrical efficiency will be considered and investigated by employing the high power LED system, which has high thermal loss during the operating time. For this research, well designed thermoelement with heat radiation system was employed to enhance the collecting thermal energy from the LED system, and then convert it as recycled electrical energy.

  1. Comparison of silicone and spin-on glass packaging materials for light-emitting diode encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Liann-Be; Pan, Ke-Wei; Yen, Chia-Yi [Department of Electronic Engineering and Green Technology Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Jeng, Ming-Jer, E-mail: mjjeng@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Electronic Engineering and Green Technology Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chun-Te; Hu, Sung-Cheng; Kuo, Yang-Kuao [Chemical Systems Research Division, Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology Armaments Bureau, MND, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03

    Traditional white light light-emitting diode (LED) encapsulation is performed by mixed phosphors and silicone coating on LED die. However, this encapsulation with silicone coating incurs overheated temperatures and yellowing problem. Therefore, this work attempts to replace silicone paste by using spin-on-glass (SOG) materials. Experimental results indicate that although initial brightness of SOG-based packaging is lower than that of silicone packaging, its light attenuation is significantly lower than that of silicone for a long lighting time. After the LED power is turned on for 12 h, the brightness of LED with silicone and SOG material packaging decreases from 84 to 48 lm and 73 to 59 lm, respectively. Therefore, SOG material provides an alternative packaging solution for high power LED lighting applications. - Highlights: • Spin-on-glass (SOG) material was used to replace silicone coating for LED packaging. • Initial brightness of SOG packaging is lower than that of silicone packaging. • Over time, light attenuation in SOG is much lower than that in silicone. • Color rendering index and brightness of LED packaging was optimized by Taguchi method.

  2. Inkjet printing the three organic functional layers of two-colored organic light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coenen, Michiel J.J.; Slaats, Thijs M.W.L.; Eggenhuisen, Tamara M.; Groen, Pim

    2015-01-01

    Inkjet printing allows for the roll-2-roll fabrication of organic electronic devices at an industrial scale. In this paper we demonstrate the fabrication of two-colored organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) in which three adjacent organic device layers were inkjet printed from halogen free inks. The resulting devices demonstrate the possibilities offered by this technique for the fabrication of OLEDs for signage and personalized electronics. - Highlights: • Two-colored organic light emitting diodes with 3 inkjet printed device layers were fabricated. • All materials were printed from halogen free inks. • Inkjet printing of emissive materials is suitable for signage applications

  3. Molecular-scale simulation of electroluminescence in a multilayer white organic light-emitting diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mesta, Murat; Carvelli, Marco; de Vries, Rein J

    2013-01-01

    we show that it is feasible to carry out Monte Carlo simulations including all of these molecular-scale processes for a hybrid multilayer organic light-emitting diode combining red and green phosphorescent layers with a blue fluorescent layer. The simulated current density and emission profile......In multilayer white organic light-emitting diodes the electronic processes in the various layers--injection and motion of charges as well as generation, diffusion and radiative decay of excitons--should be concerted such that efficient, stable and colour-balanced electroluminescence can occur. Here...

  4. Investigations of thin p-GaN light-emitting diodes with surface plasmon compatible metallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadil, Ahmed; Ou, Yiyu; Iida, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We investigate device performance of InGaN light-emitting diodes with a 30-nm p-GaN layer. The metallization used to separate the p-contact from plasmonic metals, reveals limitations on current spreading which reduces surface plasmonic enhancement.......We investigate device performance of InGaN light-emitting diodes with a 30-nm p-GaN layer. The metallization used to separate the p-contact from plasmonic metals, reveals limitations on current spreading which reduces surface plasmonic enhancement....

  5. Investigations of thin p-GaN light-emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadil, Ahmed; Ou, Yiyu; Iida, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We investigate device performance of InGaN light-emitting diodes with a 30-nm p-GaN layer. The metallization used to separate the p-contact from plasmonic metals, reveals limitations on current spreading which reduces surface plasmonic enhancement.......We investigate device performance of InGaN light-emitting diodes with a 30-nm p-GaN layer. The metallization used to separate the p-contact from plasmonic metals, reveals limitations on current spreading which reduces surface plasmonic enhancement....

  6. Printed assemblies of ultrathin, microscale inorganic light emitting diodes for deformable and semitransparent displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John A.; Nuzzo, Ralph; Kim, Hoon-sik; Brueckner, Eric; Park, Sang Il; Kim, Rak Hwan

    2017-05-09

    Described herein are printable structures and methods for making, assembling and arranging electronic devices. A number of the methods described herein are useful for assembling electronic devices where one or more device components are embedded in a polymer which is patterned during the embedding process with trenches for electrical interconnects between device components. Some methods described herein are useful for assembling electronic devices by printing methods, such as by dry transfer contact printing methods. Also described herein are GaN light emitting diodes and methods for making and arranging GaN light emitting diodes, for example for display or lighting systems.

  7. Infrared light-emitting diode radiation causes gravitropic and morphological effects in dark-grown oat seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. F.; Brown, C. S.; Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.; Chapman, D. K.; Deitzer, G. F.

    1996-01-01

    Oat (Avena sativa cv Seger) seedlings were irradiated with IR light-emitting diode (LED) radiation passed through a visible-light-blocking filter. Infrared LED irradiated seedlings exhibited differences in growth and gravitropic response when compared to seedlings grown in darkness at the same temperature. Thus, the oat seedlings in this study were able to detect IR LED radiation. These findings call into question the use of IR LED as a safe-light for some photosensitive plant response experiments. These findings also expand the defined range of wavelengths involved in radiation-gravity (light-gravity) interactions to include wavelengths in the IR region of the spectrum.

  8. Red/near-infrared light-emitting diode therapy for traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Martin, Paula I.; Ho, Michael D.; Krengel, Maxine H.; Bogdanova, Yelena; Knight, Jeffrey A.; Yee, Megan K.; Zafonte, Ross; Frazier, Judith; Hamblin, Michael R.; Koo, Bang-Bon

    2015-05-01

    This invited paper reviews our research with scalp application of red/near-infrared (NIR) light-emitting diodes (LED) to improve cognition in chronic, traumatic brain injury 1. Application of red/NIR light improves mitochondrial function (especially hypoxic/compromised cells) promoting increased ATP, important for cellular metabolism. Nitric oxide is released locally, increasing regional cerebral blood flow. Eleven chronic, mTBI participants with closed-head injury and cognitive dysfunction received 18 outpatient treatments (MWF, 6 Wks) starting at 10 Mo. to 8 Yr. post-mTBI (MVA, sports-related, IED blast injury). LED therapy is non-invasive, painless, non-thermal (FDA-cleared, non-significant risk device). Each LED cluster head (2.1" diameter, 500mW, 22.2mW/cm2) was applied 10 min (13J/cm2) to 11 scalp placements: midline, from front-to-back hairline; and bilaterally on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, temporal, and parietal areas. Testing performed pre- and post-LED (+1 Wk, 1 and 2 Mo post- 18th treatment) showed significant linear trend for LED effect over time, on improved executive function and verbal memory. Fewer PTSD symptoms were reported. New studies at VA Boston include TBI patients treated with transcranial LED (26J/cm2); or treated with only intranasal red, 633nm and NIR, 810nm diodes placed into the nostrils (25 min, 6.5mW, 11.4J/cm2). Intranasal LEDs are hypothesized to deliver photons to hippocampus. Results are similar to Naeser et al. (2014). Actigraphy sleep data show increased sleep time (average, +1 Hr/night) post-18th transcranial or intranasal LED treatment. LED treatments may be self-administered at home (Naeser et al., 2011). A shamcontrolled study with Gulf War Illness Veterans is underway.

  9. Relationships between junction temperature, electroluminescence spectrum and ageing of light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaskuri, Anna; Kärhä, Petri; Baumgartner, Hans; Kantamaa, Olli; Pulli, Tomi; Poikonen, Tuomas; Ikonen, Erkki

    2018-04-01

    We have developed spectral models describing the electroluminescence spectra of AlGaInP and InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) consisting of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution and the effective joint density of states. One spectrum at a known temperature for one LED specimen is needed for calibrating the model parameters of each LED type. Then, the model can be used for determining the junction temperature optically from the spectral measurement, because the junction temperature is one of the free parameters. We validated the models using, in total, 53 spectra of three red AlGaInP LED specimens and 72 spectra of three blue InGaN LED specimens measured at various current levels and temperatures between 303 K and 398 K. For all the spectra of red LEDs, the standard deviation between the modelled and measured junction temperatures was only 2.4 K. InGaN LEDs have a more complex effective joint density of states. For the blue LEDs, the corresponding standard deviation was 11.2 K, but it decreased to 3.5 K when each LED specimen was calibrated separately. The method of determining junction temperature was further tested on white InGaN LEDs with luminophore coating and LED lamps. The average standard deviation was 8 K for white InGaN LED types. We have six years of ageing data available for a set of LED lamps and we estimated the junction temperatures of these lamps with respect to their ageing times. It was found that the LEDs operating at higher junction temperatures were frequently more damaged.

  10. Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Colloidal Silicon Quantum Dots with Octyl and Phenylpropyl Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangkai; Zhao, Shuangyi; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Yuting; Qiao, Xvsheng; Ni, Zhenyi; Pi, Xiaodong; Yang, Deren

    2018-02-14

    Colloidal silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) hold ever-growing promise for the development of novel optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Although it has been proposed that ligands at the surface of colloidal Si QDs may significantly impact the performance of LEDs based on colloidal Si QDs, little systematic work has been carried out to compare the performance of LEDs that are fabricated using colloidal Si QDs with different ligands. Here, colloidal Si QDs with rather short octyl ligands (Octyl-Si QDs) and phenylpropyl ligands (PhPr-Si QDs) are employed for the fabrication of LEDs. It is found that the optical power density of PhPr-Si QD LEDs is larger than that of Octyl-Si QD LEDs. This is due to the fact that the surface of PhPr-Si QDs is more oxidized and less defective than that of Octyl-Si QDs. Moreover, the benzene rings of phenylpropyl ligands significantly enhance the electron transport of QD LEDs. It is interesting that the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of PhPr-Si QD LEDs is lower than that of Octyl-Si QD LEDs because the benzene rings of phenylpropyl ligands suppress the hole transport of QD LEDs. The unbalance between the electron and hole injection in PhPr-Si QD LEDs is more serious than that in Octyl-Si QD LEDs. The currently obtained highest optical power density of ∼0.64 mW/cm 2 from PhPr-Si QD LEDs and highest EQE of ∼6.2% from Octyl-Si QD LEDs should encourage efforts to further advance the development of high-performance optoelectronic devices based on colloidal Si QDs.

  11. Blue Light Emitting Diodes for Optical Stimulation of Quartz in Retrospective Dosimetry and Dating (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botter-Jensen, L.; Duller, G.A.T.; Murray, A.S.; Banerjee, D.

    1999-01-01

    Recently developed blue light emitting diodes (LEDs) for the optical stimulation of quartz for use in routine optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating and retrospective dosimetry have been tested. For similar power densities, it was found that the higher energy light provided by the blue LEDs (470 nm) gives order of magnitude greater rate of stimulation in quartz than that from conventional blue-green light filtered from a halogen lamp. A practical blue LED OSL configuration is described. From comparisons of OSL decay curves produced by green and blue light sources, and by examination of the dependence of the blue LED OSL on preheat temperature, it is deduced that there is no evidence that the blue LEDs stimulate deep traps in a different manner from broadband filtered light. It is concluded that blue LEDs offer a practical alternative to existing stimulation sources. They have the significant advantages that the life-time is indefinite, and the output can be controlled electronically; this allows the power to be readily controlled by software. Unlike a filtered light source, there are no electromechanical parts, and the switch on/off times are about 10 times faster than a shutter. Finally, preliminary results from ramping the blue light power output with time are demonstrated. It is shown that this technique enables the separation of OSL components with differing stimulation rates. (author)

  12. Colour tuning in white hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckbauer, Jochen; Brasser, Catherine; Edwards, Paul R; Martin, Robert W; Findlay, Neil J; Skabara, Peter J; Wallis, David J

    2016-01-01

    White hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were fabricated by combining a novel organic colour converter with a blue inorganic LED. An organic small molecule was specifically synthesised to act as down-converter. The characteristics of the white colour were controlled by changing the concentration of the organic molecule based on the BODIPY unit, which was embedded in a transparent matrix, and volume of the molecule and encapsulant mixture. The concentration has a critical effect on the conversion efficiency, i.e. how much of the absorbed blue light is converted into yellow light. With increasing concentration the conversion efficiency decreases. This quenching effect is due to aggregation of the organic molecule at higher concentrations. Increasing the deposited amount of the converter does not increase the yellow emission despite more blue light being absorbed. Degradation of the organic converter was also observed during a period of 15 months from LED fabrication. Angular-dependent measurements revealed slight deviation from a Lambertian profile for the blue and yellow emission peaks leading to a small change in ‘whiteness’ with emission angle. Warm white and cool white light with correlated colour temperatures of 2770 K and 7680 K, respectively, were achieved using different concentrations of the converter molecule. Although further work is needed to improve the lifetime and poor colour rendering, these hybrid LEDs show promising results as an alternative approach for generating white LEDs compared with phosphor-based white LEDs. (paper)

  13. The application of the light emitting diode in MR room lighting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jun; Wang Chunhong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the application of white light emitting diode (LED) in magnetic resonance room, in order to resolve the damageable problem of incandescent lights under the high magnetic field. Methods: The white LEDs and the incandescent lights were installed in MR room, the number of damaged lights was compared after 300 hours. Chi-square test was used for the statistical analysis. And the illuminance and 50 000 hours electricity consumption between LED and incandescent lights were calculated. Results: The number of damaged LED and incandescent lights was 2 and 32, respectively and there was a significant difference (χ 2 =48.813, P=0.000). The illuminance of the LED and incandescent lights was 155 lx and 100 lx at the 0.75 m horizontal level and the 50 000 hour's electricity consumption was 200 kW and 5000 kW, respectively. Conclusion: It is feasible and a great advantage to use the white LEDs in MR room lighting. (authors)

  14. Carrier-injection studies in GaN-based light-emitting-diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dinh Chuong; Vaufrey, David; Leroux, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    Although p-type GaN has been achieved by Mg doping, the low hole-mobility still remains a difficulty for GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Due to the lack of field-dependent-velocity model for holes, in GaN-based LED simulations, the hole mobility is usually supposed to remain constant. However, as the p-GaN-layer conductivity is lower than the n-GaN-layer conductivity, a strong electric-field exists in the p-side of an LED when the applied voltage exceeds the LED's built-in voltage. Under the influence of this field, the mobilities of electrons and holes are expected to decrease. Based on a field-dependent-velocity model that is usually used for narrow-bandgap materials, an LED structure is modelled with three arbitrarily chosen hole saturation-velocities. The results show that a hole saturation-velocity lower than 4x106 cm/s can negatively affect the LED's behaviors.

  15. Temperature and current dependent electroluminescence measurements on colour-coded multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergbauer, Werner [OSRAM Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Regensburg (Germany); FH Deggendorf (Germany); Laubsch, Ansgar; Peter, Matthias; Mayer, Tobias; Bader, Stefan; Oberschmid, Raimund; Hahn, Berthold [OSRAM Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Regensburg (Germany); Benstetter, Guenther [FH Deggendorf (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    As the efficiency and the luminous flux have been increased enormously in the last few years, today Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are even pushed to applications like general lighting and Home Cinema Projection. Still, InGaN/GaN heterostructure based LEDs suffer from loss-mechanisms like non-radiative defect and Auger recombination, carrier leakage and piezo-field induced carrier separation. To optimize the high current efficiency we evaluated the benefit of Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) compared to Single Quantum Well (SQW) LEDs. Temperature dependent electroluminescence of colour-coded structures with different Indium content in certain Quantum Wells was measured. The experiments demonstrated a strong temperature and current dependence of the MQW operation. The comparison between different LED structures showed effectively the increased LED performance of those structures which operate with a well adjusted MQW active area. Due to the enhanced carrier distribution in the high current range, these LEDs show a higher light output and additionally a reduced wavelength shift.

  16. Temperature and current dependent electroluminescence measurements on colour-coded multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergbauer, Werner; Laubsch, Ansgar; Peter, Matthias; Mayer, Tobias; Bader, Stefan; Oberschmid, Raimund; Hahn, Berthold; Benstetter, Guenther

    2008-01-01

    As the efficiency and the luminous flux have been increased enormously in the last few years, today Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are even pushed to applications like general lighting and Home Cinema Projection. Still, InGaN/GaN heterostructure based LEDs suffer from loss-mechanisms like non-radiative defect and Auger recombination, carrier leakage and piezo-field induced carrier separation. To optimize the high current efficiency we evaluated the benefit of Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) compared to Single Quantum Well (SQW) LEDs. Temperature dependent electroluminescence of colour-coded structures with different Indium content in certain Quantum Wells was measured. The experiments demonstrated a strong temperature and current dependence of the MQW operation. The comparison between different LED structures showed effectively the increased LED performance of those structures which operate with a well adjusted MQW active area. Due to the enhanced carrier distribution in the high current range, these LEDs show a higher light output and additionally a reduced wavelength shift

  17. Structural design and optimization of near-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with wide wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Yen-Kuang, E-mail: ykuo@cc.ncue.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Chen, Fang-Ming [Institute of Photonics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Chang, Jih-Yuan [Center for Teacher Education, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Shih, Ya-Hsuan [Department of Photonics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-07

    The characteristics of the near-ultraviolet (NUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with wide (14-nm-thick) and narrow (2-nm-thick) wells under the situations of different numbers of wells and degree of polarization are systematically investigated. The simulation results show that the Auger recombination can be efficiently suppressed with the increase of number of wells in NUV LEDs. For the LEDs with wide wells, the quantum-confined Stark effect and Shockley–Read–Hall recombination play an important role when the number of wells increases, especially when the LED is under low current injection or high degree of polarization. In order to take the advantage of using wide wells, it is proposed that the quaternary Al{sub 0.1}In{sub 0.05}Ga{sub 0.85}N barriers be used in wide-well NUV LEDs along with the use of Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}N/Al{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N superlattice electron-blocking layer to mitigate the polarization effect and electron overflow. With this band-engineering structural design, the optical performance of the wide-well NUV LEDs is much better than its thin-well counterpart even under the situation of high degree of polarization.

  18. Highly Efficient Light-Emitting Diodes of Colloidal Metal-Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals beyond Quantum Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Wolf, Christoph; Kim, Young-Tae; Cho, Himchan; Kwon, Woosung; Do, Sungan; Sadhanala, Aditya; Park, Chan Gyung; Rhee, Shi-Woo; Im, Sang Hyuk; Friend, Richard H; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2017-07-25

    Colloidal metal-halide perovskite quantum dots (QDs) with a dimension less than the exciton Bohr diameter D B (quantum size regime) emerged as promising light emitters due to their spectrally narrow light, facile color tuning, and high photoluminescence quantum efficiency (PLQE). However, their size-sensitive emission wavelength and color purity and low electroluminescence efficiency are still challenging aspects. Here, we demonstrate highly efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on the colloidal perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) in a dimension > D B (regime beyond quantum size) by using a multifunctional buffer hole injection layer (Buf-HIL). The perovskite NCs with a dimension greater than D B show a size-irrespective high color purity and PLQE by managing the recombination of excitons occurring at surface traps and inside the NCs. The Buf-HIL composed of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and perfluorinated ionomer induces uniform perovskite particle films with complete film coverage and prevents exciton quenching at the PEDOT:PSS/perovskite particle film interface. With these strategies, we achieved a very high PLQE (∼60.5%) in compact perovskite particle films without any complex post-treatments and multilayers and a high current efficiency of 15.5 cd/A in the LEDs of colloidal perovskite NCs, even in a simplified structure, which is the highest efficiency to date in green LEDs that use colloidal organic-inorganic metal-halide perovskite nanoparticles including perovskite QDs and NCs. These results can help to guide development of various light-emitting optoelectronic applications based on perovskite NCs.

  19. Effectiveness of composite resin polymerization using light-emitting diodes (LEDs or halogen-based light-curing units Efetividade de polimerização de uma resina composta fotopolimerizada por diodos emissores de luz (LEDs ou luz halógena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Micali

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical performance of composite resins is greatly influenced by the quality of the light-curing unit used. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of a commercial light-emitting diode (LED with that of a halogen-based light-curing unit by means of dye penetration of a micro hybrid composite resin. The composite resin evaluated was Filtek Z250 (3M Dental. The composite was filled into acrylic moulds that were randomly polymerized for 40 seconds by each of the light-emitting systems: light-emitting diode Ultraled (Dabi Atlante or halogen light Degulux (Degussa Hüls curing units. Immediately after polymerization, each specimen was individually immersed in 1 ml of 2% methylene blue solution at 37°C ± 2°C. After 24 hours, the specimens were rinsed under running distilled water for 1 minute and stored at 37°C ± 2°C at relative humidity for 24 hours. The composite resins were removed from the moulds and individually triturated before being immersed in new test tubes containing 1 ml of absolute alcohol for 24 hours. The solutions were filtered and centrifuged for 3 minutes at 4,000 rpm and the supernatant was used to determine absorbance in a spectrophotometer at 590 nm. To verify the differences between groups polymerized by LED or halogen light t-test was applied. No significant differences were found between composite resins light-cured by LED or halogen light-curing unit (p > 0.05. The commercially LED-based light-curing unit is as effective to polymerize hybrid composite resins as the halogen-based unit.A longevidade clínica das resinas compostas é grandemente influenciada pela qualidade do aparelho fotopolimerizador utilizado. O objetivo deste trabalho foi comparar a eficácia de um aparelho fotopolimerizador de diodos emissores de luz e a de um de luz halógena através do grau de penetração de um corante em uma resina composta micro-híbrida. A resina composta utilizada (Filtek Z250/3M Dental foi inserida em matrizes

  20. Temperature rise induced by some light emitting diode and quartz-tungsten-halogen curing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmussen, Erik; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2005-02-01

    Because of the risk of thermal damage to the pulp, the temperature rise induced by light-curing units should not be too high. LED (light emitting diode) curing units have the main part of their irradiation in the blue range and have been reported to generate less heat than QTH (quartz-tungsten-halogen) curing units. This study had two aims: first, to measure the temperature rise induced by ten LED and three QTH curing units; and, second, to relate the measured temperature rise to the power density of the curing units. The light-induced temperature rise was measured by means of a thermocouple embedded in a small cylinder of resin composite. The power density was measured by using a dental radiometer. For LED units, the temperature rise increased with increasing power density, in a statistically significant manner. Two of the three QTH curing units investigated resulted in a higher temperature rise than LED curing units of the same power density. Previous findings, that LED curing units induce less temperature rise than QTH units, does not hold true in general.

  1. Spectral matching research for light-emitting diode-based neonatal jaundice therapeutic device light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ruting; Guo, Zhenning; Lin, Jieben

    2015-09-01

    To decrease the risk of bilirubin encephalopathy and minimize the need for exchange transfusions, we report a novel design for light source of light-emitting diode (LED)-based neonatal jaundice therapeutic device (NJTD). The bilirubin absorption spectrum in vivo was regarded as target. Based on spectral constructing theory, we used commercially available LEDs with different peak wavelengths and full width at half maximum as matching light sources. Simple genetic algorithm was first proposed as the spectral matching method. The required LEDs number at each peak wavelength was calculated, and then, the commercial light source sample model of the device was fabricated to confirm the spectral matching technology. In addition, the corresponding spectrum was measured and the effect was analyzed finally. The results showed that fitted spectrum was very similar to the target spectrum with 98.86 % matching degree, and the actual device model has a spectrum close to the target with 96.02 % matching degree. With higher fitting degree and efficiency, this matching algorithm is very suitable for light source matching technology of LED-based spectral distribution, and bilirubin absorption spectrum in vivo will be auspicious candidate for the target spectrum of new LED-based NJTD light source.

  2. Transparent conductive oxide films embedded with plasmonic nanostructure for light-emitting diode applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shih-Hao; Tsung, Cheng-Sheng; Chen, Ching-Ho; Ou, Sin-Liang; Horng, Ray-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Yi; Wuu, Dong-Sing

    2015-02-04

    In this study, a spin coating process in which the grating structure comprises an Ag nanoparticle layer coated on a p-GaN top layer of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode (LED) was developed. Various sizes of plasmonic nanoparticles embedded in a transparent conductive layer were clearly observed after the deposition of indium tin oxide (ITO). The plasmonic nanostructure enhanced the light extraction efficiency of blue LED. Output power was 1.8 times the magnitude of that of conventional LEDs operating at 350 mA, but retained nearly the same current-voltage characteristic. Unlike in previous research on surface-plasmon-enhanced LEDs, the metallic nanoparticles were consistently deposited over the surface area. However, according to microstructural observation, ITO layer mixed with Ag-based nanoparticles was distributed at a distance of approximately 150 nm from the interface of ITO/p-GaN. Device performance can be improved substantially by using the three-dimensional distribution of Ag-based nanoparticles in the transparent conductive layer, which scatters the propagating light randomly and is coupled between the localized surface plasmon and incident light internally trapped in the LED structure through total internal reflection.

  3. Improved photoluminescence efficiency in UV nanopillar light emitting diode structures by recovery of dry etching damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Dae-Woo; Jang, Lee-Woon; Jeon, Ju-Won; Park, Jae-Woo; Song, Young Ho; Jeon, Seong-Ran; Ju, Jin-Woo; Baek, Jong Hyeob; Lee, In-Hwan

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we have fabricated 375-nm-wavelength InGaN/AlInGaN nanopillar light emitting diodes (LED) structures on c-plane sapphire. A uniform and highly vertical nanopillar structure was fabricated using self-organized Ni/SiO2 nano-size mask by dry etching method. To minimize the dry etching damage, the samples were subjected to high temperature annealing with subsequent chemical passivation in KOH solution. Prior to annealing and passivation the UV nanopillar LEDs showed the photoluminescence (PL) efficiency about 2.5 times higher than conventional UV LED structures which is attributed to better light extraction efficiency and possibly some improvement of internal quantum efficiency due to partially relieved strain. Annealing alone further increased the PL efficiency by about 4.5 times compared to the conventional UV LEDs, while KOH passivation led to the overall PL efficiency improvement by more than 7 times. Combined results of Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggest that annealing decreases the number of lattice defects and relieves the strain in the surface region of the nanopillars whereas KOH treatment removes the surface oxide from nanopillar surface.

  4. Modeling of light-emitting diode wavefronts for the optimization of transmission holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthaus, Daniela; Giehl, Markus; Sandfuchs, Oliver; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2017-06-20

    The objective of applying transmission holograms in automotive headlamp systems requires the adaptation of holograms to divergent and polychromatic light sources like light-emitting diodes (LEDs). In this paper, four different options to describe the scalar light waves emitted by a typical automotive LED are regarded. This includes a new approach to determine the LED's wavefront from interferometric measurements. Computer-generated holograms are designed considering the different LED approximations and recorded into a photopolymer. The holograms are reconstructed with the LED and the resulting images are analyzed to evaluate the quality of the wave descriptions. In this paper, we show that our presented new approach leads to better results in comparison to other wave descriptions. The enhancement is evaluated by the correlation between reconstructed and ideal images. In contrast to the next best approximation, a spherical wave, the correlation coefficient increased by 0.18% at 532 nm, 1.69% at 590 nm, and 0.75% at 620 nm.

  5. A charge inverter for III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui, E-mail: zh.zhang@hebut.edu.cn, E-mail: wbi@hebut.edu.cn, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org, E-mail: sunxw@sustc.edu.cn; Zhang, Yonghui; Bi, Wengang, E-mail: zh.zhang@hebut.edu.cn, E-mail: wbi@hebut.edu.cn, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org, E-mail: sunxw@sustc.edu.cn; Geng, Chong; Xu, Shu [Key Laboratory of Electronic Materials and Devices of Tianjin, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, 5340 Xiping Road, Beichen District, Tianjin 300401 (China); Demir, Hilmi Volkan, E-mail: zh.zhang@hebut.edu.cn, E-mail: wbi@hebut.edu.cn, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org, E-mail: sunxw@sustc.edu.cn [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, Department of Physics, and UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, TR-06800 Ankara (Turkey); Sun, Xiao Wei, E-mail: zh.zhang@hebut.edu.cn, E-mail: wbi@hebut.edu.cn, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org, E-mail: sunxw@sustc.edu.cn [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, College of Engineering, South University of Science and Technology, 1088 Xue-Yuan Road, Nanshan, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China)

    2016-03-28

    In this work, we propose a charge inverter that substantially increases the hole injection efficiency for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The charge inverter consists of a metal/electrode, an insulator, and a semiconductor, making an Electrode-Insulator-Semiconductor (EIS) structure, which is formed by depositing an extremely thin SiO{sub 2} insulator layer on the p{sup +}-GaN surface of a LED structure before growing the p-electrode. When the LED is forward-biased, a weak inversion layer can be obtained at the interface between the p{sup +}-GaN and SiO{sub 2} insulator. The weak inversion region can shorten the carrier tunnel distance. Meanwhile, the smaller dielectric constant of the thin SiO{sub 2} layer increases the local electric field within the tunnel region, and this is effective in promoting the hole transport from the p-electrode into the p{sup +}-GaN layer. Due to the improved hole injection, the external quantum efficiency is increased by 20% at 20 mA for the 350 × 350 μm{sup 2} LED chip. Thus, the proposed EIS holds great promise for high efficiency LEDs.

  6. Tuning the white light spectrum of light emitting diode lamps to reduce attraction of nocturnal arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longcore, Travis; Aldern, Hannah L; Eggers, John F; Flores, Steve; Franco, Lesly; Hirshfield-Yamanishi, Eric; Petrinec, Laina N; Yan, Wilson A; Barroso, André M

    2015-05-05

    Artificial lighting allows humans to be active at night, but has many unintended consequences, including interference with ecological processes, disruption of circadian rhythms and increased exposure to insect vectors of diseases. Although ultraviolet and blue light are usually most attractive to arthropods, degree of attraction varies among orders. With a focus on future indoor lighting applications, we manipulated the spectrum of white lamps to investigate the influence of spectral composition on number of arthropods attracted. We compared numbers of arthropods captured at three customizable light-emitting diode (LED) lamps (3510, 2704 and 2728 K), two commercial LED lamps (2700 K), two commercial compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs; 2700 K) and a control. We configured the three custom LEDs to minimize invertebrate attraction based on published attraction curves for honeybees and moths. Lamps were placed with pan traps at an urban and two rural study sites in Los Angeles, California. For all invertebrate orders combined, our custom LED configurations were less attractive than the commercial LED lamps or CFLs of similar colour temperatures. Thus, adjusting spectral composition of white light to minimize attracting nocturnal arthropods is feasible; not all lights with the same colour temperature are equally attractive to arthropods. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. EDGE EFFECT MODELING AND STUDY FOR THREE-CHIP RGB LIGHT-EMITTING DIODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Podosinnikov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study. The paper deals with light quality improvement of multi–chip RGB light-emitting diodes (LEDs and luminaries on their basis. In particular, we have studied the issues of the edge effect reducing, which is non–uniformity of color when observing the source of light under different angles as well as non-uniformity of color distribution on the illuminated surface. Methods. Experimental study of the edge effect has been performed, namely, the analysis of the halo at the periphery of the illuminated area and the non–uniformity of area at the surface of the screen illuminated with RGB LEDs with and without light concentrators. Modeling of illumination distribution at various distances from the source for the system containing four RGB LEDs with reflectors by ZEMAX software has been carried out. Assessment of the uniformity for light distribution via calculating the chromaticity coordinates has been performed. Main results. The possibility of modeling application at the stage of a luminary design is shown on the example of RGB LEDs for assessing the efficiency of light flux usage and colorimetric parameters. Suggested method simplifies significantly the design of luminaries and reduces associated costs. Practical relevance. The findings can be used in the design of luminaries based on RGB LEDs, including the ones with secondary optics elements.

  8. A charge inverter for III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Zhang, Yonghui; Bi, Wengang; Geng, Chong; Xu, Shu; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Xiao Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we propose a charge inverter that substantially increases the hole injection efficiency for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The charge inverter consists of a metal/electrode, an insulator, and a semiconductor, making an Electrode-Insulator-Semiconductor (EIS) structure, which is formed by depositing an extremely thin SiO 2 insulator layer on the p + -GaN surface of a LED structure before growing the p-electrode. When the LED is forward-biased, a weak inversion layer can be obtained at the interface between the p + -GaN and SiO 2 insulator. The weak inversion region can shorten the carrier tunnel distance. Meanwhile, the smaller dielectric constant of the thin SiO 2 layer increases the local electric field within the tunnel region, and this is effective in promoting the hole transport from the p-electrode into the p + -GaN layer. Due to the improved hole injection, the external quantum efficiency is increased by 20% at 20 mA for the 350 × 350 μm 2 LED chip. Thus, the proposed EIS holds great promise for high efficiency LEDs.

  9. Hybrid tunnel junction contacts to III–nitride light-emitting diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Young, Erin C.

    2016-01-26

    In this work, we demonstrate highly doped GaN p–n tunnel junction (TJ) contacts on III–nitride heterostructures where the active region of the device and the top p-GaN layers were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and highly doped n-GaN was grown by NH3 molecular beam epitaxy to form the TJ. The regrowth interface in these hybrid devices was found to have a high concentration of oxygen, which likely enhanced tunneling through the diode. For optimized regrowth, the best tunnel junction device had a total differential resistivity of 1.5 × 10−4 Ω cm2, including contact resistance. As a demonstration, a blue-light-emitting diode on a ($20\\\\bar{2}\\\\bar{1}$) GaN substrate with a hybrid tunnel junction and an n-GaN current spreading layer was fabricated and compared with a reference sample with a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer. The tunnel junction LED showed a lower forward operating voltage and a higher efficiency at a low current density than the TCO LED.

  10. Color tunable hybrid light-emitting diodes based on perovskite quantum dot/conjugated polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germino, José C.; Yassitepe, Emre; Freitas, Jilian N.; Santiago, Glauco M.; Bonato, Luiz Gustavo; de Morais, Andréia; Atvars, Teresa D. Z.; Nogueira, Ana F.

    2017-08-01

    Inorganic organic metal halide perovskite materials have been investigated for several technological applications, such as photovoltaic cells, lasers, photodetectors and light emitting diodes (LEDs), either in the bulk form or as colloidal nanoparticles. Recently, all inorganic Cesium Lead Halide (CsPbX3, X=Cl,Br, I) perovskite quantum dots (PQDs) were reported with high photoluminescence quantum yield with narrow emission lines in the visible wavelengths. Here, green-emitting perovskite quantum dots (PQDs) prepared by a synthetic method based on a mixture of oleylamine and oleic acid as surfactants were applied in the electroluminescent layer of hybrid LEDs in combination with two different conjugated polymers: polyvinylcarbazole (PVK) or poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO). The performance of the diodes and the emission color tuning upon dispersion of different concentrations of the PQDs in the polymer matrix is discussed. The presented approach aims at the combination of the optical properties of the PQDs and their interaction with wide bandgap conjugated polymers, associated with the solution processing ability of these materials.

  11. Hybrid tunnel junction contacts to III–nitride light-emitting diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Young, Erin C.; Yonkee, Benjamin P.; Wu, Feng; Oh, Sang Ho; DenBaars, Steven P.; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, James S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate highly doped GaN p–n tunnel junction (TJ) contacts on III–nitride heterostructures where the active region of the device and the top p-GaN layers were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and highly doped n-GaN was grown by NH3 molecular beam epitaxy to form the TJ. The regrowth interface in these hybrid devices was found to have a high concentration of oxygen, which likely enhanced tunneling through the diode. For optimized regrowth, the best tunnel junction device had a total differential resistivity of 1.5 × 10−4 Ω cm2, including contact resistance. As a demonstration, a blue-light-emitting diode on a ($20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}$) GaN substrate with a hybrid tunnel junction and an n-GaN current spreading layer was fabricated and compared with a reference sample with a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer. The tunnel junction LED showed a lower forward operating voltage and a higher efficiency at a low current density than the TCO LED.

  12. Ideality factor of GaN-based light-emitting diodes determined by the measurement of photovoltaic characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Joong; Ryu, Geun-Hwan; Yang, Won-Bo; Ryu, Han-Youl [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    We present a method for determining the ideality factor of GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by using the measured photovoltaic characteristics. The relation between the short-circuit current and the open-circuit voltage is obtained as the incident power of a laser diode emitting at 405 nm is varied, which is used to determine the ideality factor of the LED. From the photovoltaic measurements, the ideality factors of a blue and a green LED are determined to be 1.16 and 1.78, respectively. The ideality factors obtained by using the photovoltaic measurement are found to be much smaller than those obtained by using the I - V curve without illumination, which is believed to result from the different carrier generation and transport mechanisms. Investigating the photovoltaic characteristics of GaN-based LEDs is expected to provide insight into the origin of the high diode ideality factor in GaN-based devices.

  13. Ideality factor of GaN-based light-emitting diodes determined by the measurement of photovoltaic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Joong; Ryu, Geun-Hwan; Yang, Won-Bo; Ryu, Han-Youl

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for determining the ideality factor of GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by using the measured photovoltaic characteristics. The relation between the short-circuit current and the open-circuit voltage is obtained as the incident power of a laser diode emitting at 405 nm is varied, which is used to determine the ideality factor of the LED. From the photovoltaic measurements, the ideality factors of a blue and a green LED are determined to be 1.16 and 1.78, respectively. The ideality factors obtained by using the photovoltaic measurement are found to be much smaller than those obtained by using the I - V curve without illumination, which is believed to result from the different carrier generation and transport mechanisms. Investigating the photovoltaic characteristics of GaN-based LEDs is expected to provide insight into the origin of the high diode ideality factor in GaN-based devices.

  14. Self-assembly surface modified indium-tin oxide anodes for single-layer light-emitting diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Morgado, J; Charas, A; Matos, M; Alcacer, L; Cacialli, F

    2003-01-01

    We study the effect of indium-tin oxide surface modification by self assembling of highly polar molecules on the performance of single-layer light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated with polyfluorene blends and aluminium cathodes. We find that the efficiency and light-output of such LEDs is comparable to, and sometimes better than, the values obtained for LEDs incorporating a hole injection layer of poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulphonic acid. This effect is attributed to the dipole-induced work function modification of indium-tin oxide.

  15. Self-assembly surface modified indium-tin oxide anodes for single-layer light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, Jorge; Barbagallo, Nunzio; Charas, Ana; Matos, Manuel; Alcacer, Luis; Cacialli, Franco

    2003-01-01

    We study the effect of indium-tin oxide surface modification by self assembling of highly polar molecules on the performance of single-layer light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated with polyfluorene blends and aluminium cathodes. We find that the efficiency and light-output of such LEDs is comparable to, and sometimes better than, the values obtained for LEDs incorporating a hole injection layer of poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulphonic acid. This effect is attributed to the dipole-induced work function modification of indium-tin oxide

  16. Adoption of Light-Emitting Diodes in Common Lighting Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Mary [Navigant Consulting, Suwanee, GA (United States); Chwastyk, Dan [Navigant Consulting, Suwanee, GA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Report estimating LED energy savings in nine applications where LEDs compete with traditional lighting sources such as incandescent, halogen, high-pressure sodium, and certain types of fluorescent. The analysis includes indoor lamp, indoor luminaire, and outdoor luminaire applications.

  17. Adoption of Light-Emitting Diodes in Common Lighting Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Mary [Navigant, Chicago, IL (United States); Stober, Kelsey [Navigant, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Report estimating LED energy savings between 2012 and 2014 in 10 applications where LEDs competed with traditional lighting sources such as incandescent, halogen, high-pressure sodium, and fluorescent. The analysis includes indoor lamp, indoor luminaire, and outdoor luminaire applications.

  18. Passivation of organic light emitting diode anode grid lines by pulsed Joule heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janka, M.; Gierth, R.; Rubingh, J.E.; Abendroth, M.; Eggert, M.; Moet, D.J.D.; Lupo, D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the self-aligned passivation of a current distribution grid for an organic light emitting diode (OLED) anode using a pulsed Joule heating method to align the passivation layer accurately on the metal grid. This method involves passing an electric current through the grid to cure a polymer

  19. Nanostructured current-confined single quantum dot light-emitting diode at 1300 nm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monat, C.; Alloing, B.; Zinoni, C.; Li, L.; Fiore, A.

    2006-01-01

    A novel light-emitting-diode structure is demonstrated, which relies on nanoscale current injection through an oxide aperture to achieve selective excitation of single InAs/GaAs quantum dots. Low-temp. electroluminescence spectra evidence discrete narrow lines around 1300 nm (line width ~ 75 micro

  20. Peculiarities of electrooptical characteristics of gallium phosphide light-emitting diodes in high injection level conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Hontaruk

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electroluminescence of green N-doped gallium phosphide light-emitting diodes was studied. The negative differential resistance region in the current-voltage characteristics was found at low temperature (Т ≤ 90 К. Possible reason of this phenomenon is the redistribution of recombinational flows between annihilation channels on isolated nitrogen atoms and annihilation channel on the NN1 pairs.

  1. Bright infrared quantum-dot light-emitting diodes through inter-dot spacing control

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Liangfeng; Choi, Joshua J.; Stachnik, David; Bartnik, Adam C.; Hyun, Byung-Ryool; Malliaras, George G.; Hanrath, Tobias; Wise, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Infrared light-emitting diodes are currently fabricated from direct-gap semiconductors using epitaxy, which makes them expensive and difficult to integrate with other materials. Light-emitting diodes based on colloidal semiconductor quantum dots, on the other hand, can be solution-processed at low cost, and can be directly integrated with silicon. However, so far, exciton dissociation and recombination have not been well controlled in these devices, and this has limited their performance. Here, by tuning the distance between adjacent PbS quantum dots, we fabricate thin-film quantum-dot light-emitting diodes that operate at infrared wavelengths with radiances (6.4 W sr '1 m '2) eight times higher and external quantum efficiencies (2.0%) two times higher than the highest values previously reported. The distance between adjacent dots is tuned over a range of 1.3 nm by varying the lengths of the linker molecules from three to eight CH 2 groups, which allows us to achieve the optimum balance between charge injection and radiative exciton recombination. The electroluminescent powers of the best devices are comparable to those produced by commercial InGaAsP light-emitting diodes. By varying the size of the quantum dots, we can tune the emission wavelengths between 800 and 1,850 nm.© 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  2. All-solution processed polymer light-emitting diodes with air stable metal-oxide electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, P. de; Moet, D.J.D.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    We present an all-solution processed polymer light-emitting diode (PLED) using spincoated zinc oxide (ZnO) and vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) as electron and hole injecting contact, respectively. We compare the performance of these devices to the standard PLED design using PEDOT:PSS as anode and Ba/Al as

  3. The efficiency challenge of nitride light-emitting diodes for lighting

    KAUST Repository

    Weisbuch, Claude; Piccardo, Marco; Martinelli, Lucio; Iveland, Justin; Peretti, Jacques; Speck, James S.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. We discuss the challenges of light-emitting diodes in view of their application to solid-state lighting. The requirement is to at least displace the quite efficient fluorescent, sodium, and high

  4. Determination of the trap-assisted recombination strength in polymer light emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuik, Martijn; Nicolai, Herman T.; Lenes, Martijn; Wetzelaer, Gert-Jan A. H.; Lu, Mingtao; Blom, Paul W. M.

    2011-01-01

    The recombination processes in poly(p-phenylene vinylene) based polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) are investigated. Photogenerated current measurements on PLED device structures reveal that next to the known Langevin recombination also trap-assisted recombination is an important recombination

  5. Determination of the trap-assisted recombination strength in polymer light emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuik, M.; Nicolai, H.T.; Lenes, M.; Wetzelaer, G.-J.A.H.; Lu, M.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The recombination processes in poly(p -phenylene vinylene) based polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) are investigated. Photogenerated current measurements on PLED device structures reveal that next to the known Langevin recombination also trap-assisted recombination is an important recombination

  6. A triphenylamine substituted quinacridone derivative for solution processed organic light emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilz da Cunha, M.; Do, T.T.; Yambem, S.D.; Pham, H.D.; Chang, S.; Manzhos, S.; Katoh, R.; Sonar, P.

    2018-01-01

    We report on a novel quinacridone derivative design, namely, 2,9-bis(4-(bis(4-methoxyphenyl)amino)phenyl)-5,12-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-5,12-dihydroquinolino[2,3-b]acridine-7,14-dione (TPA-QA-TPA) for possible use as a solution processable emissive layer in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). TPA-QA-TPA

  7. Bright infrared quantum-dot light-emitting diodes through inter-dot spacing control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liangfeng; Choi, Joshua J; Stachnik, David; Bartnik, Adam C; Hyun, Byung-Ryool; Malliaras, George G; Hanrath, Tobias; Wise, Frank W

    2012-05-06

    Infrared light-emitting diodes are currently fabricated from direct-gap semiconductors using epitaxy, which makes them expensive and difficult to integrate with other materials. Light-emitting diodes based on colloidal semiconductor quantum dots, on the other hand, can be solution-processed at low cost, and can be directly integrated with silicon. However, so far, exciton dissociation and recombination have not been well controlled in these devices, and this has limited their performance. Here, by tuning the distance between adjacent PbS quantum dots, we fabricate thin-film quantum-dot light-emitting diodes that operate at infrared wavelengths with radiances (6.4 W sr(-1) m(-2)) eight times higher and external quantum efficiencies (2.0%) two times higher than the highest values previously reported. The distance between adjacent dots is tuned over a range of 1.3 nm by varying the lengths of the linker molecules from three to eight CH(2) groups, which allows us to achieve the optimum balance between charge injection and radiative exciton recombination. The electroluminescent powers of the best devices are comparable to those produced by commercial InGaAsP light-emitting diodes. By varying the size of the quantum dots, we can tune the emission wavelengths between 800 and 1,850 nm.

  8. Efficient electron injection from solution-processed cesium stearate interlayers in organic light-emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzelaer, G. A. H.; Najafi, A.; Kist, R. J. P.; Kuik, M.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2013-01-01

    The electron-injection capability of solution-processed cesium stearate films in organic light-emitting diodes is investigated. Cesium stearate, which is expected to exhibit good solubility and film formation due to its long hydrocarbon chain, is synthesized using a straightforward procedure.

  9. Highly efficient exciplex organic light-emitting diodes incorporating a heptazine derivative as an electron acceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Nomura, Hiroko; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-11

    Highly efficient exciplex systems incorporating a heptazine derivative () as an electron acceptor and 1,3-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)benzene () as an electron donor are developed. An organic light-emitting diode containing 8 wt% : as an emitting layer exhibits a maximum external quantum efficiency of 11.3%.

  10. Trap-assisted and Langevin-type recombination in organic light-emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzelaer, G. A. H.; Kuik, M.; Nicolai, H. T.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Trapping of charges is known to play an important role in the charge transport of organic semiconductors, but the role of traps in the recombination process has not been addressed. Here we show that the ideality factor of the current of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in the

  11. High tunability and superluminescence in InAs mid-infrared light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherstnev, V.V.; Krier, A.; Hill, G.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the observation of super luminescence and high spectral current tunability (181 nm) of InAs light emitting diodes operating at 3.0 μm. The source is based on an optical whispering gallery mode which is generated near the edges of the mesa and which is responsible for the superluminescence. (author)

  12. Polymer Light-Emitting Diode Prepared by Floating-Off Film-Transfer Technique

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Jihoon; Kim, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Floating-off film-transfer technique was used for the formation of semiconducting polymer multi-layers and the effect on the performance of polymer light-emitting diode (PLED) was studied. This method

  13. Three-dimensional modeling of charge transport, injection and recombination in organic light-emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holst, van der J.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are ideally suited for lighting and display applications. Commercial OLED displays as well as OLED white-light sources are presently being introduced to the market. Essential electronic processes in OLEDs are the injection of electrons and holes into an organic

  14. Bright infrared quantum-dot light-emitting diodes through inter-dot spacing control

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Liangfeng

    2012-05-06

    Infrared light-emitting diodes are currently fabricated from direct-gap semiconductors using epitaxy, which makes them expensive and difficult to integrate with other materials. Light-emitting diodes based on colloidal semiconductor quantum dots, on the other hand, can be solution-processed at low cost, and can be directly integrated with silicon. However, so far, exciton dissociation and recombination have not been well controlled in these devices, and this has limited their performance. Here, by tuning the distance between adjacent PbS quantum dots, we fabricate thin-film quantum-dot light-emitting diodes that operate at infrared wavelengths with radiances (6.4 W sr \\'1 m \\'2) eight times higher and external quantum efficiencies (2.0%) two times higher than the highest values previously reported. The distance between adjacent dots is tuned over a range of 1.3 nm by varying the lengths of the linker molecules from three to eight CH 2 groups, which allows us to achieve the optimum balance between charge injection and radiative exciton recombination. The electroluminescent powers of the best devices are comparable to those produced by commercial InGaAsP light-emitting diodes. By varying the size of the quantum dots, we can tune the emission wavelengths between 800 and 1,850 nm.© 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  15. Low cost batch fabrication of microdevices using ultraviolet light-emitting diode photolithography technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Neam Heng; Swamy, Varghese; Ramakrishnan, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Solid-state technology has enabled the use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in lithography systems due to their low cost, low power requirement, and higher efficiency relative to the traditional mercury lamp. Uniform irradiance distribution is essential for photolithography to ensure the critical dimension (CD) of the feature fabricated. However, light illuminated from arrays of LEDs can have nonuniform irradiance distribution, which can be a problem when using LED arrays as a source to batch-fabricate multiple devices on a large wafer piece. In this study, the irradiance distribution of an UV LED array was analyzed, and the separation distance between light source and mask optimized to obtain maximum irradiance uniformity without the use of a complex lens. Further, employing a diffuser glass enhanced the fabrication process and the CD loss was minimized to an average of 300 nm. To assess the performance of the proposed technology, batch fabrication of surface acoustic wave devices on lithium niobate substrate was carried out, and all the devices exhibited identical insertion loss of -18 dB at a resonance frequency of 39.33 MHz. The proposed low-cost UV lithography setup can be adapted in academic laboratories for research and teaching on microdevices.

  16. An optically stabilized fast-switching light emitting diode as a light source for functional neuroimaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Wagenaar

    Full Text Available Neuroscience research increasingly relies on optical methods for evoking neuronal activity as well as for measuring it, making bright and stable light sources critical building blocks of modern experimental setups. This paper presents a method to control the brightness of a high-power light emitting diode (LED light source to an unprecedented level of stability. By continuously monitoring the actual light output of the LED with a photodiode and feeding the result back to the LED's driver by way of a proportional-integral controller, drift was reduced to as little as 0.007% per hour over a 12-h period, and short-term fluctuations to 0.005% root-mean-square over 10 seconds. The LED can be switched on and off completely within 100 μs, a feature that is crucial when visual stimuli and light for optical recording need to be interleaved to obtain artifact-free recordings. The utility of the system is demonstrated by recording visual responses in the central nervous system of the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana using voltage-sensitive dyes.

  17. Differential carrier lifetime and transport effects in electrically injected III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, A.; Nami, M.; Monavarian, M.; Aragon, A.; DaVico, K.; Ayoub, F.; Mishkat-Ul-Masabih, S.; Rishinaramangalam, A.; Feezell, D.

    2017-07-01

    This work describes a small-signal microwave method for determining the differential carrier lifetime and transport effects in electrically injected InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). By considering the carrier diffusion, capture, thermionic escape, and recombination, the rate equations are used to derive an equivalent small-signal electrical circuit for the LEDs, from which expressions for the input impedance and modulation response are obtained. The expressions are simultaneously fit to the experimental data for the input impedance and modulation response for nonpolar InGaN/GaN micro-LEDs on free-standing GaN substrates. The fittings are used to extract the transport related circuit parameters and differential carrier lifetimes. The dependence of the parameters on the device diameter and current density is reported. We also derive approximations for the modulation response under low and high injection levels and show that the transport of carriers affects the modulation response of the device, especially at low injection levels. The methods presented are relevant to the design of high-speed LEDs for visible-light communication.

  18. Monolithic Inorganic ZnO/GaN Semiconductors Heterojunction White Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seonghoon; Oh, Seung Kyu; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Kwang-Soon; Song, Keun Man; Kim, Hyunsoo

    2018-01-31

    Monolithic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that can generate white color at the one-chip level without the wavelength conversion through packaged phosphors or chip integration for photon recycling are of particular importance to produce compact, cost-competitive, and smart lighting sources. In this study, monolithic white LEDs were developed based on ZnO/GaN semiconductor heterojunctions. The electroluminescence (EL) wavelength of the ZnO/GaN heterojunction could be tuned by a post-thermal annealing process, causing the generation of an interfacial Ga 2 O 3 layer. Ultraviolet, violet-bluish, and greenish-yellow broad bands were observed from n-ZnO/p-GaN without an interfacial layer, whereas a strong greenish-yellow band emission was the only one observed from that with an interfacial layer. By controlled integration of ZnO/GaN heterojunctions with different postannealing conditions, monolithic white LED was demonstrated with color coordinates in the range (0.3534, 0.3710)-(0.4197, 0.4080) and color temperatures of 4778-3349 K in the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage 1931 chromaticity diagram. Furthermore, the monolithic white LED produced approximately 2.1 times higher optical output power than a conventional ZnO/GaN heterojunction due to the carrier confinement effect at the Ga 2 O 3 /n-ZnO interface.

  19. Electroluminescent refrigeration by ultra-efficient GaAs light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick Xiao, T.; Chen, Kaifeng; Santhanam, Parthiban; Fan, Shanhui; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2018-05-01

    Electroluminescence—the conversion of electrons to photons in a light-emitting diode (LED)—can be used as a mechanism for refrigeration, provided that the LED has an exceptionally high quantum efficiency. We investigate the practical limits of present optoelectronic technology for cooling applications by optimizing a GaAs/GaInP double heterostructure LED. We develop a model of the design based on the physics of detailed balance and the methods of statistical ray optics, and predict an external luminescence efficiency of ηext = 97.7% at 263 K. To enhance the cooling coefficient of performance, we pair the refrigerated LED with a photovoltaic cell, which partially recovers the emitted optical energy as electricity. For applications near room temperature and moderate power densities (1.0-10 mW/cm2), we project that an electroluminescent refrigerator can operate with up to 1.7× the coefficient of performance of thermoelectric coolers with ZT = 1, using the material quality in existing GaAs devices. We also predict superior cooling efficiency for cryogenic applications relative to both thermoelectric and laser cooling. Large improvements to these results are possible with optoelectronic devices that asymptotically approach unity luminescence efficiency.

  20. Collimating lens for light-emitting-diode light source based on non-imaging optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangzhen; Wang, Lili; Li, Fuli; Zhang, Gongjian

    2012-04-10

    A collimating lens for a light-emitting-diode (LED) light source is an essential device widely used in lighting engineering. Lens surfaces are calculated by geometrical optics and nonimaging optics. This design progress does not rely on any software optimization and any complex iterative process. This method can be used for any type of light source not only Lambertian. The theoretical model is based on point source. But the practical LED source has a certain size. So in the simulation, an LED chip whose size is 1 mm*1 mm is used to verify the feasibility of the model. The mean results show that the lenses have a very compact structure and good collimating performance. Efficiency is defined as the ratio of the flux in the illuminated plane to the flux from LED source without considering the lens material transmission. Just investigating the loss in the designed lens surfaces, the two types of lenses have high efficiencies of more than 90% and 99%, respectively. Most lighting area (possessing 80% flux) radii are no more than 5 m when the illuminated plane is 200 m away from the light source.

  1. Highly Efficient Visible Colloidal Lead-Halide Perovskite Nanocrystal Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Xing, Jun; Xing, Guichuan; Quan, Lina; Tan, Swee Tiam; Zhao, Jiaxin; Su, Rui; Zhang, Lulu; Chen, Shi; Zhao, Yawen; Huan, Alfred; Sargent, Edward H.; Xiong, Qihua; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2018-05-01

    Lead-halide perovskites have been attracting attention for potential use in solid-state lighting. Following the footsteps of solar cells, the field of perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs) has been growing rapidly. Their application prospects in lighting, however, remain still uncertain due to a variety of shortcomings in device performance including their limited levels of luminous efficiency achievable thus far. Here we show high-efficiency PeLEDs based on colloidal perovskite nanocrystals (PeNCs) synthesized at room temperature possessing dominant first-order excitonic radiation (enabling a photoluminescence quantum yield of 71% in solid film), unlike in the case of bulk perovskites with slow electron-hole bimolecular radiative recombination (a second-order process). In these PeLEDs, by reaching charge balance in the recombination zone, we find that the Auger nonradiative recombination, with its significant role in emission quenching, is effectively suppressed in low driving current density range. In consequence, these devices reach a record high maximum external quantum efficiency of 12.9% reported to date and an unprecedentedly high power efficiency of 30.3 lm W-1 at luminance levels above 1000 cd m-2 as required for various applications. These findings suggest that, with feasible levels of device performance, the PeNCs hold great promise for their use in LED lighting and displays.

  2. Response of conifer species from three latitudinal populations to light spectra generated by light-emitting diodes and high-pressure sodium lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent G. Apostol; Kas Dumroese; Jeremy Pinto; Anthony S. Davis

    2015-01-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) technology shows promise for supplementing photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in forest nurseries because of the potential reduction in energy consumption and an ability to supply discrete wavelengths to optimize seedling growth. Our objective was to examine the effects of light spectra supplied by LED and traditional high-pressure...

  3. Scalable Light Module for Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Light- Emitting Diode Luminaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarsa, Eric [Cree, Inc., Goleta, CA (United States)

    2015-08-31

    During this two-year program Cree developed a scalable, modular optical architecture for low-cost, high-efficacy light emitting diode (LED) luminaires. Stated simply, the goal of this architecture was to efficiently and cost-effectively convey light from LEDs (point sources) to broad luminaire surfaces (area sources). By simultaneously developing warm-white LED components and low-cost, scalable optical elements, a high system optical efficiency resulted. To meet program goals, Cree evaluated novel approaches to improve LED component efficacy at high color quality while not sacrificing LED optical efficiency relative to conventional packages. Meanwhile, efficiently coupling light from LEDs into modular optical elements, followed by optimally distributing and extracting this light, were challenges that were addressed via novel optical design coupled with frequent experimental evaluations. Minimizing luminaire bill of materials and assembly costs were two guiding principles for all design work, in the effort to achieve luminaires with significantly lower normalized cost ($/klm) than existing LED fixtures. Chief project accomplishments included the achievement of >150 lm/W warm-white LEDs having primary optics compatible with low-cost modular optical elements. In addition, a prototype Light Module optical efficiency of over 90% was measured, demonstrating the potential of this scalable architecture for ultra-high-efficacy LED luminaires. Since the project ended, Cree has continued to evaluate optical element fabrication and assembly methods in an effort to rapidly transfer this scalable, cost-effective technology to Cree production development groups. The Light Module concept is likely to make a strong contribution to the development of new cost-effective, high-efficacy luminaries, thereby accelerating widespread adoption of energy-saving SSL in the U.S.

  4. GaN-based light-emitting diodes on various substrates: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqiang; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Lin, Yunhao; Wang, Haiyan; Lin, Zhiting; Zhou, Shizhong

    2016-05-01

    GaN and related III-nitrides have attracted considerable attention as promising materials for application in optoelectronic devices, in particular, light-emitting diodes (LEDs). At present, sapphire is still the most popular commercial substrate for epitaxial growth of GaN-based LEDs. However, due to its relatively large lattice mismatch with GaN and low thermal conductivity, sapphire is not the most ideal substrate for GaN-based LEDs. Therefore, in order to obtain high-performance and high-power LEDs with relatively low cost, unconventional substrates, which are of low lattice mismatch with GaN, high thermal conductivity and low cost, have been tried as substitutes for sapphire. As a matter of fact, it is not easy to obtain high-quality III-nitride films on those substrates for various reasons. However, by developing a variety of techniques, distincts progress has been made during the past decade, with high-performance LEDs being successfully achieved on these unconventional substrates. This review focuses on state-of-the-art high-performance GaN-based LED materials and devices on unconventional substrates. The issues involved in the growth of GaN-based LED structures on each type of unconventional substrate are outlined, and the fundamental physics behind these issues is detailed. The corresponding solutions for III-nitride growth, defect control, and chip processing for each type of unconventional substrate are discussed in depth, together with a brief introduction to some newly developed techniques in order to realize LED structures on unconventional substrates. This is very useful for understanding the progress in this field of physics. In this review, we also speculate on the prospects for LEDs on unconventional substrates.

  5. Water cooling of high power light emitting diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The development in light technologies for entertainment is moving towards LED based solutions. This progress is not without problems, when more than a single LED is used. The amount of generated heat is often in the same order as in a conventional discharge lamp, but the allowable operating...... temperature is much lower. In order to handle the higher specific power (W/m3) inside the LED based lamps cold plates were designed and manufactured. 6 different designs were analyzed through laboratory experiments and their performances were compared. 5 designs cover; traditional straight mini channel, S...

  6. Deep Ultra-Violet (DUV) Light Emitting Diodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Deepika

    2003-01-01

    Problems to Overcome: The main problem to overcome is to develop a commercially and economically viable method to synthesize and process high crystalline quality diamond films for applications such as DUV LEDs and solar-blind detectors...

  7. Light-Emitting Diodes: Research, Manufacturing, and Applications III

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schubert, E

    1999-01-01

    .... Red LEDs with an emission wavelength of 680 nm which emission energy was smaller than the band-gap energy of InN were fabricated mainly resulting from the piezoelectric field due to the strain...

  8. Efficient photochemical generation of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides with ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, N. D.; Taha, Y. M.; Odame-Ankrah, C. A.; Huo, J. A.; Tokarek, T. W.; Cairns, E.; Moussa, S. G.; Liggio, J.; Osthoff, H. D.

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical sources of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides (PANs) are utilized in many atmospheric measurement techniques for calibration or to deliver an internal standard. Conventionally, such sources rely on phosphor-coated low-pressure mercury (Hg) lamps to generate the UV light necessary to photo-dissociate a dialkyl ketone (usually acetone) in the presence of a calibrated amount of nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen (O2). In this manuscript, a photochemical PAN source in which the Hg lamp has been replaced by arrays of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) is described. The output of the UV-LED source was analyzed by gas chromatography (PAN-GC) and thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TD-CRDS). Using acetone, diethyl ketone (DIEK), diisopropyl ketone (DIPK), or di-n-propyl ketone (DNPK), respectively, the source produces peroxyacetic (PAN), peroxypropionic (PPN), peroxyisobutanoic (PiBN), or peroxy-n-butanoic nitric anhydride (PnBN) from NO in high yield (> 90%). Box model simulations with a subset of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) were carried out to rationalize products yields and to identify side products. The use of UV-LED arrays offers many advantages over conventional Hg lamp setups, including greater light output over a narrower wavelength range, lower power consumption, and minimal generation of heat.

  9. Efficient photochemical generation of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides with ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, N. D.; Taha, Y. M.; Odame-Ankrah, C. A.; Huo, J. A.; Tokarek, T. W.; Cairns, E.; Moussa, S. G.; Liggio, J.; Osthoff, H. D.

    2015-07-01

    Photochemical sources of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides (PANs) are utilized in many atmospheric measurement techniques for calibration or to deliver an internal standard. Conventionally, such sources rely on phosphor-coated low-pressure mercury (Hg) lamps to generate the UV light necessary to photo-dissociate a dialkyl ketone (usually acetone) in the presence of a calibrated amount of nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen (O2). In this manuscript, a photochemical PAN source in which the Hg lamp has been replaced by arrays of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) is described. The output of the UV-LED source was analyzed by gas chromatography (PAN-GC) and thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TD-CRDS). Using acetone, diethyl ketone (DIEK), diisopropyl ketone (DIPK), or di-n-propyl ketone (DNPK), respectively, the source produces peroxyacetic (PAN), peroxypropionic (PPN), peroxyisobutanoic (PiBN), or peroxy-n-butanoic nitric anhydride (PnBN) from NO in high yield (> 90 %). Box model simulations with a subset of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) were carried out to rationalize product yields and to identify side products. The present work demonstrates that UV-LED arrays are a viable alternative to current Hg lamp setups.

  10. Efficient perovskite light-emitting diodes featuring nanometre-sized crystallites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhengguo; Kerner, Ross A.; Zhao, Lianfeng; Tran, Nhu L.; Lee, Kyung Min; Koh, Tae-Wook; Scholes, Gregory D.; Rand, Barry P.

    2017-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials are emerging as highly attractive semiconductors for use in optoelectronics. In addition to their use in photovoltaics, perovskites are promising for realizing light-emitting diodes (LEDs) due to their high colour purity, low non-radiative recombination rates and tunable bandgap. Here, we report highly efficient perovskite LEDs enabled through the formation of self-assembled, nanometre-sized crystallites. Large-group ammonium halides added to the perovskite precursor solution act as a surfactant that dramatically constrains the growth of 3D perovskite grains during film forming, producing crystallites with dimensions as small as 10 nm and film roughness of less than 1 nm. Coating these nanometre-sized perovskite grains with longer-chain organic cations yields highly efficient emitters, resulting in LEDs that operate with external quantum efficiencies of 10.4% for the methylammonium lead iodide system and 9.3% for the methylammonium lead bromide system, with significantly improved shelf and operational stability.

  11. Light extraction in planar light-emitting diode with nonuniform current injection: model and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmyrova, Irina; Watanabe, Norikazu; Kholopova, Julia; Kovalchuk, Anatoly; Shapoval, Sergei

    2014-07-20

    We develop an analytical and numerical model for performing simulation of light extraction through the planar output interface of the light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with nonuniform current injection. Spatial nonuniformity of injected current is a peculiar feature of the LEDs in which top metal electrode is patterned as a mesh in order to enhance the output power of light extracted through the top surface. Basic features of the model are the bi-plane computation domain, related to other areas of numerical grid (NG) cells in these two planes, representation of light-generating layer by an ensemble of point light sources, numerical "collection" of light photons from the area limited by acceptance circle and adjustment of NG-cell areas in the computation procedure by the angle-tuned aperture function. The developed model and procedure are used to simulate spatial distributions of the output optical power as well as the total output power at different mesh pitches. The proposed model and simulation strategy can be very efficient in evaluation of the output optical performance of LEDs with periodical or symmetrical configuration of the electrodes.

  12. Dislocation-related trap levels in nitride-based light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturi, Giulia; Castaldini, Antonio; Cavallini, Anna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Meneghini, Matteo; Zanoni, Enrico [Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova, via Gradenigo 6/B, Padova 35131 (Italy); Zhu, Dandan; Humphreys, Colin [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-26

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was performed on InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes (LEDs) in order to determine the effect of the dislocation density on the deep intragap electronic levels. The LEDs were grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on GaN templates with a high dislocation density of 8 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2} and a low dislocation density of 3 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −2}. Three trapping levels for electrons were revealed, named A, A1, and B, with energies E{sub A} ≈ 0.04 eV, E{sub A1} ≈ 0.13 eV, and E{sub B} ≈ 0.54 eV, respectively. The trapping level A has a much higher concentration in the LEDs grown on the template with a high density of dislocations. The logarithmic dependence of the peak amplitude on the bias pulse width for traps A and A1 identifies the defects responsible for these traps as associated with linearly arranged defects. We conclude that traps A and A1 are dislocation-related intragap energy levels.

  13. Dislocation-related trap levels in nitride-based light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturi, Giulia; Castaldini, Antonio; Cavallini, Anna; Meneghini, Matteo; Zanoni, Enrico; Zhu, Dandan; Humphreys, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was performed on InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes (LEDs) in order to determine the effect of the dislocation density on the deep intragap electronic levels. The LEDs were grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on GaN templates with a high dislocation density of 8 × 10 9 cm −2 and a low dislocation density of 3 × 10 8 cm −2 . Three trapping levels for electrons were revealed, named A, A1, and B, with energies E A  ≈ 0.04 eV, E A1  ≈ 0.13 eV, and E B  ≈ 0.54 eV, respectively. The trapping level A has a much higher concentration in the LEDs grown on the template with a high density of dislocations. The logarithmic dependence of the peak amplitude on the bias pulse width for traps A and A1 identifies the defects responsible for these traps as associated with linearly arranged defects. We conclude that traps A and A1 are dislocation-related intragap energy levels.

  14. Progress in Piezo-Phototronic-Effect-Enhanced Light-Emitting Diodes and Pressure Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Caofeng; Chen, Mengxiao; Yu, Ruomeng; Yang, Qing; Hu, Youfan; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-02-24

    Wurtzite materials exhibit both semiconductor and piezoelectric properties under strains due to the non-central symmetric crystal structures. The three-way coupling of semiconductor properties, piezoelectric polarization and optical excitation in ZnO, GaN, CdS and other piezoelectric semiconductors leads to the emerging field of piezo-phototronics. This effect can efficiently manipulate the emission intensity of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by utilizing the piezo-polarization charges created at the junction upon straining to modulate the energy band diagrams and the optoelectronic processes, such as generation, separation, recombination and/or transport of charge carriers. Starting from fundamental physics principles, recent progress in piezo-phototronic-effect-enhanced LEDs is reviewed; following their development from single-nanowire pressure-sensitive devices to high-resolution array matrices for pressure-distribution mapping applications. The piezo-phototronic effect provides a promising method to enhance the light emission of LEDs based on piezoelectric semiconductors through applying static strains, and may find perspective applications in various optoelectronic devices and integrated systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Reliability analysis of GaN-based light emitting diodes for solid state illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ling; Ma Xiaohua; Feng Qian; Hao Yue

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we have discussed the effect of electrical stress on GaN light emitting diode (LED). With the lapse of time, the LED with an applied large current stress can reduce its current more than without such a stress under a large forward-voltage drop. Its scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image shows that there exist several pits on the surface of the p-metal. With an electrical stress applied, the number of pits greatly increases. We also find that the degradation of GaN LED is related to the oxidized Ni/Au ohmic contact to p-GaN. The electrical activation of H-passivated Mg acceptors is described in detail. Annealing is performed in ambient air for 10 min and the differential resistances at a forward-voltage drop of 5 V are taken to evaluate the activation of the Mg acceptors. These results suggest some mechanisms of degradation responsible for these phenomena, which are described in the paper. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  16. Disinfection of Spacecraft Potable Water Systems by Photocatalytic Oxidation Using UV-A Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmele, Michele N.; O'Neal, Jeremy A.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light has long been used in terrestrial water treatment systems for photodisinfection and the removal of organic compounds by several processes including photoadsorption, photolysis, and photocatalytic oxidation/reduction. Despite its effectiveness for water treatment, UV has not been explored for spacecraft applications because of concerns about the safety and reliability of mercury-containing UV lamps. However, recent advances in ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have enabled the utilization of nanomaterials that possess the appropriate optical properties for the manufacture of LEDs capable of producing monochromatic light at germicidal wavelengths. This report describes the testing of a commercial-off-the-shelf, high power Nichia UV-A LED (250mW A365nnJ for the excitation of titanium dioxide as a point-of-use (POD) disinfection device in a potable water system. The combination of an immobilized, high surface area photocatalyst with a UV-A LED is promising for potable water system disinfection since toxic chemicals and resupply requirements are reduced. No additional consumables like chemical biocides, absorption columns, or filters are required to disinfect and/or remove potentially toxic disinfectants from the potable water prior to use. Experiments were conducted in a static test stand consisting of a polypropylene microtiter plate containing 3mm glass balls coated with titanium dioxide. Wells filled with water were exposed to ultraviolet light from an actively-cooled UV-A LED positioned above each well and inoculated with six individual challenge microorganisms recovered from the International Space Station (ISS): Burkholderia cepacia, Cupriavidus metallidurans, Methylobacterium fujisawaense, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Wautersia basilensis. Exposure to the Nichia UV-A LED with photocatalytic oxidation resulted in a complete (>7-log) reduction of each challenge bacteria population in UV-A LEDs and semi

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of Micro-membrane GaN Light Emitting Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Liao, Hsien-Yu

    2015-05-01

    Developing etching of GaN material system is the key to device fabrications. In this thesis, we report on the fabrication of high throughput lift-off of InGaN/GaN based micro-membrane light emitting diode (LED) from sapphire substrate using UV-assisted photoelectroless chemical (PEsC) etching. Unlike existing bandgap selective etching based on unconventional sacrificial layer, the current hydrofluoric acid based wet etching process enables the selective etching of undoped GaN layer already incorporated in standard commercial LED structures, thus attaining the leverage on high performance device design, and facile wet process technology. The lift-off micro-membrane LED showed 16% alleviated quantum efficiency droop under 200 mA/cm2 current injection, demonstrating the advantage of LED epitaxy exfoliation from the lattice-mismatched sapphire substrate. The origin of the performance improvement was investigated based on non-destructive characterization methods. Photoluminescence (PL) characterization showed a 7nm peak emission wavelength shift in the micro-membrane LED compared to the GaN-on-Sapphire LED. The Raman spectroscopy measurements correlate well with the PL observation that a 0.86 GPa relaxed compressive biaxial strain was achieved after the lift-off process. The micro-membrane LED technology enables further heterogeneous integration for forming pixelated red, green, blue (RGB) display on flexible and transparent substrate. The development of discrete and membrane LEDs using nano-fiber paper as the current spreading layer was also explored for such integration.

  18. Plant experiments with light-emitting diode module in Svet space greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, Iliyana; Ivanova, Tania; Naydenov, Yordan; Dandolov, Ivan; Stefanov, Detelin

    Light is necessary for photosynthesis and shoot orientation in the space plant growth facilities. Light modules (LM) must provide sufficient photosynthetic photon flux for optimal efficiency of photosynthetic processes and also meet the constraints for power, volume and mass. A new LM for SVET Space Greenhouse using Cree R XLamp R 7090 XR light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is developed. Three types of monochromic LEDs emitting in the red, green, and blue region of the spectrum are used. The new LM contains 36 LED spots - 30 LED spots with one red, green and blue LED and 6 LED spots with three red LEDs. DMX programming device controls the LED spots and can set 231 levels of light intensity thus achieving Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density (PPFD) in the range 0-400 µmol.m-2 .s-1 and different percentages of the red, green and blue light, depending on the experimental objectives. Two one-month experiments with "salad-type" plants - lettuce and chicory were carried at 400 µmol.m-2 .s-1 PPFD (high light - HL) and 220 µmol.m-2 .s-1 PPFD (low light - LL) and composition 70% red, 20% green and 10% blue light. In vivo modulated chlorophyll fluorescence was measured by a PAM fluorometer on leaf discs and the following parameters: effective quantum yield of Photosystem II (ΦP SII ) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) were calculated. Both lettuce and chicory plants grown at LL express higher photochemical activity of Photosystem II (PSII) than HL grown plants, evaluated by the actual PSII quantum yield, ΦP SII . The calculated steady state NPQ values did not differ significantly in lettuce and chicory. The rapid phase of the NPQ increase was accelerated in all studied LL leaves. In conclusion low light conditions ensured more effective functioning of PSII than HL when lettuce and chicory plants were grown at 70% red, 20% green and 10% blue light composition.

  19. Overshoot effects of electron on efficiency droop in InGaN/GaN MQW light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yang; Liu, Zhiqiang, E-mail: lzq@semi.ac.cn, E-mail: spring@semi.ac.cn; Yi, Xiaoyan, E-mail: lzq@semi.ac.cn, E-mail: spring@semi.ac.cn; Guo, Yao; Wu, Shaoteng; Yuan, Guodong; Wang, JunXi; Wang, Guohong; Li, Jinmin [R& D Center for Semiconductor Lighting, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Solid State Lighting, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Engineering Research Center for the 3rd Generation Semiconductor Materials and Application, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate electron leakage in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs), analytic models of ballistic and quasi-ballistic transport are developed. With this model, the impact of critical variables effecting electron leakage, including the electron blocking layer (EBL), structure of multiple quantum wells (MQWs), polarization field, and temperature are explored. The simulated results based on this model shed light on previously reported experimental observations and provide basic criteria for suppressing electron leakage, advancing the design of InGaN/GaN LEDs.

  20. Paired emitter-detector light emitting diodes for the measurement of lead(II) and cadmium(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, K.-T. [Adaptive Sensors Group, National Centre for Sensor Research, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)]. E-mail: kim.lau@dcu.ie; McHugh, Eimear [Adaptive Sensors Group, National Centre for Sensor Research, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Baldwin, Susan [Adaptive Sensors Group, National Centre for Sensor Research, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Diamond, Dermot [Adaptive Sensors Group, National Centre for Sensor Research, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)]. E-mail: Dermot.diamond@dcu.ie

    2006-05-31

    A transmittance mode optical device based on using a reverse biased light emitting diode (LED) as light detector has been developed for colorimetric analysis. This new optical device was validated with bromocresol green dye for absorbance measurements before being employed for detecting cadmium(II) and lead(II) in water. Results show that the performance of this LED-based device is comparable to much more expensive bench top UV-vis instruments, but with the advantages of being low cost, low power and simple to operate.

  1. Paired emitter-detector light emitting diodes for the measurement of lead(II) and cadmium(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, K.-T.; McHugh, Eimear; Baldwin, Susan; Diamond, Dermot

    2006-01-01

    A transmittance mode optical device based on using a reverse biased light emitting diode (LED) as light detector has been developed for colorimetric analysis. This new optical device was validated with bromocresol green dye for absorbance measurements before being employed for detecting cadmium(II) and lead(II) in water. Results show that the performance of this LED-based device is comparable to much more expensive bench top UV-vis instruments, but with the advantages of being low cost, low power and simple to operate

  2. Tunable light extraction efficiency of GaN light emitting diodes by ZnO nanorod arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, C H; Lin, W H; Lin, C F; Chen, C H; Changjean, C H

    2009-01-01

    We report the influence of ZnO nanorod arrays (NRAs) on the light extraction efficiency of GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs). Our investigation indicates that the output light intensity of the device exhibits a periodic oscillation as a function of the rod length. The variation of light extraction efficiency is caused by the Fabry–Perot resonance of the film composed of the nanorods. The theoretical analysis shows a good agreement with the measurement results. Our study reveals a method to control the output light extraction efficiency of GaN LEDs via a simple solution-based synthesized ZnO NRAs

  3. Current-voltage characteristics of dendrimer light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, S G; Samuel, I D W; Staton, S V; Knights, K A; Burn, P L; Williams, J H T; Walker, Alison B

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of unipolar and bipolar organic diodes that use phosphorescent dendrimers as the emissive organic layer. Through simulation of the measured I-V characteristics we were able to determine the device parameters for each device structure studied, leading to a better understanding of injection and transport behaviour in these devices. It was found that the common practice of assuming injection barriers are equal to the difference between bare electrode work functions and molecular orbital levels is unsuitable for the devices considered here, particularly for gold contacts. The studies confirm that different aromatic units in the dendrons can give significant differences in the charge transporting properties of the dendrimers.

  4. Current-voltage characteristics of dendrimer light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, S. G.; Samuel, I. D. W.; Staton, S. V.; Knights, K. A.; Burn, P. L.; Williams, J. H. T.; Walker, Alison B.

    2010-09-01

    We have investigated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of unipolar and bipolar organic diodes that use phosphorescent dendrimers as the emissive organic layer. Through simulation of the measured I-V characteristics we were able to determine the device parameters for each device structure studied, leading to a better understanding of injection and transport behaviour in these devices. It was found that the common practice of assuming injection barriers are equal to the difference between bare electrode work functions and molecular orbital levels is unsuitable for the devices considered here, particularly for gold contacts. The studies confirm that different aromatic units in the dendrons can give significant differences in the charge transporting properties of the dendrimers.

  5. Current-voltage characteristics of dendrimer light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, S G; Samuel, I D W [Organic Semiconductor Centre, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Staton, S V; Knights, K A; Burn, P L [Department of Chemistry, Chemistry Research Laboratory, 12 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TA (United Kingdom); Williams, J H T; Walker, Alison B, E-mail: a.b.walker@bath.ac.u [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-29

    We have investigated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of unipolar and bipolar organic diodes that use phosphorescent dendrimers as the emissive organic layer. Through simulation of the measured I-V characteristics we were able to determine the device parameters for each device structure studied, leading to a better understanding of injection and transport behaviour in these devices. It was found that the common practice of assuming injection barriers are equal to the difference between bare electrode work functions and molecular orbital levels is unsuitable for the devices considered here, particularly for gold contacts. The studies confirm that different aromatic units in the dendrons can give significant differences in the charge transporting properties of the dendrimers.

  6. Design and geometry of hybrid white light-emitted diodes for efficient energy transfer from the quantum well to the nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopylov, Oleksii; Huck, Alexander; Shirazi, Roza

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate light color conversion in patterned InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which is enhanced via nonradiative exciton resonant energy transfer (RET) from the electrically driven diode to colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs). Patterning of the diode is essential for the coupling...... between a quantum well (QW) and NCs, because the distance between the QW and NCs is a main and very critical factor of RET. Moreover, a proper design of the pattern can enhance light extraction....

  7. Light emitting diode driver with differential voltage supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    The current invention relates to a driver for driving one or a plurality of LEDs (D1, D2), comprising at least one driving unit (201, 202) adapted to be supplied with a differential voltage, between one first bias voltage (VB1) and one second bias voltage (VB2), the differential voltage being

  8. Fluorescent SiC for white light-emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Ou, Yiyu; Kamiyama, S.

    2012-01-01

    The strong photoluminescence from f-SiC was achieved after the optimization of the B and N concentrations. Surface nanostructures were successfully applied to enhance the extraction efficiency. f-SiC is a promising wavelength convertor for white LEDs....

  9. Using high-power light emitting diodes for photoacoustic imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, R. S.

    2011-01-01

    for the experiment consists of a 3mm high x 5mm wide slice of green colored gelatine overlaid by a 3cm layer of colorless gelatine. The light pulses from the LED is focused on the green gelatine. The photoacoustic response from the green gelatine is detected by a single transducer on the opposite (top) surface...

  10. Degradation mechanism of AlInGaP light emitting diodes during PMMA encapsulation and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preuss, S.

    2007-11-15

    In this thesis we investigate the degradation mechanism of AlInGaP light emitting diodes (LEDs) during encapsulation and operation. The AlInGaP LEDs are encapsulated using an injection moulding tool. The molded part acts as physical housing as well as tailors the radiation pattern. Thus a narrow light beam with a spread angle of {alpha}=10 has been observed. The LED temperature has been measured by the voltage variation of the LED which is caused by the temperature change at a constant current. Thus the thermal load of the LED chips during the encapsulation process is investigated. To verify the temperature measurement a simulation based on the finite element method has been carried out. The experimental and theoretical data are in good agreement. The LED properties are investigated before and after the encapsulation. The results are compared and we found a reduction of the serial resistance and an enhanced luminous efficiency. The peak emission energy remained constant, but a peak broadening of {delta}E=9meV has been observed. A slight polarisation of the emitted light is an indication for a polarization effect of the polymethylmethacrylat (PMMA) housing. Accelerated degradation experiments using high forward currents are performed to estimate the lifetime of the PMMA encapsulated LEDs. A diffusion model is presented to explain the decay in luminous flux versus degradation time and degradation current. We believe that the reduction of quantum efficiency is caused by p-type dopant diffusion into the active layer where it acts as a non-radiative recombination centre. Using this model we determine the lifetime under the recommended drive current of I=20mA. The resulting lifetime is t=1.5.10{sup 6}h using a reduction of 50% in the luminous flux as failure criteria. (orig.)

  11. Characterization, Modeling, and Optimization of Light-Emitting Diode System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders

    limit of human color perception. A method has been developed to optimize multicolored cluster LED systems with respect to light quality, using multi objective optimization. The results are simulated SPDs similar to traditional light sources, and with high light quality. As part of this work...... the techniques have been applied in practical illumination applications. The presented examples are historical artifacts and illumination of plants to increase photosynthesis....

  12. Assessing the therapeutic effect of 625-nm light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zongzhen; Xu, Guodong; Yang, Yi

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of red Light-Emitting Diodes on elbow extensor and flexor strength and the recovery of exercise induced fatigue, the torque values from the isokinetic dynamometer as well as biochemistry parameters were used as outcome measures. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial was performed with twenty male young tennis athletes. Active LED therapy (LEDT, with wavelength 625nm, 10 minutes total irradiation time, irradiated area amount to 30cm2, and 900J of total energy irradiated) or an identical placebo was delivered under double-blinded conditions to the left elbow just before exercise. The isokinetic muscle strength was measured immediately after irradiation. The blood lactate levels were sampled pre-exercise and post-exercise. The peak torque values of elbow extensor strength were significantly different between two groups. As in elbow flexor strength, the difference of peak torque was not significant. The blood lactate concentration of LEDT group post-exercise was significantly lower than those of placebo group. The results indicate that 625nm LED therapy is effective in preventing muscle fatigue as it can significantly reduce peak torque value of elbow extensors and blood lactate concentration. It has no effect on the strength of left elbow flexor or backhand performance in tennis.

  13. Self-sensing of temperature rises on light emitting diode based optrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkhoda, Fahimeh; Soltan, Ahmed; Ponon, Nikhil; Jackson, Andrew; O'Neill, Anthony; Degenaar, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Objective. This work presents a method to determine the surface temperature of microphotonic medical implants like LEDs. Our inventive step is to use the photonic emitter (LED) employed in an implantable device as its own sensor and develop readout circuitry to accurately determine the surface temperature of the device. Approach. There are two primary classes of applications where microphotonics could be used in implantable devices; opto-electrophysiology and fluorescence sensing. In such scenarios, intense light needs to be delivered to the target. As blue wavelengths are scattered strongly in tissue, such delivery needs to be either via optic fibres, two-photon approaches or through local emitters. In the latter case, as light emitters generate heat, there is a potential for probe surfaces to exceed the 2 °C regulatory. However, currently, there are no convenient mechanisms to monitor this in situ. Main results. We present the electronic control circuit and calibration method to monitor the surface temperature change of implantable optrode. The efficacy is demonstrated in air, saline, and brain. Significance. This paper, therefore, presents a method to utilize the light emitting diode as its own temperature sensor.

  14. Estimation of carrier leakage in InGaN light emitting diodes from photocurrent measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, Shopan; Zhang, Fan; Monavarian, Morteza; Okur, Serdal; Avrutin, Vitaliy; Morkoç, Hadis; Özgür, Ümit

    2014-02-01

    Carrier transport in double heterostructure (DH) InGaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) was investigated using photocurrent measurements performed under CW HeCd laser (325 nm wavelength) excitation. The effect of electron injector thicknesses was investigated by monitoring the excitation density and applied bias dependent escape of photogenerated carriers from the active region and through energy band structure and carrier transport simulations using Silvaco Atlas. For quad (4x) 3-nm DH LED structures incorporating staircase electron injectors (SEIs), photocurrent increased with SEI thickness due to reduced effective barrier opposing carrier escape from the active region as confirmed by simulations. The carrier leakage percentile at -3V bias and 280 Wcm-2 optical excitation density increased from 24 % to 55 % when In 0.04Ga0.96N + In0.08Ga0.92N SEI thickness was increased from 4 nm + 4 nm to 30 nm + 30 nm. The increased leakage with thicker SEI correlates with increased carrier overflow under forward bias.

  15. Sensor Fabrication Method for in Situ Temperature and Humidity Monitoring of Light Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yuan Lee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work micro temperature and humidity sensors are fabricated to measure the junction temperature and humidity of light emitting diodes (LED. The junction temperature is frequently measured using thermal resistance measurement technology. The weakness of this method is that the timing of data capture is not regulated by any standard. This investigation develops a device that can stably and continually measure temperature and humidity. The device is light-weight and can monitor junction temperature and humidity in real time. Using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS, this study minimizes the size of the micro temperature and humidity sensors, which are constructed on a stainless steel foil substrate (40 μm-thick SS-304. The micro temperature and humidity sensors can be fixed between the LED chip and frame. The sensitivities of the micro temperature and humidity sensors are 0.06 ± 0.005 (Ω/°C and 0.033 pF/%RH, respectively.

  16. A hole modulator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Kyaw, Zabu; Liu, Wei; Ji, Yun; Wang, Liancheng; Tan, Swee Tiam; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2015-02-01

    The low p-type doping efficiency of the p-GaN layer has severely limited the performance of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) due to the ineffective hole injection into the InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) active region. The essence of improving the hole injection efficiency is to increase the hole concentration in the p-GaN layer. Therefore, in this work, we have proposed a hole modulator and studied it both theoretically and experimentally. In the hole modulator, the holes in a remote p-type doped layer are depleted by the built-in electric field and stored in the p-GaN layer. By this means, the overall hole concentration in the p-GaN layer can be enhanced. Furthermore, the hole modulator is adopted in the InGaN/GaN LEDs, which reduces the effective valance band barrier height for the p-type electron blocking layer from ˜332 meV to ˜294 meV at 80 A/cm2 and demonstrates an improved optical performance, thanks to the increased hole concentration in the p-GaN layer and thus the improved hole injection into the MQWs.

  17. A hole modulator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Kyaw, Zabu; Liu, Wei; Ji, Yun; Wang, Liancheng; Tan, Swee Tiam; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2015-01-01

    The low p-type doping efficiency of the p-GaN layer has severely limited the performance of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) due to the ineffective hole injection into the InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) active region. The essence of improving the hole injection efficiency is to increase the hole concentration in the p-GaN layer. Therefore, in this work, we have proposed a hole modulator and studied it both theoretically and experimentally. In the hole modulator, the holes in a remote p-type doped layer are depleted by the built-in electric field and stored in the p-GaN layer. By this means, the overall hole concentration in the p-GaN layer can be enhanced. Furthermore, the hole modulator is adopted in the InGaN/GaN LEDs, which reduces the effective valance band barrier height for the p-type electron blocking layer from ∼332 meV to ∼294 meV at 80 A/cm 2 and demonstrates an improved optical performance, thanks to the increased hole concentration in the p-GaN layer and thus the improved hole injection into the MQWs

  18. Cuprous halides semiconductors as a new means for highly efficient light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Doyeol; Park, Seoung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    In group-III nitrides in use for white light-emitting diodes (LEDs), optical gain, measure of luminous efficiency, is very low owing to the built-in electrostatic fields, low exciton binding energy, and high-density misfit dislocations due to lattice-mismatched substrates. Cuprous halides I-VII semiconductors, on the other hand, have negligible built-in field, large exciton binding energies and close lattice matched to silicon substrates. Recent experimental studies have shown that the luminescence of I-VII CuCl grown on Si is three orders larger than that of GaN at room temperature. Here we report yet unexplored potential of cuprous halides systems by investigating the optical gain of CuCl/CuI quantum wells. It is found that the optical gain and the luminescence are much larger than that of group III-nitrides due to large exciton binding energy and vanishing electrostatic fields. We expect that these findings will open up the way toward highly efficient cuprous halides based LEDs compatible to Si technology. PMID:26880097

  19. Improving lumen maintenance by nanopore array dispersed quantum dots for on-chip light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Yang, Fan; Wan, Renzhuo; Fang, Dong

    2017-12-01

    The temperature stability of quantum dots (QDs), which is crucial for integrating into high power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in the on-chip configuration, needs to be further improved. In this letter, we report warm white LEDs, where CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles were incorporated into a porous anodic alumina (PAA) matrix with a chain structure by the self-assembly method. Experiments demonstrate that the QD concentration range in toluene solvent from 1% mg/μl to 1.2% mg/μl in combination with the PAA matrix shows the best luminous property. To verify the reliability of the as-prepared device, a comparison experiment was conducted. It indicates excellent lumen maintenance of the light source and less chromaticity coordinate shift under accelerated life testing conditions. Experiments also prove that optical depreciation was only up to 4.6% of its initial value after the 1500 h aging test at the junction temperature of 76 °C.

  20. Contact light-emitting diodes based on vertical ZnO nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panin, G. N. [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow district (Russian Federation); Cho, H. D.; Lee, S. W.; Kang, T. W. [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    We report vertical contact light-emitting diodes (VCLEDs), that are based on heterojunctions formed by using the point contacts of n-ZnO nanorods (NRs) to the p-type semiconductor substrate and that are fabricated using a new approach to the formation of LEDs (Appl. Phys. Lett. 98, 093110 (2011)). A p-type GaN film grown on a sapphire substrate was used to form n-ZnO NRs/pGaN VCLEDs on a large area of about 4 cm{sup 2}. The VCLEDs emitted a pure blue electroluminescence with high efficiency. Electroluminescence at 470 nm, which is visible to the naked eye, started at small current of about 50 μA and is attributed to the good optical properties of the structurally perfect heterojunctions in the point contacts. The VCLED configuration allows the creation of ZnO/p-GaN nano-LEDs of high density and high-quality with a greatly reduced concentration of nonradiative defects in the active regions. The VCLEDs showed the high brightness of light required for active matrix displays and general solid-state lighting.

  1. Ultraviolet Laser SQUID Microscope for GaN Blue Light Emitting Diode Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daibo, M; Kamiwano, D; Kurosawa, T; Yoshizawa, M; Tayama, N

    2006-01-01

    We carried out non-contacting measurements of photocurrent distributions in GaN blue light emitting diode (LED) chips using our newly developed ultraviolet (UV) laser SQUID microscope. The UV light generates the photocurrent, and then the photocurrent induces small magnetic fields around the chip. An off-axis arranged HTS-SQUID magnetometer is employed to detect a vector magnetic field whose typical amplitude is several hundred femto-tesla. Generally, it is difficult to obtain Ohmic contacts for p-type GaN because of the low hole concentration in the p-type epitaxial layer and the lack of any available metal with a higher work function compared with the p-type GaN. Therefore, a traditional probecontacted electrical test is difficult to conduct for wide band gap semiconductors without an adequately annealed electrode. Using the UV-laser SQUID microscope, the photocurrent can be measured without any electrical contact. We show the photocurrent vector map which was reconstructed from measured magnetic fields data. We also demonstrate how we found the position of a defect of the electrical short circuits in the LED chip

  2. Characterization, Modeling, and Optimization of Light-Emitting Diode Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders

    are simulated SPDs similar to traditional light sources, and with high light quality. As part of this work the techniques have been applied in practical illumination applications. The presented examples are historical artifacts and illumination of plants to increase photosynthesis....... comparing the chromaticity of the measured SPD with tted models, the deviation is found to be larger than the lower limit of human color perception. A method has been developed to optimize multicolored cluster LED systems with respect to light quality, using multi objective optimization. The results...

  3. Photonic effects in microstructured conjugated polymer films and light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matterson, B.J.

    2002-03-01

    This thesis reports an investigation into the photonic effects caused by wavelength scale microstructure patterned onto films of conjugated polymers. The efficiency of light emitting diodes (LEDs) made from conjugated polymers is limited in part by the trapping of light into waveguide modes caused by the high refractive index of these materials. Waveguide modes in films of poly(p,-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) and poly(2-methoxy, 5-(2'ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) are analysed and the refractive index of these materials is calculated. The photoluminescence of conjugated polymer films that have been spun onto textured substrates is analysed. It is found that the photoluminescence quantum yield of a film spun onto a substrate inscribed with a grating is increased. It is also found that the photoluminescence spectrum of the film is dramatically altered and varies substantially with viewing angle. The features in the spectrum caused by the grating are strongly polarized. These effects are analysed and are attributed to the scattering of waveguided light out of the film. It is found that films spun onto metal gratings exhibit especially strong scattering. The effect of metal gratings with various grating depths is analysed. The possible contribution of band gaps to the photoluminescence spectrum from polymers on strong metal gratings is discussed. LEDs that include grating structures are constructed and analysed. It is found that having grating structures on the metal layers that are used as electrodes in the LED does not adversely affect the electrical properties of the LED. It is demonstrated that grating in the LED is able to substantially increase the light emission without using extra electrical power. The emission spectra from LEDs are observed to vary with angle, and exhibit considerable polarization. (author)

  4. Reduced-droop green III-nitride light-emitting diodes utilizing GaN tunnel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Abdullah I.; Young, Erin C.; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; Albadri, Abdulrahman; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Speck, James S.

    2018-04-01

    We report the fabrication of low-droop high-efficiency green c-plane light-emitting diodes (LEDs) utilizing GaN tunnel junction (TJ) contacts. The LED epitaxial layers with a top p-GaN layer were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and an n++-GaN layer was deposited by molecular beam epitaxy to form a TJ. The TJ LEDs were then compared with equivalent LEDs having a tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) contact. The TJ LEDs exhibited a higher performance and a lower efficiency droop than did the ITO LEDs. At 35 A/cm2, the external quantum efficiencies for the TJ and ITO LEDs were 31.2 and 27%, respectively.

  5. Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patibandla, Nag; Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of this program, Applied Materials, Inc., with generous support from the United States Department of Energy, developed a world-class three chamber III-Nitride epi cluster tool for low-cost, high volume GaN growth for the solid state lighting industry. One of the major achievements of the program was to design, build, and demonstrate the world’s largest wafer capacity HVPE chamber suitable for repeatable high volume III-Nitride template and device manufacturing. Applied Materials’ experience in developing deposition chambers for the silicon chip industry over many decades resulted in many orders of magnitude reductions in the price of transistors. That experience and understanding was used in developing this GaN epi deposition tool. The multi-chamber approach, which continues to be unique in the ability of the each chamber to deposit a section of the full device structure, unlike other cluster tools, allows for extreme flexibility in the manufacturing process. This robust architecture is suitable for not just the LED industry, but GaN power devices as well, both horizontal and vertical designs. The new HVPE technology developed allows GaN to be grown at a rate unheard of with MOCVD, up to 20x the typical MOCVD rates of 3{micro}m per hour, with bulk crystal quality better than the highest-quality commercial GaN films grown by MOCVD at a much cheaper overall cost. This is a unique development as the HVPE process has been known for decades, but never successfully commercially developed for high volume manufacturing. This research shows the potential of the first commercial-grade HVPE chamber, an elusive goal for III-V researchers and those wanting to capitalize on the promise of HVPE. Additionally, in the course of this program, Applied Materials built two MOCVD chambers, in addition to the HVPE chamber, and a robot that moves wafers between them. The MOCVD chambers demonstrated industry-leading wavelength yield for GaN based LED wafers and industry

  6. Charge Injection and Current Flow in Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. L.; Davids, P. S.; Heller, C. M.; Crone, B. K.; Campbell, I. H.; Barashkov, N. N.; Ferraris, J. P.

    1997-03-01

    We present a comparison between device model calculations and current-voltage measurements for a series of organic LED structures. The Schottky energy barrier of an injecting contact is systematically varied by changing the metal used to form that contact. The current-voltage characteristics of the structures are described using a device model that considers charge injection, transport and space charge effects in the low mobility organic material. Charge injection into the organic material is controlled by the Schottky energy barrier of the metal/organic contact. For Schottky energy barriers greater than about 0.4 eV injection into the organic material is the principal limitation to current flow. In this regime the net injected charge density is relatively small, the electric field in the structure is nearly uniform, and space charge effects are not important. For smaller energy barriers relatively large charge densities are injected into the organic material and space charge effects become the dominant limit to current flow. The measured current-voltage characteristics are quantitatively described by the device model using Schottky barrier values independently determined by internal photoemission and electroabsorption measurements.

  7. Red light emitting solid state hybrid quantum dot-near-UV GaN LED devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hongjoo; Lee, Seonghoon

    2007-01-01

    We produced core-shell (CdSe)ZnSe quantum dots by direct colloidal chemical synthesis and the surface-passivation method-an overcoating of the core CdSe with a larger-bandgap material ZnSe. The (CdSe)ZnSe quantum dots(QDs) play the role of a colour conversion centre. We call these quantum dots nanophosphors. We fabricated red light emitting hybrid devices of (CdSe)ZnSe QDs and a near-UV GaN LED by combining red light emitting (CdSe)ZnSe quantum dots (as a colour conversion centre) with a near-UV(NUV) GaN LED chip (as an excitation source). A few good red phosphors have been known for UV excitation wavelengths, and red phosphors for UV excitation have been sought for a long time. Here we tested the possibility of using (CdSe)ZnSe QDs as red nanophosphors for UV excitation. The fabricated red light emitting hybrid device of (CdSe)ZnSe and a NUV GaN LED chip showed a good luminance. We demonstrated that the (CdSe)ZnSe quantum dots were promising red nanophosphors for NUV excitation and that a red LED made of QDs and a NUV excitation source was a highly efficient hybrid device

  8. Photobiomodulation with light-emitting diodes improves sperm motility in men with asthenozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban Frangez, Helena; Frangez, Igor; Verdenik, Ivan; Jansa, Vid; Virant Klun, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Sperm motility is an important parameter of male fertility and depends on energy consumption. Photobiomodulation with light-emitting diode (LED) is known to stimulate respiratory chain in mitochondria of different mammalian cells. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of photobiomodulation with LED on sperm motility in infertile men with impaired sperm motility-asthenozoospermia. Thirty consecutive men with asthenozoospermia and normal sperm count who visited the infertility clinic of University Medial Centre Ljubljana between September 2011 and February 2012 were included in the study. Semen sample of each man was divided into five parts: one served as a non-treated (native) control and four parts were irradiated with LED of different wavelengths: (1) 850 nm, (2) 625, 660 and 850 nm, (3) 470 nm and (4) 625, 660 and 470 nm. The percentage of motile sperm and kinematic parameters were measured using a Sperm Class Analyser system following the WHO recommendations. In the non-treated semen samples, the average ratio of rapidly progressive sperms was 12% and of immotile sperm 73%. Treating with LED significantly increased the proportion of rapidly progressive sperm (mean differences were as follows: 2.83 (1.39-4.28), 3.33 (1.61-5.05), 4.50 (3.00-5.99) and 3.83 (2.31-5.36) for groups 1-4, respectively) and significantly decreased the ratio of immotile sperm (the mean differences and 95% CI were as follows: 3.50 (1.30-5.70), 4.33 (2.15-6.51), 5.83 (3.81-7.86) and 5.50 (2.98-8.02) for groups 1-4, respectively). All differences were highly statistically significant. This finding confirmed that photobiomodulation using LED improved the sperm motility in asthenozoospermia regardless of the wavelength.

  9. High-Brightness Blue Light-Emitting Diodes Enabled by a Directly Grown Graphene Buffer Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaolong; Zhang, Xiang; Dou, Zhipeng; Wei, Tongbo; Liu, Zhiqiang; Qi, Yue; Ci, Haina; Wang, Yunyu; Li, Yang; Chang, Hongliang; Yan, Jianchang; Yang, Shenyuan; Zhang, Yanfeng; Wang, Junxi; Gao, Peng; Li, Jinmin; Liu, Zhongfan

    2018-06-08

    Single-crystalline GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with high efficiency and long lifetime are the most promising solid-state lighting source compared with conventional incandescent and fluorescent lamps. However, the lattice and thermal mismatch between GaN and sapphire substrate always induces high stress and high density of dislocations and thus degrades the performance of LEDs. Here, the growth of high-quality GaN with low stress and a low density of dislocations on graphene (Gr) buffered sapphire substrate is reported for high-brightness blue LEDs. Gr films are directly grown on sapphire substrate to avoid the tedious transfer process and GaN is grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The introduced Gr buffer layer greatly releases biaxial stress and reduces the density of dislocations in GaN film and In x Ga 1- x N/GaN multiple quantum well structures. The as-fabricated LED devices therefore deliver much higher light output power compared to that on a bare sapphire substrate, which even outperforms the mature process derived counterpart. The GaN growth on Gr buffered sapphire only requires one-step growth, which largely shortens the MOCVD growth time. This facile strategy may pave a new way for applications of Gr films and bring several disruptive technologies for epitaxial growth of GaN film and its applications in high-brightness LEDs. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Evaluation of mobile digital light-emitting diode fluorescence microscopy in Hanoi, Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisson, L H; Reber, C; Phan, H; Switz, N; Nilsson, L M; Myers, F; Nhung, N V; Luu, L; Pham, T; Vu, C; Nguyen, H; Nguyen, A; Dinh, T; Nahid, P; Fletcher, D A; Cattamanchi, A

    2015-09-01

    Hanoi Lung Hospital, Hanoi, Viet Nam. To compare the accuracy of CellScopeTB, a manually operated mobile digital fluorescence microscope, with conventional microscopy techniques. Patients referred for sputum smear microscopy to the Hanoi Lung Hospital from May to September 2013 were included. Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) smear microscopy, conventional light-emitting diode (LED) fluorescence microscopy (FM), CellScopeTB-based LED FM and Xpert(®) MTB/RIF were performed on sputum samples. The sensitivity and specificity of microscopy techniques were determined in reference to Xpert results, and differences were compared using McNemar's paired test of proportions. Of 326 patients enrolled, 93 (28.5%) were Xpert-positive for TB. The sensitivity of ZN microscopy, conventional LED FM, and CellScopeTB-based LED FM was respectively 37.6% (95%CI 27.8-48.3), 41.9% (95%CI 31.8-52.6), and 35.5% (95%CI 25.8-46.1). The sensitivity of CellScopeTB was similar to that of conventional LED FM (difference -6.5%, 95%CI -18.2 to 5.3, P = 0.33) and ZN microscopy (difference -2.2%, 95%CI -9.2 to 4.9, P = 0.73). The specificity was >99% for all three techniques. CellScopeTB performed similarly to conventional microscopy techniques in the hands of experienced TB microscopists. However, the sensitivity of all sputum microscopy techniques was low. Options enabled by digital microscopy, such as automated imaging with real-time computerized analysis, should be explored to increase sensitivity.

  11. Modification in oxidative processes in muscle tissues exposed to laser- and light-emitting diode radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monich, Victor A; Bavrina, Anna P; Malinovskaya, Svetlana L

    2018-01-01

    Exposure of living tissues to high-intensity red or near-infrared light can produce the oxidative stress effects both in the target zone and adjacent ones. The protein oxidative modification (POM) products can be used as reliable and early markers of oxidative stress. The contents of modified proteins in the investigated specimens can be evaluated by the 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine assay (the DNPH assay). Low-intensity red light is able to decrease the activity of oxidative processes and the DNPH assay data about the POM products in the biological tissues could show both an oxidative stress level and an efficiency of physical agent protection against the oxidative processes. Two control groups of white rats were irradiated by laser light, the first control group by red light and the second one by near-infrared radiation (NIR).Two experimental groups were consequently treated with laser and red low-level light-emitting diode radiation (LED). One of them was exposed to red laser light + LED and the other to NIR + LED. The fifth group was intact. Each group included ten animals. The effect of laser light was studied by methods of protein oxidative modifications. We measured levels of both induced and spontaneous POM products by the DNPH assay. The dramatic increase in levels of POM products in the control group samples when compared with the intact group data as well as the sharp decrease in the POM products in the experimental groups treated with LED low-level light were statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05). Exposure of skeletal muscles to high-intensity red and near-infrared laser light causes oxidative stress that continues not less than 3 days. The method of measurement of POM product contents by the DNPH assay is a reliable test of an oxidative process rate. Red low-intensity LED radiation can provide rehabilitation of skeletal muscle tissues treated with high-intensity laser light.

  12. Development of Radiation-Resistant In-Water Wireless Transmission System Using Light Emitting Diodes and Photo Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Shibata, H.; Otsuka, N.; Uehara, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Shibagaki, T.; Komanome, H.

    2016-10-01

    Several kinds of commercially available light emitting diodes (LED) and photo diodes (PD) were irradiated with 60Co gamma ray up to 1 MGy for development of a radiation-resistant in-water wireless transmission system using visible light. The lens parts of the LEDs turned brown by the irradiation and their colors became dark with the absorbed dose. The total luminous fluxes decreased with the absorbed dose and the LED with shorter emission wavelength had the higher decrease rate. Meanwhile, the current-voltage characteristics hardly changed. These results indicate that the decreases of the total luminous flux of the LEDs were mainly caused not by the degradation of the semiconductor parts but by the coloring of the lens parts by the irradiation. On the other hand, the light sensitivities of the PDs decreased with the absorbed dose. The PDs with the window part which turned a darker color had the higher decrease rate. These results indicate that the decreases of light sensitivities of the PDs were also mainly caused by the coloring of the resin parts by the irradiation. If the wireless transmission is performed using the candidate LED and PD between 5 meters in water, using a few LEDs and PDs, the PD's output current generated by the emission light of the LED is estimated to be detectable even considering the effects of the absorption of the light in water and the increased dark current by the irradiation. Therefore, a radiation resistant in-water transmission system can be constructed using commercially available LEDs and PDs in principle.

  13. Point-of-use water disinfection using ultraviolet and visible light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lui, Gough Yumu, E-mail: gough@student.unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); School of Photovoltaics and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Roser, David, E-mail: djroser@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Corkish, Richard, E-mail: r.corkish@unsw.edu.au [School of Photovoltaics and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Ashbolt, Nicholas J., E-mail: ashbolt@ualberta.ca [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); School of Public Health, South Academic Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Stuetz, Richard, E-mail: r.stuetz@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Improvements in point-of-use (POU) drinking water disinfection technologies for remote and regional communities are urgently needed. Conceptually, UV-C light-emitting diodes (LEDs) overcome many drawbacks of low-pressure mercury tube based UV devices, and UV-A or visible light LEDs also show potential. To realistically evaluate the promise of LED disinfection, our study assessed the performance of a model 1.3 L reactor, similar in size to solar disinfection bottles. In all, 12 different commercial or semi-commercial LED arrays (270–740 nm) were compared for their ability to inactivate Escherichia coli K12 ATCC W3110 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 19433 over 6 h. Five log{sub 10} and greater reductions were consistently achieved using the 270, 365, 385 and 405 nm arrays. The output of the 310 nm array was insufficient for useful disinfection while 430 and 455 nm performance was marginal (≈ 4.2 and 2.3-log{sub 10}s E. coli and E. faecalis over the 6 h). No significant disinfection was observed with the 525, 590, 623, 660 and 740 nm arrays. Delays in log-phase inactivation of E. coli were observed, particularly with UV-A wavelengths. The radiation doses required for > 3-log{sub 10} reduction of E. coli and E. faecalis differed by 10 fold at 270 nm but only 1.5–2.5 fold at 365–455 nm. Action spectra, consistent with the literature, were observed with both indicators. The design process revealed cost and technical constraints pertaining to LED electrical efficiency, availability and lifetime. We concluded that POU LED disinfection using existing LED technology is already technically possible. UV-C LEDs offer speed and energy demand advantages, while UV-A/violet units are safer. Both approaches still require further costing and engineering development. Our study provides data needed for such work. - Highlights: • Disinfection of E. coli and E. faecalis achieved with 270 and 365–455 nm LEDs • No significant disinfection was found with 310 and > 455 nm LEDs

  14. Point-of-use water disinfection using ultraviolet and visible light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, Gough Yumu; Roser, David; Corkish, Richard; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.; Stuetz, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in point-of-use (POU) drinking water disinfection technologies for remote and regional communities are urgently needed. Conceptually, UV-C light-emitting diodes (LEDs) overcome many drawbacks of low-pressure mercury tube based UV devices, and UV-A or visible light LEDs also show potential. To realistically evaluate the promise of LED disinfection, our study assessed the performance of a model 1.3 L reactor, similar in size to solar disinfection bottles. In all, 12 different commercial or semi-commercial LED arrays (270–740 nm) were compared for their ability to inactivate Escherichia coli K12 ATCC W3110 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 19433 over 6 h. Five log_1_0 and greater reductions were consistently achieved using the 270, 365, 385 and 405 nm arrays. The output of the 310 nm array was insufficient for useful disinfection while 430 and 455 nm performance was marginal (≈ 4.2 and 2.3-log_1_0s E. coli and E. faecalis over the 6 h). No significant disinfection was observed with the 525, 590, 623, 660 and 740 nm arrays. Delays in log-phase inactivation of E. coli were observed, particularly with UV-A wavelengths. The radiation doses required for > 3-log_1_0 reduction of E. coli and E. faecalis differed by 10 fold at 270 nm but only 1.5–2.5 fold at 365–455 nm. Action spectra, consistent with the literature, were observed with both indicators. The design process revealed cost and technical constraints pertaining to LED electrical efficiency, availability and lifetime. We concluded that POU LED disinfection using existing LED technology is already technically possible. UV-C LEDs offer speed and energy demand advantages, while UV-A/violet units are safer. Both approaches still require further costing and engineering development. Our study provides data needed for such work. - Highlights: • Disinfection of E. coli and E. faecalis achieved with 270 and 365–455 nm LEDs • No significant disinfection was found with 310 and > 455 nm LEDs. • UV

  15. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes on Solution-Processed Graphene Transparent Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junbo

    2010-01-26

    Theoretical estimates indicate that graphene thin films can be used as transparent electrodes for thin-film devices such as solar cells and organic light-emitting diodes, with an unmatched combination of sheet resistance and transparency. We demonstrate organic light-emitting diodes with solution-processed graphene thin film transparent conductive anodes. The graphene electrodes were deposited on quartz substrates by spincoating of an aqueous dispersion of functionalized graphene, followed by a vacuum anneal step to reduce the sheet resistance. Small molecular weight organic materials and a metal cathode were directly deposited on the graphene anodes, resulting in devices with a performance comparable to control devices on indium-tin-oxide transparent anodes. The outcoupling efficiency of devices on graphene and indium-tin-oxide is nearly identical, in agreement with model predictions. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  16. Overcoming the electroluminescence efficiency limitations of perovskite light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Himchan; Jeong, Su-Hun; Park, Min-Ho; Kim, Young-Hoon; Wolf, Christoph; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Heo, Jin Hyuck; Sadhanala, Aditya; Myoung, NoSoung; Yoo, Seunghyup; Im, Sang Hyuk; Friend, Richard H.; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2015-12-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites are emerging low-cost emitters with very high color purity, but their low luminescent efficiency is a critical drawback. We boosted the current efficiency (CE) of perovskite light-emitting diodes with a simple bilayer structure to 42.9 candela per ampere, similar to the CE of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes, with two modifications: We prevented the formation of metallic lead (Pb) atoms that cause strong exciton quenching through a small increase in methylammonium bromide (MABr) molar proportion, and we spatially confined the exciton in uniform MAPbBr3 nanograins (average diameter = 99.7 nanometers) formed by a nanocrystal pinning process and concomitant reduction of exciton diffusion length to 67 nanometers. These changes caused substantial increases in steady-state photoluminescence intensity and efficiency of MAPbBr3 nanograin layers.

  17. AlGaInN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes grown on Si(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipshidze, G.; Kuryatkov, V.; Borisov, B.; Holtz, M.; Nikishin, S.; Temkin, H.

    2002-01-01

    Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes grown on Si(111) by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy with ammonia are described. The layers are composed of superlattices of AlGaN/GaN and AlN/AlGaInN. The layers are doped n and p type with Si and Mg, respectively. Hole concentration of 4x10 17 cm -3 , with a mobility of 8 cm2/Vs, is measured in Al 0.4 Ga 0.6 N/GaN. We demonstrate effective n- and p-type doping of structures based on AlN/AlGaInN. Light-emitting diodes based on these structures show light emission between 290 and 334 nm

  18. Highly efficient single-layer dendrimer light-emitting diodes with balanced charge transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Markham, Jonathan P. J.; Namdas, Ebinazar B.; Samuel, Ifor D. W.; Lo, Shih-Chun; Burn, Paul L.

    2003-06-01

    High-efficiency single-layer-solution-processed green light-emitting diodes based on a phosphorescent dendrimer are demonstrated. A peak external quantum efficiency of 10.4% (35 cd/A) was measured for a first generation fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium cored dendrimer when blended with 4,4'-bis(N-carbazolyl)biphenyl and electron transporting 1,3,5-tris(2-N-phenylbenzimidazolyl)benzene at 8.1 V. A maximum power efficiency of 12.8 lm/W was measured also at 8.1 V and 550 cd/m2. These results indicate that, by simple blending of bipolar and electron-transporting molecules, highly efficient light-emitting diodes can be made employing a very simple device structure.

  19. Influence of Pre-trimethylindium flow treatment on blue light emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Bing; Zhao, Jun Liang; Dai, Hai Tao; Wang, Shu Guo; Lin, Ray-Ming; Chu, Fu-Chuan; Huang, Chou-Hsiung; Yu, Sheng-Fu; Sun, Xiao Wei

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Pre-trimethylindium (TMIn) flow treatment prior to quantum well growth on blue light emitting diode properties were investigated. High-resolution X-ray diffraction indicated that Pre-TMIn flow treatment did not change the composition of indium in quantum wells, but influenced electrical and optical properties of blue light emitting diode. Electroluminescence exhibited redshift with increasing TMIn treatment time. Though, the forward voltage became a little larger with longer Pre-TMIn treatment time due to the slight phase separation and indium aggregation, the efficiency droop of the device was improved effectively. - Highlights: • Pre-trimethylindium treatment can lead to longer wavelength. • External quantum efficiency can be improved effectively. • Electrical properties are not decreased using Pre-trimethylindium treatment

  20. Influence of Pre-trimethylindium flow treatment on blue light emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Bing; Zhao, Jun Liang [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Dai, Hai Tao, E-mail: htdai@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang, Shu Guo [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Lin, Ray-Ming, E-mail: rmlin@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electronic Engineering and Green Technology Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chu, Fu-Chuan; Huang, Chou-Hsiung [Graduate Institute of Electronic Engineering and Green Technology Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Yu, Sheng-Fu [Institute of Microelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Sun, Xiao Wei, E-mail: xwsun@sustc.edu.cn [South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, Guangdong (China)

    2014-01-31

    The effects of Pre-trimethylindium (TMIn) flow treatment prior to quantum well growth on blue light emitting diode properties were investigated. High-resolution X-ray diffraction indicated that Pre-TMIn flow treatment did not change the composition of indium in quantum wells, but influenced electrical and optical properties of blue light emitting diode. Electroluminescence exhibited redshift with increasing TMIn treatment time. Though, the forward voltage became a little larger with longer Pre-TMIn treatment time due to the slight phase separation and indium aggregation, the efficiency droop of the device was improved effectively. - Highlights: • Pre-trimethylindium treatment can lead to longer wavelength. • External quantum efficiency can be improved effectively. • Electrical properties are not decreased using Pre-trimethylindium treatment.

  1. Note: An online testing method for lifetime projection of high power light-emitting diode under accelerated reliability test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Chen, Quan; Luo, Xiaobing

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, due to the fast development of high power light-emitting diode (LED), its lifetime prediction and assessment have become a crucial issue. Although the in situ measurement has been widely used for reliability testing in laser diode community, it has not been applied commonly in LED community. In this paper, an online testing method for LED life projection under accelerated reliability test was proposed and the prototype was built. The optical parametric data were collected. The systematic error and the measuring uncertainty were calculated to be within 0.2% and within 2%, respectively. With this online testing method, experimental data can be acquired continuously and sufficient amount of data can be gathered. Thus, the projection fitting accuracy can be improved (r(2) = 0.954) and testing duration can be shortened.

  2. Using rare earth doped thiosilicate phosphors in white light emitting LEDs: Towards low colour temperature and high colour rendering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smet, P.F.; Korthout, K.; Haecke, J.E. van; Poelman, D.

    2008-01-01

    Rare earth doped thiosilicates are promising materials for use in phosphor converted light emitting diodes (pcLEDs). These phosphors (including the hosts Ca 2 SiS 4 , BaSi 2 S 5 and Ba 2 SiS 4 in combination with Ce 3+ and/or Eu 2+ doping) cover the entire visible part of the spectrum, as the emission colour can be changed from deep blue to red. The photoluminescence emission spectrum and the overlap of the excitation spectrum with the emission of pumping LEDs is evaluated. The trade-off between high colour rendering and high electrical-to-optical power efficiency is discussed by simulation with both blue and UV emitting LEDs. Finally, a phosphor combination with low colour temperature (3000 K) and high colour rendering (CRI = 93) is proposed

  3. Solution-Grown ZnO Films toward Transparent and Smart Dual-Color Light-Emitting Diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Li; Wang, Shijie; Chi, Dongzhi; Chua, Soo Jin

    2016-06-22

    An individual light-emitting diode (LED) capable of emitting different colors of light under different bias conditions not only allows for compact device integration but also extends the functionality of the LED beyond traditional illumination and display. Herein, we report a color-switchable LED based on solution-grown n-type ZnO on p-GaN/n-GaN heterojunction. The LED emits red light with a peak centered at ∼692 nm and a full width at half-maximum of ∼90 nm under forward bias, while it emits green light under reverse bias. These two lighting colors can be switched repeatedly by reversing the bias polarity. The bias-polarity-switched dual-color LED enables independent control over the lighting color and brightness of each emission with two-terminal operation. The results offer a promising strategy toward transparent, miniaturized, and smart LEDs, which hold great potential in optoelectronics and optical communication.

  4. A Review on Experimental Measurements for Understanding Efficiency Droop in InGaN-Based Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency droop in GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs under high injection current density perplexes the development of high-power solid-state lighting. Although the relevant study has lasted for about 10 years, its mechanism is still not thoroughly clear, and consequently its solution is also unsatisfactory up to now. Some emerging applications, e.g., high-speed visible light communication, requiring LED working under extremely high current density, makes the influence of efficiency droop become more serious. This paper reviews the experimental measurements on LED to explain the origins of droop in recent years, especially some new results reported after 2013. Particularly, the carrier lifetime of LED is analyzed intensively and its effects on LED droop behaviors are uncovered. Finally, possible solutions to overcome LED droop are discussed.

  5. Micro-light-emitting diodes with III–nitride tunnel junction contacts grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Hwang, David

    2017-12-13

    Micro-light-emitting diodesLEDs) with tunnel junction (TJ) contacts were grown entirely by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. A LED structure was grown, treated with UV ozone and hydrofluoric acid, and reloaded into the reactor for TJ regrowth. The silicon doping level of the n++-GaN TJ was varied to examine its effect on voltage. µLEDs from 2.5 × 10−5 to 0.01 mm2 in area were processed, and the voltage penalty of the TJ for the smallest µLED at 20 A/cm2 was 0.60 V relative to that for a standard LED with indium tin oxide. The peak external quantum efficiency of the TJ LED was 34%.

  6. Micro-light-emitting diodes with III–nitride tunnel junction contacts grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Hwang, David; Mughal, Asad J.; Wong, Matthew S.; Alhassan, Abdullah I.; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2017-01-01

    Micro-light-emitting diodesLEDs) with tunnel junction (TJ) contacts were grown entirely by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. A LED structure was grown, treated with UV ozone and hydrofluoric acid, and reloaded into the reactor for TJ regrowth. The silicon doping level of the n++-GaN TJ was varied to examine its effect on voltage. µLEDs from 2.5 × 10−5 to 0.01 mm2 in area were processed, and the voltage penalty of the TJ for the smallest µLED at 20 A/cm2 was 0.60 V relative to that for a standard LED with indium tin oxide. The peak external quantum efficiency of the TJ LED was 34%.

  7. InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode microwires of submillimeter length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, W. V., E-mail: lundin.vpegroup@mail.ioffe.ru; Rodin, S. N.; Sakharov, A. V.; Lundina, E. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Usov, S. O. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Research and Engineering Center of Submicron Heterostructures for Microelectronics (Russian Federation); Zadiranov, Yu. M.; Troshkov, S. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Tsatsulnikov, A. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Research and Engineering Center of Submicron Heterostructures for Microelectronics (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    Microcrystalline wire-like InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes designed as core–shell structures 400–600 μm in length are grown by metal–organic vapor-phase epitaxy on sapphire and silicon substrates. The technology of the titanium-nanolayer-induced ultrafast growth of nanowire and microwire crystals is used. As a current is passed through the microcrystals, an electroluminescence signal is observed in the blue–green spectral region.

  8. Highly Efficient Perovskite-Quantum-Dot Light-Emitting Diodes by Surface Engineering

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Jun; Quan, Li Na; Zhao, Yongbiao; Peng, Wei; Banavoth, Murali; Sarmah, Smritakshi P.; Yuan, Mingjian; Sinatra, Lutfan; AlYami, Noktan; Liu, Jiakai; Yassitepe, Emre; Yang, Zhenyu; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Mohammed, Omar F.; Lu, Zheng Hong; Kim, Dong Ha; Sargent, Edward H.; Bakr, Osman

    2016-01-01

    A two-step ligand-exchange strategy is developed, in which the long-carbon-chain ligands on all-inorganic perovskite (CsPbX3, X = Br, Cl) quantum dots (QDs) are replaced with halide-ion-pair ligands. Green and blue light-emitting diodes made from the halide-ion-paircapped quantum dots exhibit high external quantum efficiencies compared with the untreated QDs.

  9. Inkjet Printing of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Alcohol-Soluble Polyfluorenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odod, A. V.; Gadirov, R. M.; Solodova, T. A.; Kurtsevich, A. E.; Il'gach, D. M.; Yakimanskii, A. V.; Burtman, V.; Kopylova, T. N.

    2018-04-01

    Ink compositions for inkjet printing based on poly(9.9-dioctylfluorene) and its alcohol-soluble analog are created. Current-voltage, brightness-voltage, and spectral characteristics are compared for one- and twolayer polymer structures of organic light-emitting diodes. It is shown that the efficiency of the alcohol-soluble polyfluorene analog is higher compared to poly(9.9-dioctylfluorene), and the possibility of viscosity optimization is higher compared to aromatic chlorinated solvents.

  10. Extracting the emitter orientation in organic light-emitting diodes from external quantum efficiency measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Tobias D., E-mail: Tobias.Schmidt@physik.uni-augsburg.de; Reichardt, Lukas J.; Wehrmeister, Sebastian; Scholz, Bert J.; Mayr, Christian; Brütting, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Bruetting@physik.uni-augsburg.de [Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany); Rausch, Andreas F.; Wehlus, Thomas; Reusch, Thilo C. G. [OSRAM OLED GmbH, Wernerwerkstrasse 2, 93049 Regensburg (Germany); Ciarnáin, Rossá Mac; Danz, Norbert [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2014-07-28

    Emitter orientation will play a major role in future applications of organic light-emitting diodes due to its strong impact on the efficiency of the devices. Up to now, determining the orientation of transition dipole moments required elaborate angular-dependent measurements of the light emission pattern. In this paper, we present a simplified and straightforward method to extract the emitter orientation from external quantum efficiency measurements. We demonstrate the validity of the method on three different dye-doped emitting systems.

  11. Study of voltage decrease in organic light emitting diodes during the initial stage of lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusumano, P.

    2016-02-01

    We report the results of lifetime DC testing at constant current of not-encapsulated organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on Tris (8 idroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) as emitting material. In particular, a voltage decrease during the initial stage of the lifetime test is observed. The cause of this behavior is also discussed, mainly linked to initial Joule self-heating of the device, rising its temperature above room temperature until thermal equilibrium is reached at steady state.

  12. Advanced Oxidation of Tartrazine and Brilliant Blue with Pulsed Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Robert; Mudimbi, Patrick; Miller, Michael E.; Magnuson, Matthew; Willison, Stuart; Phillips, Rebecca; Harper, Willie F.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UVLEDs) coupled with hydrogen peroxide as an advanced oxidation process (AOP) for the degradation of two test chemicals. Brilliant Blue FCF consistently exhibited greater degradation than tartrazine, with 83% degradation after 300 minutes at the 100% duty cycle compared with only 17% degradation of tartrazine under the same conditions. These differences are attributable to the structural properties of the compounds. Duty...

  13. Highly Efficient Perovskite-Quantum-Dot Light-Emitting Diodes by Surface Engineering

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Jun

    2016-08-16

    A two-step ligand-exchange strategy is developed, in which the long-carbon-chain ligands on all-inorganic perovskite (CsPbX3, X = Br, Cl) quantum dots (QDs) are replaced with halide-ion-pair ligands. Green and blue light-emitting diodes made from the halide-ion-paircapped quantum dots exhibit high external quantum efficiencies compared with the untreated QDs.

  14. Degradation effects of the active region in UV-C light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaab, Johannes; Haefke, Joscha; Ruschel, Jan; Brendel, Moritz; Rass, Jens; Kolbe, Tim; Knauer, Arne; Weyers, Markus; Einfeldt, Sven; Guttmann, Martin; Kuhn, Christian; Enslin, Johannes; Wernicke, Tim; Kneissl, Michael

    2018-03-01

    An extensive analysis of the degradation characteristics of AlGaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes emitting around 265 nm is presented. The optical power of LEDs stressed at a constant dc current of 100 mA (current density = 67 A/cm2 and heatsink temperature = 20 °C) decreased to about 58% of its initial value after 250 h of operation. The origin of this degradation effect has been studied using capacitance-voltage and photocurrent spectroscopy measurements conducted before and after aging. The overall device capacitance decreased, which indicates a reduction of the net charges within the space-charge region of the pn-junction during operation. In parallel, the photocurrent at excitation energies between 3.8 eV and 4.5 eV and the photocurrent induced by band-to-band absorption in the quantum barriers at 5.25 eV increased during operation. The latter effect can be explained by a reduction of the donor concentration in the active region of the device. This effect could be attributed to the compensation of donors by the activation or diffusion of acceptors, such as magnesium dopants or group-III vacancies, in the pn-junction space-charge region. The results are consistent with the observed reduction in optical power since deep level acceptors can also act as non-radiative recombination centers.

  15. Nanostructured High Performance Ultraviolet and Blue Light Emitting Diodes for Solid State Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arto V. Nurmikko; Jung Han

    2007-03-31

    We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and near ultraviolet for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the duration of the contract period include (i) new means of synthesizing AlGaN and InN quantum dots by droplet heteroepitaxy, (ii) synthesis of AlGaInN nanowires as building blocks for GaN-based microcavity devices, (iii) progress towards direct epitaxial alignment of the dense arrays of nanowires, (iv) observation and measurements of stimulated emission in dense InGaN nanopost arrays, (v) design and fabrication of InGaN photonic crystal emitters, and (vi) observation and measurements of enhanced fluorescence from coupled quantum dot and plasmonic nanostructures. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

  16. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting [Ventura, CA

    2011-04-26

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  17. Surface plasmon enhanced organic light emitting diodes by gold nanoparticles with different sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Ying-Chung [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kan-Lin [Department of Electronic Engineering, Fortune Institute of Technology, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chien-Jung, E-mail: chien@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • Different varieties, sizes, and shapes for nanoparticles will generate different surface plasmon resonance effects in the devices. • The red-shift phenomenon for absorption peaks is because of an increasing contribution of higher-order plasmon modes for the larger gold nanoparticles. • The mobility of electrons in the electron-transport layer of organic light-emitting diodes is a few orders of magnitude lower than that of holes in the hole-transport layer of organic light-emitting diodes. - Abstract: The influence of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with different sizes doped into (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate)) (PEDOT:PSS) on the performance of organic light-emitting diodes is investigated in this study. The current efficiency of the device, at a current density of 145 mA/cm, with PEDOT:PSS doped with GNPs of 8 nm is about 1.57 times higher than that of the device with prime PEDOT:PSS because the absorption peak of GNPs is closest to the photoluminescence peak of the emission layer, resulting in maximum surface plasmon resonance effect in the device. In addition, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy also reveals the maximum surface plasmon resonance effect in the device when the mean particle size of GNPs is 8 nm.

  18. Invariable optical properties of phosphor-free white light-emitting diode under electrical stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Long; Hao, Fang; Sheng-Li, Qi; Li-Wen, Sang; Wen-Yu, Cao; Jian, Yan; Jun-Jing, Deng; Zhi-Jian, Yang; Guo-Yi, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports that a dual-wavelength white light-emitting diode is fabricated by using a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition method. Through a 200-hours' current stress, the reverse leakage current of this light-emitting diode increases with the aging time, but the optical properties remained unchanged despite the enhanced reverse leakage current. Transmission electron microscopy and cathodeluminescence images show that indium atoms were assembled in and around V-shape pits with various compositions, which can be ascribed to the emitted white light. Evolution of cathodeluminescence intensities under electron irradiation is also performed. Combining cathodeluminescence intensities under electron irradiation and above results, the increase of leakage channels and crystalline quality degradation are realized. Although leakage channels increase with aging, potential fluctuation caused by indium aggregation can effectively avoid the impact of leakage channels. Indium aggregation can be attributed to the mechanism of preventing optical degradation in phosphor-free white light-emitting diode. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  19. Resonant cavity light-emitting diodes based on dielectric passive cavity structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledentsov, N.; Shchukin, V. A.; Kropp, J.-R.; Zschiedrich, L.; Schmidt, F.; Ledentsov, N. N.

    2017-02-01

    A novel design for high brightness planar technology light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and LED on-wafer arrays on absorbing substrates is proposed. The design integrates features of passive dielectric cavity deposited on top of an oxide- semiconductor distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), the p-n junction with a light emitting region is introduced into the top semiconductor λ/4 DBR period. A multilayer dielectric structure containing a cavity layer and dielectric DBRs is further processed by etching into a micrometer-scale pattern. An oxide-confined aperture is further amended for current and light confinement. We study the impact of the placement of the active region into the maximum or minimum of the optical field intensity and study an impact of the active region positioning on light extraction efficiency. We also study an etching profile composed of symmetric rings in the etched passive cavity over the light emitting area. The bottom semiconductor is an AlGaAs-AlAs multilayer DBR selectively oxidized with the conversion of the AlAs layers into AlOx to increase the stopband width preventing the light from entering the semiconductor substrate. The approach allows to achieve very high light extraction efficiency in a narrow vertical angle keeping the reasonable thermal and current conductivity properties. As an example, a micro-LED structure has been modeled with AlGaAs-AlAs or AlGaAs-AlOx DBRs and an active region based on InGaAlP quantum well(s) emitting in the orange spectral range at 610 nm. A passive dielectric SiO2 cavity is confined by dielectric Ta2O5/SiO2 and AlGaAs-AlOx DBRs. Cylindrically-symmetric structures with multiple ring patterns are modeled. It is demonstrated that the extraction coefficient of light to the air can be increased from 1.3% up to above 90% in a narrow vertical angle (full width at half maximum (FWHM) below 20°). For very small oxide-confined apertures 100nm the narrowing of the FWHM for light extraction can be reduced down to 5

  20. Feasibility of ultraviolet-light-emitting diodes as an alternative light source for photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Lanfang H; Richards, Jeffrey T; Coutts, Janelle L; Soler, Robert; Maxik, Fred; Wheeler, Raymond M

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether ultraviolet-light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) could serve as an efficient photon source for heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO). An LED module consisting of 12 high-power UV-A (lambda max = 365 nm) LEDs was designed to be interchangeable with a UV-A fluorescent black light blue (BLB) lamp for a bench scale annular reactor packed with silica-titania composite (STC) pellets. Lighting and thermal properties of the module were characterized to assess its uniformity and total irradiance. A forward current (I(F)) of 100 mA delivered an average irradiance of 4.0 mW cm(-2) at a distance of 8 mm, which is equivalent to the maximum output of the BLB, but the irradiance of the LED module was less uniform than that of the BLB. The LED and BLB reactors were tested for the oxidization of ethanol (50 ppm(v)) in a continuous-flow-through mode with 0.94 sec residence time. At the same average irradiance, the UV-A LED reactor resulted in a lower CO2 production rate (19.8 vs. 28.6 nmol L(-1) s(-1)), lower ethanol removal (80% vs. 91%), and lower mineralization efficiency (28% vs. 44%) than the UV-A BLB reactor. Ethanol mineralization was enhanced with the increase of the irradiance at the catalyst surface. This result suggests that reduced ethanol mineralization in the LED reactor relative to the BLB reactor at the same average irradiance could be attributed to the nonuniform irradiance over the photocatalyst, that is, a portion of the catalyst was exposed to less than the average irradiance. The potential of UV-A LEDs may be fully realized by optimizing the light distribution over the catalyst and utilizing their instantaneous "on" and "off" feature for periodic irradiation. Nevertheless, our results also showed that the current UV-A LED module had the same wall plug efficiency (WPE) of 13% as that of the UV-A BLB, demonstrating that UV-A LEDs are a viable photon source both in terms of WPE and PCO efficiency.

  1. Feasibility of Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes as an Alternative Light Source for Photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Langanf H.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Soler, Robert; Maxik, Fred; Coutts, Janelle; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) could serve as an alternative photon source efficiently for heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO). An LED module consisting of 12 high-power UV-A LEDs was designed to be interchangeable with a UV-A fluorescent black light blue (BLB) lamp in a Silica-Titania Composite (STC) packed bed annular reactor. Lighting and thermal properties were characterized to assess the uniformity and total irradiant output. A forward current of (I(sub F)) 100 mA delivered an average irradiance of 4.0 m W cm(exp -2), which is equivalent to the maximum output of the BLB, but the irradiance of the LED module was less uniform than that of the BLB. The LED- and BLB-reactors were tested for the oxidization of 50 ppmv ethanol in a continuous flow-through mode with 0.94 sec space time. At the same irradiance, the UV-A LED reactor resulted in a lower PCO rate constant than the UV-A BLB reactor (19.8 vs. 28.6 nM CO2 sec-I), and consequently lower ethanol removal (80% vs. 91%) and mineralization efficiency (28% vs. 44%). Ethanol mineralization increased in direct proportion to the irradiance at the catalyst surface. This result suggests that reduced ethanol mineralization in the LED- reactor could be traced to uneven irradiance over the photocatalyst, leaving a portion of the catalyst was under-irradiated. The potential of UV-A LEDs may be fully realized by optimizing the light distribution over the catalyst and utilizing their instantaneous "on" and "off' feature for periodic irradiation. Nevertheless, the current UV-A LED module had the same wall plug efficiency (WPE) of 13% as that of the UV-A BLB. These results demonstrated that UV-A LEDs are a viable photon source both in terms of WPE and PCO efficiency.

  2. Fabrication, characterization and applications of flexible vertical InGaN micro-light emitting diode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Pengfei; McKendry, Jonathan J D; Gu, Erdan; Chen, Zhizhong; Sun, Yongjian; Zhang, Guoyi; Dawson, Martin D; Liu, Ran

    2016-01-11

    Flexible vertical InGaN micro-light emitting diode (micro-LED) arrays have been fabricated and characterized for potential applications in flexible micro-displays and visible light communication. The LED epitaxial layers were transferred from initial sapphire substrates to flexible AuSn substrates by metal bonding and laser lift off techniques. The current versus voltage characteristics of flexible micro-LEDs degraded after bending the devices, but the electroluminescence spectra show little shift even under a very small bending radius 3 mm. The high thermal conductivity of flexible metal substrates enables high thermal saturation current density and high light output power of the flexible micro-LEDs, benefiting the potential applications in flexible high-brightness micro-displays and high-speed visible light communication. We have achieved ~40 MHz modulation bandwidth and 120 Mbit/s data transmission speed for a typical flexible micro-LED.

  3. Wireless Power Transmission to Organic Light Emitting Diode Lighting Panel with Magnetically Coupled Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Hae; Han, Jun-Han; Kang, Seung-Youl; Cheon, Sanghoon; Lee, Myung-Lae; Ahn, Seong-Deok; Zyung, Taehyoung; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Moon, Jaehyun; Chu, Hye Yong

    2012-09-01

    We are successful to lit the organic light emitting diode (OLED) lighting panel through the magnetically coupled wireless power transmission technology. For the wireless power transmission, we used the operation frequency 932 kHz, specially designed double spiral type transmitter, small and thin receiver on the four layered printed circuit board, and schottky diodes for the full bridge rectifier. Our white OLED is a hybrid type, in which phosphorescent and fluorescent organics are used together to generate stable white color. The total efficiency of power transmission is around 72%.

  4. White organic light emitting diodes based on fluorene-carbazole dendrimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usluer, Özlem; Demic, Serafettin; Kus, Mahmut; Özel, Faruk; Serdar Sariciftci, Niyazi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report on theProd. Type: FTP fabrication and characterization of blue and white light emitting devices based on two fluorene-carbazole containing dendrimers and para-sexiphenyl (6P) oligomers. Blue light emitting diodes were fabricated using 9′,9″-(9,9-dioctyl-9H-fluorene-2,7-diyl)bis-9′H-9,3′:6′,9″-tercarbazole (OFC-G2) and 9′,9″-(9,9′-spirobi[fluorene]-2,7-diyl)bis-9′H-9,3′:6′,9″-tercarbazole (SBFC-G2) dendrimers as a hole transport and emissive layer (EML) and 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) as an electron transport layer. White light emitting diodes were fabricated using 6P and these two dendrimers as an EML. OLED device with the structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS (50 nm)/OFC-G2 (40 nm)/6P (20 nm)/LiF:Al (0.5:100 nm) shows maximum luminance of nearly 1400 cd/m 2 and a Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of (0.27, 0.30) at 12 V. -- Highlights: • White organic light emitting diodes have been fabricated using two fluorene-carbazole dendrimers and para-sexiphenyl (6P) oligomers. • When only these two dendrimers are used as EML, OLED devices are emitted blue light. • The emission colors of OLED devices change from blue to white when 6P is coated on dendrimer films

  5. White organic light emitting diodes based on fluorene-carbazole dendrimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usluer, Özlem, E-mail: usluerozlem@yahoo.com.tr [Department of Chemistry, Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University, 48000 Muğla (Turkey); Demic, Serafettin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Izmir Katip Çelebi University, 35620 Çiğli, Izmir (Turkey); Kus, Mahmut, E-mail: mahmutkus1@gmail.com [Chemical Engineering Department and Advanced Technology R and D Center, Selçuk University, Konya (Turkey); Özel, Faruk [Chemical Engineering Department and Advanced Technology R and D Center, Selçuk University, Konya (Turkey); Serdar Sariciftci, Niyazi [Linz Institute for Organic Solar Cells (LIOS), Physical Chemistry, Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, we report on theProd. Type: FTP fabrication and characterization of blue and white light emitting devices based on two fluorene-carbazole containing dendrimers and para-sexiphenyl (6P) oligomers. Blue light emitting diodes were fabricated using 9′,9″-(9,9-dioctyl-9H-fluorene-2,7-diyl)bis-9′H-9,3′:6′,9″-tercarbazole (OFC-G2) and 9′,9″-(9,9′-spirobi[fluorene]-2,7-diyl)bis-9′H-9,3′:6′,9″-tercarbazole (SBFC-G2) dendrimers as a hole transport and emissive layer (EML) and 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) as an electron transport layer. White light emitting diodes were fabricated using 6P and these two dendrimers as an EML. OLED device with the structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS (50 nm)/OFC-G2 (40 nm)/6P (20 nm)/LiF:Al (0.5:100 nm) shows maximum luminance of nearly 1400 cd/m{sup 2} and a Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of (0.27, 0.30) at 12 V. -- Highlights: • White organic light emitting diodes have been fabricated using two fluorene-carbazole dendrimers and para-sexiphenyl (6P) oligomers. • When only these two dendrimers are used as EML, OLED devices are emitted blue light. • The emission colors of OLED devices change from blue to white when 6P is coated on dendrimer films.

  6. Efficiency Drop in Green InGaN /GaN Light Emitting Diodes: The Role of Random Alloy Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auf der Maur, Matthias; Pecchia, Alessandro; Penazzi, Gabriele; Rodrigues, Walter; Di Carlo, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    White light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on III-nitride InGaN /GaN quantum wells currently offer the highest overall efficiency for solid state lighting applications. Although current phosphor-converted white LEDs have high electricity-to-light conversion efficiencies, it has been recently pointed out that the full potential of solid state lighting could be exploited only by color mixing approaches without employing phosphor-based wavelength conversion. Such an approach requires direct emitting LEDs of different colors, including, in particular, the green-yellow range of the visible spectrum. This range, however, suffers from a systematic drop in efficiency, known as the "green gap," whose physical origin has not been understood completely so far. In this work, we show by atomistic simulations that a consistent part of the green gap in c -plane InGaN /GaN -based light emitting diodes may be attributed to a decrease in the radiative recombination coefficient with increasing indium content due to random fluctuations of the indium concentration naturally present in any InGaN alloy.

  7. Multispectral imaging of the ocular fundus using light emitting diode illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everdell, N L; Styles, I B; Calcagni, A; Gibson, J; Hebden, J; Claridge, E

    2010-09-01

    We present an imaging system based on light emitting diode (LED) illumination that produces multispectral optical images of the human ocular fundus. It uses a conventional fundus camera equipped with a high power LED light source and a highly sensitive electron-multiplying charge coupled device camera. It is able to take pictures at a series of wavelengths in rapid succession at short exposure times, thereby eliminating the image shift introduced by natural eye movements (saccades). In contrast with snapshot systems the images retain full spatial resolution. The system is not suitable for applications where the full spectral resolution is required as it uses discrete wavebands for illumination. This is not a problem in retinal imaging where the use of selected wavelengths is common. The modular nature of the light source allows new wavelengths to be introduced easily and at low cost. The use of wavelength-specific LEDs as a source is preferable to white light illumination and subsequent filtering of the remitted light as it minimizes the total light exposure of the subject. The system is controlled via a graphical user interface that enables flexible control of intensity, duration, and sequencing of sources in synchrony with the camera. Our initial experiments indicate that the system can acquire multispectral image sequences of the human retina at exposure times of 0.05 s in the range of 500-620 nm with mean signal to noise ratio of 17 dB (min 11, std 4.5), making it suitable for quantitative analysis with application to the diagnosis and screening of eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration.

  8. Optical diffraction tomography microscopy with transport of intensity equation using a light-emitting diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaji; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Jialin; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Yan; Zuo, Chao

    2017-08-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an effective label-free technique for quantitatively refractive index imaging, which enables long-term monitoring of the internal three-dimensional (3D) structures and molecular composition of biological cells with minimal perturbation. However, existing optical tomographic methods generally rely on interferometric configuration for phase measurement and sophisticated mechanical systems for sample rotation or beam scanning. Thereby, the measurement is suspect to phase error coming from the coherent speckle, environmental vibrations, and mechanical error during data acquisition process. To overcome these limitations, we present a new ODT technique based on non-interferometric phase retrieval and programmable illumination emitting from a light-emitting diode (LED) array. The experimental system is built based on a traditional bright field microscope, with the light source replaced by a programmable LED array, which provides angle-variable quasi-monochromatic illumination with an angular coverage of ±37 degrees in both x and y directions (corresponding to an illumination numerical aperture of ∼0.6). Transport of intensity equation (TIE) is utilized to recover the phase at different illumination angles, and the refractive index distribution is reconstructed based on the ODT framework under first Rytov approximation. The missing-cone problem in ODT is addressed by using the iterative non-negative constraint algorithm, and the misalignment of the LED array is further numerically corrected to improve the accuracy of refractive index quantification. Experiments on polystyrene beads and thick biological specimens show that the proposed approach allows accurate refractive index reconstruction while greatly reduced the system complexity and environmental sensitivity compared to conventional interferometric ODT approaches.

  9. Computational diffraction tomographic microscopy with transport of intensity equation using a light-emitting diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaji; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Jialin; Zuo, Chao

    2017-10-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an effective label-free technique for quantitatively refractive index imaging, which enables long-term monitoring of the internal three-dimensional (3D) structures and molecular composition of biological cells with minimal perturbation. However, existing optical tomographic methods generally rely on interferometric configuration for phase measurement and sophisticated mechanical systems for sample rotation or beam scanning. Thereby, the measurement is suspect to phase error coming from the coherent speckle, environmental vibrations, and mechanical error during data acquisition process. To overcome these limitations, we present a new ODT technique based on non-interferometric phase retrieval and programmable illumination emitting from a light-emitting diode (LED) array. The experimental system is built based on a traditional bright field microscope, with the light source replaced by a programmable LED array, which provides angle-variable quasi-monochromatic illumination with an angular coverage of +/-37 degrees in both x and y directions (corresponding to an illumination numerical aperture of ˜ 0.6). Transport of intensity equation (TIE) is utilized to recover the phase at different illumination angles, and the refractive index distribution is reconstructed based on the ODT framework under first Rytov approximation. The missing-cone problem in ODT is addressed by using the iterative non-negative constraint algorithm, and the misalignment of the LED array is further numerically corrected to improve the accuracy of refractive index quantification. Experiments on polystyrene beads and thick biological specimens show that the proposed approach allows accurate refractive index reconstruction while greatly reduced the system complexity and environmental sensitivity compared to conventional interferometric ODT approaches.

  10. Low driving voltage blue, green, yellow, red and white organic light-emitting diodes with a simply double light-emitting structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhensong; Yue, Shouzhen; Wu, Yukun; Yan, Pingrui; Wu, Qingyang; Qu, Dalong; Liu, Shiyong; Zhao, Yi

    2014-01-27

    Low driving voltage blue, green, yellow, red and white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with a common simply double emitting layer (D-EML) structure are investigated. Our OLEDs without any out-coupling schemes as well as n-doping strategies show low driving voltage, e.g. white OLED, respectively. This work demonstrates that the low driving voltages and high efficiencies can be simultaneously realized with a common simply D-EML structure.

  11. Slanted n-ZnO/p-GaN nanorod arrays light-emitting diodes grown by oblique-angle deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ju Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available High-efficient ZnO-based nanorod array light-emitting diodes (LEDs were grown by an oblique-angle deposition scheme. Due to the shadowing effect, the inclined ZnO vapor-flow was selectively deposited on the tip surfaces of pre-fabricated p-GaN nanorod arrays, resulting in the formation of nanosized heterojunctions. The LED architecture composed of the slanted n-ZnO film on p-GaN nanorod arrays exhibits a well-behaving current rectification of junction diode with low turn-on voltage of 4.7 V, and stably emits bluish-white luminescence with dominant peak of 390 nm under the operation of forward injection currents. In general, as the device fabrication does not involve passivation of using a polymer or sophisticated material growth techniques, the revealed scheme might be readily applied on other kinds of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  12. Manipulating Ion Migration for Highly Stable Light-Emitting Diodes with Single-Crystalline Organometal Halide Perovskite Microplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingming; Shan, Xin; Geske, Thomas; Li, Junqiang; Yu, Zhibin

    2017-06-27

    Ion migration has been commonly observed as a detrimental phenomenon in organometal halide perovskite semiconductors, causing the measurement hysteresis in solar cells and ultrashort operation lifetimes in light-emitting diodes. In this work, ion migration is utilized for the formation of a p-i-n junction at ambient temperature in single-crystalline organometal halide perovskites. The junction is subsequently stabilized by quenching the ionic movement at a low temperature. Such a strategy of manipulating the ion migration has led to efficient single-crystalline light-emitting diodes that emit 2.3 eV photons starting at 1.8 V and sustain a continuous operation for 54 h at ∼5000 cd m -2 without degradation of brightness. In addition, a whispering-gallery-mode cavity and exciton-exciton interaction in the perovskite microplatelets have both been observed that can be potentially useful for achieving electrically driven laser diodes based on single-crystalline organometal halide perovskite semiconductors.

  13. Enhanced Output Power of Near-Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diodes by p-GaN Micro-Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Ke-Xiong; Liang, Hong-Wei; Song, Shi-Wei; Yang, De-Chao; Shen, Ren-Sheng; Liu, Yang; Xia, Xiao-Chuan; Luo, Ying-Min; Du, Guo-Tong

    2014-02-01

    Near-ultraviolet (UV) InGaN/AlGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are grown by low-pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The scanning electronic microscope image shows that the p-GaN micro-rods are formed above the interface of p-AlGaN/p-GaN due to the rapid growth rate of p-GaN in the vertical direction. The p-GaN micro-rods greatly increase the escape probability of photons inside the LED structure. Electroluminescence intensities of the 372 nm UV LED lamps with p-GaN micro rods are 88% higher than those of the flat surface LED samples.

  14. Effect of Interface Nanotexture on Light Extraction of InGaN-Based Green Light Emitting Diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao-Bo, Pan; Sheng-Li, Qi; Hao, Fang; Guo-Yi, Zhang; Mao-Sheng, Hao

    2010-01-01

    We report the enhancement of the light extraction of InGaN-based green light emitting diodes (LEDs) via the interface nanotexturing. The texture consists of high-density nanocraters on the surface of a sapphire substrate with an in situ etching. The width of nanocraters is about 0.5 μm and the depth is around 0.1 μm. It is demonstrated that the LEDs with interface texture exhibit about a 27% improvement in luminance intensity, compared with standard LEDs. High power InGaN-based green LEDs are obtained by using the interface nanotexture. An optical ray-tracing simulation is performed to investigate the effect of interface nanotexture on light extraction. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  15. AlGaN-Based Deep-Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes Fabricated on AlN/sapphire Template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Wen, Sang; Zhi-Xin, Qin; Hao, Fang; Yan-Zhao, Zhang; Tao, Li; Zheng-Yu, Xu; Zhi-Jian, Yang; Bo, Shen; Guo-Yi, Zhang; Shu-Ping, Li; Wei-Huang, Yang; Hang-Yang, Chen; Da-Yi, Liu; Jun-Yong, Kang

    2009-01-01

    We report on the growth and fabrication of deep ultraviolet (DUV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) on an AlN template which was grown on a pulsed atomic-layer epitaxial buffer layer. Threading dislocation densities in the AlN layer are greatly decreased with the introduction of this buffer layer. The crystalline quality of the AlGaN epilayer is further improved by using a low-temperature GaN interlayer between AlGaN and AlN. Electroluminescences of different DUV-LED devices at a wavelength of between 262 and 317 nm are demonstrated. To improve the hole concentration of p-type AlGaN, Mg-doping with trimethylindium assistance approach is performed. It is found that the serial resistance of DUV-LED decreases and the performance of DUV-LED such as EL properties is improved. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  16. Tailoring of polarization in electron blocking layer for electron confinement and hole injection in ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yu-Hsuan; Pilkuhn, Manfred H.; Fu, Yi-Keng; Chu, Mu-Tao; Huang, Shyh-Jer; Su, Yan-Kuin; Wang, Kang L.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) with graded aluminum composition on electron confinement and hole injection in AlGaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated. The light output power of LED with graded AlGaN EBL was markedly improved, comparing to LED with conventional EBL. In experimental results, a high increment of 86.7% can be obtained in light output power. Simulation analysis shows that via proper modification of the barrier profile from the last barrier of the active region to EBL, not only the elimination of electron overflow to p-type layer can be achieved but also the hole injection into the active region can be enhanced, compared to a conventional LED structure. The dominant factor to the performance improvement is shown to be the modulation of polarization field by the graded Al composition in EBL

  17. Performance improvement of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes with triangular- shaped multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Li-Hong; Zheng, Qing-Hong; Liu, Bao-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Triangular-shaped InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown on a sapphire substrate were adopted as an active layer of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The temperature dependence of the normalized integrated photoluminescence (PL) intensity showed that the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of the LEDs with triangular-shaped MQW is much higher than that of the LEDs with conventional rectangular MQW structures. The electroluminescence (EL) spectra of the two series devices have been comparatively studied as functions of injection current. It was found that the device with the triangular-shaped MQW structure exhibited a stronger intensity and a narrower linewidth. Furthermore, the peak energy is nearly independent of the injection current, indicating that the triangular MQW LEDs are more efficient and stable than the rectangular ones

  18. Improved performance of GaN based light emitting diodes with ex-situ sputtered AlN nucleation layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo-Wei Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal quality, electrical and optical properties of GaN based light emitting diodes (LEDs with ex-situ sputtered physical vapor deposition (PVD aluminum nitride (AlN nucleation layers were investigated. It was found that the crystal quality in terms of defect density and x-ray diffraction linewidth was greatly improved in comparison to LEDs with in-situ low temperature GaN nucleation layer. The light output power was 3.7% increased and the reverse bias voltage of leakage current was twice on LEDs with ex-situ PVD AlN nucleation layers. However, larger compressive strain was discovered in LEDs with ex-situ PVD AlN nucleation layers. The study shows the potential and constrain in applying ex-situ PVD AlN nucleation layers to fabricate high quality GaN crystals in various optoelectronics.

  19. Tailoring of polarization in electron blocking layer for electron confinement and hole injection in ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yu-Hsuan; Pilkuhn, Manfred H. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Fu, Yi-Keng; Chu, Mu-Tao [Electronics and Optoelectronics Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shyh-Jer, E-mail: yksu@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: totaljer48@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Su, Yan-Kuin, E-mail: yksu@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: totaljer48@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, Kun-Shan University, Tainan 71003, Taiwan (China); Wang, Kang L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-21

    The influence of the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) with graded aluminum composition on electron confinement and hole injection in AlGaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated. The light output power of LED with graded AlGaN EBL was markedly improved, comparing to LED with conventional EBL. In experimental results, a high increment of 86.7% can be obtained in light output power. Simulation analysis shows that via proper modification of the barrier profile from the last barrier of the active region to EBL, not only the elimination of electron overflow to p-type layer can be achieved but also the hole injection into the active region can be enhanced, compared to a conventional LED structure. The dominant factor to the performance improvement is shown to be the modulation of polarization field by the graded Al composition in EBL.

  20. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure Lighting at U.S. Department of Labor Headquarters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2013-03-01

    This report documents a solid-state lighting (SSL) technology demonstration at the parking structure of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) Headquarters in Washington, DC, in which light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires were substituted for the incumbent high-pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires and evaluated for relative light quantity and performance. The demonstration results show energy savings of 52% from the initial conversion of HPS to the LED product. These savings were increased to 88% by using occupancy sensor controls that were ultimately set to reduce power to 10% of high state operation after a time delay of 2.5 minutes. Because of the relatively high cost of the LED luminaires at their time of purchase for this project (2010), the simple payback periods were 6.5 years and 4.9 years for retrofit and new construction scenarios, respectively. Staff at DOL Headquarters reported high satisfaction with the operation of the LED product.

  1. Optimization of emission color and efficiency of organic light emitting diodes for lighting applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Stefan; Krause, Ralf [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Kozlowski, Fryderyk; Schmid, Guenter; Hunze, Arvid [Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Winnacker, Albrecht [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In recent years the performance of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) has reached a level where OLED lighting presents an interesting application target. Research activities therefore focus amongst other things on the development of high efficient and stable white light emitting devices. We demonstrate how the color coordinates can be adjusted to achieve a warm white emission spectrum, whereas the OLED stack contains phosphorescent red and green dyes combined with a fluorescent blue one. Detailed results are presented with respect to a variation of layer thicknesses and dopant concentrations of the emission layers. Furthermore the influence of various dye molecules and hence different energy level alignments between host and dopants on color and efficiency will be discussed.

  2. Zinc oxide nanorods/polymer hybrid heterojunctions for white light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willander, M.; Nur, O.; Zaman, S.; Zainelabdin, A.; Bano, N.; Hussain, I.

    2011-06-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) with its deep level defect emission covering the whole visible spectrum holds promise for the development of intrinsic white lighting sources with no need of using phosphors for light conversion. ZnO nanorods (NRs) grown on flexible plastic as substrate using a low temperature approach (down to 50 °C) were combined with different organic semiconductors to form hybrid junction. White electroluminescence (EL) was observed from these hybrid junctions. The configuration used for the hybrid white light emitting diodes (LEDs) consists of two-layers of polymers on the flexible plastic with ZnO NRs on the top. The inorganic/organic hybrid heterojunction has been fabricated by spin coating the p-type polymer poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT : PSS) for hole injection with an ionization potential of 5.1 eV and poly(9, 9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) is used as blue emitting material with a bandgap of 3.3 eV. ZnO NRs are grown on top of the organic layers. Two other configurations were also fabricated; these are using a single MEH PPV (red-emitting polymer) instead of the PFO and the third configuration was obtained from a blend of the PFO and the MEH PPV. The white LEDs were characterized by scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction (XRD), current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, room temperature photoluminescence (PL) and EL. The EL spectrum reveals a broad emission band covering the range from 420 to 800 nm, and the emissions causing this white luminescence were identified.

  3. Zinc oxide nanorods/polymer hybrid heterojunctions for white light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willander, M; Nur, O; Zaman, S; Zainelabdin, A; Bano, N; Hussain, I

    2011-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) with its deep level defect emission covering the whole visible spectrum holds promise for the development of intrinsic white lighting sources with no need of using phosphors for light conversion. ZnO nanorods (NRs) grown on flexible plastic as substrate using a low temperature approach (down to 50 0 C) were combined with different organic semiconductors to form hybrid junction. White electroluminescence (EL) was observed from these hybrid junctions. The configuration used for the hybrid white light emitting diodes (LEDs) consists of two-layers of polymers on the flexible plastic with ZnO NRs on the top. The inorganic/organic hybrid heterojunction has been fabricated by spin coating the p-type polymer poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT : PSS) for hole injection with an ionization potential of 5.1 eV and poly(9, 9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) is used as blue emitting material with a bandgap of 3.3 eV. ZnO NRs are grown on top of the organic layers. Two other configurations were also fabricated; these are using a single MEH PPV (red-emitting polymer) instead of the PFO and the third configuration was obtained from a blend of the PFO and the MEH PPV. The white LEDs were characterized by scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction (XRD), current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, room temperature photoluminescence (PL) and EL. The EL spectrum reveals a broad emission band covering the range from 420 to 800 nm, and the emissions causing this white luminescence were identified.

  4. Light-emitting diode assessment of dentinal defects: the role of presumed extraction forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Santos Coelho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The evaluation of iatrogenic dentinal defects in extracted teeth may be influenced by extraction forces and prolonged dry times. The purpose of this study was to compare the presence of dentinal defects in freshly extracted, periodontally compromised teeth with those in a group of teeth with uncontrolled extraction forces and storage time. Materials and Methods The experimental group consisted of eighteen roots obtained from teeth extracted due to periodontal reasons with class II or III mobility. They were kept in saline and sectioned within 1 hour following extraction. The control group consisted of matched root types obtained from an anonymous tooth collection, consistent with previous dentinal defect studies. The slices were obtained at 3, 6, and 9 mm from the apex. The imaging process exposed all specimens to no more than 60 seconds of dry time. The × 12.8 magnification was used for the 9 mm slices and × 19.2 magnification for the 3 mm and 6 mm slices under light-emitting diode (LED transillumination. The root canal spaces and periodontal tissues were masked to minimize extraneous factors that might influence the evaluators. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results Dentinal defects were detected in 17% of the experimental group teeth, compared to 61% of control teeth (p = 0.015. Conclusions LED transillumination assessment of freshly extracted roots with class II or III mobility showed smaller number of dentinal defects than roots with uncontrolled storage time and extraction forces. The use of freshly extracted roots with mobility should be considered for future dental defect assessment studies.

  5. Chip-scale white flip-chip light-emitting diode containing indium phosphide/zinc selenide quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Bingfeng; Yan, Linchao; Lao, Yuqin; Ma, Yanfei; Chen, Zimin; Ma, Xuejin; Zhuo, Yi; Pei, Yanli; Wang, Gang

    2017-08-01

    A method for preparing a quantum dot (QD)-white light-emitting diode (WLED) is reported. Holes were etched in the SiO2 layer deposited on the sapphire substrate of the flip-chip LED by inductively coupled plasma, and these holes were then filled with QDs. An ultraviolet-curable resin was then spin-coated on top of the QD-containing SiO2 layer, and the resin was cured to act as a protecting layer. The reflective sidewall structure minimized sidelight leakage. The fabrication of the QD-WLED is simple in preparation and compatible with traditional LED processes, which was the minimum size of the WLED chip-scale integrated package. InP/ZnS core-shell QDs were used as the converter in the WLED. A blue light-emitting diode with a flip-chip structure was used as the excitation source. The QD-WLED exhibited color temperatures from 5900 to 6400 K and Commission Internationale De L'Elcairage color coordinates from (0.315, 0.325) to (0.325, 0.317), under drive currents from 100 to 400 mA. The QD-WLED exhibited stable optoelectronic properties.

  6. Warm White Light-Emitting Diodes Based on a Novel Orange Cationic Iridium(III) Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huaijun; Meng, Guoyun; Chen, Zeyu; Wang, Kaimin; Zhou, Qiang; Wang, Zhengliang

    2017-06-16

    A novel orange cationic iridium(III) complex [(TPTA)₂Ir(dPPOA)]PF₆ (TPTA: 3,4,5-triphenyl-4 H -1,2,4-triazole, dPPOA: N,N-diphenyl-4-(5-(pyridin-2-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)aniline) was synthesized and used as a phosphor in light-emitting diodes (LEDs). [(TPTA)₂Ir(dPPOA)]PF₆ has high thermal stability with a decomposition temperature ( T d ) of 375 °C, and its relative emission intensity at 100 °C is 88.8% of that at 25°C. When only [(TPTA)₂Ir(dPPOA)]PF₆ was used as a phosphor at 6.0 wt % in silicone and excited by a blue GaN (GaN: gallium nitride) chip (450 nm), an orange LED was obtained. A white LED fabricated by a blue GaN chip (450 nm) and only yellow phosphor Y₃Al₅O 12 :Ce 3+ (YAG:Ce) (1.0 wt % in silicone) emitted cold white light, its CIE (CIE: Commission International de I'Eclairage ) value was (0.32, 0.33), color rendering index (CRI) was 72.2, correlated color temperature (CCT) was 6877 K, and luminous efficiency ( η L ) was 128.5 lm∙W -1 . Such a cold white LED became a neutral white LED when [(TPTA)₂Ir(dPPOA)]PF₆ was added at 0.5 wt %; its corresponding CIE value was (0.35, 0.33), CRI was 78.4, CCT was 4896 K, and η L was 85.2 lm∙W -1 . It further became a warm white LED when [(TPTA)₂Ir(dPPOA)]PF₆ was added at 1.0 wt %; its corresponding CIE value was (0.39, 0.36), CRI was 80.2, CCT was 3473 K, and η L was 46.1 lm∙W -1 . The results show that [(TPTA)₂Ir(dPPOA)]PF₆ is a promising phosphor candidate for fabricating warm white LEDs.

  7. Measuring the Photocatalytic Breakdown of Crystal Violet Dye using a Light Emitting Diode Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Underwood, Lauren W.; O'Neal, Duane; Pagnutti, Mary; Davis, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    A simple method to estimate the photocatalytic reactivity performance of spray-on titanium dioxide coatings for transmissive glass surfaces was developed. This novel technique provides a standardized method to evaluate the efficiency of photocatalytic material systems over a variety of illumination levels. To date, photocatalysis assessments have generally been conducted using mercury black light lamps. Illumination levels for these types of lamps are difficult to vary, consequently limiting their use for assessing material performance under a diverse range of simulated environmental conditions. This new technique uses an ultraviolet (UV) gallium nitride (GaN) light emitting diode (LED) array instead of a traditional black light to initiate and sustain photocatalytic breakdown. This method was tested with a UV-resistant dye (crystal violet) applied to a titanium dioxide coated glass slide. Experimental control is accomplished by applying crystal violet to both titanium dioxide coated slides and uncoated control slides. A slide is illuminated by the UV LED array, at various light levels representative of outdoor and indoor conditions, from the dye side of the slide. To monitor degradation of the dye over time, a temperature-stabilized white light LED, whose emission spectrum overlaps with the dye absorption spectrum, is used to illuminate the opposite side of the slide. Using a spectrometer, the amount of light from the white light LED transmitted through the slide as the dye degrades is monitored as a function of wavelength and time and is subsequently analyzed. In this way, the rate of degradation for photocatalytically coated versus uncoated slide surfaces can be compared. Results demonstrate that the dye absorption decreased much more rapidly on the photocatalytically coated slides than on the control uncoated slides, and that dye degradation is dependent on illumination level. For photocatalytic activity assessment purposes, this experimental configuration and

  8. Effects of light emitting diode irradiation on neural differentiation of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani-Soltani, Samereh; Shojaee, Mohammad; Jalalkamali, Mahshid; Babaee, Abdolreza; Nematollahi-Mahani, Seyed Noureddin

    2017-08-30

    Recently, light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been introduced as a potential physical factor for proliferation and differentiation of various stem cells. Among the mesenchymal stem cells human umbilical cord matrix-derived mesenchymal (hUCM) cells are easily propagated in the laboratory and their low immunogenicity make them more appropriate for regenerative medicine procedures. We aimed at this study to evaluate the effect of red and green light emitted from LED on the neural lineage differentiation of hUCM cells in the presence or absence of retinoic acid (RA). Harvested hUCM cells exhibited mesenchymal and stemness properties. Irradiation of these cells by green and red LED with or without RA pre-treatment successfully differentiated them into neural lineage when the morphology of the induced cells, gene expression pattern (nestin, β-tubulin III and Olig2) and protein synthesis (anti-nestin, anti-β-tubulin III, anti-GFAP and anti-O4 antibodies) was evaluated. These data point for the first time to the fact that LED irradiation and optogenetic technology may be applied for neural differentiation and neuronal repair in regenerative medicine.

  9. The Development of Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes on p-SiC Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummer, Gordon

    Ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) are promising light sources for purification, phototherapy, and resin curing applications. Currently, commercial UV LEDs are composed of AlGaN-based n-i-p junctions grown on sapphire substrates. These devices suffer from defects in the active region, inefficient p-type doping, and poor light extraction efficiency. This dissertation addresses the development of a novel UV LED device structure, grown on p-SiC substrates. In this device structure, the AlGaN-based intrinsic (i) and n-layers are grown directly on the p-type substrate, forming a p-i-n junction. The intrinsic layer (active region) is composed of an AlN buffer layer followed by three AlN/Al0.30Ga0.70N quantum wells. After the intrinsic layer, the n-layer is formed from n-type AlGaN. This device architecture addresses the deficiencies of UV LEDs on sapphire substrates while providing a vertical device geometry, reduced fabrication complexity, and improved thermal management. The device layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The material properties were optimized by considering varying growth conditions and by considering the role of the layer within the device. AlN grown at 825 C and with a Ga surfactant yielded material with screw dislocation density of 1x10 7 cm-2 based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. AlGaN alloys grown in this work contained compositional inhomogeneity, as verified by high-resolution XRD, photoluminescence, and absorption measurements. Based on Stokes shift measurements, the degree of compositional inhomogeneity was correlated with the amount of excess Ga employed during growth. Compositional inhomogeneity yields carrier localizing potential fluctuations, which are advantages in light emitting device layers. Therefore, excess Ga growth conditions were used to grow AlN/Al0.30Ga0.70N quantum wells (designed using a wurtzite k.p model) with 35% internal quantum efficiency. Potential fluctuations limit the mobility of carriers

  10. Lightening performance investigation of conformal coating in light emitting diode packaging fabricated using a piezoelectric ultrasonic vibrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Young-Min; Son, Byeong-Ho; Hong, Seung-Min; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new ultrasonic vibrator which can be applicable to high viscosity conformal coating in the light emitting diode (LED) packaging process. In order to achieve this goal, an ultrasonic vibrator is devised utilizing piezoelectric actuators so as to have a longitudinal motion. After analyzing the standing wave of the proposed ultrasonic vibrator, the design parameters of the concentrator horn are optimally determined to maximize the tip displacement amplitude of the ultrasonic vibrator. The size and flow of droplets sprayed from the proposed ultrasonic vibrator are evaluated by a fluid dynamics analysis. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed ultrasonic vibrator, the designed vibrator is manufactured and applied to conformal coating of an LED. The manufactured LED is then evaluated by the lighting uniformity and the correlated color temperature (CCT). (technical note)

  11. Zinc oxide nanorod based photonic devices: recent progress in growth, light emitting diodes and lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willander, M; Nur, O; Zhao, Q X; Yang, L L [Department of Science and Technology, Linkoeping University, SE-601 74 Norrkoeping (Sweden); Lorenz, M; Cao, B Q; Zuniga Perez, J; Czekalla, C; Zimmermann, G; Grundmann, M [Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik II, Universitaet Leipzig, Linnestrasse 5, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Bakin, A; Behrends, A; Al-Suleiman, M; El-Shaer, A; Che Mofor, A; Postels, B; Waag, A [Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Boukos, N; Travlos, A [National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Institute of Materials Science, GR 15310 Agia Paraskevi Attikis, Athens (Greece); Kwack, H S, E-mail: magwi@itn.liu.s [CEA-CNRS Group ' Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs' , Institut Neel, CNRS and Universit' e Joseph Fourier, F-38042 Grenoble (France)

    2009-08-19

    Zinc oxide (ZnO), with its excellent luminescent properties and the ease of growth of its nanostructures, holds promise for the development of photonic devices. The recent advances in growth of ZnO nanorods are discussed. Results from both low temperature and high temperature growth approaches are presented. The techniques which are presented include metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD), vapour phase epitaxy (VPE), pulse laser deposition (PLD), vapour-liquid-solid (VLS), aqueous chemical growth (ACG) and finally the electrodeposition technique as an example of a selective growth approach. Results from structural as well as optical properties of a variety of ZnO nanorods are shown and analysed using different techniques, including high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL), for both room temperature and for low temperature performance. These results indicate that the grown ZnO nanorods possess reproducible and interesting optical properties. Results on obtaining p-type doping in ZnO micro- and nanorods are also demonstrated using PLD. Three independent indications were found for p-type conducting, phosphorus-doped ZnO nanorods: first, acceptor-related CL peaks, second, opposite transfer characteristics of back-gate field effect transistors using undoped and phosphorus doped wire channels, and finally, rectifying I-V characteristics of ZnO:P nanowire/ZnO:Ga p-n junctions. Then light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on n-ZnO nanorods combined with different technologies (hybrid technologies) are suggested and the recent electrical, as well as electro-optical, characteristics of these LEDs are shown and discussed. The hybrid LEDs reviewed and discussed here are mainly presented for two groups: those based on n-ZnO nanorods and p-type crystalline substrates, and those based on n-ZnO nanorods and p-type amorphous substrates. Promising electroluminescence

  12. Design strategies for enhancing carrier localization in InGaN-based light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yujue; Ma, Ping; Wei, Xuecheng; Yan, Dan; Wang, Yafang; Zeng, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    By designing the quantum well structure with the introduction of GaN and InN interlayers into the InGaN wells, the carrier localization is enhanced by demonstrating temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Two emission peaks corresponding to In-rich localized state and quantum well ground state emissions are observed from the electroluminescence (EL) spectra, which demonstrates that the phase separation takes place in our designed structures and the enhanced phase separation is most likely the dominated mechanism for the formation of In-rich localized states, accounting for the stronger localization and hence improved light-emission characteristics. Therefore, it is suggested that enhancing localization is possible, to some extent, by modulating the QW structures with the introduction of the GaN and InN interlayers for superior light-emission performances in InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Moreover, the nonradiative channel probably associated with InN droplet is proved to be existent from the Arrhenius plots in our InGaN–delta-InN MQW structure. - Highlights: • By designing the quantum well structure with the introduction of GaN and InN interlayers into the InGaN wells, the carrier localization is enhanced. • Two emission peaks observed from electroluminescence (EL) spectra demonstrate that the enhanced phase separation is most likely the dominated mechanism for the formation of In-rich localized states, accounting for the stronger localization. • The nonradiative channel associated with InN droplet is proved to be existent from the Arrhenius plots

  13. Colour-tunable light-emitting diodes based on InP/GaP nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatami, Fariba; Masselink, W Ted; Harris, James S

    2006-01-01

    We describe a novel colour-tunable light-emitting diode whose operation is based on direct band-gap emission from coupled configurations of InP quantum dots and quantum wells embedded in GaP. The control of the emission colour stems from a marked difference in the current dependence of intensities of two different emission processes. At lower currents, the emission is dominated by the 720 nm luminescence from the quantum dots and appears red; at higher currents, the emission is dominated by the 550 nm quantum-well luminescence and the perceived colour is green. Thus, we are able to tune the colour of such diodes from red to green by means of drive current. A multi-colour pixel can be realized by a single diode, with rapid switching between colour states to provide a range of colour mix

  14. Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes based on aggregation-induced emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shuming; Kwok, Hoi Sing [Center for Display Research, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Zhao Zujin; Tang, Ben Zhong, E-mail: eekwok@ust.h [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-03-10

    Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) based on newly synthesized bluish-green light-emitting material 1,3,6,8-tetrakis [4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl]pyrene (TTPEPy) and red light-emitting material 4-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl)-7-(5-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl) phenyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (BTPETTD) have been demonstrated. A maximum efficiency of 7.4 cd A{sup -1}, 4 lm W{sup -1} and brightness of 18 000 cd m{sup -2} have been achieved by employing 3 nm thick 4, 4'-bis [N-(1-naphthyl-1-)-N-phenyl-amino]- biphenyl (NPB) as an electron-blocking layer. The WOLEDs exhibit a high colour rendering index of 90 and moderate colour stability with 1931 Commision International de L'Eclairage coordinates changing from (0.41, 0.41) to (0.38, 0.40) over a wide range of driving voltages. Moreover, the non-doped WOLEDs enjoy a reduced efficiency roll-off due to their nature of aggregation-induced emission.

  15. Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes based on aggregation-induced emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shuming; Kwok, Hoi Sing; Zhao Zujin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) based on newly synthesized bluish-green light-emitting material 1,3,6,8-tetrakis [4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl]pyrene (TTPEPy) and red light-emitting material 4-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl)-7-(5-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl) phenyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (BTPETTD) have been demonstrated. A maximum efficiency of 7.4 cd A -1 , 4 lm W -1 and brightness of 18 000 cd m -2 have been achieved by employing 3 nm thick 4, 4'-bis [N-(1-naphthyl-1-)-N-phenyl-amino]- biphenyl (NPB) as an electron-blocking layer. The WOLEDs exhibit a high colour rendering index of 90 and moderate colour stability with 1931 Commision International de L'Eclairage coordinates changing from (0.41, 0.41) to (0.38, 0.40) over a wide range of driving voltages. Moreover, the non-doped WOLEDs enjoy a reduced efficiency roll-off due to their nature of aggregation-induced emission.

  16. High-efficient and brightness white organic light-emitting diodes operated at low bias voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Yu, Junsheng; Yuan, Kai; Jian, Yadong

    2010-10-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) used for display application and lighting need to possess high efficiency, high brightness, and low driving voltage. In this work, white OLEDs consisted of ambipolar 9,10-bis 2-naphthyl anthracene (ADN) as a host of blue light-emitting layer (EML) doped with tetrabutyleperlene (TBPe) and a thin codoped layer consisted of N, N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)-benzidine (NPB) as a host of yellow light-emitting layer doped with 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tert-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidin-4-yl-vinyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) were investigated. With appropriate tuning in the film thickness, position, and dopant concentration of the co-doped layer, a white OLED with a luminance yield of 10.02 cd/A with the CIE coordinates of (0.29, 0.33) has been achieved at a bias voltage of 9 V and a luminance level of over 10,000 cd/m2. By introducing the PIN structure with both HIL and bis(10- hydroxybenzo-quinolinato)-beryllium (BeBq2) ETL, the power efficiency of white OLED was improved.

  17. Nanopatterned yttrium aluminum garnet phosphor incorporated film for high-brightness GaN-based white light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Joong-yeon; Park, Sang-Jun; Ahn, Jinho; Lee, Heon

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated high-brightness white light emitting diodes (LEDs) by developing a nanopatterned yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) phosphor-incorporated film. White light can be obtained by mixing blue light from a GaN-based LED and yellow light of the YAG phosphor-incorporated film. If white light sources can be fabricated by exciting proper yellow phosphor using blue light, then these sources can be used instead of the conventional fluorescent lamps with a UV source, for backlighting of displays. In this work, a moth-eye structure was formed on the YAG phosphor-incorporated film by direct spin-on glass (SOG) printing. The moth-eye structures have been investigated to improve light transmittance in various optoelectronic devices, including photovoltaic solar cells, light emitting diodes, and displays, because of their anti-reflection property. Direct SOG printing, which is a simple, easy, and relatively inexpensive process, can be used to fabricate nanoscale structures. After direct SOG printing, the moth-eye structure with a diameter of 220 nm was formed uniformly on the YAG phosphor-incorporated film. As a result of moth-eye patterning on the YAG phosphor-incorporated film, the light output power of a white LED with a patterned YAG phosphor-incorporated film increased to up to 13% higher than that of a white LED with a non-patterned film. - Highlights: • GaN-based high-brightness white LED was prepared using patterned YAG phosphor-incorporated films. • Direct hydrogen silsesquioxane printing was used to form moth-eye patterns on the YAG films. • The electroluminescence intensity of the white LED was enhanced by up to 14.9%

  18. Nanopatterned yttrium aluminum garnet phosphor incorporated film for high-brightness GaN-based white light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Joong-yeon; Park, Sang-Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jinho, E-mail: jhahn@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Heon, E-mail: heonlee@korea.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-03

    In this study, we fabricated high-brightness white light emitting diodes (LEDs) by developing a nanopatterned yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) phosphor-incorporated film. White light can be obtained by mixing blue light from a GaN-based LED and yellow light of the YAG phosphor-incorporated film. If white light sources can be fabricated by exciting proper yellow phosphor using blue light, then these sources can be used instead of the conventional fluorescent lamps with a UV source, for backlighting of displays. In this work, a moth-eye structure was formed on the YAG phosphor-incorporated film by direct spin-on glass (SOG) printing. The moth-eye structures have been investigated to improve light transmittance in various optoelectronic devices, including photovoltaic solar cells, light emitting diodes, and displays, because of their anti-reflection property. Direct SOG printing, which is a simple, easy, and relatively inexpensive process, can be used to fabricate nanoscale structures. After direct SOG printing, the moth-eye structure with a diameter of 220 nm was formed uniformly on the YAG phosphor-incorporated film. As a result of moth-eye patterning on the YAG phosphor-incorporated film, the light output power of a white LED with a patterned YAG phosphor-incorporated film increased to up to 13% higher than that of a white LED with a non-patterned film. - Highlights: • GaN-based high-brightness white LED was prepared using patterned YAG phosphor-incorporated films. • Direct hydrogen silsesquioxane printing was used to form moth-eye patterns on the YAG films. • The electroluminescence intensity of the white LED was enhanced by up to 14.9%.

  19. Study of electrical fatigue by defect engineering in organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassmann, Andrea; Yampolskii, Sergey V.; Klein, Andreas; Albe, Karsten; Vilbrandt, Nicole; Pekkola, Oili; Genenko, Yuri A.; Rehahn, Matthias; Seggern, Heinz von

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Electrical fatigue is investigated in PPV-based polymer light-emitting diodes. • Bromide defects remaining from Gilch synthesis limit PLED lifetime. • Electrical stress yields lower hole mobility and transition to dispersive transport. • Triplet excitons reduce lifetime and EL-emission-induced degradation observed. • Self-consistent drift-diffusion model for charge carrier injection and transport. - Abstract: In this work the current knowledge on the electrical degradation of polymer-based light-emitting diodes is reviewed focusing especially on derivatives of poly(p-phenylene-vinylene) (PPV). The electrical degradation will be referred to as electrical fatigue and is understood as mechanisms, phenomena and material properties that change during continuous operation of the device at constant current. The focus of this review lies especially on the effect of chemical synthesis on the transport properties of the organic semiconductor and the device lifetimes. In addition, the prominent transparent conductive oxide indium tin oxide as well as In 2 O 3 will be reviewed and how their properties can be altered by the processing conditions. The experiments are accompanied by theoretical modeling shining light on how the change of injection barriers, charge carrier mobility or trap density influence the current–voltage characteristics of the diodes and on how and which defects form in transparent conductive oxides used as anode

  20. Green Synthesis of InP/ZnS Core/Shell Quantum Dots for Application in Heavy-Metal-Free Light-Emitting Diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Hung, Shih-Ting; Lin, Yen-Ting; Chou, Tzu-Lin; Kuo, Ming-Cheng; Kuo, Ya-Pei; Chen, Chia-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) have been considered as potential display technologies with the characterizations of high color purity, flexibility, transparency, and cost efficiency. For the practical applications, the development of heavy-metal-free QD-LEDs from environment-friendly materials is the most important issue to reduce the impacts on human health and environmental pollution. In this work, heavy-metal-free InP/ZnS core/shell QDs with different fluorescence were prepare...

  1. Growth and characterization of air annealing Tb-doped YAG:Ce single crystal for white-light-emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Maogao [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Xiang, Weidong, E-mail: xiangweidong001@126.com [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Liang, Xiaojuan [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Zhong, Jiasong; Chen, Daqin [College of Materials & Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Huang, Jun; Gu, Guorui; Yang, Cheng; Xiang, Run [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2015-08-05

    Highlights: • We report preparation of transparent Ce,Tb:YAG single crystal by Czochralski method. • The effect of annealing on Ce,Tb:YAG single crystal had been investigated. • The Ce,Tb:YAG single crystal after annealing exhibited better optical performance. • The Ce,Tb:YAG single crystal could be used as an ideal candidate for WLED. - Abstract: We report the preparation of transparent Ce and Tb co-doped Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} single crystal by the Czochralski method. The characterization of the resulting single crystal was accomplished by using X-ray powder diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Absorption peak of the single crystal at about 460 nm has been obtained from ultraviolet–visible absorption spectrometer and their intensity is changed with different annealing condition. Its optical properties also have been investigated using fluorescence spectrometer. What’s more, its photoelectric parameters were studied by LED fast spectrometer. The constructed single crystal based white-light-emitting diode exhibits a high luminous efficiency of 140.89 lm/W, and a correlated color temperature of 4176 K as well as a color rendering index of 56.7, which reveal the prominent feasibility of the present single crystal material in white-light-emitting diode application.

  2. Growth and characterization of air annealing Tb-doped YAG:Ce single crystal for white-light-emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Maogao; Xiang, Weidong; Liang, Xiaojuan; Zhong, Jiasong; Chen, Daqin; Huang, Jun; Gu, Guorui; Yang, Cheng; Xiang, Run

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We report preparation of transparent Ce,Tb:YAG single crystal by Czochralski method. • The effect of annealing on Ce,Tb:YAG single crystal had been investigated. • The Ce,Tb:YAG single crystal after annealing exhibited better optical performance. • The Ce,Tb:YAG single crystal could be used as an ideal candidate for WLED. - Abstract: We report the preparation of transparent Ce and Tb co-doped Y 3 Al 5 O 12 single crystal by the Czochralski method. The characterization of the resulting single crystal was accomplished by using X-ray powder diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Absorption peak of the single crystal at about 460 nm has been obtained from ultraviolet–visible absorption spectrometer and their intensity is changed with different annealing condition. Its optical properties also have been investigated using fluorescence spectrometer. What’s more, its photoelectric parameters were studied by LED fast spectrometer. The constructed single crystal based white-light-emitting diode exhibits a high luminous efficiency of 140.89 lm/W, and a correlated color temperature of 4176 K as well as a color rendering index of 56.7, which reveal the prominent feasibility of the present single crystal material in white-light-emitting diode application

  3. Integrated porous-silicon light-emitting diodes: A fabrication process using graded doping profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barillaro, G.; Diligenti, A.; Pieri, F.; Fuso, F.; Allegrini, M.

    2001-01-01

    A fabrication process, compatible with an industrial bipolar+complementary metal - oxide - semiconductor (MOS)+diffusion MOS technology, has been developed for the fabrication of efficient porous-silicon-based light-emitting diodes. The electrical contact is fabricated with a double n + /p doping, achieving a high current injection efficiency and thus lower biasing voltages. The anodization is performed as the last step of the process, thus reducing potential incompatibilities with industrial processes. The fabricated devices show yellow-orange electroluminescence, visible with the naked eye in room lighting. A spectral characterization of light emission is presented and briefly discussed. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  4. Efficient hole injection in organic light-emitting diodes using polyvinylidenefluoride as an interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Soon Ok; Soo Yook, Kyoung [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Dankook University, Jukjeon-dong, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Yeob, E-mail: leej17@dankook.ac.k [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Dankook University, Jukjeon-dong, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The effect of the polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) interlayer on the hole injection and the device performances of the green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) was investigated. The hole current density of the hole only device was improved and the power efficiency of the green PHOLEDs was enhanced from 10.5 to 12.5 lm/W by the PVDF interlayer. The reduction of the interfacial energy barrier was responsible for the high hole current density in the PVDF interlayer based green PHOLEDs.

  5. Natural substrate lift-off technique for vertical light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Yu; Lan, Yu-Pin; Tu, Po-Min; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Chung; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Chi, Gou-Chung; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2014-04-01

    Hexagonal inverted pyramid (HIP) structures and the natural substrate lift-off (NSLO) technique were demonstrated on a GaN-based vertical light-emitting diode (VLED). The HIP structures were formed at the interface between GaN and the sapphire substrate by molten KOH wet etching. The threading dislocation density (TDD) estimated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was reduced to 1 × 108 cm-2. Raman spectroscopy indicated that the compressive strain from the bottom GaN/sapphire was effectively released through the HIP structure. With the adoption of the HIP structure and NSLO, the light output power and yield performance of leakage current could be further improved.

  6. Towards developing a tandem of organic solar cell and light emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [School of Engineering and IT, B-purple-12, Faculty of EHS, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2011-01-15

    It is proposed here to design a tandem of organic solar cell (OSC) and white organic light emitting diode (WOLED) which can generate power in the day time from the sun and provide lighting at night. With the advancement of chemical technology, such device is expected to be very-cost effective and reasonably efficient. A device thus fabricated has the potential of meeting the world's sustainable domestic and commercial power and lighting needs (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Charge injection and transport properties of an organic light-emitting diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Juhasz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The charge behavior of organic light emitting diode (OLED is investigated by steady-state current–voltage technique and impedance spectroscopy at various temperatures to obtain activation energies of charge injection and transport processes. Good agreement of activation energies obtained by steady-state and frequency-domain was used to analyze their contributions to the charge injection and transport. We concluded that charge is injected into the OLED device mostly through the interfacial states at low voltage region, whereas the thermionic injection dominates in the high voltage region. This comparison of experimental techniques demonstrates their capabilities of identification of major bottleneck of charge injection and transport.

  8. Ultraviolet electroluminescence from zinc oxide nanorods/deoxyribonucleic acid hybrid bio light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rohini Bhardwaj; Nagpal, Swati; Arora, Swati; Bhatnagar, Pramod Kumar; Mathur, Parmatma Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diode using salmon deoxyribonucleic acid (sDNA)-cetyltrimethylammonium complex as an electron blocking layer and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods as emissive material was fabricated. UV emission, which was blue shifted up to 335 nm with respect to the band edge emission of 390 nm, was observed. This blue shift was caused due to accumulation of electrons in the conduction band of ZnO because of a high potential barrier existing at the sDNA/ZnO interface.

  9. Combination of carbon dot and polymer dot phosphors for white light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chun; Zhang, Yu; Sun, Kai; Reckmeier, Claas; Zhang, Tieqiang; Zhang, XiaoYu; Zhao, Jun; Wu, Changfeng; Yu, William W; Rogach, Andrey L

    2015-07-28

    We realized white light-emitting diodes with high color rendering index (85-96) and widely variable color temperatures (2805-7786 K) by combining three phosphors based on carbon dots and polymer dots, whose solid-state photoluminescence self-quenching was efficiently suppressed within a polyvinyl pyrrolidone matrix. All three phosphors exhibited dominant absorption in the UV spectral region, which ensured the weak reabsorption and no energy transfer crosstalk. The WLEDs showed excellent color stability against the increasing current because of the similar response of the tricolor phosphors to the UV light variation.

  10. White organic light-emitting diodes with 9, 10-bis (2-naphthyl) anthracene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan Yunxia; Niu Lianbin [Key Laboratory of Optical Engineering, College of Physics and Information Technology, Chongqing Normal University, Chongqing 400047 (China)], E-mail: gyxybsy@126.com, E-mail: niulb03@126.com

    2009-03-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes were fabricated by 9, 10-bis (2-naphthyl) anthracene (ADN) doped with Rubrene with a structure of ITO/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) / NPB /ADN: Rubrene /Alq{sub 3} /CsF/Mg:Ag/Ag. Multilayer organic devices using AND and Rubrene as an emitting layer produced white emissions with good chromaticity and luminous efficiency as high as 5.93 cd/A. This performance can be explained by Foerster energy transfer from the blue-emitting host to the orange-emitting dopant.

  11. White organic light-emitting diodes with 9, 10-bis (2-naphthyl) anthracene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Yunxia; Niu Lianbin

    2009-01-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes were fabricated by 9, 10-bis (2-naphthyl) anthracene (ADN) doped with Rubrene with a structure of ITO/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) / NPB /ADN: Rubrene /Alq 3 /CsF/Mg:Ag/Ag. Multilayer organic devices using AND and Rubrene as an emitting layer produced white emissions with good chromaticity and luminous efficiency as high as 5.93 cd/A. This performance can be explained by Foerster energy transfer from the blue-emitting host to the orange-emitting dopant.

  12. Transparent Heat-Resistant PMMA Copolymers for Packing Light-Emitting Diode Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ling Yeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Transparent and heat-resistant poly(methyl methacrylate copolymers were synthesized by bulk polymerizing methyl methacrylate (MMA, isobornyl methacrylate (IBMA, and methacrylamide (MAA monomers. Copolymerization was performed using a chain transfer agent to investigate the molecular weight changes of these copolymers, which exhibited advantages including a low molecular weight distribution, excellent optical properties, high transparency, high glass transition temperature, low moisture absorption, and pellets that can be readily mass produced by using extrusion or jet injection for packing light-emitting diode materials.

  13. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-01-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  14. Organic light-emitting diodes with a spacer enhanced exciplex emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Chen, Rui; Sun, Handong; Wei Sun, Xiao

    2014-04-01

    By introducing a spacer molecule into the blended exciplex emissive layer, the performance of the bulk heterojunction exciplex organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) was improved dramatically; the maximum luminous efficiency was enhanced by about 22% from 7.9 cd/A to 9.7 cd/A, and the luminous efficiency drop was reduced by 28% at 400 mA/cm2. Besides the suppressed annihilation of exciton, the time-resolved photoluminescence measurements indicated that the spacer enhanced the delayed fluorescence through increasing the backward intersystem crossing rate from the triplet to singlet exciplex state. This method is useful for developing high performance exciplex OLEDs.

  15. Quantitative description of charge-carrier transport in a white organic light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, M.; Anderson, M.; Thomschke, M.; Widmer, J.; Furno, M.; Scholz, R.; Lüssem, B.; Leo, K.

    2011-10-01

    We present a simulation model for the analysis of charge-carrier transport in organic thin-film devices, and apply it to a three-color white hybrid organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with fluorescent blue and phosphorescent red and green emission. We simulate a series of single-carrier devices, which reconstruct the OLED layer sequence step by step. Thereby, we determine the energy profiles for hole and electron transport, show how to discern bulk from interface limitation, and identify trap states.

  16. Weak-microcavity organic light-emitting diodes with improved light out-coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang-Hwan; Song, Young-Woo; Lee, Joon-gu; Kim, Yoon-Chang; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Ha, Jaeheung; Oh, Jong-Suk; Lee, So Young; Lee, Sun Young; Hwang, Kyu Hwan; Zang, Dong-Sik; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2008-08-18

    We propose and demonstrate weak-microcavity organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays with improved light-extraction and viewing-angle characteristics. A single pair of low- and high-index layers is inserted between indium tin oxide (ITO) and a glass substrate. The electroluminescent (EL) efficiencies of discrete red, green, and blue weak-microcavity OLEDs are enhanced by 56%, 107%, and 26%, respectively, with improved color purity. Moreover, full-color passive-matrix bottom-emitting OLED displays are fabricated by employing low-index layers of two thicknesses. As a display, the EL efficiency of white color was 27% higher than that of a conventional OLED display.

  17. Extraction of surface plasmons in organic light-emitting diodes via high-index coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Bert J; Frischeisen, Jörg; Jaeger, Arndt; Setz, Daniel S; Reusch, Thilo C G; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2012-03-12

    The efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is still limited by poor light outcoupling. In particular, the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at metal-organic interfaces represents a major loss channel. By combining optical simulations and experiments on simplified luminescent thin-film structures we elaborate the conditions for the extraction of SPPs via coupling to high-index media. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrate the possibility to extract light from wave-guided modes and surface plasmons in a top-emitting white OLED by a high-index prism.

  18. The performance of quantum dots-based white light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Lin; Chung, Shu-Ru

    2017-08-01

    Recently, the investigation of quantum dots (QDs) as a color converter for white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) application has attracted a great deal of attention. Because the narrow emission wavelength of QDs can be controlled by their particle sizes and compositions, which is facilitated to improve the color gamut of display as well as color rendering index (CRI) and the correlated color temperature (CCT) of WLEDs. In a typical commercially available LCD display, the color gamut is approximately to 75 % which is defined by the National Television System Committee (NTSC). In order to enhance NTSC, the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of color converter should be less than 30 nm. Therefore, the QDs are the best choice for display application due to the FWHM of QDs is meet the demand of display application. In this study, the hot injection method with one-pot process is used to synthesis of colloidal ternary ZnCdSe green (G-) and red-emission (R-) QDs with a narrow emission wavelength around 537 and 610 nm. By controlling the complex reagents-stearic acid (SA) and lauric acid (LA), high performance of G- and R-QDs can be prepared. The quantum yields (QYs), particle sizes and FWHM for G- and R-QDs are 70, 30 %, 3.2 +/- 0.5, 4.1 +/- 0.5 nm and 25, 26 nm, respectively. In order to explore the performance of QDs-based WLEDs, mixing ratios effect between G-QD and R-QD are studied and the WLED is packed as conformal-type. Different ratios of R-QD and G-QD (1:10, 1:20 and 1:30) are mixed and fill up the 3020 SMD blue-InGaN LED, and named as LED-10, LED-20 and LED-30. After that, UV curable gel is deposited on the top of QD layer to form WLED and named as LED-10*, LED-20* and LED-30*. The results show that the Commission International d'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates, color rendering index (CRI), luminous efficacy of LED-10*, LED-20* and LED-30* are (0.27, 0.21), 53, 1.9 lm/W, (0.29, 0.30), 72, 3.3 lm/W and (0.25, 0.34), 45, 6.8 lm/W, respectively. We can find

  19. Analysis of dominant carrier recombination mechanisms depending on injection current in InGaN green light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyu-Sang; Han, Dong-Pyo; Kim, Hyun-Sung; Shim, Jong-In

    2014-01-01

    Two kinds of green InGaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been investigated in order to understand the different slopes in logarithmic light output power-current (L-I) curves. Through the analysis of the carrier rate equation and by considering the carrier density-dependent the injection efficiency into quantum wells, the slopes of the logarithmic L-I curves can be more rigorously understood. The low current level, two as the tunneling current is initially dominant. The high current level beyond the peak of the external quantum efficiency (EQE) diminishes below one as the carrier overflow becomes dominant. In addition, the normalized carrier injection efficiency can be obtained by analyzing the slopes of the logarithmic L-I curves. The carrier injection efficiency decreases after the EQE peak of the InGaN LEDs, determined from the analysis of the slopes of the logarithmic L-I curves

  20. Carbon nanotube-graphene composite film as transparent conductive electrode for GaN-based light-emitting diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Kang, Chun Hong

    2016-08-23

    Transparent conductive electrodes (TCE) made of carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene composite for GaN-based light emitting diodes (LED) are presented. The TCE with 533-Ω/□ sheet resistance and 88% transmittance were obtained when chemical-vapor-deposition grown graphene was fused across CNT networks. With an additional 2-nm thin NiOx interlayer between the TCE and top p-GaN layer of the LED, the forward voltage was reduced to 5.12 V at 20-mA injection current. Four-fold improvement in terms of light output power was observed. The improvement can be ascribed to the enhanced lateral current spreading across the hybrid CNT-graphene TCE before injection into the p-GaN layer.

  1. Isoelectronic Ln doping in p-GaN and its effects on InGaN light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C. S.; Cheong, H. S.; Kang, D. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Hong, C. H.; Suh, E. K.; Lee, H. J.; Cho, H. K.; Adesida, I.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of isoelectronic In doping in a Mg-doped p-GaN layer on device performance of InGaN light-emitting diodes (LED) were investigated. It was found that there was a decrease of Hall resistivity and contact resistivity in p-GaN with In doping, compared to typical Mg-doped p-GaN. Isoelectronic In doping in p-GaN seems to cause a kind of surfactant effect and/or purification effect similar to the In-doped GaN case, which exhibits a decrease of non-radiative recombination centers and an enhancement of carrier concentration. Light output power and operating voltage were improved by applying an In-doped p-GaN contact layer to the LED.

  2. Theoretical analysis of enhanced light output from a GaN light emitting diode with an embedded photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Feng; Liu Deming; Huang Lirong

    2010-01-01

    The enhancement of the light output of an embedded photonic crystal light emitting diode is investigated based on the finite-difference time-domain modeling. The embedded photonic crystal (PC) lattice type, multi-layer embedded PC, distance between the multiple quantum well and the embedded PC are studied. It is found that the embedded one dimensional PC can act as well as embedded two dimensional PCs. The emitted light flux in the up direction can be increased by a new kind of multi-layer embedded PC. Also, we show that the light output in the up direction for the LED with both surfaces and embedded PC could be as high as five times that of a conventional LED. (semiconductor devices)

  3. Carbon nanotube-graphene composite film as transparent conductive electrode for GaN-based light-emitting diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Kang, Chun Hong; Shen, Chao; M. Saheed, M. Shuaib; Mohamed, Norani Muti; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif

    2016-01-01

    Transparent conductive electrodes (TCE) made of carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene composite for GaN-based light emitting diodes (LED) are presented. The TCE with 533-Ω/□ sheet resistance and 88% transmittance were obtained when chemical-vapor-deposition grown graphene was fused across CNT networks. With an additional 2-nm thin NiOx interlayer between the TCE and top p-GaN layer of the LED, the forward voltage was reduced to 5.12 V at 20-mA injection current. Four-fold improvement in terms of light output power was observed. The improvement can be ascribed to the enhanced lateral current spreading across the hybrid CNT-graphene TCE before injection into the p-GaN layer.

  4. Characteristics of InGaN-Based Light-Emitting Diodes on Patterned Sapphire Substrates with Various Pattern Heights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Fu Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical and electrical characteristics of InGaN-based blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs grown on patterned sapphire substrates (PSSs with different pattern heights and on planar sapphire by atmospheric-pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition were investigated. Compared with planar sapphire, it was found that the LED electroluminescence intensity is significantly enhanced on PSSs with pattern heights of 0.5 (21%, 1.1 (57%, 1.5 (81%, and 1.9 (91% μm at an injected current of 20 mA. The increased light intensity exhibits the same trend in a TracePro simulation. In addition, it was also found that the level of leakage current depends on the density of V-shape defects, which were measured by scanning electron microscopy.

  5. High-power AlGaN-based near-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes grown on Si(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zengcheng; Liu, Legong; Huang, Yingnan; Sun, Qian; Feng, Meixin; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Hanmin; Yang, Hui

    2017-07-01

    High-power AlGaN-based 385 nm near-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UVA-LEDs) grown on Si(111) substrates are reported. The threading dislocation (TD) density of AlGaN was reduced by employing an Al-composition step-graded AlN/AlGaN multilayer buffer. V-shaped pits were intentionally incorporated into the active region to screen the carriers from the nonradiative recombination centers (NRCs) around the TDs and to facilitate hole injection. The light extraction efficiency was enhanced by the surface roughening of a thin-film (TF) vertical chip structure. The as-fabricated TF-UVA-LED exhibited a light output power of 960 mW at 500 mA, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 59.7%.

  6. Theoretical analysis of enhanced light output from a GaN light emitting diode with an embedded photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Feng; Liu Deming; Huang Lirong, E-mail: hlr5649@163.co [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, College of Opto-Electronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2010-10-15

    The enhancement of the light output of an embedded photonic crystal light emitting diode is investigated based on the finite-difference time-domain modeling. The embedded photonic crystal (PC) lattice type, multi-layer embedded PC, distance between the multiple quantum well and the embedded PC are studied. It is found that the embedded one dimensional PC can act as well as embedded two dimensional PCs. The emitted light flux in the up direction can be increased by a new kind of multi-layer embedded PC. Also, we show that the light output in the up direction for the LED with both surfaces and embedded PC could be as high as five times that of a conventional LED. (semiconductor devices)

  7. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of Al(Ga)N nanowire deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mi, Z; Zhao, S; Djavid, M; Liu, X; Kang, J; Woo, S Y; Bugnet, M; Botton, G A; Kong, X; Guo, H; Ji, W; Liu, Z

    2016-01-01

    We report on the detailed molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of Al(Ga)N nanowire heterostructures on Si and their applications for deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lasers. The nanowires are formed under nitrogen-rich conditions without using any metal catalyst. Compared to conventional epilayers, Mg-dopant incorporation is significantly enhanced in nearly strain- and defect-free Al(Ga)N nanowire structures, leading to efficient p -type conduction. The resulting Al(Ga)N nanowire LEDs exhibit excellent performance, including a turn-on voltage of ∼5.5 V for an AlN nanowire LED operating at 207 nm. The design, fabrication, and performance of an electrically injected AlGaN nanowire laser operating in the UV-B band is also presented. (paper)

  8. A novel orange emissive phosphor SrWO4:Sm3+ for white light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Zhenghua; Wei Ruiping; Ma Jingxin; Pang Chaoran; Liu Weisheng

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → A novel orange emissive phosphor SrWO 4 :Sm 3+ was firstly reported. → The optics properties of Sm 3+ -doped SrWO 4 phosphor were successfully discussed. → The temperature-dependent luminescence indicates the phosphor exhibits a small thermal-quenching property. → The phosphor is a potential candidate as orange-emitting component for white LED. - Abstract: A novel orange emissive phosphor, Sm 3+ -doped SrWO 4 , was synthesized by high temperature solid-state reaction in air atmosphere. The excitation spectra show that the phosphors can be efficiently excited by ultraviolet and near-ultraviolet light, the optimized concentration is 4 mol%. Three emission peaks locate at 562, 596 and 642 nm, corresponding to CIE chromaticity coordinates of (x = 0.54, y = 0.46), which indicates the orange light emitting. The decay curves are well fitted with triple-exponential decay models. The quantum yield of the Sr 0.96 Sm 0.04 WO 4 phosphor is about 70.65% under excitation of 377 nm. Furthermore, the temperature-dependent luminescence indicates the phosphor exhibits a small thermal-quenching property. So the phosphor is able to be applied to UV-LED chip-based white light-emitting diodes.

  9. Flexible deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes for significant improvement of quantum efficiencies by external bending

    KAUST Repository

    Shervin, Shahab; Oh, Seung Kyu; Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Keon Hwa; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Kim, Seung Hwan; Kim, Jeomoh; Pouladi, Sara; Lee, Sung-Nam; Li, Xiaohang; Kwak, Joon-Seop; Ryou, Jae-Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) light at the wavelength range of 250‒280 nm (UVC spectrum) is essential for numerous applications such as sterilization, purification, sensing, and communication. III-nitride-based DUV light-emitting diodes (DUV LEDs), like other solid-state lighting sources, offer a great potential to replace the conventional gas-discharged lamps with short lifetimes and toxic-element-bearing nature. However, unlike visible LEDs, the DUV LEDs are still suffering from low quantum efficiencies (QEs) and low optical output powers. In this work, reported is a new route to improve QEs of AlGaN-based DUV LEDs using mechanical flexibility of recently developed bendable thin-film structures. Numerical studies show that electronic band structures of AlGaN heterostructures and resulting optical and electrical characteristics of the devices can be significantly modified by external bending through active control of piezoelectric polarization. Internal quantum efficiency (IQE) is enhanced higher than three times, when the DUV LEDs are moderately bent to induce in-plane compressive strain in the heterostructure. Furthermore, efficiency droop at high injection currents is mitigated and turn-on voltage of diodes decreases with the same bending condition. The concept of bendable DUV LEDs with a controlled external strain can provide a new path for high-output-power and high-efficiency devices.

  10. Flexible deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes for significant improvement of quantum efficiencies by external bending

    KAUST Repository

    Shervin, Shahab

    2018-01-26

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) light at the wavelength range of 250‒280 nm (UVC spectrum) is essential for numerous applications such as sterilization, purification, sensing, and communication. III-nitride-based DUV light-emitting diodes (DUV LEDs), like other solid-state lighting sources, offer a great potential to replace the conventional gas-discharged lamps with short lifetimes and toxic-element-bearing nature. However, unlike visible LEDs, the DUV LEDs are still suffering from low quantum efficiencies (QEs) and low optical output powers. In this work, reported is a new route to improve QEs of AlGaN-based DUV LEDs using mechanical flexibility of recently developed bendable thin-film structures. Numerical studies show that electronic band structures of AlGaN heterostructures and resulting optical and electrical characteristics of the devices can be significantly modified by external bending through active control of piezoelectric polarization. Internal quantum efficiency (IQE) is enhanced higher than three times, when the DUV LEDs are moderately bent to induce in-plane compressive strain in the heterostructure. Furthermore, efficiency droop at high injection currents is mitigated and turn-on voltage of diodes decreases with the same bending condition. The concept of bendable DUV LEDs with a controlled external strain can provide a new path for high-output-power and high-efficiency devices.

  11. Electroplex emission at PVK/Bphen interface for application in white organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Liang; Li Fushan; Xie Jiangxing; Wu Chaoxing; Zheng Yong; Chen Dongling; Xu Sheng; Guo Tailiang; Qu Bo; Chen Zhijian; Gong Qihuang

    2011-01-01

    White organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with a structure of ITO/poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK)/4,7-diphenyl-1, 10-phenanthroline (Bphen)/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq 3 )/LiF/Al has been fabricated via the thermal evaporation technique. The electroluminescence (EL) spectrum of the as-fabricated WOLED covers from 380 to 700 nm of the visible light region with a wide blue emission from PVK and an interesting new red emission. The red emission at 613 nm in EL spectra of the WOLED was attributed to electroplex emission at PVK/Bphen interface since it was not observed in photoluminescence spectra. The WOLED showed a Commission International De l'Eclairage coordinate of (0.31, 0.32), which is very close to the standard white coordinate (0.33, 0.33). - Highlights: → A white organic light-emitting diode was fabricated by vacuum deposition. → A new red emission at 613 nm was observed in the electroluminescence spectra. → Red emission comes from electroplex instead of exciplex at PVK/Bphen interface. → The device has a CIE coordinate of (0.31, 0.32).

  12. Stacking multiple connecting functional materials in tandem organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Deng-Ke; Jiang, Nan; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2017-02-01

    Tandem device is an important architecture in fabricating high performance organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. The key element in making a high performance tandem device is the connecting materials stack, which plays an important role in electric field distribution, charge generation and charge injection. For a tandem organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with a simple Liq/Al/MoO3 stack, we discovered that there is a significant current lateral spreading causing light emission over an extremely large area outside the OLED pixel when the Al thickness exceeds 2 nm. This spread light emission, caused by an inductive electric field over one of the device unit, limits one’s ability to fabricate high performance tandem devices. To resolve this issue, a new connecting materials stack with a C60 fullerene buffer layer is reported. This new structure permits optimization of the Al metal layer in the connecting stack and thus enables us to fabricate an efficient tandem OLED having a high 155.6 cd/A current efficiency and a low roll-off (or droop) in current efficiency.

  13. Origin of colour stability in blue/orange/blue stacked phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Jang, Jyongsik; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2009-01-01

    The origin of colour stability in phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes (PHWOLEDs) with a blue/orange/blue stacked emitting structure was studied by monitoring the change in a recombination zone. A balanced recombination zone shift between the blue and the orange light-emitting layers was found to be responsible for the colour stability in the blue/orange/blue stacked PHWOLEDs.

  14. White-light-emitting diode based on a single-layer polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B. Z.; Zhang, X. P.; Liu, H. M.

    2013-05-01

    A broad-band light-emitting diode was achieved in a single-layer device based on pure poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-co-bis-N,N'-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N,N'-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine) (PFB). Electromer emission was observed in the red with a center wavelength of about 620 nm in electroluminescence (EL) spectrum. This kind of emission exhibits strong dependence on the thickness of the PFB layer, so that the shape of the EL spectrum may be adjusted through changing the thickness of the active polymer layer to balance between the intrinsic PFB emission in the blue and the electromer emission in the red. Thus, white light emission may be achieved from such a single-layer single-material diode.

  15. Investigation of GaN-based light emitting diodes with nano-hole patterned sapphire substrate (NHPSS) by nano-imprint lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.W.; Lin, C.H.; Huang, J.K.; Lee, K.Y.; Lin, C.F.; Yu, C.C.; Tsai, J.Y.; Hsueh, R.; Kuo, H.C.; Wang, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, gallium-nitride (GaN)-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with nano-hole patterned sapphire (NHPSS) by nano-imprint lithography are fabricated and investigated. At an injection current of 20 mA, the LED with NHPSS increased the light output power of the InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well LEDs by a factor of 1.33, and the wall-plug efficiency is 30% higher at 20 mA indicating that the LED with NHPSS had larger light extraction efficiency. In addition, by examining the radiation patterns, the LED with NHPSS shows stronger light extraction with a wider view angle. These results offer promising potential to enhance the light output powers of commercial light-emitting devices using the technique of nano-imprint lithography.

  16. A Rat Model of Thrombosis in Common Carotid Artery Induced by Implantable Wireless Light-Emitting Diode Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Chao Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work has developed a novel approach to form common carotid artery (CCA thrombus in rats with a wireless implantable light-emitting diode (LED device. The device mainly consists of an external controller and an internal LED assembly. The controller was responsible for wirelessly transmitting electrical power. The internal LED assembly served as an implant to receive the power and irradiate light on CCA. The thrombus formation was identified with animal sonography, 7T magnetic resonance imaging, and histopathologic examination. The present study showed that a LED assembly implanted on the outer surface of CCA could induce acute occlusion with single irradiation with 6 mW/cm2 LED for 4 h. If intermittent irradiation with 4.3–4.5 mW/cm2 LED for 2 h was shut off for 30 min, then irradiation for another 2 h was applied; the thrombus was observed to grow gradually and was totally occluded at 7 days. Compared with the contralateral CCA without LED irradiation, the arterial endothelium in the LED-irradiated artery was discontinued. Our study has shown that, by adjusting the duration of irradiation and the power intensity of LED, it is possible to produce acute occlusion and progressive thrombosis, which can be used as an animal model for antithrombotic drug development.

  17. Effects of Mg doping in the quantum barriers on the efficiency droop of GaN based light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Yang Yongchun

    2016-01-01

    The effects of Mg doping in the quantum barriers (QBs) on the efficiency droop of GaN based light emitting diodes (LEDs) were investigated through a duel wavelength method. Barrier Mg doping would lead to the enhanced hole transportation and reduced polarization field in the quantum wells (QWs), both may reduce the efficiency droop. However, heavy Mg doping in the QBs would strongly deteriorate the crystal quality of the QWs grown after the doped QB. When increasing the injection current, the carriers would escape from the QWs between n-GaN and the doped QB and recombine non-radiatively in the QWs grown after the doped QB, leading to a serious efficiency droop. (paper)

  18. Enhancing the performance of blue GaN-based light emitting diodes with carrier concentration adjusting layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yao; Huang, Yang; Wang, Junxi; Wang, Guohong [R& D Center for Semiconductor Lighting, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083,P. R. China (China); Liu, Zhiqiang, E-mail: lzq@semi.ac.cn, E-mail: spring@semi.ac.cn; Yi, Xiaoyan, E-mail: lzq@semi.ac.cn, E-mail: spring@semi.ac.cn; Li, Jinmin [R& D Center for Semiconductor Lighting, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083,P. R. China (China); State Key Laboratory of Solid State Lighting, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Engineering Research Center for the 3rd Generation Semiconductor Materials and Application, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a novel carrier concentration adjusting insertion layer for InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells light-emitting diodes was proposed to mitigate the efficiency droop and improve optical output properties at high current density. The band diagrams and carrier distributions were investigated numerically and experimentally. The results indicate that due to the newly formed electron barrier and the adjusted built-in field near the active region, the hole injection has been improved and a better radiative recombination can be achieved. Compared to the conventional LED, the light output power of our new structure with the carrier concentration adjusting layers is enhanced by 127% at 350 mA , while the efficiency only droops to be 88.2% of its peak efficiency.

  19. Point and line defects which are common to both degraded light emitting diodes and plastically deformed GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liliental, Z.

    1983-01-01

    Similar dipoles with Burger's vector b = a/2 [101] (also referred to as dark line defects) were found in the active layer of degraded light emitting diodes (LED's) and in plastically deformed GaAs. The dependence of characteristic x-ray production of electron channeling conditions has been used in an electron microscope to study point defects in the neighbourhood of these dipoles. Our results are consistent with the occurence of I/sub As/, I/sub As/ +V/sub Ga/, V/sub Ga/ and IAs in descending order of likelihood. Of these, I/sub As/ +V/sub Ga/ can explain the dislocation climb without any extra point defects involved in such process

  20. Quantum-dot light-emitting diodes utilizing CdSe /ZnS nanocrystals embedded in TiO2 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung-Hee; Kumar, Ch. Kiran; Lee, Zonghoon; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Huh, Chul; Kim, Eui-Tae

    2008-11-01

    Quantum-dot (QD) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are demonstrated on Si wafers by embedding core-shell CdSe /ZnS nanocrystals in TiO2 thin films via plasma-enhanced metallorganic chemical vapor deposition. The n-TiO2/QDs /p-Si LED devices show typical p-n diode current-voltage and efficient electroluminescence characteristics, which are critically affected by the removal of QD surface ligands. The TiO2/QDs /Si system we presented can offer promising Si-based optoelectronic and electronic device applications utilizing numerous nanocrystals synthesized by colloidal solution chemistry.