WorldWideScience

Sample records for lecturer academic level

  1. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    12, 13, 14, 15 & 16 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Telecommunication for the future Rob Parker / CERN-IT Few fields have experienced such a high level of technical advance over the last few decades as that of telecommunications. This lecture series will track the evolution of telecommunications systems since their inception, and consider how technology is likely to advance over the next years. A personal view will also be given of the effect of these innovations on our work and leisure activities.The lecture series will be aimed at an audience with no specific technical knowledge of telecommunications.

  2. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    18, 19, 20, 21, 22 November LECTURE FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Telling the Truth with Statistics R. Barlow / Univ. of Manchester, UK This course of lectures will cover probability, distributions, fitting, errors and confidence levels, for practising High Energy Physicists who need to use Statistical techniques to express their results. Concentrating on these appropriate specialist techniques means that they can be covered in appropriate depth, while assuming only the knowledge and experience of a typical Particle Physicist. The different definitions of probability will be explained, and it will be appear why this basic subject is so controversial; there are several viewpoints and it is important to understand them all, rather than abusing the adherents of different beliefs. Distributions will be covered: the situations they arise in, their useful properties, and the amazing result of the Central Limit Theorem. Fitting a parametrisation to a set of data is one of the m...

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel 73127

    2001-01-01

    28, 29, 30, 31 May and 1 June REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Quantum computing and Quantum cryptography T. Hey / University of Southampton, GB, and D. Ross / CERN-TH This course will give both an overview and a detailed introduction to quantum computing and quantum cryptography. The first lecture will survey the field, starting from its origins in Feyman's lecture in 1981. The next three lectures will explain in detail the relevance of Bell states and the workings of Grover's Quantum Search and Shor's quantum factorization algorithms. In addition, an explanation of quantum teleportation will be given. The last lecture will survey the recent progress towards realizing working quantum computers and quantum cryptographic systems.

  4. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    26, 27, 28 February and 1, 2 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Recent Results on CP Violation and B Physics P.F. HARRISON / QMW, London, UK With the advent of the asymmetric B factories in Japan and the US, exciting new results on CP Violation and B Physics are starting to be achieved. In these lectures, we review the existing experimental and phenomenological context of these measurements, we compare and contrast the new experimental facilities and discuss the implications of the recent results on our understanding. Finally we summarise the prospects for future developments.

  5. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    23, 24, 25, 26 and 27 April REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500, on 23 April from 11:15 to 12:15 hrs Searches for Dark Matter F. Feinstein / CPPM, Marseille, F The fact that the mass of the visible stars could not account for the gravitational cohesion of the galaxy clusters was the first manifestation of non-radiating matter in the Universe. Since then, many observations imply that most of the matter is indeed dark. Its nature is still unknown and likely to have several contributions. Recent results indicate that most of it may not be composed of normal matter. These lectures will review the experimental methods, which have been developed to unravel this 70-year long mystery and confront their results with the current theoretical framework of cosmology.

  6. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    9, 10 and 11 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 10:00 to 12:00 hrs on 9 and 10 May and on 11 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Cosmology and Particle Physics K. Olive / CERN-TH A general overview of the standard big bang model will be presented with special emphasis on astro-particle physics. Specific topics will include: Inflation, Baryoogenesis, Nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter.

  7. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 April REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 New Developments in Supersymmetry S. Raby / CERN-TH Introduction to supersymmetric grand unified theories. An introduction to the MSSM and different mechanisms for supersymmetry breaking. Then the details of SU(5) and SO(10) unification, the new gauge sector beyond the standard model, representations of quarks and leptons. Gauge and Yukawa coupling unification and some predictions.

  8. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Tracking at the LHC K. Safarik / CERN-EP The lecture will start with a short history of particle tracking in high-energy physics. Then we will concentrate on tracking in the LHC experiments. We will discuss various tracking devices proposed for these experiments, dividing them into two large groups: solid state detectors and gas detectors. Their characteristics, as well as their behaviour in different external conditions (i.e. magnetic field, radiation) will be compared. Furthermore, we will turn to the question: how to design a tracker using these various technologies, what are the essential parameters to be taken into account and we will apply these considerations to the proposed the LHC detectors. The last part of the lecture will be devoted to tracking software. We will mention simulation and concentrate on track finding and reconstruction, reviewing different algorithms prototyped for the LHC experiments. We will ...

  9. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    26, 27, 28, 29 and 30 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes T. Damour / IHES, Bures-sur-Yvette, F. Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  10. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES-QUESTIONNAIRE

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  11. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15 and 16 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 14, 15 May from 10:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 16 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Council Chamber, bldg 503 Modern Signal Processing: Wavelets vs. Fourier M. Vetterli / EPFL, Lausanne, CH and UC Berkeley Wavelets have established themselves as an important tool in modern signal processing as well as in applied mathematics. This is linked to several facts, among others: New theoretical advances have been achieved, like new forms of 4 time-frequency bases for signal analysis. Efficient computational algorithms are available. Many applications either used similar ideas, like for example the concept of multiresolution, or took advantage of the unified framework provided by wavelets. This combination of elegant theory, efficient algorithms, and successful applications makes the field of wavelets and signal processing quite exciting. It is the purpose of these lectures to establish the theory necessary to understand wavelets and related constructions. A...

  12. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15 and 16 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 14, 15 May from 10:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 16 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Council Chamber, bldg 503 Modern Signal Processing: Wavelets vs. Fourier M. Vetterli / EPFL, Lausanne, CH and UC Berkeley Wavelets have established themselves as an important tool in modern signal processing as well as in applied mathematics. This is linked to several facts, among others: i. New theoretical advances have been achieved, like new forms of 4 time-frequency bases for signal analysis. ii. Efficient computational algorithms are available. iii. Many applications either used similar ideas, like for example the concept of multiresolution, or took advantage of the unified framework provided by wavelets. This combination of elegant theory, efficient algorithms, and successful applications makes the field of wavelets and signal processing quite exciting. It is the purpose of these lectures to establish the theory necessary to understand wavelets and related construct...

  13. Academic Training: Academic Training Lectures-Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  14. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    21, 22, 23 November LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 21 November Auditorium, bldg 500 on 22, 23 November Introduction to symmetry breaking phenomena in physics E. Brezin / ENS, Paris, F. The notion of broken symmetries started slowly to emerge in the 19th century. The early studies of Pasteur on the parity asymmetry of life, the studies of Curie on piezoelectricity and on the symmetries of effects versus the symmetry of causes (which clearly excluded spontaneous symmetry breaking), are important historical landmarks. However the possibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking within the usual principles of statistical mechanics, waited for the work of Peierls and Onsager. The whole theory of phase transitions and critical phenomena, as well as the construction of field theoretic models as long distance limit of yet unknown physics, relies nowadays on the concept of criticality associated to spontaneous symmetry breaking. The phenomena of Goldstone bosons, of Meissn...

  15. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 October LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 10:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Introduction to Field Theory R. Kleiss / University of Nijmegen, NL Starting from the notion of path integrals as developed by Feynman, we discuss field theory in zero spacetime dimensions. The concepts of perturbation expansions, connected amplitudes, Feynman diagrams, classical solutions, renormalization and the effective action are developed. The model is extended to four spacetime dimensions, and the full Feynman rules for relativisitc scalar theory derived. The S matrix and the concept of unitarity are discussed, leading to the amputation rules for S matrix elements from considerations of unitarity. The rules are extended to include particles with spin-1/2 and spin-1. The high-energy behaviour of the theory is discussed as a method to derive the gauge symmetry of the various models.

  16. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    11, 12, 13, 14 and 15 June REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 What have we learned from LEP J. Ellis / CERN-TH The basic formalism of the Standard Model will be reviewed, and the limited state of our knowledge before the start-up of LEP will be recalled. Neutrino counting at LEP will be compared with astrophysical and cosmological constraints. The interpretation of precision electroweak data will be discussed, including their predictions for the top quark and the Higgs boson, and the hints they offer for the future direction beyond the Standard Model: probably a weakly-interacting theory that may be extrapolated up to a grand unification scale. Topics in QCD and heavy-flavour physics will be discussed briefly, and topics in W physics at greater length. Direct LEP searches for the Higgs boson and supersymmetric particles will be discussed, and the prospects for their discoveries at future accelerators will be previewed.

  17. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    19, 20, 21, 22 and 23 February REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - 19, 20 and 21 February Main Auditorium bldg. 500, 22 and 23 February Council Chamber, bldg 503 Introduction to Cryogenic Engineering J.G. Weisend / SLAC, Stanford, USA Cryogenic engineering is an important speciality at CERN. With the construction of LHC, this technology will have an even greater impact on machine operations. The goal of the course is to give people not working in cryogenics an appreciation of the basic principals and problems associated with the field. The course will also provide a foundation for future learning in cryogenics. Topics to be covered will include: properties of cryogenic fluids and materials, refrigeration, cryostat design, instrumentation, safety and propertiesof He II. Examples of working cryogenic systems, many of them from high energy physics, will be presented.

  18. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15, 16, 17, 18 January LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg 500 Superconducting materials suitable for magnets D.C. Larbalestier / Univ. of Wisconsin, USA The range of materials available for superconducting magnets is steadily expanding, even as the choice of material becomes potentially more complex. When virtually all magnets were cooled by helium at ~2-5 K it was easy to separate the domain of Nb-Ti from those of Nb3Sn applications and very little surprise that more than 90% of all magnets are still made from Nb-Ti. But the development of useful conductors of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and YBa2Cu3Ox high temperature superconductors, coupled to the recent discovery of the 39 K superconductor MgB2 and the developing availability of cryocoolers suggests that new classes of higher temperature, medium field magnets based on other than Nb-based conductors could become available in the next 5-10 years. My talks will discuss the essential physics and materials science of these 5 classes...

  19. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2002-01-01

    14, 15, 16, 17, 18 January LECTURE SERIES From 11:00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg 500 Superconducting materials suitable for magnets D.C. Larbalestier / Univ. of Wisconsin, USA The range of materials available for superconducting magnets is steadily expanding, even as the choice of material becomes potentially more complex. When virtually all magnets were cooled by helium at ~2-5 K it was easy to separate the domain of Nb-Ti from those of Nb3Sn applications and very little surprise that more than 90% of all magnets are still made from Nb-Ti. But the development of useful conductors of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and YBa2Cu3Ox high temperature superconductors, coupled to the recent discovery of the 39 K superconductor MgB2 and the developing availability of cryocoolers suggests that new classes of higher temperature, medium field magnets based on other than Nb-based conductors could become available in the next 5-10 years. My talks will discuss the essential physics and materials science of these 5 classes of material - Nb-Ti...

  20. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    27, 28, 29 June and 2, 3 July REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 27, 28, 29 June and Auditorium, bldg 500 on 2, 3 July Particle Identification at the LHC P. Eerola / Lund University, SE The LHC experiments will explore new frontiers of particle physics. To maximize the physics potential of LHC, we need identification of leptons, hadrons, photons and 'invisible' particles. This is realized through reconstruction of electrons and muons, charged particle tracking and identification, b- and tau-tagging, and jet reconstruction. In addition, missing energy has to be measured in order to look for signatures of invisible particles. The experimental conditions posed by the collider, which will be operating at higher energy and luminosity than the present ones, are demanding. A large dynamical range is required in order to measure energies and momenta ranging from below one GeV to several TeVs. The detectors should be able to cope with the 40 MHz collision rate, with a large number ...

  1. Academic Training Lecture - Regular lecture programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Wednesday 28, Thursday 29 and Friday 30 September 2011 Supersymmetric Recipes by Prof. Ben Allanech / University of Cambridge, UK  from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500 ) In these lectures, I shall describe the theory of supersymmetry accessible to people with a knowledge of basic quantum field theory. The lectures will contain recipes of how to calculate which interactions (and which special relations) are in supersymmetry, without providing detailed proofs of where they come from. We shall also cover: motivation for weak-scale supersymmetry and the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  2. Perceptions of Engineering students, lecturers and academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceptions of Engineering students, lecturers and academic development practitioners about academic development classes at a university of technology. ... development, engineering education, scaffolding, self-regulated learning, students ...

  3. Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Lecture Programme 9 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Inner Tracking Detectors by Pippa Wells (CERN) 10 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Calorimeters (2/5) by Philippe Bloch (CERN) 11 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Muon systems (3/5) by Kerstin Hoepfner (RWTH Aachen) 12 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Particle Identification and Forward Detectors by Peter Krizan (University of Ljubljana and J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia) 13 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Trigger and Data Acquisition (5/5) by Dr. Brian Petersen (CERN) from 11:00 to 12:00 at CERN ( Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant )

  4. Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 25 & Wednesday 26 May 2010 from 11:00 to 12:30 - Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500-1-001 Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe by Prof. Hitoshi Murayama (University of California, Berkeley) In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  5. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES QUESTIONNAIRE: SUGGEST AND WIN!

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Time to plan for the 2001-02 lecture series. From today until April 9 you have the chance to give your contribution to improved planning for next year's Academic Training Lectures Series. At the web site: http://wwwinfo/support/survey/academic-training/ you will find questionnaires concerning the following different categories: high energy physics, applied physics, science and society and post-graduate students lectures. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at CERN bookshop.

  6. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (1/3), by Maria Teresa Dova (Universidad Nacional de La Plata & CONICET, Argentina).   Wednesday, April 25, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN (500-1-001 - Main Auditorium ) The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above 1000 TeV, is still unknown. The discovery of their sources will reveal the engines of the most energetic astrophysical accelerators in the universe. In these lectures we present the recent observational results from HiRes, Telescope Array and Pierre Auger Observatory as well as (some of) the possible astrophysical origins of UHECR. These experiments deal with particle interactions at energies orders of magnitude higher than achieved in terrestrial accelerators. Organised by Luis Alvarez-Gaume.

  7. Academic Quality Control in Nigerian Universities: Exploring Lecturers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiekezie, E. O.; Ejemot-Nwadiaro, R. I.; Essien, M. I.; Timothy, A. Essien

    2014-01-01

    The level of job performance, international comparability and competitiveness of Nigerian university graduates are burning issues. Consequently, the academic quality of Nigerian universities has come under severe criticism. Since university lecturers are key players in quality control in universities, this study explored their perceptions of…

  8. Academic Quality Assurance Variables in Nigerian Universities: Exploring Lecturers' Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiekezie, Eucharia O.; Ejemot-Nwadiaro, Regina I.; Timothy, Alexander E.; Essien, Margaret I.

    2016-01-01

    The level of job performance, international comparability and competitiveness of Nigerian university graduates are burning issues. Consequently, the academic quality of Nigerian universities has come under severe criticism. Since university lecturers are key players in quality assurance in universities, this study explored their perceptions of…

  9. Academic training: Advanced lectures on multiprocessor programming

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme 31 October 1, 2 November 2011 from 11:00 to 12:00 -  IT Auditorium, Bldg. 31   Three classes (60 mins) on Multiprocessor Programming Prof. Dr. Christoph von Praun Georg-Simon-Ohm University of Applied Sciences Nuremberg, Germany This is an advanced class on multiprocessor programming. The class gives an introduction to principles of concurrent objects and the notion of different progress guarantees that concurrent computations can have. The focus of this class is on non-blocking computations, i.e. concurrent programs that do not make use of locks. We discuss the implementation of practical non-blocking data structures in detail. 1st class: Introduction to concurrent objects 2nd class: Principles of non-blocking synchronization 3rd class: Concurrent queues Brief Bio of Christoph von Praun Christoph worked on a variety of analysis techniques and runtime platforms for parallel programs. Hist most recent research studies programming models an...

  10. The Challenges of Listening to Academic Lectures for EAP Learners and the Impact of Metacognition on Academic Lecture Listening Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rahimirad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic listening skill is an indispensable necessity for English for academic purposes (EAP students in English-medium universities and also critical for their future success in comprehending conference lectures. But due to the specific nature of such academic lectures, nonnative students all too often face challenges in getting a full command of this task. This study investigates the challenges of listening to academic lectures and the impact of related metacognitive strategies on academic lecture listening comprehension on a group of Iranian learners in an EAP workshop. Fifteen academic staff who took part in two intact classes at the University of Qom, Iran, were randomly assigned to treatment (N = 8 and control (N = 7 groups. The treatment group received 16 hr of metacognitive strategy instruction based on the models proposed by Vandergrift during academic listening instruction, while the control group was just exposed to academic lectures with no explicit strategy instruction. The academic listening sections of the British International English Language Testing System (IELTS were utilized to measure the listening comprehension of both groups before and after the treatment. The results of the data analysis determined that the experimental group significantly outperformed the control group in the listening posttest. The interviews before and after the treatment revealed details of challenges in academic lecture comprehension and also shed light on the perception of the learners regarding metacognitive strategy instruction and the frequency of main metacognitive strategies used in comprehending academic lectures.

  11. Academic Training: The cosmic microwave background - Lecture series

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE REGULAR PROGRAMME 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18 June From 11:00 hrs to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 The cosmic microwave background M. Zaldarriaga / Harvard University, USA ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  12. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    18, 19, 20, 21, 22 November From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Telling the Truth with Statistics R. Barlow / Univ. of Manchester, UK This course of lectures will cover probability, distributions, fitting, errors and confidence levels, for practising High Energy Physicists who need to use Statistical techniques to express their results. Concentrating on these appropriate specialist techniques means that they can be covered in appropriate depth, while assuming only the knowledge and experience of a typical Particle Physicist. The different definitions of probability will be explained, and it will be appear why this basic subject is so controversial; there are several viewpoints and it is important to understand them all, rather than abusing the adherents of different beliefs. Distributions will be covered: the situations they arise in, their useful properties, and the amazing result of the Central Limit Theorem. Fitting a parametrisation to a set of data is one of the most widespread uses of statistics:...

  13. Utilization of academic library by lecturers and students for research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examine d the importance of Academic library as it enhances lecturers' and students' research productivities in the university community. ... 15000 students, simple random sampling technique was used to sample 180 respondents.

  14. Academic Training: Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 19 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (1/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (3/5) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 20 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (2/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) A. PICH (IFIC) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 21 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (3/8) 10:15 - 11:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (4/8) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (5/5) 14:00 - 15:00 R. BRUN (CERN) ROOT: Introduction and Demonstration DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (5/8) 10:15 - 11:00 C. De La Taille (Laboratoire de l'Accélérateur Linéaire) Introduction to Electronics (1/3) 11:15 - 12:00 A. PICH (IFIC) C. De La Taille (Laboratoi...

  15. Academic Training: Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 26 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. Pich (IFIC) The Standard Model (7/8) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) 11:15 - 12:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic Colliders (1/4) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 27 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. Pich (IFIC) The Standard Model (8/8) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) A. Pich (IFIC) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 28 July 09:15 - 10:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic Colliders (2/4) 10:15 - 11:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic Colliders (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) 14:00 - 15:00 R. Assmann (CERN) The CLIC project DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic ...

  16. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme: Cloud Computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Cloud Computing (1/2), by Belmiro Rodrigues Moreira (LIP Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Part).   Wednesday, May 30, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( 500-1-001 - Main Auditorium ) Cloud computing, the recent years buzzword for distributed computing, continues to attract and keep the interest of both the computing and business world. These lectures aim at explaining "What is Cloud Computing?" identifying and analyzing it's characteristics, models, and applications. The lectures will explore different "Cloud definitions" given by different authors and use them to introduce the particular concepts. The main cloud models (SaaS, PaaS, IaaS), cloud types (public, private, hybrid), cloud standards and security concerns will be presented. The borders between Cloud Computing and Grid Computing, Server Virtualization, Utility Computing will be discussed and analyzed.

  17. Academic Training: Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 12 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. Ross (The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics & CERN) Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) 10:15 - 11:00 O. Bruening (CERN) Accelerators (1/5) 11:15 - 12:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (4/4) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 13 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. Ross (The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics & CERN) Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) 10:15 - 11:00 O. Bruening (CERN) Accelerators (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. Bruening (CERN) G. Ross (The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics & CERN) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 14 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. Ross (The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics & CERN) Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (3/6) 10:15 - 11:00 O. Bruening (CERN) Accelerators (3/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. Bruening (CERN) Accelerators (4/5) 14:00 - ...

  18. Academic Training Lectures - QCD for Postgraduates

    CERN Multimedia

    Maureen Prola-Tessaur

    2010-01-01

    by Giulia Zanderighi (University of Oxford) Monday 12 to Friday 16 April 2010 From 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500-1-001 Monday 12 - Modern QCD - Lecture 1 Starting from the QCD Lagrangian we will revisit some basic QCD concepts and derive fundamental properties like gauge invariance and isospin symmetry and will discuss the Feynman rules of the theory. We will then focus on the gauge group of QCD and derive the Casimirs CF and CA and some useful color identities. Tuesday 13 - Modern QCD - Lecture 2 We will start discussing the matter content of the theory and revisit the experimental measurements that led to the discovery of quarks. We will then consider a classic QCD observable, the R-ratio, and use it to illustrate the appearance of UV divergences and the need to renormalize the coupling constant of QCD. We will then discuss asymptotic freedom and confinement. Finally, we will examine a case where soft and collinear infrared divergences appear, will discuss the soft approximation in QCD ...

  19. Academic Training Lecture: Statistical Methods for Particle Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2012-01-01

    2, 3, 4 and 5 April 2012 Academic Training Lecture  Regular Programme from 11:00 to 12:00 -  Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant Statistical Methods for Particle Physics by Glen Cowan (Royal Holloway) The series of four lectures will introduce some of the important statistical methods used in Particle Physics, and should be particularly relevant to those involved in the analysis of LHC data. The lectures will include an introduction to statistical tests, parameter estimation, and the application of these tools to searches for new phenomena.  Both frequentist and Bayesian methods will be described, with particular emphasis on treatment of systematic uncertainties.  The lectures will also cover unfolding, that is, estimation of a distribution in binned form where the variable in question is subject to measurement errors.

  20. Academic Training: Real Time Process Control - Lecture series

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE REGULAR PROGRAMME 7, 8 and 9 June From 11:00 hrs to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Real Time Process Control T. Riesco / CERN-TS What exactly is meant by Real-time? There are several definitions of real-time, most of them contradictory. Unfortunately the topic is controversial, and there does not seem to be 100% agreement over the terminology. Real-time applications are becoming increasingly important in our daily lives and can be found in diverse environments such as the automatic braking system on an automobile, a lottery ticket system, or robotic environmental samplers on a space station. These lectures will introduce concepts and theory like basic concepts timing constraints, task scheduling, periodic server mechanisms, hard and soft real-time.ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  1. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES-QUESTIONNAIRE: SUGGEST AND WIN!

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Its time to plan for the 2002-2003 lecture series. From today until April 26 you have the chance to give your contribution to improved planning for next year's Academic Training Lectures Series. At the web site, you will find questionnaires concerning the following different categories: high energy physics, applied physics, science and society and post-graduate student lectures. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee is offering 10 prizes of a self-teach web based training course to people who provide their email address when filling in the questionnaire. The 10 winners will be chosen randomly from the replies received before the closing date.

  2. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES-QUESTIONNAIRE: SUGGEST AND WIN!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Its time to plan for the 2003-2004 lecture series. From today until April 25 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lectures Series. At the web site : http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES-QUESTIONNAIRE: SUGGEST AND WIN !

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Its time to plan for the 2003-2004 lecture series. From today until April 25 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lectures Series. At the web site : http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  4. Effect of Simulation Techniques and Lecture Method on Students' Academic Performance in Mafoni Day Secondary School Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Sulaiman; Ibi, Mustapha Baba; Bukar, Ibrahim Bulama

    2016-01-01

    The study examined the effect of simulation technique and lecture method on students' academic performance in Mafoni Day Secondary School, Maiduguri. The study used both simulation technique and lecture methods of teaching at the basic level of education in the teaching/learning environment. The study aimed at determining the best predictor among…

  5. The Impact of Lecturer-Student Relationship on Self-Esteem and Academic Performance at Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvester Dodzi Nyadanu; Mirrielle Yayra Garglo; Timothy Adampah; Rachel Libline Garglo

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the effects of lecturer-student relationship on the self-esteem and academic performance of nursing students at the University of Cape Coast, Ghana. The descriptive statistics on the level-clustered random samples indicated two of the lecturer-student relationships, more connectedness and non-threatening, to be positive while the other two, independent and conflicting, were negative relationships. Thus the student-lecturer relationship was an average. With the exception...

  6. [Postdoctoral lecturer thesis in medicine: academic competence or career booster?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, H; Betzler, C; Grieswald, C; Schwab, C G G; Tilkorn, D J; Hauser, J

    2016-06-01

    The postdoctoral lecturer thesis in medicine represents an essential success factor for the career of a physician; however, there is controversial discussion on whether this reflects academic competence or is more a career booster. In this context we conducted a survey among postdoctoral medical lecturers with the aim to evaluate the significance of this qualification. The online survey was performed using a questionnaire requesting biographical parameters and subjective ratings of topics concerning the postdoctoral lecturer thesis. Overall 628 questionnaires were included in the study. The significance of the postdoctoral qualification was rated high in 68.6 % and was seen to be necessary for professional advancement in 71.0 %. The chances of obtaining a full professorship after achieving a postdoctoral qualification were rated moderate to low (68.1 %); nevertheless, 92.3 % would do it again and 86.5 % would recommend it to colleagues. Accordingly, 78.8 % were against its abolishment. Wishes for reforms included standardized federal regulations, reduced dependency on professors and more transparency. The postdoctoral lecturer qualification in medicine is highly valued and the majority of responders did not want it to be abolished. Although the chances for a full professorship were only rated low, successful graduation seems to be beneficial for the career; however, there is a need for substantial structural and international changes.

  7. Academic Training Lecture: Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Regular Programme 21, 22, 23 & 24 June 2010 from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500-1-001 Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders by Dr. Karl Jakobs (University of Freiburg) In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and ...

  8. Academic Training: Search for Dark Matter - Lecture series

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    28, 29, 30 June, 1 & 2 July ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE REGULAR PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - 28, 29 June, 1, 2 July, Main Auditorium bldg. 500. 30 June, Council Chamber bldg. 503 Search for Dark Matter B. Sadoulet / Univ. of California, Berkeley, USA In the first lecture, I will review the most recent cosmological evidence for the pervading dark matter in the universe and the emerging consensus that it is not ordinary matter. We will then focus on thermal particle candidates, which may have been produced in the hot early universe and stayed around to constitute dark matter: neutrinos and Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). I will emphasize what can be learnt from cosmology (e.g. the evidence for cold dark matter and the limits on neutrino masses). The third and the fourth lectures will be devoted the direct detection of WIMPs, its technical challenges and the present status. I will describe the recent advances from phonon-mediated detectors which currently provide the best limits and revi...

  9. Academic Training: The cosmic microwave background - Lecture series

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE REGULAR PROGRAMME 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18 June From 11:00 hrs to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 The cosmic microwave background M. Zaldarriaga / Harvard University, USA The Cosmic Microwave Background has become an indispensable tool for cosmology. The measurement of its frequency spectrum firmly established the Hot Big Bang model of the Universe. Measurements of anisotropies in its temperature and its degree of polarization provide the earliest snapshot we have of the universe, giving us information about its state at the epoch of hydrogen recombination approximately 300,000 after the Big Bang. The anisotropies can be used to constrain many of the parameters in the cosmological model, such as the mean density of baryons and dark matter as well as the curvature of the Universe. In this lectures I will review the physics of the temperature and polarization anisotropies. I will discuss the mechanisms that lead to the anisotropies and how cosmological parameters can be inferr...

  10. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES: Searching for Supersymmetry at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    3, 4, 5, 6, 7 February 2003 ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES from 10.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Searching for Supersymmetry at the LHC by F. Gianotti, CERN-EP and G. Ridolfi, Univ. Di Genova, Italy We will review the general motivations for proposing non-standard descriptions of fundamental interactions. We will give a simple and pedagogical presentation of the theoretical foundations of Supersymmetry, and we will describe the main features of a realistic supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. We will present the phenomenology expected in several motivated scenarios. We will then review the present status of the experimental searches for Supersymmetry at LEP and Tevatron, and discuss prospects at future machines with emphasis on the LHC. We will outline the search strategies and the analysis methods, and compare the sensitivity and reach of the various machines.

  11. Academic Training Lectures | FCC | 2-5 February

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Please note that the next series of Academic Training Lectures will take place from 2 to 5 February 2016.   Tuesday, 2 February 2016 from 10.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. in the Filtration Plant (Building 222-R-001) FCC 1: Introduction to FCC by Michael Benedikt FCC 2: FCC Physics - Challenges and Potentials by Christophe Grojean, Michelangelo Mangano https://indico.cern.ch/event/472105/   Wednesday, 3 February 2016 from 10.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m in the Filtration Plant (Building 222-R-001) FCC 3: FCC hh Detectors and Experiments by Werner Riegler FCC 4: Experimental Measurements and Detectors for the FCC-ee by Mogens Dam https://indico.cern.ch/event/472106/   Thursday, 4 February 2016 from 10.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m in the Filtration Plant (Building 222-R-001) FCC 5: FCC Hadron Collider Design by Daniel Schulte FCC 6: FCC Lepton Collider Design by Frank Zimmermann https://indico...

  12. Level of Perceived Stress Among Lectures in Nigerian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofoegbu, Felicia; Nwadiani, Mon

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide empirical evidence on the level of stress among lecturers in Nigerian universities. On the whole eight universities were used for the study. A sample of 228 (123 male and 105 female) lecturers was selected according to the variables of age, sex, marital status, experience, domicile, areas of specialization,…

  13. LECTURE CANCELLED - Academic Training Lecture: Implications of LHC Data to New Physics (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS LECTURE IS CANCELLED by Alex Pomarol Clotet (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain). Monday, March 18, 2013 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( 4-3-006 - TH Conference Room ) More information here.

  14. Embedding the Teaching of Academic Writing into Anthropology Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, Linda Ann; Townsend, Rodwell

    2018-01-01

    This paper lends support to the argument that students require a variety of teaching strategies to help them improve their academic writing. The study described here took place in 2014 in the context of embedding the teaching of academic writing into anthropology modules. The strategies implemented were microthemes, peer feedback, annotated…

  15. Lecture Attendance, Study Time, and Academic Performance: A Panel Data Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrietti, Vincenzo; Velasco, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The authors analyze matched administrative survey data on economics students enrolled in two econometrics courses offered in consecutive terms at a major public university in Spain to assess the impact of lecture attendance and study time on academic performance. Using proxy variables in a cross-sectional regression setting, they find a positive…

  16. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES: Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    10, 11, 12, 13, 14 February ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes by T.DAMOUR, IHES, Bures-sur-Yvette, F - Physical motivation behind Einstein's theory. - Mathematical formalism of General Relativity. - Experimental confirmations of Einstein's theory. - Introduction to Black Holes physics.

  17. Perceptions of Engineering students, lecturers and academic development practitioners about academic development classes at a university of technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thembeka G.C. Shange

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With the increase in student enrolments in higher education, which has resulted in changesto student profiles, academic development has become important in terms of students’success. This article is a report on a qualitative study that used in-depth interviews toinvestigate the perceptions of Engineering students and staff to academic developmentclasses at a university of technology (UoT in South Africa. The students’ feelingsconcerning the need for academic development to continue beyond their first year ofstudy was of particular interest. Participants included five lecturers from the Engineeringfaculty and four academic development practitioners, who were all purposefully selected.The sample consisted of men and women who were interviewed individually. Interviewswere also conducted with ten first-year Engineering students and ten second-year students,who were randomly selected on the grounds of having been involved in the academicdevelopment programme during their first year.The responses of the lecturers were compared with those of the academic developmentpractitioners and the first- and second-year students’ responses were compared. It emergedthat academic development was considered questionable as it did not seem to be structuredand that the academic development curriculum, itself, was problematic.

  18. Academic Training Lectures | Instrumentation | 12-14 November

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Instrumentation (1, 2 & 3) by Rhodri Jones (CERN)   Wednesday 12, Thursday 13 and Friday 14 November from 11:00 to 12:00 at CERN (40-S2-A01 - Salle Anderson) Description: The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. These lectures will introduce these systems and comment on their contributions to the various stages of beam operation. They will include details on: the beam position system and its use for real-time global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades. ...

  19. Academic Training Lecture | Game Theory | 8 - 9 May

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Game Theory (1 & 2), by Elias Koutsoupias (Professor of Computer Science, University of Oxford, UK).   Thursday 8 May and Friday 9 May from 11 a.m. to 12 a.m. CERN (500-1-001 - Main Auditorium) Description: This lecture series will present the main directions of Algorithmic Game Theory, a new field that has emerged in the last two decades at the interface of Game Theory and Computer Science, because of the unprecedented growth in size, complexity, and impact of the Internet and the Web. These include the price of anarchy (what is the impact of selfishness on a system of competing entities), computational complexity (can the market find a reasonable solution), mechanisms and auctions (what incentives to give to selfish individuals). See the Indico page here.

  20. Rho Chi lecture. The pharmaceutical sciences as academic disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberger, A P

    1988-10-01

    Recent studies of higher education in America have raised concern over the lack of integrity and coherence, the absence of vigorous intellectual exchange, and the dominance of careerism in the undergraduate curriculum. Observations and recommendations emanating from studies of pharmaceutical education acknowledge the importance of problem-solving abilities but emphasize the inculcation of knowledge relevant to professional functions and the development of skill in contemporary practice. The current emphasis placed on training students for pharmacy practice found in the pharmacy curriculum causes the objective of achieving intellectual growth to be overshadowed. Balance must be restored. The pharmaceutical sciences, taught for their value as academic disciplines and for their integrity with other branches of science, could serve as the stimulus for intellectual growth of students. An academic baccalaureate program with a major in pharmaceutical sciences as the required base for professional education is proposed as a remedy.

  1. Academic Training Lectures Want to ASK for something? Then ANSWER the questionnaire!

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Academic Training questionnaire for 2001 is now available on the Web, so if there's a course you think that's missing, now's your chance to ask for it. The questionnaire is your opportunity to give feedback - positive or negative - to the Academic Training Committee, and its an opportunity to make sure the programme is best adapted to CERN's needs. There can't be many at CERN who have never attended an Academic Training lecture. Their subject matter ranges far and wide, making sure that there's something for everyone. Perhaps there are courses that you'd have liked to have followed, but you didn't have the time. Maybe the timetable wasn't compatible with your work schedule, or maybe there's a course you need that isn't on offer. Whatever your concern about Academic Training, the on-line questionnaire is there to let you discuss your concerns with the course organisers. Academic Training has been part of life at CERN since the early 1960s, with short lecture series on topics in high energy physics and rela...

  2. Academic Training: Evolutionary Heuristic Optimization: Genetic Algorithms and Estimation of Distribution Algorithms - Lecture serie

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE REGULAR PROGRAMME 1, 2, 3 and 4 June From 11:00 hrs to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Evolutionary Heuristic Optimization: Genetic Algorithms and Estimation of Distribution Algorithms V. Robles Forcada and M. Perez Hernandez / Univ. de Madrid, Spain In the real world, there exist a huge number of problems that require getting an optimum or near-to-optimum solution. Optimization can be used to solve a lot of different problems such as network design, sets and partitions, storage and retrieval or scheduling. On the other hand, in nature, there exist many processes that seek a stable state. These processes can be seen as natural optimization processes. Over the last 30 years several attempts have been made to develop optimization algorithms, which simulate these natural optimization processes. These attempts have resulted in methods such as Simulated Annealing, based on nat...

  3. Academic Training Lectures | Stuxnet and Cyber-Warfare | 13-14 January 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Please note that the next series of Academic Training Lectures will take place on 13 and 14 January 2016. The lectures will be given by Gian Piero Siroli (Università e INFN, Bologna (IT))   Stuxnet and Cyber-Warfare (1/2)​ on Wednesday, 13 January from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. http://indico.cern.ch/event/438525/ Stuxnet and Cyber-Warfare (2/2) on Thursday, 14 January from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. http://indico.cern.ch/event/438526/ at CERN, Council Chamber (503-1-001)  Description: The first part of the lecture is devoted to the description of the Stuxnet worm, the first cyber-weapon whose existence has been made public, discovered in 2010 and targeting a specific industrial control system; the worm is responsible for the damaging of many centrifuges at an uranium enrichment facility, with the goal of sabotaging Iran&...

  4. Academic training lectures | The outlook for energy supply and demand | 14 - 16 September

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Please note that the next series of Academic Training Lectures will take place on the 14, 15 and 16 September. The lectures will be given by by Chris Llewellyn Smith (Director of Energy Research, University of Oxford, President of SESAME Council). The Outlook for Energy Supply and Demand (1/3) on Monday, 14 September from 11.00 a.m. to 12.00 p.m. https://indico.cern.ch/event/388334/ Can Future Energy Needs be Met Sustainably? (2/3) on Tuesday, 15 September from 4.30 p.m. to 5.30 p.m.  (CERN Colloquium) https://indico.cern.ch/event/388335/ The Outlook for Energy Supply and Demand (3/3) on Wednesday, 16 September from 11.00 a.m to 12.00 p.m. https://indico.cern.ch/event/388336/ at CERN, Main Auditorium, in Building 500-1-001. Description: These lectures will review the challenges facing energy policy, the outlook for different sources of primary energy (fossil and renewable), how energy is used, and prospects for improved energy efficiency. A colloquium ‘Can Future Energy Needs be Met ...

  5. Academic Training Lectures | Introduction to Parallelism, Concurrency and Acceleration | 19-20 January

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Please note that the next series of Academic Training Lectures will take place on 19 and 20 January 2016. The lectures will be given by Andrzej Nowak (TIK Services, Switzerland).   An Introduction to Parallelism, Concurrency and Acceleration (1/2) on Tuesday, 19 January from 11 a.m. to 12 noon https://indico.cern.ch/event/404682/ An Introduction to Parallelism, Concurrency and Acceleration (2/2) on Wednesday, 20 January from 11 a.m. to 12 noon https://indico.cern.ch/event/404683/ at CERN IT Amphitheatre (31-3-004) Description: Concurrency and parallelism are firm elements of any modern computing infrastructure, made even more prominent by the emergence of accelerators. These lectures offer an introduction to these important concepts. We will begin with a brief refresher of recent hardware offerings to modern-day programmers. We will then open the main discu...

  6. Academic Training Lectures | The Cosmological Constant Problem | 12-13 November

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Please note that the next series of Academic Training Lectures will take place on the 12 and 13 November. The lectures will be given by Antonio Padilla (University of Nottingham, UK). The Cosmological Constant Problem (1/2) on Thursday, 12 November from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. https://indico.cern.ch/event/453187/ The Cosmological Constant Problem (2/2) on Friday, 13 November from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. https://indico.cern.ch/event/453188/ at CERN, Council Chamber (503-1-001)  Description: I will review the cosmological constant problem as a serious challenge to our notion of naturalness in Physics. Weinberg’s no go theorem is worked through in detail. I review a number of proposals possibly including Linde's universe multiplication, Coleman's wormholes, the fat graviton, and SLED, to name a few. Large distance modifications of gravity are also discussed, with causality considerations pointi...

  7. Academic Training Lectures | The Art of Way Finding | 9-10 December

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Please note that the next series of Academic Training Lectures will take place on 9 and 10 December. The lectures will be given by John Huth (Harvard University (US)).   The Art of Way Finding (1/2) on Wednesday, 9 December from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. https://indico.cern.ch/event/436443/ The Art of Way Finding (2/2) on Thursday, 10 December from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. http://indico.cern.ch/event/436444/ at CERN, Council Chamber (503-1-001)  Description: In the modern era we've become accustomed to the instantaneous transfer of information filtered by applications that act as a kind of guardian of information. In the realm of finding one’s way, we use GPS and devices that take us from point A to point B without giving it a second thought. Are we slowly losing the cognitive processes that our ancestors had, and at what price? I use the theme of navi...

  8. Academic Training Lectures | Representing Scientific Communities by Data Visualization | 14-15 March

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Please note that the next series of Academic Training Lectures will take place from 14 to 15 March 2016 and will be given by Dario Rodighiero (EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland).   Representing Scientific Communities by Data Visualisation (1/2)​ Monday, 14 March 2016 from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. https://indico.cern.ch/event/465533/ Representing Scientific Communities by Data Visualisation (2/2)​ Tuesday, 15 March 2016 from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. https://indico.cern.ch/event/465534/ at CERN, IT Amphitheatre (31-3-004)  Description: These lectures present research that investigates the representation of communities, and the way to foster their understanding by different audiences. Communities are complex multidimensional entities intrinsically difficult to represent synthetically. The way to represent them is likely to differ depending on the audience considered: governi...

  9. Academic Training: Evolutionary Heuristic Optimization: Genetic Algorithms and Estimation of Distribution Algorithms - Lecture series

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE REGULAR PROGRAMME 1, 2, 3 and 4 June From 11:00 hrs to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Evolutionary Heuristic Optimization: Genetic Algorithms and Estimation of Distribution Algorithms V. Robles Forcada and M. Perez Hernandez / Univ. de Madrid, Spain In the real world, there exist a huge number of problems that require getting an optimum or near-to-optimum solution. Optimization can be used to solve a lot of different problems such as network design, sets and partitions, storage and retrieval or scheduling. On the other hand, in nature, there exist many processes that seek a stable state. These processes can be seen as natural optimization processes. Over the last 30 years several attempts have been made to develop optimization algorithms, which simulate these natural optimization processes. These attempts have resulted in methods such as Simulated Annealing, based on natural annealing processes or Evolutionary Computation, based on biological evolution processes. Geneti...

  10. The semantic-pragmatic interface of authorial presence in academic lecturing phraseology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosario Artiga León

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Epistemic lexical verbs (Hyland, 1998 constitute essential elements in conveying different interpersonal meanings, among those judgment, certainty, doubt, and evidence, aiding speakers both to project themselves into the speech and to maintain interesting relationships with audiences. Supporting Sinclair’s (1991 contention that meanings are clustered into lexicogrammatical patternings, and not in isolated items, this paper explores the phraseology accompanying the most representative epistemic lexical verbs (ELVs in university lectures. By applying corpus-based methodology, we also illustrate the functional variability of think –the most salient of these lexical verbs–, especially the roles it performs when hedging the discourse and complying with politeness conventions as part of interactional and metadiscoursal strategies. At a textual level, results indicate that lecturing speech favors the proliferation of evaluation markers that appear to be arranged in several recurrent formal patterns. This clearly entails potential for pedagogical purposes and ESP syllabuses.

  11. Effects of Lecture Method Supplemented with Music and Computer Animation on Senior Secondary School Students' Academic Achievement in Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpoghol, T. V.; Ezeudu, F. O.; Adzape, J. N.; Otor, E. E.

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of Lecture Method Supplemented with Music (LMM) and Computer Animation (LMC) on senior secondary school students' academic achievement in electrochemistry in Makurdi metropolis. Six research questions and six hypotheses guided the study. The design of the study was quasi experimental, specifically the pre-test,…

  12. Contextualising change through a common strategy: Lecturers' perceptions and key role in supporting academic reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindelan, Paz; Martin, Ana

    2014-05-01

    European universities are currently going through a process of change in order to meet the common goals set for higher education by the European Commission. They are revising their educational models to adjust them to the guidelines of the "Bologna Process" and are devising an institutional strategy for its implementation. In practical terms, this means aligning former national degrees and diplomas to standard European Bachelor and Masters degrees and PhD doctorates, by creating acknowledged professional qualification benchmarks that also include adjusted course lengths and contents. This process, in the end, mostly affects academic staff members who have a fundamental role to play in carrying out the pedagogical reforms on the teaching front. Besides presenting a commentary on the institutional approach of one particular technical university in Spain, the purpose of this paper is to propose, from the authors' point of view as lecturers, a strategy which has the potential to create a favourable atmosphere for carrying out such a reform. The article's main objective is to highlight a series of action points which may serve to reinforce and advance the main institutional strategy by relying on the powerful influence of its academic staff members.

  13. Investigating students' academic numeracy in 1st level university courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, Linda; Hobohm, Carola

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates how an online test (`Self-Test' developed at the University of Southern Queensland) can enrich students' understanding of their academic numeracy, through a purpose-built, self-assessment tool aligned with online modules. Since its creation and evaluation, the tool has been developed and tailored to suit other first year courses based around an academic numeracy framework of competence, confidence and critical awareness (Galligan 2013a). This paper will highlight how the new Self-Test is underpinned by this framework and how students' levels of numeracy can be better understood by the lecturer through Self-Test in a first year nursing for numeracy course and a maths for teachers course. It particularly addresses over- and under-confidence, error analysis and students' reflective comments, and how this understanding can better inform course development and teaching.

  14. Speaker comfort and increase of voice level in lecture rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas; Gade, Anders Christian; Bellester, G P

    2008-01-01

    Teachers often suffer health problems or tension related to their voice. These problems may be related to there working environment, including room acoustics of the lecture rooms which forces them to stress their voices. The present paper describes a first effort in finding relationships between...... were also measured in the rooms and subjective impressions from about 20 persons who had experience talking in these rooms were collected as well. Analysis of the data revealed significant differences in the sound power produced by the speaker in the different rooms. It was also found...

  15. Academic Training Lecture | Practical Statistics for LHC Physicists: Descriptive Statistics, Probability and Likelihood | 7-9 April

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Please note that our next series of Academic Training Lectures will take place on the 7, 8 and 9 April 2015   Practical Statistics for LHC Physicists: Descriptive Statistics, Probability and Likelihood, by Harrison Prosper, Floridia State University, USA. from 11.00 a.m. to 12.00 p.m. in the Council Chamber (503-1-001) https://indico.cern.ch/event/358542/

  16. Academic Training Lectures | Theories of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking: A Post LHC Run-I Perspective | 26, 27 and 29 May

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Please note that our next series of Academic Training Lectures will take place on the 26, 27 and 29 May 2015.   Theories of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking: A Post LHC Run-I Perspective, by James Daniel Wells (University of Michigan (US)) from 11.00 a.m. to 12.00 p.m. in the Council Chamber (503-1-001) https://indico.cern.ch/event/383514/

  17. A comparative study of traditional lecture methods and interactive lecture methods in introductory geology courses for non-science majors at the college level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundley, Stacey A.

    In recent years there has been a national call for reform in undergraduate science education. The goal of this reform movement in science education is to develop ways to improve undergraduate student learning with an emphasis on developing more effective teaching practices. Introductory science courses at the college level are generally taught using a traditional lecture format. Recent studies have shown incorporating active learning strategies within the traditional lecture classroom has positive effects on student outcomes. This study focuses on incorporating interactive teaching methods into the traditional lecture classroom to enhance student learning for non-science majors enrolled in introductory geology courses at a private university. Students' experience and instructional preferences regarding introductory geology courses were identified from survey data analysis. The information gained from responses to the questionnaire was utilized to develop an interactive lecture introductory geology course for non-science majors. Student outcomes were examined in introductory geology courses based on two teaching methods: interactive lecture and traditional lecture. There were no significant statistical differences between the groups based on the student outcomes and teaching methods. Incorporating interactive lecture methods did not statistically improve student outcomes when compared to traditional lecture teaching methods. However, the responses to the survey revealed students have a preference for introductory geology courses taught with lecture and instructor-led discussions and students prefer to work independently or in small groups. The results of this study are useful to individuals who teach introductory geology courses and individuals who teach introductory science courses for non-science majors at the college level.

  18. Academic Locus of Control, Tendencies Towards Academic Dishonesty and Test Anxiety Levels as the Predictors of Academic Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilyurt, Etem

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have focused on finding the level of effect that academic locus of control, tendencies towards academic dishonesty, and test anxiety levels have had on academic self-efficacy, and providing a separate explanation ratio for each. The relationship among the effects of the academic locus of control, tendencies towards academic…

  19. Evaluating Academic Workplaces: The Hyper-Expansive Environment Experienced by University Lecturers in Professional Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Pete; Smith, Caroline; Ilhan Beyaztas, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    Academic developers need to understand the situated workplaces of the academic tribes they are supporting. This study proposes the use of the expansive--restrictive workplace learning environment continuum as a tool for evaluation of academic workplaces. The tool is critically appraised through its application to the analysis of workplace…

  20. What Makes an Excellent Lecturer? Academics' Perspectives on the Discourse of "Teaching Excellence" in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Margaret; Su, Feng

    2017-01-01

    In the context of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), we examine academics' perspectives on the discourse of "teaching excellence" based on an empirical study with 16 participants from five post-1992 universities. The article reports the findings on academics' views of the term and concept of "teaching excellence",…

  1. Availability, Level of Use and Constraints to Use of Electronic Resources by Law Lecturers in Public Universities in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amusa, Oyintola Isiaka; Atinmo, Morayo

    2016-01-01

    (Purpose) This study surveyed the level of availability, use and constraints to use of electronic resources among law lecturers in Nigeria. (Methodology) Five hundred and fifty-two law lecturers were surveyed and four hundred and forty-two responded. (Results) Data analysis revealed that the level of availability of electronic resources for the…

  2. Interactive anatomical and surgical live stream lectures improve students' academic performance in applied clinical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Thomas; Butz, Benjamin; Herlan, Stephan; Kramer, Andreas; Hirt, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Tuebingen's Sectio Chirurgica (TSC) is an innovative, interactive, multimedia, and transdisciplinary teaching method designed to complement dissection courses. The Tuebingen's Sectio Chirurgica (TSC) allows clinical anatomy to be taught via interactive live stream surgeries moderated by an anatomist. This method aims to provide an application-oriented approach to teaching anatomy that offers students a deeper learning experience. A cohort study was devised to determine whether students who participated in the TSC were better able to solve clinical application questions than students who did not participate. A total of 365 students participated in the dissection course during the winter term of the 2012/2013 academic year. The final examination contained 40 standard multiple-choice (S-MC) and 20 clinically-applied multiple-choice (CA-MC) items. The CA-MC items referred to clinical cases but could be answered solely using anatomical knowledge. Students who regularly participated in the TSC answered the CA-MC questions significantly better than the control group (75% and 65%, respectively; P  0.05). The CA-MC questions had a slightly higher level of difficulty than the S-MC questions (0.725 and 0.801, respectively; P = 0.083). The discriminatory power of the items was comparable (S-MC median Pearson correlations: 0.321; CA-MC: 0.283). The TSC successfully teaches the clinical application of anatomical knowledge. Students who attended the TSC in addition to the dissection course were able to answer CA-MC questions significantly better than students who did not attend the TSC. Thus, attending the TSC in addition to the dissection course supported students' clinical learning goals. Anat Sci Educ 10: 46-52. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  3. Laughter in University Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesi, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses laughter in spoken academic discourse, with the aim of discovering why lecturers provoke laughter in their lectures. A further purpose of the paper is to identify episodes in British data which may differ from those in other cultural contexts where other lecturing practices prevail, and thus to inform the design of study skills…

  4. The Analysis of Factors and Levels Associated with Lecturers' Motivation and Job Satisfaction in University of Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyengabe, Sylvestre; He, Haiyan; Yiyi, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to expect good performance of students in universities without having a motivated lecturing staff. The study aimed to correlate the levels of lecturers' motivation and job satisfaction and find out factors associated with. A cross-sectional study was conducted between February and April 2016. Structured online questionnaires of the…

  5. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme: Physics at the AD/PS/SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Physics at the AD/PS/SPS (1/4), by Lau Gatignon (CERN).   Monday, June 18, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant )   Lecture 1: The CERN injector complex and beams for non-LHC physics. The various machines and beam lines in the CERN injector complex are presented, from the linacs to the SPS. Special emphasis is given to the beam lines at the PS and SPS machines: AD, North and East Areas, nTOF and CNGS and HiRadMad as well as the ion beams. A short outlook is given to possible future upgrades and projects.   More information here.  

  6. Academic Training Lecture | LHC Operation: Past and Future by Mike Lamont | 10-12 September

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    After a successful first running period, LHC is now well into a two year shutdown for extensive consolidation. A pedagogical overview of the machine, its operating principles, its systems and underlying accelerator physics is presented. Performance past and future is discussed.   These lectures will be presented in three parts: LHC Operation: Past and Future (1/3): Tuesday 10 September 2013 from 11:00 to 12:00 at CERN (222-R-001 - Filtration Plant) LHC Operation: Past and Future (2/3): Wednesday 11 September from 11:00 to 12:00 at CERN (222-R-001 - Filtration Plant) LHC Operation: Past and Future (3/3): Thursday 12 September from 11:00 to 12:00 at CERN (222-R-001 - Filtration Plant) Click here to view the event details on Indico.

  7. A Comparison of Traditional and Engaging Lecture Methods in a Large, Professional-Level Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cynthia J.; McNear, Jacquee; Metz, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    In engaging lectures, also referred to as broken or interactive lectures, students are given short periods of lecture followed by "breaks" that can consist of 1-min papers, problem sets, brainstorming sessions, or open discussion. While many studies have shown positive effects when engaging lectures are used in undergraduate settings,…

  8. Student Learning Outcomes and Attitudes When Biotechnology Lab Partners Are of Different Academic Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Heather B.; Witherow, D. Scott; Carson, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The North Carolina State University Biotechnology Program offers laboratory-intensive courses to both undergraduate and graduate students. In “Manipulation and Expression of Recombinant DNA,” students are separated into undergraduate and graduate sections for the laboratory, but not the lecture, component. Evidence has shown that students prefer pairing with someone of the same academic level. However, retention of main ideas in peer learning environments has been shown to be greater when partners have dissimilar abilities. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that there will be enhanced student learning when lab partners are of different academic levels. We found that learning outcomes were met by both levels of student, regardless of pairing. Average undergraduate grades on every assessment method increased when undergraduates were paired with graduate students. Many of the average graduate student grades also increased modestly when graduate students were paired with undergraduates. Attitudes toward working with partners dramatically shifted toward favoring working with students of different academic levels. This work suggests that offering dual-level courses in which different-level partnerships are created does not inhibit learning by students of different academic levels. This format is useful for institutions that wish to offer “boutique” courses in which student enrollment may be low, but specialized equipment and faculty expertise are needed. PMID:22949428

  9. Academic Training Lecture | Big Data Challenges in the Era of Data Deluge | 9 - 10 March

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Big Data Challenges in the Era of Data Deluge, by Ilya Volvovski (Senior Software Architect, Cleversafe, USA).   Monday, 9 March 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00 and Tuesday, 10 March 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00 at CERN ( 4-3-006 - TH Conference Room ) Description: For better or for worse, the amount of data generated in the world grows exponentially. The year of 2012 was dubbed the year of 'Big Data' and 'Data Deluge'; in 2013, the petabyte scale was referenced matter­-of-­factly; and exabyte size is now in the vocabulary of storage providers and large organisations. Traditional copy-based technology doesn’t scale into this size territory: relational DBs give up after many billions of rows in tables; typical file systems are not designed to store trillions of objects; Disks fail; networks are not always available. Yet individuals, businesses and academic institutions demand 100% availability with no data loss. Is this the final dead end? ...

  10. Utilizing public scientific web lectures to teach contemporary physics at the high school level: A case study of learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulamit Kapon1,*

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a teaching experiment designed to examine the learning (i.e., retention of content and conceptual development that takes place when public scientific web lectures delivered by scientists are utilized to present advanced ideas in physics to students with a high school background in physics. The students watched an exemplary public physics web lecture that was followed by a collaborative generic activity session. The collaborative session involved a guided critical reconstruction of the main arguments in the lecture, and a processing of the key analogical explanations. Then the students watched another exemplary web lecture on a different topic. The participants (N=14 were divided into two groups differing only in the order in which the lectures were presented. The students’ discussions during the activities show that they were able to reason and demonstrate conceptual progress, although the physics ideas in the lectures were far beyond their level in physics. The discussions during the collaborative session contributed significantly to the students’ understanding. We illustrate this point through an analysis of one of these discussions between two students on an analogical explanation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect that was presented in one of the lectures. The results from the tests that were administered to the participants several times during the intervention further support this contention.

  11. Utilizing public scientific web lectures to teach contemporary physics at the high school level: A case study of learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapon, Shulamit; Ganiel, Uri; Eylon, Bat Sheva

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes a teaching experiment designed to examine the learning (i.e., retention of content and conceptual development) that takes place when public scientific web lectures delivered by scientists are utilized to present advanced ideas in physics to students with a high school background in physics. The students watched an exemplary public physics web lecture that was followed by a collaborative generic activity session. The collaborative session involved a guided critical reconstruction of the main arguments in the lecture, and a processing of the key analogical explanations. Then the students watched another exemplary web lecture on a different topic. The participants (N=14) were divided into two groups differing only in the order in which the lectures were presented. The students’ discussions during the activities show that they were able to reason and demonstrate conceptual progress, although the physics ideas in the lectures were far beyond their level in physics. The discussions during the collaborative session contributed significantly to the students’ understanding. We illustrate this point through an analysis of one of these discussions between two students on an analogical explanation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect that was presented in one of the lectures. The results from the tests that were administered to the participants several times during the intervention further support this contention.

  12. Environmental Lectures at the Campus Universitari de la Mediterrania, Teaching at European/Worldwide level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, J. M.; Babiano, A.; Fraunie, P.; Blanes, N.

    2009-04-01

    Since 1997, the Campus Universitari de la Mediterrania, an independent institution created jointly by the Vilanova i la Geltru City council, The Politechnic University of Catalonia (at Barcelona) and the Generalitat (Local Goverment) of Catalonia. Has organized different types of summer schools at different levels of speciality ranging from cultural and continuing education to advanced post-doctoral level. The number of students has risen from 300 to about a thousand, with many students being able to transfer ETCS credits gained at CUM to other institutions or universities. In the ambit of environmental sciences and engineering, at least two courses (typically one week / 20-30 hours of lectures) and 2 workshops (2-3 days 16-20 hours of seminars) have been organized since 1999. Funding from a variety of sources, ERCOFTAC, EGU, NATO, etc.. including Socrates/Erasmus European Union Grants allow to gather groups of enthusiastic master and phD students with world wide lecturers to focus on specific subjets such as Ocean Mixing, Bioacoustics, Turbulence, Astrophysics, Climate change, turbulence modelling, etc..

  13. Comparison the Effect of Teaching by Group Guided Discovery Learning, Questions & Answers and Lecturing Methods on the Level of Learning and Information Durability of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardanparvar H.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The requirements for revising the traditional education methods and utilization of new and active student-oriented learning methods have come into the scope of the educational systems long ago. Therefore, the new methods are being popular in different sciences including medical sciences. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of teaching through three methods (group guided discovery, questions and answers, and lecture methods on the learning level and information durability in the nursing students. Instrument & Methods: In the semi-experimental study, 62 forth-semester nursing students of Nursing and Midwifery Faculty of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, who were passing the infectious course for the first time at the first semester of the academic year 2015-16, were studied. The subjects were selected via census method and randomly divided into three groups including group guided discovery, questions and answers, and lecture groups. The test was conducted before, immediately after, and one month after the conduction of the training program using a researcher-made questionnaire. Data was analyzed by SPSS 19 software using Chi-square test, one-way ANOVA, ANOVA with repeated observations, and LSD post-hoc test. Findings: The mean score of the test conducted immediately after the training program in the lecture group was significantly lesser than guided discovery and question and answer groups (p<0.001. In addition, the mean score of the test conducted one month after the training program in guided discovery group was significantly higher than both question and answer (p=0.004 and lecture (p=0.001 groups. Conclusion: Active educational methods lead to a higher level of the students’ participation in the educational issues and provided a background to enhance learning and for better information durability. 

  14. Puzzle-based versus traditional lecture: comparing the effects of pedagogy on academic performance in an undergraduate human anatomy and physiology II lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetzik, Lucas; Deeter, Anthony; Parker, Jamie; Yukech, Christine

    2015-06-23

    A traditional lecture-based pedagogy conveys information and content while lacking sufficient development of critical thinking skills and problem solving. A puzzle-based pedagogy creates a broader contextual framework, and fosters critical thinking as well as logical reasoning skills that can then be used to improve a student's performance on content specific assessments. This paper describes a pedagogical comparison of traditional lecture-based teaching and puzzle-based teaching in a Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab. Using a single subject/cross-over design half of the students from seven sections of the course were taught using one type of pedagogy for the first half of the semester, and then taught with a different pedagogy for the second half of the semester. The other half of the students were taught the same material but with the order of the pedagogies reversed. Students' performance on quizzes and exams specific to the course, and in-class assignments specific to this study were assessed for: learning outcomes (the ability to form the correct conclusion or recall specific information), and authentic academic performance as described by (Am J Educ 104:280-312, 1996). Our findings suggest a significant improvement in students' performance on standard course specific assessments using a puzzle-based pedagogy versus a traditional lecture-based teaching style. Quiz and test scores for students improved by 2.1 and 0.4% respectively in the puzzle-based pedagogy, versus the traditional lecture-based teaching. Additionally, the assessments of authentic academic performance may only effectively measure a broader conceptual understanding in a limited set of contexts, and not in the context of a Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab. In conclusion, a puzzle-based pedagogy, when compared to traditional lecture-based teaching, can effectively enhance the performance of students on standard course specific assessments, even when the assessments only test a limited

  15. Tiered Models of Integrated Academic and Behavioral Support: Effect of Implementation Level on Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noltemeyer, Amity; Sansosti, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study examined (a) Integrated Systems Model (ISM) implementation levels, and (b) the effect of implementation of the academic and behavioral components of ISM on student academic outcomes. Participants included 2,660 students attending six suburban elementary schools. Hierarchical linear regression was conducted using a control…

  16. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    3, 4, 5, 6, 7 February 2003 from 10.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Searching for Supersymmetry at the LHC by F. Gianotti, CERN-EP and G. Ridolfi, Univ. di Genova, Italy We will review the general motivations for proposing non-standard descriptions of fundamental interactions. We will give a simple and pedagogical presentation of the theoretical foundations of Supersymmetry, and we will describe the main features of a realistic supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. We will present the phenomenology expected in several motivated scenarios. We will then review the present status of the experimental searches for Supersymmetry at LEP and Tevatron, and discuss prospects at future machines with emphasis on the LHC. We will outline the search strategies and the analysis methods, and compare the sensitivity and reach of the various machines.

  17. Academic Training Lecture 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Programme 22 & 23 February 2011 Mr. Derrick Brashear, Jeffrey Altman (Your File System Inc.) from 11:00 to 12:00 - Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant Tuesday 22 February 2011 A History of the Andrew File System Derrick Brashear and Jeffrey Altman will present a technical history of the evolution of Andrew File System starting with the early days of the Andrew Project at Carnegie Mellon through the commercialization by Transarc Corporation and IBM and a decade of OpenAFS. The talk will be technical with a focus on the various decisions and implementation trade-offs that were made over the course of AFS versions 1 through 4, the development of the Distributed Computing Environment Distributed File System (DCE DFS), and the course of the OpenAFS development community. The speakers will also discuss the various AFS branches developed at the University of Michigan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Carnegie Mellon University. Wednesday 23 February The Future of the Andrew File System T...

  18. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    27, 28, 29, 30, 31 January from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 27, 28, 30, 31 January Council room on 29 January Cosmology : The Homogeneous Universe and the Evolution of Structures BY R. DURRER, UNIVERSITY OF GENEVA, CH In my course I will first give and introduction to standard cosmology. I discuss the equations of the homogeneous and isotropic universe and I'll briefly summarize its thermal history. After that I want to concentrate on the fluctuations in the universe. We will study anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background, fluctuations of the matter density and the velocity field and weak lensing. I want to explain especially new cosmological data which are coming up right now and their implication for the cosmological model.

  19. A lecture on lecturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calnan, J

    1976-11-01

    There are major differences between a lecture and a paper for publication. Often the printed word is spoken at meetings, a kind of compulsive public reading which has robbed the lecturer of the chance of oratory and the audience of a little enjoyment. The simple fact is that although doctors read aloud badly (actors do this far better) most can learn to speak spontaneolsly and with animation; but this requires time and effort, both of which are donated in a miserly way. The successful lecturer is generous and considerate of his audience--a rare being at medical meetings.

  20. A Comparison between the Effect of Cooperative Learning Teaching Method and Lecture Teaching Method on Students' Learning and Satisfaction Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadjani, Farzad; Tonkaboni, Forouzan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to investigate a comparison between the effect of cooperative learning teaching method and lecture teaching method on students' learning and satisfaction level. The research population consisted of all the fourth grade elementary school students of educational district 4 in Shiraz. The statistical population…

  1. Stress level and academic performance of university students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the relationship between level of stress and students' academic performance in Universities in Kwara State, Nigeria. The study adopted a descriptive survey research design. Proportional stratified random sampling was used to select 300 students for the study. A “Students' Stress Level Questionnaire ...

  2. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme: How Large-Scale Civil Engineering Projects Realise the Potential of a City

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    How Large-Scale Civil Engineering Projects Realise the Potential of a City (1/3), by Bill Hanway (Excecutive Director of Operations, AECOM Europe).   Wednesday, June 6, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( 80-1-001 - Globe 1st Floor ) In this series of three special lectures, leading experts from AECOM would explore the impact of a trio of major projects on a single city. In common with every metropolis, London has run-down districts and infrastructure in need of upgrading. The lectures propose to cover three of the biggest challenges: regenerating run-down areas; reducing congestion and transporting people more efficiently; and improving water and wastewater systems. Each project contributes to a collective public aim - to realise the potential of a growing city, and ensure its healthy, sustainable and competitive future. Lecture 1: Into the lecture series and The London 2012 Olympic Games Most cities share a group of common complex challenges – growing populations, agei...

  3. Physical Self-Efficacy and Academic Level as Predictors Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Self–efficacy is the belief in one's capabilities to organize and execute courses of action required to manage prospective situations. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of self-efficacy, academic level and gender in predicting university maladjustment. A total of 200 undergraduate students (100 male and 100 ...

  4. The Contemporary Academic: Orientation towards Research Work and Researcher Identity of Higher Education Lecturers in the Health Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Pete; Smith, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Internationally, the increasing emphasis in universities on the quality of teaching, on student employability and on a corporate approach to entrepreneurial income generation has created a tension around the primacy afforded to published research outputs as a focus for academic work and status. In this study, a framework for academic socialisation…

  5. Does a Link Exist Between Examination Performance and Lecture Attendance for First Year Engineering Students ?

    OpenAIRE

    O'Dwyer, Aidan

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine if a link exists between lecture attendance and examination performance of Level 7, Year 1, Electrical Engineering students at Dublin Institute of Technology in the Electrical Systems subject. Lecture attendance was monitored and analysed over four academic years (2007-8, 2008-9, 2009-10 and 2010-11). The average lecture attendance for students in the three academic years from 2007-10 was 55%, increasing noticeably in the 2009-10 academic year. A stat...

  6. 2000-2001 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME 1ST TERM - 11 SEPTEMBER-22 DECEMBER 2000 LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS

    CERN Multimedia

    TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT; Françoise Benz; Tel. 73127

    2000-01-01

    Introduction to Particle Accelerators by E.J.N. Wilson / CERN-AC 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 September 10:00-12:00 - Auditorium 11, 12, 13, 14 and Council Chamber 15 September (early starting time) Introduction to Field Theory by R. Kleiss, Univ. of Nijmegen, NL 23, 24, 25, 26, 27 October 10:00-12:00 - Auditorium (early starting time) Introduction to QCD by B. Webber, Univ. of Cambridge, GB 30, 31 October, 1, 2, 3 November 10:00-12:00 - Auditorium (early starting time) Introduction to the Standard Model by G. Ridolfi (TH-Division) 20, 21, 22, 23 & 24 November 10:00-12:00 - Auditorium (early starting time) Beyond the Standard Model by G. Giudice (TH-Division) 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 December 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the CERN bulletin, the WWW, and by Notices before each term and for each series of lectures.

  7. Web-Based Learning Enhancements: Video Lectures through Voice-Over PowerPoint in a Majors-Level Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lents, Nathan H.; Cifuentes, Oscar E.

    2009-01-01

    This study is an experimental introduction of web-based lecture delivery into a majors-level introductory biology course. Web-based delivery, achieved through the use of prerecorded Voice-Over PowerPoint video lectures, was introduced on a limited basis to an experimental section while a control group, with the same instructor, received standard…

  8. Academic performance and student engagement in level 1 physics undergraduates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, M M; McVitie, S

    2009-01-01

    At the beginning of academic year 2007-08, staff in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow started to implement a number of substantial changes to the administration of the level 1 physics undergraduate class. The main aims were to improve the academic performance and progression statistics. With this in mind, a comprehensive system of learning support was introduced, the main remit being the provision of an improved personal contact and academic monitoring and support strategy for all students at level 1. The effects of low engagement with compulsory continuous assessment components had already been observed to have a significant effect on students sitting in the middle of the grade curve. Analysis of data from the 2007-08 class showed that even some nominally high-achieving students achieved lowered grades due to the effects of low engagement. Nonetheless, academic and other support measures put in place during 2007-08 played a part in raising the passrate for the level 1 physics class by approximately 8% as well as raising the progression rate by approximately 10%.

  9. Academic performance and student engagement in level 1 physics undergraduates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, M M; McVitie, S [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.casey@physics.gla.ac.uk

    2009-09-15

    At the beginning of academic year 2007-08, staff in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow started to implement a number of substantial changes to the administration of the level 1 physics undergraduate class. The main aims were to improve the academic performance and progression statistics. With this in mind, a comprehensive system of learning support was introduced, the main remit being the provision of an improved personal contact and academic monitoring and support strategy for all students at level 1. The effects of low engagement with compulsory continuous assessment components had already been observed to have a significant effect on students sitting in the middle of the grade curve. Analysis of data from the 2007-08 class showed that even some nominally high-achieving students achieved lowered grades due to the effects of low engagement. Nonetheless, academic and other support measures put in place during 2007-08 played a part in raising the passrate for the level 1 physics class by approximately 8% as well as raising the progression rate by approximately 10%.

  10. Relationship of level of physical skills and academic achievemnts

    OpenAIRE

    Doubková, Karolína

    2010-01-01

    The thesis aims to investigate whether there is dependence between the level of physical skills and achievements in school. By means of test I will analyze the level of physical skills for pupils in lower multi-annual gymnasium. Based on the measured results I try to find and compare the level of physical skills and students academic achievemnt dependence in the first semester of that year. Subsequently I also detect, by using my pre-prepared questionnaire, the relationship of students to spo...

  11. Academic literacy of South African higher education level students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    Specifically, measuring vocabulary size, i.e. how many words a student knows ... The focus of this module is on basic research skills, critical thinking, finding and ..... (x) Make meaning (e.g. of an academic text) beyond the level of the sentence. ..... 25. 30. Total 275 28.05. 2.72 .16. 9. 30. 2000- word. 2. 38. 28.50. 1.62 .26. 24.

  12. Examination of burnout levels and academic procrastination of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekkurşun Demir Gönül

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the relationship between the academic procrastination and the students’ burnout levels was examined. 406 students from different departments at Gazi University Sports Sciences Faculty participated in the research. In order to collect data, the student version of Maslach’s Burnout Inventory and the Academic Procrastination Scale (APS were used in the study. It was determined that the students at the faculty of sports science did not show any significant difference in terms of gender variable according to MBI-SF and APS. When analyzed in terms of department variable, there was a significant difference in the MBI-SF subscales, while no significance was observed in the total score of APS. Similar results were obtained in the APS total scores among the grades; but there was significance in the subscales of MBI-SF. The analyses indicated that a statistically significant negative relationship at medium level was found between the MBI-SF and APS. The results of the analyses also indicated that there was a statistically significant negative relationship between academic procrastination and student burnout levels.

  13. Student experience and academic success: comparing a student-centred and a lecture-based course programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severiens, S.; Meeuwisse, M.; Born, M.

    2015-01-01

    Past research has shown that, under certain conditions, student-centred and small-scale course programmes result in more academic success. The present study investigates these conditions in further detail. It is examined whether, in comparison to a course programme that is relatively more

  14. Academic Satisfaction Level and Academic Achievement among Students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences: Academic Year 2015-2016

    OpenAIRE

    Khadijeh Jamshidi; Babak Mohammadi; Zahra Mohammadi; Mohammad Karimi Parviz; Roghayeh Poursaberi; Mohammad Mehdi Mohammadi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Academic satisfaction is considered one of the most important factors affecting academic achievement among students. The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between academic satisfaction and academic achievement among students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted with 346 student participants using stratified random sampling. The research instrument included the Student Academic Sa...

  15. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme: Particle Physics Foundations of Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and Inflation (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Particle Physics Foundations of Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and Inflation (1/3), by Dr. Edward (Rocky) Kolb (University of Chicago).   Wednesday, May 9, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( 500-1-001 - Main Auditorium ) Ninety-five percent of the present mass-energy density of the Universe is dark.  Twenty-five percent is in the form of dark matter holding together galaxies and other large scale structures, and 70% is in the form of dark energy driving an accelerated expansion of the universe.  Dark matter and dark energy cannot be explained within the standard model of particle physics.  In the first lecture I will review the evidence for dark matter and the observations that point to an explanation in the form of cold dark matter.  I will then describe the expected properties of a hypothetical Weakly-Interacting Massive Particle, or WIMP, and review experimental and observational approaches to test the hypothesis.  Finally, I will discus...

  16. CANDU lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouben, B.

    1984-06-01

    This document is a compilation of notes prepared for two lectures given by the author in the winter of 1983 at the Institut de Genie Nucleaire, Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal. The first lecture gives a physical description of the CANDU reactor core: the nuclear lattice, the reactivity mechanisms, their functions and properties. This lecture also covers various aspects of reactor core physics and describes different calculational methods available. The second lecture studies the numerous facets of fuel management in CANDU reactors. The important variables in fuel management, and the rules guiding the refuelling strategy, are presented and illustrated by means of results obtained for the CANDU 600

  17. Interactive lectures: Clickers or personal devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Lesley J; Joyce, Domino A

    2015-01-01

    Audience response systems ('clickers') are frequently used to promote participation in large lecture classes, and evidence suggests that they convey a number of benefits to students, including improved academic performance and student satisfaction. The limitations of these systems (such as limited access and cost) can be overcome using students' personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops together with text message, web- or app-based polling systems. Using questionnaires, we compare student perceptions of clicker and smartphone based polling systems. We find that students prefer interactive lectures generally, but those that used their own device preferred those lectures over lectures using clickers. However, device users were more likely to report using their devices for other purposes (checking email, social media etc.) when they were available to answer polling questions. These students did not feel that this distracted them from the lecture, instead, concerns over the use of smartphones centred around increased battery usage and inclusivity for students without access to suitable technology. Our results suggest that students generally preferred to use their own devices over clickers, and that this may be a sensible way to overcome some of the limitations associated with clickers, although issues surrounding levels of distraction and the implications for retention and recall of information need further investigation.

  18. Examining the Level of Career maturity among Foreign Asian Students by measuring Academic Level

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Tekke; Faiz Bin Adam Ghani

    2013-01-01

    The Asian individuals are dependent and collectivist compared with the western individuals that are independent and individualistic. Foreign Asian students choosing similar courses with their country friends do not reveal their career maturity and also lead to negative effect on their choices.  This study aims at examining the level of career maturity of foreign Asian students in Malaysia based on academic level by using the Career Maturity Inventory. Two hundred and twenty nine ( Male=106, ...

  19. Lectures on Chevalley groups

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Robert Steinberg's Lectures on Chevalley Groups were delivered and written during the author's sabbatical visit to Yale University in the 1967-1968 academic year. The work presents the status of the theory of Chevalley groups as it was in the mid-1960s. Much of this material was instrumental in many areas of mathematics, in particular in the theory of algebraic groups and in the subsequent classification of finite groups. This posthumous edition incorporates additions and corrections prepared by the author during his retirement, including a new introductory chapter. A bibliography and editorial notes have also been added. This is a great unsurpassed introduction to the subject of Chevalley groups that influenced generations of mathematicians. I would recommend it to anybody whose interests include group theory. -Efim Zelmanov, University of California, San Diego Robert Steinberg's lectures on Chevalley groups were given at Yale University in 1967. The notes for the lectures contain a wonderful exposition of ...

  20. Perceptions of Geography as a Discipline among Students of Different Academic Levels in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Munazza

    2016-01-01

    Geography is facing the problem of its identity and recognition as a useful academic discipline in Pakistan. This research paper examines the perception about geography as an academic discipline from the students of different academic levels i.e. intermediate, graduate, master and M.Phil. Data were collected through structured questionnaires and a…

  1. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 8, introduction cementitious systems for Low-Level Waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.F.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.; Mason, T.O.; Brough, A.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents details about cementitious systems for low-level waste immobilization. Topics discussed include: composition and properties of portland cement; hydration properties; microstructure of concrete; pozzolans; slags; zeolites; transport properties; and geological aspects of long-term durability of concrete

  2. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 8, introduction cementitious systems for Low-Level Waste immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.F.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.; Mason, T.O.; Brough, A.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents details about cementitious systems for low-level waste immobilization. Topics discussed include: composition and properties of portland cement; hydration properties; microstructure of concrete; pozzolans; slags; zeolites; transport properties; and geological aspects of long-term durability of concrete.

  3. Students distracted by electronic devices perform at the same level as those who are focused on the lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romesh P. Nalliah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Little is known about the characteristics of internet distractions that students may engage in during lecture. The objective of this pilot study is to identify some of the internet-based distractions students engage in during in-person lectures. The findings will help identify what activities most commonly cause students to be distracted from the lecture and if these activities impact student learning.Methods. This study is a quasi-experimental pilot study of 26 students from a single institution. In the current study, one class of third-year students were surveyed after a lecture on special needs dentistry. The survey identified self-reported utilization patterns of “smart” devices during the lecture. Additionally, twelve quiz-type questions were given to assess the students’ recall of important points in the lecture material that had just been covered.Results. The sample was comprised of 26 students. Of these, 17 were distracted in some form (either checking email, sending email, checking Facebook, or sending texts. The overall mean score on the test was 9.85 (9.53 for distracted students and 10.44 for non-distracted students. There were no significant differences in test scores between distracted and non-distracted students (p = 0.652. Gender and types of distractions were not significantly associated with test scores (p > 0.05. All students believed that they understood all the important points from the lecture.Conclusions. Every class member felt that they acquired the important learning points during the lecture. Those who were distracted by electronic devices during the lecture performed similarly to those who were not. However, results should be interpreted with caution as this study was a small quasi-experimental design and further research should examine the influence of different types of distraction on different types of learning.

  4. Students distracted by electronic devices perform at the same level as those who are focused on the lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalliah, Romesh P; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the characteristics of internet distractions that students may engage in during lecture. The objective of this pilot study is to identify some of the internet-based distractions students engage in during in-person lectures. The findings will help identify what activities most commonly cause students to be distracted from the lecture and if these activities impact student learning. Methods. This study is a quasi-experimental pilot study of 26 students from a single institution. In the current study, one class of third-year students were surveyed after a lecture on special needs dentistry. The survey identified self-reported utilization patterns of "smart" devices during the lecture. Additionally, twelve quiz-type questions were given to assess the students' recall of important points in the lecture material that had just been covered. Results. The sample was comprised of 26 students. Of these, 17 were distracted in some form (either checking email, sending email, checking Facebook, or sending texts). The overall mean score on the test was 9.85 (9.53 for distracted students and 10.44 for non-distracted students). There were no significant differences in test scores between distracted and non-distracted students (p = 0.652). Gender and types of distractions were not significantly associated with test scores (p > 0.05). All students believed that they understood all the important points from the lecture. Conclusions. Every class member felt that they acquired the important learning points during the lecture. Those who were distracted by electronic devices during the lecture performed similarly to those who were not. However, results should be interpreted with caution as this study was a small quasi-experimental design and further research should examine the influence of different types of distraction on different types of learning.

  5. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    AMS_02 Particle Physics Detector Technologies Orbiting the Earth (1/2), by Corrado Gargiulo (CERN).   Thursday, April 19, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:30 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( 4-3-006 - TH Conference Room ) AMS-02 has taken the high performance technologies used in particle physics and implemented them for use in low Earth orbit. Safety aspects for the Space Shuttle flight, that carried AMS_02 to the International Space Station, Space environment and inaccessibility during the life of AMS_02 are some of the aspects which have driven the design of the experiment. The technical challenges to build such a detector have been surmounted through the close collaboration amongst the AMS scientists and industries around the world. Their efforts have resulted in the development of new technologies and higher standards of precision.

  6. Examining the Level of Career maturity among Foreign Asian Students by measuring Academic Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Tekke

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Asian individuals are dependent and collectivist compared with the western individuals that are independent and individualistic. Foreign Asian students choosing similar courses with their country friends do not reveal their career maturity and also lead to negative effect on their choices.  This study aims at examining the level of career maturity of foreign Asian students in Malaysia based on academic level by using the Career Maturity Inventory. Two hundred and twenty nine ( Male=106, Female= 123 international students studying in various semesters completed the Career Maturity Inventory and it was reported that there were no significant differences between respondents of different academic semesters with regard to level of career maturity, this might reflect an educational level bias in the construction of the career decision-making. The findings of the current study are not consistent with theoretical expectations and prior research that international undergraduate senior students would be having higher career maturity than international undergraduate fresh students. Research emphasizes the reason behind might result from dependent and collectivist Asian culture that leading to fresh international students are higher career maturity compared to senior international students.

  7. Word-Level Stress Patterns in the Academic Word List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John; Kandil, Magdi

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses teachers and researchers of English as a second or foreign language who are interested in speech intelligibility training and/or vocabulary acquisition. The study reports a stress-pattern analysis of the Academic Word List (AWL) as made available by Coxhead [TESOL Quarterly 34 (2000) 213]. To examine the AWL in a new way, we…

  8. People, Policy and Process in College-Level Academic Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thang N.

    2016-01-01

    Academic institution structure is both hierarchical and committee-based. It is hierarchical in the Administration including staff, similar to business corporations. It is committee-based for the Faculty body in a fashion similar to US Congress. It can exploit the best of both models for better governance and rightfully democratic decisions. The…

  9. Load leveling air conditioning technology development by unused energy high-level utilization. Summary of lectures given at the achievement report meeting; Miriyo energy kodo katsuyo fuka heijunka reidanbo gijutsu kaihatsu. Seika hokokukai koen yoshishu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes lectures given at the research and development achievement report meeting on load leveling air conditioning technologies utilizing unutilized energies at high levels. The lecture titled 'the current status and future problems in heat supply industries' given by the manager of the Heat Supply Industry Department at the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy explained the heat supply businesses in relation with global environment issues, electric power load leveling, and cogeneration. The lecture titled 'improvement of cities to energy saving type cities and district air conditioning systems' given by a construction official at the Ministry of Construction explained the guideline (draft) for introduction of district air conditioning systems as to their purpose, positioning, procedure for discussing the introduction, and procedure for its implementation as a business. The lecture titled 'the recent trend inside and outside the country around unutilized energies' given by Professor Tanazawa at the Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology described the intensification of energy problems, environment problems, and the near future measures to be taken against these problems. The lecture titled 'summarization of the achievements in development of load leveling air conditioning technologies utilizing unutilized energies at high levels' given by Professor Nakahara at the Kanagawa University explained the summary of the achievements in research and development by themes. (NEDO)

  10. Academic stress levels were positively associated with sweet food consumption among Korean high-school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeonsoo; Yang, Hye Young; Kim, Ae-Jung; Lim, Yunsook

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to identify the association among levels of persistent academic stress, appetite, and dietary habits and to determine the specific types of sweet foods consumed by Korean high-school students according to their academic stress levels. The study participants included 333 high-school students in the 10th to 12th grades in Kyunggi Province, Korea. The level of academic stress was scored with a 75-item academic stress scale and was categorized as high, medium, or low. A food-frequency questionnaire was used to measure the sugar intake from sweet foods. Korean high-school students with a high academic stress level had larger meals than the other students. Compared with students with low academic stress, the students with high academic stress had a higher frequency of sugar intake from the following food types: confectionaries, candies and chocolates, breads, and flavored milk. Moreover, compared with students with low academic stress, the students with high academic stress had a higher total intake of sugar from the following food types: confectionaries, candies, chocolates, flavored milk, traditional Korean beverages, and spicy, sweet, and fried rice cakes. Unhealthy stress-related food choices may compromise high-school students' health and contribute to their morbidity. The findings of the present study could be used to help nutritionists develop effective strategies for nutritional education and counseling to improve adolescent health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Role of Neighborhood Context and School Climate in School-Level Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Linda D; McMahon, Susan D; Jason, Leonard A

    2018-03-30

    In recent years, the quality of education available to children has become increasingly dependent on the social and economic demographics of neighborhoods in which the children live. This study assesses the role of community violence in explaining the relation between socio-economic status (SES) and academic outcomes and the potential of positive school climate to promote academic achievement. With a sample of 297 Chicago public elementary schools, we examine community-level and school-level data and use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping to illustrate how school academic achievement coincides with neighborhood economics and crime statistics. Results support the hypothesized mediation, such that lower SES was associated with lower academic achievement, and violent crime partially mediated this relation. School climate was positively associated with academic achievement, and student safety significantly moderated the relation between SES and academic achievement. Implications for theory, research, and intervention are discussed. © Society for Community Research and Action 2018.

  12. Jubilee Lecture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-08-07

    Aug 7, 2017 ... E up V As a \\ Nipio with students, teachers and researchers in India. Nsp1 Nup8C Nup57. Nup57. Nup145N. High tea will be served after the lecture. For details contact: M. Ananth, Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Science. Email: ananthmuthiah Ogmail.com/ananthmOmbu..iscernet.in Mob. 984 ...

  13. Employability Skills, Personal Qualities, and Early Employment Problems of Entry-Level Auditors: Perspectives from Employers, Lecturers, Auditors, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yet-Mee; Lee, Teck Heang; Yap, Ching Seng; Ling, Chui Ching

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine the issue of employability of university accounting students from the perspectives of accounting firm employers, junior auditors, accounting lecturers, and accounting students. Areas of investigation include perceived importance of employability skills and desirable personal qualities; and early employment problems encountered…

  14. Effects of High School Students' Perceptions of School Life Quality on Their Academic Motivation Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin Kösterelioglu, Meltem; Kösterelioglu, Ilker

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify the effects of high school students' perceptions of school life quality on their academic motivation levels. The study was conducted on a sample of high school students (n = 2371) in Amasya Province in the fall semester of 2013-2014 academic year. Study sample was selected with the help of cluster sampling method. Data…

  15. To determine the level of satisfaction among medical students of a public sector medical university regarding their academic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzar Bushra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An ongoing evaluation system is essential to determine if the academic system in place has worked to produce a better product, hence the objective of our study was to evaluate the satisfaction level among medical students regarding their academic teaching and assessment method and what measures will they suggest for the future to rectify the current situation. This questionnaire based cross sectional study was conducted in a public sector medical university from February to July 2010. A well structured questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 375 final year medical students. However 292 of the students provided informed consent and filled in the questionnaire which included their demographic profile as well as questions in line with the study objective. Data was entered in a Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version.16 and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Findings The male to female ratio in our study was 1:2. Most of the students (57.2% were dissatisfied with the quality of teaching in the university. Fifty-seven percent of the participants believed that the current standard of their institute were not at par with those of international medical universities. BCQ's were the mode of examination questions preferred by the majority of the students. Most of the students (66.1% wanted the university to conduct career planning seminars to help them plan their career. Conclusions These results suggest that the students of public sector medical universities are unsatisfied from current academic facilities and teaching activities. Students recommend increased emphasis on better lectures and practical training as well as a need to incorporate career planning sessions for the students to help plan them their future career paths.

  16. Special lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, H.

    1998-01-01

    In his special lecture, given at the Artsimovich-Kadomtsev Memorial Session of the 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Yokohama, October 1998, Prof. H. Yoshikawa stated that the fusion program had come to a crossroads. He was wondering whether the future would lead to cooperation between nations, striving to overcome the difficulties the world is confronted with, or if it would lead to despair

  17. Five Lectures on Photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    These five lectures were held by E. Broda during the International Symposium on Alternative Energies, in September 1979. Lecture 1 – The Great Physicists and Photosynthesis; Lecture 2 – The Influence of Photosynthesis on the Biosphere. Past, Present and Future; Lecture 3 – The Origin of Photosynthesis; Lecture 4 – The Evolution from Photosynthetic Bacteria to Plants; Lecture 5 – Respiration and Photorespiration. (nowak)

  18. Master’s degree in Nuclear Engineering UPC-ENDESA. Creating synergy at industrial and academic levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batet, I.; Calviño, F.; Duch, M.A.; Dies, J.; León, P.; Fernández-Olano, P.

    2015-07-01

    The Master’s degree in Nuclear Engineering, born from the alignment of objectives of Academy and Industry, aims to prepare competent engineers to assume managerial positions within the Nuclear Industry. MNE is completely taught in English. Synergies are established at both industrial and academic levels. MNE syllabus has been designed (and is being continuously improved) with the help of industrial partners and the Spanish Regulatory Body (CSN). One half of the lectures are delivered by professionals external to the university. Besides ENDESA, other companies (ANAV, AREVA, ENRESA, ENSA, ENUSA, IDOM, Nuclenor, Tecnatom, Westinghouse) collaborate in the master. Lecturers from CSN and CIEMAT (the major Spanish research centre) participate in the Master as well. A large portion of the master contents is delivered as Project Based Learning, In general, active learning and team work activities are thoroughly used so as to help the students achieve the learning objectives and acquire a number of soft skills required by industry. MNE is embedded in EMINE, the European Master in Nuclear Energy (European Institute of Technology, KIC-InnoEnergy). As well, MNE is part of a double degree in the Barcelona Engineering School (ETSEIB) with the official Master in Industrial Engineering (MUEI). Having in the same classroom EMINE and MNE students creates a good working atmosphere, while allowing the future engineers work in a multicultural and international environment. The double degree MNE-MUEI allows students to acquire the MNE competencies and, at the same time, legal engineering attributions. It has been useful to attract good engineering students to the master. (Author)

  19. Level of Attention of Secondary School Students and Its Relationship with their Academic Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Manzoor Hussain Shah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The major purpose of the study was to find out the relationship between the level of attention and academic achievement. The tool designed to carry out this study was questionnaire. A sample of 420 students was taken from six secondary schools of district chakwal. The data was collected personally by visiting the concerned schools. The collected data was properly tabulated and analyzed with the help of ANOVA. The major findings of the study were: students’ level of attention directly effects their academic achievement. Those students who have high level of attention their academic achievement is also higher. As the level of attention decreases academic achievement also decreases student with moderate attention level have average academic achievement while the student with low level of attention are failed. The main factors that distract student attention are noise, home environment, financial problems, health problems and lack of interest. The study concludes that attention should be considered an important psychological phenomenon that effects the students’ academic achievement. As the individuals are different in their capabilities, skills, intelligence and aptitude their level of attention is also different.

  20. Opening lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    The opening lecture on the results of fifty years in the nuclear energy field, deals with the main principles underlying the CEA policy concerning the fission nuclear energy transformation, i.e. the design of a nuclear industry that is a safe, high-performance and reliable source of electric power, the development of an adaptive power generation tool with the capacity to progress according to new constraints, and the necessary anticipation for preparing to the effects of the next 50 year technological leaps

  1. Does social comparison make a difference? Optimism as a moderator of the relation between comparison level and academic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibbons, FX; Blanton, H; Gerrard, M; Buunk, B; Eggleston, T

    Previous research has demonstrated that poor academic performance is associated with a downward shift in preferred level of academic comparison level (ACL). The current study assessed the long-term impact of this downward shift on the academic performance of college students and also examined the

  2. Differences in academic performance and self-regulated learning based on level of student participation in supplemental instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Ana C.

    This study examined differences in academic performance and self-regulated learning based on levels of student participation in Supplemental Instruction (SI) sessions in two introductory undergraduate biology and chemistry courses offered at University of Central Florida in the Spring 2006 semester. The sample consisted of 282 students enrolled in the biology class and 451 students enrolled in chemistry. Academic performance was measured using students' final course grades and rates of withdrawal from the courses. The self-regulated learning constructs of motivation, cognition, metacognition, and resource management were measured using the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Relationships between students' gender and ethnic background and levels of SI participation were also analyzed in this research. Findings in both biology and chemistry courses revealed a statistically significant decrease in student motivation from beginning to end of semester. In chemistry, frequent SI participants also showed statistically significantly higher levels of motivation at the end of the semester than occasional and non-SI participants. There were no statistically significant gains in cognitive, metacognitive, and resource management strategies from beginning to end of semester. However, statistically significant differences in resource management were observed at the end of the semester among SI attendance groups in both courses. Students in the high SI attendance group were more likely to use learning resources than those who did not participate regularly or did not participate at all. Statistically significant differences in academic performance based on students' SI participation were found in both biology and chemistry courses. Frequent SI participants had significantly higher final percentage grades and were more likely to receive grades of A, B, or C, than those who either did not attend SI regularly of did not participate at all. They were also less

  3. OCCUPATIONAL BURNOUT LEVELS OF ACADEMIC STAFF: TURKEY-MALTA STUDY GROUP SAMPLE

    OpenAIRE

    Demirtas, Cagri; Kapusuzoglu, Saduman

    2016-01-01

    The study group of this survey comprises of 185academic staff working in the University, Faculty of Education and Faculty ofEconomics and Administrative Sciences, in Turkey, and Malta University, Facultyof Education and Faculty of Economy, Management and Accounting. This study is adescriptive survey model, in which the assessment tool of Maslach BurnoutInventory is used. The burnout levels of academic personnel are investigated interm of gender, age and Faculty variables. As a result, it was ...

  4. Opening lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.J.

    1979-01-01

    In his lecture, the author discusses the question as to whether our technical standards come up to the requirements of our legal system. It is true that acceptance of our technical standards is voluntary but, as in the case of standards issued by the Government, standardization will only prove useful when accepted by the majority of the citizens. This becomes evident in cases where the health and quality of life of the citizens has to be defended against the impacts of technical progress. Here, the state has to fulfil a protective function for the benefit of its citizens. Hence the 'standardization contract' has been agreed upon in order to guarantee compliance of technical standards and requirements with the interests of public life and health. (HSCH) [de

  5. Lecturer on tour!

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Readers may recall the interview with Professor Peter Kalmus which appeared in the July issue of Physics Education and which indicated his latest role of lecturer for the 1998-9 Institute of Physics Schools and Colleges Lecture series. This year's lecture is entitled `Particles and the universe' and the tour was due to begin in St Andrews, Scotland, late in September. Professor Kalmus will be looking at various aspects of particle physics, quantum physics and relativity, and discussing how they reveal the secrets of the beginning of our universe. His own experience of working at CERN, the European centre for particle physics in Switzerland, as well as at other international research facilities will provide a unique insight into activity in one of the most exciting areas of physics. The talks are aimed at the 16-19 age group but members of the public are also welcome to attend. They will act as an opportunity to gain a sneak preview of the dynamic new topics that will soon feature in the A-level syllabus arising from the Institute's 16-19 project. Further details of attendance are available from the local organizers, a list of whom may be obtained from Catherine Wilson in the Education Department at the Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 0171 470 4800, fax: 0171 470 4848). The published schedule (as of September) for the lecture series consists of the following: Dates

  6. Academic level and student’s faculty as factors of test anxiety among undergraduates in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E. Oladipo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Test anxiety as a prominent problem among students has been a focus of study for decades now, with studies focusing more on such factors as age, gender and study habit in relation to test anxiety. There is a dearth of literature in respect of such factors as academic level and student’s faculty in relation to test anxiety among undergraduates. The focus of the present study therefore, was to investigate academic level and students’ faculty as factors predicting test anxiety among undergraduates in Nigeria. Using simple random sampling technique, a total of 197(126 males and 71 females undergraduates participated in the study. Their ages ranged from 16 to 30years (M=21.6,SD=2.68.Four hypotheses were tested with Pearson Product moment correlation and Multiple regression analysis. The results revealed that academic level and students’ faculty had no correlation with test anxiety. Moreover, the result of the multiple regression analysis showed that academic level and students’ faculty have no independent and joint influence on test anxiety. It was concluded that irrespective of student’s academic level and faculty, test anxiety is unavoidable. Other factors might be responsible for student test anxiety especially among undergraduates Nigeria. It is therefore recommend that more research should be conducted in this area so as to determine the salient factors that predict test anxiety.

  7. Measuring Levels of Work in Academic Libraries: A Time Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Donald P.

    1985-01-01

    Using Stratified Systems Theory, which focuses on the manager-subordinate relationship in the bureaucratic structure, a study was conducted to measure level of responsibility in work of 37 professional and nonprofessional positions in four academic library technical services departments. Three levels of work were measured in "time-spans of…

  8. The Influence of Parents Educational Level on Secondary School Students Academic Achievements in District Rajanpur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rana Muhammad Asad; Iqbal, Nadeem; Tasneem, Saima

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to focus the influence and impact of parents educational level on students academic achievement at secondary level of education. The study utilizes the students results of the 9th class in secondary school certificate examination taken by the Board of Intermediate & Secondary Education Dera Ghazi Khan. Oral interview,…

  9. Scientific Creativity and High Ability: Gender and academic level differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Javier ESPARZA MOLINA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of gender and educational level on scientific creativity among gifted/talented students. A cohort of creatividad científica y alta habilidad: diferencias de género y nivel educativo 78 secondary school students from 12 to 16 years old participated in this research. The scientific creativity was measured using the Creative Scientific Ability Test (Sak & Ayas, 2011 designed for secondary school students from 11 to 14 years old. Its theoretical framework sets up the measurement of a three dimensional structure: general creative abilities (fluency, flexibility and creativity, scientific creative abilities (hypothesis generation, hypothesis testing and evidence evaluation and scientific knowledge. This test has the right adequate psychometric properties with a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.848 (Sak & Ayas, 2013. Results indicated that male students scored significantly higher in a task named Interaction Graph which measures hypothesis generation in interdisciplinary science. The analysis also showed that students involved in upper education levels scores significantly higher in general fluency and in the task called The Food Chain which measures evidence evaluation in the area of ecology.

  10. The relations between the academic success levels of the boys playing basketball and certain variables

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    Umut CANLI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the relation between the academic success levels of the boys playing basketball and certain variables such as age, basketball playing times, the number of the weekly average trainings and motoric skills. Material and Methods: 93 students participated voluntarily in the study from three different sports clubs. The ages in which the participants started basketball varied between 10 and 13, and their durations of weekly trainings differed from each other. The end-of-the-year academic success average points of the participants were considered in determining the academic success levels; and the International Physical Performance Test Profile (IPPTP (Kamar, 2008 was used in measuring the motoric skills. The issue of whether there was a significant difference between the participants was determined by using the SPSS 21.0 Package Program together with the One-Way ANOVA Test. Results: According to the findings, it was determined that there were no relations between the academic success rates and the basketball playing durations, the number of weekly trainings, and their motoric skills (p>0.05. On the other hand, a statistically significant difference was determined between the age variable and the academic success levels (p<0.05. Conclusions: No significant differences were detected between the motoric skills, number of trainings, starting basketball dates and the academic success levels of the sportsmen who receive basic basketball training (which contribute to the development of motoric skills with different numbers of weekly training and with different basketball starting dates; while a negative significance was detected between the age variable and academic success.

  11. SOCIAL MEDIA USE AND PERCEPTION OF LIVE LECTURES BY MEDICAL STUDENTS

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    Nisha Narendran

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The current generation is rightly described as generation M (edia highlighting the increasing time spent with media on any given day. The availability of mobiles and the absence of mobile jammers in lecture classes will seriously interfere with lecture attendance or concentration in lecture hours. We intend to take a survey on the level of social media use or use of smartphone for other non-academic uses by medical students during their lecture hours. We expect them to put forward their views as to how they perceive live lectures and what can be done to improve the effect of live lectures in this era of widespread and anytime media use. Aims of the study were- 1. To conduct a survey among medical students in preclinical postings regarding use of social media use during live lecture hours. 2. To assess their perception regarding conventional lecture duration and the factors, which could improve their concentration during lecture hours. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted among the participants. Approval was obtained from the Institutional Research Committee. All the 135 participants of the study were administered a semi-structured prevalidated questionnaire to assess their perception regarding live lecture and a survey regarding use of social media was taken. The collected data was entered into MS Excel and analysed using Epiinfo version 7. Percentages were used to quantify the results. Settings and Design- The study was conducted among third semester students attending pharmacology lectures in Government Medical College, Thrissur. RESULTS 77 (57% participants agreed of using social media regularly in lecture hours. Majority used it to chat or connect with friends and in gaming either because of addiction or to avoid boredom. They were a majority in opinion that the hot noon time lectures should be cut short in duration. They preferred the use of newer technology based methods to be adopted for

  12. Letter to Editor: RESITA NETWORK - ACADEMIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION NETWORK OF SOUTH EASTERN EUROPEAN UNIVERSITIES: AN EXAMPLE OF SUCCESSFUL NETWORKING IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION AT ACADEMIC LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schulte

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The foundation, development, activities, and wider social impact of the AcademicEntrepreneurship and Innovation Network of South Eastern European Universities, or shortlyRESITA Network, is presented in this paper as a positive example of successful networking inentrepreneurship and innovation at academic level.

  13. Relations among Academic Enablers and Academic Achievement in Children with and without High Levels of Parent-Rated Symptoms of Inattention, Impulsivity, and Hyperactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaray, Michelle Kilpatrick; Jenkins, Lyndsay N.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among academic enablers (i.e., engagement, interpersonal skills, motivation, study skills) and academic achievement in children with and without high levels of parent-rated symptoms of inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity (Symptoms of IIH Group). The study included 69 participants (29 [42%] in the IIH…

  14. Enhancing Academic Achievement and Retention in Senior Secondary School Chemistry through Discussion and Lecture Methods: A Case Study of Some Selected Secondary Schools in Gboko, Benue State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omwirhiren, Efe M.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was initiated to determine how academic achievement and retention in chemistry is enhanced using the two instructional methods among SSII students and ascertained the differential performance of male and female students in chemistry with a view of improving student performance in chemistry. The study adopted a non-equivalent…

  15. Level of and motivation for extracurricular activity are associated with academic performance in the veterinary curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meredyth L; Rush, Bonnie R; Elmore, Ronnie G; White, Brad J

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine the number of school-sanctioned extracurricular opportunities available to veterinary students and characterize the policies of school administrations toward extracurricular involvement and academic standing. Further, we sought to describe the level of extracurricular involvement of veterinary students, determine the association between extracurricular activity involvement and academic performance, and determine the motivation for extracurricular involvement of veterinary students. Survey data were obtained from 18 associate deans of colleges of veterinary medicine regarding the number of extracurricular student organizations within their school and administrative recommendations regarding student involvement. Another survey was administered and responded to by 665 veterinary students enrolled in curricular years 1-3 at Kansas State University and Texas A&M University regarding their extracurricular involvement. Associate deans of 11 schools responded that they make formal or informal recommendations to students about extracurricular activities, workload, and academic priority (61.1%). In a multivariate model, students who participated two times per week or more had a significantly higher overall grade point average (GPA) than students participating once per week (pStudents for whom the primary reason for participation was networking or social enhancement had a significantly lower overall GPA than students for whom the primary reason was gaining new knowledge and skills (pstudent extracurricular involvement is a consideration for administrators when counseling students in academic difficulty. Moderate levels of extracurricular involvement can contribute to the academic success of students, but students should temper their level of involvement based upon their own motivations.

  16. Does academic assessment system type affect levels of academic stress in medical students? A cross-sectional study from Pakistan

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    Madiha Ali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stress among medical students induced by academic pressures is on the rise among the student population in Pakistan and other parts of the world. Our study examined the relationship between two different systems employed to assess academic performance and the levels of stress among students at two different medical schools in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods: A sample consisting of 387 medical students enrolled in pre-clinical years was taken from two universities, one employing the semester examination system with grade point average (GPA scores (a tiered system and the other employing an annual examination system with only pass/fail grading. A pre-designed, self-administered questionnaire was distributed. Test anxiety levels were assessed by The Westside Test Anxiety Scale (WTAS. Overall stress was evaluated using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS. Results: There were 82 males and 301 females while four did not respond to the gender question. The mean age of the entire cohort was 19.7±1.0 years. A total of 98 participants were from the pass/fail assessment system while 289 were from the GPA system. There was a higher proportion of females in the GPA system (85% vs. 59%; p<0.01. Students in the pass/fail assessment system had a lower score on the WTAS (2.4±0.8 vs. 2.8±0.7; p=0.01 and the PSS (17.0±6.7 vs. 20.3±6.8; p<0.01, indicating lower levels of test anxiety and overall stress than in students enrolled in the GPA assessment system. More students in the pass/fail system were satisfied with their performance than those in the GPA system. Conclusion: Based on the present study, we suggest governing bodies to revise and employ a uniform assessment system for all the medical colleges to improve student academic performance and at the same time reduce stress levels. Our results indicate that the pass/fail assessment system accomplishes these objectives.

  17. Academic Stress Influences Periodontal Health Condition and Interleukin-1 beta Level

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    Sandra O. Kuswandani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a risk factor for periodontal disease, causing increase levels of interleukin-1 beta that involve in periodontal destruction. Objective: To analyze the relationship between academic stress in residency program students conditions and levels of interleukin-1 beta in gingival crevicular fluid. Methods: Thirty eight subjects filled the questionnaire of Graduate Dental Environtmental Stress (GDES, periodontal examination and samples of gingival crevicular fluid were tested for interleukin-1 beta with the Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA test. Results: There were significant differences between academic stress to periodontal tissue in oral hygiene (p=0.038, bleeding on probing index (p=0.02, but no significant differences in pocket depth and loss of attachment (p=0.972. There were significant differences between academic stress to levels of interleukin-1 beta (p=0.03, but no significant differences between levels of interleukin-1 beta to periodontal tissue in oral hygiene (p=0.465, bleeding on probing index (p=0.826, pocket depth (p=0.968, and loss of attachment (p=0.968. Conclusion: Academic stress influences the periodontal risk factor and level of interleukin-1 beta.

  18. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors of Urban Chinese Children: Grade Level Prevalence and Academic Burden Associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xihe Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were (a to report grade level prevalence in physical activity and sedentary behaviors and (b to examine academic burden associations with these behaviors. School-aged children (n = 48,118 reported their physical activity, perception of physical activity sufficiency, factors for activity insufficiency, homework hours, and screen time in a typical week. Data were analyzed using general linear models and logistic regression models of Complex Samples. Prevalence results showed that children had lower physical activity and lower screen viewing time, but higher homework time during transition grades (6th, 9th, and 12th and high school years. Academic burden was cited as the primary reason for not having sufficient physical activity (76.6%. Compared to those citing academic burden, students who did not report academic burden were significantly more likely to meet physical activity guidelines (Odds Ratio (OR = 5.38, 95% CI = 4.74–6.11, but less likely to meet screen time guidelines (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.72–0.84, controlling for body mass index, gender, and grade level. Additionally, children who reported academic burdens had significantly longer average daily homework time than those who did not (p<0.01. Policy makers should promote physical activity and help children find a balance between homework and physical activity time particularly among the educational transition grades.

  19. The Relationship between Teacher Candidates' Emotional Intelligence Level, Leadership Styles and Their Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildizbas, Füsun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The personal characteristics as well as professional competencies of teachers are important in the formation of changes in student behaviors. This article examines the relation between emotional intelligence level, teacher leadership style and academic success of teacher candidates who are studying in a Pedagogical Teacher Education…

  20. Students' Commitment, Engagement and Locus of Control as Predictor of Academic Achievement at Higher Education Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Muhammad; Ashrafi, Ghulam Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze Students' Commitment, Engagement and Locus of Control as predictors of Academic Achievement at Higher Education Level. We used analytical model and conclusive research approach to conduct study and survey method for data collection. We selected 369 students using multistage sampling technique from three…

  1. Academic Writing for Graduate-Level English as a Second Language Students: Experiences in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidman-Taveau, Rebekah; Karathanos-Aguilar, Katya

    2015-01-01

    Graduate-level ESL students in Education are future multicultural educators and promising role models for our diverse K-12 students. However, many of these students struggle with academic English and, in particular, writing. Yet little research or program development addresses the specific writing-support needs of this group. This article shares…

  2. Examination of Occupational Anxiety Levels and Academic Self-Efficacy of Physical Education Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlevan, Zeka; Mustu,Eda; Çepikkurt, Fatma

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at determining the occupational anxiety level of pre-service physical education teachers according to variables, and revealing the correlation between occupational anxiety and academic self-efficacy. Study group consists of 586 pre-service teachers from 10 different universities in Turkey. Data is collected by "Occupational…

  3. Academic Procrastination and the Performance of Graduate-Level Cooperative Groups in Research Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qun G.; DaRos-Voseles, Denise A.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which academic procrastination predicted the performance of cooperative groups in graduate-level research methods courses. A total of 28 groups was examined (n = 83 students), ranging in size from 2 to 5 (M = 2.96, SD = 1.10). Multiple regression analyses revealed that neither within-group mean nor within-group…

  4. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    12, 13, 14, March LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 POSTPONED! - Modern Project Management Methods - POSTPONED! By G. Vallet / Ed. Highware, Paris, F. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  5. Opportunism of University Lecturers As a Way to Adaptate the External Control Activities Strengthening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita V. Kurbatova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available At the present the Russian government is undertaking a higher education system reform actively introducing management tools of new public management. Implementation of these instruments is accompanied by the transformation of universities in the customer-oriented organizations and lecturers into the employees. There is a substitution of incentives based on the existing informal norms of academic standards and reputation mechanisms of control to the incentives based on the quasi-market conditions artificially generated by the state and corresponding to the mechanisms of external assessment and monitoring. Practices changing used by lecturers to follow their interests is the inevitable result and more widespread form is opportunism. The purpose of the paper is to characterize the forms of manifestation of opportunistic behavior of university lecturers emerging as a result of changes in the nature of lecturers’ contract in the conditions of university governance managerisation. The main forms of lecturers’ opportunism and assesses of its degree based on data analysis of the two waves of the expert survey on the problems of assessing the impact of implementation mechanisms of external evaluation of their activities and the questionnaire survey of lecturers more than 40 Russian universities of different status are described as well as lecturers’ strategy of behavior, which are presented as a combination of different severity practices used by opportunistic behavior is highlighted. It shows the relation between the non-observance of academic freedom and the choice of lecturers’ strategies conduct. It is proved that the lecturers of Russian universities depending on the accumulated stocks of human and social capital as well as the resource capacity of separate universities are choosing different strategies to follow their own interests, which differ in the level of shirking in different areas of activity. All this is accompanied by

  6. Student learning style preferences in college-level biology courses: Implications for teaching and academic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitton, Jennifer Susan

    Education research has focused on defining and identifying student learning style preferences and how to incorporate this knowledge into teaching practices that are effective in engaging student interest and transmitting information. One objective was determining the learning style preferences of undergraduate students in Biology courses at New Mexico State University by using the online VARK Questionnaire and an investigator developed survey (Self Assessed Learning Style Survey, LSS). Categories include visual, aural, read-write, kinesthetic, and multimodal. The courses differed in VARK single modal learning preferences (p = 0.035) but not in the proportions of the number of modes students preferred (p = 0.18). As elsewhere, the majority of students were multimodal. There were similarities and differences between LSS and VARK results and between students planning on attending medical school and those not. Preferences and modalities tended not to match as expected for ratings of helpfulness of images and text. To detect relationships between VARK preferred learning style and academic performance, ANOVAs were performed using modality preferences and normalized learning gains from pre and post tests over material taught in the different modalities, as well as on end of semester laboratory and lecture grades. Overall, preference did not affect the performance for a given modality based activity, quiz, or final lecture or laboratory grades (p > 0.05). This suggests that a student's preference does not predict an improved performance when supplied with material in that modality. It is recommended that methods be developed to aid learning in a variety of modalities, rather than catering to individual learning styles. Another topic that is heavily debated in the field of education is the use of simulations or videos to replace or supplement dissections. These activities were compared using normalized learning gains from pre and post tests, as well as attitude surveys

  7. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  8. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Background Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. Methods A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ) assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8–12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Results Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785). The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p lecturer-students interactions were increased in the EVS lecture for one lecturer and reduced for the other. Both lecturers felt that the EVS lectures were difficult to prepare, that they were able to keep to time in the traditional lectures, that the educational value of both lecture styles was similar, and that they were neutral-to-slightly favourably disposed

  9. Modeling of the time sharing for lecturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Shakhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of modernization of the Russian system of higher education, it is necessary to analyze the working time of the university lecturers, taking into account both basic job functions as the university lecturer, and others.The mathematical problem is presented for the optimal working time planning for the university lecturers. The review of the documents, native and foreign works on the study is made. Simulation conditions, based on analysis of the subject area, are defined. Models of optimal working time sharing of the university lecturers («the second half of the day» are developed and implemented in the system MathCAD. Optimal solutions have been obtained.Three problems have been solved:1 to find the optimal time sharing for «the second half of the day» in a certain position of the university lecturer;2 to find the optimal time sharing for «the second half of the day» for all positions of the university lecturers in view of the established model of the academic load differentiation;3 to find the volume value of the non-standardized part of time work in the department for the academic year, taking into account: the established model of an academic load differentiation, distribution of the Faculty number for the positions and the optimal time sharing «the second half of the day» for the university lecturers of the department.Examples are given of the analysis results. The practical application of the research: the developed models can be used when planning the working time of an individual professor in the preparation of the work plan of the university department for the academic year, as well as to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the administrative decisions in the development of local university regulations.

  10. Lectures on quantum chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Smilga, Andrei

    2001-01-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is the fundamental theory of strong interactions. It is a physical theory describing Nature. Lectures on Quantum Chromodynamics concentrates, however, not on the phenomenological aspect of QCD; books with comprehensive coverage of phenomenological issues have been written. What the reader will find in this book is a profound discussion on the theoretical foundations of QCD with emphasis on the nonperturbative formulation of the theory: What is gauge symmetry on the classical and on the quantum level? What is the path integral in field theory? How to define the path integ

  11. Differences in academic achievement according to the levels of cognitive and of self-regulation strategies

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    Antonio Valle

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding study as a strategic and self-regulated activity and having in mind the distinction between cognitive and self-regulated learning strategies suggested in the literature, this paper analyses whether the differences in the use of this kind of strategies leads to different levels of academic achievement. Data were collected using a sample of 447 (12 to 16 years-old students from Spanish Secondary Compulsive Education. Various instruments were applied to assess students’ cognitive and self-regulated learning strategies. Students’ marks in Maths, Spanish, English (Foreign language, Science, Social studies and Music were taken as indicators of academic achievement. Data suggest that the more students use cognitive and self-regulated learning strategies in a specifi c subject the better their level of achievement in that same subject.

  12. Role of Starting School Age in the Academic Performance at the Tertiary Level

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    Mahwish Ali Baber

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to find out whether starting school earlier than four years of age gave any academic benefit to the students in the long run. This research aimed to find out whether the students who started schooling earlier than four years of age are able to achieve better grades and are better at self-regulation at the tertiary level. For this purpose, a sample of 108 students from a private business school comprising both early and late school starters were made to fill in questionnaires reporting their school starting age, their CGPA and answering questions that showed their level of self-regulation. The findings of this study suggest that there is no difference in the academic performance of the two groups, both in terms of their CGPA and their self-regulation skills.

  13. Perceived Statistical Knowledge Level and Self-Reported Statistical Practice Among Academic Psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Badenes-Ribera

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Publications arguing against the null hypothesis significance testing (NHST procedure and in favor of good statistical practices have increased. The most frequently mentioned alternatives to NHST are effect size statistics (ES, confidence intervals (CIs, and meta-analyses. A recent survey conducted in Spain found that academic psychologists have poor knowledge about effect size statistics, confidence intervals, and graphic displays for meta-analyses, which might lead to a misinterpretation of the results. In addition, it also found that, although the use of ES is becoming generalized, the same thing is not true for CIs. Finally, academics with greater knowledge about ES statistics presented a profile closer to good statistical practice and research design. Our main purpose was to analyze the extension of these results to a different geographical area through a replication study.Methods: For this purpose, we elaborated an on-line survey that included the same items as the original research, and we asked academic psychologists to indicate their level of knowledge about ES, their CIs, and meta-analyses, and how they use them. The sample consisted of 159 Italian academic psychologists (54.09% women, mean age of 47.65 years. The mean number of years in the position of professor was 12.90 (SD = 10.21.Results: As in the original research, the results showed that, although the use of effect size estimates is becoming generalized, an under-reporting of CIs for ES persists. The most frequent ES statistics mentioned were Cohen's d and R2/η2, which can have outliers or show non-normality or violate statistical assumptions. In addition, academics showed poor knowledge about meta-analytic displays (e.g., forest plot and funnel plot and quality checklists for studies. Finally, academics with higher-level knowledge about ES statistics seem to have a profile closer to good statistical practices.Conclusions: Changing statistical practice is not

  14. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    6, 7 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Decoding the Human Genome, Scientific basis and ethic and social aspects by S.E. Antonarakis and A. Mauron / Univ. of Geneva Decoding the Human genome is a very up-to-date topic, raising several questions besides purely scientific, in view of the two competing teams (public and private), the ethics of using the results, and the fact that the project went apparently faster and easier than expected. The lecture series will address the following chapters: Scientific basis and challenges, Ethical and social aspects of genomics. Academic Training Françoise Benz Tel. 73127

  15. The Fulfilment Level of Turkic Republics Higher Education Students' Academic and Social Expectations in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Mirgül ENTERİEVA; Ferudun SEZGİN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the fulfilment level of students who come from Turkic Republics to study in Turkey, regarding their academic and social expectations. The qualita-tive research technique and phenomenological design were used in the study. Data of this research was collected via a semistructured interview form consisting 11 openended questions and probes, which were developed by the researchers. A total of 39 undergraduate and postgraduate students from Azerbaijan, Kazakhs...

  16. The Relationships between the Big Five Personality Traits and Academic Motivation Levels of Turkish University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Bozanoğlu, İhsan; Sapancı, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between personality traits and motivation are significant for effective learning and teaching. The main purpose of this study is to determine the relationships between personality traits and motivation levels of Turkish university students. The specific purpose of the study is to determine which personality factor predicts academic motivation to what extent. For this purpose, Adjective Based Personality Scale (ABPT)  developed by Bacanlı et al. (2009) was conducted on 353   ...

  17. Intra and Interspecific Variations of Gene Expression Levels in Yeast Are Largely Neutral: (Nei Lecture, SMBE 2016, Gold Coast).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Rong; Maclean, Calum J; Park, Chungoo; Zhao, Huabin; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2017-09-01

    It is commonly, although not universally, accepted that most intra and interspecific genome sequence variations are more or less neutral, whereas a large fraction of organism-level phenotypic variations are adaptive. Gene expression levels are molecular phenotypes that bridge the gap between genotypes and corresponding organism-level phenotypes. Yet, it is unknown whether natural variations in gene expression levels are mostly neutral or adaptive. Here we address this fundamental question by genome-wide profiling and comparison of gene expression levels in nine yeast strains belonging to three closely related Saccharomyces species and originating from five different ecological environments. We find that the transcriptome-based clustering of the nine strains approximates the genome sequence-based phylogeny irrespective of their ecological environments. Remarkably, only ∼0.5% of genes exhibit similar expression levels among strains from a common ecological environment, no greater than that among strains with comparable phylogenetic relationships but different environments. These and other observations strongly suggest that most intra and interspecific variations in yeast gene expression levels result from the accumulation of random mutations rather than environmental adaptations. This finding has profound implications for understanding the driving force of gene expression evolution, genetic basis of phenotypic adaptation, and general role of stochasticity in evolution. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Career advancement of men and women in academic radiology: is the playing field level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vydareny, K H; Waldrop, S M; Jackson, V P; Manaster, B J; Nazarian, G K; Reich, C A; Ruzal-Shapiro, C B

    2000-07-01

    The authors' purposes were to determine if there are gender differences in the speed of promotion and/or academic productivity in academic radiology and if this situation had changed since a previous study was performed in 1987. Surveys were distributed to faculty members of academic radiology departments in May 1997. A total of 707 surveys were analyzed according to gender for time at rank for assistant and associate professor levels, in relation to publication rate, grant funding rate, and distribution of professional time. There was no difference between genders in the time at assistant professor rank. Among all current professors, women had been associate professors longer than men, but there was no difference between genders for those who had been in academic radiology for less than 15 years. There was no gender difference at any rank in the rate of publishing original articles. There was no difference in funding rates, although men had more total grant support. Male associate professors reported spending more time in administration and slightly more time in total hours at work than did their female colleagues, and male professors spent slightly more time teaching residents. Otherwise, there is no difference in how men and women at any rank spend their professional time. There are, however, lower percentages of women in tenured positions and in the uppermost levels of departmental administration. The time at rank for men and women and their rate of publication appear to have equalized. Women still are underrepresented at the uppermost levels of departmental administration, however, and are less likely than men to hold tenured positions.

  19. A Combined MIS/DS Course Uses Lecture Capture Technology to "Level the Playing Field" in Student Numeracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovich, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the process taken to develop a quantitative-based and Excel™-driven course that combines "BOTH" Management Information Systems (MIS) and Decision Science (DS) modeling outcomes and lays the foundation for upper level quantitative courses such as operations management, finance and strategic management. In addition,…

  20. Optoelectronic lessons as an interdisciplinary lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Wu, Maocheng; Gu, Jihua

    2017-08-01

    It is noticed that more and more students in college are passionately curious about the optoelectronic technology, since optoelectronic technology has advanced extremely quickly during the last five years and its applications could be found in a lot of domains. The students who are interested in this area may have different educational backgrounds and their majors cover science, engineering, literature and social science, etc. Our course "History of the Optoelectronic Technology" is set up as an interdisciplinary lecture of the "liberal education" at our university, and is available for all students with different academic backgrounds from any departments of our university. The main purpose of the course is to show the interesting and colorful historical aspects of the development of this technology, so that the students from different departments could absorb the academic nourishment they wanted. There are little complex derivations of physical formulas through the whole lecture, but there are still some difficulties about the lecture which is discussed in this paper.

  1. Music during Lectures: Will Students Learn Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosseville, Fabrice; Laborde, Sylvain; Scelles, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the influence of music during learning on the academic performance of undergraduate students, and more particularly the influence of affects induced by music. Altogether 249 students were involved in the study, divided into a control group and an experimental group. Both groups attended the same videotaped lecture, with the…

  2. "But They Won't Come to Lectures..." The Impact of Audio Recorded Lectures on Student Experience and Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Helen E.

    2010-01-01

    The move to increasingly flexible platforms for student learning and experience through provision of online lecture recordings is often interpreted by educators as students viewing attendance at lectures as optional. The trend toward the use of this technology is often met with resistance from some academic staff who argue that student attendance…

  3. Addition by Subtraction: The Relation Between Dropout Rates and School-Level Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennie, Elizabeth; Bonneau, Kara; Vandellen, Michelle; Dodge, Kenneth A

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to improve student achievement should increase graduation rates. However, work investigating the effects of student-level accountability has consistently demonstrated that increases in the standards for high school graduation are correlated with increases in dropout rates. The most favored explanation for this finding is that high-stakes testing policies that mandate grade repetition and high school exit exams may be the tipping point for students who are already struggling academically. These extra demands may, in fact, push students out of school. This article examines two hypotheses regarding the relation between school-level accountability and dropout rates. The first posits that improvements in school performance lead to improved success for everyone. If school-level accountability systems improve a school for all students, then the proportion of students performing at grade level increases, and the dropout rate decreases. The second hypothesis posits that schools facing pressure to improve their overall accountability score may pursue this increase at the cost of other student outcomes, including dropout rate. Our approach focuses on the dynamic relation between school-level academic achievement and dropout rates over time-that is, between one year's achievement and the subsequent year's dropout rate, and vice versa. This article employs longitudinal data of records on all students in North Carolina public schools over an 8-year period. Analyses employ fixed-effects models clustering schools and districts within years and controls each year for school size, percentage of students who were free/reduced-price lunch eligible, percentage of students who are ethnic minorities, and locale. This study finds partial evidence that improvements in school-level academic performance will lead to improvements (i.e., decreases) in school-level dropout rates. Schools with improved performance saw decreased dropout rates following these successes. However, we find

  4. Addition by Subtraction: The Relation Between Dropout Rates and School-Level Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    GLENNIE, ELIZABETH; BONNEAU, KARA; VANDELLEN, MICHELLE; DODGE, KENNETH A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context Efforts to improve student achievement should increase graduation rates. However, work investigating the effects of student-level accountability has consistently demonstrated that increases in the standards for high school graduation are correlated with increases in dropout rates. The most favored explanation for this finding is that high-stakes testing policies that mandate grade repetition and high school exit exams may be the tipping point for students who are already struggling academically. These extra demands may, in fact, push students out of school. Purpose/Objective/Focus This article examines two hypotheses regarding the relation between school-level accountability and dropout rates. The first posits that improvements in school performance lead to improved success for everyone. If school-level accountability systems improve a school for all students, then the proportion of students performing at grade level increases, and the dropout rate decreases. The second hypothesis posits that schools facing pressure to improve their overall accountability score may pursue this increase at the cost of other student outcomes, including dropout rate. Research Design Our approach focuses on the dynamic relation between school-level academic achievement and dropout rates over time—that is, between one year’s achievement and the subsequent year’s dropout rate, and vice versa. This article employs longitudinal data of records on all students in North Carolina public schools over an 8-year period. Analyses employ fixed-effects models clustering schools and districts within years and controls each year for school size, percentage of students who were free/reduced-price lunch eligible, percentage of students who are ethnic minorities, and locale. Findings/Results This study finds partial evidence that improvements in school-level academic performance will lead to improvements (i.e., decreases) in school-level dropout rates. Schools with improved

  5. Mindfulness as an Intervention for Recalling Information from a Lecture as a Measure of Academic Performance in Higher Education: A Randomized Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Rebecca Iranzo; Egan, Helen; Cook, Amy; Mantzios, Michail

    2018-01-01

    Higher education students experience heightened levels of stress and anxiety, and report experiencing negative thoughts and emotions, which influence information retention and recall. In a randomized experiment, we assigned participants to either a mindfulness meditation or an audiobook listening condition, and recorded the information recalled…

  6. Eight lectures on theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Planck, Max

    1997-01-01

    In 1909 the great German physicist and Nobel Prize winner Max Planck (1858-1947) delivered a series of eight lectures at Columbia University giving a fascinating overview of the new state of physics, which he had played a crucial role in bringing about. The first, third, fifth, and sixth lectures present his account of the revolutionary developments occasioned when he first applied the quantum hypothesis to blackbody radiation. The reader is given an invaluable opportunity to witness Planck's thought processes both on the level of philosophical principles as well as their application to physi

  7. Learning Language Levels in Students Accurate with a History Academic Achievement History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorlela Binti Noordin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to evaluate the Malay proficiency among students in Form Two especially non-Malay students and its relationship to academic achievement History. To achieve the purpose of the study there are two objectives, the first is to look at the difference between mean of Malay Language test influences min of academic achievement of History subject among non-Malay students in Form Two and the second is the relationship between the level of Malay proficiency and their academic achievement for History. This study used quantitative methods, which involved 100 people of Form Two non-Malay students in one of the schools in Klang, Selangor. This study used quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and statistical inference with IBM SPSS Statistics v22 software. This study found that there was a relationship between the proficiency of Malay language among non-Malay students with achievements in the subject of History. The implications of this study are discussed in this article.

  8. Nursing students' critical thinking disposition according to academic level and satisfaction with nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hee; Moon, Seongmi; Kim, Eun Jung; Kim, Young-Ju; Lee, Sunhee

    2014-01-01

    The development of critical thinking dispositions has become an important issue in nursing education in Korea. Nursing colleges in Korea have developed teaching strategies and curricula that focus on developing critical thinking dispositions. It is an imperative step that evaluates the changing pattern and development of students' critical thinking dispositions. This study identified critical thinking dispositions of Korean nursing students according to academic level and satisfaction with nursing. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among 1074 students in four colleges who completed the self-reported Critical Thinking Disposition Scale. Descriptive and univariate general linear model analyses were performed. The critical thinking disposition score increased according to academic level until junior year, after which it decreased in the senior year. Nursing students who were satisfied with nursing reported higher levels of critical thinking than those who were not satisfied or who responded neutrally. The critical thinking scores of nursing students not satisfied with nursing dropped greatly in the senior year. These results suggest the importance of targeting the development of curriculum and teaching methods for seniors and students who have a lower level of satisfaction with nursing to increase their critical thinking dispositions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Low-Level Waste Regulation: Putting Principles Into Practice - 13297 - The Richard S. Hodes, M.D., Honor Lecture Award

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, James E.

    2013-01-01

    In carrying out its mission to ensure the safe use of radioactive materials for beneficial civilian purposes while protecting people and the environment, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) adheres to its Principles of Good Regulation. The Principles-Independence, Openness, Efficiency, Clarity, and Reliability-apply to the agency as a whole in its decision-making and to the individual conduct of NRC employees. This paper describes the application of the Principles in a real-life staff activity, a guidance document used in the NRC's low-level radioactive waste (LLW) program, the Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation Branch Technical Position (CA BTP). The staff's process to revise the document, as well as the final content of the document, were influenced by following the Principles. For example, consistent with the Openness Principle, the staff conducted a number of outreach activities and received many comments on three drafts of the document. Stakeholder comments affected the final staff positions in some cases. The revised CA BTP, once implemented, is expected to improve management and disposal of LLW in the United States. Its positions have an improved nexus to health and safety; are more performance-based than previously, thus providing licensees with options for how they achieve the required outcome of protecting an inadvertent human intruder into a disposal facility; and provide for disposal of more sealed radioactive sources, which are a potential threat to national security. (author)

  10. Low-Level Waste Regulation: Putting Principles Into Practice - 13297 - The Richard S. Hodes, M.D., Honor Lecture Award

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, James E. [Low-Level Waste Branch Division of Waste Management and Environmental Protection, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC, 20555-0001 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In carrying out its mission to ensure the safe use of radioactive materials for beneficial civilian purposes while protecting people and the environment, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) adheres to its Principles of Good Regulation. The Principles-Independence, Openness, Efficiency, Clarity, and Reliability-apply to the agency as a whole in its decision-making and to the individual conduct of NRC employees. This paper describes the application of the Principles in a real-life staff activity, a guidance document used in the NRC's low-level radioactive waste (LLW) program, the Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation Branch Technical Position (CA BTP). The staff's process to revise the document, as well as the final content of the document, were influenced by following the Principles. For example, consistent with the Openness Principle, the staff conducted a number of outreach activities and received many comments on three drafts of the document. Stakeholder comments affected the final staff positions in some cases. The revised CA BTP, once implemented, is expected to improve management and disposal of LLW in the United States. Its positions have an improved nexus to health and safety; are more performance-based than previously, thus providing licensees with options for how they achieve the required outcome of protecting an inadvertent human intruder into a disposal facility; and provide for disposal of more sealed radioactive sources, which are a potential threat to national security. (author)

  11. First grade classroom-level adversity: Associations with teaching practices, academic skills, and executive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abry, Tashia; Granger, Kristen L; Bryce, Crystal I; Taylor, Michelle; Swanson, Jodi; Bradley, Robert H

    2018-05-24

    Using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development and a model-building approach, the authors examined direct and indirect associations between first-grade (G1) classroom-level adversity (CLA), G1 teaching practices, and student (N = 1,073; M = 6.64 years; 49% girls; 82% White) academic skills and executive functioning in G1 and third grades (G3). Teachers reported the prevalence of adversity among their students (e.g., poor home/family life, poor academic/social readiness). Observers rated G1 teaching practices: teachers' classroom management, controlling instruction, and amount of academic instruction (classroom observation system). Children completed literacy and math assessments at 54 months, G1, and G3 (Woodcock Johnson Letter-Word Identification and Applied Problems), and executive functioning at G1 and G3 (Tower of Hanoi). Direct associations emerged between CLA and controlling instruction (positive), classroom management, and academic instruction (both negative). In addition, CLA was related to G1 literacy (but not math) directly and indirectly via classroom management (negatively) and controlling instruction (positively). The addition of G3 outcomes revealed a negative direct longitudinal association between CLA and G3 executive functioning, and indirect associations with G3 literacy and math through G1 teaching practices and literacy. Results support the notion that collective student characteristics influence student outcomes in part through teaching practices and suggest that teachers and students may benefit from the diffusion of high-adversity classroom compositions when possible. Moreover, in high-adversity classrooms teachers and students may benefit from supports targeting classroom management and foundational student competencies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Professionalism of Lecturers at Faculty of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangkere, T. F. S.; Langitan, F. W.; Maukar, S. M. D.; Roring, R. F.

    2018-02-01

    The main objective of this research was to get the picture pertaining to the professionalization of Lecturers at Faculty of Education in Manado State University, Indonesia. The research method was naturalistic inquiry with qualitative approach. The research techniques were: deep interview, participative observation and document study. The data were analyzed by: data reduction, data display and conclusions, while the validation of data was done by four criteria, namely: credibility, transferability, dependability and conformability. The collecting procedure and data recording were done through observation and interviews. From the findings and conclusions, it can be identified that professionalization of Lecturers at Faculty of Education in Manado State University has been well processed. This can be proved by fulfillment of the minimum academic standard Ninety-one out of the total l12 lecturers has been certified. Based on conclusions, the researcher recommends that the teacher always develop their capability through increasing their academic qualification, self-development through attending educational trainings, conducting more research and publishing those researches through accredited journals. Dean of every Faculty and also execute supporting activities which will support self-development of the lectures and increase the budget for research of the lecturers.

  13. Lectures on string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorn, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    Several topics are discussed in string theory presented as three lectures to the Spring School on Superstrings at the ICTP at Trieste, Italy, in April, 1988. The first lecture is devoted to some general aspects of conformal invariance and duality. The second sketches methods for carrying out perturbative calculations in string field theory. The final lecture presents an alternative lattice approach to a nonperturbative formulation of the sum over world surfaces. 35 refs., 12 figs

  14. A Geminoid as Lecturer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Julie Rafn; Schärfe, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report our findings from an experiment with the teleoperated android Geminoid-DK. The geminoid took up the role of a university lecturer and delivered a 45 minute lecture in front of 150 freshmen students at Aalborg University. While considering the role of the geminoid in this e......In this paper we report our findings from an experiment with the teleoperated android Geminoid-DK. The geminoid took up the role of a university lecturer and delivered a 45 minute lecture in front of 150 freshmen students at Aalborg University. While considering the role of the geminoid...

  15. Thinking Academic Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Lis

    2016-01-01

    This lecture argues that the politicisation and instrumentalisation of the university caused by neoliberal frames has as a result the depoliticisation of knowledge and of the academic as individual. This depoliticisation has turned academic freedom into a right to disengage not only from the political fight around these issues but also from the…

  16. Advice for New and Student Lecturers on Probability and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Lecture is a common presentation style that gives instructors a lot of control over topics and time allocation, but can limit active student participation and learning. This article presents some ideas to increase the level of student involvement in lecture. The examples and suggestions are based on the author's experience as a senior lecturer for…

  17. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme: Particle Therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Particle Therapy using Proton and Ion Beams - From Basic Principles to Daily Operations and Future Concepts by Andreas Peter (Head of Accelerator Operations, Heidelberg Ion Beam Theraps Centre (HIT), Germany) Part I: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant ) • An introduction about the historical developments of accelerators and their use for medical applications: tumour treatment from X-rays to particle therapy • Description of the underlying physics and biology of particle therapy; implications on the requirements for the needed beam parameters (energy, intensity, focus, beam structure) • Accelerator technology used for particle therapy so far: cyclotrons and synchrotrons • Particle therapy facilities worldwide: an overview and some examples in detail: PSI/Switzerland, Loma Linda/USA, HIMAC/Japan, HIT/Heidelberg, CNAO/Italy Part II: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CER...

  18. Academic Training Lecture - 2009-2010

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Regular Programme 15, 16, 17 & 18 February 2010 from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500   Monday 15 February Physics Requirements and Experimental Conditions (1/4) by Dr. Marco Battaglia (CERN-PH/University of California, Santa Cruz, USA) How is the anticipated physics program of a future e+e- collider shaping the R&D for new detectors in collider particle physics ? This presentation will review the main physics requirements and experimental conditions comparing to LHC and LEP. In particular, I shall discuss how e+e- experimentation is expected to change moving from LEP-2 up to multi-TeV energies. Tuesday 16 February Tracking and Vertexing (2/4) by Dr. Marco Battaglia (CERN-PH/University of California, Santa Cruz, USA) Efficient and precise determination of the flavour of partons in multi-hadron final states is essential to the anticipated LC physics program. This makes tracking in the vicinity of the interaction region of great importance. Tracking extrapolation and mo...

  19. The Fulfilment Level of Turkic Republics Higher Education Students' Academic and Social Expectations in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirgül ENTERİEVA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the fulfilment level of students who come from Turkic Republics to study in Turkey, regarding their academic and social expectations. The qualita-tive research technique and phenomenological design were used in the study. Data of this research was collected via a semistructured interview form consisting 11 openended questions and probes, which were developed by the researchers. A total of 39 undergraduate and postgraduate students from Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan participated in the present study. This study indicated that, while expecting satisfactory accommodation the students also anticipated having quality education enabling them for better employment opportunities upon graduation. Some of the students thought that graduate studies in Turkey would be a bridge to Europe. However, it has been found out that students have several academical, social and educational support service problems. According to findings it can be recommended to improve internationalization in higher education, student-centered environment and current educational and training content, organization of orientation programs, submission of international student office and guidance and consultancy services and enhancing the education support services and dormitory facilities.

  20. Effects of self-concept levels and perceived academic achievements of Turkish students on smoking perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert, Hilal Parlak; Bektas, Murat; Ozturk, Candan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of self-concept levels and perceived academic achievements of sixth, seventh and eighth grade primary school students upon their perceptions about smoking. The data were collected with the Socio-Demographic Data Collection Form, Pier-Herris Self-Concept scale and Children's Decision Balance Scale. The study sample consisted of 374 students receiving education in the sixth, seventh and eighth grades of three primary schools, which were selected among primary schools of Izmir Provincial Directorate for National Education representing three socio-economic groups with a simple random sampling method. The data were collected in December 2012-January 2013. Percentages and the t test were used in the evaluation of the data. While students with a positive self-concept had score averages of 7.12±2.18 regarding the lower dimension of smoking pros and 29.0±2.47 regarding the lower dimension of smoking cons, their counterparts with a negative self-concept had score averages of 8.61±3.76 (p=0.000) and 28.1±3.49 (p=0.004), respectively. According to self-perception, there was statistical difference between perceptions of students regarding smoking (pself-perception had a low perception of smoking pros and a high perception of smoking cons. Perception of academic achievement did not affect the pros and cons perceptions of children regarding smoking.

  1. SYNTACTIC COMPLEXITY IN THE READING MATERIALS OF ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES LEVELS 1 – 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widdy Wijanti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available LLT Journal: A Journal on Language and Language Teaching Open Journal Systems LLT Journal ISSNs: e-ISSN: 2579-9533 (electronic p-ISSN: 1410-7201 (print User Username Password Remember me Journal Content Search Search Scope Browse By Issue By Author By Title Other Journals Font Size Make font size smaller Make font size default Make font size larger LLT Journal Barcode TOOLS FULL PAPER GUIDELINES Article Tools Print this article Indexing metadata How to cite item Email this article (Login required Email the author (Login required About The Author Widdy Wijanti Sampoerna University, Jakarta Indonesia OUR CONTACT LLT Journal English Language Education Sanata Dharma University Yogyakarta, Indonesia For more details, please visit: LLT Journal Contact Address Home About Login Register Search Current Archives Author Guidelines Editorial Team Focus and Scope Publication Ethics Author Index Originality Screening Indexing and Abstracting Review Process Article Processing Charges Article Submission Charges Publishing Rights Peer Reviewers Home > Vol 20, No 2 (2017 > Wijanti SYNTACTIC COMPLEXITY IN THE READING MATERIALS OF ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES LEVELS 1 – 3 Widdy Wijanti Abstract In Indonesia, English is still considered as a foreign language and has become a crucial subject of study especially in the university level. For this reason, English for Academic Purposes has been conducted in the first year of college level for many years. Unfortunately, although many Asian countries including Indonesia have run the EAP course, the output is that there are still many Indonesian students who do not meet the vocabulary size and syntactic complexity that are expected while their learning process in the university. This results lower grades that they have in their assignments. Therefore, the recent study is aimed at evaluating the reading materials of EAP, especially in measuring the syntactic complexity containing in the texts as it is strongly believed in

  2. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer Edward

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. Methods A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8–12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Results Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785. The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p Conclusion In this setting, EVS technology used in large group lectures did not offer significant advantages over the more traditional lecture format.

  3. How Marketing Academics View A-Level Journals: Psychological Insights into Differences between Published and Striving Authors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Riley G.; Kellaris, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Many colleges of business demand A-level journal publications from marketing faculty as a condition for professional advancement. Yet only around 10 percent of marketing academics ever publish in the "Big 4," A-level journals ("Journal of Marketing," "Journal of Marketing Research," "Journal of Consumer…

  4. 2004-2005 Academic Training Programme: Electroweak Theory and the Standard Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 December LECTURE SERIES 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 6, 7, 8, 10 December, TH Auditorium, bldg. 4 3-006 on 9 December Electroweak Theory and the Standard Model R. BARBIERI / CERN-PH-TH There is a natural splitting in four sectors of the theory of the ElectroWeak (EW) Interactions, at pretty different levels of development /test. Accordingly, the 5 lectures are organized as follows, with an eye to the future: Lecture 1: The basic structure of the theory; Lecture 2: The gauge sector; Lecture 3: The flavor sector; Lecture 4: The neutrino sector; Lecture 5: The EW symmetry breaking sector. Transparencies available at: http://agenda.cern.ch/fullAgenda.php?ida=a042577 ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can ...

  5. 2004-2005 Academic Training Programme: Electroweak Theory and the Standard Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 December LECTURE SERIES 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 6, 7, 8, 10 December, TH Auditorium, bldg. 4 3-006 on 9 December Electroweak Theory and the Standard Model R. BARBIERI / CERN-PH-TH There is a natural splitting in four sectors of the theory of the ElectroWeak (EW) Interactions, at pretty different levels of development /test. Accordingly, the 5 lectures are organized as follows, with an eye to the future: Lecture 1: The basic structure of the theory; Lecture 2: The gauge sector; Lecture 3: The flavor sector; Lecture 4: The neutrino sector; Lecture 5: The EW symmetry breaking sector. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch Si vous désirez participer à l'un des cours suivants, veuillez en discuter avec votre superviseur et vous inscrire électroniquement en direct depuis les pages de description des cours dans le Web que vous trouvez &ag...

  6. Vocal intensity in lecturers: Results of measurements conducted during lecture sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Mikulski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational voice users (inter alia: lecturers speak with different levels of vocal intensity. Speakers adjust this intensity knowingly (e.g. to underline the importance of fragments of the speech or unknowingly. The unknown adjustment of voice intensity occurs e.g. in the presence of high acoustic background noise (so-called Lombard effect, but it also results from many other factors: hearing loss, construction of the vocal tract, habits and others. The aim of the article is to confirm the thesis that in similar conditions of acoustic properties of the room different lecturers speak with different levels of vocal intensity. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a group of 10 lecturers in the same conference room. A-weighted sound pressure level determined at 1 m from the lecturer's mouth was adopted as a parameter defining the intensity of the lecturer's voice. The levels of all lecturers' voice intensity were compared and evaluated according to the criteria defined in EN ISO 9921. Results: Nine in ten lecturers were speaking with normal voice intensity (60-65 dB and only one full-time university lecturer was speaking with raised voice (66-71 dB. Conclusions: It was found that in the room of the same acoustic conditions the lecturers spoke with different intensities of voice. Some lecturers occasionally, and one all the time spoke with the voice intensity specified by PN-EN ISO 9921 as a raised voice. The results of the preliminary study warrant further studies in a larger group of teachers. Med Pr 2013;64(6:797–804

  7. Feynman Lectures on Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Feynman, Richard Phillips; Allen, Robin W

    1999-01-01

    "When, in 1984-86, Richard P. Feynman gave his famous course on computation at the California Institute of Technology, he asked Tony Hey to adapt his lecture notes into a book. Although led by Feynman,"

  8. Students’ opinions about modern lecture: development path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana A. Astashova

    2017-01-01

    the online component of training. The main stages are – analysis of external requirements for the academic discipline, definition of organizational requirements and limitations, analysis of the target audience, goals and outcomes of the training, didactic analysis of the discipline, planning analysis of the effectiveness of the learning process.An analysis of lecturers’ opinions and analysis of the study results of students’ opinions can be concluded about the need to help lectures in the design, using the appropriate methodology, developed in the form of a technological card. The proposed methodology for designing the learning process with the mixed training in conditions of binding to the activity into the audience, implemented in the form of a technological card can be an effective tool for teaching, allowing not only effectively designing the training process and to evaluate the quality, but also provide for measures to improve it.

  9. Association of iodine status with IQ level and academic achievement of rural primary school children in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Bhowal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iodine being an integral component of the thyroid hormones is crucial for physical and mental development. Iodine status & intake is often measured by a surrogate measure, namely urine iodine excretion, as almost all ingested iodine is excreted in the urine. Aims &Objectives: To investigate the body Iodine status of rural primary school children and its association with their intelligence level (IQ & academic achievement. Materials & Methods: A cross-sectional analytical study was carried out in three Government schools in the district of 24 Parganas, West Bengal, India among  300 children (150 boys & 150 girls aged 6 to 8 years  studying in class II to IV. Urinary iodine was estimated by the 'Wet Digestion Method (Sandell-Kolthoff reaction. IQ level was evaluated using Ravens Progressive Matrices test. Academic achievement was evaluated on the marks obtained in the term end examinations.  Result: 12.34%, 15.6% & 24.3% of the children were in the severe, moderate & mild range of iodine deficiency in terms of urinary iodine excretion. It was found that 85.67% & 14.33% of the children were consumed iodated salt ≥15 ppm &< 15 ppm of iodine level. 0.67%, 5% & 27.34 % of them achieved A, B & C of IQ grades, respectively.62.34 % of the students achieved first three academic grades. Body Iodine status of the children has significant positive correlation (P<0.01 with IQ grades and academic achievement. Academic achievement of the children has significant positive correlation (P<0.05 with their intelligence level. Conclusions: Poor body Iodine status of the rural primary school children may be one of the causes for their poor intelligence level and academic achievement.

  10. Association of iodine status with IQ level and academic achievement of rural primary school children in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Bhowal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iodine being an integral component of the thyroid hormones is crucial for physical and mental development. Iodine status & intake is often measured by a surrogate measure, namely urine iodine excretion, as almost all ingested iodine is excreted in the urine. Aims &Objectives: To investigate the body Iodine status of rural primary school children and its association with their intelligence level (IQ & academic achievement. Materials & Methods: A cross-sectional analytical study was carried out in three Government schools in the district of 24 Parganas, West Bengal, India among  300 children (150 boys & 150 girls aged 6 to 8 years  studying in class II to IV. Urinary iodine was estimated by the 'Wet Digestion Method (Sandell-Kolthoff reaction. IQ level was evaluated using Ravens Progressive Matrices test. Academic achievement was evaluated on the marks obtained in the term end examinations.  Result: 12.34%, 15.6% & 24.3% of the children were in the severe, moderate & mild range of iodine deficiency in terms of urinary iodine excretion. It was found that 85.67% & 14.33% of the children were consumed iodated salt ≥15 ppm &< 15 ppm of iodine level. 0.67%, 5% & 27.34 % of them achieved A, B & C of IQ grades, respectively.62.34 % of the students achieved first three academic grades. Body Iodine status of the children has significant positive correlation (P<0.01 with IQ grades and academic achievement. Academic achievement of the children has significant positive correlation (P<0.05 with their intelligence level. Conclusions: Poor body Iodine status of the rural primary school children may be one of the causes for their poor intelligence level and academic achievement.

  11. Worsening Work Conditions and Rising Levels of Job Satisfaction? Measuring the Happiness of Academics in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Theresa; Fankhauser, Peter; Goodman, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Working conditions in academia are generally considered to be deteriorating. Data from surveys which look at the job satisfaction of academics, however, do not clearly support this notion. This appears to be especially true for the case of Japan. Much of the recent literature on academics' job satisfaction globally relies on the comparison of two…

  12. Interactive lectures in engineering education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, L.A.; van den Berg, G.C.; van Keulen, H.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses an alternative approach to lecturing: the interactive lecture. In the literature, interactive teaching is forwarded as a means to increase the effectiveness of lectures. Members of lecturing staff still seem, however, reluctant to incorporate interactive teaching in their

  13. Women in academic surgery: why is the playing field still not level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Natashia M; Webster, Fiona; Holden, Helen Alyx; Moulton, Carol-Anne E; Baxter, Nancy; Desjardins, Christine; Cil, Tulin

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore career satisfaction and advancement for women in academic surgery. A 48-item web-based survey was emailed to women surgeons in academic centers across Canada, exploring career advancement, family planning, mentorship, discrimination, and career satisfaction. The survey response rate was 38% (81 of 212); 18% of participants felt they experienced gender discrimination in medical school, 36% in residency, 12% in fellowship, and 41% as staff surgeons. More than half felt that their gender had played a role in the career challenges they faced. Responses to open-ended questions suggested that many surgeons struggled to balance their academic careers with family life. Despite this, participants rated their career satisfaction very highly. There remain ongoing challenges for women in academic surgery including lack of gender equality, appropriate mentorship, and accommodations for surgeons with families. Continued advancement of women in academic surgery is dependent on addressing these concerns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Academic Training: Academic Training Programme 50th Anniversary Lectures

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    13, 14, 15 & 16 September From 16:30 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 50 years of research at CERN: from past to future Monday 13 September 50 years of research at CERN: from past to future (Accelerator) (1/4) K. Hubner / CERN-DSU A summary of the evolution of the CERN accelerator complex since the beginning will be given. The emphasis will be on the salient features and highlights and what has been learned at each stage in terms of accelerator physics and technology. Possible future options for CERN based on accelerators will be discussed. Tuesday 14 September 50 years of research at CERN: from past to future (Theory) (2/4) G. Veneziano / CERN-PH-TH Great developments in our understanding of fundamental physics, together with striking technological advances, have repeatedly changed the way CERN/TH has been operating during the past 50 years. I will outline the main 'revolutions' I have myself witnessed at CERN/TH since the mid sixties, and then dare to express expectations, hopes, and fears for how ...

  15. Using self-determination theory to describe the academic motivation of allied health professional-level college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballmann, Jodi M; Mueller, Jill J

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the various reasons that allied health students believe they are currently attending college. The Academic Motivation Scale was administered to a convenience sample of 222 upperclassmen and graduate-level students (162 women, 46 men). The Academic Motivation Scale proposes various reasons for continued engagement in academic pursuits that may be characteristic of personal and current reasons for persistence in a subject's particular academic program. The results showed that students portrayed themselves as currently attending college for both intrinsically and extrinsically motivated reasons. The most frequently endorsed motivational styles were identified (autonomous) extrinsic motivation and externally regulated (nonautonomous) extrinsic motivation. This study showed that this sample of professional-level college students was not completely self-determined in their end-stage academic pursuits. One conclusion that may be drawn from this study is that allied health programs that provide students with an educational context that supports self-determination may encourage future allied health professionals to develop the ability to support the self-determination of their future clients.

  16. An Eight-Year Study of Online Lecture Use in a Medical Gross Anatomy and Embryology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieder, Gary L.; Borges, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    Online lectures have been used in lieu of live lectures in our gross anatomy and embryology course for the past eight years. We examined patterns of online lecture use by our students and related that use to academic entry measures, gender and examination performance. Detailed access records identified by student were available from server logs.…

  17. Graduate Students' Needs and Preferences for Written Feedback on Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine graduate students' needs and preferences for written feedback on academic writing from their lecturers and thesis supervisors. Quantitative method via survey questionnaire was used to collect data from 21 respondents. The data collection involved Master and Doctorate students at a tertiary level institution…

  18. Lectures from Markov processes to Brownian motion

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Kai Lai

    1982-01-01

    This book evolved from several stacks of lecture notes written over a decade and given in classes at slightly varying levels. In transforming the over­ lapping material into a book, I aimed at presenting some of the best features of the subject with a minimum of prerequisities and technicalities. (Needless to say, one man's technicality is another's professionalism. ) But a text frozen in print does not allow for the latitude of the classroom; and the tendency to expand becomes harder to curb without the constraints of time and audience. The result is that this volume contains more topics and details than I had intended, but I hope the forest is still visible with the trees. The book begins at the beginning with the Markov property, followed quickly by the introduction of option al times and martingales. These three topics in the discrete parameter setting are fully discussed in my book A Course In Probability Theory (second edition, Academic Press, 1974). The latter will be referred to throughout this book ...

  19. Determining the Differences Between Academic Success and Perception Levels of Conservatory Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan OTACIOĞLU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research was studied about professionals in the field of music education students, with musical perception levels and some variable to reveal the differences that occur in this dimension. 50 students from Mimar Sinan University State Conservatory, 39 students from İstanbul University State Conservatory and 38 students from Karadeniz Technique University State Conservatory (N=127. Conservatory students, who are the students of the 2nd, 3 rd and 4th class in 2014-2015 academic year, have been participated which is a field research done by survey method.In this survey, two basic data collection tools were used. First data collection tool is “Student Information Form” which is aimed to obtain individual knowledge, second data collection tool is “Musical Perception Inventory” developed by G.Otacıoğlu and Aslan in 2007 to measure musical perception skills of students. Statistical analysis techniques were used to demonstrate the differences between the variables in the study. As a result of the study, there were statistically significant differences between demographic variables and the scores of musical perception

  20. Lecture Based Versus peer Assisted Learning: Quasi-Experimental Study to Compare Knowledge Gain of Forth Year Medical Students in Community Health and Nutrition Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Daud

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: The present study concludes that in terms of academic achievements, PAL was equally effective to lectures. Therefore, PAL can be incorporated as a supplement to lectures in medical school curricula.

  1. Metacognitive Reading Strategies in Learning Disability: Relations between Usage Level, Academic Self-Efficacy and Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girli, Alev; Öztürk, Halil

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between the usage levels of metacognitive reading strategies by students diagnosed with specific learning disability (SLD), academic self-efficacy and the concept of self, in comparison to their typically developing (TD) peers. The data to be used in the study were collected using the…

  2. Teacher Candidates' Learning Strategies and Academic Self-Efficacy Levels: Is There a Relation between the Two?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçaoglu, Mustafa Öztürk

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to identify teacher candidates' learning strategies and academic self-efficacy levels. Furthermore, the correlations between these variables and gender and departments were looked into. The study was mainly descriptive and correlational. The sample of the study consisted of 256 teacher candidates enrolled at a faculty of…

  3. Parental Level of Education: Associations with Psychological Well-Being, Academic Achievement and Reasons for Pursuing Higher Education in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlechter, Melissa; Milevsky, Avidan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to determine the interconnection between parental level of education, psychological well-being, academic achievement and reasons for pursuing higher education in adolescents. Participants included 439 college freshmen from a mid-size state university in the northeastern USA. A survey, including indices of…

  4. Predictors of cultural capital on science academic achievement at the 8th grade level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misner, Johnathan Scott

    The purpose of the study was to determine if students' cultural capital is a significant predictor of 8th grade science achievement test scores in urban locales. Cultural capital refers to the knowledge used and gained by the dominant class, which allows social and economic mobility. Cultural capital variables include magazines at home and parental education level. Other variables analyzed include socioeconomic status (SES), gender, and English language learners (ELL). This non-experimental study analyzed the results of the 2011 Eighth Grade Science National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). The researcher analyzed the data using a multivariate stepwise regression analysis. The researcher concluded that the addition of cultural capital factors significantly increased the predictive power of the model where magazines in home, gender, student classified as ELL, parental education level, and SES were the independent variables and science achievement was the dependent variable. For alpha=0.05, the overall test for the model produced a R2 value of 0.232; therefore the model predicted 23.2% of variance in science achievement results. Other major findings include: higher measures of home resources predicted higher 2011 NAEP eighth grade science achievement; males were predicted to have higher 2011 NAEP 8 th grade science achievement; classified ELL students were predicted to score lower on the NAEP eight grade science achievement; higher parent education predicted higher NAEP eighth grade science achievement; lower measures of SES predicted lower 2011 NAEP eighth grade science achievement. This study contributed to the research in this field by identifying cultural capital factors that have been found to have statistical significance on predicting eighth grade science achievement results, which can lead to strategies to help improve science academic achievement among underserved populations.

  5. Are radiography lecturers, leaders?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendry, Julie Anne

    2013-01-01

    This review article aims to explore the concept of radiography lecturers acting as leaders to their student followers. Through a brief review of the literature, a definition of leadership is suggested and some leadership theories explored. The path-goal theory, leader–member exchange theory and the contemporary theory of transformational leadership are examined more closely. Links between lecturer-leader behaviour and student motivation and learning are tentatively suggested with transformational leadership appearing to offer the optimal leadership style for lecturers to adopt. The paucity of literature relating directly to radiography is acknowledged and areas for further research are suggested. The article concludes with some of the author's practical ideas for incorporating transformational leadership styles and behaviours into radiography education today

  6. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service and the Pensioners Association are pleased to invite CERN pensioners to a series of lectures given by professors and specialists from the Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva on the following topic: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The lectures will take place in the Main CERN Auditorium (Building 60) from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. on the following dates: Thursday 15 January 2009: Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease Pr Gabriel GOLD Wednesday 25 February 2009: What is the brain reserve? Speaker’s name to be announced at a later date. The lectures will be given in French, with transparencies in English, and will be followed by a wide-ranging debate with the participants. CERN Medical Service - Pensioners Association - CERN-ESO (GAC-EPA)

  7. Film documentaire, lecture documentarisante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Odin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Réfléchir sur la relation entre le cinéma et la réalité n’est pas, bien sûr, tenter de distinguer l’espace du documentaire de celui de la fiction, au point que l’opposition avec le film de fiction est devenu le critère de définition privilégié du film documentaire. Prenant acte l’existence, dans le espace de la lecture des films, d’une lecture documentaire ou, plus exactement, d’une lecture documentarisante, nous pensons qu’il y a un ensemble de films que s’affiche comme documentaire (tout le problème est précisément étudier comment s’effetue cet affichage.

  8. Albert Einstein memorial lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Mechoulam, Raphael; The Israel Academy for Sciences and Humanities

    2012-01-01

    This volume consists of a selection of the Albert Einstein Memorial Lectures presented annually at the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Delivered by eminent scientists and scholars, including Nobel laureates, they cover a broad spectrum of subjects in physics, chemistry, life science, mathematics, historiography and social issues. This distinguished memorial lecture series was inaugurated by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities following an international symposium held in Jerusalem in March 1979 to commemorate the centenary of Albert Einstein's birth. Considering that Einstein's interests, activities and influence were not restricted to theoretical physics but spanned broad fields affecting society and the welfare of humankind, it was felt that these memorial lectures should be addressed to scientists, scholars and erudite laypersons rather than to physicists alone.

  9. Lectures on functor homology

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This book features a series of lectures that explores three different fields in which functor homology (short for homological algebra in functor categories) has recently played a significant role. For each of these applications, the functor viewpoint provides both essential insights and new methods for tackling difficult mathematical problems. In the lectures by Aurélien Djament, polynomial functors appear as coefficients in the homology of infinite families of classical groups, e.g. general linear groups or symplectic groups, and their stabilization. Djament’s theorem states that this stable homology can be computed using only the homology with trivial coefficients and the manageable functor homology. The series includes an intriguing development of Scorichenko’s unpublished results. The lectures by Wilberd van der Kallen lead to the solution of the general cohomological finite generation problem, extending Hilbert’s fourteenth problem and its solution to the context of cohomology. The focus here is o...

  10. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form a...

  11. High Level of Emotional Intelligence Is Related to High Level of Online Teaching Self-Efficacy among Academic Nurse Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nagia; Ali, Omar; Jones, James

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and online teaching self-efficacy among 115 academic nurse educators who teach online (totally, blended, or both). The sample was randomly drawn from the list of nursing schools accredited by Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) with baccalaureate, master's…

  12. Flipped classroom or an active lecture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, James D; Roberts, David J H

    2018-01-01

    Recent changes in anatomy education have seen the introduction of flipped classrooms as a replacement to the traditional didactic lecture. This approach utilizes the increasing availability of digital technology to create learning resources that can be accessed prior to attending class, with face-to-face sessions then becoming more student-centered via discussion, collaborative learning, and problem-solving activities. Although this approach may appear intuitive, this viewpoint commentary presents a counter opinion and highlights a simple alternative that utilizes evidence-based active learning approaches as part of the traditional lecture. The active lecture takes the traditional lecture, and (1) ensures the lecture content is relevant and has clear objectives, (2) contains lecture material that is designed according to the latest evidence-base, (3) complements it with additional supplementary material, (4) creates space to check prior understanding and knowledge levels, and (5) utilizes suitable technology to facilitate continual engagement and interaction. Clin. Anat. 31:118-121, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Twenty lectures on thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Buchdahl, H A

    2013-01-01

    Twenty Lectures on Thermodynamics is a course of lectures, parts of which the author has given various times over the last few years. The book gives the readers a bird's eye view of phenomenological and statistical thermodynamics. The book covers many areas in thermodynamics such as states and transition; adiabatic isolation; irreversibility; the first, second, third and Zeroth laws of thermodynamics; entropy and entropy law; the idea of the application of thermodynamics; pseudo-states; the quantum-static al canonical and grand canonical ensembles; and semi-classical gaseous systems. The text

  14. Lectures on Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Dirac, Paul Adrien Maurice

    1964-01-01

    The author of this concise, brilliant series of lectures on mathematical methods in quantum mechanics was one of the shining intellects in the field, winning a Nobel prize in 1933 for his pioneering work in the quantum mechanics of the atom. Beyond that, he developed the transformation theory of quantum mechanics (which made it possible to calculate the statistical distribution of certain variables), was one of the major authors of the quantum theory of radiation, codiscovered the Fermi-Dirac statistics, and predicted the existence of the positron.The four lectures in this book were delivered

  15. Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK): Exploring its Usefulness for Science Lecturers in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Sharon P.

    2016-02-01

    In the past 30 years, pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) frameworks have become important constructs in educational research undertaken in the school education system and a focus for research for curriculum and teacher education researchers. As regards science, PCK research has been plentiful, but thus far, the concept of PCK (significantly enhanced since its proposal) has only been validated in the school context (Kindergarten to Grade 12). Within this environment, however, it has proven to be a very useful construct for understanding teacher practice and contributing to the improvement of teacher education courses. Knowledge about whether PCK is useful as a conceptual framework for science lecturers (teachers) working in higher education is as yet unknown and represents a gap in the research literature; the research outlined here is a first step in exploring its usefulness in this context. This paper provides an analysis of data obtained from semi-structured interviews conducted with nine Australian science university lecturers from various disciplines and levels of seniority and experience of tertiary teaching, as well as an academic developer skilled in facilitating science academics' understanding of pedagogy in higher education. The research aimed to investigate the extent to which one version of a school-based science PCK framework resonated with the pedagogical thinking of university science lecturers and the ways in which it could influence their teaching practice.

  16. Academic time at a level 1 trauma center: no resident, no problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Dickinson, Rebecca M; Schaefer, Eric W; Armen, Scott B; Frankel, Heidi L

    2012-01-01

    Globally, the compliance of resident work-hour restrictions has no impact on trauma outcome. However, the effect of protected education time (PET), during which residents are unavailable to respond to trauma patients, has not been studied. We hypothesized that PET has no impact on the outcome of trauma patients. We conducted a retrospective review of relevant patients at an academic level I trauma center. During PET, a trauma attending and advanced practice providers (APPs) responded to trauma activations. PGY1, 3, and 4 residents were also available at all other times. The outcome of new trauma patient activations during Thursday morning 3-hours resident PET was compared with same time period on other weekdays (non-PET) using a univariate and multivariate analysis. From January 2005 to April 2010, a total of 5968 trauma patients were entered in the registry. Of these, 178 patients (2.98%) were included for study (37 PET and 141 non-PET). The mean injury severity score (ISS) was 16.2. Although no significant difference were identified in mortality, complications, or length of stay (LOS), we do see that length of emergency department stay (ED-LOS) tends to be longer during PET, although not significantly (314 vs 381 minutes, p = 0.74). On the multiple logistic regression model, PET was not a significant factor of complications, LOS, or ED-LOS. Few trauma activations occur during PET. New trauma activations can be staffed safely by trauma activations and APPs. However, there could be some delays in transferring patients to appropriate disposition. Additional study is required to determine the effect of PET on existing trauma inpatients. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varao-Sousa, Trish L; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms.

  18. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trish L Varao-Sousa

    Full Text Available The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms.

  19. Interactive Lecture Experiments in Large Introductory Physics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner-Bolotin, Marina M.; Kotlicki, A.; Rieger, G.; Bates, F.; Moll, R.; McPhee, K.; Nashon, S.

    2006-12-01

    We describe Interactive Lecture Experiments (ILE), which build on Interactive Lecture Demonstrations proposed by Sokoloff and Thornton (2004) and extends it by providing students with the opportunity to analyze experiments demonstrated in the lecture outside of the classroom. Real time experimental data is collected, using Logger Pro combined with the digital video technology. This data is uploaded to the Internet and made available to the students for further analysis. Student learning is assessed in the following lecture using conceptual questions (clickers). The goal of this project is to use ILE to make large lectures more interactive and promote student interest in science, critical thinking and data analysis skills. We report on the systematic study conducted using the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey, Force Concept Inventory, open-ended physics problems and focus group interviews to determine the impact of ILE on student academic achievement, motivation and attitudes towards physics. Three sections of students (750 students) experienced four ILE experiments. The surveys were administered twice and academic results for students who experienced the ILE for a particular topic were compared to the students, from a different section, who did not complete the ILE for that topic. Additional qualitative data on students’ attitudes was collected using open ended survey questions and interviews. We will present preliminary conclusions about the role of ILEs as an effective pedagogy in large introductory physics courses. Sokoloff, D.R. and R.K. Thornton (2004). Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: Active Learning in Introductory Physics, J.Wiley & Sons, INC. Interactive Lecture Experiments: http://www.physics.ubc.ca/ year1lab/p100/LectureLabs/lectureLabs.html

  20. Interactive lectures: Clickers or personal devices? [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/54w

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley J. Morrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Audience response systems (‘clickers’ are frequently used to promote participation in large lecture classes, and evidence suggests that they convey a number of benefits to students, including improved academic performance and student satisfaction. The limitations of these systems (such as limited access and cost can be overcome using students’ personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops together with text message, web- or app-based polling systems. Using questionnaires, we compare student perceptions of clicker and smartphone based polling systems. We find that students prefer interactive lectures generally, but those that used their own device preferred those lectures over lectures using clickers. However, device users were more likely to report using their devices for other purposes (checking email, social media etc. when they were available to answer polling questions. These students did not feel that this distracted them from the lecture, instead, concerns over the use of smartphones centred around increased battery usage and inclusivity for students without access to suitable technology. Our results suggest that students generally preferred to use their own devices over clickers, and that this may be a sensible way to overcome some of the limitations associated with clickers, although issues surrounding levels of distraction and the implications for retention and recall of information need further investigation.

  1. The effect of podcast lectures on nursing students' knowledge retention and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Karen S

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of academic podcasts in promoting knowledge retention and application in nursing students. Nursing education no longer simply occurs in a fixed location or time. Computer-enhanced mobile learning technologies, such as academic podcasts, must be grounded in pedagogically sound characteristics to ensure effective implementation and learning in nursing education. A convenience sample of 35 female undergraduate nursing students was randomized into three groups: a traditional face-to-face lecture group, an unsegmented (non-stop) podcast lecture group, and a segmented podcast lecture group. Retention and application of information were measured through a multiple-choice quiz and a case study based on lecture content. Students in the segmented podcast lecture group demonstrated higher scores on multiple-choice and case-study assessments than those in the other two groups. Nurse educators should be aware of this finding when seeking to employ podcast lectures in nursing education.

  2. Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 2 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Wells (CERN) The Higgs Saga at LEP 10:15 - 11:00 G. Cowan (Univ. of London) Introduction to Statistics (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. Cowan (Univ. of London) Introduction to Statistics (3/3) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 3 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Sphicas (CERN) Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems (1/2) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) G. Cowan (University of London) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 4 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Sphicas (CERN) Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems (2/2) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) Astroparticle Physics (1/3) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 5 August 09:15 - 10:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) 10:15 - 11:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) A...

  3. Impostor Syndrome 2014 lecture

    OpenAIRE

    Drew, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    A lecture given at the University of Rochester outlining what the Impostor Syndrome is, as well as how it can impact graduate student success. Other topics include how to build support networks in school as well as picking appropriately scaled projects

  4. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs

  5. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs

  6. Testing the Difference between School Level and Academic Mindset in the Classroom: Implications for Developing Student Psycho-Social Skills in Secondary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Janet

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between school level and the psychosocial construct of an academic mindset operationalized on the Likert-style Project for "Educational Research That Scales" (PERTS) instrument; widely used in testing academic mindset interventions at the classroom level. Analyses were conducted using existing school…

  7. Public Lecture: Human Space Exploration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Should you wish to attend to this lecture only (and not the full colloquium), please register here: https://indico.cern.ch/event/386996/registration/ Participants to the full colloquium are automatically registered to the public lectures.

  8. Academic Dishonesty: Does Social Media Allow for Increased and More Sophisticated Levels of Student Cheating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Linda M.; Shelley, Daniel J.

    2018-01-01

    This article examines the effects of the social media applications Facebook, Twitter, Snap Chat/Instagram, Texting and various smartphone applications on academic dishonesty in higher education. The study employed a mixed-methods approach conducted through an emailed question-pro student survey consisting of 20 questions. The results of the study…

  9. Interracial Best Friendships: Relationship with 10th Graders' Academic Achievement Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newgent, Rebecca A.; Lee, Sang Min; Daniel, Ashley F.

    2007-01-01

    The authors examined the relationships between interracial best friendships and 10th-grade students' academic achievement. The analysis consisted of data from 13,134 participants in the ELS:2002 database. The results indicated that interracial best friendships for minority students (African Americans, Latino Americans, Asian Americans, and…

  10. Planning at a Higher Level: Ideas, Form, and Academic Language in Student Prewriting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul

    2012-01-01

    For students, writing is too frequently a matter of going through the motions, perhaps no truer than with the traditional academic essay. Although there are many culprits for this disengagement, one is surely an over-emphasis on form--and particularly set form--to the detriment of content. When form becomes formula, planning is stultified, losing…

  11. Movement to Create 'Academic Alliances' of Teachers of Same Subjects at All Education Levels Is Growing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Beverly T.

    1988-01-01

    The movement to create "academic alliances" of high-school and college teachers is discussed. The alliances owe much of their strength to the increased sense of self-esteem and the pleasure that members find in the company of disciplinary colleagues. A directory of some alliances is included. (MLW)

  12. Academic Parenting: Work-Family Conflict and Strategies across Child Age, Disciplines and Career Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Anne; McDonald, Jan; Guijt, Rosanne; Leane, Elizabeth; Martin, Angela; James, Allison; Jones, Menna; Corban, Monica; Green, Bridget

    2018-01-01

    The research underpinning this article explores the impacts that parenting and primary caring responsibilities have upon academic careers. It takes an innovative approach by exploring three under-researched aspects of this issue: the longitudinal impacts that extend past the years immediately following the birth or adoption of a child; the…

  13. Outcomes of endovascular management of acute thoracic aortic emergencies in an academic level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Angela B; Branco, Bernardino C; Goshima, Kay R; Hughes, John D; Mills, Joseph L

    2014-12-01

    Thoracic aortic emergencies account for 10% of thoracic-related admissions in the United States and remain associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Open repair has declined owing to the emergence of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), but data on emergency TEVAR use for acute aortic pathology remain limited. We therefore reviewed our experience. We retrospectively evaluated emergency descending thoracic aortic endovascular interventions performed at a single academic level 1 trauma center between January 2005 and August 2013 including all cases of traumatic aortic injury, ruptured descending thoracic aneurysm, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer, aortoenteric fistula, and acute complicated type B dissection. Demographics, clinical data, and outcomes were extracted. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for death. During the study period, 51 patients underwent TEVAR; 22 cases (43.1%) were performed emergently (11 patients [50.0%] traumatic aortic injury; 4 [18.2%] ruptured descending thoracic aneurysm; 4 [18.2%] complicated type B dissection; 2 [9.1%] penetrating aortic ulcer; and 1 [4.5%] aortoenteric fistula). Overall, 72.7% (n = 16) were male with a mean age of 54.8 ± 15.9 years. Nineteen patients (86.4%) required only a single TEVAR procedure, whereas 2 (9.1%) required additional endovascular therapy, and 1 (4.5%) open thoracotomy. Four traumatic aortic injury patients required exploratory laparotomy for concomitant intra-abdominal injuries. During a mean hospital length of stay of 18.9 days (range, 1 to 76 days), 3 patients (13.6%) developed major complications. In-hospital mortality was 27.2%, consisting of 6 deaths from traumatic brain injury (1); exsanguination in the operating room before repair could be achieved (2); bowel ischemia (1) and multisystem organ failure (1); and family withdrawal of care (1). A stepwise logistic regression model identified 24-hour packed red blood cell requirements ≥4

  14. Feynman Lectures on Gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borcherds, P

    2003-01-01

    In the early 1960s Feynman lectured to physics undergraduates and, with the assistance of his colleagues Leighton and Sands, produced the three-volume classic Feynman Lectures in Physics. These lectures were delivered in the mornings. In the afternoons Feynman was giving postgraduate lectures on gravitation. This book is based on notes compiled by two students on that course: Morinigo and Wagner. Their notes were checked and approved by Feynman and were available at Caltech. They have now been edited by Brian Hatfield and made more widely available. The book has a substantial preface by John Preskill and Kip Thorne, and an introduction entitled 'Quantum Gravity' by Brian Hatfield. You should read these before going on to the lectures themselves. Preskill and Thorne identify three categories of potential readers of this book. 1. Those with a postgraduate training in theoretical physics. 2. 'Readers with a solid undergraduate training in physics'. 3. 'Admirers of Feynman who do not have a strong physics background'. The title of the book is perhaps misleading: readers in category 2 who think that this book is an extension of the Feynman Lectures in Physics may be disappointed. It is not: it is a book aimed mainly at those in category 1. If you want to get to grips with gravitation (and general relativity) then you need to read an introductory text first e.g. General Relativity by I R Kenyon (Oxford: Oxford University Press) or A Unified Grand Tour of Theoretical Physics by Ian D Lawrie (Bristol: IoP). But there is no Royal Road. As pointed out in the preface and in the introduction, the book represents Feynman's thinking about gravitation some 40 years ago: the lecture course was part of his attempts to understand the subject himself, and for readers in all three categories it is this that makes the book one of interest: the opportunity to observe how a great physicist attempts to tackle some of the hardest challenges of physics. However, the book was written 40

  15. Philosophy Underlying Emotional Intelligence in Relation to Level of Curiosity and Academic Achievement of Rural Area Students

    OpenAIRE

    Aminuddin Hassan; Tajularipin Sulaiman; Rohaizan Ishak

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Since emotional intelligence is still not wholly-accepted despite evidences of its powerful influence in general setting, this study is therefore conducted to identify the emotional intelligence level among school students in rural areas, relationships between emotional intelligence and anxiety, as well as relationships between emotional intelligence and academic achievement. Approach: It involved a sample of 223 form 1 and form 4 students. Process of data collection was ad...

  16. Metacognitive reading strategies in learning disability: Relations between usage level, academic self-efficacy and self-concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alev Girli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between the usage levels of metacognitive reading strategies by students diagnosed with specific learning disability (SLD, academic self-efficacy and the concept of self, in comparison to their typically developing (TD peers. The data to be used in the study were collected using the Metacognitive Awareness of Reading Strategies Inventory, the Academic Self-efficacy Scale, the Piers-Harris Children’s Self-concept Scale and the Demographics Information Form. The study was conducted among a total of 119 students in the fifth,sixth, seventh and eighth grades in İzmir Province, including 59 students diagnosed with SLD and 60 TD students. Considering the results of the study, in comparison to TD students, students diagnosed with SLD were significantly inadequate in terms of the usage levels of metacognitive reading strategies, levels of academic self-efficacy, and the intelligence/school subdimensions of the concept of self.

  17. Integration of Information Literacy Components into a Large First-Year Lecture-Based Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locknar, Angela; Mitchell, Rudolph; Rankin, Janet; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2012-01-01

    A first-year chemistry course is ideal for introducing students to finding and using scholarly information early in their academic careers. A four-pronged approach (lectures, homework problems, videos, and model solutions) was used to incorporate library research skills into a large lecture-based course. Pre- and post-course surveying demonstrated…

  18. Using Clickers to Facilitate Interactive Engagement Activities in a Lecture Room for Improved Performance by Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlhoaele, Malefyane; Hofman, Adriaan; Naidoo, Ari; Winnips, Koos

    2014-01-01

    What impact can interactive engagement (IE) activities using clickers have on students' motivation and academic performance during lectures as compared to attending traditional types of lectures? This article positions the research on IE within the comprehensive model of educational effectiveness and Gagné's instructional events model. For the…

  19. Attitudes to and perceptions of research for health science lecturers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The majority of AHP/nurse lecturers are drawn from clinical practice where the opportunity to undertake research activity is limited. Employment in higher education requires the undertaking of research/scholarly activity as part of their role, but research output from this group is below that from other healthcare academics. This study explores attitudes of AHP's/nurses in one higher educational establishment towards research activity. Method: Ethical approval was obtained from the academic ethics committee. Six focus groups were facilitated using semi structured and open grounded theory approaches. Participants included AHP's/nurses who are now lecturers or teachers in HE. Informed written consent was gained and each session audio recorded and transcribed. NVivo v8 was used to code data and thematic analysis carried out using the OSOP method. Findings: All groups identified previously reported barriers to research, such as lack of time, resources and skills. There was evidence of a perceived hierarchy of research within the university culture, and for some a feeling of inadequacy and inability to reach the higher levels. Those involved in research reported a feeling of isolation which reduced their output. One emergent theme highlighted that some participants did not want to undertake research and had difficulty identifying with it as part of their university role. A minority embraced research as an integral part of their work. Discussion/conclusion: When prompted participants could identify practical solutions to some of the barriers identified such as adapting working practices to release research time. The need for appropriate mentorship for inexperienced researchers is clearly demonstrated in the data however the hierarchy of research presents a barrier to accessing this. The participants are relying upon inexperienced peers for support, leading to a restricted research knowledge pool. The relative immaturity of the professions included may also

  20. Trends in National Emergency Medicine Conference Didactic Lectures Over a 6-Year Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Michael; Riddell, Jeff; Njie, Abdoulie

    2017-01-01

    National conference didactic lectures have traditionally featured hour-long lecture-based presentations. However, there is evidence that longer lectures can lead to both decreased attention and retention of information. The authors sought to identify trends in lecture duration, lecture types, and number of speakers at four national emergency medicine (EM) conferences over a 6-year period. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of the length, number of speakers, and format of didactic lectures at four different national EM conferences over 6 years. The authors abstracted data from the national academic assemblies for the four largest not-for-profit EM organizations in the United States: American Academy of Emergency Medicine, American College of Emergency Physicians, Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. There was a significant yearly decrease in the mean lecture lengths for three of the four conferences. There was an increase in the percentage of rapid fire sessions over the preceding 2 years with a corresponding decrease in the percentage of general educational sessions. There was no significant difference in the mean number of speakers per lecture. An analysis of 4210 didactic lecture sessions from the annual meetings of four national EM organizations over a 6-year period showed significant decreases in mean lecture length. These findings can help to guide EM continuing medical education conference planning and research.

  1. The Relationship Between Method of Viewing Lectures, Course Ratings, and Course Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, William B; Ma, Terence P; Grayson, Martha S

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, medical schools have provided students access to video recordings of course lectures, but few studies have investigated the impact of this on ratings of courses and teachers. This study investigated whether the method of viewing lectures was related to student ratings of the course and its components and whether the method used changed over time. Preclinical medical students indicated whether ratings of course lectures were based primarily on lecture attendance, video capture, or both. Students were categorized into Lecture, Video, or Both groups based on their responses to this question. The data consisted of 7584 student evaluations collected over 2 years. Students who attended live lectures rated the course and its components higher than students who only viewed the video or used both methods, although these differences were very small. Students increasingly watched lectures exclusively by video over time: in comparison with first-year students, second-year students were more likely to watch lectures exclusively by video; in comparison with students in the first half of the academic year, students in the second half of the academic year were more likely to watch lectures exclusively by video. With the increase in use of lecture video recordings across medical schools, attention must be paid to student attitudes regarding these methods.

  2. Lectures on Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gomberoff, Andres

    2006-01-01

    The 2002 Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute School on Quantum Gravity was held at the Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS),Valdivia, Chile, January 4-14, 2002. The school featured lectures by ten speakers, and was attended by nearly 70 students from over 14 countries. A primary goal was to foster interaction and communication between participants from different cultures, both in the layman’s sense of the term and in terms of approaches to quantum gravity. We hope that the links formed by students and the school will persist throughout their professional lives, continuing to promote interaction and the essential exchange of ideas that drives research forward. This volume contains improved and updated versions of the lectures given at the School. It has been prepared both as a reminder for the participants, and so that these pedagogical introductions can be made available to others who were unable to attend. We expect them to serve students of all ages well.

  3. Globe: Lecture series

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The LHC: an accelerator of science This series of lectures is all about understanding the scientific and technological challenges of the phenomenal LHC project and assessing its innovations through their everyday applications. Come and take a sneak preview of the LHC! Communicate: the Grid, a computer of global dimensions François Grey, head of communication in CERN’s Information Technology Department How will it be possible for the 15 million billion bytes of data generated by the LHC every year to be handled and stored by a computer that doesn’t have to be the size of a skyscraper? The computer scientists have the answer: the Grid, which will harness the power of tens of thousands of computers all over the world by creating a network of computers and making them operate as one. >>> Lectures are free and require no specialist knowledge. In french. 
 >>> By reservation only: tel. +41 (0)22 767 76 76

  4. Lectures on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachsmann, F.; Consentius, K.

    1981-01-01

    All important subjects of radiation protection are presented in concise form; the explanations may serve as lecture manuscripts. The lectures are divided into 16 to 19 teaching units. Each teaching unit is supplemented by a slide to be projected on a screen while the text is read. This method of visual teaching has already been tried with good results in medicine and medical engineering. Pictures of the slides are given in the text so that the book may also be used for self-studies. The main facts are summarized at the end of each lesson. The finished book will consist of 8 lessons; the first three of these discuss 1. Radiation effects and hazards 2. Dose definitions and units and their role in radiology and radiation protection 3. Dose limits and legal specifications. (orig.) [de

  5. Lectures on dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seljak, U.

    2001-01-01

    These lectures concentrate on evolution and generation of dark matter perturbations. The purpose of the lectures is to present, in a systematic way, a comprehensive review of the cosmological parameters that can lead to observable effects in the dark matter clustering properties. We begin by reviewing the relativistic linear perturbation theory formalism. We discuss the gauge issue and derive Einstein's and continuity equations for several popular gauge choices. We continue by developing fluid equations for cold dark matter and baryons and Boltzmann equations for photons, massive and massless neutrinos. We then discuss the generation of initial perturbations by the process of inflation and the parameters of that process that can be extracted from the observations. Finally we discuss evolution of perturbations in various regimes and the imprint of the evolution on the dark matter power spectrum both in the linear and in the nonlinear regime. (author)

  6. Lectures on dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seljak, U [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2001-11-15

    These lectures concentrate on evolution and generation of dark matter perturbations. The purpose of the lectures is to present, in a systematic way, a comprehensive review of the cosmological parameters that can lead to observable effects in the dark matter clustering properties. We begin by reviewing the relativistic linear perturbation theory formalism. We discuss the gauge issue and derive Einstein's and continuity equations for several popular gauge choices. We continue by developing fluid equations for cold dark matter and baryons and Boltzmann equations for photons, massive and massless neutrinos. We then discuss the generation of initial perturbations by the process of inflation and the parameters of that process that can be extracted from the observations. Finally we discuss evolution of perturbations in various regimes and the imprint of the evolution on the dark matter power spectrum both in the linear and in the nonlinear regime. (author)

  7. Lecture 2: Software Security

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Computer security has been an increasing concern for IT professionals for a number of years, yet despite all the efforts, computer systems and networks remain highly vulnerable to attacks of different kinds. Design flaws and security bugs in the underlying software are among the main reasons for this. This lecture addresses the following question: how to create secure software? The lecture starts with a definition of computer security and an explanation of why it is so difficult to achieve. It then introduces the main security principles (like least-privilege, or defense-in-depth) and discusses security in different phases of the software development cycle. The emphasis is put on the implementation part: most common pitfalls and security bugs are listed, followed by advice on best practice for security development, testing and deployment. Sebastian Lopienski is CERN’s deputy Computer Security Officer. He works on security strategy and policies; offers internal consultancy and audit services; develops and ...

  8. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 16 August 09:15 - 10:00 Student sessions (1/6) 10:15 - 11:00 Student sessions (2/6 11:15 - 12:00 Student sessions (3/6) Tuesday 17 August 09:15 - 10:00 Student sessions (4/6) 10:15 - 11:00 Student sessions (5/6) 11:15 - 12:00 Student sessions (6/6

  9. Lectures on LHC physics

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2012-01-01

    When we try to advance from a solid knowledge of field theory to LHC physics we usually encounter a frustrating problem: in particular Higgs physics and QCD techniques appear as a impenetrable granite block of phenomenological know-how, common lores, and historically grown intuition what works and what does not. I hope this lecture can drill a few holes into the rock and put you into a position to digest advanced writeups as well as some first research papers on the topic.

  10. Two lectures on neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramond, P.

    1992-01-01

    These notes are based on two lectures delivered at the School. A general description of neutrinos is presented, first in purely kinematic terms, then in the context of the Standard Model, focusing on the role of the global lepton numbers. Standard Model extensions with massive neutrinos are cataloged. Several popular mass matrices for neutrinos, and their consequences are presented. They proceed to give an extended discussion of neutrino oscillations in matter, and apply the results to the solar neutrinos

  11. Towards Research University through Ambidexterity Practice: A Lecturer Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Kusumastuti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of ambidexterity in organization theory refers to an organization's ability to innovate in explorative manners (Duncan, 1980. Ambidexterity can be identified into structural ambidexterity and contextual ambidexterity (Tushman, O'Reilly, 1990. In small medium enterprises, for example, innovation activities take contextual form since most owners act both as entrepreneurs and business leaders (Kusumastuti, et.al., 2015, while in established corporations innovation activities generally occur in structural form. Thus research takes academic institution as its locus, within which innovation activities are mandatory for all civitas academica (academic community. The study uses mixed method for collecting data through questionnaires and in-depth interviews. It shows that university has the capacity to provide context in institutional support and remuneration system as a means stimulate lecturers and researchers to be more innovative. The scheme also provided structure at the university and faculty level as tools to coordinate and integrate research projects. The organizational learning at the individual level reflects the pattern of contextual ambidexterity process.

  12. Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 More Information DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 7 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Fayard, O. Ullaland, D. Heagerty (CERN) Programme Presentation Workshops presentation Information on Computing Rules 10:15 - 11:00 R. Aymar (CERN) Introduction to CERN (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 J. Engelen (CERN) Introduction to CERN (2/2) 15:00 - 16:30 H. Menzel (CERN) An Introduction to Radiation Protection DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 8 july 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (1/4) 10:15 - 11:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Fundamental questions in modern nuclear physics: The challenge of exotic nuclei (1/2) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Friday 9 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (3/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Fundamental questions in modern nuclear physics: The challenge of exotic nuclei (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 P....

  13. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service and the Pensioners Association are pleased to invite CERN pensioners to a series of lectures given by professors and specialists from the Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva on the following topic: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The lectures will take place in the Main CERN Auditorium (Building 60) from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. on the following dates: Wednesday 12 November 2008: Assessing the extent of brain ageing Dr Dina ZEKRY Friday 12 December 2008: Can memory decline be prevented? Pr Jean-Pierre MICHEL Thursday 15 January 2009: Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease Pr Gabriel GOLD Wednesday 25 February 2009: What is the brain reserve? Speaker’s name to be announced at a later date The lectures will be given in French, with transparencies in English, and will be followed by a wide-ranging debate with the participants. CERN Medical Service - Pensioners Association - CERN-ESO (GAC-EPA)

  14. Lectures on quasiconformal mappings

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlfors, Lars V

    2006-01-01

    Lars Ahlfors's Lectures on Quasiconformal Mappings, based on a course he gave at Harvard University in the spring term of 1964, was first published in 1966 and was soon recognized as the classic it was shortly destined to become. These lectures develop the theory of quasiconformal mappings from scratch, give a self-contained treatment of the Beltrami equation, and cover the basic properties of Teichm�ller spaces, including the Bers embedding and the Teichm�ller curve. It is remarkable how Ahlfors goes straight to the heart of the matter, presenting major results with a minimum set of prerequisites. Many graduate students and other mathematicians have learned the foundations of the theories of quasiconformal mappings and Teichm�ller spaces from these lecture notes. This edition includes three new chapters. The first, written by Earle and Kra, describes further developments in the theory of Teichm�ller spaces and provides many references to the vast literature on Teichm�ller spaces and quasiconformal ...

  15. Public Lectures | Events | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Public and special lectures. Academy Public Lectures · Public and special lectures in Mid-Year and Annual Meetings · Platinum Jubilee Lectures. Academy's annual and mid-year meetings include a special lecture by a senior Fellow in the morning of each meeting day and one public lecture by an eminent person, from ...

  16. Return to learn: Transitioning to school and through ascending levels of academic support for students following a concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAvoy, Karen; Eagan-Johnson, Brenda; Halstead, Mark

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to familiarize healthcare providers and parents with educational language, laws, and processes as they relate to a comprehensive ascending level of academic supports as it pertains to promoting a smooth and supported transition to school following a concussion. Returning to learn (RTL) following a concussion is of parallel importance to returning to sport (RTS). A successful RTL is a critical part of concussion management. Many RTL articles advise healthcare providers and parents to request formalized educational supports, also known as Tier 2 or Tier 3 services, for children with concussion as they return to school. Premature requests for formal (Tier 2 or 3) educational services, rather than allowing for immediate informal educational supports (known as Tier 1), can actually delay academic supports and have the potential to cause adversarial relationships between parents and schools. Additionally, this practice contradicts current research demonstrating the need for fast, flexible, temporary academic supports within the first month post-injury. Allowing school districts to direct the application of existing ascending levels of educational support for students with concussion as they return to school can promote robust and positive outcomes.

  17. Automatic Online Lecture Highlighting Based on Multimedia Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Xiaoyin; Yang, Haojin; Meinel, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    Textbook highlighting is widely considered to be beneficial for students. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive solution to highlight the online lecture videos in both sentence- and segment-level, just as is done with paper books. The solution is based on automatic analysis of multimedia lecture materials, such as speeches, transcripts, and…

  18. College Students' Perceptions of the Traditional Lecture Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covill, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    Fifty-one college students responded to survey questions regarding their perceptions of the traditional lecture method of instruction that they received in a 200-level psychology course. At a time when many professors are being encouraged to use active learning methods instead of lectures, it is important to consider the students' perspective. Do…

  19. The Effect of Teaching Activities Done by Using Activity Based Posters on the Students' Academic Achievements, Retention Levels in Their Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Ismail; Eker, Cevat

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate whether the activity based posters have an effect of on the ninth class students' academic achievements and the retention levels in their learning. The research was carried out with 60 students at one of the state schools in The Central Anatolia Region of Turkey in 2015-2016 academic year.…

  20. PEER INTERACTIONS AND POSITIVE STUDENT-LECTURER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper sets out to interrogate the role played by peer interactions in the teaching and learning of College Algebra in a classroom setting. It also explores the impact of positive student-lecturer relationship on teaching and learning of College Algebra at the university level and the general improvement of student ...

  1. An audit of diagnostic reference levels in interventional cardiology and radiology: Are there differences between academic and non-academic centres?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samara, E. T.; Aroua, A.; De palma, R.; Stauffer, J. C.; Schmidt, S.; Trueb, P. R.; Stuessi, A.; Treier, R.; Bochud, F.; Verdun, F. R.

    2012-01-01

    A wide variation in patient exposure has been observed in interventional radiology and cardiology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the patient dose from fluoroscopy-guided procedures performed in non-academic centres when compared with academic centres. Four procedures (coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, angiography of the lower limbs and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of the lower limbs) were evaluated. Data on the dose-area product, fluoroscopy time and number of images for 1000 procedures were obtained from 23 non-academic centres and compared with data from 5 academic centres. No differences were found for cardiology procedures performed in non-academic centres versus academic ones. However, significantly lower doses were delivered to patients for procedures of the lower limbs when they were performed in non-academic centres. This may be due to more complex procedures performed in the academic centres. Comparison between the centres showed a great variation in the patient dose for these lower limb procedures. (authors)

  2. Differences in Learning Characteristics Between Students With High, Average, and Low Levels of Academic Procrastination: Students’ Views on Factors Influencing Their Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Visser

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Within the field of procrastination, much research has been conducted on factors that have an influence on academic procrastination. Less is known about how such factors may differ for various students. In addition, not much is known about differences in the process of how factors influence students’ learning and what creates differences in procrastination behavior between students with different levels of academic procrastination. In this study learning characteristics and the self-regulation behavior of three groups of students with different levels of academic procrastination were compared. The rationale behind this was that certain learning characteristics and self-regulation behaviors may play out differently in students with different levels of academic procrastination. Participants were first-year students (N = 22 with different levels of academic procrastination enrolled in an elementary teacher education program. The selection of the participants into three groups of students (low procrastination, n = 8; average procrastination, n = 8; high procrastination, n = 6 was based on their scores on a questionnaire measuring the students’ levels of academic procrastination. From semi-structured interviews, six themes emerged that describe how students in the three groups deal with factors that influence the students’ learning: degree program choice, getting started with study activities, engagement in study activities, ways of reacting to failure, view of oneself, and study results. This study shows the importance of looking at differences in how students deal with certain factors possibly negatively influencing their learning. Within the group of students with average and high levels of academic procrastination, factors influencing their learning are regularly present. These factors lead to procrastination behavior among students with high levels of academic procrastination, but this seems not the case among students with an average

  3. Differences in Learning Characteristics Between Students With High, Average, and Low Levels of Academic Procrastination: Students' Views on Factors Influencing Their Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Lennart; Korthagen, Fred A J; Schoonenboom, Judith

    2018-01-01

    Within the field of procrastination, much research has been conducted on factors that have an influence on academic procrastination. Less is known about how such factors may differ for various students. In addition, not much is known about differences in the process of how factors influence students' learning and what creates differences in procrastination behavior between students with different levels of academic procrastination. In this study learning characteristics and the self-regulation behavior of three groups of students with different levels of academic procrastination were compared. The rationale behind this was that certain learning characteristics and self-regulation behaviors may play out differently in students with different levels of academic procrastination. Participants were first-year students ( N = 22) with different levels of academic procrastination enrolled in an elementary teacher education program. The selection of the participants into three groups of students (low procrastination, n = 8; average procrastination, n = 8; high procrastination, n = 6) was based on their scores on a questionnaire measuring the students' levels of academic procrastination. From semi-structured interviews, six themes emerged that describe how students in the three groups deal with factors that influence the students' learning: degree program choice, getting started with study activities, engagement in study activities, ways of reacting to failure, view of oneself, and study results. This study shows the importance of looking at differences in how students deal with certain factors possibly negatively influencing their learning. Within the group of students with average and high levels of academic procrastination, factors influencing their learning are regularly present. These factors lead to procrastination behavior among students with high levels of academic procrastination, but this seems not the case among students with an average level of academic

  4. Differences in Learning Characteristics Between Students With High, Average, and Low Levels of Academic Procrastination: Students’ Views on Factors Influencing Their Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Lennart; Korthagen, Fred A. J.; Schoonenboom, Judith

    2018-01-01

    Within the field of procrastination, much research has been conducted on factors that have an influence on academic procrastination. Less is known about how such factors may differ for various students. In addition, not much is known about differences in the process of how factors influence students’ learning and what creates differences in procrastination behavior between students with different levels of academic procrastination. In this study learning characteristics and the self-regulation behavior of three groups of students with different levels of academic procrastination were compared. The rationale behind this was that certain learning characteristics and self-regulation behaviors may play out differently in students with different levels of academic procrastination. Participants were first-year students (N = 22) with different levels of academic procrastination enrolled in an elementary teacher education program. The selection of the participants into three groups of students (low procrastination, n = 8; average procrastination, n = 8; high procrastination, n = 6) was based on their scores on a questionnaire measuring the students’ levels of academic procrastination. From semi-structured interviews, six themes emerged that describe how students in the three groups deal with factors that influence the students’ learning: degree program choice, getting started with study activities, engagement in study activities, ways of reacting to failure, view of oneself, and study results. This study shows the importance of looking at differences in how students deal with certain factors possibly negatively influencing their learning. Within the group of students with average and high levels of academic procrastination, factors influencing their learning are regularly present. These factors lead to procrastination behavior among students with high levels of academic procrastination, but this seems not the case among students with an average level of academic

  5. Exploring Tablet PC Lectures: Lecturer Experiences and Student Perceptions in Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Julia; Kotsanas, George; Dawson, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Lecturers using tablet PCs with specialised pens can utilise real-time changes in lecture delivery via digital inking. We investigated student perceptions and lecturer experiences of tablet PC lectures in large-enrolment biomedicine subjects. Lecturers used PowerPoint or Classroom Presenter software for lecture preparation and in-lecture pen-based…

  6. Academic Training - Pulsed SC Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 2, 3, June 29, 30, 31 May, 1, 2 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Pulsed SC Magnets by M. Wilson Lecture 1. Introduction to Superconducting Materials Type 1,2 and high temperature superconductors; their critical temperature, field & current density. Persistent screening currents and the critical state model. Lecture 2. Magnetization and AC Loss How screening currents cause irreversible magnetization and hysteresis loops. Field errors caused by screening currents. Flux jumping. The general formulation of ac loss in terms of magnetization. AC losses caused by screening currents. Lecture 3. Twisted Wires and Cables Filamentary composite wires and the losses caused by coupling currents between filaments, the need for twisting. Why we need cables and how the coupling currents in cables contribute more ac loss. Field errors caused by coupling currents. Lecture 4. AC Losses in Magnets, Cooling and Measurement Summary of all loss mech...

  7. Recently Published Lectures and Tutorials for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Herr, J.

    2006-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project, WLAP, a collaboration between the University of Michigan and CERN, has developed a synchronized system for recording and publishing educational multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. This year, the University of Michigan team has been asked to record and publish all ATLAS Plenary sessions, as well as a large number of Physics and Computing tutorials. A significant amount of this material has already been published and can be accessed via the links below. The WLAP model is spreading. This summer, the CERN's High School Teachers program has used WLAP's system to record several physics lectures directed toward a broad audience. And a new project called MScribe, which is essentially the WLAP system coupled with an infrared tracking camera, is being used by the University of Michigan to record several University courses this academic year. All lectures can be viewed on any major platform with any common internet browser...

  8. Joseph Mountin Lecture

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-26

    In this podcast, William H. Foege, MD, MPH delivers the 29th Annual Joseph W. Mountin Lecture. Dr. Foege was a key leader in the smallpox effort and worked as an epidemiologist in the successful eradication campaign in the 1970s. Dr. Foege became chief of the Smallpox Eradication Program at CDC, and was appointed director of CDC in 1977.  Created: 10/26/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/29/2009.

  9. Lectures on electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    These lecture notes on electromagnetism have evolved from graduate and undergraduate EM theory courses given by the author at the University of Rochester, with the basics presented with clarity and his characteristic attention to detail. The thirteen chapters cover, in logical sequence, topics ranging from electrostatics, magnetostatics and Maxwell's equations to plasmas and radiation. Boundary value problems are treated extensively, as are wave guides, electromagnetic interactions and fields. This second edition comprises many of the topics expanded with more details on the derivation of vari

  10. Lectures in particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Dan

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this book on particle physics is to present the theory in a simple way. The style and organization of the material is unique in that intuition is employed, not formal theory or the Monte Carlo method. This volume attempts to be more physical and less abstract than other texts without degenerating into a presentation of data without interpretation.This book is based on four courses of lectures conducted at Fermilab. It should prove very useful to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

  11. Lectures in Micro Meteorology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling

    This report contains the notes from my lectures on Micro scale meteorology at the Geophysics Department of the Niels Bohr Institute of Copenhagen University. In the period 1993-2012, I was responsible for this course at the University. At the start of the course, I decided that the text books...... available in meteorology at that time did not include enough of the special flavor of micro meteorology that characterized the work of the meteorology group at Risø (presently of the Institute of wind energy of the Danish Technical University). This work was focused on Boundary layer flows and turbulence...

  12. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    25, 26, 27, 28 February and 1st March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 LECTURE SERIES Neutrino masses and oscillations by A. de Rujula / CERN-TH This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  13. Assessment of vocal intensity in lecturers depending on acoustic properties of lecture rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Mikulski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lombard’s effect increases the level of vocal intensity in the environment, in which noise occurs. This article presents the results of the author’s own study of vocal intensity level and A-weighted sound pressure level of background noise during normal lectures. The aim of the study was to define whether above-mentioned parameters depend on acoustic properties of rooms (classrooms or lecture rooms and to define how many lectors speak with raised voice. Material and Methods: The study was performed in a group of 50 teachers and lecturers in 10 classrooms with cubature of 160–430 m3 and reverberation time of 0.37–1.3 s (group A consisted of 3 rooms which fulfilled, group B consisted of 3 rooms which almost fulfilled and group C consisted of 4 rooms which did not fulfill criteria based on reverberation time (maximum permissible value is 0.6–0.8 s according to PN-B-02151-4:2015. Criteria of raising voice were based on vocal intensity level (maximum value: 65 dB according to EN ISO 9921:2003. The values of above-mentioned parameters were determined from modes of A-weighted sound pressure level distributions during lectures. Results: Great differentiation of vocal intensity level between lectors was found. In classrooms of group A lectors were not using raised voice, in group B – 21%, and in group C – 60% of lectors were using raised voice. Conclusions: It was observed that acoustic properties of classrooms (defined by reverberation time exert their effect on lecturer’s vocal intensity level (i.e., raising voice, which may contribute to the increased risk of vocal tract illnesses. The occurrence of Lombard’s effect in groups of teachers and lecturers, conducting lectures in rooms, was evidenced. Med Pr 2015;66(4:487–496

  14. The 1979 Bernard Gregory lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisskopf, V.F.

    1980-02-01

    This volume contains the texts of the lectures given by Professor V.F. Weisskopf at CERN and in Paris in the autumn of 1979, as the first Gregory lecturer. The titles of the three different texts are 'Growing up with Field Theory', 'Recent Trends in Particle Physics' and 'L'Art et la Science'. While the latter lecture was given in French, an English text here follows the French one. The volume starts with a short biographical note about Bernard Gregory. (orig.)

  15. The Oskar Klein memorial lectures

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    The series of Oskar Klein Memorial Lectures is a must-read for those keenly involved or simply interested in exploring the many fascinating aspects of Physics. This volume presents two landmark lectures given by Hans Bethe in October 1990 and Alan H. Guth in June 1991 under the series of Oskar Klein Memorial Lectures. Hans Bethe's lectures dealt with two themes: the astrophysical importance of neutrinos in supernova outbursts and a theoretical account of neutrinos through observations of the neutrino flux from the centre of the sun. Anyone interested in understanding the processes involved in

  16. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 P. WELLS Discussion Session 14:00 - 16:00 R. ASSMANN The CLIC Concept for a Future Particle Collider at the Energy Frontier Tuesday 30 July 09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (1/2) 10:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (1&2/4) Wednesday 31 July  09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (2/2) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK / F. ANTINORI Discussion Session Thursday 1 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (1/4) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (1/2) Friday 2 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (2/4) 10:15 ? 11:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (2/2) 11:15 ? 12:00 F. BEDESCHI / T. NAKADA Di...

  17. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 5 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (1/3) 10:15-12:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (3&4/4) Tuesday 6 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (2/3) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/3) 11:15-12:00 R. JACOBSEN / T. NAKADA Discussion Session Wednesday 7 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (3/3) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/3) 11:15-12:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (1/4) 14:00-16:00 C. BENVENUTI Basic Science, Society, and Technological Innovation (Council Chamber, bldg. 503) Thursday 8 August 09:15-10:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (2/4) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (3/3) 11:15-12:00 J. CARR / J. LESGOURDES Discussion Session Friday 9 August 09:15-11:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (3&4/4) 11:15-12:00 C. JARLSKOG Historic Lecture 14:00-16:00 Course Review Monday 12 August 09:15-12:00 Students Sessi...

  18. Lectures on Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Hsiang, Wu-Yi

    2017-01-01

    This volume consists of nine lectures on selected topics of Lie group theory. We provide the readers a concise introduction as well as a comprehensive 'tour of revisiting' the remarkable achievements of S Lie, W Killing, É Cartan and H Weyl on structural and classification theory of semi-simple Lie groups, Lie algebras and their representations; and also the wonderful duet of Cartans' theory on Lie groups and symmetric spaces.With the benefit of retrospective hindsight, mainly inspired by the outstanding contribution of H Weyl in the special case of compact connected Lie groups, we develop the above theory via a route quite different from the original methods engaged by most other books.We begin our revisiting with the compact theory which is much simpler than that of the general semi-simple Lie theory; mainly due to the well fittings between the Frobenius-Schur character theory and the maximal tori theorem of É Cartan together with Weyl's reduction (cf. Lectures 1-4). It is a wonderful reality of the Lie t...

  19. Lectures on Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis

    2007-01-01

    Beautifully illustrated and engagingly written, Lectures on Quantum Mechanics presents theoretical physics with a breathtaking array of examples and anecdotes. Basdevant's style is clear and stimulating, in the manner of a brisk classroom lecture that students can follow with ease and enjoyment. Here is a sample of the book's style, from the opening of Chapter 1: "If one were to ask a passer-by to quote a great formula of physics, chances are that the answer would be 'E = mc2'. Nevertheless, the formula 'E=hV' which was written in the same year 1905 by the same Albert Einstein, and which started quantum theory, concerns their daily life considerably more. In fact, of the three watershed years for physics toward the beginning of the 20th century - 1905: the Special Relativity of Einstein, Lorentz and Poincaré; 1915: the General Relativity of Einstein, with its extraordinary reflections on gravitation, space and time; and 1925: the full development of Quantum Mechanics - it is surely the last which has the mos...

  20. Review of the Accordia Lectures 2014–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Amicone

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Accordia is an independent research institute that operates in association with the UCL Institute of Archaeology and with the Institute of Classical Studies, the School of Advanced Study, and the University of London. It is dedicated to the promotion and co-ordination of research in all aspects of Italy, from the earliest settlements to the recent past. Accordia organises lectures, research seminars, conferences and exhibitions on aspects of Italian archaeology and history, and publishes a journal, 'Accordia Research Papers', as well as research publications including specialist volumes, conference papers and excavation reports. A subscription is charged for those who want the journal, but all Accordia events are free and open to the public (for more information see the Accordia website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/accordia/index.htm. The annual lecture series, now in its 27th year, is a regular feature of the academic calendar. Seven lectures take place between October and May, each held at either the UCL Institute of Archaeology or the Institute of Classical Studies (Senate House. The lecturers include both early career and established scholars, and their topics range widely across Italian archaeology, history and art history. The lectures are aimed at both Italian specialists and the general public. This paper offers a review of the 2014–2015 Accordia Lectures. The series was particularly interesting, and covered a wide range of topics related to the archaeology and history of Italy, from prehistoric settlements to the reception of the Etruscan world.

  1. Examine of Mobbing via Humour Styles of Lecturers at Schools of Physical Education and Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Recep; Sunay, Hakan; Yasar, Onur Mutlu

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the mobbing via humour of the lecturers at Schools of Physical Education and Sport. The sample of the study consisted of 470 lecturers dutied at those schools. In order to analyze the lecturers' perception levels about mobbing via humour behaviours, the "Scale of Humour Behaviours" was used. T-test and…

  2. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. The Lecture's Absent Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciullo, Nick J.

    2017-01-01

    According to the "Oxford English Dictionary" ("OED"), the noun "lecture" dates from the 14th century and means the "action of reading, perusal. Also, that which is read or perused." This definition, while accurate and resonates today in many college classrooms, ignores a key feature of any lecture. The…

  3. A Case Study Analysis of Clt Methods to Develop Grammar Competency for Academic Writing Purposes at Tertiary Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almodad Biduk Asmani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research project is to find out how effective grammar teaching and learning using the Principled CLT method can improve the ability of freshman Binus University students to understand and use grammar knowledge for academic writing purposes. The research project is expected to result in computer-animated format which can be used as one of the main tools in teaching and learning grammar at tertiary level. The research project applies the descriptive quantitative approach, and thus uses numeric data. The research project involves two subject groups, which are experimental and control. The two groups are pre-tested so as to find out their level of grammar competency by their academic writing works. The experimental group receives the treatment of grammar learning by using the Principled CLT approach, while the control group receives the standard CLT approach. Then, the two groups have the post-test, and the results are compared. Through statistics, the numerical data show that there is no significant difference between the two methods’ results, and as a result, either method has its own strength and weaknesses. If one is to be implemented, it must be linked to the specific goals and purposes that each entails.  

  4. Optimising Lecture Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst-Christensen, Bo

    interest in getting a degree, they prefer the educators to do the work for them. The focus of my experiments have therefore been to develop teaching techniques that ensures that the students study efficiently and at the same time moves the task of identifying which parts of the subjects that are giving...... the students problems from the educator to the students. By using techniques that put more weight on student participation, cooperation and preparation, I have been able to cut significantly down on the time used for lecturing, allowing more time for student work and reflection. As an example by getting...... the students to identify the parts of the subjects that need further explanation, I get the students to take ownership of the learning task and at the same time give me a more direct feedback. By creating teaching materials and exercises that can be used in a number of different ways, it is possible to involve...

  5. Lectures on algebraic statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Drton, Mathias; Sullivant, Seth

    2009-01-01

    How does an algebraic geometer studying secant varieties further the understanding of hypothesis tests in statistics? Why would a statistician working on factor analysis raise open problems about determinantal varieties? Connections of this type are at the heart of the new field of "algebraic statistics". In this field, mathematicians and statisticians come together to solve statistical inference problems using concepts from algebraic geometry as well as related computational and combinatorial techniques. The goal of these lectures is to introduce newcomers from the different camps to algebraic statistics. The introduction will be centered around the following three observations: many important statistical models correspond to algebraic or semi-algebraic sets of parameters; the geometry of these parameter spaces determines the behaviour of widely used statistical inference procedures; computational algebraic geometry can be used to study parameter spaces and other features of statistical models.

  6. Göttingen Lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Woyczyński, Wojbor A

    1998-01-01

    These lecture notes are woven around the subject of Burgers' turbulence/KPZ model of interface growth, a study of the nonlinear parabolic equation with random initial data. The analysis is conducted mostly in the space-time domain, with less attention paid to the frequency-domain picture. However, the bibliography contains a more complete information about other directions in the field which over the last decade enjoyed a vigorous expansion. The notes are addressed to a diverse audience, including mathematicians, statisticians, physicists, fluid dynamicists and engineers, and contain both rigorous and heuristic arguments. Because of the multidisciplinary audience, the notes also include a concise exposition of some classical topics in probability theory, such as Brownian motion, Wiener polynomial chaos, etc.

  7. Lectures on LHC physics

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson, the LHC experiments have closed the most important gap in our understanding of fundamental interactions, confirming that such interactions between elementary particles can be described by quantum field theory, more specifically by a renormalizable gauge theory. This theory is a priori valid for arbitrarily high energy scales and does not require an ultraviolet completion. Yet, when trying to apply the concrete knowledge of quantum field theory to actual LHC physics - in particular to the Higgs sector and certain regimes of QCD - one inevitably encounters an intricate maze of phenomenological know-how, common lore and other, often historically developed intuitions about what works and what doesn’t. These lectures cover three aspects to help understand LHC results in the Higgs sector and in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model: they discuss the many facets of Higgs physics, which is at the core of this significantly expanded second edition; then QCD, to the deg...

  8. Lectures on integral transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Akhiezer, N I

    1988-01-01

    This book, which grew out of lectures given over the course of several years at Kharkov University for students in the Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, is devoted to classical integral transforms, principally the Fourier transform, and their applications. The author develops the general theory of the Fourier transform for the space L^1(E_n) of integrable functions of n variables. His proof of the inversion theorem is based on the general Bochner theorem on integral transforms, a theorem having other applications within the subject area of the book. The author also covers Fourier-Plancherel theory in L^2(E_n). In addition to the general theory of integral transforms, connections are established with other areas of mathematical analysis--such as the theory of harmonic and analytic functions, the theory of orthogonal polynomials, and the moment problem--as well as to mathematical physics.

  9. Artsimovich memorial lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellat, R.

    2003-01-01

    After half a century of work, mastering on earth thermonuclear fusion to produce energy is becoming a realistic challenge: despite its scientific and technological complexity, considerable progress has been obtained without encountering insurmountable roadblocks. Such progress is due for a great part to all the pioneers, as Academician Lev Andreevich Artsimovich, who, with their talents and a visionary mind, internationally promoted the civil use of thermonuclear fusion, a source which could help to face the long term energy demand. To honour their faith and their investment in this challenge which would solve humankind energy needs on a millenary scale, I will try in this Artsimovich Memorial Lecture to: situate the fusion contribution in the future energy mix contemplated today ; survey the state of the art of fusion physics and technology fields, giving some examples; underline the next priority, to study a burning plasma, launching the construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as soon as possible

  10. Lectures on quantum information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruss, D.; Leuchs, G.

    2007-01-01

    Quantum Information Processing is a young and rapidly growing field of research at the intersection of physics, mathematics, and computer science. Its ultimate goal is to harness quantum physics to conceive - and ultimately build - 'quantum' computers that would dramatically overtake the capabilities of today's 'classical' computers. One example of the power of a quantum computer is its ability to efficiently find the prime factors of a large integer, thus shaking the supposedly secure foundations of standard encryption schemes. This comprehensive textbook on the rapidly advancing field introduces readers to the fundamental concepts of information theory and quantum entanglement, taking into account the current state of research and development. It thus covers all current concepts in quantum computing, both theoretical and experimental, before moving on to the latest implementations of quantum computing and communication protocols. With its series of exercises, this is ideal reading for students and lecturers in physics and informatics, as well as experimental and theoretical physicists, and physicists in industry. (orig.)

  11. The Investigation of Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Job Satisfactions with Burnout Level of Academıcıans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Taşlıyan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The key objective of this study is to ascertain if the emotional intelligence factors vary among some demographic characteristics through exposing the relationships between emotional intelligence factors and job satisfactions with burnout level. For this purpose, a research was conducted on total 291 academic staffs who work in various universities.This research was used a total of three scales were used for data collection. Measure emotional intelligence Chen (2004 and 2006 scale developed by EI12; to measure job satisfaction, D.J Weiss, R. V. Dawis, G.W England, L.H Lofquist developed by the Minnesota Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ-Short Form; to measure Maslach and Jackson burnout level (1981 developed by Maslach Burnou Inventory scale. Findings of the study revealed that there is a significant relationship between the subscales of emotional intelligence, job satisfactions and burnout. It was also determined that emotional intelligence factors vary among some demographic characteristics (gender, marital status and age.

  12. The interrupted learner: How distractions during live and video lectures influence learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zureick, Andrew H; Burk-Rafel, Jesse; Purkiss, Joel A; Hortsch, Michael

    2017-11-27

    New instructional technologies have been increasingly incorporated into the medical school learning environment, including lecture video recordings as a substitute for live lecture attendance. The literature presents varying conclusions regarding how this alternative experience impacts students' academic success. Previously, a multi-year study of the first-year medical histology component at the University of Michigan found that live lecture attendance was positively correlated with learning success, while lecture video use was negatively correlated. Here, three cohorts of first-year medical students (N = 439 respondents, 86.6% response rate) were surveyed in greater detail regarding lecture attendance and video usage, focusing on study behaviors that may influence histology learning outcomes. Students who reported always attending lectures or viewing lecture videos had higher average histology scores than students who employed an inconsistent strategy (i.e., mixing live attendance and video lectures). Several behaviors were negatively associated with histology performance. Students who engaged in "non-lecture activities" (e.g., social media use), students who reported being interrupted while watching the lecture video, or feeling sleepy/losing focus had lower scores than their counterparts not engaging in these behaviors. This study suggests that interruptions and distractions during medical learning activities-whether live or recorded-can have an important impact on learning outcomes. Anat Sci Educ 00: 000-000. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  13. Co-ordinated Classroom Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Darell Boyd

    From a series of lectures, a selection of eight are oriented principally toward the biologically developing child, and the physiological operations in visual process. The numbered lectures are--(1) The Coordinated Classroom, its Philosophy and Principles, (2) An Outline of a Biological Point of View, (3) The Evolution of Structure--despite man's…

  14. Three lectures on Newton's laws

    OpenAIRE

    Kokarev, Sergey S.

    2009-01-01

    Three small lectures are devoted to three Newton's laws, lying in the foundation of classical mechanics. These laws are analyzed from the viewpoint of our contemporary knowledge about space, time and physical interactions. The lectures were delivered for students of YarGU in RSEC "Logos".

  15. Social Media Interruption Affects the Acquisition of Visually, Not Aurally, Acquired Information during a Pathophysiology Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, Jane R.; Thakkar, Shivam C.; Suliman, Neveen; O'Neill, Shannon I.; Doubleday, Alison F.

    2018-01-01

    Poor academic performance from extensive social media usage appears to be due to students' inability to multitask between distractions and academic work. However, the degree to which visually distracted students can acquire lecture information presented aurally is unknown. This study examined the ability of students visually distracted by social…

  16. An Online Tutorial vs. Pre-Recorded Lecture for Reducing Incidents of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henslee, Amber M.; Goldsmith, Jacob; Stone, Nancy J.; Krueger, Merilee

    2015-01-01

    The current study compared an online academic integrity tutorial modified from Belter & du Pre (2009) to a pre-recorded online academic integrity lecture in reducing incidents of plagiarism among undergraduate students at a science and technology university. Participants were randomized to complete either the tutorial or the pre-recorded…

  17. Operationalizing Levels of Academic Mastery Based on Vygotsky's Theory: The Study of Mathematical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhnov, Peter; Kardanova, Elena; Vasilyeva, Marina; Ludlow, Larry

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested the possibility of operationalizing levels of knowledge acquisition based on Vygotsky's theory of cognitive growth. An assessment tool (SAM-Math) was developed to capture a hypothesized hierarchical structure of mathematical knowledge consisting of procedural, conceptual, and functional levels. In Study 1, SAM-Math was…

  18. Academic Procrastination of Undergraduates: Low Self-Efficacy to Self-Regulate Predicts Higher Levels of Procrastination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Robert M.; Krawchuk, Lindsey L.; Rajani, Sukaina

    2008-01-01

    This article reports two studies exploring the academic procrastination of 456 undergraduates. Study 1 explores the relationships among academic procrastination, self-regulation, academic self-efficacy, self-esteem, and self-efficacy for self-regulation. Results reveal that although other self-variables are related to procrastination,…

  19. Relationships among gender, cognitive style, academic major, and performance on the Piaget water-level task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, R E; Hoffer, N; King, W L

    1995-06-01

    Many researchers have found that more college-age adults than would be expected fail Piaget's water-level task, with women failing more frequently than men. It has been hypothesized that differences in cognitive style may account for performance differences on the water-level task. In the present study, 27 male and 27 female architectural students and 27 male and 27 female liberal-arts students were assessed for their performance on both Piaget's Water-level Task and Witkin's Group Embedded Figures Test. No difference was found in performance of male and female architectural students on either task, but male liberal-arts students scored significantly higher than female liberal-arts students on both measures. A disembedding cognitive style predicted success on the water-level task for the architectural students but not for the liberal arts students.

  20. Assessment of preclinical students’ academic motivation before and after a three-day academic affair program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Myo Nyein; Somboonwong, Juraiporn; Jaroonvanichkul, Vorapol; Wannakrairot, Pongsak

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical students’ motivation is an important driving factor for academic performance, and therefore medical teachers and educators are often highly interested in this topic. This study evaluated the impact of an academic affair program upon preclinical year medical students’ motivation to study. Design and methods An intervention study was conducted using a pretest-posttest study design. A total of 296 preclinical year medical students who had just passed their first year and were about to attend their second year at the Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, participated in the study. The intervention comprised of dialogues for personality development, pictorial expression in groups, as well as small group lectures delivered by senior students giving information on how to prepare for the forthcoming classes. Students’ academic motivation was measured before and after the intervention program, applying the transculturally translated Academic Motivation Scale (AMS). Cronbach’s alpha of Thai version AMS was 0.8992. The average scores in seven scales of AMS were compared between the pre- and posttest results, using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The differences were confirmed by using the multivariate analysis of variance. Results Students’ academic motivation increased after participation in the three-day academic program. There was also a significant increase in introjected extrinsic motivation, which can enhance the students’ self-esteem and feeling of self-worth (PAmotivation level declined significantly (P<0.001). The change of academic motivational constructs before and after the intervention was altogether significant (P=0.036, multivariate analysis of variance). Conclusion After experiencing a three-day intervention, the new students’ motivation advanced along the continuum of self-determination toward autonomous motivation. Therefore, it is considered to be worthwhile conducting an academic intervention to

  1. Emotional intelligence as a predictor of self-efficacy among students with different levels of academic achievement at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMENEH GHARETEPEH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: studies have indicated that emotional intelligence is positively related to self-efficacy and can predict the academic achievement. The present study aimed to investigate the role of emotional intelligence in identifying self-efficacy among the students of Public Health School with different levels of academic achievement. Methods: This correlational study was conducted on all the students of Public Health School. 129 students were included in the study through census method. Data were collected using Emotional Intelligence and self-efficacy questionnaires and analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression analysis by SPSS 14. Results: The average score of students with high academic achievement was higher in self-efficacy (39.78±5.82 and emotional intelligence (117.07±10.33 variables and their components than that of students with low academic achievement (39.17±5.91, 112.07±13.23. The overall emotional intelligence score to predict self-efficacy explanation was different among students with different levels of academic achievement (p<0.001. Self-efficacy structure was explained through self-awareness and self-motivation components in students with low academic achievement (r=0.571. In students with high academic achievement, self-awareness, selfmotivation and social consciousness played an effective role in explaining self-efficacy (r=0.677, p<0.001. Conclusion: Emotional intelligence and self-efficacy play an important role in achieving academic success and emotional intelligence can explain self-efficacy. Therefore, it is recommended to teach emotional intelligence skills to students with low academic achievement through training workshops.

  2. 2001 - 2002 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    1ST TERM 1ST OCTOBER - 23 NOVEMBER 2001 LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS The Autumn term of the Academic Training Programme is about to start. As usual, the first term includes lectures primarily dedicated to Post-graduate students. These are meant to help students complement the courses available from their home Universities with lectures on topics close to CERN activities. The lectures are nevertheless open to all CERN staff, and in particular to young Fellows. This year's series include courses on Accelerator Physics, on Field Theory, and on Symmetry Breaking Phenomena in Physics. The course on Accelerators by Dr. Wilson has been a regular feature on the Academic Training programme for many previous editions. This year, the course will be updated to include new sections on Colliders and on future facilities such as the Neutrino Factory. A good introduction to this very successful course can be found in the previous version of these lectures, available from the Web Lecture Archive Project: http://w...

  3. News Workshop: Getting the measure of space Conference: Respecting the evidence receives a great response Event: Communities meet to stimulate science in Wales Teachers: A day to polish up on A-level practicals Development: Exhilarating physics CPD day is a hit in London Lecture: The universe as a classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Workshop: Getting the measure of space Conference: Respecting the evidence receives a great response Event: Communities meet to stimulate science in Wales Teachers: A day to polish up on A-level practicals Development: Exhilarating physics CPD day is a hit in London Lecture: The universe as a classroom

  4. Academic Training: Small may be beautiful

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 13, 14, 15, 16 and 17 June 13, 14, 16, 17 June from 11:00 to 12:00, 15 June from 10:00 to 12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Small may be beautiful M. DAVIER / LAL, Orsay, France and T. SOLDNER / ILL, Grenoble, France M. DAVIER 13, 14, 15 June Besides the direct high-energy approach, particle physics frontiers can be explored by low-energy high-sensitivity experiments. These experiments, small on the scale of LHC detectors, can be very effective in reaching a sensitivity level why physics beyond the Standard Model can contribute. In these lectures we will discuss a subject of such experiments (excluding cold neutrons covered in T. Soldner's lectures), their interplay with theory and their impact on our knowledge of new phenomena : anormalous magnetic moments of leptons, weak-electromagnetic interference at low energy and in atomic physics, searches for an electron electric dipole moment in atomic and molecular physics. T. SOLDNER 15, 16, 17 June Neutron pa...

  5. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PEDAGOGICAL ASPECTS OF EDUCATIONAL MATERIAL PRESENTATION IN «PHYSICIST -12» TEXTBOOK FOR ACADEMIC LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiia V. Neporozhnia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Relevance of material presented in the article is stipulated by demand-driven creation of personality-oriented educational environment to the psychological and pedagogical aspects of content, methods and forms of education, individual and psychological characteristics of students age, use of hidden reserves of the psyche. The core element of the "educational environment" in the process of learning physics is a textbook. Systems approach, the principle of the integrity of the content of educational material, its sequential presentation, taking into account the basic principles of teaching learning and psychological age characteristics of students examined in the article, will enhance the effectiveness of learning, as described in textbooks, in particular, "Physics-12" (academic level.

  6. Research of Academic Motivation at the Stage of Forming a Threshold Level of Mastering Competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremicheva, Oksana Y.; Yudin, Vladimir V.; Sheptukhina, Inna I.; Zyryanova, Natalia I.; Shevchenko, Valery Y.; Komarova, Yuliya G.; Simonova, Marina V.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the researched problem is caused by the society requirement to form and implement educational and creative potential of a student as a conductor of changes that set a high level of motivational behavior. The aim of this article is to develop a structural model of motivational behavior of students that allow carrying out modeling…

  7. Entry-Level Placement Scores for the 1996-97 Academic Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padron, Eduardo J.

    This memorandum reviews the implementation of new, state-mandated placement criteria at Florida's Miami-Dade Community College (MDCC). The first section focuses on placement criteria for degree-seeking students, indicating that MDCC uses scores on the Florida College Entry-Level Placement Test for making placement decisions in reading, writing,…

  8. TEACHING MATHEMATICS USING LECTURE CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Audi, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Technology in highereducation is dramatically changing and continuously giving a challenging timefor educators and institutions to provide the same level of innovativecontents, environment and interaction to a digital native generation which iswell powered with technology. It has been well observed and recognized thatvideo lectures technology can have positive impacts on student learning andsatisfaction however research on Mathematics intensive subjects have yet to befully explored. This expl...

  9. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (6/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (1/3) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (1/3) Tuesday 23 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (7/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (2/3) Wednesday 24July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (8/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session 14:00 - 16:00 O. GROBNER UHV Technology Thursday 25 July (Theory Auditorium) 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) (TH) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (1/3) (TH) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (3/3) (TH) Friday 26 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00  R...

  10. John Adams Lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    13 December 2010 14:30 - Council Chamber, Bldg.503-1-001 Accelerator Breakthroughs, Achievements and Lessons from the Tevatron Collider V. Shiltsev / Fermilab’s Accelerator Physics Centre This year we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the first proton-antiproton collisions in the Tevatron. For two and a half decades the Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, IL, USA) was a centerpiece of the US and world’s High Energy Physics as the world’s highest energy particle collider at 1.8 TeV center of mass energy. While funding agencies are deciding on a 3-year extension of the Collider Run II operation through 2014, we – in this 2010 John Adams Lecture - will take a look in exciting story of the Tevatron: the story of long preparations, great expectations, numerous difficulties, years of “blood and sweat”, continuous upgrades, exceeding original goals (by a factor of 400) and high emotions. An accelerator scientist prospective will be given on a wide spectrum o...

  11. Power plants 2010. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The proceedings include the following lectures: Facing the challenges - new structures for electricity production. Renewable energies in Europe - chances and challenges. Nuclear outlook in the UK. Sustainable energy for Europe. Requirements of the market and the grid operator at the electricity production companies. Perspectives for the future energy production. Pumped storage plants - status and perspectives. Nuclear power/renewable energies -partners or opponents? New fossil fired power stations in Europe - status and perspectives. Nuclear energy: outlook for new build and lifetime extension in Europe. Biomass in the future European energy market - experiences for dong energy. Meeting the EU 20:20 renewable energy targets: the offshore challenges. DESERTEC: sustainable electricity for Europe, Middle East and North Africa. New power plants in Europe - a challenge for project and quality management. Consideration of safely in new build activities of power plants. Challenges to an integrated development in Maasvlakte, Netherlands. Power enhancement in EnBW power plants. Operational experiences of CCS pilot plants worldwide. Two years of operational experiences with Vattenfall's oxyfuel pilot plant. Pre-conditions for CCS. Storage technologies for a volatile generation. Overview: new generation of gas turbines.

  12. Lectures on general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Papapetrou, Achille

    1974-01-01

    This book is an elaboration of lecture notes for the graduate course on General Rela­ tivity given by the author at Boston University in the spring semester of 1972. It is an introduction to the subject only, as the time available for the course was limited. The author of an introduction to General Relativity is faced from the beginning with the difficult task of choosing which material to include. A general criterion as­ sisting in this choice is provided by the didactic character of the book: Those chapters have to be included in priority, which will be most useful to the reader in enabling him to understand the methods used in General Relativity, the results obtained so far and possibly the problems still to be solved. This criterion is not sufficient to ensure a unique choice. General Relativity has developed to such a degree, that it is impossible to include in an introductory textbook of a reasonable length even a very condensed treatment of all important problems which have been discussed unt...

  13. Lectures on quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanics represents the central revolution of modern natural science and reaches in its importance farely beyond physics. Neither chemistry nor biology on the molecular scale would be understandable without it. Modern information technology from the laptop over the mobile telephone and the flat screen until the supercomputer would be unthinkable without quantum-mechanical effects. It desribes the world on the atomic and subatomic scale and is by this the starting point of our modern worldview. The Nobel-prize carrier Steven Weinberg has done ever among others by his theory of the unification of the weak and the electromagnetic interaction one of the most important contributions to this revolution. In this book he reproduces his personal view of quantum mechanics, which captivates by its strictly logic construction, precise linguistic representation, and mathematical clearness and completeness. This book appeals to studyings of natural sciences, especially of physics. Accompanied is the test by exercise problems, which allow the studying to apply immediately the knowledge, but also test their understanding. Because of its precision and clearness ''Lectures on Quantum Mechanics'' by Weinberg is also essentially suited for the self-study.

  14. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 30 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN T. Nakada / CERN P. Wells / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) Violation of Particle Anti-particle Symmetry (3/3) LEP Physics (3/4) Tuesday 31 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN F. Dydak / CERN P. Wells / CERN P. Lebrun / CERN P. Lebrun / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) Neutrino Physics (1/4) LEP Physics (4/4) Superconducting Technology for particle accelerators (1/2) Superconducting Technology for particle accelerators (2/2) Wednesday 1 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN F. Dydak / CERN G. Guidice; P. Wells G. Guidice in main auditorium, P. Wells in TH auditorium) O. Grobner / CERN O. Grobner / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) Neutrino Physics (2/4) Discussion Session Ultra High Vacuum Technology (1/2) Ultra High Vacuum Technology (2/2) Thursday 2 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 F. Antinori / CERN F. Dydak / CERN J. Aysto / CERN Heavy Ions (1/2) Neutrino Physics (3/4) Isolde Physics O...

  15. Educational influences on student academic attainment: a multi-level analysis in the context of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Jahan, Monira

    2012-01-01

    Bangladesh has made significant progress in terms of improving student access and gender disparity at primary and secondary levels of education. Currently, the major concern is the quality of education. In the national interest, the government of Bangladesh has undertaken a number of intervention programmes to increase the quality of primary and secondary education. Recently, researchers and practitioners are more engaged in investigating the quality of education, particularly at primary and ...

  16. TA Mentorship in Lecture significantly enhances students' learning in mechanics in large introductory physics classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K.; Caglar, Mehmet

    2011-10-01

    Lab is an important component of students' learning in a traditional lecture-lab setting of introductory physics courses. Using standard mechanics concepts and baseline surveys as well as independent classroom observations, the effects of TA mentorship in Lecture on students' learning of physics concepts and problem-solving skills among different student subgroups taught by other TAs and lecturers using different level of student interactive engagement in classes have been analyzed. Our data indicate that in lecture training of TA promotes lecture/lab synergism in improvement students' learning of mechanics in large introductory physics classes.

  17. Social networking in Bangladesh: Boon or curse for academic engagement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouri Dey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The number of social networking services (SNSs users in Bangladesh is increasing at an accelerating rate. There are many who argue that SNS usage is destroying the students’ future by diminishing their academic engagement. The authors aim to investigate whether there is any relationship between students’ academic performance and their SNS usage. The study chose Facebook as a representative of SNSs because this is the most popular platform for online social connectivity and conducted a survey regarding the usage of Facebook among students of Business Administration from three private Bangladeshi private universities. The research results show that Facebook can be used for at least 21 academic tasks or goals and that these can be grouped into six major factors. Moreover, students opine that their online socializing does not reduce their study time, instead it helps them get the latest study related information, sharing courses, class schedules etc. After running a regression analysis, the authors conclude that the students’ level of engagement with the academic life through Facebook does not influence their academic results. The reason for this insignificant relation between academic results and academic engagement through SNSs may be due to the non-diversified course curriculum, the traditional way of delivering lectures and evaluating, limited study materials, non-receptiveness to technology-based learning etc. However, the authors propose to include SNSs as a study tool as it is a popular media and to conduct further research to better understand the effective way of using it in the education system.

  18. Frank and Fearless: Supporting Academic Career Progression for Women in an Australian Program

    OpenAIRE

    Polly Parker; Belinda Hewitt; Jennifer Witheriff; Amy Cooper

    2018-01-01

    The underrepresentation of women in senior positions continues to be a major challenge in higher education and most other industries. In Australia, the career trajectory for academic women stalls at a lower level than that of their male counterparts. Concern about this situation in one Australian university led to the design and delivery of a career progression program to support women’s advancement from senior lecturer to associate professor. This study details the main features of the progr...

  19. School Emphasis on Academic Success: Exploring Changes in Science Performance in Norway between 2007 and 2011 Employing Two-Level SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Trude; Gustafsson, Jan-Eric

    2014-01-01

    We study whether changes in school emphasis on academic success (SEAS) and safe schools (SAFE) may explain the increased science performance in Norway between TIMSS 2007 and 2011. Two-level structural equation modelling (SEM) of merged TIMSS data was used to investigate whether changes in levels of SEAS and SAFE mediate the changes in science…

  20. Does Remediation Work for All Students? How the Effects of Postsecondary Remedial and Developmental Courses Vary by Level of Academic Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatman, Angela; Long, Bridget Terry

    2018-01-01

    We examine the impact of remedial and developmental courses on college students with varying levels of academic preparedness, thus focusing on a wider range of students than previous studies. Using a regression discontinuity design, we provide causal estimates of the effects of placement in different levels of remedial courses on short-,…

  1. Recontextualising work into academic practices

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Globalisation and the related changes in social and economic practices have impacted strongly on teaching .... One aspect of work/academic curriculum interactions is that there is .... lecturers who were responsible for designing and teaching on the work ... were assessed on their ability to mimic the layout of a given news-.

  2. Professional development of international classroom lecturers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    and cultural backgrounds. The training of higher education teachers (lecturers) vary considerably from one country – or even higher education institution – to the other, and the overarching picture changes from mandatory to voluntary programmes to no programmes at all. Where they exist, they have different...... and weaknesses) and discuss their applicability in a wider context. Key words: Professional development; International classroom; English Medium Instruction, Opportunities and challenges Simon, Eszter & Gabriela Pleschová (eds).2013. Teacher Development in Higher Education. Existing Programs, Program Impact...... through a language other than their own first language to students who also learn through what for them is a second or third language. As part of a survey conducted by the IntlUni Erasmus Academic Network project in 2013, 38 Higher Education institutions in 27 countries were asked to which extent...

  3. Social Responsibility At The Academic Level. Study Case: The University Of Bucharest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Marinescu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades the corporate social responsibility (CSR has been a major subject both for universities, civil society and businesses. Although the CSR concept is especially promoted by large multinational and transnational corporations, it has become also a prominent issue for universities. Social responsibility represents more than a challenge for universities. It has to be a purpose of the universities, taking into account that young people formation also means creating a high level of awareness about the need to involve members of society in solving social problems. Our paper contributes for better clarifying the CSR concept and presents as a study case some of initiatives of the University of Bucharest related to the social responsibility.

  4. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN IDENTITY AND ACADEMIC MOTIVATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Rumi; Ozaki, Hitomi

    2015-08-01

    This study examined university students' academic motivation, focusing on individual differences in their sense of identity. The participants were 109 female Japanese students from two private universities (age range = 19-22 yr., M = 19.3, SD = 0.6). They completed four scales: the Multidimensional Ego Identity Scale, the Scale of Students' Attitude Toward Their Classes, the Academic Motivation Inventory, and the Scale of Lecture Self-Evaluation. Correlational analyses assessed the relationships between subscales. Then, path analysis was conducted to evaluate whether sense of identity affected attitude toward classes, academic motivation, and lecture self-evaluation. Differences particularly in psychosocial identity and self-identity accounted for significant variance in the students' attitudes toward classes, academic motivation, and lecture self-evaluation.

  5. Effect Of Accounting Lecturer Lecturer Commitment To The Development Of Professional Accounting Empirical Study Lecturer Accounting Faculty Of Economics University Of Muhammadiyah Tangerang 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endraria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of the study in which the researcher is interested in conducting research by taking the title The Effect of Commitment Against Lecturer - Lecturer in Accounting Accounting Profession Development Empirical Study of Accounting Lecturer Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang in 2013 . This research was conducted at the Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang is located at Independence Pioneer Road I No.33 Cikokol Tangerang City. The experiment was conducted at the research site easily accessible for the author. The method used in this research is descriptive quantitative methods which aim to describe the descriptive method of data distribution of each variable.There are significant accounting lecturers commitment to the development of the accounting profession Empirical Study of Accounting Lecturer Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang in 2013 this is evidenced by the results of hypothesis testing that has been done obtained tcount ttable value 5.7193 and with a significance level of 5 and df n - 2 40-2 38 is equal to 1.686 with the statement concluded that t count t table. Thus Ha Ho accepted and rejected. The conclusion was that there are significant accounting lecturers commitment to the development of the accounting profession Empirical Study of Accounting Lecturer Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang in 2013. As for advice to be conveyed in this study is the government as a regulator should be able to evaluate the development of the accounting profession especially in Indonesia with the influence of commitment accounting lecturers are expected to improve and develop the accounting profession especially in the Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang.

  6. Assessment of preclinical students' academic motivation before and after a three-day academic affair program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Myo Nyein; Somboonwong, Juraiporn; Jaroonvanichkul, Vorapol; Wannakrairot, Pongsak

    2015-01-01

    Medical students' motivation is an important driving factor for academic performance, and therefore medical teachers and educators are often highly interested in this topic. This study evaluated the impact of an academic affair program upon preclinical year medical students' motivation to study. An intervention study was conducted using a pretest-posttest study design. A total of 296 preclinical year medical students who had just passed their first year and were about to attend their second year at the Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, participated in the study. The intervention comprised of dialogues for personality development, pictorial expression in groups, as well as small group lectures delivered by senior students giving information on how to prepare for the forthcoming classes. Students' academic motivation was measured before and after the intervention program, applying the transculturally translated Academic Motivation Scale (AMS). Cronbach's alpha of Thai version AMS was 0.8992. The average scores in seven scales of AMS were compared between the pre- and posttest results, using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The differences were confirmed by using the multivariate analysis of variance. Students' academic motivation increased after participation in the three-day academic program. There was also a significant increase in introjected extrinsic motivation, which can enhance the students' self-esteem and feeling of self-worth (Pmotivation toward accomplishment increased significantly (Pacademic milestones, and a step ahead of autonomous motivation. Amotivation level declined significantly (Pacademic motivational constructs before and after the intervention was altogether significant (P=0.036, multivariate analysis of variance). After experiencing a three-day intervention, the new students' motivation advanced along the continuum of self-determination toward autonomous motivation. Therefore, it is considered to be worthwhile

  7. EXPLORING THE TERTIARY EFL STUDENTS' ACADEMIC WRITING COMPETENCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aunurrahman Aunurrahman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For tertiary English as a Foreign Language (EFL students, academic writing is not an easy task. It requires knowledge of the academic writing genres with their particular linguistic features. Moreover, academic writing demands good critical thinking. This research aims to explore the students' academic writing competencies that also focus on critical thinking. The research involved thirty-six first-year tertiary EFL students from a regular class of a private university in Pontianak, West Kalimantan, Indonesia. The source for data collection was the students’ texts. Three texts were selected and the students were categorized into low, medium, and high levels of writing achievement. The text analysis utilized functional grammar rooted in systemic functional linguistics (Emilia, 2014. The analysis shows that the students, regardless of their levels of writing achievement, have little control over the schematic structure and linguistic features of an argumentative writing. The text analysis also shows that the students’ texts have some limitations as regards their critical thinking capacity. Still, a few examples of academic language were detected in the texts. The findings suggest that the lecturer should incorporate explicit teaching and cooperative learning activities to alleviate the students' difficulties and develop their academic writing and critical thinking capacity.

  8. The Relationship between Job Variables of Life Satisfaction and Marital Satisfaction of Lecturers

    OpenAIRE

    Metehan ÇELİK; Songül TÜMKAYA

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the job variables of life satisfaction and marital satisfaction of lecturers. It is descriptive study comparing the marital satisfaction and life satisfaction in terms of gender, academic status, working year and working hours. The sample of the study consisted of voluntary and married 119 lecturers (40 female, 79 male). Data collection instruments were Marital Adjustment Scale and Life Satisfaction Scale. In terms of gender va...

  9. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    15, 16, 17 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Council room, bldg. 503 on 15 May, Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 16 and 17 May Introduction to free electron lasers by R.P. Walker / Rutherford Laboratory, UK The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise the...

  10. Academic Training: QCD: are we ready for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 4, 5, 6, 7 December, from 11:00 to 12:00 4, 5, 6 December - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, 7 December - TH Auditorium, bldg. 4 - 3-006 QCD: are we ready for the LHC S. FRIXIONE / INFN, Genoa, Italy The LHC energy regime poses a serious challenge to our capability of predicting QCD reactions to the level of accuracy necessary for a successful programme of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. In these lectures, I'll introduce basic concepts in QCD, and present techniques based on perturbation theory, such as fixed-order and resummed computations, and Monte Carlo simulations. I'll discuss applications of these techniques to hadron-hadron processes, concentrating on recent trends in perturbative QCD aimed at improving our understanding of LHC phenomenology.

  11. General Education Teachers' Ratings of the Academic Engagement Level of Students Who Read Braille: A Comparison with Sighted Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, Julie A.; Lewis, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    English and language arts teachers of braille-reading students in general education classes rated these students' academic engagement and the academic achievement of low- and average-achieving sighted students in the same classrooms. The braille readers were found to be statistically similar to the low-achieving students with regard to effort,…

  12. Power plants 2009. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Within the Annual Conference 2009 of the VGB PowerTech e.V. (Essen, Federal Republic of Germany) from 23rd to 25th May, 2009, in Lyon (France) the following lectures were held: (1) Electricity demand, consequences of the financial and economic crisis - Current overview 2020 for the EU-27 (Hans ten Berge); (2) Status and perspectives of the electricity generation mix in France (Bernard Dupraz); (3) European electricity grid - status and perspective (Dominique Maillard); (4) Technologies and acceptance in the European energy market (Gordon MacKerran); (5) EPR construction in Finland, China, France, (Claude Jaouen); (6) EPR Flamanville 3: A project on the path towards nuclear revival (Jacques Alary); (7) Worldwide nuclear Revival and acceptance (Luc Geraets); (8) An overview on the status of final disposal of radioactive wastes worldwide (Piet Zuidema); (9) Who needs pumped storage plants? PSP are partner to grid stability and renewable energies (Hans-Christoph Funke); (10) Sustainable use of water resources to generate electricity safely and efficiently (Patrick Tourasse); (11) The growth strategy of RWE Innogy - Role of RES in RWE strategy (Fritz Vahrenholt); (12) Solar technologies towards grid parity - key factors and timeframe (G. Gigliucci); (13) Overview on CCS technologies and results of Vattenfalls oxyfuel pilot plant (Philippe Paelinck); (14) Development perspectives of lignite-based IGCC-plants with CCS (Dietmar Keller); (15) Post combustion capture plants - concept and plant integration (Wolfgang Schreier); (16) CCS fossil power generation in a carbon constraint world (Daniel Hofmann); (17) CEZ group strategy in Central and South Eastern Europe (Jan Zizka); (18) Strategy and projects of DONG Energy (Jens Erik Pedersen); (19) E.ON coal-based power generation of the future - The highly efficient power plant and downstream separation of carbon dioxide (Gerhard Seibel); (20) Final sage of first supercritical 460 MW e l. CFB Boiler construction - firs

  13. Dynamic e-learning modules for student lecture preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy McIntyre

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed and demonstrated the effectiveness of a set of online interactive learning modules to accompany physics courses at first- and second-year university levels. Students access the modules prior to attending lectures to familiarize themselves with content which is then discussed and reaffirmed in class. Student surveys and access data show that students were much more likely to use material presented in this form, rather than a textbook, when preparing for lectures given in an active learning format. The students found that interactive simulations, videos of problem-solving approaches prepared by course staff, and quick-check immediate feedback questions were all useful tools for lecture preparation–none of which are available when using a traditional textbook for lecture preparation.

  14. Academic Training: Einstein and beyond: Introduction to General relativity

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Einstein and beyond: Introduction to General relativity by N. Straumann / Institut fur theoretische physics, Univ. Zürich We review the enduring achievements of Einstein's papers of 1905 and their impact on the further developments in physics. Program : Lectures I and II:Einstein's Contributions to Statistical Mechanics and Quantum Theory Lecture III:Einstein's Thesis at the University of Zürich Lecture IV: From Special to General Relativity Lecture V: The History and the Mystery of the Cosmological Constant ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  15. Effect of lecture instruction on student performance on qualitative questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Paula R. L.

    2015-06-01

    The impact of lecture instruction on student conceptual understanding in physics has been the subject of research for several decades. Most studies have reported disappointingly small improvements in student performance on conceptual questions despite direct instruction on the relevant topics. These results have spurred a number of attempts to improve learning in physics courses through new curricula and instructional techniques. This paper contributes to the research base through a retrospective analysis of 20 randomly selected qualitative questions on topics in kinematics, dynamics, electrostatics, waves, and physical optics that have been given in introductory calculus-based physics at the University of Washington over a period of 15 years. In some classes, questions were administered after relevant lecture instruction had been completed; in others, it had yet to begin. Simple statistical tests indicate that the average performance of the "after lecture" classes was significantly better than that of the "before lecture" classes for 11 questions, significantly worse for two questions, and indistinguishable for the remaining seven. However, the classes had not been randomly assigned to be tested before or after lecture instruction. Multiple linear regression was therefore conducted with variables (such as class size) that could plausibly lead to systematic differences in performance and thus obscure (or artificially enhance) the effect of lecture instruction. The regression models support the results of the simple tests for all but four questions. In those cases, the effect of lecture instruction was reduced to a nonsignificant level, or increased to a significant, negative level when other variables were considered. Thus the results provide robust evidence that instruction in lecture can increase student ability to give correct answers to conceptual questions but does not necessarily do so; in some cases it can even lead to a decrease.

  16. Academic Training: Gravitational Waves Astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 16, 17, 18 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Gravitational Waves Astronomy M. LANDRY, LIGO Hanford Observatory, Richland, USA Gravitational wave astronomy is expected to become an observational field within the next decade. First direct detection of gravitational waves is possible with existing terrestrial-based detectors, and highly probable with proposed upgrades. In this three-part lecture series, we give an overview of the field, including material on gravitional wave sources, detection methods, some details of interferometric detectors, data analysis methods, and current results from observational data-taking runs of the LIGO and GEO projects. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www...

  17. Effect of peer nominations of teacher-student support at individual and classroom levels on social and academic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jan N; Im, Myung Hee; Wehrly, Sarah E

    2014-06-01

    This longitudinal study examined the prospective relations between 713 elementary students' individual peer teacher support reputation (PTSR) and a measure of the classroom-wide dispersion of peer nominations of teacher support (Centralization of Teacher Support) on students' peer relatedness (i.e., peer acceptance and peer academic reputation) and academic motivation (i.e., academic self-efficacy and teacher-rated behavioral engagement). PTSR was measured as the proportion of classmates who nominated a given student on a descriptor of teacher-student support. Centralization of Teacher Support was assessed using social network analysis to identify the degree to which peer nominations of teacher support in a classroom centered on a few students. PTSR predicted changes in all student outcomes, above academic achievement and relevant covariates. Centralization of Teacher Support predicted changes in students' peer academic reputation, net the effect of PTSR and covariates. Students' academic achievement moderated effects of PTSR and Centralization of Teacher Support on some outcomes. Findings highlight the importance of peers' perceptions of teacher support and of the structure of those perceptions for children's social and academic outcomes. Implications for practice are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of preclinical students’ academic motivation before and after a three-day academic affair program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung MN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Myo Nyein Aung,1 Juraiporn Somboonwong,2 Vorapol Jaroonvanichkul,1 Pongsak Wannakrairot3 1Medical Education Unit, 2Quality Management Division and Department of Physiology, 3Academic Affairs Division, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, ThailandBackground: Medical students’ motivation is an important driving factor for academic performance, and therefore medical teachers and educators are often highly interested in this topic. This study evaluated the impact of an academic affair program upon preclinical year medical students’ motivation to study.Design and methods: An intervention study was conducted using a pretest-posttest study design. A total of 296 preclinical year medical students who had just passed their first year and were about to attend their second year at the Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, participated in the study. The intervention comprised of dialogues for personality development, pictorial expression in groups, as well as small group lectures delivered by senior students giving information on how to prepare for the forthcoming classes. Students’ academic motivation was measured before and after the intervention program, applying the transculturally translated Academic Motivation Scale (AMS. Cronbach’s alpha of Thai version AMS was 0.8992. The average scores in seven scales of AMS were compared between the pre- and posttest results, using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The differences were confirmed by using the multivariate analysis of variance.Results: Students’ academic motivation increased after participation in the three-day academic program. There was also a significant increase in introjected extrinsic motivation, which can enhance the students’ self-esteem and feeling of self-worth (P<0.001. Moreover, intrinsic motivation toward accomplishment increased significantly (P<0.001. This is related to the enjoyment of passing academic milestones, and a step

  19. Bioethics and academic freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The author describes the events surrounding his attempts to lecture on the subject of euthanasia in West Germany in June 1989. Singer, who defends the view that active euthanasia for some newborns with handicaps may be ethically permissible, had been invited to speak to professional and academic groups. Strong public protests against Singer and his topic led to the cancellation of some of his engagements, disruptions during others, and harrassment of the German academics who had invited him to speak. These incidents and the subject of euthanasia became matters of intense national debate in West Germany, but there was little public or academic support for Singer's right to be heard. Singer argues that bioethics and bioethicists must have the freedom to challenge conventional moral beliefs, and that the events in West Germany illustrate the grave danger to that freedom from religious and political intolerance.

  20. Use of social media platforms for improving academic performance at Further Education and Training colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godwin P. Dzvapatsva

    2014-11-01

    Objectives: The aim of the project was to investigate the use of: (1 a knowledge portal for verifying the quality of assessments by lecturers and (2 social media to increase contact time with FET college students in an attempt to improve their academic performance. Method: The NC(V level 3 student test scores for 2011 were compared to those of 2012. In addition to the test scores, students also received a questionnaire so as to determine their perceptions on social media usage. Lecturers also received a questionnaire on their perception of the knowledge portal. Results: The data collected from seven lecturers and 38 students indicated a 35% (from 30% – 65% improvement in academic performance after the introduction of the interventions, that is social media and a knowledge portal; an indication of the importance of electronic media in enhancing learning. Conclusion: The research offered FET lecturers an additional method for learning and teaching in that they could use the knowledge portal to set up quality assessments for the students and social media to increase contact learning time.

  1. The Relationship of Level of Positive Mental Health with Current Mental Disorders in Predicting Suicidal Behavior and Academic Impairment in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Corey L. M.; Eisenberg, Daniel; Perry, Geraldine S.; Dube, Shanta R.; Kroenke, Kurt; Dhingra, Satvinder S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether level of positive mental health complements mental illness in predicting students at risk for suicidal behavior and impaired academic performance. Participants: A sample of 5,689 college students participated in the 2007 Healthy Minds Study and completed an Internet survey that included the Mental Health…

  2. The Relationship between Medical Students' Cognitive Method of Thinking, Their Sex Their Academic Level and the Degree of Their Creative Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qutami, Nayfeh

    2005-01-01

    The sample of the study consisted of all the students in the Faculty of Medicine. The study was conducted using 290 students. The performance of 279 students of the total were analyzed. 141 were males and 135 were females. The results showed an influence in the interaction of different variables such as sex, academic level, and the cognitive…

  3. The Investigation of the Relationship between the Level of Metacognitive Awareness, Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Academic Achievement of Preschool Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagal, Asude Balaban; Bayindir, Dilan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine the relationship between the level of metacognitive awareness, self-directed learning readiness and academic achievement of preschool teacher candidates. The study group of the research, which was designed in survey method, included 151 teacher candidates from Atatürk Education Faculty, Preschool Teaching…

  4. Investigating University Students' Attitudes towards Physics Lesson, Their Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Burnout Levels for the Prediction of Their Academic Success in Physics Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capri, Burhan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out whether university students' attitudes towards physics lesson, their self-efficacy beliefs and burnout levels predict their academic success in physics lessons. The research group consists of 641 university students of which 307 are girls (47.1%) and 334 boys (52.9%). The research data were collected using…

  5. How Does the Science Writing Heuristic Approach Affect Students' Performances of Different Academic Achievement Levels? A Case for High School Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingir, Sevgi; Geban, Omer; Gunel, Murat

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH), known as an argumentation-based science inquiry approach, on Grade 9 students' performance on a post-test in relation to their academic achievement levels. Four intact classes taught by 2 chemistry teachers from a Turkish public high school were selected for the study; one…

  6. The Role of School Culture and Basic Psychological Needs on Iranian Adolescents' Academic Alienation: A Multi-Level Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Hojjat; Brown, Monica R.; Amani Saribagloo, Javad; Dadashzadeh, Shiva

    2018-01-01

    This aim of this current research was a multi-level analysis of the relationship between school culture, basic psychological needs, and adolescents' academic alienation. One thousand twenty-nine (N = 1,029) high school students from Qom City were randomly selected through a multi-phase cluster sampling method and answered questions regarding…

  7. A Path Analysis of Basic Need Support, Self-Efficacy, Achievement Goals, Life Satisfaction and Academic Achievement Level among Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseth, Age; Danielsen, Anne G.; Samdal, Oddrun

    2012-01-01

    Teachers' support of basic psychological needs, self-efficacy, achievement goals, life satisfaction and academic achievement level was measured in a sample of 240 secondary school students (8th and 10th grades). Correlation analysis showed significant positive relations between all of the variables, except for the relation between need support of…

  8. Relationship between blood manganese levels and children's attention, cognition, behavior, and academic performance--a nationwide cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhang, Soo-Young; Cho, Soo-Churl; Kim, Jae-Won; Hong, Yun-Chul; Shin, Min-Sup; Yoo, Hee Jeong; Cho, In Hee; Kim, Yeni; Kim, Bung-Nyun

    2013-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is neurotoxic at high concentrations. However, Mn is an essential element that can protect against oxidative damage; thus, extremely low levels of Mn might be harmful. Our aim was to examine whether either high or low environmental Mn exposure is related to academic and attention function development among school-aged children. This cross-sectional study included 1089 children 8-11 years of age living in five representative areas in South Korea. Blood Mn, blood lead, and urine cotinine were measured. We assessed IQ with the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence; attention with a computerized continuous performance test called the Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Diagnostic System (ADS), the Korean version of the Stroop Color-Word Test, the Children's Color Trails Test (CCTT), and the ADHD Rating Scale; academic functions with the Learning Disability Evaluation Scale (LDES); and emotional and behavioral problems with the Korean version of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). We further assessed the presence of ADHD using a highly structured diagnostic interview, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version IV (DISC-IV). The median blood concentration of Mn was 14.14 µg/L. We observed a nonlinear association between the CCTT2 completion time and the CPT commission error (F=3.14, p=0.03 and F=4.05, p=0.01, respectively). We divided the data into three groups: lower (21.453 µg/L) and middle 90th percentile to determine whether a lack or overload of Mn could cause adverse effects. After adjusting for urine cotinine, blood lead, children's IQ, and other potential confounders, the high Mn group showed lower scores in thinking (B=-0.83, p=0.006), reading (B=-0.93, p=0.004), calculations (B=-0.72, p=0.005), and LQ (B=-4.06, p=0.006) in the LDES and a higher commission error in the CPT (B=8.02, p=0.048). The low Mn group showed lower color scores in the Stroop test (B=-3.24, p=0.040). We found that excess Mn in children is

  9. Use of search engines for academic activities by the academic staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research was designed to investigate the Internet Search Engine use behaviour and experiences of lecturers at the University of Jos, using the academics of the Faculty of Natural Sciences in the University as a focal population. The entire population of 148 academic staff members in the Faculty was adopted for the ...

  10. University Teachers' Experiences of Academic Leadership and Their Approaches to Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, Paul; Prosser, Michael; Trigwell, Keith; Martin, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    The study examined associations between university teachers' experiences of academic leadership, their perceptions of a specific academic context and their approaches to teaching in a particular subject that was taught in that context. The sample consisted of 439 lecturers in Australian universities in four fields of study. Lecturers completed…

  11. Instruction and Interaction in an American Lecture Class. Observations from a Corpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Pérez-Llantada

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Taking the Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English, this paper explores the pragmatic behavior of one-word tags – a common feature in conversational English – in academic speech. The analysis indicates that university professors use tags within textual metadiscourse patterns to signpost their audiences and facilitate comprehension. In addition, tags correlate with interpersonal metadiscourse elements typical of conversation that help lecturers adopt stances, convey solidarity and socialize with their undergraduates. The conclusion section relates the interpersonal semiotics of lectures to the communicative goals of university talk and suggests the need to approach listening comprehension through students’ awareness of genres as social actions.

  12. LAST CHANCE TO HELP PLAN FOR THE 2001-02 LECTURE SERIES

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Please note that you still have the chance to give your contribution to improved planning for next year's Academic Training Lectures Series. At the web site: http://wwwinfo/support/survey/academic-training/ you will find questionnaires concerning the following different categories: high energy physics, applied physics, science and society and post-graduate students lectures. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at CERN bookshop.

  13. Approaches to learning as predictors of academic achievement: Results from a large scale, multi-level analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Kim Jesper; McCune, Velda; Bager-Elsborg, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The relationships between university students’ academic achievement and their approaches to learning and studying continuously attract scholarly attention. We report the results of an analysis in which multilevel linear modelling was used to analyse data from 3,626 Danish university students....... Controlling for the effects of age, gender, and progression, we found that the students’ end-of-semester grade point averages were related negatively to a surface approach and positively to organised effort. Interestingly, the effect of the surface approach on academic achievement varied across programmes....... While there has been considerable interest in the ways in which academic programmes shape learning and teaching, the effects of these contexts on the relationship between approaches to learning and academic outcomes is under-researched. The results are discussed in relation to findings from recent meta...

  14. Lectures on strings and dualities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vafa, C.

    1997-01-01

    In this set of lectures I review recent developments in string theory emphasizing their non-perturbative aspects and their recently discovered duality symmetries. The goal of the lectures is to make the recent exciting developments in string theory accessible to those with no previous background in string theory who wish to join the research effort in this area. Topics covered include a brief review of string theory, its compactifications, solitons and D-branes, black hole entropy and wed of string dualities. (author)

  15. Combined Effect of Levels in Personal Self-Regulation and Regulatory Teaching on Meta-Cognitive, on Meta-Motivational, and on Academic Achievement Variables in Undergraduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Jesús; Sander, Paul; Martínez-Vicente, José M; Vera, Mariano; Garzón, Angélica; Fadda, Salvattore

    2017-01-01

    The Theory of Self- vs . Externally-Regulated Learning™ (SRL vs. ERL) proposed different types of relationships among levels of variables in Personal Self-Regulation (PSR) and Regulatory Teaching (RT) to predict the meta-cognitive, meta-motivational and -emotional variables of learning, and of Academic Achievement in Higher Education. The aim of this investigation was empirical in order to validate the model of the combined effect of low-medium-high levels in PSR and RT on the dependent variables. For the analysis of combinations, a selected sample of 544 undergraduate students from two Spanish universities was used. Data collection was obtained from validated instruments, in Spanish versions. Using an ex-post-facto design, different Univariate and Multivariate Analyses (3 × 1, 3 × 3, and 4 × 1) were conducted. Results provide evidence for a consistent effect of low-medium-high levels of PSR and of RT, thus giving significant partial confirmation of the proposed rational model. As predicted, (1) the levels of PSR and positively and significantly effected the levels of learning approaches, resilience, engagement, academic confidence, test anxiety, and procedural and attitudinal academic achievement; (2) the most favorable type of interaction was a high level of PSR with a high level RT process. The limitations and implications of these results in the design of effective teaching are analyzed, to improve university teaching-learning processes.

  16. Embedding a Virtual Patient Simulator in an Interactive Surgical lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Robert; Plum, Patrick; Heiermann, Nadine; Wahba, Roger; Chang, De-Huan; Hölscher, Arnulf H; Stippel, Dirk L

    2016-01-01

    Lectures are traditionally used for teaching declarative knowledge. One established tool for clinical education is the demonstration of a real patient. The use of real patients in the daily clinical environment is increasingly difficult. The use of a virtual patient simulator (VPS) can potentially circumvent these problems. Unlimited availability and the opportunity of an electronic feedback system could possibly enrich traditional lectures by enabling more interactivity that meets the expectations of the current student generation. As students face the consequences of their own decisions they take a more active role in the lecture. VPS links declarative knowledge with visual perception that is known to influence students' motivation. Until now, there have been no reports covering the usage and validation of interactive VPS for supporting traditional lectures. In this study, we (1) described the development of a custom-made three-dimensional (3D) VPS for supporting the traditional lecture and (2) performed a feasibility study including an initial assessment of this novel educational concept. Conceptualization included definition of curricular content, technical realization and validation. A custom-made simulator was validated with 68 students. The degree of student acceptance was evaluated. Furthermore, the effect on knowledge gain was determined by testing prelecture and postlecture performance. A custom-made simulator prototype that displays a 3D virtual clinic environment was developed and linked to a PowerPoint presentation. Students were able to connect to the simulator via electronic devices (smartphones and tablets) and to control the simulator via majority vote. The simulator was used in 6 lectures and validated in 2 lectures with 68 students each. Student acceptance and their opinion about effectiveness and applicability were determined. Students showed a high level of motivation when using the simulator as most of them had fun using it. Effect on

  17. Academic Training: 2003 - 2004 Academic Training Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch 3rd Term - 5 April to 2nd July 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 April Complex Systems, Chaos and Measurements by P. Collet / Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France 26, 27, 28, 29 April The Theory of Heavy Ion Collisions by U. Wiedemann / CERN-PH/TH 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 May Particle Identification at the LHC by D. Fournier / LAL, Orsay, France 1, 2, 3, 4 June Neural Systems, Genetic Algorithms by V. Robles Forcada and M. Perez Hernandez / Univ. Politecnica de Madrid E. 7, 8, 9, June Real Time Process Control by T. Riesco / CERN-TS 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 June The Cosmic Microwave Background by M. Zaldarriaga / Harvard University, USA 21, 22, 23, June Fixed Target Physics at CERN : Results and Prospects by J. Engelen / CERN-DG 28, 29, 30 June, 1, 2, July Search for Dark Matter by B. Sadoulet / Univ. of California, Berkeley, USA The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstrac...

  18. Lectures on fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Shinbrot, Marvin

    2012-01-01

    Readable and user-friendly, this high-level introduction explores the derivation of the equations of fluid motion from statistical mechanics, classical theory, and a portion of the modern mathematical theory of viscous, incompressible fluids. 1973 edition.

  19. Academic training: QCD: are we ready for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 4, 5, 6, 7 December, from 11:00 to 12:00 4, 5, 6 December - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, 7 December - TH Auditorium, bldg. 4 - 3-006 QCD: are we ready for the LHC S. FRIXIONE / INFN, Genoa, Italy The LHC energy regime poses a serious challenge to our capability of predicting QCD reactions to the level of accuracy necessary for a successful programme of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. In these lectures, I'll introduce basic concepts in QCD, and present techniques based on perturbation theory, such as fixed-order and resummed computations, and Monte Carlo simulations. I'll discuss applications of these techniques to hadron-hadron processes, concentrating on recent trends in perturbative QCD aimed at improving our understanding of LHC phenomenology. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply ...

  20. Academic Training: The World of Quantum Matter

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 23, 24, 25, 26 January 2006 from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 The World of Quantum Matter M. WEIDEMUELLER / Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg In my lecture series, I will present the recent spectacular advances in the field of quantum gases and macroscopic quantum physics. A variety of subjects will be covered including Bose condensates and degenerate Fermi gases, ultracold molecules and chemistry near absolute zero, Rydberg gases, single-atom manipulation, quantum information processing, as well as applications of cold atoms as precision targets. The topics of the lectures are: Physics near absolute zero Bose condensation and Fermi degeneracy Molecules, Rydberg gases and other exotic species Single-atom manipulation, quantum information processing and ultracold atoms as targets in storage rings. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the f...

  1. Lecture notes on ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedbloed, J.P.

    1983-03-01

    Notes, prepared for a course of lectures held at the Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Brazil (June-August 1978). An extensive theoretical treatment of the behaviour of hot plasmas caught in equations and mathematical models is presented in 12 chapters

  2. The 1978 Macmillan Education Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shirley

    1978-01-01

    This is the text of the lecture of the British Secretary of State for Education and Science given at the 1978 Meeting of the Association for Science Education (ASE). Three themes are presented; (1) British innovative science curricula; (2) relationship between science and technology; and (3) science for non-scientist. (HM)

  3. Introduction lecture to magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, J.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture deals with all that is common either to electron paramagnetic resonance (E.P.R.) or to nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.). It will present, in an as elementary form as possible, the main concepts used in magnetic resonance emphasizing some aspects, specific for interface science. (orig./BHO)

  4. Lecture I. Introduction to charm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Lectures are given on some manifestations of charm and some characteristics of the charmed particle. Various points of view in a cultural orientation, leptons, reasons for a belief in quarks, gauge theories of weak and electromagnetic and strong interactions, and lastly the viewpoint that there is not a systhesis at hand, but instead chaos are treated. 6 references

  5. Koshiba, Tanaka give Nobel lectures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Masatoshi Kosiba and Koichi Tanaka presented lectures in English on Sunday, touching on topics ranging from particle physics, to teamwork to commemorate their reception of this year's Nobel Prize for Physics and Chemistry. The two will receive their respective prizes in an awards ceremony scheduled for Tuesday (1 page).

  6. Lectures on algebraic model theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hart, Bradd

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, model theory has had remarkable success in solving important problems as well as in shedding new light on our understanding of them. The three lectures collected here present recent developments in three such areas: Anand Pillay on differential fields, Patrick Speissegger on o-minimality and Matthias Clasen and Matthew Valeriote on tame congruence theory.

  7. The Oskar Klein memorial lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Bergström, Lars

    1991-01-01

    This is an invaluable collection of colloquium-type lectures given by some of the most prominent theoretical physicists of today. In a form accessible to the interested general physicist, it covers topics ranging from the use of field-theoretical methods in different contexts via duality symmetries between various field theories, to the Ads/CFT correspondence and cosmology.

  8. Lectures on cosmic topological defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vachaspati, T [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Colaba, Mumbai (India) and Physics Department, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (United States)

    2001-11-15

    These lectures review certain topological defects and aspects of their cosmology. Unconventional material includes brief descriptions of electroweak defects, the structure of domain walls in non-Abelian theories, and the spectrum of magnetic monopoles in SU(5) Grand Unified theory. (author)

  9. Bayesian Data Analysis (lecture 2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    framework but we will also go into more detail and discuss for example the role of the prior. The second part of the lecture will cover further examples and applications that heavily rely on the bayesian approach, as well as some computational tools needed to perform a bayesian analysis.

  10. Bayesian Data Analysis (lecture 1)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    framework but we will also go into more detail and discuss for example the role of the prior. The second part of the lecture will cover further examples and applications that heavily rely on the bayesian approach, as well as some computational tools needed to perform a bayesian analysis.

  11. The STEM Lecture Hall: A Study of Effective Instructional Practices for Diverse Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Lynn Christine

    First-generation, low-income, underrepresented minority (URM) and female undergraduates are matriculating into science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) majors at unprecedented levels. However, a disproportionate number of these students end up graduating in non-STEM disciplines. Attrition rates have been observed to spike in conjunction with introductory STEM courses in chemistry, biology, and physics. These "gateway" courses tend to be housed in large, impersonal lecture halls. First-generation and URM students struggle in this environment, possibly because of instructors' reliance on lecture-based content delivery and rote memorization. Recent social psychological studies suggest the problem may be related to cultural mismatch, or misalignment between independent learning norms typical of American universities and interdependent learning expectancies for first-generation and URM students. Value-affirming and utility-value interventions yield impressive academic achievement gains for these students. These findings overlap with a second body of literature on culturally responsive instruction. Active gateway learning practices that emphasize interactive instruction, frequent assessment, and epistemological instruction can be successful because of their propensity to incorporate values affirming and utility-value techniques. The present study observed instruction for gateway STEM courses over a three-year period at the University of California, Irvine (N = 13,856 undergraduates in 168 courses). Exploratory polychoric factor analysis was used to identify latent variables for observational data on gateway STEM instructional practices. Variables were regressed on institutional student data. Practices implemented in large lecture halls fall into three general categories: Faculty-Student Interaction, Epistemological Instruction, and Peer Interaction . The present study found that Faculty-Student Interaction was negatively associated with student outcomes for

  12. Public Lecture: The Odyssey of Voyager

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Should you wish to attend to this lecture only (and not the full colloquium), please register here: https://indico.cern.ch/event/387001/registration/ Participants to the full colloquium are automatically registered to the public lectures.

  13. Video gallery of educational lectures integrated in faculty's portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Majerník

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a web based educational video-clips exhibition created to share various archived lectures for medical students, health care professionals as well as for general public. The presentation of closely related topics was developed as video gallery and it is based solely on free or open source tools to be available for wide academic and/or non-commercial use. Even if the educational video records can be embedded in any websites, we preferred to use our faculty’s portal, which should be a central point to offer various multimedia educational materials. The system was integrated and tested to offer open access to infectology lectures that were captured and archived from live-streamed sessions and from videoconferences.

  14. A Comparison of Online and Traditional Chemistry Lecture and Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulconer, E. K.; Griffith, J. C.; Wood, B. L.; Acharyya, S.; Roberts, D. L.

    2018-01-01

    While the equivalence between online and traditional classrooms has been well researched, very little effort has been expended to do such comparisons for college level introductory chemistry. The existing literature has only one study that investigated chemistry lectures at an entire course level as opposed to particular course components such as…

  15. Lectures on the inverse scattering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, V.E.

    1983-06-01

    In a series of six lectures an elementary introduction to the theory of inverse scattering is given. The first four lectures contain a detailed theory of solitons in the framework of the KdV equation, together with the inverse scattering theory of the one-dimensional Schroedinger equation. In the fifth lecture the dressing method is described, while the sixth lecture gives a brief review of the equations soluble by the inverse scattering method. (author)

  16. Metallurgy department publications and lectures 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder Pedersen, A.; Bilde-Soerensen, J.B.

    1988-04-01

    A presentation (including abstract) of scientific and technical publications and lectures by the staff of the Metallurgy Department during 1987 is given. The list comprises journal papers, conference papers, reports, lectures and poster presentations in the following categories: Publications, Lectures and Poster Presentations. (author)

  17. CISM Courses and Lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Toschi, Federico; Collective dynamics from bacteria to crowds : an excursion through modeling, analysis and simulation

    2014-01-01

    Multiscale models in social applications combine mean-field and kinetic equations with either microscopic or macroscopic level descriptions. In this book the reader will find not only a wide spectrum of multiscale analysis results (like convergence proofs), but also practically important information such as derivations of mean-field equations, methods to handle hard contacts numerically, to model group behavior, to quantitative estimate microscopic/macroscopic segregation of competing species, to quantitative understand the limits of validity of mass-action kinetics for simple reactions.

  18. Engagement in Digital Lecture Halls: A Study of Student Course Engagement and Mobile Device use During Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendolyn Witecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Universities have experienced increases in technology ownership and usage amongst students entering undergraduate programs. Almost all students report owning a mobile phone and many students view laptops and tablets as educational tools, though they also report using them for non-academic activities during lectures. We explored the relationship between student course engagement and the use of smartphones, laptops, cell phones, and tablets during lecture. Undergraduate students responded to an online survey asking about both course engagement and mobile device habits. Results show that smartphone use was most strongly related to lowered course engagement and while laptop use was related to lowered engagement, it was to a lesser extent. In contrast, overall engagement of students using tablets or cell phones was not significantly different than those who did not.

  19. Lectures on quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Nobel Laureate Steven Weinberg combines his exceptional physical insight with his gift for clear exposition to provide a concise introduction to modern quantum mechanics. Ideally suited to a one-year graduate course, this textbook is also a useful reference for researchers. Readers are introduced to the subject through a review of the history of quantum mechanics and an account of classic solutions of the Schrödinger equation, before quantum mechanics is developed in a modern Hilbert space approach. The textbook covers many topics not often found in other books on the subject, including alternatives to the Copenhagen interpretation, Bloch waves and band structure, the Wigner–Eckart theorem, magic numbers, isospin symmetry, the Dirac theory of constrained canonical systems, general scattering theory, the optical theorem, the 'in-in' formalism, the Berry phase, Landau levels, entanglement and quantum computing. Problems are included at the ends of chapters, with solutions available for instructors at www.cam...

  20. Examining the Effects of School-Level Variables on Elementary School Students' Academic Achievement: The Use of Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Sala, Matthew Robert

    2014-01-01

    School finance scholars have called for the alignment of accountability policies with state finance formulae to allocate resources toward student learning goals (Adams, 2008; Ryan, 2008; Superfine, 2009; Verstegen, 2002). With the presence of accountability policies that focus on improving students' academic achievement, state finance systems must…

  1. Effects of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on Students' Academic Achievement and Retention in Chemistry at Secondary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Ishtiaq; Suleman, Qaiser; ud Din, M. Naseer; Shafique, Farhan

    2017-01-01

    The current paper investigated the effects of information and communication technology on the students' academic achievement and retention in chemistry. Fifty students of 9th grade were selected randomly from Kohsar Public School and College Latamber Karak. The students were grouped into equivalent groups based on pretest score. In order to…

  2. The Impact of Parental Level of Income on Students' Academic Performance in High School in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machebe, Chioma Henrietta; Ezegbe, Bernedeth N.; Onuoha, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The socioeconomic status of a child parent impacts on the educational development and achievement of the child. This study evaluated the effect of socioeconomic status, specifically parents income and parents-child relationship on student's academic performance in Senior High School in Japan. Three hundred students of Senior High Schools in Osaka…

  3. The Relation between English Learning Students' Levels of Self-Regulation and Metacognitive Skills and Their English Academic Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adigüzel, Abdullah; Orhan, Ali

    2017-01-01

    It is remarkable that there are only a few studies that measures to what extent metacognitive and self-regulation skills affect students' academic achievements in the English lesson. This study is important for identifying the personal variables that have an impact on metacognitive and self-regulation skill and determining the relationship between…

  4. Graduate Students' Poster Session Experiences: Do Levels of Academic Self-Efficacy and Individual Characteristics Play a Role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipova, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study assesses the effectiveness of poster session presentations as an alternative to traditional presentations in the public administration classroom. It also determined if graduate students' college academic self-efficacy and background characteristics impacted poster performance outcomes. Data were collected over four…

  5. Engineering students' and faculty perceptions of teaching methods and the level of faculty involvement that promotes academic success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpilo, Lacy N.

    Student academic success is a top priority of higher education institutions in the United States and the trend of students leaving school prior to finishing their degree is a serious concern. Accountability has become a large part of university and college ratings and perceived success. Retention is one component of the accountability metrics used by accreditation agencies. In addition, there are an increasing number of states allocating funds based in part on retention (Seidman, 2005). Institutions have created initiatives, programs, and even entire departments to address issues related to student academic success to promote retention. Universities and colleges have responded by focusing on methods to retain and better serve students. Retention and student academic success is a primary concern for high education institutions; however, engineering education has unique retention issues. The National Science Board (2004) reports a significant decline in the number of individuals in the United States who are training to become engineers, despite the fact that the number of jobs that utilize an engineering background continues to increase. Engineering education has responded to academic success issues by changing curriculum and pedagogical methods (Sheppard, 2001). This descriptive study investigates the perception of engineering students and faculty regarding teaching methods and faculty involvement to create a picture of what is occurring in engineering education. The population was the engineering students and faculty of Colorado State University's College of Engineering. Data from this research suggests that engaging teaching methods are not being used as often as research indicates they should and that there is a lack of student-faculty interaction outside of the classroom. This research adds to the breadth of knowledge and understanding of the current environment of engineering education. Furthermore, the data allows engineering educators and other higher

  6. Brief, cooperative peer-instruction sessions during lectures enhance student recall and comprehension*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Niu; Henderson, Charles N.R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the academic impact of cooperative peer instruction during lecture pauses in an immunology/endocrinology course. Methods: Third-quarter students participated across iterations of the course. Each class offered 20 lectures of 50 minutes each. Classes were divided into a peer-instruction group incorporating cooperative peer instruction and a control group receiving traditional lectures. Peer-instruction group lectures were divided into 2–3 short presentations followed by a multiple-choice question (MCQ). Students recorded an initial answer and then had 1 minute to discuss answers with group peers. Following this, students could submit a revised answer. The control group received the same lecture material, but without MCQs or peer discussions. Final-exam scores were compared across study groups. A mixed-design analysis of covariance was used to analyze the data. Results: There was a statistically significant main effect for the peer-instruction activity (F(1, 93) = 6.573, p = .012, r = .257), with recall scores higher for MCQs asked after peer-instruction activities than for those asked before peer instruction. Final-exam scores at the end of term were greater in the peer-instruction group than the control group (F(1, 193) = 9.264, p = .003, r = .214; question type, F(1, 193) = 26.671, p = .000, r = .348). Conclusion: Lectures with peer-instruction pauses increase student recall and comprehension compared with traditional lectures. PMID:26967766

  7. Water Technology Lecture 1: Introducing Water Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Nicholas Frederick

    2017-01-01

    This is a full set of PowerPoint lectures for a course in Water Technology currently given at Trinity College, University of Dublin by professor N.F. Gray. The lectures cover all aspects of water and wastewater treatment and are available for use to lecturers or those interested in the subject. The lecture series is to be used in conjunction with the new textbook ?Water Science and Technology? (4th edition) published by CRC Press in 2017. Lecture 1 is an introduction to the water indust...

  8. Level of Awareness and Basic Knowledge Related to Radiation Protection Based on Academic Qualification and Service Tenure in Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munira Shaikh Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Effective radiation protection program is vital to ensure the safety of workers involved in work related to radiation. This objective of this research was to determine the level of awareness towards radiation protection among the workers at Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Questionnaire forms containing questions related to relevant work experience and knowledge of radiation safety were distributed to a group of identified radiation workers. The hypothesis of this study is that all workers involved have high levels of awareness and basic knowledge as they work in an institution which activities frequently and routinely involve radiation. The result of this research show that the level of awareness and knowledge of the respondents were at a good level, with an average overall score of 87.2% showed a high level of awareness among respondents. Overall, highest academic qualifications did not affect the level of knowledge (p > 0.05). In contrast, service tenure affects their level of knowledge (p < 0.05). (author)

  9. Lectures on matrix field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ydri, Badis

    2017-01-01

    These lecture notes provide a systematic introduction to matrix models of quantum field theories with non-commutative and fuzzy geometries. The book initially focuses on the matrix formulation of non-commutative and fuzzy spaces, followed by a description of the non-perturbative treatment of the corresponding field theories. As an example, the phase structure of non-commutative phi-four theory is treated in great detail, with a separate chapter on the multitrace approach. The last chapter offers a general introduction to non-commutative gauge theories, while two appendices round out the text. Primarily written as a self-study guide for postgraduate students – with the aim of pedagogically introducing them to key analytical and numerical tools, as well as useful physical models in applications – these lecture notes will also benefit experienced researchers by providing a reference guide to the fundamentals of non-commutative field theory with an emphasis on matrix models and fuzzy geometries.

  10. Effective Communication between Students and Lecturers: Improving Student-Led Communication in Educational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdian, Hannah Lena; Warrior, John Kyle

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated students' communication preferences in educational settings, resulting in an empirical model of effective communication between students and lecturers. Students from a psychology department at a UK university were asked about their preferred communication tool for academic purposes, including social networking, emails,…

  11. Part-Time Lecturers Teaching Part-Time Learners at University: A Transformation Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    February, C.; Koetsier, J.; Walters, S.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the academic labour market and the global labour market provides an important context for this research. There appear to be growing numbers of part-time lecturers at universities worldwide, which is seen as an extension of casualisation of labour more generally. From a social justice perspective, it is therefore of concern…

  12. Motivating Change from Lecture-Tutorial Modes to Less Traditional Forms of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Helen J.; Kenny, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching academics are under pressure to move away from traditional lecture-tutorial teaching modes to less traditional forms. Such pressures are in addition to changes to funding arrangements and other developments that increasingly oblige universities to operate as businesses. The flow-on effects for teachers are increased student:staff ratios,…

  13. Promoting Student Learning through the Integration of Lab and Lecture: The Seamless Biology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrowes, Patricia; Nazario, Gladys

    2008-01-01

    The authors engaged in an education experiment to determine if the integration of lab and lecture activities in zoology and botany proved beneficial to student learning and motivation toward biology. Their results revealed that this strategy positively influenced students' academic achievement, conceptual understanding, and ability to apply…

  14. The lecturer doesn't have a rewind button – addressing the listening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article details an attempt to produce tapes of academic lectures to enable mainstream L2 students to improve their listening skills. Very little material for second language speakers is developed in New Zealand, and almost all material available to improve listening skills is produced in Australia, Britain or America.

  15. An Analysis of Student Characteristics and Behaviour in Relation to Absence from Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawon, Krystyna; Pembroke, Michael; Wille, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Concern has been expressed in the literature that student absenteeism from lectures is undesirable as it may have adverse consequences for academic performance. The aim of this study was to examine whether there are identifiable groups of low-attendance students who display characteristic behaviours that are more typical than any other group.…

  16. Examining the Use of Lecture Capture Technology: Implications for Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Jovan F.; Quigley, Brenna; Herry, Yves

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to provide a better understanding of how lecture capture technology is used by students and how its use is related to student satisfaction, attendance, and academic performance. Using a mixed method design with both quantitative and qualitative methods to collect data, instruments included a student questionnaire, interviews and…

  17. Trieste lectures on mirror symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, K [Department of Physics and Department of Mathematics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-08-15

    These are pedagogical lectures on mirror symmetry given at the Spring School in ICTP, Trieste, March 2002. The focus is placed on worldsheet descriptions of the physics related to mirror symmetry. We start with the introduction to general aspects of (2,2) supersymmetric field theories in 1 + 1 dimensions. We next move on to the study and applications of linear sigma model. Finally, we provide a proof of mirror symmetry in a class of models. (author)

  18. The Feynman lectures on physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feynman, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    This set of lectures tries to elucidate from the beginning those features of the quantum mechanics which are most general. The first lectures tackle head on the ideas of a probability amplitude, the interference of amplitudes, the abstract notion of a state, and the superposition and resolution of states - and the Dirac notation is used from the start. In each instance the ideas are introduced together with a detailed discussion of some specific examples - to try to make the physical ideas as real as possible. The time dependence of states including states of definite energy comes next, and the ideas are applied at once to the study of two-state systems. A detailed discussion of the ammonia maser provides the framework for the introduction to radiation absorption and induced transitions. The lectures then go on to consider more complex systems, leading to a discussion of the propagation of electrons in a crystal, and to a rather complete treatment of the quantum mechanics of angular momentum. Our introduction to quantum mechanics ends in Chapter 20 with a discussion of the Schroedinger wave function, its differential equation, and the solution for the hydrogen atom. The last Chapter of this volume is not intended to be a part of the 'course.' It is a 'seminar' on superconductivity and was given in the spirit of some of the entertainment lectures of the first two volumes, with the intent of opening to the students a broader view of the relation of what they were learning to the general culture of physics. Feynman's 'epilogue' serves as the period to the three-volume series [fr

  19. Lectures in medical educaton: what students think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Tajammal; Farooq, Zerwa; Asad, Zunaira; Amjad, Rabbia; Badar, Iffat; Chaudhry, Abdul Majeed; Khan, Mohammad Amer Zaman; Rafique, Farida

    2014-01-01

    The volume of medical knowledge has increased exponentially and so has the need to improve the efficiency of current teaching practices.With increasing emphasis on interactive and problem based learning, the place of lectures in modern medical education has become a questionable issue. Objectives were to assess the perspective of undergraduate medical students regarding the role and effectiveness of lectures as a mode of instruction as well as the ways and means that can be employed to enhance the effectiveness of lectures. A cross sectional study was carried out among 2nd to final year medical students from five medical colleges including both private and public sector institutions. A total of 347 students participated by completing a structured questionnaire. Data was analyzed using SPSS-17. Sixty seven percent students considered lectures as a useful mode of instruction (47% males and 77% females), whereas 83% of the students reported that clinical sessions were superior to lectures because of small number of students in clinical sessions, active student participation, enhanced clinical orientation, and interaction with patients. About 64% responded that lectures should be replaced by clinical sessions. Majority of the students (92%) reported not being able to concentrate during a lecture beyond 30 minutes, whereas 70% skipped lectures as they were boring. A significantly greater proportion of male respondents, students from clinical years, and those who skipped lectures, considered lectures to be boring, a poor utilization of time and resources, and could not concentrate for the full duration of a lecture compared to females, students from preclinical years, and those who do not skip lectures, respectively. Lecturing techniques need to be improvised. The traditional passive mode of instruction has to be replaced with active learning and inquiry based approach to adequately utilize the time and resources spent on lectures.

  20. Structural Empowerment and Organizational Commitment of Lecturers in Private International Educational Institutions at Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puncreobutr, Vichian

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to measure the level of structural empowerment and organizational commitment of lecturers at private international educational institutions at Thailand. Further to measure the relationship between structural empowerment and organizational commitment of lecturers. The target respondents of the study were lecturers…

  1. Awareneness and usage of web 2.0 tools among lecturers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Findings from the study revealed a high level of awareness and use of Web 2.0 tools among the lecturers in Nigerian universities while facebook, youtube, linkedln, twitter, wikis, and podcasting were found to be the popular tools among the lecturers. Also, facebook, linkedln, and wikis were found to be the most used Web ...

  2. Academic Motivations and Academic Self-Efficacy of Nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    Gamze Sarikoc

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Academic motivation and academic self-efficacy play important roles in the learning process. They increase academic achievement and the attainment of educational goals, thus providing opportunities in the training of qualified nurses. This study was conducted to determine nursing students%u2019 academic motivation and academic self-efficacy levels. Material and Method: This is a descriptive study. A total of 346 students who are attending a nursing school as either a first, second, third...

  3. Twenty-one lectures on complex analysis a first course

    CERN Document Server

    Isaev, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    At its core, this concise textbook presents standard material for a first course in complex analysis at the advanced undergraduate level. This distinctive text will prove most rewarding for students who have a genuine passion for mathematics as well as certain mathematical maturity. Primarily aimed at undergraduates with working knowledge of real analysis and metric spaces, this book can also be used to instruct a graduate course. The text uses a conversational style with topics purposefully apportioned into 21 lectures, providing a suitable format for either independent study or lecture-based teaching. Instructors are invited to rearrange the order of topics according to their own vision. A clear and rigorous exposition is supported by engaging examples and exercises unique to each lecture; a large number of exercises contain useful calculation problems. Hints are given for a selection of the more difficult exercises. This text furnishes the reader with a means of learning complex analysis as well as a subtl...

  4. Graduates', University Lecturers' and Employers' Perceptions towards Employability Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Vathsala; Perera, Lasantha

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore employability skills that employers, university lecturers and graduates value to bring to the workplace, when graduates are applying for entry-level graduate jobs in the field of computer science in Sri Lanka. Design/methodology/approach: A total of three samples were selected for this exploratory…

  5. Emotional Labour in University Lecturers: Considerations for Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Karen; Cassidy, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Emotional labour is a state that exists when there is a discrepancy between the emotional demeanour that an individual displays and the genuinely felt emotions that would be inappropriate to display (Mann 1999b).The study examined levels of emotional labour in university lecturers and compared these data to other occupations. Employing a mixed…

  6. Expository lectures on topology, geometry, and gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akyildiz, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The article provides an extremely useful and clear explanation of applications of topology and differential geometry in modern gauge theories. Basic concepts like invariants, manifolds, (co)homology, etc. are explained. The author has prepared this lecture with physicists in mind and the level of mathematical sophistication has been kept to a minimum. (S.J.P.)

  7. Multimedia Usage among Islamic Education Lecturers at Higher Education Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Mohd Isa; Rinaldi; Razak, Khadijah Abdul

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to examine the level of multimedia usage among Islamic education lecturers at higher education institutions in West Sumatera, Indonesia. The participants were chosen from three types of higher institutions by using stratified random sampling. The data was collected from 250 students using questionnaires. The findings showed that…

  8. Demonstrating the unit hydrograph and flow routing processes involving active student participation - a university lecture experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Karsten; Burgholzer, Reinhard; Klotz, Daniel; Wesemann, Johannes; Herrnegger, Mathew

    2018-05-01

    The unit hydrograph (UH) has been one of the most widely employed hydrological modelling techniques to predict rainfall-runoff behaviour of hydrological catchments, and is still used to this day. Its concept is based on the idea that a unit of effective precipitation per time unit (e.g. mm h-1) will always lead to a specific catchment response in runoff. Given its relevance, the UH is an important topic that is addressed in most (engineering) hydrology courses at all academic levels. While the principles of the UH seem to be simple and easy to understand, teaching experiences in the past suggest strong difficulties in students' perception of the UH theory and application. In order to facilitate a deeper understanding of the theory and application of the UH for students, we developed a simple and cheap lecture theatre experiment which involved active student participation. The seating of the students in the lecture theatre represented the hydrological catchment in its size and form. A set of plastic balls, prepared with a piece of magnetic strip to be tacked to any white/black board, each represented a unit amount of effective precipitation. The balls are evenly distributed over the lecture theatre and routed by some given rules down the catchment to the catchment outlet, where the resulting hydrograph is monitored and illustrated at the black/white board. The experiment allowed an illustration of the underlying principles of the UH, including stationarity, linearity, and superposition of the generated runoff and subsequent routing. In addition, some variations of the experimental setup extended the UH concept to demonstrate the impact of elevation, different runoff regimes, and non-uniform precipitation events on the resulting hydrograph. In summary, our own experience in the classroom, a first set of student exams, as well as student feedback and formal evaluation suggest that the integration of such an experiment deepened the learning experience by active

  9. Lecturers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    directed learning skills; and (iv) the increased motivation for learning'.[1,2]. Additional benefits of the PBL approach have been reported. These include improvement in problem-solving abilities, effective literature sourcing, increased ability to work in teams, as well as gaining the knowledge skills and expertise needed for ...

  10. Study of Ethical Values and Practices in Academic Programmes at a Higher Learning Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanasamy, Kogilah; Shetty, M. V.

    The study on ethical values in academic programmes has attracted the attention of many researchers throughout the world especially in view of its important role today. Many academic programmes today focus on how to make profit both for the individual and the organization and on how to increase the firm`s market share and shareholders value and in the process may compromise on their ethical values and have unethical practices. Thus, this study is undertaken to evaluate the extent of integration of ethical values in the academic programmes of the higher learning operating institution involved with post graduate and higher level programs. The impact of demographics and race of the lecturer and students have been separately ascertained. The sample has been taken from one college, rated to be high in ethical values and practices, a sample of 120 students and 31 lecturers from a leading college (reputed for ethical values) have been collated and analyzed for validation of the objectives. The explanation on ethics has been done to a large extent in the study. The study also indicates the number of higher learning institutions to indicate the extent of impact if these issues are appropriately addressed. Government policy in this regard also needs to be reviewed and improved to avoid deterioration of ethical values and practices in the dynamic market place of today. This study review that, the level at which lecturers at the institutions have high ethical values and do incorporate it in their lectures and discussions in the classroom. The impact of demographic factors on the ethical values and practice of the lecturers have useful insights for academic staff recruitment and staff training. On the other hand, students` ethical values and behavior is a cause for concern to everyone as these future pillars of the nation have been found to have their ethical values and practices at low levels. The implications for the college management as to consider further emphasis on the

  11. Locus of control, self-efficacy, and the mediating effect of outcome control: predicting course-level and global outcomes in an academic context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Evelyn W M

    2015-01-01

    The current study utilizes Skinner's framework to examine the unique contributions of internal locus of control, self-efficacy, and perceived outcome control over course performance on students' academic experiences. Undergraduate students (N = 225) took part in a longitudinal study and completed two surveys (Time 1: just before their mid-term exams; Time 2: just before their final exam in the same semester). Both locus of control and self-efficacy at Time 1 predicted course-level perceived control over course performance at Time 2. Student-level perceived control over course performance at Time 2 mediated the relationship between self-efficacy at Time 1 and course-level perseverance, course-specific stress, and course enjoyment at Time 2. For global perceived stress and life satisfaction measured at Time 2, both locus of control and self-efficacy at Time 1 had only a direct effect on global perceived stress at Time 2, but only self-efficacy at Time 1 predicted life satisfaction at Time 2. Both locus of control and self-efficacy uniquely contribute to students' academic experiences. Student-level perceived control plays an important mediating role between locus of control and self-efficacy at Time 1, and course-level perseverance, course-specific stress, and course enjoyment at Time 2.

  12. Job Stress and Burnout among Academic Career Anaesthesiologists at an Egyptian University Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Tarek; El-Masry, Ragaa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: There is compelling evidence that anaesthesiology is a stressful occupation and, when this stressful occupation is associated with an academic career, the burnout level is high. This study aimed to assess the predictors and prevalence of stress and burnout, associated sociodemographic characteristics, and job-related features. Methods: A cross-sectional survey study was carried out at Mansoura University Hospital in Egypt among 98 anaesthesiologists who had academic careers. The English version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) scale and the Workplace Stress Scale of the American Institute of Stress were used to measure job stress and burnout. Data were analysed according to the guidelines for data processing and an analysis of the scales used. Results: The participation rate of this study was 73.1%, where 69.4% were encountering job stress, while 62.2% experienced emotional exhaustion, 56.1% depersonalisation, and 58.2% reduced personal capacity. There was a significant positive correlation between job stress and MBI-HSS subscales. Residents and assistant lecturers were the most affected group. The strongest significant single predictor of all burnout dimensions was a lack of job support. Conclusion: Stress and burnout among academic anaesthesiologists were caused by the lack of job support; this was especially true among residents and assistant lecturers. We can conclude that a well-organised institutional strategy to mitigate the heavy professional demands of academic anaesthesiologists’ will relieve their stress and burnout. PMID:23862036

  13. Job Stress and Burnout among Academic Career Anaesthesiologists at an Egyptian University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Tarek; El-Masry, Ragaa

    2013-05-01

    There is compelling evidence that anaesthesiology is a stressful occupation and, when this stressful occupation is associated with an academic career, the burnout level is high. This study aimed to assess the predictors and prevalence of stress and burnout, associated sociodemographic characteristics, and job-related features. A cross-sectional survey study was carried out at Mansoura University Hospital in Egypt among 98 anaesthesiologists who had academic careers. The English version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) scale and the Workplace Stress Scale of the American Institute of Stress were used to measure job stress and burnout. Data were analysed according to the guidelines for data processing and an analysis of the scales used. The participation rate of this study was 73.1%, where 69.4% were encountering job stress, while 62.2% experienced emotional exhaustion, 56.1% depersonalisation, and 58.2% reduced personal capacity. There was a significant positive correlation between job stress and MBI-HSS subscales. Residents and assistant lecturers were the most affected group. The strongest significant single predictor of all burnout dimensions was a lack of job support. Stress and burnout among academic anaesthesiologists were caused by the lack of job support; this was especially true among residents and assistant lecturers. We can conclude that a well-organised institutional strategy to mitigate the heavy professional demands of academic anaesthesiologists' will relieve their stress and burnout.

  14. How Do Nursing Students Use Digital Tools during Lectures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebri, Isabelle; Bartier, Jean-Claude; Pelaccia, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Teachers often wonder what students are doing during lectures, behind their computers, mobile phones and other digital tools. This study aimed to document the type of tools used during lectures by nursing students and what they do with them. We carried out a descriptive, prospective, multicentre study including 1446 nursing students in Alsace (France). The students filled in an anonymous questionnaire at the end of a lesson they had just attended. 99% of the students had taken at least one digital tool to the lesson. 90% had a mobile phone with them. It was mainly used for entertainment (particularly for sending and/or receiving text messages and consulting emails). 52% had a laptop with them. It was essentially used for academic tasks (taking notes, working on other teaching units or revising for exams). Most nursing students take a phone or laptop to lectures with them with the intention of using them for entertainment and learning respectively. These results could guide training establishments in drafting their institutional policy concerning the use of digital tools in class.

  15. How Do Nursing Students Use Digital Tools during Lectures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Sebri

    Full Text Available Teachers often wonder what students are doing during lectures, behind their computers, mobile phones and other digital tools. This study aimed to document the type of tools used during lectures by nursing students and what they do with them.We carried out a descriptive, prospective, multicentre study including 1446 nursing students in Alsace (France. The students filled in an anonymous questionnaire at the end of a lesson they had just attended.99% of the students had taken at least one digital tool to the lesson. 90% had a mobile phone with them. It was mainly used for entertainment (particularly for sending and/or receiving text messages and consulting emails. 52% had a laptop with them. It was essentially used for academic tasks (taking notes, working on other teaching units or revising for exams.Most nursing students take a phone or laptop to lectures with them with the intention of using them for entertainment and learning respectively. These results could guide training establishments in drafting their institutional policy concerning the use of digital tools in class.

  16. Academic Freedom in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokay GEDİKOĞLU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the concept ‘academic freedom’ is discussed, its implications and value for the academics, institutions of higher education, and the society are focused, and a few suggestions for the Turkish higher education are made. Academic freedom is defined as the freedom of the academic staff to look for and to find the truth in their scientific field, to publish the findings, and to teach these findings to their students without any external intervention. The concept has gained a further definition with inclusion of research activities into academic freedom as part of the reform attempts started in the German higher education in the 19th century. Therefore, academic freedom is at the very core of the missions of the institutions of higher education; that is, teaching-learning and research. On the point of academic staff and their academic activities of the academic freedom, the subjects such as the aim of the course, choosing the teaching materials and textbooks, the lecturer, and the criteria for the measurement and evaluation of the course take place. And he point of research covers the aim of the study, academicians can’t be imposed the involve in an academic and artistic studies that conflict their values and beliefs; researchers should comply with codes of ethical principles and practices during the process of researching; and research outputs should be reported accurately and honestly without any misleading manipulation. Academic freedom does not provide any exemption from accountability in academic activities of the faculty, nor does it provide any right to act against the well-being of the society, current laws and regulations, and codes of ethical principles and practices.

  17. Academic Training: Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, TH Auditorium, bldg 4, 3rd floor, on 13 October Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists L. LYONS, University of Oxford, GB Lecture 1: Learning to love the errror matrix Introductory remarks. Conditional probability. Statistical and systematic errors. Combining results Binomial, Poisson and 1-D Gaussian 2-D Gaussian and the error matrix. Understanding the covariance. Using the error matrix. Estimating the error matrix. Combining correlated measurements Lecture 2: Parameter determination by likelihood: Do's and don'ts Introduction to likelihood. Error estimate. Simple examples: (1) Breit Wigner (2) Lifetime binned and unbinned likelihood several parameters extended maximum likelihood. Common misapprehensions: Normalisation delta(lnL) = 1/2 rule and coverage Integrating the likelihood Unbinned L_max as goodness of fit Punzi effect Lecture 3: Chi-squared and hypothesis test...

  18. Academic Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  19. Frank and Fearless: Supporting Academic Career Progression for Women in an Australian Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polly Parker

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The underrepresentation of women in senior positions continues to be a major challenge in higher education and most other industries. In Australia, the career trajectory for academic women stalls at a lower level than that of their male counterparts. Concern about this situation in one Australian university led to the design and delivery of a career progression program to support women’s advancement from senior lecturer to associate professor. This study details the main features of the program, designed to facilitate women’s transition from being leading academics to academic leaders through a focus on leadership and career progression. We report the participants’ perceptions of its value based on survey data. We conclude that leadership development is difficult work and requires a supportive environment where risk-taking is encouraged, where frank and fearless feedback is provided, and where the individual is required to examine assumptions and biases and to assume a leadership identity.

  20. Job Satisfaction of University Academics: Perspectives from Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssesanga, Karim; Garrett, Roger M.

    2005-01-01

    Although several studies in the affluent world have examined the job satisfaction and dissatisfaction of lecturers in higher education, little is known about academic job satisfaction in the low-resource countries. This study probes those factors contributing to academic satisfaction and dissatisfaction in higher education in the developing world.…

  1. Tell-Tale Signs: Reflection towards the Acquisition of Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tell-Tale Signs: Reflection towards the Acquisition of Academic Discourses as Second Languages. ... Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics ... After enrolling in a sign language course, we – lecturers teaching academic discourses – decided to explore this phenomenon and determine the implications for pedagogical practice.

  2. Academic Training: Climate change and challenges for the environment / POSTPONED!!!

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 20, 21, 22 June 20, 21, 22 June, from 11:00 to 12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Climate change and challenges for the environment C. SCHLUECHTER / Univ. Bern, CH The Academic Training is postponed.

  3. Nobel Lecture: Topological quantum matter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, F. Duncan M.

    2017-10-01

    Nobel Lecture, presented December 8, 2016, Aula Magna, Stockholm University. I will describe the history and background of three discoveries cited in this Nobel Prize: The "TKNN" topological formula for the integer quantum Hall effect found by David Thouless and collaborators, the Chern insulator or quantum anomalous Hall effect, and its role in the later discovery of time-reversal-invariant topological insulators, and the unexpected topological spin-liquid state of the spin-1 quantum antiferromagnetic chain, which provided an initial example of topological quantum matter. I will summarize how these early beginnings have led to the exciting, and currently extremely active, field of "topological matter."

  4. Mechanics lectures on theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerfeld, Arnold Johannes Wilhelm

    1952-01-01

    Mechanics: Lectures on Theoretical Physics, Volume I covers a general course on theoretical physics. The book discusses the mechanics of a particle; the mechanics of systems; the principle of virtual work; and d'alembert's principle. The text also describes oscillation problems; the kinematics, statics, and dynamics of a rigid body; the theory of relative motion; and the integral variational principles of mechanics. Lagrange's equations for generalized coordinates and the theory of Hamilton are also considered. Physicists, mathematicians, and students taking Physics courses will find the book

  5. The effects of synchronous class sessions on students' academic achievement and levels of satisfaction in an online introduction to computers course

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeShea, Andrea Valene

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental static-group comparison study was to test the theory of transactional distance that relates the inclusion of synchronous class sessions into an online introductory computer course to students' levels of satisfaction and academic achievement at a post-secondary technical college. This study specifically looked at the effects of adding live, synchronous class sessions into an online learning environment using collaboration software such as Blackboard Collaborate and the impact that this form of live interaction had on students' overall levels of satisfaction and academic achievement with the course. A quasi-experiment using the post-test only, static-group comparison design was utilized and conducted in an introductory computer class at a local technical college. It was determined that incorporating live, synchronous class sessions into an online course did not increase students' levels of achievement, nor did it result in improved test scores. Additionally, the study revealed that there was no significant difference in students' levels of satisfaction between those taking online courses using live, synchronous methods and those experiencing traditional online methods. In light of this evidence, further research needs to be conducted to determine if students prefer a completely asynchronous online learning experience or if, when, and how they would prefer a blended approach that offers synchronous sessions as well.

  6. Recognizing Academic Performance, Sleep Quality, Stress Level, and Mental Health using Personality Traits, Wearable Sensors and Mobile Phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Akane; Phillips, Andrew J; Yu, Amy Z; McHill, Andrew W; Taylor, Sara; Jaques, Natasha; Czeisler, Charles A; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Picard, Rosalind W

    2015-06-01

    What can wearable sensors and usage of smart phones tell us about academic performance, self-reported sleep quality, stress and mental health condition? To answer this question, we collected extensive subjective and objective data using mobile phones, surveys, and wearable sensors worn day and night from 66 participants, for 30 days each, totaling 1,980 days of data. We analyzed daily and monthly behavioral and physiological patterns and identified factors that affect academic performance (GPA), Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) score, perceived stress scale (PSS), and mental health composite score (MCS) from SF-12, using these month-long data. We also examined how accurately the collected data classified the participants into groups of high/low GPA, good/poor sleep quality, high/low self-reported stress, high/low MCS using feature selection and machine learning techniques. We found associations among PSQI, PSS, MCS, and GPA and personality types. Classification accuracies using the objective data from wearable sensors and mobile phones ranged from 67-92%.

  7. An Investigation of First-Year Students' and Lecturers' Expectations of University Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Hassel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Transition from school to university can cause concern for many students. One issue is the gap between students' prior expectations and the realities of university life, which can cause significant distress, poor academic performance and increased drop-out rates if not managed effectively. Research has shown several similarities in the expectations of staff and students in regards to which factors determine academic success, but there is also evidence of dissonance. For example, staff consider independent study and critical evaluation as key factors, whereas students view feedback on drafts of work and support from staff as being most important. The aim of the current study was to determine what expectations students hold when starting university education, and what expectations university lecturers have of students entering university. Lecturers (n = 20 and first year students (n = 77 completed a series of questionnaires concerning their expectations of learning in HE (staff and students and their approach to teaching (staff. Results revealed that students have largely realistic expectations of university. For example, the majority expected to be in charge of their own study. Some unrealistic expectations were also evident, e.g., most expected that teaching would be the same at university as it had been at school. The expectation that lecturers would provide detailed notes varied as a function of student age. Lecturers reported modifying their expectations of students and adapting their teaching approach according to year of study. Information-transmission/teacher-focused style was more common when teaching 1st year students; a more concept-changing/student-focused approach tended to be used when teaching 2nd year students (and above. Lecturer's expectations of student engagement did not differ according to year. Less experienced lecturers reported more negative expectations of student engagement than did experienced lecturers. In line with

  8. An Investigation of First-Year Students' and Lecturers' Expectations of University Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Stefanie; Ridout, Nathan

    2018-01-01

    Transition from school to university can cause concern for many students. One issue is the gap between students' prior expectations and the realities of university life, which can cause significant distress, poor academic performance and increased drop-out rates if not managed effectively. Research has shown several similarities in the expectations of staff and students in regards to which factors determine academic success, but there is also evidence of dissonance. For example, staff consider independent study and critical evaluation as key factors, whereas students view feedback on drafts of work and support from staff as being most important. The aim of the current study was to determine what expectations students hold when starting university education, and what expectations university lecturers have of students entering university. Lecturers (n = 20) and first year students (n = 77) completed a series of questionnaires concerning their expectations of learning in HE (staff and students) and their approach to teaching (staff). Results revealed that students have largely realistic expectations of university. For example, the majority expected to be in charge of their own study. Some unrealistic expectations were also evident, e.g., most expected that teaching would be the same at university as it had been at school. The expectation that lecturers would provide detailed notes varied as a function of student age. Lecturers reported modifying their expectations of students and adapting their teaching approach according to year of study. Information-transmission/teacher-focused style was more common when teaching 1st year students; a more concept-changing/student-focused approach tended to be used when teaching 2nd year students (and above). Lecturer's expectations of student engagement did not differ according to year. Less experienced lecturers reported more negative expectations of student engagement than did experienced lecturers. In line with previous work, we

  9. Social media interruption affects the acquisition of visually, not aurally, acquired information during a pathophysiology lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, Jane R; Thakkar, Shivam C; Suliman, Neveen; O'Neill, Shannon I; Doubleday, Alison F

    2018-06-01

    Poor academic performance from extensive social media usage appears to be due to students' inability to multitask between distractions and academic work. However, the degree to which visually distracted students can acquire lecture information presented aurally is unknown. This study examined the ability of students visually distracted by social media to acquire information presented during a voice-over PowerPoint lecture, and to compare performance on examination questions derived from information presented aurally vs. that presented visually. Students ( n = 20) listened to a 42-min cardiovascular pathophysiology lecture containing embedded cartoons while taking notes. The experimental group ( n = 10) was visually, but not aurally, distracted by social media during times when cartoon information was presented, ~40% of total lecture time. Overall performance among distracted students on a follow-up, open-note quiz was 30% poorer than that for controls ( P < 0.001). When the modality of presentation (visual vs. aural) was compared, performance decreased on examination questions from information presented visually. However, performance on questions from information presented aurally was similar to that of controls. Our findings suggest the ability to acquire information during lecture may vary, depending on the degree of competition between the modalities of the distraction and the lecture presentation. Within the context of current literature, our findings also suggest that timing of the distraction relative to delivery of material examined affects performance more than total distraction time. Therefore, when delivering lectures, instructors should incorporate organizational cues and active learning strategies that assist students in maintaining focus and acquiring relevant information.

  10. Use of questioning during lectures in a dental hygiene didactic course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessheimer, Heather M; Rogo, Ellen J; Howlett, Bernadette

    2011-08-01

    The purposes of this quasi-experimental, one-group crossover study were to determine the effect of questioning during dental hygiene lectures on low-level and high-level learning and to evaluate student perceptions of questioning. Twenty-three dental hygiene students participated in two control lectures using traditional lecturing methods. The students served as their own controls by next participating in two experimental lectures with questions asked throughout the lecture at both low and high cognitive levels. Student performance was measured with an examination containing low- and high-level questions. The interaction between the group and the level of questions was analyzed using ANOVA, and no statistically significant difference was found. Based on a Likert scale (1 to 6), average ratings for student perceptions were as follows: enjoyment of use, 4.5; understanding the lecture material, 4.74; and questioning effectiveness, 4.35. Student perceptions of questioning were positive; however, this strategy was found to be no more effective than the traditional lecture in promoting retention of information.

  11. Lectures on the Topological Vertex

    CERN Document Server

    Mariño, M

    2008-01-01

    In this lectures, I will summarize the approach to Gromov–Witten invariants on toric Calabi–Yau threefolds based on large N dualities. Since the large N duality/topological vertex approach computes Gromov–Witten invariants in terms of Chern–Simons knot and link invariants, Sect. 2 is devoted to a review of these. Section 3 reviews topological strings and Gromov–Witten invariants, and gives some information about the open string case. Section 4 introduces the class of geometries we will deal with, namely toric (noncompact) Calabi–Yau manifolds, and we present a useful graphical way to represent these manifolds which constitutes the geometric core of the theory of the topological vertex. Finally, in Sect. 5, we define the vertex and present some explicit formulae for it and some simple applications. A brief Appendix contains useful information about symmetric polynomials. It has not been possible to present all the relevant background and physical derivations in this set of lectures. However, these...

  12. Declaration of Academic Freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan ÇETİNSAYA

    2014-04-01

    , despised or labeled by academics and other students due to their own opinions, stances, attitudes and differences. No student should be subjected to discrimination due to his or her worldviews. Assessment and evaluation of the students must be based solely on the content and the subject of the lectures. Students have the right to object if they think the evaluations or assessments are unfair. 8. Every person in the university has academic freedom. Just as academics and students, guests invited to the university also possess the right of freedom of expression. The guests who visit the university for academic, cultural and sportive events or activities should be welcomed appropriately, should not be deprived of their freedom of expression due to their political thoughts or identities, and should not be prevented by the academics or students because of their different views. The freedom of expression is also valid for the people with opposite views. People with opposite views can express themselves in various ways as long as they do not violate the guests' rights to express themselves and others' rights to listen to them. 9. Both students and academics have the right to criticize and protest when there is a subject they disapprove or reject. However, this right cannot interrupt the operation of academic activities and the organization of the university. Any action, occupying and protesting that restricts the students' freedom of learning, academics' freedom of teaching, and freedom of expressing an opinion in the university setting is a violation of academic freedom. Freedom of expression is a necessary condition of pluralism, tolerance, and open-mindness as well as of democratic society; but it is not absolute. Any discourse ignoring the individual rights and freedoms; including insult, slander, contempt or abuse and prompting rebellion and pointing the individuals and groups as a target in order to harm them overtly due to their difference can never comply with the freedom

  13. Promoting Active Learning in Calculus and General Physics through Interactive and Media-Enhanced Lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Tang

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an approach of incorporating interactive and media-enhanced lectures to promote active learning in Calculus and General Physics courses. The pedagogical practice of using interactive techniques in lectures to require "heads-on" and "hands-on" learning, and involve students more as active participants than passive receivers is a part of academic curricular reform efforts undertaken currently by the mathematics, physics and chemistry departments at North Carolina A&T State University under the NSF funded project "Talent-21: Gateway for Advancing Science and Mathematics Talents."

  14. A Case Study of Gender Bias at the Postdoctoral Level in Physics, and its Resulting Impact on the Academic Career Advancement of Females

    OpenAIRE

    Towers, S.

    2008-01-01

    This case study of a typical U.S. particle physics experiment explores the issues of gender bias and how it affects the academic career advancement prospects of women in the field of physics beyond the postdoctoral level; we use public databases to study the career paths of the full cohort of 57 former postdoctoral researchers on the Run II Dzero experiment to examine if males and females were treated in a gender-blind fashion on the experiment. The study finds that the female researchers wer...

  15. Use of Admission Criteria to Predict Performance of Students in an Entry-Level Master's Program on Fieldwork Placements and in Academic Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, G L; Stone, R G; Holm, M B

    2001-01-01

    The relationships among clinical outcomes, academic success, and predictors used to screen applicants for entrance into a Master in Occupational Therapy Program (MOT) were examined. The dependent variables were grade point average in occupational therapy courses (OT-GPA), client therapy outcomes at the clinic, and ratings of MOT students by Level II Fieldwork supervisors. Predictor variables included undergraduate GPA, scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and an essay. Both undergraduate GPA and scores on the GRE were found to predict OT-GPA. The analytical section of the GRE was also positively correlated with fieldwork supervisors' ratings of students.

  16. Live lecture versus video-recorded lecture: are students voting with their feet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardall, Scott; Krupat, Edward; Ulrich, Michael

    2008-12-01

    In light of educators' concerns that lecture attendance in medical school has declined, the authors sought to assess students' perceptions, evaluations, and motivations concerning live lectures compared with accelerated, video-recorded lectures viewed online. The authors performed a cross-sectional survey study of all first- and second-year students at Harvard Medical School. Respondents answered questions regarding their lecture attendance; use of class and personal time; use of accelerated, video-recorded lectures; and reasons for viewing video-recorded and live lectures. Other questions asked students to compare how well live and video-recorded lectures satisfied learning goals. Of the 353 students who received questionnaires, 204 (58%) returned responses. Collectively, students indicated watching 57.2% of lectures live, 29.4% recorded, and 3.8% using both methods. All students have watched recorded lectures, and most (88.5%) have used video-accelerating technologies. When using accelerated, video-recorded lecture as opposed to attending lecture, students felt they were more likely to increase their speed of knowledge acquisition (79.3% of students), look up additional information (67.7%), stay focused (64.8%), and learn more (63.7%). Live attendance remains the predominant method for viewing lectures. However, students find accelerated, video-recorded lectures equally or more valuable. Although educators may be uncomfortable with the fundamental change in the learning process represented by video-recorded lecture use, students' responses indicate that their decisions to attend lectures or view recorded lectures are motivated primarily by a desire to satisfy their professional goals. A challenge remains for educators to incorporate technologies students find useful while creating an interactive learning culture.

  17. Evaluation of doctors' performance as facilitators in basic medical science lecture classes in a new Malaysian medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Salwani; Salam, Abdus; Alattraqchi, Ahmed G; Annamalai, Lakshmi; Chockalingam, Annamalai; Elena, Wan Putri; Rahman, Nor Iza A; Abubakar, Abdullahi Rabiu; Haque, Mainul

    2015-01-01

    Didactic lecture is the oldest and most commonly used method of teaching. In addition, it is considered one of the most efficient ways to disseminate theories, ideas, and facts. Many critics feel that lectures are an obsolete method to use when students need to perform hands-on activities, which is an everyday need in the study of medicine. This study evaluates students' perceptions regarding lecture quality in a new medical school. This was a cross-sectional study conducted of the medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin. The study population was 468 preclinical medical students from years 1 and 2 of academic year 2012-2013. Data were collected using a validated instrument. There were six different sections of questions using a 5-point Likert scale. The data were then compiled and analyzed, using SPSS version 20. The response rate was 73%. Among 341 respondents, 30% were male and 70% were female. Eighty-five percent of respondents agree or strongly agree that the lectures had met the criteria with regard to organization of lecture materials. Similarly, 97% of students agree or strongly agree that lecturers maintained adequate voices and gestures. Medical students are quite satisfied with the lecture classes and the lectures. However, further research is required to identify student-centered teaching and learning methods to promote active learning.

  18. Structural Analysis of Lexical Bundles in University Lectures of Politics and Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Kashiha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Referred to as extended collocations, lexical bundles are considered as a main factor in building fluency in academic discourse; helping to shape meaning and coherence in a text or speech. For decades, lexical bundles have attracted considerable amount of attention in corpus-based research in English for Academic Purposes (EAP. While, the focus of the most of the studies on lexical bundles was to explore the use of these multi-word expressions in academic written registers such as research articles, academic spoken registers such as university lectures have not received that amount of attention from the scholars. In this vein, there is still an open question of how they are structurally different across disciplines. With these concerns in mind, this study aimed to explore how lexical bundles are used structurally in a 50291 words corpus of 8 university lectures across two disciplines: chemistry and politics. To this aim, the most frequent four-word bundles in the corpus were classified according to their grammatical types to see the possible disciplinary variations in their frequency of use as well as the structure involved in their use. Results of the analysis revealed that noun phrase and prepositional phrase fragments were the most common structures in the lectures of the two disciplines, accounting for more than half of the bundles in politics. University lecturers appear to apply a variety of structures in the use of lexical bundles often peculiar to the discipline in order to convey their disciplinary messages.  This would lead to the need to emphasize the instruction of the most common structures in that discipline in a way for the lectures to be as comprehensive as possible for the intended audiences.

  19. Issues in Lecturing in a Second Language: Lecturer's Behaviour and Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lindsay

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how Hong Kong Chinese engineering students with low English language proficiency manage to cope with their lectures given in English. An ethnographic case study approach was used with multiple sources of data triangulated to provide a picture of the lecture event from both the students' and the lecturer's perspectives. One of…

  20. Online Lecture Recordings and Lecture Attendance: Investigating Student Preferences in a Large First Year Psychology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Alexandra; Raju, Sadhana; Sharma, Manjula D.

    2016-01-01

    While blended learning has been around for some time, the interplay between lecture recordings, lecture attendance and grades needs further examination particularly for large cohorts of over 1,000 students in 500 seat lecture theatres. This paper reports on such an investigation with a cohort of 1,450 first year psychology students' who indicated…

  1. The Use of Recorded Lectures in Education and the Impact on Lecture Attendance and Exam Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Nynke; Groeneveld, Caspar; van Bruggen, Jan; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Universities increasingly record lectures and make them available online for students. Though the technology to record these lectures is now solidly implemented and embedded in many institutions, the impact of the usage of recorded lectures on exam performance is not clear. The purpose of the current study is to address the use of recorded…

  2. The use of recorded lectures in education and the impact on lecture attendance and exam performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Nynke; Groeneveld, Caspar; Van Bruggen, Jan; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    Universities increasingly record lectures and make them available online for students. Though the technology to record these lectures is now solidly implemented and embed- ded in many institutions, the impact of the usage of recorded lectures on exam perfor- mance is not clear. The purpose of the

  3. Lecture Attendance and Web Based Lecture Technologies: A Comparison of Student Perceptions and Usage Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Konsky, Brian R.; Ivins, Jim; Gribble, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of web based lecture recordings on learning and attendance at lectures. Student opinions regarding the perceived value of the recordings were evaluated in the context of usage patterns and final marks, and compared with attendance data and student perceptions regarding the usefulness of lectures. The availability…

  4. Improving Lecture Quality through Training in Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowbray, Robert; Perry, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Lecturing is a common instructional format but poor lecturing skills can detract from students' learning experiences and outcomes. As lecturing is essentially a form of public communication, training in public speaking may improve lecture quality. Twelve university lecturers in Malaysia participated in a six-week public speaking skills training…

  5. Lecture notes on diophantine analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zannier, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    These lecture notes originate from a course delivered at the Scuola Normale in Pisa in 2006. Generally speaking, the prerequisites do not go beyond basic mathematical material and are accessible to many undergraduates. The contents mainly concern diophantine problems on affine curves, in practice describing the integer solutions of equations in two variables. This case historically suggested some major ideas for more general problems. Starting with linear and quadratic equations, the important connections with Diophantine Approximation are presented and Thue's celebrated results are proved in full detail. In later chapters more modern issues on heights of algebraic points are dealt with, and applied to a sharp quantitative treatment of the unit equation. The book also contains several Supplements, hinted exercises and an Appendix on recent work on heights.

  6. Two lectures on track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waligorski, M.P.R.

    1987-01-01

    In a series of two lectures the principles of track structure theory, developed by Katz and collaborators, are reviewed. The text is intended to serve as an introduction to the theory. Applications of the model to c-hit physical detectors and to biological systems are reviewed. The model relates the signal of a detector after doses of X and gamma radiations to its signal after heavy charged particle irradiations, and is applicable to a variety of physical dosimeters: alanine, thermoluminescence and the Fricke dosimeters, to the inactivation of enzymes and viruses, and to biological systems: description of survival and neoplastic transformations in mammalian cells. Application of the model to heavy-ion cancer radiotherapy and to radiation protection is discussed as well as the controversies around the track structure approach. The model suggests new insights to fundamental research in detector theory and in radiobiology and in their applications in radiotherapy and radiation protection. 41 refs., 39 figs. (author)

  7. 1989 lectures in complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, E.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Lectures on a Theory of Computation and Complexity over the Reals; Algorithmic Information Content, Church-Turing Thesis, Physical Entroph, and Maxwell's Demon; Physical Measures of Complexity; An Introduction to Chaos and Prediction; Hamiltonian Chaos in Nonlinear Polarized Optical Beam; Chemical Oscillators and Nonlinear Chemical Dynamics; Isotropic Navier-Stokes Turbulence. I. Qualitative Features and Basic Equations; Isotropic Navier-Stokes Turbulence. II. Statistical Approximation Methods; Lattice Gases; Data-Parallel Computation and the Connection Machine; Preimages and Forecasting for Cellular Automata; Lattice-Gas Models for Multiphase Flows and Magnetohydrodynamics; Probabilistic Cellular Automata: Some Statistical Mechanical Considerations; Complexity Due to Disorder and Frustration; Self-Organization by Simulated Evolution; Theoretical Immunology; Morphogenesis by Cell Intercalation; and Theoretical Physics Meets Experimental Neurobiology

  8. Collide@CERN - public lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to a public lecture by Gilles Jobin, first winner of the Collide@CERN Geneva Dance and Performance Artist-in-residence Prize, and his CERN inspiration partner, Joao Pequenao. They will present their work in dance and science at the Globe of Science and Innovation on Wednesday, 23 May 2012 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6.30 p.m.).   
                                                  Programme 19:00 Opening address by - Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, - Ariane Koek...

  9. Lecture 3: Web Application Security

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Computer security has been an increasing concern for IT professionals for a number of years, yet despite all the efforts, computer systems and networks remain highly vulnerable to attacks of different kinds. Design flaws and security bugs in the underlying software are among the main reasons for this. This lecture focuses on security aspects of Web application development. Various vulnerabilities typical to web applications (such as Cross-site scripting, SQL injection, cross-site request forgery etc.) are introduced and discussed. Sebastian Lopienski is CERN’s deputy Computer Security Officer. He works on security strategy and policies; offers internal consultancy and audit services; develops and maintains security tools for vulnerability assessment and intrusion detection; provides training and awareness raising; and does incident investigation and response. During his work at CERN since 2001, Sebastian has had various assignments, including designing and developing software to manage and support servic...

  10. Short lecture series in sustainable product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.

    2005-01-01

    Three lectures in sustainable product development models, methods and mindsets should give insight into the way of thinking about the environment when developing products. The first two lectures will guide you through: . Environmental problems in industry & life-cycle thinking . Professional...... methods for analysing and changing products’ environmental profiles . Sustainability as a driver for innovation...

  11. Students' Perception of Live Lectures' Inherent Disadvantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Juraj; Pale, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to provide insight into various properties of live lectures from the perspective of sophomore engineering students. In an anonymous online survey conducted at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, we investigated students' opinions regarding lecture attendance, inherent disadvantages of live…

  12. What Predicts Skill in Lecture Note Taking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peverly, Stephen T.; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Brown, Cindy; Sumowski, James; Alidoost, Moona; Garner, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    Despite the importance of good lecture notes to test performance, very little is known about the cognitive processes that underlie effective lecture note taking. The primary purpose of the 2 studies reported (a pilot study and Study 1) was to investigate 3 processes hypothesized to be significantly related to quality of notes: transcription…

  13. Enhancing the Lecture: Revitalizing the Traditional Format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonwell, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    The traditional lecture format of college courses can be enhanced by including active learning designed to further course goals of learning knowledge, developing skills, or fostering attitudes. Techniques suggested include using pauses, short writing periods, think-pair-share activities, formative quizzes, lecture summaries, and several assessment…

  14. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented

  15. Academics respond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK......Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK...

  16. 2006 - 2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    1st Term: 02.10. 2006 - 15.12.2006 LECTURE SERIES Practical statistics for particle physicists by L. Lyons, Univ. Oxford, GB 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 October 11:00 -12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg 500 Gravitational waves by M. Landry, LIGO Hanford Observatory, Richland, USA 16, 17, 18 October 11:00-12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg 500 Neutrino physics, past and future by B. Kayser, FERMILAB, Batavia, USA 27, 28, 29, 30 November, 1 December 11:00-12:00 - TH Auditorium, Bldg 4, 3rd Floor QCD: are we ready for the LHC by S. Frixione, INFN, Genoa, It 4, 5, 6, 7 December 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the CERN bulletin, the WWW, and by Notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  17. Anthropocentric Video Segmentation for Lecture Webcasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas Raul

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many lecture recording and presentation systems transmit slides or chalkboard content along with a small video of the instructor. As a result, two areas of the screen are competing for the viewer's attention, causing the widely known split-attention effect. Face and body gestures, such as pointing, do not appear in the context of the slides or the board. To eliminate this problem, this article proposes to extract the lecturer from the video stream and paste his or her image onto the board or slide image. As a result, the lecturer acting in front of the board or slides becomes the center of attention. The entire lecture presentation becomes more human-centered. This article presents both an analysis of the underlying psychological problems and an explanation of signal processing techniques that are applied in a concrete system. The presented algorithm is able to extract and overlay the lecturer online and in real time at full video resolution.

  18. Anthropocentric Video Segmentation for Lecture Webcasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Rojas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Many lecture recording and presentation systems transmit slides or chalkboard content along with a small video of the instructor. As a result, two areas of the screen are competing for the viewer's attention, causing the widely known split-attention effect. Face and body gestures, such as pointing, do not appear in the context of the slides or the board. To eliminate this problem, this article proposes to extract the lecturer from the video stream and paste his or her image onto the board or slide image. As a result, the lecturer acting in front of the board or slides becomes the center of attention. The entire lecture presentation becomes more human-centered. This article presents both an analysis of the underlying psychological problems and an explanation of signal processing techniques that are applied in a concrete system. The presented algorithm is able to extract and overlay the lecturer online and in real time at full video resolution.

  19. Academic Training: Astronomy from Space

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 14, 15, 16, 18 March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Astronomy from Space by T. Courvoisier / Observatoire de Genève In the very wide field of High Energy astrophysics we will select a number of topics that range from the source of radiative energy in the deep potential well around Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes and the basics of accretion disks around compact objects to the description and (where possible) the understanding of binary systems including a compact object (neutron star or black hole), of Active Galactic Nuclei and of gamma ray bursts. The approach that is chosen aims at giving an understanding of the most important phenomenologies encountered in high energy astrophysics rather than a detailed knowledge of one specific topic. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  20. 'Academic literacies approaches to genre'?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Street

    Full Text Available I provide an overview of approaches to writing referred to as 'academic literacies' building on broader traditions, such as New Literacy Studies, and I draw out the relevance of such traditions for the ways in which lecturers provide support to their students with regard to the writing requirements of the University. I offer three case studies of the application of academic literacies approaches to programmes concerned with supporting student writing, in the UK and the USA. I briefly conclude by asking how far these accounts and this work can be seen to bring together many of the themes raised at SIGET conferences - including academic literacies and its relation to genre theories - and express the hope that it opens up trajectories for future research and collaboration of the kind they were founded to develop.

  1. Academic writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  2. The role of observational research in improving faculty lecturing skills: A qualitative study in an Italian dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visioli, Sonia; Lodi, Giovanni; Carrassi, Antonio; Zannini, Lucia

    2009-08-01

    This pilot study is based on observational research of lecturing skills during the annual Oral Medicine course at the Milan Dentistry School. Our goals were to explore how teachers exhibited desirable lecturing skills, to observe how their attitudes and lecturing skills affected students' attention and thereby learning, and to provide feedback. We prepared a structured observational grid divided into four categories: explaining, questioning, visual aids, and lecturer attitude. The grid was filled in by a participant, nonactive researcher. Two main types of lecture were observed: "traditional" and "interactive". Both of these can result in a high level of attention among students. Among the categories, only "lecturer attitude" appeared to affect student attention. In particular, the skills of "speaking aloud" and "sustaining verbal communication with vocal inflection" appeared to have the greatest impact on lecturer attitude. The data were then presented blindly to the five lecturers, who were able to identify their own lesson. Our grid proved to be a valid instrument although it was very expensive. When integrated with other strategies for improving lecturing, such as student scoring, peer evaluation, and microteaching, observational research can be a cost-effective method to stimulate guided reflection and to improve the lecturing skills of faculty members.

  3. (A Research on Professional Stress of Accounting Profession Staff andAccountings lecturers)

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldırım, Suat

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, commonly used word “stress“ became the part of work life. Stress is inevitable in work life. Some jobs are more stressful than other jobs. Thinking that everybody lives in stressful condition, determining of stress level has vital importance. Due to this importance, in this study, stress level has been researched for Accounting Profession Staff and Accounting lecturers. To achieve this purpose, a survey was conducted on 73 Accounting Profession Staff and Accounting lecturers. In thi...

  4. Lecturing and Loving It: Applying the Information-Processing Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jonathan K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of lecturing, when done properly, in high schools. Describes the positive attributes of effective lecturers. Provides a human information-processing model applicable to the task of lecturing to students. (HB)

  5. Perceptions of Students and Self- assessment of Lecturers on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    assessments of lecturers on written essay error feedback. Overall 153 University of Botswana students and 20 lecturers participated in this study. All the students and 12 lecturers completed different but related questionnaires with both closed and ...

  6. Supporting English-medium pedagogy through an online corpus of science and engineering lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunioshi, Nílson; Noguchi, Judy; Tojo, Kazuko; Hayashi, Hiroko

    2016-05-01

    As English-medium instruction (EMI) spreads around the world, university teachers and students who are non-native speakers of English (NNS) need to put much effort into the delivery or reception of content. Construction of scientific meaning in the process of learning is already complex when instruction is delivered in the first language of the teachers and students, and may become even more challenging in a second language, because science education depends greatly on language. In order to identify important pedagogical functions that teachers use to deliver content and to present different ways to realise each function, a corpus of lectures related to science and engineering courses was created and analysed. NNS teachers and students in science and engineering involved in EMI higher education can obtain insights for delivering and listening to lectures from the Online Corpus of Academic Lectures (OnCAL).

  7. Active Learning and Cooperative Learning in the Organic Chemistry Lecture Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Donald R.

    1999-08-01

    Faculty in the physical sciences are one of the academic groups least receptive to the use of active learning strategies and cooperative learning in their classrooms. This is particularly so in traditional lecture classes. It is the objective of this paper to show how effective these techniques can be in improving student performance in classes. The use of active learning strategies and cooperative learning groups in my organic chemistry lecture classes has increased the overall pass rate in my classes by an astounding 20-30% over the traditional lecture mode. This has been accomplished without any reduction in "standards". The actual methods employed are presented as well as a discussion of how I came to radically change the way I teach my classes.

  8. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Bingham, Alpheus

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are hosted by the partners of the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, CERN, The UN Institute of Training and Research and the University of Geneva. The goal of the Lectures is to provide an inspirational forum for participants from the various international organizations and academic institutions in Geneva to explore how information technology is enabling greater citizen participation in tackling global development challenges as well as global scientific research. The first Citizen Cyberscience Lectures will welcome two speakers who have both made major innovative contributions in this area. Dr. Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel International, one of Africa’s most successful mobile network operators, will talk about “Mobile phones and Africa: a success story”. Dr. Alpheus Bingham, founder of InnoCentive, a Web-based community that solves indus...

  9. The Effects of Instructional Design on Student Engagement with Video Lectures at Cyber Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Costley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The number of students enrolled in online courses that use video lectures is on the rise. However, research shows that the number of students watching video lectures is low, and the number watching videos to completion is even lower. Background: This paper seeks to understand this problem by looking for correlations between instructional design and student engagement with video lectures. Methodology: Students at a cyber-university in South Korea (n=1801 were surveyed on their perception of the instructional design used in the courses they took and their engagement with online video lectures. Contribution: This paper contributes to the body of knowledge by demonstrating positive correlations between instructional design, watching, and finishing video lectures. Findings: While most other research has found low levels of online lecture viewership, this paper found significantly higher numbers watching and finishing videos. Other major findings of the paper are that five key elements of instructional design for online learning environments (designing methods, setting the curriculum, establishing time parameters, establishing netiquette, and utilizing the medium effectively all correlated positively with students watching and finishing video lectures. Recommendations for Practitioners\t: Based on findings in this paper, it is recommended that practitioners consider taking actions when designing their instruction for online courses. These include batching their video lectures together by topic, devoting greater resources to helping students utilize the medium, and communicate time parameters in a way that encourages students to view video lectures in a timely manner. Recommendation for Researchers: As the watching of video lectures in this study was mandatory for learners, an interesting area of further research would be to examine whether that decision led to higher numbers of students watching them. Future Research: It is important for

  10. Using Competencies to Assess Entry-Level Knowledge of Students Graduating from Parks and Recreation Academic Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Amy R.; Elkins, Daniel J.; Beggs, Brent A.

    2014-01-01

    To address the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism, and Related Professions accreditation standard 7.01.01, the Entry Level Competency Assessment was developed to measure 46 competencies in four categories needed by entry level professionals. Students rated their competence prior to beginning their senior internship. The results…

  11. Problematic Smartphone Use, Deep and Surface Approaches to Learning, and Social Media Use in Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozgonjuk, Dmitri; Saal, Kristiina

    2018-01-01

    Several studies have shown that problematic smartphone use (PSU) is related to detrimental outcomes, such as worse psychological well-being, higher cognitive distraction, and poorer academic outcomes. In addition, many studies have shown that PSU is strongly related to social media use. Despite this, the relationships between PSU, as well as the frequency of social media use in lectures, and different approaches to learning have not been previously studied. In our study, we hypothesized that both PSU and the frequency of social media use in lectures are negatively correlated with a deep approach to learning (defined as learning for understanding) and positively correlated with a surface approach to learning (defined as superficial learning). The study participants were 415 Estonian university students aged 19–46 years (78.8% females; age M = 23.37, SD = 4.19); the effective sample comprised 405 participants aged 19–46 years (79.0% females; age M = 23.33, SD = 4.21). In addition to basic socio-demographics, participants were asked about the frequency of their social media use in lectures, and they filled out the Estonian Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale and the Estonian Revised Study Process Questionnaire. Bivariate correlation analysis showed that PSU and the frequency of social media use in lectures were negatively correlated with a deep approach to learning and positively correlated with a surface approach to learning. Mediation analysis showed that social media use in lectures completely mediates the relationship between PSU and approaches to learning. These results indicate that the frequency of social media use in lectures might explain the relationships between poorer academic outcomes and PSU. PMID:29316697

  12. Problematic Smartphone Use, Deep and Surface Approaches to Learning, and Social Media Use in Lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Rozgonjuk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that problematic smartphone use (PSU is related to detrimental outcomes, such as worse psychological well-being, higher cognitive distraction, and poorer academic outcomes. In addition, many studies have shown that PSU is strongly related to social media use. Despite this, the relationships between PSU, as well as the frequency of social media use in lectures, and different approaches to learning have not been previously studied. In our study, we hypothesized that both PSU and the frequency of social media use in lectures are negatively correlated with a deep approach to learning (defined as learning for understanding and positively correlated with a surface approach to learning (defined as superficial learning. The study participants were 415 Estonian university students aged 19–46 years (78.8% females; age M = 23.37, SD = 4.19; the effective sample comprised 405 participants aged 19–46 years (79.0% females; age M = 23.33, SD = 4.21. In addition to basic socio-demographics, participants were asked about the frequency of their social media use in lectures, and they filled out the Estonian Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale and the Estonian Revised Study Process Questionnaire. Bivariate correlation analysis showed that PSU and the frequency of social media use in lectures were negatively correlated with a deep approach to learning and positively correlated with a surface approach to learning. Mediation analysis showed that social media use in lectures completely mediates the relationship between PSU and approaches to learning. These results indicate that the frequency of social media use in lectures might explain the relationships between poorer academic outcomes and PSU.

  13. Problematic Smartphone Use, Deep and Surface Approaches to Learning, and Social Media Use in Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozgonjuk, Dmitri; Saal, Kristiina; Täht, Karin

    2018-01-08

    Several studies have shown that problematic smartphone use (PSU) is related to detrimental outcomes, such as worse psychological well-being, higher cognitive distraction, and poorer academic outcomes. In addition, many studies have shown that PSU is strongly related to social media use. Despite this, the relationships between PSU, as well as the frequency of social media use in lectures, and different approaches to learning have not been previously studied. In our study, we hypothesized that both PSU and the frequency of social media use in lectures are negatively correlated with a deep approach to learning (defined as learning for understanding) and positively correlated with a surface approach to learning (defined as superficial learning). The study participants were 415 Estonian university students aged 19-46 years (78.8% females; age M = 23.37, SD = 4.19); the effective sample comprised 405 participants aged 19-46 years (79.0% females; age M = 23.33, SD = 4.21). In addition to basic socio-demographics, participants were asked about the frequency of their social media use in lectures, and they filled out the Estonian Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale and the Estonian Revised Study Process Questionnaire. Bivariate correlation analysis showed that PSU and the frequency of social media use in lectures were negatively correlated with a deep approach to learning and positively correlated with a surface approach to learning. Mediation analysis showed that social media use in lectures completely mediates the relationship between PSU and approaches to learning. These results indicate that the frequency of social media use in lectures might explain the relationships between poorer academic outcomes and PSU.

  14. Academic training: Introduction to Supersymmetry

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 12, 13, 14, 15 February, from 11:00 to 12:00 Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to Supersymmetry D. Kaplan, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA In these lectures, I will introduce supersymmetry as an extension to spacetime symmetries both formally and physically. I will present motivations for why we think supersymmetry may exist in the real world, and may manifest itself at the LHC. I will describe the current set of models of softly broken supersymmetry at the electroweak scale and the parts that make them exciting and the parts that make people sick. I will then cover the phenomenology of the various models - the spectra and some of the best studied collider signals. Finally, I will describe the phenomenology of the full supersymmetric parameter space in general terms and discuss this collider signals not covered by the classic models.

  15. Impact of hybrid delivery of education on student academic performance and the student experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Heather Brennan; Nutter, Douglas A; Charneski, Lisa; Butko, Peter

    2009-11-12

    To compare student academic performance and the student experience in the first-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program between the main and newly opened satellite campuses of the University of Maryland. Student performance indicators including graded assessments, course averages, cumulative first-year grade point average (GPA), and introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) evaluations were analyzed retrospectively. Student experience indicators were obtained via an online survey instrument and included involvement in student organizations; time-budgeting practices; and stress levels and their perceived effect on performance. Graded assessments, course averages, GPA, and IPPE evaluations were indistinguishable between campuses. Students' time allocation was not different between campuses, except for time spent attending class and watching lecture videos. There was no difference between students' stress levels at each campus. The implementation of a satellite campus to expand pharmacy education yielded academic performance and student engagement comparable to those from traditional delivery methods.

  16. Family and School Influences on Youths' Behavioral and Academic Outcomes: Cross-Level Interactions between Parental Monitoring and Character Development Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, Namik; Liew, Jeffrey; Luo, Wen

    2017-01-01

    The authors examined the joint (interactive) roles of the Second Step curriculum (a validated social-emotional learning and bullying prevention program; Committee for Children, Seattle, WA) and parenting practices on students' behavioral and academic outcomes in Grades 5-8. Participants were 763 parents and their children from 22 schools (8 control and 14 treatment). A 2-level random coefficient model was conducted to assess the effect of parental monitoring on school outcomes, as well as the interaction between character development curriculum and parental monitoring. Results indicated that parental monitoring was a significant predictor of school behaviors and school grades. Furthermore, the Second Step curriculum moderated the relationship between parental monitoring and problem behaviors, prosocial behaviors, and grades at school. Specifically, in schools without the Second Step curriculum parental monitoring predicted higher school grades but had no impact on students' school behaviors. By contrast, in schools with the Second Step curriculum, parental monitoring predicted fewer problem behaviors as well as more prosocial behaviors. The study results highlight the joint influences of the family and the school in children's behavioral and academic trajectories. Results have implications for education and intervention, including improving the school climate, student behaviors, and learning or achievement.

  17. Research of CO2 concentration in naturally ventilated lecture room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laska, Marta; Dudkiewicz, Edyta

    2017-11-01

    Naturally ventilated buildings especially dedicated for educational purposes need to be design to achieve required level of thermal comfort and indoor air quality. It is crucial in terms of both: health and productivity of the room users. Higher requirements of indoor environment are important due to the level of students concentration, their ability to acquire new knowledge and willingness to interact with the lecturer. The article presents the results of experimental study and surveys undertaken in naturally ventilated lecture room. The data is analysed in terms of CO2 concentration and its possible influence on users. Furthermore the outcome of the research is compared with the CO2 concentration models available in the literature.

  18. Exploring Plagiarism into Perspectives of Indonesian Academics and Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Agustina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism has been done by students from around the globes. There has been a heated discussion of finding reasons why plagiarism occurred in academic world and Eastern students in particular. This research wants to explore how actually students perceive plagiarism in their academic writing as well as how lecturers coped with plagiarism in the students’ assignments. The research participants were taken from 2 different majors, 32 English Education students and 10 Psychology students as well as 5 lecturers from English Education Department and 3 lecturers from Psychology Faculty in one of private universities in Central Java Province, Indonesia. Questionnaires were distributed to those respondents and also interviews were conducted to several lecturers and students. The results of questionnaire and interview showed that both students and lecturers knew and understand the essence of plagiarism, however, students admitted that they still plagiarised in their assignment. Lecturers, on the other hand, revealed that they could figure out when students plagiarised others’ works. However, it was limited to crossing over assignments between students. In other words, detecting plagiarism was done manually and restricted to students’ written works only. In conclusion, despite comprehending the meaning of plagiarism, student still plagiarised since there was not any real action from lecturers to encounter it.

  19. Cooperative learning combined with short periods of lecturing: A good alternative in teaching biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Santander, Ana

    2008-01-01

    The informal activities of cooperative learning and short periods of lecturing has been combined and used in the university teaching of biochemistry as part of the first year course of Optics and Optometry in the academic years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006. The lessons were previously elaborated by the teacher and included all that is necessary to understand the topic (text, figures, graphics, diagrams, pictures, etc.). Additionally, a questionnaire was prepared for every chapter. All lessons contained three parts: objectives, approach and development, and the assessment of the topic. Team work, responsibility, and communication skills were some of the abilities developed with this new methodology. Students worked collaboratively in small groups of two or three following the teacher's instructions with short periods of lecturing that clarified misunderstood concepts. Homework was minimized. On comparing this combined methodology with the traditional one (only lecture), students were found to exhibit a higher satisfaction with the new method. They were more involved in the learning process and had a better attitude toward the subject. The use of this new methodology showed a significant increase in the mean score of the students' academic results. The rate of students who failed the subject was significantly inferior in comparison with those who failed in the previous years when only lecturing was applied. This combined methodology helped the teacher to observe the apprenticeship process of students better and to act as a facilitator in the process of building students' knowledge. Copyright © 2008 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Lectures Abandoned: Active Learning by Active Seminars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Corry, Aino Vonge

    2012-01-01

    Traditional lecture-based courses are widely criticised for be- ing less eective in teaching. The question is of course what should replace the lectures and various active learning tech- niques have been suggested and studied. In this paper, we report on our experiences of redesigning a software ......- tive seminars as a replacement of traditional lectures, an activity template for the contents of active seminars, an ac- count on how storytelling supported the seminars, as well as reports on our and the students' experiences....