WorldWideScience

Sample records for learning university dpto

  1. The Learning University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Glenys

    1999-01-01

    As universities make cross-sectoral alliances, various models for integrating postsecondary education into universities arise: contract, brokerage, collaborative, validation, joint program, dual-sector institution, tertiary university, metaphoric, and federal. The integrated, comprehensive university is the learning university of the 21st century.…

  2. Open University Learning Analytics dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzilek, Jakub; Hlosta, Martin; Zdrahal, Zdenek

    2017-11-28

    Learning Analytics focuses on the collection and analysis of learners' data to improve their learning experience by providing informed guidance and to optimise learning materials. To support the research in this area we have developed a dataset, containing data from courses presented at the Open University (OU). What makes the dataset unique is the fact that it contains demographic data together with aggregated clickstream data of students' interactions in the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). This enables the analysis of student behaviour, represented by their actions. The dataset contains the information about 22 courses, 32,593 students, their assessment results, and logs of their interactions with the VLE represented by daily summaries of student clicks (10,655,280 entries). The dataset is freely available at https://analyse.kmi.open.ac.uk/open_dataset under a CC-BY 4.0 license.

  3. E-Learning in the Corporate University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Gill; Macpherson, Allan

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the development of e-learning within the context of corporate universities with the aim of informing the debate on e-learning and establishing key areas of concern for emerging corporate universities. Design/methodology/approach: Three case reviews of large leading edge organizations in different sectors. Findings: Whilst…

  4. Distance Learning Library Services in Ugandan Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayende, Jackline Estomihi Kiwelu; Obura, Constant Okello

    2013-01-01

    The study carried out at Makerere University and Uganda Martyrs University in 2010 aimed at providing strategies for enhanced distance learning library services in terms of convenience and adequacy. The study adopted a cross sectional descriptive survey design. The study revealed services provided in branch libraries in Ugandan universities were…

  5. Promoting Learning: What Universities Don't Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Universities seek to promote student learning, but assessment and credentials can undermine students' intrinsic motivation to learn. Findings from research on how people learn, mindsets, expert performance and good health are seldom incorporated into the way universities organise learning experiences.

  6. Learning Management Systems and E-Learning within Cyprus Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirkhanpour, Monaliz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an extensive research study and results on the use of existing open-source Learning Management Systems, or LMS within the public and private universities of Cyprus. The most significant objective of this research is the identification of the different types of E-Learning, i.e. Computer-Based Training (CBT, Technology-Based Learning (TBL, and Web-Based Training (WBT within Cyprus universities. The paper identifies the benefits and limitations of the main learning approaches used in higher educational institutions, i.e. synchronous and asynchronous learning, investigates the open-source LMS used in the Cypriot universities and compares their features with regards to students’ preferences for a collaborative E-Learning environment. The required data for this research study were collected from undergraduate and graduate students, alumni, faculty members, and IT professionals who currently work and/or study at the public and private universities of Cyprus. The most noteworthy recommendation of this study is the clear indication that most of the undergraduate students that extensively use the specific E-Learning platform of their university do not have a clear picture of the differences between an LMS and a VLE. This gap has to be gradually diminished in order to make optimum use of the different features offered by the specific E-Learning platform.

  7. Learning Universal Computations with Spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Uhlmann, Marvin; Kappen, Hilbert J.; Memmesheimer, Raoul-Martin

    2016-01-01

    Providing the neurobiological basis of information processing in higher animals, spiking neural networks must be able to learn a variety of complicated computations, including the generation of appropriate, possibly delayed reactions to inputs and the self-sustained generation of complex activity patterns, e.g. for locomotion. Many such computations require previous building of intrinsic world models. Here we show how spiking neural networks may solve these different tasks. Firstly, we derive constraints under which classes of spiking neural networks lend themselves to substrates of powerful general purpose computing. The networks contain dendritic or synaptic nonlinearities and have a constrained connectivity. We then combine such networks with learning rules for outputs or recurrent connections. We show that this allows to learn even difficult benchmark tasks such as the self-sustained generation of desired low-dimensional chaotic dynamics or memory-dependent computations. Furthermore, we show how spiking networks can build models of external world systems and use the acquired knowledge to control them. PMID:27309381

  8. Information Systems in University Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe SABAU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors of this article are going to bring into light the significance, the place and the role of information systems in the university education process. At the same time they define the objectives and the target group of the subject named Economic Information Systems and state the competence gained by students by studying this subject. Special attention is given to the curriculum to be taught to students and to a suggestive enumeration of a series of economic applications that can be themes for laboratory practice and for students’ dissertation (graduation thesis.

  9. University Libraries and Digital Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    University libraries around the world have embraced the possibilities of the digital learning environment, facilitating its use and proactively seeking to develop the provision of electronic resources and services. The digital environment offers opportunities and challenges for librarians in all aspects of their work – in information literacy, virtual reference, institutional repositories, e-learning, managing digital resources and social media. The authors in this timely book are leading exp...

  10. Online Learning - Between University Studies and Workplace Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Lundh Snis, Ulrika

    2018-01-01

    —by attending a blended learning course? The study builds on Engeström’s (2001) expansive learning model of two interacting activity systems, namely, the students’ master’s course and their professional work places. The study follows a mixed methods approach and finds that the students integrated requirements......This study explores learning when professionals return to education and use their professional work experience to fulfil their study objectives. The research question is: How do students learn from experiences in two contexts—a master’s course at a university and their organisations of employment...

  11. ENGINEERING OF UNIVERSITY INTELLIGENT LEARNING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliy M. Trembach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article issues of engineering intelligent tutoring systems of University with adaptation are considered. The article also dwells on some modern approaches to engineering of information systems. It shows the role of engineering e-learning devices (systems in system engineering. The article describes the basic principles of system engineering and these principles are expanded regarding to intelligent information systems. The structure of intelligent learning systems with adaptation of the individual learning environments based on services is represented in the article.

  12. Constructing museum learning at the university level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2011-01-01

    in a museum environment. How can museums be implemented at the university level and become part of a curriculum that demands high academic standards while at the same time exploiting and benefitting from the complexity and aesthetically determined learning potentials offered by museums? Following George A....... Hein’s notion of a ‘constructivist museum’ the purpose of the article is to suggest and demonstrate a learning strategy that focuses on the learner’s consideration of his or her own learning but elaborates on Hein’s general view of the physical surroundings and deals with the question of how exhibition...

  13. M-Learning Pilot at Sofia University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourova, Elissaveta; Dulev, Pavlin; Petrova-Antonova, Dessislava; Bontchev, Boyan

    2014-01-01

    Many universities have designed specialized Learning Management Systems in order to facilitate the management of education, the access to knowledge and educational resources, and the communications with all stakeholders involved. With the wide spread of mobile technologies nowadays, new challenges emerge for adapting the available systems to the…

  14. University Academics' Experiences of Learning through Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Trudy; Harvey, Marina; Cahir, Jayde

    2016-01-01

    The use of mentoring for staff development is well established within schools and the business sector, yet it has received limited consideration in the higher education literature as an approach to supporting learning for academics. In this study located at one metropolitan university in Australia, an online questionnaire and one-on-one…

  15. Introducing RFID at Middlesex University Learning Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Alan; Chandrakar, Rajesh

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the first year of the implementation of radio frequency identification (RFID) in Middlesex University Learning Resources. Design/methodology/approach: The technology is explained in detail to set the scene. Information on the implementation is presented in chronological order. Findings: Problems which would generally be…

  16. Comparison as a Universal Learning Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkulova, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores "comparison" as a universal metasubject learning action, a key curricular element envisaged by the Russian Federal State Educational Standards. Representing the modern learner's fundamental pragmatic skill embedding such core capacities as information processing, critical thinking, robust decision-making, and…

  17. Conceptualising Lifelong Learning: A Reflection on Lifelong Learning at Lund University (Sweden) and Middlesex University (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukari, Abdulai

    2005-01-01

    Lifelong Learning has in recent years become a fundamental element of many educational policy strategies aimed at achieving the goal of socio-economic development. The role of universities in this is viewed by some as crucial and requires some attention. This article examines the concept of lifelong learning and suggests another way in which it…

  18. The University in the Learning Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundvall, Bengt-Åke

    In all parts of the world, universities are exposed to a growing pressure to change. This is caused by the emergence of new relationship between the economic dynamics and the production of knowledge as well as by policy and administrative initiatives finding their rationale in interpretations...... of these changes. In this paper an attempt is made to specify some of the new challenges, and suggest appropriate responses. Under the heading 'the learning economy' changes in the context of universities are identified. One important conclusion is that traditional modes of organisation, characterised by sharp......' most significant contribution to society and the economy will remain well-educated graduates with critical minds and good learning skills....

  19. Learning biases predict a word order universal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Jennifer; Smolensky, Paul; Legendre, Géraldine

    2012-03-01

    How recurrent typological patterns, or universals, emerge from the extensive diversity found across the world's languages constitutes a central question for linguistics and cognitive science. Recent challenges to a fundamental assumption of generative linguistics-that universal properties of the human language acquisition faculty constrain the types of grammatical systems which can occur-suggest the need for new types of empirical evidence connecting typology to biases of learners. Using an artificial language learning paradigm in which adult subjects are exposed to a mix of grammatical systems (similar to a period of linguistic change), we show that learners' biases mirror a word-order universal, first proposed by Joseph Greenberg, which constrains typological patterns of adjective, numeral, and noun ordering. We briefly summarize the results of a probabilistic model of the hypothesized biases and their effect on learning, and discuss the broader implications of the results for current theories of the origins of cross-linguistic word-order preferences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. University technology platform of anticipatory learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Davidovich Gitelman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The innovative development sets large-scale and challenging tasks, which need to be addressed in the lack-of-knowledge conditions and require the coordination and integration of numerous expert structures, which are scattered around the world and have different status and competencies. One of the mechanisms of integrating the partners’ intellectual and financial resources is provided by the technology platforms. The article discusses the nature and functions of technology platforms and analyzes the experience of their application in different countries with a special emphasis on universities. The article gives an overview of the various interpretations of technology platform concepts. It also describes the development and implementation of the technological platform at the Ural Federal University (research and education centre ‘ENGEC’, which was targeted at organizing anticipatory learning in the sphere of energy engineering and high-tech industries; its mechanism and role in improving different university activities and processes are shown. This platform is based on the original methodology ‘Integrated System of Consulting, Training, and Transformation’ (ISCT, which includes authentic methods and technologies, which are used in the educational process. A significant advantage of this methodology is that it can be applied in university education as well as in corporate training integrated with innovative activities.

  1. Evaluating Usability of E-Learning Systems in Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Kipkurui Kiget; Professor G. Wanyembi; Anselemo Ikoha Peters

    2014-01-01

    The use of e-learning systems has increased significantly in the recent times. E-learning systems are supplementing teaching and learning in universities globally. Kenyan universities have adopted e-learning technologies as means for delivering course content. However despite adoption of these systems, there are considerable challenges facing the usability of the systems. Lecturers and students have different perceptions in regard to the usability of e-learning systems. The aim of this study ...

  2. Self-Access Language Learning for Malaysian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Andrew Yau Hau

    2012-01-01

    Just a few Malaysian universities offer self-access language learning activities to students. The objective of this study is to investigate if self-access learning can promote self-directed or autonomous learning in a public Malaysian technical university. Data collection is by means of interviewing the Director, lecturers, and students in a…

  3. Interactive Multimedia Learning: Innovating Classroom Education in a Malaysian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Fui-Theng; Neo, Mai

    2014-01-01

    This research study was conducted at INTI International University, and aimed at enhancing the quality of classroom learning for University students with three important emphases: Gagne's instructional model, multimedia, and student-centred learning. An Interactive Learning Module (ILM) was developed as the core component in forming the…

  4. Universal Design for Learning in Teaching Large Lecture Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Tereza; Lee-Post, Anita; Hapke, Holly

    2017-01-01

    To augment traditional lecture with instructional tools that provide options for content representation, learner engagement, and learning expression, we followed the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles to design and implement a learning environment for teaching and learning in large lecture classes. To this end, we incorporated four…

  5. Game Based Learning (GBL) adoption model for universities: cesim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Game Based Learning (GBL) adoption model for universities: cesim simulation. ... The global market has escalated the need of Game Based Learning (GBL) to offer a wide range of courses since there is a ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  6. University of Limpopo student nurses' clinical learning experiences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University of Limpopo student nurses' clinical learning experiences in a public hospital at ... was applied to explore and describe the experiences of student nurses' clinical learning ... The ethical principles relevant to the study were observed.

  7. INFORMATION-ANALYTICAL LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Tryus

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider conceptual approaches to creation of information systems, learning management school, which uses modern methods of decision-making and simulational modeling, web-technologies. The main criteria for the selection of development tools of the system are: openness, free of charge, easy to use and independence from system software and hardware. The chosen technology and the system itself satisfies such requirements as: focus on national and international standards in the field of higher education, adherence to service-oriented architecture, ensuring stable operation with a large number of users, support for a clear division of user rights to obtain and change information resources, software modularity the final product and its ability to integrate into the corporate information system of the university

  8. EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING IN INTRODUCING IFRS AT UNIVERSITIES IN INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Andian Ari Istiningrum

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Experiential Learning in Introducing IFRS at Universities in Indonesia. The purpose of this study is to find the appropriate learning model for accounting learning process at universities in Indonesia due to the process of convergence to IFRS that has already occurred in Indonesia. The study is conducted by reviewing, analyzing and evaluating the effects and solutions of convergence to IFRS in other countries that have already implemented IFRS. All possible accounting learning metho...

  9. Quantum learning and universal quantum matching machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masahide; Carlini, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Suppose that three kinds of quantum systems are given in some unknown states vertical bar f> xN , vertical bar g 1 > xK , and vertical bar g 2 > xK , and we want to decide which template state vertical bar g 1 > or vertical bar g 2 >, each representing the feature of the pattern class C 1 or C 2 , respectively, is closest to the input feature state vertical bar f>. This is an extension of the pattern matching problem into the quantum domain. Assuming that these states are known a priori to belong to a certain parametric family of pure qubit systems, we derive two kinds of matching strategies. The first one is a semiclassical strategy that is obtained by the natural extension of conventional matching strategies and consists of a two-stage procedure: identification (estimation) of the unknown template states to design the classifier (learning process to train the classifier) and classification of the input system into the appropriate pattern class based on the estimated results. The other is a fully quantum strategy without any intermediate measurement, which we might call as the universal quantum matching machine. We present the Bayes optimal solutions for both strategies in the case of K=1, showing that there certainly exists a fully quantum matching procedure that is strictly superior to the straightforward semiclassical extension of the conventional matching strategy based on the learning process

  10. What University Governance Can Taiwan Learn from the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Land, Ming H.

    2010-01-01

    Due to changes from centralization to marketization, Taiwan's university governance must increase its effectiveness. The purpose of this paper was to introduce trends in and issues of Taiwan's university governance, describe university governance in the United States, and draw implications that Taiwan's university governance needs to learn from…

  11. Quality of Learning Facilities and Learning Environment: Challenges for Teaching and Learning in Kenya's Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndirangu, Mwangi; Udoto, Maurice O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to report findings on the perceptions of quality of educational facilities in Kenyan public universities, and the implications for teaching/learning, and the learning environment. Design/methodology/approach: The study adopted an exploratory descriptive design. A total of 332 and 107 undergraduate students…

  12. A Perspective on Student Learning Outcome Assessment at Qatar University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thani, Shaikha Jabor; Abdelmoneim, Ali; Daoud, Khaled; Cherif, Adel; Moukarzel, Dalal

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a unique perspective on the student learning outcome assessment process as adopted and implemented at Qatar University from 2006 to 2012. The progress of the student learning outcome assessment and continuous improvement efforts at the university and the initiatives taken to establish a culture of assessment and evidence-based…

  13. Engaged Learning through Online Collaborative Public Relations Projects across Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Amber M. K.; Brunner, Brigitta R.

    2017-01-01

    Online learning is complementing and even replacing traditional face-to-face educational models at colleges and universities across the world. Distance education offers pedagogical and resource advantages--flexibility, greater access to education, and increased university revenues. Distance education also presents challenges such as learning to…

  14. Language Learning Motivation among Malaysian Pre-University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftah, Muneera; Rafik-Galea, Shameem

    2013-01-01

    The study describes and examines Malaysian pre-university students' integrative and instrumental motivation toward learning English language. In this study, 182 non-English major students in one of the Malaysian public universities are selected to fill out a questionnaire reflecting their attitudes and motivation towards learning English. The…

  15. Performance of Blended Learning in University Teaching:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Reiss

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning as a combination of classroom teaching and e-learning has become a widely represented standard in employee and management development of companies. The exploratory survey “Blended Learning@University” conducted in 2008 investigated the integration of blended learning in higher education. The results of the survey show that the majority of participating academic teachers use blended learning in single courses, but not as a program of study and thus do not exploit the core performance potential of blended learning. According to the study, the main driver of blended learning performance is its embeddedness in higher education. Integrated blended programs of study deliver the best results. In blended learning, learning infrastructure (in terms of software, culture, skills, funding, content providing, etc. does not play the role of a performance driver but serves as an enabler for blended learning.

  16. Assessing the Acceptance of a Blended Learning University Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselios, Nikolaos; Daskalakis, Stelios; Papadopoulou, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Usefulness and ease of use proved to be key determinants of the acceptance and usage of e-learning. On the contrary, little is known about students' perceptions in a blended learning setting. In this paper, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was utilised, in order to investigate Greek university students' attitudes toward blended learning. The…

  17. University support, motivation to learn, emotional adjustment, and academic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shanti, T.I.; Janssens, J.M.A.M.; Setiadi, B.N.

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine relationships between university support and academic performance, as mediated by motivation to learn and emotional adjustment among freshmen of X University. Data were collected from 327 X University's freshmen at the end of their first year. Results

  18. Uniting Community and University through Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arney, Janna B.; Jones, Irma

    2006-01-01

    At its core, service-learning is about creating opportunities for students to apply theory they learn in the classroom to real-world problems and real-world needs. A service-learning project was initiated with the CEO of the Brownsville Chamber of Commerce. The project required 2nd-year business communication students to interview community…

  19. UICEE Centre for Problem Based Learning (UCPBL) at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Flemming Kobberøe; Enemark, Stig; Moesby, Egon

    2002-01-01

    University is considered to have a strong position in Problem-Based Learning (PBL) with many years of experience. Within engineering education co-operation with industry has also always been a field of high importance for Aalborg University and part of the PBL concept. An increasing number of universities...... and engineering schools worldwide are consequently seeking consultancy and cooperation with Aalborg University. The establishment of UCPBL is therefore welcomed as a possibility to merge these activities into one organisational structure and to strengthen the effort of improving engineering education......UICEE Centre for Problem-Based Learning (UCPBL) is a global centre for Problem-Based Learning located at Aalborg University, Denmark UCPBL is established as a partner to the UNESCO International Centre for Engineering Education (UICEE) located at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Aalborg...

  20. The Effect of Cooperative Learning: University Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombak, Busra; Altun, Sertel

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Motivation is a significant component of success in education, and it is best achieved by constructivist learning methods, especially cooperative Learning (CL). CL is a popular method among primary and secondary schools, but it is rarely used in higher education due to the large numbers of students and time restrictions. The…

  1. Coventry University and Teenage Cancer Trust eLearning Webapp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-12

    Created by Coventry University in association with the Teenage Cancer Trust, this free e-learning web app aims to help those new to working with teenagers and young adults with cancer to understand their unique needs.

  2. Measuring organizational learning. Model testing in two Romanian universities

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Luciana Guţă

    2014-01-01

    The scientific literature associates organizational learning with superior organization performance. If we refer to the academic environment, we appreciate that it can develop and reach better levels of performance through changes driven from the inside. Thus, through this paper we elaborate on a conceptual model of organizational learning and we test the model on a sample of employees (university teachers and researchers) from two Romanian universities. The model comprises the process of org...

  3. Learning Biases Predict a Word Order Universal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Jennifer; Smolensky, Paul; Legendre, Geraldine

    2012-01-01

    How recurrent typological patterns, or universals, emerge from the extensive diversity found across the world's languages constitutes a central question for linguistics and cognitive science. Recent challenges to a fundamental assumption of generative linguistics--that universal properties of the human language acquisition faculty constrain the…

  4. Program Online Learning Sebagai Faktor Penunjang Keunggulan Kompetitif Binus University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Muliadi Kerta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Online learning has become a way to improve efficiency in the learning process without reducing the quality of learning itself. Colleges that run it hope that the program becomes an attraction for prospective students, especially those with limitation to follow the regular program. The goal of this research was to find out whether Binus Online Learning Program has any influence to the competitive advantage of Binus University. Data were compiled by distributing questionnaires to 100 respondents consist of the students and lecturers on Binus Online Learning Program. This thesis is based on a quantitative methodology to gather and analyze the data to find out if they were any correlation between Online Learning Program and the competitive advantage of Binus University. It can be concluded that there are some positive and significant influences of Online Learning Program to the competitive advantage of Binus University. Therefore, promoting and developing Online Learning Program will increase the competitive advantage of Binus University, and cover the target market which regular programs do not. 

  5. University Student and Lecturer Perceptions of Positive Emotions in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Anna Dluzewska; Fitness, Julie; Wood, Leigh Norma

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation exploring the experience and functionality of positive feelings and emotions in learning and teaching. The role of emotions in learning is receiving increasing attention; however, few studies have researched how university students and academics experience and perceive positive emotions. A prototype…

  6. Optimising the Blended Learning Environment: The Arab Open University Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Tahrir; Abu Qudais, Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    This paper will offer some insights into possible ways to optimise the blended learning environment based on experience with this modality of teaching at Arab Open University/Jordan branch and also by reflecting upon the results of several meta-analytical studies, which have shown blended learning environments to be more effective than their face…

  7. Professional Learning in Part-time University Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2007-01-01

    The theme of this article is adult students' learning in part-time studies at university level in Denmark. One issue discussed is the interplay of research and teaching in this kind of study programme. Examples are presented from the Master of Learning Processes study programme at Aalborg...

  8. Informal Learning: A Lived Experience in a University Musicianship Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Annie O.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates how a class of university music students who engaged in a "lived" experience of informal learning adopted methods and strategies to complete a self-learning "aural copying" performance assignment in a musicianship class in Hong Kong. Data were collected from observations of the performances and the…

  9. Evaluation of a Mobile Learning Organiser for University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, Dan; Sharples, Mike; Bull, Susan; Chan, Tony

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a 10-month trial of a mobile learning organiser, developed for use by university students. Implemented on a wireless-enabled Pocket PC hand-held computer, the organiser makes use of existing mobile applications as well as tools designed specifically for students to manage their learning. The trial set out to identify the…

  10. Universal Design for Learning: Guidelines for Accessible Online Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers-Shaw, Carol; Carr-Chellman, Davin J.; Choi, Jinhee

    2018-01-01

    Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a framework for the teaching-learning transaction that conceptualizes knowledge through learner-centered foci emphasizing accessibility, collaboration, and community. Given the importance of access to achieving social justice, UDL is a promising approach to meeting all learners' needs more effectively. In…

  11. Learning Orientations of IT Higher Education Students in UAE University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qirim, Nabeel; Tarhini, Ali; Rouibah, Kamel; Mohamd, Serhani; Yammahi, Aishah Rashid; Yammahi, Maraim Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    This research examines the learning preferences of students in UAE University (UAEU). The uniqueness of this research emanates from the fact that no prior research examined this area from the UAE's perspective. Thus, this research embarks on the fact that student learning strategies vary from one country to another due to many factors. This…

  12. Motivation of Russian University Students towards Learning Japanese

    OpenAIRE

    アンナ, バルスコワ; ANNA, Barusukova

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigated the motivational factors of Russian students who are learning Japanese as second language at Khabarovsk Teacher Training University in Russia. 100 students answered the motivation questionnaire that consists of 40 reasons for learning Japanese. Six motivational factors were extracted: "cultural exchange", "interest in contemporary Japan", "interest in language learning", "job orientation", "occupational interest", and "self esteem." The result suggested that to ...

  13. Contribution of university farms to teaching and learning of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contribution of university farms to teaching and learning of agricultural science in Ghana. ... leaving the university. The main factors identified for this gap were the lack of supervision, lack of basic and modern facilities on the farms, lack of motivation, inadequate funds, and inadequate time allotted for practical on the farms.

  14. Taiwanese University Students' Perspectives on Experiential Learning and Psychosocial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yii-Nii; Lai, Pi-Hui; Chiu, Yi-Hsing Claire; Hsieh, Hui-Hsing; Chen, Yueh-Hua

    2016-01-01

    This study described the relations of experiential learning and psychosocial development of Taiwanese university students through the qualitative method of phenomenology. Thirty-six students, age ranged from 19 to 25 years, from three research-oriented universities in northern Taiwan were interviewed. Seven themes were delineated: (1) discovering…

  15. Personal Learning Environments and University Teacher Roles Explored Using Delphi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Zaffar Ahmed; Khoja, Shakeel Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research using an online Delphi method, which aimed to explore university teacher roles and readiness for learner-centred pedagogy, driven by personal learning environments (PLEs). Using a modified Policy Delphi technique, a group of researchers worked with 34 international experts who are university teachers by…

  16. Measuring University Students' Approaches to Learning Statistics: An Invariance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesi, Francesca; Primi, Caterina; Bilgin, Ayse Aysin; Lopez, Maria Virginia; del Carmen Fabrizio, Maria; Gozlu, Sitki; Tuan, Nguyen Minh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to provide evidence that an abbreviated version of the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST) was invariant across different languages and educational contexts in measuring university students' learning approaches to statistics. Data were collected on samples of university students attending…

  17. Social Media as a Learning Technology for University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Irshad; Cakir, Ozlem; Candeger, Ümmügülsüm

    2018-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the role of social media as a learning technology for university students and highlights their problems associated with its use. The population of the study consisted of Masters' and Bachelor Studies students studying in their final semesters in the departments of Social Sciences at The Islamia University of Bahawalpur,…

  18. University and E-Learning Classes in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capogna, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    The article explores the use of e-learning in Italian universities. The aim is to understand how the university system has faced this problem or opportunity to date and what weaknesses or developing perspectives may result from multimedia technologies applied to academic teaching management. After a brief review of the current position of Italian…

  19. An Analysis of University Students' Attitudes towards Personalized Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Muhittin; Kisla, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to analyze university students' attitudes towards personalized learning environments with respect to the independent variables of gender, age, university, year of study, knowledge about the environment, participation in the environment and being willing to participate in the environment. The correlative survey model is…

  20. Status of E-Learning in Public Universities in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makokha, George L.; Mutisya, Dorothy N.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the status of e-learning in public universities in Kenya. Data were collected using questionnaires administered to both students and lecturers randomly sampled from seven public universities. Questionnaire responses were triangulated with interviews from key informants and focus group discussions (FGDs).…

  1. The effectiveness of a learning strategies program for university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roces Montero, Cristina; Sierra Y Arizmendiarrieta, Beatriz

    2017-11-01

    University lecturers often complain about their students’ lack of learning strategies, but not many universities in Spain offer specific courses in this area. Studies on their effectiveness are also rare. This study presents the results of a Learning Strategies Course implemented at the School of Teacher Training and Education, University of Oviedo, Spain. A quasi-experimental design was used with an experi-mental (n = 60) and a control group (n = 57) of students on the Educational Psychology course. A Spanish adaptation of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ): the CEAMR2 was used as a pre and post-test measure. Group A (EG) received training in learning strategies, while group B (CG) received no training. Post-test measures showed significant differences in five out of the ten learning strategies assessed: elaboration, organization, repetition, self-questioning and study space, and also an improvement in one out of the six motivational scales: control of learning beliefs. The results suggest that learning strategies courses with proven effectiveness should be offered to university students.

  2. Lifelong Learning from Natural Disasters: Transformative Group-Based Learning at Philippine Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Kari Kragh Blume; Millora, Christopher Malagad

    2016-01-01

    This study explores reflective experience during transformative, group-based learning among university leaders following a natural disaster such as a typhoon in two Philippine universities. Natural disasters are recurrent phenomena in many parts of the world, but the literature largely ignores their impact on lifelong human learning, for instance…

  3. Field of Study, Learning Styles, and Language Learning Strategies of University Students: Are There Any Relations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahragard, Rahman; Khajavi, Yaser; Abbasian, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the possible relationships between field of study, learning style preferences, and language learning strategies among university students majoring in the fields of arts and humanities, science, engineering, social sciences, and English as a foreign language. To this end, 376 university students completed the…

  4. Family, Learning Environments, Learning Approaches, and Student Outcomes in a Malaysian Private University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kek, Megan A. Yih Chyn; Darmawan, I. Gusti Ngurah; Chen, Yu Sui

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the quantitative findings from a mixed methods study of students and faculty at a private medical university in Malaysia. In particular, the relationships among students' individual characteristics, general self-efficacy, family context, university and classroom learning environments, curriculum, approaches to learning, and…

  5. Assembling university learning technologies for an open world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannon, John; Riddle, Matthew; Ryberg, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the emergence of social media in university teaching and learning and the capacity or universities as complex organisations with disparate interacting parts to respond to the shift of pedagogies and practices to open networks. Institutional learning technology environments...... reflect a legacy of prescriptive, hierarchical arrangements associated with enterprise systems, and are a poor fit with the heterarchical and self-organised potential for learning associated with social media and open education practices. In this paper we focus on the tensions that arise from...... the juxtaposition of these two orientations to learning technologies, and focus on how an emerging online sociality can destabilise established boundaries of learning and connect to other domains of practice...

  6. Learning and the cooperative computational universe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaans, P.; Adriaans, P.; van Benthem, J.

    2008-01-01

    In the summer of 1956, a number of scientists gathered at the Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Their goal was to study human intelligence with the help of computers. Their central hypothesis was: "that every aspect of learning or any other feature of intelligence can in principle be so

  7. University Learning Systems for Participative Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingham, Carol J.; Harper, William W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the instructional development of a course for advanced finance students on the use of data files and/or databases for solving complex finance problems. Areas covered include course goals and the design. The course class schedule and sample learning assessment assignments are provided. (JD)

  8. Music, social learning and senses in university pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Julie Borup

    2017-01-01

    Integration of music in an academic university teaching setting is an example of how artistic practice and competences have potentials to resonate beyond the immediate discipline. The article explores music activities as contributing to learning environments for university students, creating shared...... experiences in groups of diverse learners with different needs. The music activities are discussed in light of challenges in today's university concerning student diversity. Two empirical examples of experiments with music in university teaching at a Danish university are presented. Empirical data were...... collected by means of qualitative research methods (teaching logs and qualitative surveys) and analysed in a socio-cultural learning perspective. The first empirical example presents music as supporting students relate to each other in the classroom. The second example describes how music may support...

  9. Universal Design for Learning: Scanning for Alignment in K-12 Blended and Fully Online Learning Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basham, James D.; Smith, Sean J.; Satter, Allyson L.

    2016-01-01

    In the process of evaluating online learning products for accessibility, researchers in the Center on Online Learning and Students with Disabilities concluded that most often consultation guides and assessment tools were useful in determining sensory accessibility but did not extend to critical aspects of learning within the Universal Design for…

  10. Multiple Pathways to Learning: An Examination of Universal Design and Online Strategic Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Maryruth Wilks

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of universally designed (UD) instruction on strategic learning in an online, interactive learning environment (ILE). The research focused on the premise that the customizable, media-based framework of UD instruction might influence diverse online learning strategies. This study…

  11. University students’ self-regulated learning using digital technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Yot-Domínguez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analysing the process by which students—whether at university or not—manage and facilitate their own learning has been a recurrent educational research problem. Recently, the question arises about how the development of strategies taking place during the aforementioned process could be made easier by using technologies. In an effort to know whether university students really use digital technologies to plan, organize and facilitate their own learning, we have proposed three research questions. Which technologies do university students use to self-regulate their learning? What self-regulated learning strategies do they develop using technologies? What profiles could be identified among students based on their use of self-regulation strategies with technology? To answer these questions, the “Survey of Self-regulated Learning with Technology at the University” was designed. Information from a sample group with 711 students from various universities located in the region of Andalusia (Spain was collected with this survey. The results indicate that university students, even when they are frequent users of digital technology, they tend not to use these technologies to regulate their own learning process. Of all technologies analysed, Internet information search and instant communication tools are used continually. In turn, the most generalised self-regulation learning strategies are those relative to social support. Nevertheless, students differ from each other regarding their use and frequency. There are groups of students who make use of self-regulation strategies when learning with technologies. In this regard, two distinctive groups of students have been identified, who show differentiated self-regulated levels.

  12. Assessing Moroccan University Students’ English Learning Motivation: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otmane Omari

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to survey whether students are motivated to learn English or not and to evaluate the differences within and between three most known universities in Morocco, involving a private one, in terms of students’ English learning motivation. Moreover, factors that make a student more motivated to learn English were investigated. This study examines motivation of university students according to their institution, gender, and other variables. Assessment of university students’ motivation was by scores on items from the Academic Motivation Scale. The sample consisted of 329 undergraduate students from three different Moroccan universities. The most important finding was that participants in general are quite motivated to learn English with a score of (M = 3.80 with regard to the overall score using a 5-point Likert scale, and a higher level of introjected extrinsic motivation (M = 4.11, which means that they do such tasks because they are supposed or asked to do them. Moreover, factors such as how students consider university, their location during the academic year, and their decision behind choosing to go to university were found to affect students’ motivation.

  13. E-learning in Type 1 Medical Universities of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher ROKNI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nowadays the Internet is the technological pedestal of organization in the information society and one of the main applications that the Internet offers is the Digital Library (DL. Each society, especially those that claim training of the public, predictably need implementation and endorsement these systems. The time of chalk and board is passed and the globalization and universal village demands a movement targeting to establish an information society. The university is said to be responsible for making "Human". In the era of information explosion, how can a university rely on a physical classroom, a tired teacher and some drowsy students listening to him? Internet "the sweet invention of man" is a bridge, between "slump" and "spurt". It is up to each authority in a university to design, employ, develop and evaluate a system embracing Internet, Multimedia, Network and so on to go parallel in modern era and to introduce the supreme system of E-learning in its program. Of different aspects of E-learning including computer networks, multimedia, search engines, electronic libraries, distance learning, and all that (Piskurich, 2003, most of the type 1 medical universities of Iran exploit, some how or another, all or some of them. These universities including Tehran, Iran, Shahid Beheshti, Mashhad, Isfahan, Tabriz, Shiraz, Ahwaz, and Kerman, at present encompass a powerful link with their audiences regarding digital libraries, search engine and authentic data bases. The present article is going to have a bird's eye view at various capacities of these universities in this regard.

  14. MOTIVATION AND LEARNING STRATEGIES IN UNIVERSITY COURSES IN ITALIAN LANGUAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrosi-Randić, Neala; Ružić, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The present work explores relationships among motivation, the use of learning strategies and anxiety. In this research 93 university students took part; 84 females and 9 males, 19 to 26 years old. Obtained results indicate existence of positive and significant correlations between motivation and the use of learning strategies. More motivated students organise their personal activities better, they are more active during lectures and they elaborate materials better compared to the less motivat...

  15. Use of synchronous e-learning at university degrees

    OpenAIRE

    Fita Fernández, Ana María; Monserrat del Río, Jose Francisco; Moltó Martínez, Germán; Mestre i Mestre, Eva María; Rodríguez Burruezo, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    Different types of Course Management Systems (CMS) are fully integrated in conventional and online courses in many Universities degrees. Although they are suitable for lecturer-student information sharing, their asynchronous nature prevents an efficient interaction, which may hamper the learning process. As an alternative, synchronous virtual learning platforms can help fill the gaps in traditional CMS. However, there is very little feedback regarding its use in higher education. The Universi...

  16. Collaborative learning situated in the university context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de los Ángeles MARTÍNEZ RUIZ

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Effective strategies in teacher education can be based on conceptual change and social constructivism models. From this framework theory, we assume that, in order to improve the succession of the different progressive stages of teachers'conceptual development, social and collaborative strategies are more adequate than individual methodologies. The main aim of this research is to analyze the use of particular and appropiate strategies in a constructivist and collaborative teacher education context. The case-study carried out proves that conceptual change is more effective when it is implemented synergistically with strategies directed towards group autonomy and group-regulation of learning rhythms and goals. The results demostrate the benefits derived from the use of strategies that propitiate the sharing and comparing practice among prospective teachers, especially, if they are, as usual, at heterogenous levels of teaching expertise.

  17. EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING IN INTRODUCING IFRS AT UNIVERSITIES IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andian Ari Istiningrum

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Experiential Learning in Introducing IFRS at Universities in Indonesia. The purpose of this study is to find the appropriate learning model for accounting learning process at universities in Indonesia due to the process of convergence to IFRS that has already occurred in Indonesia. The study is conducted by reviewing, analyzing and evaluating the effects and solutions of convergence to IFRS in other countries that have already implemented IFRS. All possible accounting learning method offered by accounting lecturers in other countries are evaluated in order to find the solution that is appropriate with condition faced by Indonesian universities. The results are as follow: (i convergence to IFRS requires that accounting learning process should underline the use of more principle-base standard, professional judgment, fair value measurement and collaboration with other professions. (ii experiential learning through case study can be used to generate knowledge and skills of IFRS.   Keywords: IFRS, accounting learning process, experiential learning, case study   Abstrak:  Experiential Learning untuk Mengenalkan IFRS di Universitas-universitas di Indonesia. Tujuan dari kajian ini adalah untuk menemukan solusi dari permasalahan terkait dengan pembelajaran akuntansi berbasis IFRS dan mengevaluasi beberapa solusi yang bisa digunakan untuk mengintegrasikan IFRS dalam kurikulum akuntansi di perguruan tinggi Indonesia. Studi ini dilaksanakan dengan melakukan reviu, analisis dan evaluasi terhadap model pembelajaran akuntansi berbasis IFRS pada negara lain yang terlebih dahulu telah mengimplementasikan IFRS. Berbagai model pembelajaran dari negara lain akan dievaluasi sehingga ditemukan model pembelajaran akuntansi yang paling tepat untuk digunakan dalam pembelajaran IFRS di Indonesia. Studi ini memberikan hasil sebagai berikut: (i Konvergensi IFRS menimbulkan perubahan pembelajaran akuntansi di mana pembelajaran harus memfokuskan diri pada

  18. Institutional Capacities in E-learning and Problem Based Learning at Universities and University Colleges in Tanzania and Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahms, Mona-Lisa; Zakaria, Hanan Lassen

    This report provides a status of the use of e-learning and Problem Based Learning (PBL) at seven universities and university colleges in Tan- zania and Ghana. It gives an overview of policies, strategies, resources and practices. It describes experiences as well as identified needs...... at these institutions to increase the use of these current teaching approaches. Since the 1970’s, PBL and other student activating teaching forms has gained increasing foothold at many universities especially in Northern Europe. Evidence is clear that students not only learn more by being active in problem solving...... in groups than by attending traditional lectures and readings; the competences they gain are absolutely necessary to be effective in today’s increasingly competitive labor force. More recently, the continuous development of the Internet and mobile net since the mid 1990’s has also lead to a shift...

  19. Competitive universities need to internationalize learning: Perspectives from three European universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Lara

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The process of restructuring European universities in order to harmonize their educational systems is rapidly approaching a key milestone as 2010 looms large on the horizon. This paper describes an approach to the European Higher Education Area (EHEA based on a real case study of students that belong to five European Universities (University of Burgos, Technical University of Valencia, University of Valladolid, University of Basque Country and University of Applied Sciences Cologne. The objective of this paper is two-fold: on the one hand, to analyze from the student’s point of view how they value the restructuring of teaching as a result of the Bologna process and what are the implications for students with regards to both their academic qualifications and their future incorporation into the labour market; and, on the other hand, to deduce from the results obtained recommendations which may help to guide teachers towards successful internationalization and collaboration between interuniversity networks, as well as achieving greater standards of quality within university teaching. Only this would permit an environment in which students are capable of developing the necessary competences, and put into practice learning outcomes. The results show that students value communication, innovative proposals and cooperation between universities; the internationalization of knowledge between universities has been positively accepted and this has motivated research to place a stronger focus on this aspect; it impacts strongly on scientific productivity, improves the quality of education offered by the teaching staff, and leads to greater student mobility. This strategy is intrinsically linked to learning from local experiences shared by members of the same university as well as from more global experiences made available through inter-university networks. It implies being willing to listen, to communicate, to engage in dialogue and means that we must

  20. The learning of aquaponics practice in university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustina, T. W.; Rustaman, N. Y.; Riandi; Purwianingsih, W.

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to obtain a description of the perfomance capabilities of aquaponic technology and the assessment of product and packaging of harvest kale. The aquaponic practice used a STREAM (Science Technology Religion Art Matematics) approach. The method was explanatory sequential mixed method. The research was conducted on one class of Biology Education students in 6th semester. The sample was chosen purposively with 49 students. The study instruments are student worksheet, observation sheet, rubric performance and product assessment, interview sheet and field notes. The indicator of performance rubrics on the manufacture of aquaponic technology consisted of the product rubric, cultivation criteria and packing method of kale. The interview rubric is in the form of student constraints on the manufacture of aquaponics. Based on the results, most students have performance in designing technology that is categorized as enough up to good. Almost all students produce a very good kale harvest. Most of the students produce kale packaging products that are categorized as enough. The implications of this research are the learning of aquaponic with the STREAM approach can equip student’s performance and product capabilities.

  1. Pedagogical Reflections on a Blendede Learning Enviroment in Ghanaian Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyamfi, Samuel Adu

    Large enrolment of students in most African universities and its attendant problems have led to falling level of the quality of the university graduate in the area of Communication Skills, a skill that most employers value most in a university graduate seeking an employment.  Using formative...... experiment (Reinking & Watkins, 2000), this thesis explored the use of a blended learning environment named ABLECAT, to improve the students’ knowledge and skills in the course.  The result was the development of a local theory through the use of ‘motivate, explore, apply and review/assess’ design...

  2. Supporting University Learning Through Mobile Technologies: A Global Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gitumu Mugo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The workplace in the modern world continues to demand higher qualifications and refined competencies. In the recent past, workers would respond to such demands through learning by correspondence. When the Internet and e-Learning emerged, it received widespread accolade as a solution to the challenges experienced by distant learners. The technology was also seen as an opportunity for educational institutions to leverage their technological uptake to benefit regular students. However, desktop computers and Internet connectivity, which were the drivers of e-learning technologies, were expensive, bulky and scarce. So when mobile technologies emerged, educationist saw an opportunity for addressing the limitations associated with correspondence, “e” and tethered learning. Mobile devices being cheap, portable and reliable received widespread acceptance and possession. So, educators, hardware designers and program developers started to design hardware and applications that would infuse learning content into the devices. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the potential of mobile technologies in the education market place, highlighting global initiatives and trends. The paper will also review how universities around the world, Africa and in Kenya have oriented themselves for learning with mobile technologies. The study was a documentary analysis of virtual documents stored electronically for access through the Internet, text books, archival repositories and encyclopedias. The study observed a significant high global mobile ownership and usage rates, but was able to demonstrate that despite its pedagogical advantages, the use of the technology for learning purposes at university level is still at the infantry. Keywords: Mobile, Technologies, Universities, adoption, ICT, eLearning

  3. The Learning of Compost Practice in University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustina, T. W.; Rustaman, N. Y.; Riandi; Purwianingsih, W.

    2017-09-01

    The compost as one of the topics of the Urban Farming Movement in Bandung city, Indonesia. The preliminary study aims to obtain a description of the performance capabilities and compost products made by students with STREAM (Science-Technology-Religion-Art-Mathematics) approach. The method was explanatory sequential mixed method. The study was conducted on one class of Biology Education students at the one of the universities in Bandung, Indonesia. The sample was chosen purposively with the number of students as many as 44 people. The instruments were making Student Worksheets, Observation Sheets of Performance and Product Assessment, Rubric of Performance and Product, and Field Notes. The indicators of performance assessment rubrics include Stirring of Compost Materials and Composting Technology in accordance with the design. The product assessment rubric are a Good Composting Criteria and Compost Packaging. The result of can be stated most students have good performance. However, the ability to design of compost technology, compost products and the ability to pack compost are still lacking. The implication of study is students of Biology Education require habituation in the ability of designing technology.

  4. Introduction of Interactive Learning into French University Physics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Lamine, Brahim; Joyce, Michael; Vignolles, Hélène; Consiglio, David

    2014-01-01

    We report on a project to introduce interactive learning strategies (ILS) to physics classes at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie, one of the leading science universities in France. In Spring 2012, instructors in two large introductory classes, first-year, second-semester mechanics, and second-year introductory electricity and magnetism,…

  5. Universal Design for Learning and School Libraries: A Logical Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David E.

    2017-01-01

    This article will explore the basic tenets of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in relation to collaborative curriculum development and implementation; provide a case study examination of UDL principles in action; and suggest school library curricular activities that provide opportunities for multiple means of representation, action, and…

  6. Leadership for Team Learning: The Case of University Teacher Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeslag-Kreunen, Mieke G. M.; Van der Klink, Marcel R.; Van den Bossche, Piet; Gijselaers, Wim H.

    2018-01-01

    Teacher team involvement is considered a key factor in achieving sustainable innovation in higher education. This requires engaging in team learning behaviors that should result in new knowledge and solutions. However, university teachers are not used to discussing their work practices with one another and tend to neglect any innovation in their…

  7. Measuring E-Learning Effectiveness at Indonesian Private University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradana, Mahir; Amir, NarisWari

    2016-01-01

    Telkom University was founded in 2013, as a result of merging four existing higher education institutions in Indonesia. One of their study programs is Master of Management (MM) program, which also facilitates full-time workers to participate in the program. Since their physical presences are sometimes unfulfilled, an e-learning program was…

  8. Problem based learning in acoustics at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøi, Dorte; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Christensen, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    in the project work, or are defining for the candidate's professional profile. This presentation gives an overview of Problem Based Learning organized in groups in the M. Sc. in Acoustics program of Aalborg University. Examples of projects and course activities are presented to illustrate the relation...

  9. Roles of Technology in Student Learning of University Level Biostatistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weili; Zhang, Yuchen; Su, Cheng; Cui, Zhuang; Qi, Xiuying

    2014-01-01

    This study explored threshold concepts and areas of troublesome knowledge among students enrolled in a basic biostatistics course at the university level. The main area of troublesome knowledge among students was targeted by using technology to improve student learning. A total of 102 undergraduate students who responded to structured…

  10. Student Deep Learning in Bachelor English Programs within Pakistani Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Khazima

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contrast undergraduate students' descriptions about transformational teaching practices, and student deep learning in bachelor English programs in selected universities within Pakistan. This study utilized a survey to gather responses from five hundred and twenty three students. A paired sample t test was utilized…

  11. University Teaching with a Disability: Student Learnings beyond the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Lynnaire; Kotevski, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the learning experience of university students who were tutored by a teacher with quadriplegia mixed type cerebral palsy. It was inspired by Pritchard's [2010. "Disabled People as Culturally Relevant Teachers." "Journal of Social Inclusion" 1 (1): 43-51] argument that the presence of people with a…

  12. Achieving Balance: Lessons Learned from University and College Presidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havice, Pamela A.; Williams, Frankie K.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated strategies used by college and university presidents in balancing their professional and personal lives. The conceptual framework for this study comes from the work of Schein (1985, 1992). Lessons learned and words of wisdom from these presidents can enhance leadership effectiveness at all levels in higher education.

  13. Innovative Language Teaching and Learning at University: Enhancing Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Mayo, Carmen, Ed.; Gallagher-Brett, Angela, Ed.; Michel, Franck, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    This second volume in this series of papers dedicated to innovative language teaching and learning at university focuses on enhancing employability. Throughout the book, which includes a selection of 14 peer-reviewed and edited short papers, authors share good practices drawing on research; reflect on their experience to promote student…

  14. University Students' Behavioral Intention to Use Mobile Learning: Evaluating the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Youl; Nam, Min-Woo; Cha, Seung-Bong

    2012-01-01

    As many Korean universities have recommended the implementation of mobile learning (m-learning) for various reasons, the number of such tertiary learning opportunities has steadily grown. However, little research has investigated the factors affecting university students' adoption and use of m-learning. A sample of 288 Konkuk university students…

  15. Knowledge production as organizational learning: The case of Danish universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Bente

    2018-01-01

    One of the political means to encourage competitive knowledge production in universities is to employ strategic management, but is this a promising method? I explore this question through a practice-based and pragmatist version of organisational learning as well as the Nordic tradition for work...... participation from ‘below’ as a prerequisite for learning and innovation. Research leadership that works in collaboration with peers rather than maintaining a focus on strategic management could be an answer to more competitive and sustainable knowledge production....... and education to suggest ways for sustainable knowledge production. University scholars not only participate in research practices at their home university but also in worldwide knowledge production driven by passions for specific fields of inquiry. Further, the Nordic countries have a tradition for active...

  16. University Students' Attitudes towards Cell Phone Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafa' N. Muhanna

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at investigating Jordanian university undergraduate and graduate students' attitudes towards the learning environment where cell phones are used as learning tools in classroom. To achieve this goal, the researchers distributed two questionnaires among two groups of two different levels of randomly chosen university students at the Faculty of Educational Sciences at Al-al-Bayt University. The first one addresses 30 undergraduate students, 12 male and 18 female. The other addresses 20 graduates, 7 male and 13 female. The study comprised two independent variables, level and gender, as covariates. The findings indicate that undergraduates are more favorable to cell phone environment than graduate students. The study also reveals that cell phone has more influence on male students than on female students.

  17. Universal Design for Learning: Critical Need Areas for People with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Wendy; Arthanat, Sajay; Bauer, Stephen; Flagg, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    The primary market research outlined in this paper was conducted by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Technology Transfer to identify critical technology needs for people with learning disabilities. Based on the research conducted, the underlying context of these technology needs is Universal Design for Learning (UDL). The paper…

  18. Facebook Mediated Interaction and Learning in Distance Learning at Makerere University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayende, Godfrey; Muyinda, Paul Birevu; Isabwe, Ghislain Maurice Norbert; Walimbwa, Michael; Siminyu, Samuel Ndeda

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the use of Facebook as a tool to mediate learning amongst distance learners at Makerere University, a dual-mode institution offering both conventional and distance learning programs. While conventional courses take 17 weeks in a semester, the distance learners come in for two residential sessions, each…

  19. Why Teach Social Entrepreneurship: Enhance Learning and University-Community Relations through Service-Learning Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Stacy; Godshalk, Veronica M.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on providing a convincing argument for incorporating social entrepreneurship into the business professor's classroom. The outreach provided by social entrepreneurship enhances learning and promotes university-community relations. Service-learning engagement activities, in the form of social entrepreneurship, create a three-way…

  20. Corporate Universities and Corporation- University Partnerships in Thailand: Complimenting Education in Learning, Leadership and Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver S. Crocco

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With an estimated workforce of 285 million and the establishment of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN Economic Community in 2015, ASEAN faces vast challenges in human resource development (HRD and higher education. These challenges in Thailand have resulted in the rise of corporate universities and corporation-university partnerships. Corporate partnerships in education adapt quickly to industry needs and are increasingly popular and complimentary to traditional higher education. This research looks at one corporate university and one corporation-university partnership to investigate how, if at all, corporate universities and partnerships address HRD issues such as adult learning, leadership development, organisational change, corporate social responsibility (CSR, as well as ethical and global issues. This research finds initial evidence that corporate educational strategies address a variety of HRD issues and have the potential to revolutionise and compliment higher education in Thailand in a way that drives the nation toward a more sustainable future.

  1. Learning in later life: Universities, teaching, intergenerational learning and community cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Percy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There are no settled concepts in the field of learning in later life. The paper begins by suggesting that generalised statements about older people’s learning are suspect and that the way in which we talk about it shifts over time. In particular, there is a range of claims about methods of learning and teaching appropriate to older people but most have little support from empirical research. The paper then focuses on the evaluation of a small innovation project, funded by national government, at Lancaster University, 2009-10. The project sought to involve members of a local University of the Third age group in learning activity on the nearby university campus, partly using undergraduate teaching provision. It aimed to test ideological reservations within the U3A group about association with a public institution of higher education and about mixing the ‘purity’ of self-help learning for older adults, in the British U3A tradition, with more formal methods of learning. The outcomes of the project evaluation suggested that most older learners participating valued their opportunity to use university learning resources and that the British U3A ideology did not inhibit them from doing so. It also suggests that the University benefited from the presence of the older learners and that the surrounding community potentially might have done. A brief discussion of implications for intergenerational learning, community cohesion and marginalised older people follows. The paper concludes that British universities should and, perhaps, could relate more dynamically and emphatically with the provision of opportunities for learning in later life.

  2. Community Learning and University Policy: An Inner-City University Goes Back to School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd Axworthy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available For at least a decade now, the University of Winnipeg (U of W, an urban institution on Treaty One land in the heart of the Métis Nation, has challenged existing academic models and practices, and has incorporated strategies that address the social divide between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in order to more effectively serve the learning needs of its surrounding community. This article demonstrates how an inner-city university has used internal policies and programs to help support the self-determination of Indigenous peoples. Six community learning initiatives were recently evaluated for impact. This article will provide an overview of the positive outcomes of these learning initiatives on a community of underrepresented learners.

  3. Changing University Students’ Alternative Conceptions of Optics by Active Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalkida Hadžibegović

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active learning is individual and group participation in effective activities such as in-class observing, writing, experimenting, discussion, solving problems, and talking about to-be-learned topics. Some instructors believe that active learning is impossible, or at least extremely difficult to achieve in large lecture sessions. Nevertheless, the truly impressive implementation results of theSCALE-UP learning environment suggest that such beliefs are false (Beichner et al., 2000. In this study, we present a design of an active learning environment with positive effect on students. The design is based on the following elements: (1 helping students to learn from interactive lecture experiment; (2 guiding students to use justified explanation and prediction after observing and exploring a phenomenon; (3 developing a conceptual question sequencedesigned for use in an interactive lecture with students answering questions in worksheets by writing and drawing; (4 evaluating students’ conceptual change and gains by questions related to light reflection, refraction, and image formation in an exam held a week after the active learning session. Data were collected from 95 science freshmen with different secondary school backgrounds. They participated in geometrical optics classes organized for collecting research results during and after only one active learning session.The results have showed that around 60% of the students changed their initial alternative conceptions of vision and of image formation. It was also found that a large group of university students is likely to be engaged in active learning, shifting from a passive role they usually play during teacher’s lectures.

  4. Challenges of implementing e-learning in a Pakistani university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijaz A. Qureshi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The integration of e-learning programs into the educational system has reshaped the process of acquisition and dissemination of knowledge throughout the society. Although numbers of researchers approve of the effectiveness of e-learning integration in terms of the innovation it offers to engage with students does not guarantee the success of e-learning programs. This can be observed in developing countries like Pakistan, which have not yet been able to benefit fully from the advantages of e-learning. Though the importance of this issue is theoretically highlighted in research, empirical evidence is scarce particularly regarding developing countries like Pakistan.Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify the issues, related to e-learning through the feedback captured from students and provide strategies to successfully overcome the issues. In order to achieve this purpose, a number of issues prevailing in a Pakistani private university were identified through in depth literature review and discussion with the students. The findings demonstrated electricity failure and English proficiency as the most significant barriers to successful integration of e-learning. Lastly conclusion was drawn and suggestions were made on the basis of issues identified.

  5. UNIVERSITY TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESS: REFLECTIONS THROUGHOUT THE AGENCY THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Jacques Parraguez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses some reasons that might explain the insufficient academic level which is perceived in universities of developing countries. The discussion element is the teacher-student relationship which is studied under the perspective of the agency theory. It is concluded that in absence of efficient monitoring mechanisms of the teacher and student’s behavior might proliferate gaps of due diligence which attempts against the quality of the teaching-learning process.

  6. Information literacy dimension seeking learning quality in university education

    OpenAIRE

    Vaičiūnienė, Vilhelmina; Gedvilienė, Genutė

    2009-01-01

    Education in Lithuania is undergoing great transformations that are affecting higher education. Today's education at large experiences challenges caused by new technologies, abundance of information resources, thus being forced to search for new and effective methods of teaching / learning. The issue of information literacy at university level in Lithuania has not been researched in more depth so far. Integration of information literacy into the curriculum of higher education is a key questio...

  7. NASA's Universe of Learning: Engaging Learners in Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cominsky, L.; Smith, D. A.; Lestition, K.; Greene, M.; Squires, G.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Universe of Learning is one of 27 competitively awarded education programs selected by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) to enable scientists and engineers to more effectively engage with learners of all ages. The NASA's Universe of Learning program is created through a partnership between the Space Telescope Science Institute, Chandra X-ray Center, IPAC at Caltech, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Exoplanet Exploration Program, and Sonoma State University. The program will connect the scientists, engineers, science, technology and adventure of NASA Astrophysics with audience needs, proven infrastructure, and a network of over 500 partners to advance the objectives of SMD's newly restructured education program. The multi-institutional team will develop and deliver a unified, consolidated suite of education products, programs, and professional development offerings that spans the full spectrum of NASA Astrophysics, including the Exoplanet Exploration theme. Program elements include enabling educational use of Astrophysics mission data and offering participatory experiences; creating multimedia and immersive experiences; designing exhibits and community programs; providing professional development for pre-service educators, undergraduate instructors, and informal educators; and, producing resources for special needs and underserved/underrepresented audiences. This presentation will provide an overview of the program and process for mapping discoveries to products and programs for informal, lifelong, and self-directed learning environments.

  8. NASA’s Universe of Learning: Engaging Learners in Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise A.; Lestition, Kathleen; Squires, Gordon K.; Greene, W. M.; Cominsky, Lynn R.; Eisenhamer, Bonnie; NASA's Universe of Learning Team

    2016-06-01

    NASA’s Universe of Learning is one of 27 competitively awarded education programs selected by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) to enable scientists and engineers to more effectively engage with learners of all ages. The NASA's Universe of Learning program is created through a partnership between the Space Telescope Science Institute, Chandra X-ray Center, IPAC at Caltech, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Exoplanet Exploration Program, and Sonoma State University. The program will connect the scientists, engineers, science, technology and adventure of NASA Astrophysics with audience needs, proven infrastructure, and a network of over 500 partners to advance the objectives of SMD’s newly restructured education program. The multi-institutional team will develop and deliver a unified, consolidated suite of education products, programs, and professional development offerings that spans the full spectrum of NASA Astrophysics, including the Cosmic Origins, Physics of the Cosmos, and Exoplanet Exploration themes. Program elements include enabling educational use of Astrophysics mission data and offering participatory experiences; creating multimedia and immersive experiences; designing exhibits and community programs; providing professional development for pre-service educators, undergraduate instructors, and informal educators; and, producing resources for special needs and underserved/underrepresented audiences. This presentation will provide an overview of the program and process for mapping discoveries to products and programs for informal, lifelong, and self-directed learning environments.

  9. Online Independent Vocabulary Learning Experience of Hong Kong University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Tang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In response to the limited vocabulary size of its undergraduates, an independent vocabulary learning platform, VLearn was designed and launched in a university in Hong Kong. As an elearning environment that supports self-directed vocabulary learning of Chinese learners, the primary aim of VLearn is to equip users with appropriate knowledge and skills for vocabulary expansion. This paper introduces the contents of VLearn, and the theoretical underpinnings of its design. It also reports on the vocabulary learning experience of its users during an eight week evaluation study. Suggestions are made on how independent vocabulary building at higher education, as well as comprehensive vocabulary instruction at early years could be supported by means of technology.

  10. Investigation of Chinese University Students’ Attributions of English Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjin Lu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of developing students’ learning autonomy in Chinese schools similar to Western cultured schools, many concerns are raised regarding the influence and effectiveness that learner autonomy has on students’ academic achievements. The aim of this study was to identify the attribution patterns of Chinese university students for success and failure toward students who learnt through autonomy learning (student-centered approaches compared with students who learnt through teacher-centered approaches. Within this study, mixed research methods were adopted, and students used a reflective method to distinguish whether they were taught English through a traditional or student-centered method. The findings of the study reveal that there are no significant differences in attributional patterns between students who had learnt in high school through autonomous learning and those who learnt through teacher-centered approaches. The findings have implications for policy and practice in the Chinese Ministry of Education system and recommendations for future research.

  11. Investigating physics teaching and learning in a university setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenaro Guisasola, Jenaro; Zuza, Kristina; De Cock, Mieke; Bollen, Laurens; Kanim, Stephen; Ivanjek, Lana; Van Kampen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Most of the initiatives taken by the European Community and by other countries internationally in the field of science education focus on elementary and secondary levels of education, and relatively few reports have analysed the state of science education in higher education. However, research in science education, and in particular in physics education, has shown repeatedly that the way teachers teach in elementary and secondary school is strongly influenced by their own prior experience as university students. The education that future professionals, such as scientists, engineers and science teachers, receive at the university is worthy of study, because it allows us to investigate student learning relatively independently of developmental issues, and because of the more rigorous treatment of physics topics at the university level. For these reasons, it seems appropriate to identify, analyse and provide solutions to the problems of teaching and learning related to the university physics curriculum. In this symposium, we present examples of physics education research from different countries that is focused on physics topics

  12. Collaborative Learning at Engineering Universities: Benefits and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Sumtsova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the cutting edge educational approaches incorporated into syllabuses of the most progressive Russian higher technical schools. The authors discuss one of the active methods in teaching foreign languages – collaborative learning implemented in e-courses. Theoretical and historical aspects of this approach are addressed, as are its suitability for engineering education and possible ways of introducing collaborative learning into e-courses. Collaborative learning technology offers wide prospects for teachers of foreign languages as it enables the use of various patterns of interaction, promotes discussion, opinion exchange, peer assessment and building an e-learning community, fosters the development of e-culture and netiquette, and prepares future specialists for work in their professional sphere under the new conditions imposed by society’s technological and cultural development. This paper describes real pedagogical experience of teaching English to students using the platform Moodle, focusing on the capacity of different Moodle instruments for designing group work tasks. Recommendations are given for their usage and the results of implementing a collaborative learning approach into certain e-courses offered at Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU are presented.

  13. Overview of NASA's Universe of Learning: An Integrated Astrophysics STEM Learning and Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise; Lestition, Kathleen; Squires, Gordon; Biferno, Anya A.; Cominsky, Lynn; Manning, Colleen; NASA's Universe of Learning Team

    2018-01-01

    NASA's Universe of Learning creates and delivers science-driven, audience-driven resources and experiences designed to engage and immerse learners of all ages and backgrounds in exploring the universe for themselves. The project is the result of a unique partnership between the Space Telescope Science Institute, Caltech/IPAC, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and Sonoma State University, and is one of 27 competitively-selected cooperative agreements within the NASA Science Mission Directorate STEM Activation program. The NASA's Universe of Learning team draws upon cutting-edge science and works closely with Subject Matter Experts (scientists and engineers) from across the NASA Astrophysics Physics of the Cosmos, Cosmic Origins, and Exoplanet Exploration themes. Together we develop and disseminate data tools and participatory experiences, multimedia and immersive experiences, exhibits and community programs, and professional learning experiences that meet the needs of our audiences, with attention to underserved and underrepresented populations. In doing so, scientists and educators from the partner institutions work together as a collaborative, integrated Astrophysics team to support NASA objectives to enable STEM education, increase scientific literacy, advance national education goals, and leverage efforts through partnerships. Robust program evaluation is central to our efforts, and utilizes portfolio analysis, process studies, and studies of reach and impact. This presentation will provide an overview of NASA's Universe of Learning, our direct connection to NASA Astrophysics, and our collaborative work with the NASA Astrophysics science community.

  14. Universities as Regional Centres for Lifelong Learning and Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius Schröder

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available On the background of the results of a still running German project the role of universities toimprove lifelong learning and innovation will be discussed not only from the perspective of a qualificationsupplier but as an enabler for a far-reaching and continuous social innovation process, including all therelevant stakeholders, institutions and policy makers. New education and training opportunities have to beconstructed overcoming existing borders between the different education and training systems, based onalready existing successful structures and institutions. Modulation and certification of education and training,non-formal and informal learning, transmission management etc. have to be coordinated where people areliving and using these: at the regional level. Within a social innovation process universities can successfullytake the role as a central actor in a regional field of qualification and innovation. They could act as acompetent partner matching qualification and innovation demands. In order to competently fulfil their role inthis matching process, universities will face both an internal development process and external challenges. Insummary, they will face and have to master a multi-faceted social innovation process.

  15. Regulating approaches to learning: Testing learning strategy convergences across a year at university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Luke K; Vermunt, Jan D

    2018-03-01

    Contemporary models of student learning within higher education are often inclusive of processing and regulation strategies. Considerable research has examined their use over time and their (person-centred) convergence. The longitudinal stability/variability of learning strategy use, however, is poorly understood, but essential to supporting student learning across university experiences. Develop and test a person-centred longitudinal model of learning strategies across the first-year university experience. Japanese university students (n = 933) completed surveys (deep and surface approaches to learning; self, external, and lack of regulation) at the beginning and end of their first year. Following invariance and cross-sectional tests, latent profile transition analysis (LPTA) was undertaken. Initial difference testing supported small but significant differences for self-/external regulation. Fit indices supported a four-group model, consistent across both measurement points. These subgroups were labelled Low Quality (low deep approaches and self-regulation), Low Quantity (low strategy use generally), Average (moderate strategy use), and High Quantity (intense use of all strategies) strategies. The stability of these groups ranged from stable to variable: Average (93% stayers), Low Quality (90% stayers), High Quantity (72% stayers), and Low Quantity (40% stayers). The three largest transitions presented joint shifts in processing/regulation strategy preference across the year, from adaptive to maladaptive and vice versa. Person-centred longitudinal findings presented patterns of learning transitions that different students experience during their first year at university. Stability/variability of students' strategy use was linked to the nature of initial subgroup membership. Findings also indicated strong connections between processing and regulation strategy changes across first-year university experiences. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  16. Multimedia Instruction & Language Learning Attitudes: A Study with University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Izquierdo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of two types of Multimedia Instruction (MI and learners’ second language (L2 proficiency on language learning attitudes. During four weeks, university learners of French received MI on the distinctive use of the perfective and the imperfective past in one of the four following conditions: learners with low L2 proficiency level exposed to MI with (n=17 or without language awareness tasks (n=17, and learners with intermediate L2 proficiency level exposed to MI with (n=14 or without language awareness tasks (n=28. Before and after the experiment, participants completed the Attitude/Motivation Test Battery (AMTB. Non-parametric analyses revealed a positive enhancement of classroom-related attitudes only among intermediate learners exposed to MI without Language Awareness Tasks. Nevertheless, the results showed similar as well as stable attitudes towards language learning in all the experimental conditions.

  17. Project-based learning in geomatics at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höhle, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the education in Geomatics at Aalborg University (AAU), Denmark. Since its foundation in 1974 AAU has used Project-Based Learning (PBL) as its educational model. In each of the 10 semesters a project has to be carried out by a group of students. The paper presents the ideas...... behind PBL and the use of this approach in Geomatics. Some examples of project work in the field of photogrammetry and remote sensing are given. Teachers and researchers at AAU recently published a book on the Aalborg PBL model, in which progress, diversity and challenges of the approach are documented....... Some of the findings in this investigation are presented. The on-campus education in Geomatics uses the Internet, and the paper informs about its application on campus. PBL is also practised at AAU's distance education programmes, which combine e-learning and weekend seminars on the campus. Experiences...

  18. Reimagining Disability and Inclusive Education Through Universal Design for Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Doolittle Wilson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1975, Congress enacted a law eventually known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, which ensures that children with disabilities receive a free, appropriate, public education. Since then, scholarly and popular debates about the effectiveness of inclusive education have proliferated and typically focus on the ability or inability of students with disabilities to succeed in so-called regular classrooms. These debates reflect widespread assumptions that the regular classroom is rightly the province of nondisabled students and a neutral, value-free space that students with disabilities invade and disrupt via their very presence and their costly needs for adaptation. But as many scholars in the field of Disability Studies in Education (DSE have argued, these discussions often fail to recognize that the space of the regular classroom, far from neutral, is constructed for a nondisabled, neurotypical, white, male, middle-class "norm" that neither reflects nor accommodates the wide range of diverse learners within it, regardless of whether these learners have been diagnosed with a disability. A DSE perspective sees the educational environment, not students with disabilities, as the "problem" and calls for a Universal Design for Learning approach to education, or the design of instructional materials and activities that allows the learning goals to be achievable by individuals with wide differences in their abilities and backgrounds. Agreeing with this DSE perspective, this article uses an autoethnographic approach to reexamine inclusive education and to consider how university classrooms, pedagogy, and curricular materials can be improved in order to accommodate all students, not just those with disabilities. Ultimately, the article argues that Universal Design for Learning has the potential to radically transform the meaning of inclusive education and the very concept of disability.

  19. Hypermedia for language learning: the FREE model at Coventry University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Orsini-Jones

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The tradition of incorporating CALL into the language-learning curriculum goes back to the early 1980s at Coventry University, and since then has evolved in keeping with changes in the technology available (Corness 1984; Benwell 1986; Orsini-Jones 1987; Corness et al 1992; Orsini-Jones 1993. Coventry University is at present pioneering the integration of hypermedia into the curriculum for the teaching of Italian language and society. The syllabus for a complete module of the BA Modern Languages and BA European Studies Degrees, which will count as l/8th of the students' programme for year 2, has been designed upon in-house produced hypermedia courseware.

  20. A Situative Metaphor for Teacher Learning: The Case of University Tutors Learning to Grade Student Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Pete; Bloxham, Sue

    2014-01-01

    In the continuing concern about academic standards in the higher education sector a great deal of emphasis has been placed on quality assurance procedures rather than on considering how university tutors learn to grade the quality of work produced by students. As part of a larger research project focused on how tutors grade student coursework,…

  1. A Case Study of Synchronous Distance Learning Between Shih Chien University and Beijing Foreign Studies University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Fen Lo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Shih Chien University and Beijing Foreign Studies University collaboratively launched a project to offer synchronous distance learning courses on "Case Studies of Taiwanese Entrepreneurs" since February 2012. The three objectives of this study are: (1 to explore the Cross-Strait students' motives for selecting the course; (2 to examine the students' accommodation condition before and after completing the course; (3 to discuss the student's level of satisfaction of the course. This study uses qualitative data from case study interviews conducted in the second year of the project based on the research focus of the Cross-Strait students' motivation and satisfaction of the course. The research analysis tools are content analysis and theory triangulation. The findings are: (1 Cross-Strait students are motivated by their curiosity about the course, interest in the contents, and willingness to experience the novelty of distance learning to select the course; (2 the results of Cross-Strait students' accommodation condition are correlated to their interactions with the professor, the familiarity with the materials, the quality of the communication equipment, and the clarity of the images; (3 Cross-Strait students all accept the method of synchronous distance learning; (4 the quality of communication equipment has the lowest level of satisfaction.

  2. DEVELOPMENT AN INSTRUMENT TO MEASURE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS' ATTITUDE TOWARDS E-LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana MEHRA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of student’s attitude towards e-learning can in many ways help managers better prepare in light of e-learning for the future. This article describes the process of the development of an instrument to measure university students’ attitude towards e-learning. The scale was administered to 200 University students from two countries (India and Iran .The 83-item attitude towards e-learning scale was developed on six domains as Perceived usefulness ; Intention to adopt e-learning; Ease of e-learning use; Technical and pedagogical support; E-learning stressors ; Pressure to use e-learning.

  3. NASA’s Universe of Learning: Girls STEAM Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Emma; Meinke, Bonnie K.; Smith, Denise A.; Ryer, Holly; Slivinski, Carolyn; Kenney, Jessica; Arcand, Kimberly K.; Cominsky, Lynn R.; Girls STEAM Ahead with NASA Team

    2017-10-01

    NASA Science Mission Directorate’s Universe of Learning (UoL) program enables scientists and engineers to more effectively engage with learners of all ages. The Girls STEAM Ahead with NASA education program within UoL, expands upon the former program, NASA Science4Girls and Their Families, in celebration of National Women’s History Month. The initiative partners the NASA’s Universe of Learning science education program resources with public libraries to provide NASA-themed activities for girls and their families, including hands-on activities for engaging girls, complementary exhibits, and professional development for library partner staff. The science-institute-embedded partners in NASA’s UoL are uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. The thematic topics related to NASA Astrophysics enable audiences to experience the full range of NASA scientific and technical disciplines and the different career skills each requires. The events focus on engaging underserved and underrepresented audiences in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) via use of research-based best practices, collaborations with libraries, partnerships with local and national organizations (e.g. National Girls Collaborative Project or NGCP), and remote engagement of audiences. This presentation will provide an overview of the program progress related to engaging girls and their families in NASA-based science programming.

  4. MONITORING OF UNIVERSITY ALUMNI: PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosienko N. L.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methodology and results of graduates’ monitoring that solves the problem of the evaluation of higher education institutions. The goal of the present study is to develop methodology of the effectiveness of training estimation in high school and to test it on a sample of Department of Sociology’s graduates. The wide interpretation of learning outcomes, including objective and subjective indicators of employment of graduates of formation and professional, analytical and communication skills has been proposed. The result of monitoring information is the basis of informed decisions in the management of educational processes at the university. In scientific terms, the monitoring data allows us to estimate the impact of the various components of the learning outcomes (formed skills, acquired social capital, etc. at professional tracks. Information base of monitoring made by online alumni Sociology Department EF NSU survey, that’s materials revealed what analytical skills formed during study at the university, allow them to adapt to the diversified requirements of the labor market. Graduates sociologists are divided into two streams: a smaller consisting of working in the specialty, which is formed mainly through personalized contacts, and the bigger distributed to other segments of the labor market through a formal selection process.

  5. Preparation for an online asynchronous university doctoral course. Lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstead, J A; Nelson, R

    1998-01-01

    This article addresses the development of the initial course in the first completely online doctoral program in nursing. Synchronous and asynchronous methods of distance education were assessed. Planning focused at the university, school, and course levels. University planning involved the technical infrastructure, registration, student services, and library services. School planning examined administrative commitment and faculty commitment and willingness. Course planning focused on marketing, precourse information, time frame, modular design, planned interaction, and professor availability and support. Implementation issues centered on getting students connected, learning the software, changing instructional methods, and managing chats. Traditional methods of evaluating student learning and course evaluation were supplemented with the development of qualitative and quantitative tools to gather data for making administrative decisions. The Dean and faculty agreed that the internet was an effective method of delivering content in the initial Health Policy course. The Dean and faculty agreed to continue the PhD program online for one cohort and continue to evaluate student progress and faculty and student satisfaction.

  6. Original article University students with learning disabilities at the Faculty of Education, Charles University in Prague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kucharská

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The paper deals with learning disabilities (LD of university students in the Czech Republic. The first part describes most common trends in professional care of students with LD in historical context, the second part analyses contemporary situation of support of students with LD during their university studies. Pivotal part of the text describes the situation at Faculty of Education, Charles University in Prague, from the perspective of state LD students, their difficulties and means of possible support. PARTICIPANTS AND PROCEDURE Qualitative analysis of functional diagnostics took place in the frame of evidence of 15 students with learning disabilities. Focal point of the functional diagnostics is a structured interview in which an identification of needed modification for studying with specific educational needs of students with LD takes place. RESULTS From our analyses it can be stated, that students with LD apply for registration basing on their experience with high school status of a student with SD, or that their decision is influenced by their current study problems or the fact that they went through a modified entrance exam. We have also discovered the fact, that except for the difficulties which result from the type and degree of the disability and which can be compensated by specific approaches, students also need an emotional and social support. Learning disability is not, however, perceived only as a disadvantage, many students have stated that it has motivated them in their further development. CONCLUSIONS Achieved results point to general specifics to the perceived difficulties, to the specifics of the concrete degrees and to the further personal (emotional, social characteristics of LD students and they support recommended modification for successful studies.

  7. Using Cluster Analysis to Characterize Meaningful Learning in a First-Year University Chemistry Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    The Meaningful Learning in the Laboratory Instrument (MLLI) was designed to measure students' cognitive and affective learning in the university chemistry laboratory. The MLLI was administered at the beginning and the end of the first semester to first-year university chemistry students to measure their expectations and experiences for learning in…

  8. Challenges of Implementing E-Learning in Kenya: A Case of Kenyan Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarus, John K.; Gichoya, David; Muumbo, Alex

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the challenges experienced by Kenyan public universities in implementation of e-learning and recommend possible solutions towards its successful implementation. In the last few years, most Kenyan public universities have adopted e-learning as a new approach to teaching and learning. However, the implementation challenges…

  9. Developing Autonomous Learning in First Year University Students Using Perspectives from Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaskill, Ann; Denovan, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous learning is a commonly occurring learning outcome from university study, and it is argued that students require confidence in their own abilities to achieve this. Using approaches from positive psychology, this study aimed to develop confidence in first-year university students to facilitate autonomous learning. Psychological character…

  10. Promoting University Students' Metacognitive Regulation through Peer Learning: The Potential of Reciprocal Peer Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, Liesje; Van Keer, Hilde; Valcke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Although successful learning in university education can be advanced by students' competence to self-regulate their learning, students often possess insufficient metacognitive regulation skills to regulate their learning adequately. The present study investigates changes in university students' adoption of metacognitive regulation after…

  11. Development an Instrument to Measure University Students' Attitude towards E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Vandana; Omidian, Faranak

    2012-01-01

    The study of student's attitude towards e-learning can in many ways help managers better prepare in light of e-learning for the future. This article describes the process of the development of an instrument to measure university students' attitude towards e-learning. The scale was administered to 200 University students from two countries (India…

  12. Challenges Affecting Adoption of E-Learning in Public Universities in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutisya, Dorothy N.; Makokha, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Public universities in Kenya are, today, turning to the use of e-learning in an attempt to cope with the rapidly increasing demand for university education. This research was conducted between February 2012 and February 2014 to determine the challenges affecting the adoption of e-learning in these institutions of higher learning. Data were…

  13. Popular universities: An alternative vision for lifelong learning in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromquist, Nelly P.; da Costa, Romina B.

    2017-10-01

    At its inception in 1993, the European Union (EU) did not consider education one of the pillars of its regional cohesiveness and identity. As time went by, recognition of the potential role of education at individual and social levels increased. This concern for education, however, is much more centred on the acquisition of knowledge and skills towards developing a competitive labour force than towards facilitating the integration of all citizens in the European community - a bias which is reflected in EU policies and recommendations. At local levels, communities need to offer educational opportunities to all members of society, irrespective of their social, cultural and linguistic background and their level of education. In many EU member countries, this kind of learning is offered by popular universities (PUs), which are not state-funded and run in close collaboration with their respective local communities. The authors of this paper carried out a qualitative survey, collecting data on PUs in Spain and France. Their purpose was to examine how European PU offerings align with community needs, and to what extent they address emerging issues such as immigration, the refugee crisis, an aging population and youth unemployment. In the evaluation of their comparative survey, the authors link the grassroots approaches of PUs in Spain and France to the broader European Union (EU) discourse on lifelong learning (LLL) as seen in policy documents such as the European Commission's Memorandum on Lifelong Learning. Finally, they examine the ways in which PUs' approach to LLL works to contest the dominant consensus on the meaning and scope of lifelong learning, offering an alternative way forward.

  14. A systemic framework for managing e-learning adoption in campus universities: individual strategies in context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Russell

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There are hopes that new learning technologies will help to transform university learning and teaching into a more engaging experience for twenty-first-century students. But since 2000 the changes in campus university teaching have been more limited than expected. I have drawn on ideas from organisational change management research to investigate why this is happening in one particular campus university context. My study examines the strategies of individual lecturers for adopting e-learning within their disciplinary, departmental and university work environments to develop a conceptual framework for analysing university learning and teaching as a complex adaptive system. This conceptual framework links the processes through which university teaching changes, the resulting forms of learning activity and the learning technologies used – all within the organisational context of the university. The framework suggests that systemic transformation of a university's learning and teaching requires coordinated change across activities that have traditionally been managed separately in campus universities. Without such coordination, established ways of organising learning and teaching will reassert themselves, as support staff and lecturers seek to optimise their own work locally. The conceptual framework could inform strategies for realising the full benefits of new learning technologies in other campus universities.

  15. Academic managers in contemporary university: Challenges and learnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marita Sánchez-Moreno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The article presents and discusses some findings derived from a research project about University academic management, and it is focused on the identification of principal clues –even related to subjects and methodology– for the design of training programmes on this task. Design/methodology/approach: The research design adopted a qualitative approach and contemplated the development of in-depth interviews to 71 academic managers at the university who were valued as good in that task, in three Spanish Universities –Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (ULP, Universidad de Lleida (UdL y Universidad de Sevilla (US. Data were analyzed using MAXQDA.11 and their interpretations were contrasted with the opinions obtained in a second round of interviews with 15 of those managers. Findings: Results allows to identify some kind of “vital cycle” in academic managers, inform about their reasons to continue in their managing charges, about their worries related to interpersonal relationships and conflict management, as well as about the recognized need of receiving a specific training for academic management, based on an active an participative methodology which can promote a practical learning. Research limitations/implications: The most important limitations of the study have to do with two unrelated issues. First of them, from a methodological point of view, is related to the limited number of participants. Second of them derives of the changing environment in which management and government model of Spanish is changing. This could probably affect the value and the interest showed by a academics on University management. Practical implications: According to one of the original mains of the study, a training program for academics in university management was already designed and developed. Social implications: The development of training Programs on University management as the one derived from the commented study would represent a

  16. Mobile Learning: Challenges for Teachers of Indian Open Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadhiya, Ashish Kumar; Miglani, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    "Mobile Learning" (m-Learning) has emerged as a trend in the field of Open and Distance Learning (ODL). It is removing the time and geographical barriers for learning by placing learning opportunities at the fingertips of learners. ODL institutes in India are also adopting m-learning in different forms; however, it is not fully…

  17. E-Learning in Universities: Supporting Help-Seeking Processes by Instructional Prompts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schworm, Silke; Gruber, Hans

    2012-01-01

    University students are more responsible than school students for their own learning. The role of self-regulated learning increases in virtual e-learning course environments. Academic help-seeking is an important strategy of self-regulated learning, but many students fail to use this strategy appropriately. A lack of information and a perceived…

  18. 27 CFR 22.104 - Educational organizations, colleges of learning, and scientific universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., colleges of learning, and scientific universities. 22.104 Section 22.104 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... OF TAX-FREE ALCOHOL Use of Tax-Free Alcohol § 22.104 Educational organizations, colleges of learning... income tax under 26 U.S.C. 501(a). (b) Colleges of learning. Colleges of learning, for the purposes of...

  19. The Effects of Locus of Control on University Students' Mobile Learning Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Jung-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Since mobile devices have become cheaper, easily accessible, powerful, and popular and the cost of wireless access has declined gradually, mobile learning (m-learning) has begun to spread rapidly. To further improve the effectiveness and efficiency of m-learning for university students, it is critical to understand whether they use m-learning.…

  20. Moodle supporting problem-based, project-organized learning at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Møller, Brian; Enevoldsen, Lars Peter

    and efficient learning model and a trademark of Aalborg University. In 2008 some study programs started using Moodle as their learning platform. In 2011 it was decided that Moodle should be the official learning management system for Aalborg University on-campus. At the presentation we would like to share some...... of the challenges we have encountered when implementing Moodle at Aalborg University whilst keeping the problem-based, project-organized model as the pedagogical foundation....

  1. Analysis of the e-learning technologies used for teaching mathematics at Tomsk Polytechnic University

    OpenAIRE

    Pakhomova, Elena Grigorievna; Yanushchik, Olga Vladimirovna; Dorofeeva, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes the implementation of e-learning technologies in the study of mathematics at Tomsk Polytechnic University. It describes research findings of the suitability of the e-learning technology for first year students of an engineering university. The research involved 248 students and 38 teachers of Tomsk Polytechnic University. The authors surveyed first-year students to check whether they are ready to learn in the electronic environment. In addition, the students and teachers...

  2. Understanding Student Learning in Context: Relationships between University Students' Social Identity, Approaches to Learning, and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliuc, Ana-Maria; Ellis, Robert A.; Goodyear, Peter; Hendres, Daniela Muntele

    2011-01-01

    This research focuses on understanding how socio-psychological dimensions such as student social identity and student perceptions of their learning community affect learning at university. To do this, it integrates ideas from phenomenographic research into student learning with ideas from research on social identity. In two studies (N = 110, and N…

  3. Structural Relationships among Self-Regulated Learning, Learning Flow, Satisfaction, and Learning Persistence in Cyber Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Young Ju; Joung, Sunyoung; Kim, Jiyeon

    2014-01-01

    Learning persistence in a cyber-learning environment is not only an index determining the success or failure of individual learners but also a source of important information to establish the management direction of educational programs in an organization. Accordingly, learners need to be motivated to continue to grow in order to ensure both…

  4. A SWOT Analysis of the Integration of E-Learning at a University in Uganda and a University in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Justice Mugenyi, Kintu

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) to integrating e-learning perceived by academic staff at a university in Uganda and a university in Tanzania. Mixed-methods research was used in which a main qualitative study was complemented by a quantitative method. The sample participants were academic staff…

  5. Transforming Teaching and Learning at University of Ghana through Community Service-Learning: Listening to the Voices of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagoe, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Universities all over the world are undergoing change to improve teaching, learning and service. These changes have been motivated by call for universities to connect more to communities to address their problems. One of the means of ensuring that universities and communities engage mutually in a partnership where students, faculty and community…

  6. Development of an e-learning package on Service-Learning for university teachers: experience from Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Chan, Stephen C F

    2013-01-01

    To help university teachers to understand Service-Learning and develop Service-Learning subjects, a 3-h+ e-learning package was developed at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU). There are seven units in this e-learning package: introduction session (Unit 1), what is Service-Learning? (Unit 2), impact and benefits of Service-Learning (Unit 3), myths and positive attitudes toward Service-Learning (Unit 4), developing a Service-Learning subject at PolyU (Unit 5), self-reflection about Service-Learning (Unit 6), and concluding session (Unit 7). To understand the views of the users on the e-learning package, the package was offered before formal launching. For the first offering, three focus group sessions were held. Results showed that the users were satisfied with the structural arrangement of the e-learning package and agreed that the e-learning package was useful for them to understand more about Service-Learning. For the second offering, colleagues were generally satisfied with the e-learning package and demonstrated gain in knowledge on Service-Learning. Suggestions for improvement were noted.

  7. Cooperative or collaborative learning: Is there a difference in university students’ perceptions?

    OpenAIRE

    María Ángeles ANDREU-ANDRÉS

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis that the same educational objective, raised as cooperative or collaborative learning in university teaching does not affect students’ perceptions of the learning model, leads this study. It analyses the reflections of two students groups of engineering that shared the same educational goals implemented through two different methodological active learning strategies: Simulation as cooperative learning strategy and Problem-based Learning as a collaborative one. The...

  8. Algerian EFL University Teachers’ Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Language Learning: The Case of Djilali Liabes University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloud Bouchefra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL is still groping its way into Algerian English as a Foreign Language (EFL classroom, where Information Communications Technologies (ICTs are defined in terms of occasional use of computers and data projectors for material presentation in the classroom. Though major issues in the image of the lack of training and absence of facilities are clearly apparent, stakeholders’ attitudes are a decisive aspect that needs to be mapped out if we are to alter the current situation. Thus, the present work aims at investigating EFL university teachers’ attitudes towards CALL at Djilali Liabes University (western Algeria. The current work is a cross-sectional descriptive study that explores teachers’ attitudes across the three domains (affective, cognitive, and behavioural and investigates other related aspects that may help indicate teachers’ likelihood to adopt CALL in the future. The results are promising as the investigated population not only demonstrated a clearly positive attitude towards CALL but also manifested a number of signs that indicate their likelihood to adopt CALL in the future if circumstances are favourable.

  9. University students with learning disabilities advocating for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roer-Strier, D

    2002-11-20

    In recent decades Western psychology has conceptualized learning disabilities (LD) in terms of deficits and such related 'social emotional issues' as insecurity, low self-esteem and social isolation that can be rehabilitated through combined remedial teaching and psychological intervention. With increasing advocacy and legislation on behalf of people with disabilities in the US, UK and Australia, more resources are being made available to students with LD in institutions of higher education. Due to this increase in the quantity of services, written programmes and accommodations made to their needs, increased numbers of students with LD have been graduating successfully from institutions of higher education. This paper describes an option for treating students with LD that is based on a theoretical perspective that understands these students as an excluded population and emphasizes the importance of their empowerment. A project involving social work students with LD at Hebrew University in Jerusalem is presented as a case study. Case-study investigation, one of the common methods of qualitative research, explores social and human problems in their natural context. A 6-year evaluation of this project was conducted based on questionnaires, focus groups, documentation of all activities related to the project, in-depth interviews and outcome measures. The results suggest that the project developed in three stages: raising awareness, building partnerships, and lobbying for rights and services. Outcome measures indicate that the project was successful in lowering dropout rates and improving students' academic achievement. Analysis of interviews with students suggests that the project positively affected the students' perceptions by helping them reframe the social and emotional connotations of their learning disability. Students reported marked social and emotional change, including reduced stress and anxiety levels and increased self-esteem. Empowerment practices that are

  10. The Surveillance of Learning: A Critical Analysis of University Attendance Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Universities have recently strengthened their class attendance policies along with associated practices that intensify the surveillance of learning: a series of administrative and pedagogic strategies that monitor the extent to which students conform with behavioural expectations associated with learning. Drawing on university policy statements,…

  11. A Systemic Framework for Managing E-Learning Adoption in Campus Universities: Individual Strategies in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Carol

    2009-01-01

    There are hopes that new learning technologies will help to transform university learning and teaching into a more engaging experience for twenty-first-century students. But since 2000 the changes in campus university teaching have been more limited than expected. I have drawn on ideas from organisational change management research to investigate…

  12. The Implementation and Use of E-Learning in the Corporate University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Allan; Homan, Gill; Wilkinson, Krystal

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The use of e-learning in corporate universities enables access and broadens the curriculum. This paper assesses the use and implementation of e-learning through case material, and explores some of the challenges and emerging concerns. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reviews the corporate university concept and considers how an…

  13. Electronic versus Traditional Print Textbooks: A Comparison Study on the Influence of University Students' Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockinson- Szapkiw, Amanda J.; Courduff, Jennifer; Carter, Kimberly; Bennett, David

    2013-01-01

    University students are increasingly choosing to purchase e-textbooks for their mobile devices as an alternative to traditional textbooks. This study examines the relationship between textbook format and 538 university students' grades and perceived learning scores. Results demonstrate that there was no difference in cognitive learning and grades…

  14. Universal Design for Learning: Cognitive Theory into Practice for Facilitating Comprehension in Early Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Susan Trostle; Dalton, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Addressing the unique needs of children of all ages and abilities, Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is gaining momentum in schools and preschools around the nation and the globe. This article explores Universal Design for Learning and its promising applications to a variety of reading and language arts experiences in the Early Childhood…

  15. Learning Communities for University Students At-Risk of School Failure: Can They Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Terri J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of learning communities on the academic success of university students at-risk of academic failure. The effects of learning communities (LC) at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) on cumulative GPAs, retention rates, and earned cumulative hours of students with ACT sub-scores of 17 or 18 in math who were…

  16. Unicorn: Continual Learning with a Universal, Off-policy Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Mankowitz, Daniel J.; Žídek, Augustin; Barreto, André; Horgan, Dan; Hessel, Matteo; Quan, John; Oh, Junhyuk; van Hasselt, Hado; Silver, David; Schaul, Tom

    2018-01-01

    Some real-world domains are best characterized as a single task, but for others this perspective is limiting. Instead, some tasks continually grow in complexity, in tandem with the agent's competence. In continual learning, also referred to as lifelong learning, there are no explicit task boundaries or curricula. As learning agents have become more powerful, continual learning remains one of the frontiers that has resisted quick progress. To test continual learning capabilities we consider a ...

  17. Cultivating social learning spaces at an urban Johannesburg university student residence

    OpenAIRE

    Agherdien, Najma

    2015-01-01

    Ph.D. (Education) This case study investigated the conceptualisation and implementation of social learning spaces (SLS) in a University of Johannesburg student residence. The literature base I drew on included ideas, concepts and constructs associated with learning communities [where the terms ‘SLS’ and ‘learning communities’ (LCs) are often used interchangeably], Wenger’s communities of practice, the First Year Experience (FYE), university student residence life and transformation in high...

  18. Collaborative Research between Malaysian and Australian Universities on Learning Analytics: Challenges and Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Tasir; S. N. Kew; D. West; Z. Abdullah; D. Toohey

    2016-01-01

    Research on Learning Analytics is progressively developing in the higher education field by concentrating on the process of students' learning. Therefore, a research project between Malaysian and Australian Universities was initiated in 2015 to look at the use of Learning Analytics to support the development of teaching practice. The focal point of this article is to discuss and share the experiences of Malaysian and Australian universities in the process of developing the collaborative resea...

  19. DEVELOPMENT AN INSTRUMENT TO MEASURE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS' ATTITUDE TOWARDS E-LEARNING

    OpenAIRE

    Vandana MEHRA; Faranak OMIDIAN

    2012-01-01

    The study of student’s attitude towards e-learning can in many ways help managers better prepare in light of e-learning for the future. This article describes the process of the development of an instrument to measure university students’ attitude towards e-learning. The scale was administered to 200 University students from two countries (India and Iran) .The 83-item attitude towards e-learning scale was developed on six domains as Perceived usefulness ; Intention to adopt e-learning; Ease o...

  20. A Case Study in Master Planning the Learning Landscape Hub Concepts for the University at Buffalo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Shirley; Torino, Roger; Felix, Elliot

    2009-01-01

    This case study describes concepts for three types of learning spaces that grew out of a Learning Landscape planning process. The process was part of a master plan study for the three campuses of the University at Buffalo. It involved research into user needs and aspirations about future pedagogy, development of learning space strategy,…

  1. Reflection on the Use of Blended Learning at a Korean University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemsen, Katie Mae; Seong, Myeong Hee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine students' satisfaction and investigate the potential of improved learning outcomes in smart and blended learning environments. This paper reflects on the experience of the delivery of a program at H University in Seoul, Korea using smart and blended learning. The goal was to apply the findings to current…

  2. Access to E-learning in the Nigerian university system (NUS): a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In developing countries, the application of electronic learning (e-learning) in the educational system is yet to gain much ground. This study therefore seeks to survey the extent to which elearning is applied in University of Calabar for effective teaching and learning processes. The purpose of this paper is to give a brief insight ...

  3. Students' Attitudes and Motivation for Learning English at Dokuz Eylul University School of Foreign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Kadim

    2014-01-01

    Attitudes and motivation are two of the key factors in second language learning since positive attitudes and high levels of motivation are considered as the predictors of a successful learning process. This study aims to reveal the relation between university preparatory students' attitudes towards learning English and their language learning…

  4. Exploring E-Learning Acceptance among University Students in Thailand: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy; Ruangrit, Nammon; Khlaisang, Jintavee; Thammetar, Thapanee; Sunphakitjumnong, Kobkul

    2014-01-01

    This study surveys the e-learning acceptance of university students in Thailand. One thousand nine hundred and eighty-one (1,981) participants completed the E-Learning Acceptance Measure (Teo, 2010) which measures three constructs that predict e-learning acceptance (tutor quality, perceived usefulness, and facilitating conditions). Data analysis…

  5. Assessing Moroccan University Students' English Learning Motivation: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omari, Otmane; Moubtassime, Mohammed; Ridouani, Driss

    2018-01-01

    This study seeks to survey whether students are motivated to learn English or not and to evaluate the differences within and between three most known universities in Morocco, involving a private one, in terms of students' English learning motivation. Moreover, factors that make a student more motivated to learn English were investigated. This…

  6. Utilizing E-Learning Systems in the Libyan Universities: Case Study; Tripoli University, Faculty of Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansuri, Aisha Ammar; Elmansuri, Rowad Adel

    2015-01-01

    E-learning in teaching and learning considered as the easy way to use information and communication technology by using of the internet. With the support of E-learning higher education can be delivered anywhere and at any time. Although E-Learning is very importance in Libyan higher education, It's implementation is facing many challenges in the…

  7. The Influence of Perceived Stress, Loneliness, and Learning Burnout on University Students' Educational Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliker, Bryce E.; Lafreniere, Kathryn D.

    2015-01-01

    University is a pivotal period in a young adult's life; however, for some, university may be a recipe for disaster due to the stress and pressures that come along with university education. The purpose of the present study was to examine students' feelings of stress, loneliness, and levels of learning burnout in order to determine if these factors…

  8. University Lawyers: A Study of Legal Risk, Risk Management and Role in Work Integrated Learning Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Craig; Klopper, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Work integrated learning (WIL) is in growing demand by multiple stakeholders within the higher education sector in Australia. There are significant and distinct legal risks to universities associated with WIL programmes. University lawyers, along with WIL administrators and university management, are responsible for managing legal risk. This…

  9. Perspectives on Teaching and Regulation of Learning: A Comparison of Secondary and University Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oolbekkink-Marchand, H. W.; Van Driel, J. H.; Verloop, N.

    2014-01-01

    Many factors play a role in the successful transition of students from secondary to university education: one of them is the (university) teacher. In this study the similarities and differences in the perspectives on teaching and learning of secondary and university teachers were investigated. A survey was performed among 675 teachers. Three…

  10. Effect of Learning Organization Perception to the Organizational Commitment: A Comparison between Private and Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balay, Refik

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to examine the impact of faculty members' learning organization perceptions to the organizational commitment through quantitative method. The study group consists of 172 faculty members working in two universities, which are private (Zirve University) and public (Harran University) ones. The research results show that faculty…

  11. The Program Risks of Work-Integrated Learning: A Study of Australian University Lawyers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Craig; Freudenberg, Brett; Giddings, Jeff; Klopper, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) is a risky business in higher education. The strategic opportunities that WIL presents for universities cannot be achieved without taking on unavoidable legal risks. University lawyers are involved with managing the legal risks as part of their internal delivery of legal services to universities. It is important to…

  12. Explaining University Students' Effective Use of E-Learning Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Valter; Cavazotte, Flavia; Alves, Isabela

    2017-01-01

    Students' success in e-learning programs depends on how they adopt and embed technology into their learning activities. Drawing on the Technology Acceptance Model, we propose a framework to explain students' intention to use e-learning platforms effectively, that is, their intention to fully exploit system's functionalities in leaning processes,…

  13. Changing University Students' Alternative Conceptions of Optics by Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadžibegovic, Zalkida; Sliško, Josip

    2013-01-01

    Active learning is individual and group participation in effective activities such as in-class observing, writing, experimenting, discussion, solving problems, and talking about to-be-learned topics. Some instructors believe that active learning is impossible, or at least extremely difficult to achieve in large lecture sessions. Nevertheless, the…

  14. The Effect of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Application on E-Learning Acceptance: A Structural Equation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azawei, Ahmed; Parslow, Patrick; Lundqvist, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Standardising learning content and teaching approaches is not considered to be the best practice in contemporary education. This approach does not differentiate learners based on their individual abilities and preferences. The present research integrates a pedagogical theory "Universal Design for Learning" ("UDL") with an…

  15. Where's the Justice in Service-Learning? Institutionalizing Service-Learning from a Social Justice Perspective at a Jesuit University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuban, Sondra; Anderson, Jeffrey B.

    2007-01-01

    We attempt to answer "where" the social justice is in service-learning by probing "what" it is, "how" it looks in the process of being institutionalized at a Jesuit university, and "why" it is important. We develop themes about institutionalizing service-learning from a social justice perspective. Our themes were developed through an analysis of…

  16. Combining University Student Self-Regulated Learning Indicators and Engagement with Online Learning Events to Predict Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Abelardo; Han, Feifei; Ellis, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Self-regulated learning theories are used to understand the reasons for different levels of university student academic performance. Similarly, learning analytics research proposes the combination of detailed data traces derived from technology-mediated tasks with a variety of algorithms to predict student academic performance. The former approach…

  17. The Adoption of E-Learning Technology at the Faculty of Distance Learning of Plekhanov Russian University of Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, Vera G.; Melamud, Marina R.; Tutaeva, Dinara R.; Romanova, Yuliya D.; Zhenova, Nataliya A.

    2018-01-01

    The authors review application of information technologies and systems at the Faculty of Distance Learning of Plekhanov Russian University of Economics. General aspects of organizing training in e-learning environment, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of such approach are also examined. The authors study and analyze a number of…

  18. Learning English as a Second Language at the University Level in Jordan: Motivation, Self-Regulation and Learning Environment Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzubaidi, Eman; Aldridge, Jill M.; Khine, Myint Swe

    2016-01-01

    The overarching aim of this study was to investigate students' perceptions of the learning environment and whether these influenced their motivation and self-regulation in learning English as a second language at the university level in Jordan. Our sample involved 994 students, drawn from 13 schools, within three faculties (humanities, health…

  19. Perceptions of Online Learning in an Australian University: Malaysian Students? Perspectives - Usability of the Online Learning Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Renee Chew Shiun Yee

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to investigate the kinds of learning difficulties encountered by the Malaysian students and how they actually coped with online learning. The modified Online Learning Environment Survey (OLES) instrument was used to collect data from the sample of 40 Malaysian students at a university in Brisbane, Australia. A controlled group of 35 Australian students was also included for comparison purposes. Contrary to assumptions from previous researches, the findings revealed that the...

  20. A STUDY OF LEARNING STYLE PREFERENCES OF ALL FEMALE STUDENTS IN UNIVERSITY LEVEL (A Case Study in one of Islamic University in Bandung)

    OpenAIRE

    Siti Nuraeni Muhtar

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated students learning styles of all female students in University Level. The study involved 129 students in one of Islamic University in Bandung. The C.I.T.E Learning Styles Instrument by Joy Reid was used to identify 6 different kinds of Learning Styles. The research questions were as follows: (1) What are the learning styles  possessed by students?, (2) What are the dominant learning styles of Female Students in University Level?, and (3) How do those learning styles ...

  1. Strategy approach for eLearning 2.0 deployment in Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oskar Casquero

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The institutionally powered Personal Learning Environment (iPLE constitutes our vision of how Web 2.0 technologies, people arrangement and data sharing could be applied for delivering open, flexible, distributed and learner-centred learning environments to university members. Based on the iPLE, this paper explores a strategy approach that universities could follow in order to deploy eLearning 2.0 tools and services. With that aim in mind, we review the patterns that Web 2.0 has successfully applied, and have been proved to encourage people to interact and to share information. Then, we present an eLearning 2.0 provisioning strategy based on iPLEs. Finally, we explain how this strategy can help translating Web 2.0 patterns to learning, and positioning universities as eLearning 2.0 providers.

  2. E-LEARNING SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF EFQUEL: VYATKA STATE UNIVERSITY EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Syrtsova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of various aspects of development and implementation of e-learning at higher education institutions. This system has been created according to the main approaches and criteria used by the European Foundation for quality assurance of e-learning (EFQUEL. The article presents the main results of the experiment on Vyatka State University's e-learning system development. The article reveals the feasibility of the development of e-learning in the region. The authors consider three main strategies of implementation of e-learning system at Vyatka State University. The authors substantiate the choice of the most effective and promising strategy of them based on the analysis and considering the peculiarities of the university and the region. In the article, the fundamental results of the experiment and description of the stages of the implementation of e-learning system are presented.

  3. Learning Strategic Planning from Australian and New Zealand University Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Anfu

    2014-01-01

    Initiating a strategic development plan is necessary for universities to be managed scientifically; a university's strategic development plan includes both the educational philosophy and development orientation as determined by the university, including the future reallocation of resources and measures for their integration. The development…

  4. Improving Communication between Postgraduate Researchers and the University Library: A Case Study at De Montfort University Library and Learning Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petch, Melanie; Fraser, Katie; Rush, Nathan; Cope, Alan; Lowe, Julie

    2016-01-01

    A well-established postgraduate researcher development program has existed at De Montfort University for many years. Library and Learning Services include modules on literature searching skills and critical appraisal. However, we recognized that researchers seemed to be disengaged with the services on offer. This concern informed a research…

  5. Collaborative Learning at Engineering Universities: Benefits and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Olga V. Sumtsova; Tatiana Yu. Aikina; Liudmila M. Bolsunovskaya; Chris Phillips; Olga M. Zubkova; Peter J. Mitchell

    2018-01-01

    This paper concerns the cutting edge educational approaches incorporated into syllabuses of the most progressive Russian higher technical schools. The authors discuss one of the active methods in teaching foreign languages – collaborative learning implemented in e-courses. Theoretical and historical aspects of this approach are addressed, as are its suitability for engineering education and possible ways of introducing collaborative learning into e-courses. Collaborative learning technology o...

  6. Perceptions and Attitudes Towards Blended Learning for English Courses: A Case Study of Students at University of Bisha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ja'ashan, Mohammed Mohammed Nasser Hassan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of students' perceptions and attitudes towards Blended Learning course in English at University of Bisha. The statement of problem that blended learning of English course annoys students at University of Bisha. Most of the students do not understand well the objectives of e learning through blended learning courses…

  7. Problems, Challenges and Benefits of Implementing E-learning in Nigerian Universities: An Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manir Abdullahi Kamba

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper tries to examine and discuss the problems, challenges and Benefits of implementing E-Learning in Nigeria by reviewing the consciousness and willingness of the selected Universities. This study also identifies the enabling factors, the traffic-jam and, forecasts the future growth of E-learning in Nigeria. Survey research method was adopted for the study, and questionnaire was the only instrument used for the data collection. The findings of the study show that out of the 18 universities selected from different specialization areas, i.e three universities from each Geopolitical zone, only 12 responded with usable answers. The response rate was 67%, which is an expected rate for such surveys. Awareness of e-learning among the Universities is very high but investment and commitment to develop an e-learning application is very poor and below expectation according to the study. Most of the staff and students in the universities only use Internet related e- learning site just for the sake of finding related information for their researches, since their libraries cannot afford to provide them with adequate and current materials but not for the sake of real online learning. The study also found out that some of the universities have web page and others are in the trend of creating a web page, which is usually for advertisement of the universities but not for the e-leaning activities. Furthermore, the findings also reveal that staff and the students have also been using e-mail and Internet in addition to developing web pages for transaction of students. The Universities are planning to invest number of funds in future in the selected areas of the e-learning application. The Statistical analysis result shows that there are significant differences across both forms of e-learning activities and type of universities in Nigeria.

  8. Bringing Online Learning to Campus: The Hybridization of Teaching and Learning at Brigham Young University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory L. Waddoups

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of Brigham Young University (BYU is to provide students with a combination of sacred and secular education often described as the "BYU experience". Achieving this purpose is challenged by the rapid growth in Church membership and an enrollment cap of 30,000 students. To address these challenges, BYU sponsors the use of technology to bridge the gap between the increased Church membership and the number of students allowed under the enrollment caps. This institutional case study shows how these challenges have influenced the hybridization of teaching and learning for on campus (resident and off campus (distance students. It also describes how BYU has brought distance education to campus, and is beginning to bring campus-based educational practices to distance education.

  9. Supporting University Learning through Mobile Technologies: A Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugo, David Gitumu; Njagi, Kageni; Chemwei, Bernard; Gakuru, Paul Maina

    2015-01-01

    The workplace in the modern world continues to demand higher qualifications and refined competencies. In the recent past, workers would respond to such demands through learning by correspondence. When the Internet and e-Learning emerged, it received widespread accolade as a solution to the challenges experienced by distant learners. The technology…

  10. Developing Distance Learning Courses in a "Traditional" University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Sally; Barnes, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of distance learning that was developed with a business-planning approach (market research, cost-benefit analysis, feasibility study, strategic marketing) with one that did not use these techniques showed that business planning ensures that distance-learning courses are not viewed as a "cheap" option. The method identifies…

  11. An Innovative Learning Paradigm for the University of Mauritius

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    transform the existing methods of learning using wireless and mobile technologies at the ... The proposed system, Wi-Learn, enfolds a set of mobile collaborative applications .... NOBE B (3G). – gateway to .... 2G Mobile phone. Low maximum ...

  12. Learning based upon projects of architectural conservation: from university to real life

    OpenAIRE

    Mileto, Camilla; Vegas López-Manzanares, Fernando; Cristini, Valentina; Diodato, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Mileto, C.; Vegas López-Manzanares, F.; Cristini, V.; Diodato, M. (2011). Learning based upon projects of architectural conservation: from university to real life. IATED. 1-8. http://hdl.handle.net/10251/50072 Senia 1 8

  13. Evaluating Learning Management System (LMS)-facilitated Delivery of Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryans Bongey, Sarah

    This quantitative study involved 157 students in two sections of an undergraduate class in general biology, as well as one instructor who taught both sections of the course. It used resources from the Center for Applied Special Technologies (CAST) to evaluate the viability of a Learning Management System (LMS) to provide Universal Design for Learning (UDL). It also measured and tracked the instructor's level of efficacy in sustaining UDL approaches throughout the semester. In an effort to identify the UDL's specific outcomes or benefits to students, this study used a pre- and post- test to identify the treatment's impact on student engagement. Findings indicated that the LMS could be designed to comply with UDL guidelines, and the instructor was able to establish a high level of efficacy in maintaining that UDL design. However, based on the statistical analysis of pre- and post-test responses from control vs. treatment groups of students, the treatment was seen to have no significant effect in the area of student engagement. Overall, the study added to the literature by suggesting (a) the viability of the LMS as a means of providing UDL approaches, (b) the promise of the LMS as a tool faculty can use to deliver UDL with a high level of efficacy, and (c) the design's lack of effect in the area of student engagement. The fact that this study was limited to a single brand of LMS (Blackboard), a single instructor, and a single group of students underscores the need for further research.

  14. NASA’s Universe of Learning: Engaging Subject Matter Experts to Support Museum Alliance Science Briefings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Emma; Slivinski, Carolyn; Lawton, Brandon L.; Smith, Denise A.; Squires, Gordon K.; Biferno, Anya A.; Lestition, Kathleen; Cominsky, Lynn R.; Lee, Janice C.; Rivera, Thalia; Walker, Allyson; Spisak, Marilyn

    2018-06-01

    NASA's Universe of Learning creates and delivers science-driven, audience-driven resources and experiences designed to engage and immerse learners of all ages and backgrounds in exploring the universe for themselves. The project is a unique partnership between the Space Telescope Science Institute, Caltech/IPAC, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and Sonoma State University and is part of the NASA SMD Science Activation Collective. The NASA’s Universe of Learning projects pull on the expertise of subject matter experts (scientist and engineers) from across the broad range of NASA Astrophysics themes and missions. One such project, which draws strongly on the expertise of the community, is the NASA’s Universe of Learning Science Briefings, which is done in collaboration with the NASA Museum Alliance. This collaboration presents a monthly hour-long discussion on relevant NASA astrophysics topics or events to an audience composed largely of informal educators from informal learning environments. These professional learning opportunities use experts and resources within the astronomical community to support increased interest and engagement of the informal learning community in NASA Astrophysics-related concepts and events. Briefings are designed to create a foundation for this audience using (1) broad science themes, (2) special events, or (3) breaking science news. The NASA’s Universe of Learning team engages subject matter experts to be speakers and present their science at these briefings to provide a direct connection to NASA Astrophysics science and provide the audience an opportunity to interact directly with scientists and engineers involved in NASA missions. To maximize the usefulness of the Museum Alliance Science Briefings, each briefing highlights resources related to the science theme to support informal educators in incorporating science content into their venues and/or interactions with the public. During this

  15. University Students with Dyslexia: A Qualitative Exploratory Study of Learning Practices, Challenges and Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCullagh, Lois; Bosanquet, Agnes; Badcock, Nicholas A

    2017-02-01

    People with dyslexia are vastly under-represented in universities (Katusic et al., , Richardson & Wydell, ; Stampoltzis & Polychronopoulou, ). This situation is of concern for modern societies that value social justice. This study was designed to explore learning experiences of university students with dyslexia and factors that could contribute to their success. Thirteen students with dyslexia and 20 non-dyslexic peers were interviewed about their university learning experiences using a semi-structured qualitative approach. Students with dyslexia described engaging in learning activities intensively, frequently and strategically. They reported challenges and strengths relating to study skills, lectures, assessments, technology and support services. They also described helpful strategies including self-directed adaptive techniques, provisions from lecturers and assistance from the university. These findings suggest that students with dyslexia experience broad challenges at university, but helpful strategies may be available. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Comparison of the eLearning Solution at MUAF in Brno and Polytechnic University in Madrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Foltýnek

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of eLearning support of the university studies is setting up (or was setting up at the universities all over the world. This paper compares the eLearning technologies available at Mendel University in Brno (MUAF, Czech Republic, and Polytechnic University in Madrid (UPM, Spain, in the context of different conditions at both universities. The level of using of these technologies and practical experiences with them are evaluated too. In concrete this paper deals with the systems GATE (GAbinete de TeleEducación and AulaWeb, used at the UPM and system ELIS, used at MUAF. The fifteen-year experiences with development of eLearning at UPM are very valuable study material for the developers of the ELIS system. Some, especially conception properties of the ELIS system, can be, on the other hand, useful for inspiration vice versa.

  17. Strategic Avoidance: Can Universities Learn from Other Sectors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Greg; Hosie, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Universities live in interesting times. For instance, government policies in Australia are allowing for more deregulation of the student market while overseas universities are entering the Australian domestic market. In an environment of increasing uncertainty, sound strategic planning is important. Processes including benchmarking, environmental…

  18. Assessing Goal Intent and Achievement of University Learning Community Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer-Lachs, Carole F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the goal intent and achievement of university students, during the Fall 2011 semester, at Blue Wave University, a high research activity public institution in the southeast United States. This study merged theories of motivation to measure goal setting and goal attainment to examine if students who chose to…

  19. Motivations, Learning, Approaches, and Strategies in Biochemistry Students at a Public University in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Raquel Salim

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to understand how university students learn, and to comprehend the motivations and learning strategies they use when deciding in what field to major. We chose a combined research design: qualitative and quantitative. We applied the Questionnaire for the Evaluation of Learning and Studying Processes (CEPEA to Biochemistry students attending the National University of Tucumán (Argentina, and performed individual semi-structured interviews. Cluster analysis allowed us to identify three groups of students having who use different learning approaches: deep, superficial and ambivalent. We found that learning approaches are closely related with some teaching practices that encourage or inhibit them; among these are the types of learning evaluation.

  20. Service-learning from the views of university teachers: a qualitative study based on focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Chan, Stephen C F

    2013-01-01

    Under the New Undergraduate Curriculum at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU), students are required to take a 3-credit subject to fulfill service-learning requirements. To understand the views of teachers regarding service-learning, five focus group interviews (n=33) are conducted to examine the perceived characteristics and myths of service-learning as well as colleagues' views on the policy at PolyU. Results showed that most informants are aware of service-learning and have seen its benefits to both students and teachers. Most informants also possess positive views about service-learning. Nevertheless, in terms of service-learning at PolyU, three different groups of views on service-learning are observed, namely, positive, negative, and mixed views. This paper also discusses teachers' views on the anticipated difficulties of service-learning implementation and the ways, by which to promote the subject in the PolyU context.

  1. Benefits and Barriers of E-Learning for Staff Training in a Medical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Stefan; Behrends, Marianne; Haack, Claudia; Marschollek, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Learning Management Systems (LMS) are a feasible solution to fulfill the various requirements for e-learning based training in a medical university. Using the LMS ILIAS, the Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology has designed an e-learning unit about data protection, which has been used by 73% of the department's employees in the first three months. To increase the use of e-learning for staff training, it is necessary to identify barriers and benefits, which encourage the use of e-learning. Therefore, we started an online survey to examine how the employees evaluate this learning opportunity. The results show that 87% of the employees had no technical problems and also competence of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) was no barrier. If anything, reported issues were time shortages and tight schedules. Therefore, short learning modules (less than 20 minutes) are preferred. Furthermore, temporal flexibility for learning is important for 83% of employees.

  2. Implementation of Cooperative Learning in the Center for Community Service and Continuing Education at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansari, Eissa M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the success of implementation of cooperative learning in various courses delivered at the Center for Community Service and Continuing Education at Kuwait University. According to recent research in the field of social cognition, learning situations which make use of the social context often achieve superior…

  3. Why Students Need to Be Prepared to Cooperate: A Cooperative Nudge in Statistics Learning at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchs, Céline; Gilles, Ingrid; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Butera, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of cooperative learning at university, its implementation is challenging. Here, we propose a theory-based 90-min intervention with 185 first-year psychology students in the challenging domain of statistics, consisting of an exercise phase and an individual learning post-test. We compared three conditions that…

  4. How Learning Designs, Teaching Methods and Activities Differ by Discipline in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Leanne

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the learning designs, teaching methods and activities most commonly employed within the disciplines in six universities in Australia. The study sought to establish if there were significant differences between the disciplines in learning designs, teaching methods and teaching activities in the current Australian context, as…

  5. Learning to Be: The Modelling of Art and Design Practice in University Art and Design Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budge, Kylie

    2016-01-01

    Learning to be an artist or designer is a complex process of becoming. Much of the early phase of "learning to be" occurs during the time emerging artists and designers are students in university art/design programmes, both undergraduate and postgraduate. Recent research reveals that a critical role in assisting students in their…

  6. The Determinants of Students' Perceived Learning Outcomes and Satisfaction in University Online Education: An Empirical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Sean B.; Wen, H. Joseph; Ashill, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    In this study, structural equation modeling is applied to examine the determinants of students' satisfaction and their perceived learning outcomes in the context of university online courses. Independent variables included in the study are course structure, instructor feedback, self-motivation, learning style, interaction, and instructor…

  7. Physical and Psychological Well-Being and University Student Satisfaction with E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Genevieve Marie

    2015-01-01

    Although research establishes that student characteristics exert considerable influence on learning outcomes, research concerned with e-learning satisfaction most typically focuses of factors associated with instructional design, curriculum and pedagogy. Fifty-eight first-year university e-students completed an online survey that queried their…

  8. Assuring Student Learning Outcomes Achievement through Faculty Development: An Online University Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Shelia; Ewing, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Asynchronous discussions in the online teaching and learning environment significantly contributes to the achievement of student learning outcomes, which is dependent upon qualified and engaged faculty members. The discourse within this article addresses how an online university conducted faculty development through its unique Robust Learning…

  9. Learning Indicators of a Foreign Language in Spanish Public University. Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Lorenzo, M-Teresa; Salas-Pascual, Marcos; Afonzo-de-Tovar, Isabel-Cristina; Vera-Cazorla, M-Jesús; Santana-Alvarado, Yaiza; Santana-Quintana, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates 292 postgraduate students of the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain), through a Likert-scale questionnaire. This inquiry was about private, educational actions and learning valuation of a foreign language and its relation with the learning of one or several foreign languages. The analysis of…

  10. Study of the Entrepreneurship in Universities as Learning Organization Based on Senge Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejad, Bahareh Azizi; Abbaszadeh, Mir Mohammad Seiied; Hassani, Mohammad; Bernousi, Iraj

    2012-01-01

    Learning organization and entrepreneurship are the most important issues that are focused on different themes in management. The purpose of present research was to study the relationship between learning organization elements and entrepreneurship among academic faculty members of the West Azarbaijan State Universities. The research method was…

  11. Google Translate as a Supplementary Tool for Learning Malay: A Case Study at Universiti Sains Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Hossein; Mahadi, Tengku Sepora Tengku

    2016-01-01

    The present paper examines the use of Google Translate as a supplementary tool for helping international students at Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) to learn and develop their knowledge and skills in learning Bahasa Malaysia (Malay Language). The participants of the study were 16 international students at the School of Languages, Literacies, and…

  12. Mobile Learning via SMS at Open University Malaysia: Equitable, Effective, and Sustainable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tina; Fadzil, Mansor; Mansor, Norziati

    2011-01-01

    This article describes Open University Malaysia's efforts at enhancing the blended learning approach for undergraduate distance learners with the successful implementation of the Mobile Learning via SMS initiative. The pilot project was implemented in the May 2009 semester, and this coming January 2011 semester will be in its sixth consecutive…

  13. Breaking Ground on the University Garden: Service-Learning and Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bryce Collin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to document, analyze, understand, and describe how the environmental virtue ethics of undergraduate students were impacted after participating in a service-learning project designed to establish a new university garden. This service-learning project occurred during the fall semester of 2011, on the campus of…

  14. Beliefs about Teaching and Learning in University Teachers: Revision of Some Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Carmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Research shows that the belief the teachers have about teaching, learning, and their students affect their planning, instructing and evaluation processes in the classroom, and also that they have a repercussion on the student's learning and performance in the classroom. In the case of university teachers, the beliefs about the teaching-learning…

  15. Listening to Students: Customer Journey Mapping at Birmingham City University Library and Learning Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Judith; Eade, Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    Birmingham City University's Library and Learning Resources' strategic aim is to improve student satisfaction. A key element is the achievement of the Customer Excellence Standard. An important component of the standard is the mapping of services to improve quality. Library and Learning Resources has developed a methodology to map these…

  16. Towards a Personality Understanding of Information Technology Students and Their IT Learning in UAE University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qirim, Nabeel; Rouibah, Kamel; Tarhini, Ali; Serhani, Mohamed Adel; Yammahi, Aishah Rashid; Yammahi, Maraim Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    This research investigates the personality characteristics of Information Technology students (CIT) in UAE University (UAEU) and how such features impact their IT learning. To achieve this objective, this research attempts to explain the impact of the Big-5 factors on learning using survey research. Results from 179 respondents suggested that…

  17. Collaborative e-learning course design: Impacts on instructors in the Open University of Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nihuka, Kassimu A.; Voogt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    Efforts by universities in sub-Sahara Africa to promote professional development of instructors in course design and delivery by e-learning technologies have often lacked meaningful impacts. This study investigated the impact of collaborative course design on instructors' professional learning about

  18. Multiple Intelligences, Motivations and Learning Experience Regarding Video-Assisted Subjects in a Rural University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajhashemi, Karim; Caltabiano, Nerina; Anderson, Neil; Tabibzadeh, Seyed Asadollah

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates multiple intelligences in relation to online video experiences, age, gender, and mode of learning from a rural Australian university. The inter-relationships between learners' different intelligences and their motivations and learning experience with the supplementary online videos utilised in their subjects are…

  19. Culture-Based Contextual Learning to Increase Problem-Solving Ability of First Year University Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samo, Damianus Dao; Darhim; Kartasasmita, Bana G.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to show the differences in problem-solving ability between first-year University students who received culture-based contextual learning and conventional learning. This research is a quantitative research using quasi-experimental research design. Samples were the First-year students of mathematics education department;…

  20. Burnout Syndrome in Students of a Distance Learning Program: The Open University of Cyprus Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlakis, Andreas; Kaitelidou, Dafni

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Distance learning seems to have a crucial impact on the social and emotional life of students. Within the framework of distance learning at the Open University of Cyprus, the "Healthcare Management" department conducted a study regarding the levels of stress, anxiety and depression reported by the student population. The…

  1. University-affiliated schools as sites for research learning in pre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    University-affiliated schools as sites for research learning in pre-service teacher education ... they can also learn from good example, in well-functioning schools, where they can also get .... school can offer in terms of signs and tools to achieve.

  2. University EFL Learners' Perceptions of Their Autonomous Learning Responsibilities and Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Razeq, Anwar Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the readiness of university students for autonomous learning of English as a foreign language. Data was collected using questionnaires and interviews. The study assessed learners' readiness for autonomous learning across three dimensions: a) learners' perceptions of their educational responsibilities; b) learners' abilities…

  3. Predicting Students' Attitudes towards Advertising on a University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogba, Ike-Elechi; Saul, Neil; Coates, Nigel F.

    2012-01-01

    Most if not all UK universities and many in other parts of the world support their student learning via a virtual learning environment (VLE). Online resources are going to be increasingly important to students as the internet is very much part of their lives. However, the VLE will require ongoing investment to keep pace with technological…

  4. The Level of E-Learning Integration at the University of Jordan: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shboul, Muhannad

    2013-01-01

    E-Learning is playing a significant role in education to improve students' skills and teach them new ways for managing their knowledge and information. Many universities and institutions of higher education have recognized the value of the Internet in changing the way people learn. Traditional classroom courses can be augmented with interactive…

  5. Self-Regulated Learning Strategies and Pre-University Math Performance of International Students in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loong, Tang Eng

    2012-01-01

    This study is an attempt to compare the use of self-regulated learning strategies and their math performance between home and international students in the Monash University Foundation Year (MUFY) and determine the self-regulated learning strategies that are significantly associated with their math performance. The participants of the study were…

  6. Factors Contributing to E-Learning Success: A Case Study in the Hashemite University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khasawneh, Ahmad; Obeidallah, Randa

    2015-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the improvement of teaching and learning process through the adoption of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and e-learning in Jordanian higher education institutions particularly in The Hashemite University (HU). The main challenge of the study is to provide such an understanding of how ICT and e-learning…

  7. Predicting Digital Informal Learning: An Empirical Study among Chinese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tao; Zhu, Chang; Questier, Frederik

    2018-01-01

    Although the adoption of digital technology has gained considerable attention in higher education, currently research mainly focuses on implementation in formal learning contexts. Investigating what factors influence students' digital informal learning is still unclear and limited. To understand better university students' digital informal…

  8. A Study of Informal Learning among University of Wyoming Extension Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrabut, Stanley A.

    2013-01-01

    University of Wyoming Extension educators are often hired because of their subject matter expertise; yet, they must still develop education skills as well as learn to use various and ever-changing technologies. This research was conducted to understand what impact guided instruction on informal learning concepts and methods had on UW Extension…

  9. Critical Success Factors for eLearning in Saudi Arabian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhabeeb, Abdullah; Rowley, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to offer insights into the development of eLearning systems and the perceptions of key players in the management of eLearning systems in three large universities in Saudi Arabia. It establishes the relative importance of different factors and compares these findings with studies conducted elsewhere in the…

  10. Learning Style Patterns among Special Needs Adult Students at King Saud University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshuaibi, Abdulrahman

    2017-01-01

    Few studies of learning styles among adults with special needs exist worldwide. Even though there are large numbers of adults with special needs, this population in university education has been largely ignored in educational research. Therefore, this study aimed to gather and analyze learning styles of adult special needs students and to provide…

  11. A Study of Changes in German Learning Motivation by Chinese University Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meihua; Li, Mingming

    2018-01-01

    The present research examined the changes in Chinese university students' motivation to learn German during a 16-week semester. Analyses of the data showed that both at the beginning and toward the end of the semester, the participants held (fairly) positive attitudes towards German, were motivated to learn the language mainly for integrative and…

  12. Cultural Influences on Chinese Students' Asynchronous Online Learning in a Canadian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Naxin; McDougall, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    This study explored six Chinese graduate students' asynchronous online learning in a large urban Canadian university. Individual interviews in Mandarin elicited their perceptions of online learning, their participation in it, and the cultural factors that influenced their experiences. In general, the participants had a positive attitude towards…

  13. Transactional Distance among Open University Students: How Does it Affect the Learning Process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassandrinou, Amanda; Angelaki, Christina; Mavroidis, Ilias

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the presence of transactional distance among students, the factors affecting it, as well as the way it influences the learning process of students in a blended distance learning setting in Greece. The present study involved 12 postgraduate students of the Hellenic Open University (HOU). A qualitative research was conducted,…

  14. Using External Collaborations To Advance Distributed Learning at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleey, Michael; Comegno, Marsha

    1999-01-01

    Discusses distributed-learning technology and distance learning in higher education and describes initiatives at the University of Pennsylvania to collaborate with businesses and choose outsourcing for some functions. Reasons for outsourcing include a decentralized institutional structure, high initial costs, uncertainty about which techniques…

  15. Incorporating Service-Learning, Technology, and Research Supportive Teaching Techniques into the University Chemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitta, E. K. H.; Bowdon, M. A.; Geiger, C. L.

    2011-01-01

    Technology was integrated into service-learning activities to create an interactive teaching method for undergraduate students at a large research institution. Chemistry students at the University of Central Florida partnered with high school students at Crooms Academy of Information Technology in interactive service learning projects. The…

  16. When Culture and Learning Styles Matter: A Canadian University with Middle-Eastern Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke-Westcott, Tracey; Johnson, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Transnational branch campuses of universities are a growing phenomenon, particularly in the Middle-East. The cultures of home institutions and host countries are often foreign to each other. The result is a cultural and learning style gap between faculty and students impacting students' learning and teachers' effectiveness. A pilot study of the…

  17. An Empirical Investigation of Student Acceptance of Synchronous E-Learning in an Online University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minseok; Shin, Won sug

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes an extended technology acceptance model to predict acceptance of synchronous e-learning by examining relationships among variables associated with factors influencing the technology acceptance of synchronous e-learning. Learners at an online university participated through an online survey; there were 251 respondents in all.…

  18. Quality, the Enhancement of a University's Teaching and Learning and the Role of Quality Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Kath; Whalley, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    There has been, and remains, much criticism of the external monitoring of the quality of universities' learning and teaching by bodies such as the QAA largely on the grounds that it is essentially a bureaucratic collection of data that does little, if anything, to help in improving or enhancing the learning and teaching. In this article, while…

  19. Self-Directed Learning Readiness among Undergraduate Students at Saudi Electronic University in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaifi, Mousa S.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the level of self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) among undergraduate students at Saudi Electronic University in Saudi Arabia. Also, investigated were potential relationships between the level of self-directed learning readiness and selected demographic variables such as gender and specific college within the…

  20. Boundaries and Bricolage: Examining the Roles of Universities and Schools in Student Teacher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Steven Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The literature shows that an active exploration of difference between university- and school-based perspectives can provide important opportunities for student teacher learning in initial teacher education. This paper presents a study that looks at the learning opportunities presented to student teachers as they talk about teaching and learning…

  1. Researching into Learning Resources in Colleges and Universities. The Practical Research Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Chris; Reading, Judy; Taylor, Paul

    This book examines issues and methods for conducting research into the educational resource environment in colleges and universities. That environment is defined as whatever is used to facilitate the learning process, including learning space, support staff, and teaching staff. Chapter 1 is an introduction to the series and lays out the process of…

  2. Barriers and Opportunities of e-Learning Implementation in Iraq: A Case of Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azawei, Ahmed; Parslow, Patrick; Lundqvist, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Although the implementation of e-learning initiatives has reached advanced stages in developed countries, it is still in its infancy in many developing nations and the Middle East in particular. Recently, few public universities in Iraq have initiated limited attempts to use e-learning alongside traditional classrooms. However, different obstacles…

  3. Physiology Teaching and Learning Experience in a New Modular Curriculum at the National University of Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahutu, Jean Bosco

    2010-01-01

    In the present article, I report on my experience in teaching and learning physiology in the first year of a new modular curriculum at the Faculty of Medicine of the National University of Rwanda. With self-reported questionnaires, I collected learning experience perceptions from 112 students who attended the module of physiology in 2008. The…

  4. Teaching and Learning in the Virtual Campus: The Case of the University of Barcelona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Juana M. Sancho; Sanchez, Joan-Anton

    2012-01-01

    This article is based on a research project aimed at analysing the teaching and learning models explicit and implicit in the different uses of e-learning platforms. From qualitative analysis of the interview with the coordinator of the Virtual Campus of the University of Barcelona (VC-UB) and the focus group with the 8 lecturers, emerged both the…

  5. Older Women, Deeper Learning, and Greater Satisfaction at University: Age and Gender Predict University Students' Learning Approach and Degree Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Mark; Scevak, Jill; Southgate, Erica; Macqueen, Suzanne; Williams, Paul; Douglas, Heather

    2018-01-01

    The present study explored the interactive effect of age and gender in predicting surface and deep learning approaches. It also investigated how these variables related to degree satisfaction. Participants were 983 undergraduate students at a large public Australian university. They completed a research survey either online or on paper. Consistent…

  6. The Development of the Assessment for Learning Model of Mathematics for Rajamangala University of Technology Rattanakosin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wannaree Pansiri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were 1 to develop the assessment for learning model of Mathematics for Rajamangala University 2 to study the effectivness of assessment for learning model of Mathematics for Rajamagala University of Technology Rattanakosin. The research target group consisted of 72 students from 3 classes and 3 General Mathematics teachers. The data was gathered from observation, worksheets, achievement test and skill of assessment for learning, questionnaire of the assessment for learning model of Mathematics. The statistics that used in this research were Frequency, Percentage, Mean, Standard Deviation, and Growth Score. The results of this research were 1. The assessment of learning model of Mathematics for Rajamangala University of Technology Rattanakosin consisted of 3 components ; 1. Pre-assessment which consisted of 4 activities ; a Preparation b Teacher development c Design and creation the assessment plan and instrument for assessment and d Creation of the learning experience plan 2. The component for assessment process consisted of 4 steps which were a Identifying the learning objectives and criteria b Identifying the learning experience plan and assessment follow the plan c Learning reflection and giving feedback and d Learner development based on information and improve instruction and 3. Giving feedback component. 2. The effective of assessment for learning model found that most students had good score in concentration, honest, responsibilities, group work, task presentation, worksheets, and doing exercises. The development knowledge of learning and knowledge and skill of assessment for learning of lecturers were fairly good. The opinion to the assessment for learning of learners and assessment for learning model of Mathematics of teachers found that was in a good level.

  7. The Use of a Mobile Learning Management System at an Online University and Its Effect on Learning Satisfaction and Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Sug Shin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates online students’ acceptance of mobile learning and its influence on learning achievement using an information system success and extended technology acceptance model (TAM. Structural equation modeling was used to test the structure of individual, social, and systemic factors influencing mobile learning’s acceptance, and how said acceptance influences learning satisfaction and achievement. Unlike earlier TAM-related research that did not provide a broad view of technological acceptance and its impact on learning activities, the present study’s results highlight the relationship between behavioral intention/learning satisfaction and learning achievement. Additionally, this study tests the theoretical model of successful mobile learning by empirically accepting mobile learning management systems. The findings further imply that students at online universities have started to accept mobile technology as a new learning tool; consequently, its acceptance has influenced their learning achievement both directly and indirectly. These discoveries should facilitate a better understanding of students’ usage of mobile learning systems in higher education, and provide timely guidance for its development and implementation.

  8. Organizational Learning Capability: An Example of University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasin UZUNTARLA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In health care institutions aiming healthy society by the way protecting and promoting human health, reaching information has a vital importance. This descriptive research purposed an evaluation of organizational learning capability of 396 employees working in Gülhane Military Medical Academy Hospital. A questionnaire including socio-demographic characteristics was used along with Organizational Learning Capability scale designed by Ricardo CHIVA and His Friends. Data acquired was analyzed with SPSS 15.0 program. Participants’ Organizational Learning Capability and its subscales means were assessed in terms of their sociodemographic characteristics. Assessing participants’ answers in terms of 5 subscales which are experimentation, risk taking, interaction with the external environment, dialogue and participatory decision-making; for education level and professional groups, statistical significant differences was found between Organizational Learning Capability and its subscales means.

  9. Game Based Learning (GBL) Adoption Model for Universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2018-03-05

    Mar 5, 2018 ... faced while adopting Game Based Learning (GBL) model, its benefits and ... preferred traditional lectures styles, 7% online class and. 34% preferred .... students in developing problem-solving skills which in return may help ...

  10. E-LEARNING READINESS AMONG MEDICAL EDUCATORS IN UNIVERSITI SAINS ISLAM MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Salleha Khalid; Tengku Madeehah Tengku Mohd; Khadijah Hassanah; Suhaila Sanip; Muhammad Shamsir Aris; Khaironi Sharif; Mohd Mokthar

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in information technology has made e-learning feasible in many fields of education. Medical education is not any different. This survey is conducted among all the medical educators in Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia (USIM) assessing their readiness and attitudes towards e-learning. A cross-sectional questionnaires assessing the IT skills, Internet usage, attitude, perceived benefits and usage of e-learning among USIM medical lecturers were used. Data gained were then analyzed....

  11. Learning Analytics Mobile Application for the Bucharest University of Economic Studies’ Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca IANCU

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Learning analytics refers to improving the educational process by providing feedback and in-volving all the stakeholders. It is a very useful method with positive effects on both students and teachers. In ASE, the idea of learning analytics is not very well shaped, so development is needed on this side. This article proposes a learning analytics app for better exploitation of SIMUR database content in order to improve the educational processes in the university.

  12. E-portfolios in university and blended learning settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke

    2009-01-01

    or case work, if the process of and interaction between the students are prioritised. The paper adds to the existing findings within ePortfolio and their application to formal learning settings. It discusses both the planning of and running the process, psychological barriers, students' motivation as well...... as more technological practical aspects of ePortfolio use, that are relevant for people engaged in IT and learning....

  13. University of Central Florida and the American Association of State Colleges and Universities: Blended Learning Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Blended Learning Toolkit supports the course redesign approach, and interest in its openly available clearinghouse of online tools, strategies, curricula, and other materials to support the adoption of blended learning continues to grow. When the resource originally launched in July 2011, 20 AASCU [American Association of State Colleges and…

  14. Conceptions of Memorizing and Understanding in Learning, and Self-Efficacy Held by University Biology Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Chiang; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore Taiwanese university students' conceptions of learning biology as memorizing or as understanding, and their self-efficacy. To this end, two questionnaires were utilized to survey 293 Taiwanese university students with biology-related majors. A questionnaire for measuring students' conceptions of memorizing and…

  15. 3-Dimensional and Interactive Istanbul University Virtual Laboratory Based on Active Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Elif; Kirbaslar, Fatma Gulay; Yolcu, Ergun; Aslan, Ayse Esra; Kayacan, Zeynep Cigdem; Alkan Olsson, Johanna; Akbasli, Ayse Ceylan; Aytekin, Mesut; Bauer, Thomas; Charalambis, Dimitris; Gunes, Zeliha Ozsoy; Kandemir, Ceyhan; Sari, Umit; Turkoglu, Suleyman; Yaman, Yavuz; Yolcu, Ozgu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a 3-dimensional interactive multi-user and multi-admin IUVIRLAB featuring active learning methods and techniques for university students and to introduce the Virtual Laboratory of Istanbul University and to show effects of IUVIRLAB on students' attitudes on communication skills and IUVIRLAB. Although there…

  16. Enhancing University Teachers' Information and Communication Technology Usage by Using a Virtual Learning Environment Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageel, Mohammed; Woollard, John

    2012-01-01

    The research project is a case study focussing on the use of a virtual learning environment (VLE) implemented to increase the use of information and communication technology (ICT) by university teachers in Jazan University, Saudi Arabia. The study aims to investigate the effect of the VLE as the vehicle for a training course in ICT designed to…

  17. Targeted, Timely, Learning Support for International Students: One Australian University's Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Craig

    2012-01-01

    This paper documents the approach taken by an Australian University to enhance student study skills, development of academic language, and writing skills. The Curtin Business School (CBS) has the only fully faculty-based student learning support centre at Curtin University in Western Australia. Called the CBS Communication Skills Centre (CSC) it…

  18. Factors Affecting Faculty Attitude for Adopting Online Learning at Aljouf University, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazy, Salim M.

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to take an initial step toward investigating the readiness of faculty members for adopting online learning at Aljouf University, a Saudi newly established university. Participants (n = 156) were asked to complete a Web-based questionnaire that starts with eight demographic questions and has four other parts: attitude toward online…

  19. IGeneration: A Study in Challenge Based Learning at a Small Private University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hift, Jodi A.

    2013-01-01

    Faculty-buy in is an essential component of successful technology integration processes at the Higher Education level. The goal of this case study was to assess the University faculty's role in the utilization of Challenge Based Learning while teaching undergraduate students. Did the University have the faculty's support and buy-in concerning the…

  20. Self-Reported Learning from Co-Teaching Primary Science Lessons to Peers at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter; Nykvist, Shaun; Mukherjee, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Universities are challenged continuously in reviews to improve teacher education, which includes providing substantial theory-practice connections for undergraduates. This study investigated second year preservice teachers' (n = 48) self-reported learning as a result of co-teaching primary science to their peers within the university setting. From…

  1. Investigating Learning Strategies for Vocabulary Development: A Comparative Study of Two Universities of Quetta, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Irum; Pathan, Zahid Hussain

    2016-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research is to investigate the vocabulary learning strategies employed by the undergraduate students of Sardar Bahadur Khan Women's University (SBKWU) and University of Balochistan (UOB), Quetta, Pakistan. A quantitative design was employed in this study to answer the two research questions of the present study. The…

  2. Quality of Faculty Life and Lifelong Learning Tendencies of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beytekin, Osman Ferda; Kadi, Aysegül

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the university students' opinions about quality of faculty life and their lifelong learning tendencies. Research was conducted with 375 university students. According to the findings: the quality of faculty life of students differ according to gender. Male students have lower quality of faculty life than…

  3. Mathematical E-Learning: State of the Art and Experiences at the Open University of Catalonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, A.; Huertas, A.; Steegmann, C.; Corcoles, C.; Serrat, C.

    2008-01-01

    In this article we present a review of the state of the art in mathematical e-learning and some personal experiences on this area developed during the last eleven years at the Open University of Catalonia (UOC), a completely online university located in Spain. The article discusses important aspects related to online mathematics courses offered in…

  4. Principal Perceptions of the Effectiveness of University Educational Leadership Preparation and Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Arvin D.

    2016-01-01

    Principals and assistant principals currently serving in Florida and Georgia school districts were surveyed about their perceptions of university educational leadership preparation and professional learning. The results revealed that many principals and assistant principals agreed that university educational leadership preparation programs…

  5. Learning style preferences of nursing students at two universities in Iran and Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Learning style preferences vary within the nursing field and there is no consensus on a predominant learning style preference in nursing students. The current study compared the learning style preferences of nursing students at two universities in Iran and Malaysia. Methods: A purposive sampling method was used to collect data from the two study populations. Data were collected using the Learning Style Scale (LSS, which is a valid and reliable inventory. The LSS consists of 22 items with five subscales including perceptive, solitary, analytic, imaginative, and competitive. The questionnaires were distributed at the end of the academic year during regular class time for optimum response. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the learning style preferences between the two study populations. Results: A significant difference was found in perceptive, solitary, and analytic learning styles between two groups of nursing students. However, there was no significant difference in imaginative and competitive learning styles between the two groups. Most of the students were in the middle range of the learning styles. Conclusion: There were similarities and differences in learning style preferences between Zabol Medical Sciences University (ZBMU and University Sains Malaysia (USM nursing students. The USM nursing students were more sociable and analytic learners, whereas the ZBMU nursing students were more solitary and perceptive learners.

  6. Learning style preferences of nursing students at two universities in Iran and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahimohammad, Abdolghani; Ja'afar, Rogayah

    2014-01-01

    Learning style preferences vary within the nursing field and there is no consensus on a predominant learning style preference in nursing students. The current study compared the learning style preferences of nursing students at two universities in Iran and Malaysia. A purposive sampling method was used to collect data from the two study populations. Data were collected using the Learning Style Scale (LSS), which is a valid and reliable inventory. The LSS consists of 22 items with five subscales including perceptive, solitary, analytic, imaginative, and competitive. The questionnaires were distributed at the end of the academic year during regular class time for optimum response. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the learning style preferences between the two study populations. A significant difference was found in perceptive, solitary, and analytic learning styles between two groups of nursing students. However, there was no significant difference in imaginative and competitive learning styles between the two groups. Most of the students were in the middle range of the learning styles. There were similarities and differences in learning style preferences between Zabol Medical Sciences University (ZBMU) and University Sains Malaysia (USM) nursing students. The USM nursing students were more sociable and analytic learners, whereas the ZBMU nursing students were more solitary and perceptive learners.

  7. Challenges of Utilizing E-Learning Systems in Public Universities in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhannad Anwar Al-Shboul

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This research paper lists and discusses major challenges and barriers that may face faculty members at the public universities in Jordan in employing e-Learning systems authoring tools in their instructions. It also proposes several suggestions for the administrators in public universities in Jordan for what they could do to improve the utilization of e-Learning authoring tools at their campuses. E-Learning systems authoring tools allow instructors to easily create and deliver their e-contents and e-lectures. Furthermore, online course materials which uploaded by using such authoring tools could be viewed by any popular web browser system.

  8. Virtual universities--the reality of e-learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Graham; Betts, Helen J

    2002-01-01

    With the growth of the internet and world wide web new ways of exchanging information are emerging, barriers are being overcome, new partnerships and ways of working are emerging. Amongst the hype is the notion of a Virtual University; it is hype or reality? What are the issues? A description of a University will not just include the programmes that it delivers but would no doubt include research and the academic environment. This paper raises some of the issues for Health Informatics.

  9. Use of machine learning methods to classify Universities based on the income structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlyga, Alexandra; Balk, Igor

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we discuss use of machine learning methods such as self organizing maps, k-means and Ward’s clustering to perform classification of universities based on their income. This classification will allow us to quantitate classification of universities as teaching, research, entrepreneur, etc. which is important tool for government, corporations and general public alike in setting expectation and selecting universities to achieve different goals.

  10. To learn and to serve in the university: a civic pathway to the educational development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre SOTELINO LOSADA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines whether some changes associated with the European Higher Education Area (ehea have affected the educational processes at the university, while also the reform involves a learning approach focused on the acquisition of skills by students. Its objective is to explore the possibilities for the training of students is the connection between university and community. To that end, after review of the thematic literature of recent years, we use an empirical study with ex-post-facto methodology. And we propose service-learning as a strategy able to favour a more experiential pedagogy at the university

  11. Motivation, Psychology and Language Effect on Mobile Learning in Universiti Sains Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issham Ismail

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the motivation, psychology and language effect on Mobile learning in the School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang. Mobile learning or m-learning is a new learning phenomenon in the open and distance learning environments. Moving from stationary to mobile learning allows informal collaboration and interaction between learners. Therefore, there is a necessity to revise people’s psychological factors, process and mechanisms that underlie M-learning so that the practice can move from technology-centred implementation to human-centred effective learning processes. The Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS Version 12.0 and Rasch Model Analysis was used to measure these items. The 5-point Likert scale questionnaires (12 items being sent to 105 distance education students from four courses including Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Social Science and Bachelor of Management which was distributed in tutorial sessions during the annual residential intensive course in the main campus of the Universiti Sains Malaysia by their respective course managers. The finding shows that a positive response from the learners as they feel happy to use this additional learning tools (mobile learning. Learner’s feel supported and motivated to use the mobile application with the usability of simple language.

  12. Learning styles of nursing and allied health students in Semnan university of medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ahadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several factors as learning styles can influence the learning process. The aim of thisstudy was to determine learning styles, which are used by nursing and allied health students in SemnanUniversity of Medical Sciences.Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 199 nursing and allied healthstudents of Semnan university of medical sciences (2007, Iran. Students were selected using a simplesampling method. The assessment instrument was the last version of Kolb learning style inventory (KLSIV.3.1.Results: Generally, the learning styles of students were divergent (% 27.1, accommodations (% 26.6,convergent (%23.6, and assimilation (%22.6. The preferred learning style in nursing students wasconvergent (%31.9, and in allied health students was divergent (%36.1. There was a significantrelationship between the type of learning styles with academic courses (P=0.006 married status(P=0.004 and average score (P=0.031, but there was no correlation between the type of learning stylesand gender.Conclusion: Considering the predominance of convergent and divergent learning styles in thesestudents, the usage of some educational methods such as problem -based learning, group discussions,brain storming, role playing, computerized simulation and demonstration are recommended in theoretical,clinical and skill laboratory fields, so that; the students in the new and objective situations can apply theirvisualization for more earning knowledge and professional skills.

  13. ATTITUDE TOWARDS THE USE OF LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad A. A.TRAYEK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning management system (LMS is a learning platform for both full time and distant learning students at the International Islamic University in Malaysia (IIUM. LMS becomes a tool for IIUM to disseminate information and learning resources to the students. The objectives of this study were to Ø investigate students' attitudes toward the use of LMS, Ø to verify the impact of perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use on attitude towards use of learning management system, Ø to examine the differences in attitudes toward the use of LMS between distance learning and full time students. There were 120 (70 full time and 50 distance learning students at the Institute of Education responded for the study. The collected data was analysed using descriptive statistics, t-test and Multiple Regression Analysis (MRA. The results of the study showed that perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness determine students' attitudes toward the use of LMS. However, this study did not find any significant differences between distance learning and full time students. According to the findings the study recommended that the University should continue using LMS because it is useful for both distance learning and full time students. Further suggestions are made to customize and upgrade the LMS suitable for innovative teaching and learning.

  14. Moving Universities: A Case Study on the Use of Unconferencing for Facilitating Sustainability Learning in a Swiss University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Hansmann

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Unconferencing is a method for organizing social learning which could be suitable to trigger sustainability learning processes. An unconference is defined as participant-driven meeting that tries to avoid one or more aspects of a conventional conference, such as top-down organization, one-way communication and power-relationships based on titles, formal hierarchies and status. This paper presents a case study on the application of unconferencing in a large Swiss university (ETH Zurich where an unconference was conducted to engage students, academics, staff and external experts in a mutual learning process aimed at the development of project ideas for reducing its CO2 emissions. The study analyzes how the unconferencing format initiated and promoted sustainability oriented group processes during the unconference, and in how far the projects which were developed contributed to a reduction of the university’s CO2 emissions.

  15. Collaborative Learning: Theoretical Foundations and Applicable Strategies to University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselli, Nestor D.

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative learning is a construct that identifies a current strong field, both in face-to-face and virtual education. Firstly, three converging theoretical sources are analyzed: socio-cognitive conflict theory, intersubjectivity theory and distributed cognition theory. Secondly, a model of strategies that can be implemented by teachers to…

  16. Employment Satisfaction of University Graduates with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaus, Joseph W.; Zhao, Jiarong; Ruban, Lilia

    2008-01-01

    Because of its significant impact on overall life satisfaction, employment satisfaction is one marker for determining successful adult outcomes. The present investigation reports the perceptions of employment satisfaction for 500 graduates with learning disabilities from three postsecondary institutions. The graduates reported high levels of…

  17. University and Flipped Learning TIC & DIL Project: Framework and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnelli, Stefania; Fiorucci, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The flipped classroom approach (FC) is for the educational world a chance of recovery and improvement of pedagogical student-centered model and collaborative teaching methods aimed at optimizing the time resource and to promote personalization and self-learning in a perspective of autonomy. The paper moving from a pedagogical reflection on…

  18. Self-Disclosure Decisions of University Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Emma V.; Cawthon, Stephanie W.

    2015-01-01

    The number of students with learning disabilities (SLD) at postsecondary institutions has tripled over the past three decades and now constitutes about 11% of undergraduate students (Joyce & Rossen, 2006; U.S. Department of Education, 2013). Research has found that SLD who use accommodations at their postsecondary institution are more…

  19. The learning of Foreign Languages in Kenyan Universities: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Everybody seems to agree that the world today has been transformed into a small village. The effects of globalization have been felt all over the world and the best reaction that people seem to prefer is accepting this reality and learning to live with it. One of the obvious consequences of this phenomenon is that people from ...

  20. Creating the Strategic Learning Environment at City University London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinsee, Susannah; Bullimore, Anise

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the creation of a new approach to the implementation of educational technologies at a UK Higher Education Institution. Driven by changes in technology, an evaluation of the virtual learning environment (VLE) provided the opportunity to reassess the application of technology to the curriculum. However, such an…

  1. CHALLENGES AND STRATEGIES FOR E-LEARNING DEVELOPMENT IN THE UNIVERSITY OF PAYAM NOOR IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz MOHAMADZADEH (Correspond author,

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Higher education in Iran is confronting with several challenges; Some of them are increasing demand for education and insufficiency of current programs to meet the growing needs, emerging information age and the necessity of achieving information literacy, speed up in knowledge production and the necessity of development of a lifelong and continuous training system, necessity of considering to user orientation and extending educational justice. It is assumes that a high performance e-learning system can overcome to the mentioned problems. E-learning is main component of educational systems in 21st century. It removes time and place restrictions and creates economical benefits, and makes available lifelong learning opportunity for all. The primary purpose of this study was to identify challenges of electronic learning development in Payam Noor University of Ardabil province of Iran to present feasible solutions for establishing a suitable e-learning system. Descriptive survey design for data collection was adopted in this study. The population of this study was consisted of 600 instructors and faculty members. A sample of 160 faculty member was selected by using random sampling method. Results show that barriers such as incompatibility of contents and methods, skill unavailability, attitudinal hampering, cultural barriers, infrastructural obstacles, encouraging and credit barriers as well as barriers related to incorporating e- learning into traditional education systems were the main challenges of e-learning in the Payam Noor University. Also results revealed that factors such as educational effectiveness in e- learning, policy making, university's technical and social support of e- learning, financial support and expansion of income earning for instructors and faculty members, improving working conditions, foreign language skill and faculty members interest in professional development were the most important factors in developing e-learning in

  2. Can Task-based Learning Approach Help Attract Students with Diverse Backgrounds Learn Chinese at A Danish University?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruan, Youjin; Duan, Xiaoju; Wang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Task-based method is regarded as a meaningful approach for promoting interaction and collaboration in language learning. In an elective Chinese language beginner course at Aalborg University, Denmark, a selection of tasks are designed and used to attract the students’ interests in learning a new...... and study programs showed good interests in this method and the course itself. Nevertheless, it is necessary to study the concrete effect of various types of tasks to maximize the learning outcome....... foreign language. Chinese culture elements are also integrated into the tasks and the learning process. By analyzing seven items of a post-course survey, this paper investigates the learners’ opinions towards the Task-based language teaching and learning method and toward the method of integrating culture...

  3. Integrating E-Learning and Classroom Learning for Engineering Quality Control unit - Curtin University Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M. Darabi Golshani

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Engineering employers expect engineering graduates to possess a wide range of skills that goes beyond their technical knowledge. It is vital that graduates have skills which demonstrate that they are responsible for their own development and careers. Some of these skills include; communication abilities, organizational skills, self-promotion, the ability to work as part of a team, be an effective problem solver, be a critical thinker, have good negotiation skills, have the ability to be a leader and being able to network effectively. Department of Civil Engineering at Curtin University of Technology in Perth, Australia offers a Master of Engineering Management degree for Engineers from various disciplines. One of the units taught in this Master degree program is Engineering Quality Control. It was decided to incorporate these non-technical skills in this unit by using an e-learning platform (Blackboard together with an adaptation of the Seven Principles of Good Practice and Dr Meredith Belbin’s team role theory to divide participants into groups. At the end of the unit, most of the participants were showing improvements in their non-technical skills.

  4. Structured Peer Mentoring: Enhancing Lifelong Learning in Pakistani Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Nosheen Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Higher Education in developing countries is frequently restricted to students from privileged backgrounds, especially those from private secondary education. In Pakistan, access to Higher Education, while competitive, is more broadly based, with state universities particularly recruiting students from diverse backgrounds. Just as Widening…

  5. E-Learning for University Effectiveness in the Developing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiwu, Denis

    2010-01-01

    The globalisation trends of society have taken centre stage meaning that people around the world are required to develop high level but low cost technologies and innovative competencies in order to enhance social development. In the field of higher education, university managers need to join the technological revolution by adopting low cost ICT…

  6. Dewey on Educating Vocation: Bringing Adult Learning to the University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitges, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses Dewey's complex notion of vocation--particularly his idea of multiple vocational activities--and relates it to educating for vocation in colleges and universities. The author argues that higher educators can best respect a student's autonomy as a chooser--with multiple potential vocations--by giving him or her multiple…

  7. Online Learning Trends in Private-Sector Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    For the past eight years, the Babson Survey Research Group has conducted surveys of higher education institutions on their attitudes, beliefs, and practices concerning online education. This current report is a new analysis of this collection of data, focusing on the role of online education among private-sector colleges and universities. For the…

  8. Learning History through the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landorf, Hilary; Pineda, Martha Fernanda

    2007-01-01

    Although adolescent students often do not have knowledge of specific laws, they usually have a keen sense of justice and fairness. In this article, the author discusses the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) as a powerful tool to channel students' sense of fairness into visible actions. Adopted in December 1948 by the General Assembly of…

  9. What Has Been Learned from School-University Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Melissa; Templin, Thomas; Setiawan, Caly

    2012-01-01

    Sustained school-university partnerships are recognized as a means by which school physical education can move forward and sustain itself. Yet, these partnerships have been more the exception than the rule. There is little public knowledge about the benefits of sustained partnerships or of the process to achieve them. This article summarizes the…

  10. Recreating big Ban to learn more about universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    A multi-nation effort at Gemeva-based CERN laboratory to recreate conditions existing just after the Big Ban could give vital clues to the creation of the universe and help overcome prejudices against this widely held scientific theory, an eminent science writer said in Kolkata on Tuesday

  11. Managing University Clinical Partnership: Learning from International Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Stephen; Smith, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Dialogue between the leaders of academic clinical organisations in different countries has revealed that the core elements of the partnership between universities and health care systems are remarkably consistent across national boundaries. There is now an impetus to move beyond analysis of common challenges and towards strategies for success that…

  12. Examining E-Learning Barriers as Perceived by Faculty Members of Engineering Colleges in the Jordanian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawneh, Muhammad K.

    2014-01-01

    Employing computer's technology that includes e-learning system in the field of Engineering is a vital issue which needs to be discussed. Therefore, this study purposed to examine e-learning barriers as perceived by faculty members of engineering in three major universities in Jordan (Yarmouk University, Jordan University of Science and…

  13. The Power of Inquiry as a Way of Learning in Undergraduate Education at a Large Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Debra A.; Matthews, Pamela R.; Schielack, Jane F.; Webb, Robert C.; Wu, X. Ben

    2012-01-01

    Inquiry-guided learning (IGL) is not new to Texas A&M University, a large research-extensive institution. The ideas of asking questions and seeking answers have always been associated at this university with both learning and discovery. In this article the authors present how, as a natural extension, Texas A&M University infuses IGL more…

  14. Assessment of Kolb's Learning Styles among College Students of Qom University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh rahiminia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Learning styles are effective factors in the learning. Learning is a relatively permanent change in the behavior or attitude of a person over time. Whereas improvement of existing conditions is pivotal in educational activities; therefore, the aim of this study was the assessment of stages and learning styles based on the Kolb theory among students of Qom University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 279 students of the QomUniversity of Medical Sciences, Iran in October 2015. The participants were selected using a stratified sampling method. The assessment instrument was the Kolb learning style inventory (KLSI V.3.1. Data analysis was performed by SPSS using descriptive statistics and Chi square test. Results: The mean age of students was 22.23±4.38 years, and the average grade was 16.85±1.65. Generally, the learning styles of students were convergent (% 38.9, assimilative (% 37.5, divergent (%13.2 and accommodative (%10.4. There was a significant relationship between learning styles with gender (P=0.01. Conclusion: Considering the predominance of convergent and assimilative learning styles in these students, it is recommended that faculty members use visual methods such as diagrams, self learning, individualized instruction and emphasize on practical methods in teaching.

  15. AN APPLICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION IN NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY OF ARTS E-LEARNING PLATFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Feng Lin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the development of the course ―Education for Environmental Sustainability‖ by using the Learning Content Management System (LCMS in National Taiwan University of Arts (NTUA E-learning platform. There are three segments for this article. First, it discusses the characteristics of the NTUA E-learning platform, which is based on the theory of E-learning, and to discern the differential function of authorization between teachers and students. Second, it analyzes how the E-learning version of ―Education for Environmental Sustainability‖ course is planned and developed. This course is an outgrowth of Blending Learning, which is the integration of Classroom Learning and Electronic Learning. The course development theory is based on the process of five stages: A (Analysis, D (Design, D (Development, I (Implement and E (Evaluation. Third, it concerns the usage of, and the suggestion for, the platform. With students as the end users, it should be designed in a student-oriented way, especially when the learning achievement of NTUA students originated mainly from presenting their individual talent (i.e., their artwork pictures or performance videos. Hence, the students‘ performance talent and comments will be significant references for future development of e-contents, e-services, and e-technical in art universities.

  16. Essentials of University Strategy Development in the Field of Lifelong Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Irina POPESCU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of strategy development reflects, in any organisation, the clarity of the purpose of the organisation’s mere existence. Although many organisations may decide ‘to go with the flow’, in the current economic context it is advisable that organisations, including higher education institutions, go through a thorough strategy development process. The lifelong learning approach brings a shift in the paradigm of education, and was considered to be the manner in which individuals get educated in the knowledge-based society. The most active players in the higher education market embraced this approach by developing lifelong learning strategies, either separated or incorporated in the overall university strategy. In this context, the study presents guidelines for the development of strategies in universities, and attempts to investigate to which extent three public universities representative for different regions of Romania have embraced the lifelong learning approach in their university strategies so far. The investigation uses the framework of the principles of university lifelong learning presented in the Universities‘ Charter on Lifelong Learning (2008.

  17. Comparing Learning Outcomes of Blended Learning and Traditional Face-to-Face Learning of University Students in ESL Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Chang

    2018-01-01

    Combining elements of online and face-to-face education, blended learning is emerging as an important teaching and learning model in higher education. In order to examine the effectiveness of blended learning, as compared to the traditional face-to-face learning mode, this research investigated the learning outcomes of students following English…

  18. Learning Safety Assessment from Accidents in a University Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Niels; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2013-01-01

    This contribution describes how a chemical engineering department started learning from accidents during experimental work and ended up implementing an industrially inspired system for risk assessment of new and existing experimental setups as well as a system for assessing potential risk from the chemicals used in the experimental work. These experiences have led to recent developments which focus increasingly on the a theoretical basis for modeling and reasoning on safety as well as operati...

  19. Recognition and Validation of Non Formal and Informal Learning: Lifelong Learning and University in the Italian Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a reflection, on the basis of empirical research conducted in Italy, on theoretical, methodological and systemic-organisational aspects linked to the recognition and validation of the prior learning acquired by adult learners or workers who decide to enrol at university at a later stage in their lives. The interest in this research…

  20. 5E Mobile Inquiry Learning Approach for Enhancing Learning Motivation and Scientific Inquiry Ability of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ping-Han; Yang, Ya-Ting Carolyn; Chang, Shih-Hui Gilbert; Kuo, Fan-Ray Revon

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, many universities have opened courses to increase students' knowledge in the field of nanotechnology. These have been shown to increase students' knowledge of nanotechnology, but beyond this, advanced and applied nanotechnology courses should also focus on learning motivation and scientific enquiry abilities to equip students to…

  1. Innovation in engineering education through computer assisted learning and virtual university model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raicu, A.; Raicu, G.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the most important aspects of innovation in Engineering Education using Computer Assisted Learning. The authors propose to increase the quality of Engineering Education programs of study at European standards. The use of computer assisted learning methodologies in all studies is becoming an important resource in Higher Education. We intend to improve the concept of e-Learning using virtual terminals, online support and assisting special training through live seminars and interactive labs to develop a virtual university model. We intend to encourage computer assisted learning and innovation as sources of competitive advantage, to permit vision and learning analysis, identifies new sources of technology and ideas. Our work is based on our university datasets collected during last fifteen years using several e-Learning systems. In Constanta Maritime University (CMU), using eLearning and Knowledge Management Services (KMS) is very important and we apply it effectively to achieve strategic objectives, such as collaboration, sharing and good practice. We have experience in this field since 2000 year using Moodle as KMS in our university. The term KMS can be associated to Open Source Software, Open Standards, Open Protocols and Open Knowledge licenses, initiatives and policies. In CMU Virtual Campus we have today over 12500 active users. Another experience of the authors is the implementation of MariTrainer Wiki educational platform based on Dokeos and DekiWiki under MARICOMP and MEP Leonardo da Vinci Project. We'll also present in this paper a case study under EU funded project POSDRU, where the authors implemented other educational platform in Technological High Schools from Romania used over 1000 teachers. Based on large datasets the study tries to improve the concept of e-Learning teaching using the revolutionary technologies. The new concept present in this paper is that the teaching and learning will be interactive and live. The new and modern

  2. The Wider Impacts of Universities: Habermas on Learning Processes and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Eckhardt Larsen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The discourse of reform in higher education tends to focus narrowly on employability and the relationship between higher education and the labor market. Universities as research institutions are now considered solely in the dominant discourse of innovation. This way of conceiving universities is inspired by functionalist theory that focuses on the imperatives of a knowledge economy. Taking a departure in the theory of society developed by Jürgen Habermas this paper seeks to provide a theoretical framework for an empirical comparative analysis on the wider societal impact of universities. It is the argument that the wider impacts of higher education and research at universities must be seen in a more complex vision of modern societies. The paper is thus primarily a re-reading of Habermas’ critique of functionalist views of the university and an application of Habermas’ critique on current issues in the debates on higher education. A special discussion will be taken on issues of the self in view of the current tendencies to regard all education from the standpoint of the economic outputs.

  3. CHALLENGES AND STRATEGIES FOR E-LEARNING DEVELOPMENT IN THE PAYAME NOOR UNIVERSITY OF IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz MOHAMADZADEH

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher education in Iran is confronting with several challenges; some of them are increasing demand for education and insufficiency of current programs to meet the growing needs, emerging information age and the necessity of achieving information literacy, and extending educational justice. It is assumes that a high performance e-learning system can overcome to the mentioned problems. It removes time and place restrictions and creates economical benefits, and makes available lifelong learning opportunity for all. The primary purpose of this study was to identify challenges of electronic learning development in Payame Noor University of Iran to present feasible solutions for establishing a suitable e-learning system. Descriptive survey design for data collection was adopted in this study. The population of this study was consisted of 600 instructors and faculty members. A sample of 160 faculty member was selected by using random sampling method. Results show that barriers such as incompatibility of contents and methods, skill unavailability, attitudinal hampering, cultural barriers, infrastructural obstacles, encouraging and credit barriers as well as barriers related to incorporating e- learning into traditional education systems were the main challenges of e-learning in the Payame Noor University. Also results revealed that factors such as educational effectiveness in e- learning, policy making, university's technical and social support of e- learning, financial support and expansion of income earning for instructors and faculty members, improving working conditions, foreign language skill and faculty members interest in professional development were the most important factors in developing e-learning in Payame Noor university of Iran.

  4. Development of Mobile Learning in Faculty of Economics, Bina Nusantara University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herru Darmadi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The research wanted to find the workflow and solution by developing m-learning object for Android and iOS-based smartphone and tablet that supported interactive multimedia. The research began with analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation. Currently, the learning objects were not compatible with mobile devices. To overcome this problem, the research focused on designing the instructional design for m-learning and the development of interactive multimedia. Instructional design was created by the collaboration of the subject matter expert and instructional designer. M-learning was designed using UML and developed using Adobe AIR technology. The implementation of this research was a prototype of m-learning for concept of cost in Faculty of Economics, Bina Nusantara University. Then, the evaluation was conducted by distributing m-learning object to 32 selected students by simple random sampling in their first week of lectures in February 2014. The observation was conducted during m-learning object installation and initial learning process. At the end of the second week of the experiment, summative assessment and questionnaire were given to students. The results show that m-learning object is compatible with mobile devices. The students also say that m-learning is easy to use and helpful for their learning.

  5. Monash Universitys Q-manual: An Example Of Learning Guide For University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Aulia, Asdi

    2006-01-01

    Pendidikan adalah proses mengubah perilaku manusia, dimana dalam konteks universitas adalah mahasiswa. Perubahan perilaku itu misalnya dari yang tidak mampu mengaplikasikan ilmunya menjadi mampu mengaplikasikan ilmunya. Agar pendidikan dapat berhasil, maka mahasiswa harus mengalami pengalarnan belajar (learning experience) yang relevan. Mengingat bahwa pengalaman belajar ini sangat dipengaruhi oleh aktivitas yang dilakukan mahasiswa, maka adalah sangat penting bahwa mahasiswa melakukan aktivi...

  6. Monash University's Q-manual: An Example Of Learning Guide For University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Aulia, Asdi

    2006-01-01

    Pendidikan adalah proses mengubah perilaku manusia, dimana dalam konteks universitas adalah mahasiswa. Perubahan perilaku itu misalnya dari yang tidak mampu mengaplikasikan ilmunya menjadi mampu mengaplikasikan ilmunya. Agar pendidikan dapat berhasil, maka mahasiswa harus mengalami pengalarnan belajar (learning experience) yang relevan. Mengingat bahwa pengalaman belajar ini sangat dipengaruhi oleh aktivitas yang dilakukan mahasiswa, maka adalah sangat penting bahwa mahasiswa melakukan aktivi...

  7. Algerian EFL University Teachers' Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Language Learning: The Case of Djilali Liabes University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchefra, Miloud; Baghoussi, Meriem

    2017-01-01

    Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) is still groping its way into Algerian English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom, where Information Communications Technologies (ICTs) are defined in terms of occasional use of computers and data projectors for material presentation in the classroom. Though major issues in the image of the lack of…

  8. Enhancing Teaching and Learning through the Use of Mobile Technologies in Zimbabwean Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Mupfiga

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to establish mlearning infrastructure and resources available in Zimbabwean universities, determine the level of mobile learning activities in Zimbabwean universities, identify challenges faced by Zimbabwean universities as they implement mobile learning in teaching and learning and to come up with recommendations that were possible solutions to the challenges faced by Zimbabwean universities in implementing mobile learning. The participants of this research were university lecturers, students, the ITS directors and the Librarians. The research adopted the descriptive research method and the triangulation methodology to draw conclusions from the data collected. Random sampling was used to select the respondents to the questionnaires. Tools for data collection included a questionnaire (with both open ended questions and closed questions targeted to the lecturers and the students, as well as interviews with the ITS directors and the Librarians. The research revealed that students and lecturers have mobile technology devices to use for mlearning. There are some mobile learning activities that are already happening at universities which include uploading of material on electronic learning platform, downloading learning material, browsing the internet for research, students’ online discussions and access of electronic resources from the universities’ elibrary, amongst others. Network infrastructure is available at the universities but some of the equipment needs to be upgraded and some needs replacement as it has been in use for many years. There were a number of challenges highlighted by the participants of this study that were affecting the implementation of mobile learning which included access to internet, high cost of mobile devices, high broadband costs, lack of a mlearning management system, resistance to change, negative attitude of lecturers and WI-FI connectivity amongst others. The research recommended the

  9. NASA Lunabotics Mining Competition for Universities: Results and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Murphy, Gloria A.

    2011-01-01

    Space Mining for resources such as water ice, and regolith, which contain many elements in the form of metals, minerals, volatiles and other compounds, is a necessary step in Space Resource Utilization. One of the primary goals is to extract propellants from the regolith such as oxygen and hydrogen which could then be used for in-space transportation. In addition, the space mining system can be used for various construction tasks that can benefit human and robotic exploration as well as scientific investigations based on the exposed topography. The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) Lunabotics Mining Competition is a university-level competition designed to engage and retain students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative lunar excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual lunar excavation device or payload. The challenge is for students to design and build a remote controlled or autonomous excavator, called a lunabot, that can collect and deposit a minimum of 10 kilograms of lunar simulant within 15 minutes. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the lunar simulant, the weight and size limitations of the lunabot, and the ability to control the lunabot from a remote control center. This paper will present the results of the first and second annual Lunabotics Mining Competitions held in May 2010 and May 2011. In 2010, 22 United States (US) universities competed, and in May 2011 the competition was opened to international participation, with 46 Universities expected to attend. There are 12 international teams and 34 US teams. This combined total directly inspired an estimated 544 university students. More students and the public were engaged via internet broadcasting and social networking media. The various designs will be

  10. Expansive learning in the university setting: the case for simulated clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Jacquelyn

    2007-03-01

    This paper argues that simulated practice in the university setting is not just a second best to learning in the clinical area but one which offers the potential for deliberation and deep learning [Eraut, M., 2000. Non-formal learning, implicit learning and tacit knowledge in professional work. Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, 113-136]. The context of student learning in an undergraduate midwifery programme is analysed using human activity theory [Engeström, Y., 2001. Expansive learning at work: toward an activity theoretical reconceptualization. Journal of Education and Work, 14, 133-156]. The advantages of this approach to student learning as opposed to situated learning theory and the concept of legitimate peripheral participation [Lave, J., Wenger, E., 1991. Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge University Press, New York] are discussed. An activity system changes as a result of contradictions and tensions between what it purports to produce and the views of stakeholders (multi-voicedness) as well as its historical context (Historicity of activity). A focus group with students highlights their expressed need for more simulated practice experience. The views of midwifery lecturers are sought as an alternative voice on this tension in the current programme. Qualitative differences in types of simulated experience are explored and concerns about resources are raised in the analysis. Discussion considers the value of well planned simulations in encouraging the expression of tacit understanding through a group deliberative learning process [Eraut, M., 2000. Non-formal learning, implicit learning and tacit knowledge in professional work. Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, 113-136].

  11. How online learning modules can improve the representational fluency and conceptual understanding of university physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M.; Sharma, M. D.; Johnston, H.

    2015-07-01

    The use of online learning resources as core components of university science courses is increasing. Learning resources range from summaries, videos, and simulations, to question banks. Our study set out to develop, implement, and evaluate research-based online learning resources in the form of pre-lecture online learning modules (OLMs). The aim of this paper is to share our experiences with those using, or considering implementing, online learning resources. Our first task was to identify student learning issues in physics to base the learning resources on. One issue with substantial research is conceptual understanding, the other with comparatively less research is scientific representations (graphs, words, equations, and diagrams). We developed learning resources on both these issues and measured their impact. We created weekly OLMs which were delivered to first year physics students at The University of Sydney prior to their first lecture of the week. Students were randomly allocated to either a concepts stream or a representations stream of online modules. The programme was first implemented in 2013 to trial module content, gain experience and process logistical matters and repeated in 2014 with approximately 400 students. Two validated surveys, the Force and Motion Concept Evaluation (FMCE) and the Representational Fluency Survey (RFS) were used as pre-tests and post-tests to measure learning gains while surveys and interviews provided further insights. While both streams of OLMs produced similar positive learning gains on the FMCE, the representations-focussed OLMs produced higher gains on the RFS. Conclusions were triangulated with student responses which indicated that they have recognized the benefit of the OLMs for their learning of physics. Our study shows that carefully designed online resources used as pre-instruction can make a difference in students’ conceptual understanding and representational fluency in physics, as well as make them more aware

  12. Networking European Universities through e-learning (reviewed text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Dlouhá

    2008-05-01

    The main purpose of the Inventory is to show concrete examples which have been implemented in the Member States under the concept of ESD in formal and non-formal learning contexts and which are at the forefront as regards innovative approaches. Projects/programmes selected as innovative good practice will be used to inform the preparation of the next Progress Report on the EU Sustainable Development Strategy in Education. See European Commission DG Education and Culture Inventory of innovative practices in education for sustainable development, the case study VCSE - Virtual Campus for a Sustainable Europe (EUROPEAN LEVEL, page 33.

  13. Networking European Universities through e-learning (reviewed text)

    OpenAIRE

    Dlouhá, Jana

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Campus for a Sustainable Europe (VCSE) network has been selected to be part of the EC DG EAC Inventory of innovative good practice on education for sustainable development. The main purpose of the Inventory is to show concrete examples which have been implemented in the Member States under the concept of ESD in formal and non-formal learning contexts and which are at the forefront as regards innovative approaches. Projects/programmes selected as innovative good practice will be use...

  14. Learning Safety Assessment from Accidents in a University Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2013-01-01

    This contribution describes how a chemical engineering department started learning from accidents during experimental work and ended up implementing an industrially inspired system for risk assessment of new and existing experimental setups as well as a system for assessing potential risk from...... the chemicals used in the experimental work. These experiences have led to recent developments which focus increasingly on the a theoretical basis for modeling and reasoning on safety as well as operational aspects within a common framework. Presently this framework is being extended with barrier concepts both...

  15. Grappling with Grammar on a Virtual Learning Platform: The Case of First Year French Students at the University of Wollongong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissoonauth-Bedford, A.; Stace, Ray

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on an online discussion forum that was created on the University of Wollongong's Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to aid and support the learning of French grammar at beginner/false beginner level. The aim was to provide a blended learning situation which combines face to face teaching with online learning using multimedia…

  16. Collaborative Learning: Theoretical Foundations and Applicable Strategies to University Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor D. Roselli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative learning is a construct that identifies a current strong field, both in face-to-face and virtual education. Firstly, three converging theoretical sources are analyzed: socio-cognitive conflict theory, intersubjectivity theory and distributed cognition theory. Secondly, a model of strategies that can be implemented by teachers to develop socio-cognitive collaboration is presented. This model integrates and systematizes several academic group animation techniques developed within the collaborative learning field. These integrated techniques, within a coherent and unified didactic intention, allow talking more about strategies than independent and dissociated techniques. Each strategy is specifically described, which refers to six areas: encouragement of dialogue, listening to others and reciprocal assessment; collaboration for negotiation and consensus building; activity organization; study and appropriation of bibliographic information; conceptual development; collective writing. These strategies proposed (designed to stimulate the collaboration between 2, 4 and exceptionally, 6 or 8 students are not the only possible strategies, they can be combined with the ones the teacher might suggest. The strict pattern of each strategy is a characteristic of the proposal. The teacher is also encouraged to benchmark the results obtained using each strategy and those obtained using individual or non-collaborative strategies. Finally, conclusions and recommendations for the implementation of these strategies are discussed.

  17. Explorers of the Universe: Metacognitive Tools for Learning Science Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Marino C.

    1998-01-01

    Much of school learning consists of rote memorization of facts with little emphasis on meaningful interpretations. Knowledge construction is reduced to factual knowledge production with little regard for critical thinking, problem solving, or clarifying misconceptions. An important role of a middle and secondary teacher when teaching science is to aid students' ability to reflect upon what they know about a given topic and make available strategies that will enhance their understanding of text and science experiments. Developing metacognition, the ability to monitor one's own knowledge about a topic of study and to activate appropriate strategies, enhances students' learning when faced with reading, writing and problem solving situations. Two instructional strategies that can involve students in developing metacognitive awareness are hierarchical concept mapping, and Vee diagrams. Concept maps enable students to organize their ideas and reveal visually these ideas to others. A Vee diagram is a structured visual means of relating the methodological aspects of an activity to its underlying conceptual aspect in ways that aid learners in meaningful understanding of scientific investigations.

  18. Forecasting with Universal Approximators and a Learning Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Anders Bredahl

    2011-01-01

    to the performance of the best single model in the set of models combined from. The use of universal approximators along with a combination scheme for which explicit loss bounds exist should give a solid theoretical foundation to the way the forecasts are performed. The practical performance will be investigated...... combination has a long history in econometrics focus has not been on proving loss bounds for the combination rules applied. We apply the Weighted Average Algorithm (WAA) of Kivinen & Warmuth (1999) for which such loss bounds exist. Specifically, one can bound the worst case performance of the WAA compared...

  19. Forecasting with Universal Approximators and a Learning Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Anders Bredahl

    bounds for the combination rules applied. We apply the Weighted Average Algorithm (WAA) of Kivinen and Warmuth (1999) for which such loss bounds exist. Specifically, one can bound the worst case performance of the WAA compared to the performance of the best single model in the set of models combined from....... The use of universal approximators along with a combination scheme for which explicit loss bounds exist should give a solid theoretical foundation to the way the forecasts are performed. The practical performance will be investigated by considering various monthly postwar macroeconomic data sets for the G...

  20. Teaching and learning strategies for pedagogical training of non-educational university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mena, Alodio

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a system of teaching and learning strategies for pedagogical training of non-educational students. The modeling of teaching and learning strategies presented is the result of a research project carried out at the University of Camagüey; its results are being employed successfully. A full description of research methods, rationale, and each of the suggested strategies is provided.

  1. Expectancy as a mediator of the relation between learning strategies and academic achievement among university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shurbanovska Orhideja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the mediation role of the expectancy component of motivation (self-efficacy and control beliefs for learning in the relationship between learning strategies (cognitive, meta-cognitive, resource management strategies and academic achievement. The sample consisted of 155 university students (85 psychology students and 70 architecture students. Learning strategies section from the MSLQ (Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire was taken to assess the extent of learning strategies usage during exam preparation. Motivation for learning was measured by the Expectancy scale as a part of the Motivation section of the MSLQ. Mediation analysis was used for data processing. Following the proposed steps for mediation effect testing, a series of regression analyses was conducted: first, the expectancy component of motivation was regressed on learning strategies; second, academic achievement was regressed on learning strategies; and third, academic achievement was regressed on the expectancy component of motivation. It was found that learning strategies influence academic achievement indirectly through the expectancy component of motivation (Sobel test=2.18; p=.029. It is emphasized that students should be encouraged to use learning strategies in knowledge acquisition.

  2. Developing Inclusive Teaching and Learning Through the Principles of Universal Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knarlag, Kjetil; Olaussen, Elinor

    2016-01-01

    For decades, the term reasonable accommodations has been the lead strategy and praxis in addressing diversity and disabilities in Higher Education. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a well-known theory and a practical approach which challenges these traditions in order to improve inclusive teaching and learning in the American school system. A European funded project, UDLL, has transferred these theories to a European context, and developed best practice guidelines for key stakeholders in European Higher Education Institutions. This universal approach challenges established traditions, methods and mindsets in addressing the diverse student population.

  3. Barriers to Participation in Learning Management Systems in Saudi Arabian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alenezi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify various barriers that have hindered the adoption of LMSs in Saudi Arabian universities. Learning management systems (LMSs have been adopted in many learning institutions because of their functionalities and applications to improve pedagogy. Universities have been encouraged to use LMSs to enhance the collaborative working environment among students and between the students and their instructors. This study was done by administering 150 questionnaires to students in three universities in Saudi Arabia. Findings from the study revealed that the main barriers to the use of LMSs were inadequate technical support by the universities, negative attitude toward technology, and inadequate training on the LMS platforms. Minor barriers identified include poor Internet access and networking, limited infrastructure to support the LMS, lack of hardware and software to run the LMS, and challenges in English language proficiency.

  4. Distance learning for University Physics in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilliers, J. A.; Basson, I.

    1997-03-01

    The University of South Africa (Unisa) is one of the largest distance education universities in the world. Teaching physics at a distance is a complex and multifaceted problem which is compounded in the South African context by the diversity of educational backgrounds of the learners involved. The fact that students are distributed over a vast geographical area, presents unique problems for the incorporation of the practical component into the curriculum. Current research involves a fundamental evaluation of the aims and objectives of the introductory laboratory. The project is based on the notion that practicals, as they have been used in most physics curricula, are not particularly effective or efficient, although they are costly both financially and logistically. Design, development and delivery of efficient study material imply that there should be agreement between what the student knows and can do, and what the material offers. An in depth profile that takes into account biographic as well as cognitive characteristics of the target group, is therefore being compiled. This paper gives an overview of the specific problems and circumstances that were identified for distance education in physics in a multi-cultural society, and proposes a new model for the incorporation of the introductory laboratory into the curriculum.

  5. Pre-Service Teachers’ Attitudes Toward Teaching Science and Their Science Learning at Indonesia Open University

    OpenAIRE

    Nadi SUPRAPTO; Ali MURSID

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on attitudes toward (teaching) science and the learning of science for primary school among pre-service teachers at the Open University of Indonesia. A three-year longitudinal survey was conducted, involving 379 students as pre-service teachers (PSTs) from the Open University in Surabaya regional office. Attitudes toward (teaching) science’ (ATS) instrument was used to portray PSTs’ preparation for becoming primary school teachers. Data analyses were used, including descrip...

  6. Amongst mathematicians teaching and learning mathematics at university level

    CERN Document Server

    Nardi, Elena

    2008-01-01

    "Amongst Mathematicians" offers a unique perspective on the ways in which mathematicians perceive their students' learning, the way they teach and reflect on those teaching practices. Elena Nardi employs fictional characters to create a conversation on these important issues. While personas are created, the facts incorporated into their stories are based on large bodies of data including intense focus groups comprised of mathematicians and mathematics education.This book further develops analyses of the data and demonstrates the pedagogical potential that lies in collaborative research that engages educators, researchers, and students in undergraduate mathematics education. Nardi also addresses the need for action in undergraduate mathematics education by creating discourse for reform and demonstrating the feasibility and potential of collaboration between mathematicians and researchers. "Amongst Mathematicians" is of interest to the entire mathematics community including teacher educators, undergraduate and ...

  7. Barriers in Implementing E-Learning in Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakbala, Parvin

    2015-11-03

    E-learning provides an alternative way for higher educational institutes to deliver knowledge to learners at a distance, rather than the traditional way. The aim of this study is to identify the barrier factors of e-learning programs in Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences (HUMS) in respect of the students and lecturers' point of view. A cross-sectional study based on a questionnaire was conducted among 286 of students and lecturers in the nursing, midwifery and paramedic schools of HUMS. Two hundred and eighty-six participants filled in the questionnaire: 256 students, and 30 lecturers. Results of the study showed a lack of proper training in e-learning courses of the university 182 (69.1%), limited communication with the instructor 174 (68%) and the learners dominance of English language 174 (68%) showed the greatest importance for the students. The awareness about e-learning program was 80% and 43% among lecturers and students respectively.The dominance of English language 26 (86.7%) and lack of research grants for e-learning 23 (76.6%) and lack of proper training on e-learning courses from the university 20 (66.7 %) were the most important barrier factors of implementing e-learning for lecturers. E-learning courses to supplement classroom teaching was a solution that mentioned by the majority of students 240 (93.8%) and lecturers 29 (96.7%) in this study. The positive perception of e-learning is an important consequence effect in the future, educational development of nursing, midwifery and paramedic schools.

  8. Barriers in Implementing E-Learning in Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakbala, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Background: E-learning provides an alternative way for higher educational institutes to deliver knowledge to learners at a distance, rather than the traditional way. The aim of this study is to identify the barrier factors of e-learning programs in Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences (HUMS) in respect of the students and lecturers’ point of view. Methods: A cross-sectional study based on a questionnaire was conducted among 286 of students and lecturers in the nursing, midwifery and paramedic schools of HUMS. Two hundred and eighty-six participants filled in the questionnaire: 256 students, and 30 lecturers. Results: Results of the study showed a lack of proper training in e-learning courses of the university 182 (69.1%), limited communication with the instructor 174 (68%) and the learners dominance of English language 174 (68%) showed the greatest importance for the students. The awareness about e-learning program was 80% and 43% among lecturers and students respectively. The dominance of English language 26 (86.7%) and lack of research grants for e-learning 23 (76.6%) and lack of proper training on e-learning courses from the university 20 (66.7 %) were the most important barrier factors of implementing e-learning for lecturers. E-learning courses to supplement classroom teaching was a solution that mentioned by the majority of students 240 (93.8%) and lecturers 29 (96.7%) in this study. Conclusions: The positive perception of e-learning is an important consequence effect in the future, educational development of nursing, midwifery and paramedic schools. PMID:26925885

  9. Identification of Learning Management Systems Functional Areas and Limitations (Case Study: E-Learning Center of University of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali akbar Farhangi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, ICT and educational processes are experiencing development and innovation. This new trend will help promote educational technology and enhance innovations regarding educational planning. E-learning is considered as one of the most prominent ICT applications across the world. Advantages of virtual learning have entailed daily usage in various universities. Learning management systems are specific web-based systems to manage, track students, define courses, and evaluate the learners. However, these systems may involve inefficiencies and disadvantages as well. This paper attempts to identify the LMS functional areas in University of Tehran based on a specific conceptual framework and to present the relevant issues and problems for each dimension. The data for the present study were collected using focused group interviews, system observations. The researchers also compared the documents and the university system with that of other universities. The results of the theme analysis indicated that “communication” and “system cooperation” dimensions are involved with more important problems and issues. The researchers believe that the main issues are due to the test modules, evaluations, and systemic and underlying databases.

  10. Examining E-Learning Barriers As Perceived By Faculty 
Members Of Engineering Colleges In The Jordanian Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad K. AL-ALAWNEH,

    2014-01-01

    Employing computer's technology that includes e-learning system in the field of Engineering is a vital issue which needs to be discussed. Therefore, this study purposed to examine e-learning barriers as perceived by faculty members of engineering in three major universities in Jordan (Yarmouk University, Jordan University of Science and Technology, and Al-Balqaa Applied University) in the second semester of 2012. The study's instrument was distributed to collect the data from a sam...

  11. Promoting Active Learning in Technology-Infused TILE Classrooms at the University of Iowa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Van Horne

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this case study, the authors describe the successful implementation of technology-infused TILE classrooms at the University of Iowa. A successful collaboration among campus units devoted to instructional technologies and teacher development, the TILE Initiative has provided instructors with a new set of tools to support active learning. The authors detail the implementation of the TILE classrooms, the process of training instructors to design effective instruction for these classrooms, and an assessment project that helps improve the process of ensuring faculty can successfully facilitate learning activities in a technology-infused learning environment.

  12. IntlUni - The Challenges of the Multilingual and Multicultural Learning Space in the International University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    IntlUni: The challenges of the multilingual and multicultural learning space in the international university The past decade has witnessed an unprecedented increase in the internationalisation of higher education. This means that more people in higher education than ever before are teaching...... education adds value – or has the potential to add value – to the programmes offered and the learning outcomes achieved by students, the overarching aim of IntlUni is to identify the quality criteria that characterize or should characterize teaching and learning in the multilingual and multicultural...

  13. Learning Styles of Medical and Midwifery Students in Mashhad University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zeraati

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Students have individual learning style preferences including visual (V; learning from graphs, charts, and flow diagrams, auditory (A; learning from speech, read-write(R; learning from reading and writing, and kinesthetic (K; learning from touch, hearing, smell, taste, and sight.These preferences can be assessed using the VARK questionnaire.Purpose: We aimed to assess different learning styles of medical students in our collage.Methods: This study was conducted to describe learning styles of 214 Medical and Midwifery students in Mashhad University of medical sciences. By using the English version of the VARK questionnaire, we measured the difference in learning styles of medical students and midwifery students and compared with 57336 global general students who completed the test in VARK website up to Sep 2007.Results: The dominant learning preference of our students was Aural preference (30.8% followed by Read/Write (20.6%, while (7.5% were in Kinesthetic and (5.6% were Visual learners; still most of the students (35.5% represented a multimodal learning preference. No significant difference was found between males and females. The general pattern between medical student and Midwifery student is the same. There was a significant relation between Internship Entrance Exam score and thelearning styles of medical student and who were more Read/Write got higher scores.Conclusion: Knowing that our students have different preferred learning modes will help medical instructors in our faculty develop appropriate learning approaches and explore opportunities so that they will be able to make the educational experience more productive.Key words: MEDICAL EDUCATION, LEARNING MODELS VARK, VISUAL, AUDITORY, READ-WRITE, KINESTHETIC, SSTUDENTS.

  14. Balancing Bologna: opportunities for university teaching that integrates academic and practical learning outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Lorenz; Pflug, Verena; Brandenburg, Christiane; Guggenberger, Thomas; Mentler, Axel; Wurzinger, Maria

    2014-05-01

    In the course of the Bologna Process, the quality of university teaching has become more prominent in the discourse on higher education. More attention is now paid to didactics and methods and learner-oriented modes of teaching are introduced. The application of knowledge, practical skills and in consequence the employability of university graduates have become requirements for university teaching. Yet, the lecture-style approach still dominates European universities, although empirical evidence confirms that student-centred, interdisciplinary and experiential learning is more effective. Referring to the learning taxonomy introduced by Bloom, we argue that standard approaches rarely move beyond the learning level of comprehension and fail to reach the levels of application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Considering the rapid changes and multiple challenges society faces today, responsible practitioners and scientists who can improve the current management of natural resources are urgently needed. Universities are expected to equip their graduates with the necessary skills to reflect and evaluate their actions when addressing 'real world' problems in order to improve impact and relevance of their work. Higher education thus faces the challenge of providing multi-level learning opportunities for students with diverse practical and theoretical learning needs. In this study, we reflect on three cases of university teaching attempting to bridge theory and practice and based on the principles of systemic, problem based learning. The described courses focus on organic farming, rural development and landscape planning and take place in Uganda, Nicaragua and Italy. We show that being part of a real-world community of stakeholders requires hands-on learning and the reflection and evaluation of actions. This prepares students in a more effective and realistic way for their future roles as responsible decision makers in complex social, economic and ecological systems. We

  15. Using Social Network and Dropbox in Blended Learning: an Application to University Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justo de Jorge Moreno

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to analyze the use of the Social Networking and dropbox in blended learning by University students. We try identifying this method, over the student’s performance. The results show that the implementation of blended learning has a positive effect on in learning outcomes. The use of the Knowledge Management process has enabled captures a three-factor structure that reflected the five types of knowledge. The segmentation of the student sample analyzed using cluster technique, has established a clear typology of four groups. Students with higher levels of learning are related to the increased use of resources used and more proactive in blended learning.

  16. How to facilitate freshmen learning and support their transition to a university study environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Jari; Rantanen, Elisa; Kettunen, Lauri

    2017-11-01

    Most freshmen enter universities with high expectations and with good motivation, but too many are driven into performing instead of true learning. The issues are not only related to the challenge of comprehending the substance, social and other factors have an impact as well. All these multifaceted needs should be accounted for to facilitate student learning. Learning is an individual process and remarkable improvement in the learning practices is possible, if proper actions are addressed early enough. We motivate and describe a study of the experience obtained from a set of tailor-made courses that were given alongside standard curriculum. The courses aimed to provide a 'safe community' to address the multifaceted needs. Such support was integrated into regular coursework where active learning techniques, e.g. interactive small groups were incorporated. To assess impact of the courses we employ the feedback obtained during the courses and longitudinal statistical data about students' success.

  17. Integrating Information and Communication Technology (ICT into University Teaching and Learning: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Yuen Fook

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade the push for academics to develop competencies in the use of information and communication technologies (ICT in teaching and learning has increased. Within the Malaysian context unfortunately, until now there has not been a holistic and conclusive study on the integration of ICT in higher education. This exploratory study examined the integration of ICT among academics for the enhancement of university teaching and learning. A descriptivecorrelational research methodology that employed a survey questionnaire was used in this case study. The data was analyzed using means, standard deviation, t-test, ANOVA, and correlation. The findings indicated that the ICT facilities in the higher instituion left much to be desired and the usage of ICT in teaching among the academics was not at a satisfactory level. Even though a majority of the acdemics are aware of the many benefits of ICT there still exists academics who hold firm to the importance of face-to-face interaction and the didactic role of the instructors. The findings also revealed that the integration of ICT into the classroom focuses mainly on teaching and learning rather than the technical knowhow about computers themselves and how this technology helps support users to participate in the integration of ICT into teaching and learning. However, most of the respondents have shown a keen willingness to adopt ICT in their future teaching and learning processes once proper training and relevant technical support are provided. The findings, in general, can help lecturers, IT staff and university management to manage the integration of ICT in university teaching and learning in a more organized manner. The findings also would enable the faculty to be more responsive to the needs of staff and students to effectively address the critical problems related to the integration of technology into university teaching and learning in ways that are both contextualized and authentic.

  18. The Influence of Personal Well-Being on Learning Achievement in University Students Over Time: Mediating or Moderating Effects of Internal and External University Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined the relationship between students' personal well-being and their learning achievement during university study, and whether such relationship would be mediated or moderated by university engagement. A total of 434 university students from one public university in Hong Kong participated in the study. The participants completed an online survey consisting of personal well-being (cognitive behavioral competence and general positive youth development, university engagement, and learning achievement measures (personal growth, and accumulated GPA as academic achievement at four time points with a 1-year interval. Results showed that personal well-being measured at the beginning of university study positively predicted students' personal growth and academic achievement after 3 years' study. While the internal dimensions of university engagement (academic challenge and learning with peers showed longitudinal significant mediational effect, the external dimensions (experience with faculty and campus environment did not have significant longitudinal moderating effect. Nevertheless, external dimensions of student engagement also showed direct effect on personal growth and academic achievement. The long-standing positive effects of personal well-being on university engagement and subsequently, learning achievement during university years call for more attention to the promotion of holistic development among university students in Hong Kong.

  19. The Influence of Personal Well-Being on Learning Achievement in University Students Over Time: Mediating or Moderating Effects of Internal and External University Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu; Shek, Daniel T. L.; Zhu, Xiaoqin

    2018-01-01

    The current study examined the relationship between students' personal well-being and their learning achievement during university study, and whether such relationship would be mediated or moderated by university engagement. A total of 434 university students from one public university in Hong Kong participated in the study. The participants completed an online survey consisting of personal well-being (cognitive behavioral competence and general positive youth development), university engagement, and learning achievement measures (personal growth, and accumulated GPA as academic achievement) at four time points with a 1-year interval. Results showed that personal well-being measured at the beginning of university study positively predicted students' personal growth and academic achievement after 3 years' study. While the internal dimensions of university engagement (academic challenge and learning with peers) showed longitudinal significant mediational effect, the external dimensions (experience with faculty and campus environment) did not have significant longitudinal moderating effect. Nevertheless, external dimensions of student engagement also showed direct effect on personal growth and academic achievement. The long-standing positive effects of personal well-being on university engagement and subsequently, learning achievement during university years call for more attention to the promotion of holistic development among university students in Hong Kong. PMID:29375421

  20. Factors influencing the adoption of E-learning in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdekhoda, Mohammadhiwa; Dehnad, Afsaneh; Ghazi Mirsaeed, Sayd Javad; Zarea Gavgani, Vahideh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electronic Learning (E-learning), is the use of electronic technology in education via computer and the internet. Despite its slow adoption by faculty members, e-learning provides several benefits to individuals and organizations. This study was conducted to determine the factors influencing the adoption of e-learning by faculty members in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This was a cross- sectional study, in which a sample of 190 faculty members of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences was randomly selected, using stratified sampling. A Conceptual Path Model of Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) was applied to assess the faculty members’ attitude towards e-learning. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS16, using descriptive statistics and regression analysis. The model was tested by structural equation modeling (SEM) and was finally represented by Analysis of Moment Structures. Results: The results evidenced that UTAUT model explains about 56% of the variance for adoption of elearning. The findings also revealed that performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influences and behavior indentation had direct and significant effects on faculty members’ behavior towards the use of e-learning. However, facilitated condition had no significant effects on the use of e-learning. Conclusion: The authorized model provides considerable insight for perception and anticipation of faculty members’ behaviors in adopting e-learning. The survey clearly identified significant and non-significant factors that may affect the adoption of e-learning. The results of this study could help the policy makers when successful adoption of e-learning is in their agenda. PMID:28491832

  1. UDENTE (Universal Dental E-Learning) a golden opportunity for dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Patricia

    2012-01-10

    The incorporation of technological advancements in higher education has started to bridge the gap in local, national and global delivery of dental courses. This gap, including the global decrease in senior clinical academics, has influenced the development of new teaching and learning techniques. Institutional virtual learning environments (VLE) and other e-learning resources are now in higher demand. This paper describes how one such innovative solutions has been IVIDENT (International Virtual Dental School), has enabled secure and seamless access to high quality e-content and tools through an innovative, universal flexible learning platform. IVIDENT, now UDENTE (Universal Dental E-learning) has been shown to offer new learning experiences for students of dentistry, but its approach can apply across all educational domains. UDENTE also benefits staff as it allows them to contribute and access resources through peer reviewed publishing processes, which ensure the highest quality in education. UDENTE was developed thanks to a £2.3 million grant from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and the Department of Health. http://www.udente.org. This academically led educational research project involved dental schools in seven countries. An initially scoping of requirements was followed by elaboration of the tools needed. Pilot testing of the tools, systems and learning resources in particular and the impact of the UDENTE in general were carried out. The pilots revealed evidence of positive impact of a space for learning, teaching, development and communication, with tools for planning of electives and administrative support. The results of these initial pilots have been positive and encouraging, describing UDENTE as an accessible, user friendly platform providing tools that otherwise would be difficult to access in a single space. However, attention to supporting faculty to embrace these new learning domains is essential if such technology enhanced

  2. Factors influencing the adoption of E-learning in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdekhoda, Mohammadhiwa; Dehnad, Afsaneh; Ghazi Mirsaeed, Sayd Javad; Zarea Gavgani, Vahideh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electronic Learning (E-learning), is the use of electronic technology in education via computer and the internet. Despite its slow adoption by faculty members, e-learning provides several benefits to individuals and organizations. This study was conducted to determine the factors influencing the adoption of e-learning by faculty members in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This was a cross- sectional study, in which a sample of 190 faculty members of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences was randomly selected, using stratified sampling. A Conceptual Path Model of Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) was applied to assess the faculty members' attitude towards e-learning. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS16, using descriptive statistics and regression analysis. The model was tested by structural equation modeling (SEM) and was finally represented by Analysis of Moment Structures. Results: The results evidenced that UTAUT model explains about 56% of the variance for adoption of elearning. The findings also revealed that performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influences and behavior indentation had direct and significant effects on faculty members' behavior towards the use of e-learning. However, facilitated condition had no significant effects on the use of e-learning. Conclusion: The authorized model provides considerable insight for perception and anticipation of faculty members' behaviors in adopting e-learning. The survey clearly identified significant and non-significant factors that may affect the adoption of e-learning. The results of this study could help the policy makers when successful adoption of e-learning is in their agenda.

  3. Public Computer Assisted Learning Facilities for Children with Visual Impairment: Universal Design for Inclusive Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Kin Wai Michael; Lam, Mei Seung

    2012-01-01

    Although computer assisted learning (CAL) is becoming increasingly popular, people with visual impairment face greater difficulty in accessing computer-assisted learning facilities. This is primarily because most of the current CAL facilities are not visually impaired friendly. People with visual impairment also do not normally have access to…

  4. Blended Learning and Disciplinarity: Negotiating Connections in French Studies in Regional Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Neil; Rolls, Alistair

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we outline the challenges facing French Studies in regional Australian universities resulting from an increasingly vocational curriculum and doubts about the cost-effectiveness of language learning in higher education. These pressures have resulted in a process of discipline restructuring and significant cuts in the numbers of…

  5. Qualitative Variation in Approaches to University Teaching and Learning in Large First-Year Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Michael; Trigwell, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Research on teaching from a student learning perspective has identified two qualitatively different approaches to university teaching. They are an information transmission and teacher-focused approach, and a conceptual change and student-focused approach. The fundamental difference being in the former the intention is to transfer information to…

  6. Use and Mastery of Virtual Learning Environment in Brazilian Open University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Margarita Victoria

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses the dynamics of the use and/or mastery of Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) by educators and students Open University, important part of the Brazilian Educational System. A questionnaire with 32 items was answered by 174 students/instructors/coordinators of the Media in Education and Physics courses, of two…

  7. Foundations of Dynamic Learning Analytics: Using University Student Data to Increase Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Sara; Gibson, David; Du Plessis, Coert; Halloran, Pat; Williams, Ed; Ambrose, Matt; Dunwell, Ian; Arnab, Sylvester

    2015-01-01

    With digitisation and the rise of e-learning have come a range of computational tools and approaches that have allowed educators to better support the learners' experience in schools, colleges and universities. The move away from traditional paper-based course materials, registration, admissions and support services to the mobile, always-on and…

  8. Integrating Assessment for Learning in the Teacher Education Programme at the University of Oslo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Lisbeth M.; Blikstad-Balas, Marte; Engelien, Kirsti Lyngvaer

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of the integration of assessment for learning principles in the newly revised five-year Master of Education programme at the University of Oslo, Norway, across didactic subjects, pedagogy and school practice. The analysis draws on lecture notes, student videos and student exam papers among 143 student teachers,…

  9. Global Culture, Learning Style, and Outcome: An Interdisciplinary Empirical Study of International University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2010-01-01

    The study examined 2500 business degree students from 21 countries, enrolled at an Australian university, using a survey to assess learning style, which was integrated into a global culture taxonomy. The research hypothesis was that academic outcome could be explained through an interdisciplinary model, by integrating proven theories from…

  10. A Case Study of Universal Design for Learning Applied in the College Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichliter, Marie E.

    2010-01-01

    As the landscape of education and the demographics of the postsecondary classroom continue to evolve, so too must the teaching practices at our nation's institutions of higher education. This study follows an instructor who has evolved to incorporate Universal Design for Learning (UDL) techniques into her classroom, even though prior to…

  11. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and Learners with Severe Support Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework as one way to understand how to support learners with severe disabilities and how to support their access to authentic and appropriate curricula that improves their quality of life. Two key ideas from the UDL framework, (a) understanding learner variability and (b) supporting…

  12. The Feasibility of E-Learning Implementation in an Iranian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzamohammadi, M. H.

    2017-01-01

    The present research aimed to investigate the feasibility of e-learning implementation in an Iranian comprehensive university (included medical and non-medical fields) to provide appropriate solutions in this regard. To achieve this objective, seven research questions were formed. Surveying method was applied for data collection in this study.…

  13. The Nature of E-Learning Adoption by Stakeholders of a University in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, Eric; Boateng, Richard; Boateng, Sheena L.; Anderson, Augustus B.

    2017-01-01

    Studies looking at the nature of technology adoption from a multi-dimensional perspective have remained below expectation especially in African countries. This study, therefore, sought to explore the nature of e-learning adoption in the University of Ghana using a multi-stakeholder approach. A quantitative survey approach was adopted for this…

  14. Determinants of E-Learning Adoption in Universities: Evidence from a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, Eric; Lovia Boateng, Sheena; Boateng, Richard

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to explore the technological, organizational, and environmental determinants of e-learning adoption in University of Ghana using a multistakeholder approach. Another construct (nature of the course) was added to the traditional constructs of the technology-organization-environment framework. Using survey research, e-learning…

  15. The Effect of Visual of a Courseware towards Pre-University Students' Learning in Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri, Mazyrah; Wan Ahmad, Wan Fatimah; Nordin, Shahrina Md.; Sulaiman, Suziah

    This paper highlights the effect of visual of a multimedia courseware, Black Cat Courseware (BC-C), developed for learning literature at a pre-university level in University Teknologi PETRONAS (UTP). The contents of the courseware are based on a Black Cat story which is covered in an English course at the university. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the usability and effectiveness of BC-C. A total of sixty foundation students were involved in the study. Quasi-experimental design was employed, forming two groups: experimental and control groups. The experimental group had to interact with BC-C as part of the learning activities while the control group used the conventional learning methods. The results indicate that the experimental group achieved a statistically significant compared to the control group in understanding the Black Cat story. The study result also proves that the effect of visual increases the students' performances in literature learning at a pre-university level.

  16. Collective Learning, Transformational Leadership and New Forms of Careers Guidance in Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodders, Nanda; Meijers, Frans

    2017-01-01

    In post-industrial societies, careers are to a large extent unpredictable. Therefore, individuals are expected to demonstrate more and more self-directedness. Universities in general embrace the idea of developing more self-directedness among their students but mostly fail to create the learning environment needed to foster this. In this article,…

  17. Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Learning Contract Course: Experience and Performance of the First Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ani, Adi Irfan Che; Tawil, Norngainy Mohd; Johar, Suhana; Ismail, Khaidzir; Razak, Mohd Zulhanif Abd

    2014-01-01

    Research from different parts of the world recognizes the effectiveness of a learning contract course in improving the personal skills of students. Therefore, UKM has chosen this approach to improve the personal soft skills of its students. The university has carried out this approach by making HHHC9118-Soft Skills as a compulsory course for all…

  18. Effective Utilization of ICT in English Language Learning--The Case of University of Botswana Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umunnakwe, Ngozi; Sello, Queen

    2016-01-01

    The study investigates the effective utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by first year undergraduates of the University of Botswana (UB) in their reading and writing skills. The first year students are not first language (L1) learners of English. They have not utilized computers for learning reading and writing in their…

  19. Understanding the Design Context for Australian University Teachers: Implications for the Future of Learning Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sue; Thomas, Lisa; Agostinho, Shirley; Lockyer, Lori; Jones, Jennifer; Harper, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Based on the premise that providing support for university teachers in designing for their teaching will ultimately improve the quality of student learning outcomes, recent interest in the development of support tools and strategies has gained momentum. This article reports on a study that examined the context in which Australian university…

  20. Chinese Students' Perceptions of the Effects of Western University Examination Formats on Their Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    The recruitment of Asian students into western universities has highlighted the debate about commercialisation of education, academic standards and the role of culture and language in approaches to learning. This article investigates Chinese students' perceptions of how two typical examination formats (multiple choice and essay) affect their…

  1. E-learning course design in teacher design teams. Experiences in the Open University of Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nihuka, Kassimu A.; Voogt, Joke

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative course design in teacher design teams (TDTs) has proved to be a promising professional development arrangement. This study explored the potential of TDTs in orienting teachers on course redesign for e-learning delivery at the context of Open University of Tanzania (OUT). Three teachers

  2. Learning, Retention, and Forgetting of Newton's Third Law throughout University Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Eleanor C.; Franklin, Scott V.; Dymek, Stephanie; Clark, Jessica; Sun, Yifei

    2012-01-01

    We present data from a between-student study on student response to questions on Newton's third law given in two introductory calculus-based physics classes (Mechanics and Electromagnetism) at a large northeastern university. Construction of a response curve reveals subtle dynamics in student learning not capturable by pretesting and post-testing.…

  3. Universal Design for Learning: A Blueprint for Success for All Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Susan Trostle; Favazza, Antoinette E.; Dalton, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    The Center for Applied Special Technology, Inc. (CAST), an educational research organization, introduced Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in its earliest form nearly 25 years ago. According to Orkwis and McLane (1998), UDL is a tangible means by which educators implement the special education requirements and sustain the gains that were…

  4. Faith-Learning Interaction in Graphic Design Courses in Protestant Evangelical Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    Integration or connectedness between faith and learning is a core aim of Protestant evangelical colleges and universities. It is pursued in a number of different ways in the academic programs of these institutions, even in commercially oriented courses that they offer, such as graphic design. However, the different ways that practical and…

  5. Understanding and Overcoming Barriers: Learning Experiences of Undergraduate Sudanese Students at an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gately, Natalie Jane; Ellis, Suzanne; Britton, Katherine; Fleming, Tina

    2017-01-01

    An increase in migration of Sudanese and South Sudanese people to Australia due to civil unrest in their home country has increased the numbers of Sudanese students at university. Migrant experiences, particularly those of English as a second language, can impact negatively on education and learning. Inconsistencies between student scores on…

  6. Promoting Active Learning in Technology-Infused TILE Classrooms at the University of Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horne, Sam; Murniati, Cecilia; Gaffney, Jon D. H.; Jesse, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    In this case study, the authors describe the successful implementation of technology-infused TILE classrooms at the University of Iowa. A successful collaboration among campus units devoted to instructional technologies and teacher development, the TILE Initiative has provided instructors with a new set of tools to support active learning. The…

  7. An Assessment of Resource Availability for Problem Based Learning in a Ghanaian University Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okyere, Gabriel Asare; Tawiah, Richard; Lamptey, Richard Bruce; Oduro, William; Thompson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the differences pertaining to the resources presently accessible for problem-based learning (PBL) among six colleges of Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach: Data for the study are the cross-sectional type drawn from 1,020 students. Poisson…

  8. Self-Regulated Learning and Perceived Health among Students Participating in University Physical Activity Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ron E.; Xiang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Three hundred and sixty-one students participating in university physical activity classes completed questionnaires assessing perceived health and self-regulated learning. In addition, 20 students (11 men; 9 women) were interviewed about their reasons for enrolling, participation and goals in the class. Results indicated the students endorsed…

  9. EFL Instructors' Perceptions of Blackboard Learning Management System (LMS) at University Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawalbeh, Thaer Issa

    2018-01-01

    The present paper aims to investigate EFL instructors' perceptions of Blackboard learning management system (LMS) at Taif University in Saudi Arabia. To achieve this purposes, the researcher attempted to answer two questions. The first question investigates EFL instructors' perceptions of Blackboard LMS. The second question aims to identify…

  10. Deep Learning Questions Can Help Selection of High Ability Candidates for Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellanby, Jane; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Stein, John

    2009-01-01

    Selection of students for places at universities mainly depends on GCSE grades and predictions of A-level grades, both of which tend to favour applicants from independent schools. We have therefore developed a new type of test that would measure candidates' "deep learning" approach since this assesses the motivation and creative thinking…

  11. Critical Success Factors in Crafting Strategic Architecture for E-Learning at HP University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kunal; Pandit, Pallvi; Pandit, Parul

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to outline the critical success factors for crafting a strategic architecture for e-learning at HP University. Design/methodology/approach: A descriptive survey type of research design was used. An empirical study was conducted on students enrolled with the International Centre for Distance and Open Learning…

  12. Homeostasis of Complementary Pair Theory: Ecological Comparisons in Diverse Universal Design for Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianneo, Brittany

    2014-01-01

    Accommodation~assimilation relations were theorized by Kelso and Engstrom (2006) as independent and dependent complementary pairs. This study defined relationships between organisms that experienced complementary interactions of accommodation~assimilation in diverse ecologies designed with universal design for learning environments (UDLE) compared…

  13. The Influence of the Organizational Structures of Colleges and Universities on College Student Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph B.

    2002-01-01

    Reports the findings of a study conducted to determine the influence of various dimensions of organizational structure (bureaucratic, collegial, political, symbolic, and systemic) on college student learning. Findings indicate that dimensions of the structure of the colleges and universities as organizations exert both positive and negative…

  14. Exploring Students' Perceptions about English Learning in a Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Patricia Kim

    2018-01-01

    This manuscript reports the final findings of an exploratory, descriptive case study that aimed at exploring the perceptions of a group of English as a foreign language students in a public university regarding their English learning and the commitment level through the process. A questionnaire, a survey, and the teacher's diary were the…

  15. Attitudes toward English & English Learning at an Iranian Military University: A Preliminary Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi Zafarghandi, Amir; Jodai, Hojat

    2012-01-01

    This study intends to represent attitudes toward English and English learning at an Iranian military university. Iranian military staff is required to study English in a social environment where there is little immediate need or opportunity to use the language for real communicative purposes.The subjects included 34 Iranian military personnel who…

  16. The Aalborg University PO-PBL Model from a Socio-cultural Learning Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández, Carola Hernández; Ravn, Ole; Valero, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1970’s, Aalborg University has been developing a new pedagogical model in higher education: The Project Oriented – Problem Based Learning (PO-PBL). In particular, the Faculty of Engineering and Science has developed a pedagogical proposal that introduces students to a different type...

  17. Fostering the Quality of Teaching and Learning by Developing the "Neglected Half " of University Teachers' Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marentic Požarnik, Barica; Lavric, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    For too long, the quality of teaching and learning in universities has been undervalued in comparison to research. Current social, economic, ecological and other challenges require that more attention be given to measures to improve the situation. Academic staff should receive incentives, policy support and high-quality pedagogical training to…

  18. Self-Regulated Learning and Perceived Health among University Students Participating in Physical Activity Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ron E.; Altunsöz, Irmak Hürmeriç; Su, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Ping; Demirhan, Giyasettin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore motivational indicators of self-regulated learning (SRL) and the relationship between self-regulation (SR) and perceived health among university students enrolled in physical activity (PA) classes. One hundred thirty-one Turkish students participating in physical education activity classes at two…

  19. Adapting research-based curricula at Seattle Pacific University: Results on student learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Eleanor; Vokos, Stamatis; Lindberg, John; Seeley, Lane

    2004-05-01

    Seattle Pacific University is the recent recipient of a NSF CCLI grant to improve student learning in introductory physics and calculus courses. This talk will outline the goals of this collaborative project and present some initial results on student performance. Results from research-based assessments will be presented as well as specific examples of successes and challenges from mechanics and electricity and magnetism.

  20. Cooperative online learning: a possible methodological approach to the management of online university courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmo Trentin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Discussion of a proposal on how to organize, manage and evaluate the interaction online university courses based on collaborative learning. The proposal is illustrated through the description of two online courses on the use of ICT in human resource development.

  1. Learning to Lead in Higher Education: Insights into the Family Backgrounds of Women University Presidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Susan R.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the lived experiences of women university presidents related to becoming leaders or learning to lead. This manuscript highlights the research focused on the immediate family backgrounds and influences on these presidents. The research question was as follows: With regard to their family backgrounds and…

  2. Integrating Student-Centered Learning in Finance Courses: The Case of a Malaysian Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janor, Hawati; Rahim, Ruzita Abdul; Rahman, Aisyah Abdul; Auzairy, Noor Azryani; Hashim, Noor Azuan; Yusof, Muhamad Zain

    2013-01-01

    The student-centered learning (SCL) approach is an approach to education that focuses on learners and their needs, rather than relying upon the input of the teacher's. The present paper examines how the SCL approach is integrated as a learner-centered paradigm into finance courses offered at a business school in a research university in Malaysia.…

  3. Status of Utilizing Social Media Networks in the Teaching-Learning Process at Public Jordanian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneera Abdalkareem Alshdefait

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at finding out the status of utilizing social media networks in the teaching-learning process at public Jordanian Universities. To achieve the goal of the study, the descriptive developmental method was used and a questionnaire was developed, consisting of (35 statements. The questionnaire was checked for its validity and reliability. Then it was distributed to a sample of (382 male and female students from the undergraduate and graduate levels. The study results showed that the participants gave a low score to the status of utilizing social media networks in the teaching-learning process at public Jordanian universities. The results also showed that there were statistically significant differences between the participants of the study according to the academic rank attributed to the graduate students, and according to gender attributed to male students at the instrument macro level and on all dimensions of the two variables. In light of these results, the study recommended that public universities should utilize modern technology in the educational process, urge and encourage the teaching staff members to use the social media networks in the teaching-learning process and raise the students' awareness about the benefits of using social media networks. Keywords: Social media networks, Teaching-learning process, Public Jordanian Universities

  4. Adaptation to Altitude as a Vehicle for Experiential Learning of Physiology by University Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigle, David S.; Buben, Amelia; Burke, Caitlin C.; Carroll, Nels D.; Cook, Brett M.; Davis, Benjamin S.; Dubowitz, Gerald; Fisher, Rian E.; Freeman, Timothy C.; Gibbons, Stephen M.; Hansen, Hale A.; Heys, Kimberly A.; Hopkins, Brittany; Jordan, Brittany L.; McElwain, Katherine L.; Powell, Frank L.; Reinhart, Katherine E.; Robbins, Charles D.; Summers, Cameron C.; Walker, Jennifer D.; Weber, Steven S.; Weinheimer, Caroline J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, an experiential learning activity is described in which 19 university undergraduates made experimental observations on each other to explore physiological adaptations to high altitude. Following 2 wk of didactic sessions and baseline data collection at sea level, the group ascended to a research station at 12,500-ft elevation.…

  5. At What Cost? Examining the Cost Effectiveness of a Universal Social-Emotional Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Leah J.; DiPerna, James C.; Hart, Susan Crandall; Crowley, Max

    2018-01-01

    Although implementation of universal social-emotional learning programs is becoming more common in schools, few studies have examined the cost-effectiveness of such programs. As such, the purpose of this article is two fold. First, we provide an overview of cost-effectiveness methods for school-based programs, and second, we share results of a…

  6. Helping Teams Work: Lessons Learned from the University of Arizona Library Reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Joseph R.; Pintozzi, Chestalene

    1999-01-01

    Describes library reorganization at the University of Arizona resulting from fiscal challenges and the need for current technology. Highlights include: the restructuring process and customer focus; team functioning and the learning organization, including training issues, communication, empowerment, and evaluation/assessment; current challenges,…

  7. Teacher Candidates Implementing Universal Design for Learning: Enhancing Picture Books with QR Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Marya; Pontrello, Camille

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if teacher candidates could gain knowledge of the principles of Universal Design for Learning by enhancing traditional picture books with Quick Response (QR) codes and to determine if the process of making these enhancements would impact teacher candidates' comfort levels with using technology on both…

  8. Application of ICT-based Learning Resources for University Inorganic Chemistry Course Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana M. Derkach

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article studies expediency and efficiency of various ICT-based learning resources use in university inorganic chemistry course training, detects difference of attitudes toward electronic resources between students and faculty members, which create the background for their efficiency loss

  9. Exhilarated Learning and the Scholarship of Engagement: From Here (the University) to the Horizon (the Community)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strean, William Ben

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I explain the components of "exhilarated learning," a model for effective classroom environments, and show how this model can be applied to the broader context of community-university engagement. I describe the following three dimensions: human connection, whole body engagement, and linking content to context; and I…

  10. Metacognition and Self-Regulated Learning in Predicting University Students' Academic Achievement in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Baris

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether perceived levels of self-regulated learning and metacognition predicted the ultimate grade point average (GPA) attained by 206 female and 70 male college seniors (aged 21 to 27) finishing their elementary education teaching certification studies at a university in Turkey. Data regarding individual…

  11. Students' Attitude to Cloud-Based Learning in University Diverse Environment: A Case of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabekova, Anastasia; Gorbatenko, Rimma; Chilingaryan, Kamo

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores the ways how Russian students with different social background view the cloud- based foreign language learning. The empirical data was collected through questionnaires and in-depth interviews of students from metropolitan and regional universities, taking into account the students' family incomes, ethnic and religious…

  12. The Impact Of Using Computer Software On Vocabulary Learning Of Iranian EFL University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Pahlavanpoorfard

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, using computer is common in all fields. Education is not an exception. In fact, this approach of technology has been using increasingly in language classrooms. We have witnessed there are more and more language teachers are using computers in their classrooms. This research study investigates the impact of using computer   on vocabulary learning of Iranian EFL university students. To this end, a sample of 40 university students in Islamic Azad University, Larestan branch were randomly assigned into the experimental and control groups. Prior the treatment and to catch the initial deferences between the participants, all the students sat for a pre-test that was an Oxford Placement Test. Then the students were received the treatment for 10 weeks. The students in the experimental group were taught by computer software for vocabulary learning while the students in the control group were taught through traditional method for vocabulary learning. After the treatment, all the students sat for a post-test. The statistical analysis through running Independent-Sample T-tests revealed thatthe students in the experimental group who used the computer software for vocabulary learning performed better than the students in the control group were taught through traditional method for vocabulary learning.

  13. E-learning in University: a case of study on cultural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Lorusso

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available How much important and fundamental instruments, formation and information methods, different from the traditional ones in the different fields of human and experimental sciences, are today and will be in the future, is highlightened in this article. According to this, some problems typical of our instructive institutions (such as universities, public administrations, factories and their relevant possible solutions are underlined. These solutions can be achieved thanks to the introduction of the "e-learning" i.e. the possibility of learning through the web. It is important to note that the usage of data processing systems and telecom technologies could improve the access to the learning resources and to meet the different requirements. A case that can be considered emblematic, with reference to our specific experience, is represented by the cultural heritage field and by the university teledidactic and telecom courses as "Cultural heritage Operator".

  14. University Students’ Perceptions of Their Failures in Learning English as a Foreign Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen YILMAZ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate university students' perceived failure attributions in learning English as a foreign language at a preparatory school. The participants were 118 undergraduate students who failed at the end of a preparatory year and had to attend the repeat program. Each participant was asked to write about their perceived causes of failure in learning English. Students' responses were analyzed based on Weiner's (1983, 1985 Attribution Theory, and the emerging themes were linked to the locus of control, stability and controllability dimensions. The qualitative nature of the study provided in-depth information about the content of each dimension. The results suggest that students mostly attributed their academic failure in learning English to external and uncontrollable factors, which are in line with the findings of similar studies conducted in other university settings.

  15. Virtual shooting vs. actual learning: examining university students’ ideas about video games as tools for learning history

    OpenAIRE

    Feenstra, William

    2011-01-01

    Video games are a popular area of research in education and many scholars are currently investigating the great potential of video games to engage and to teach students more effectively. Studies have long demonstrated that students perceive history as a dull subject. This study examines the potential of commercial video games as a potential tool to improve students’ engagement in history, by focusing on what historical content university students believe they learn and what interests they dev...

  16. A STUDY OF LEARNING STYLE PREFERENCES OF ALL FEMALE STUDENTS IN UNIVERSITY LEVEL (A Case Study in one of Islamic University in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nuraeni Muhtar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research investigated students learning styles of all female students in University Level. The study involved 129 students in one of Islamic University in Bandung. The C.I.T.E Learning Styles Instrument by Joy Reid was used to identify 6 different kinds of Learning Styles. The research questions were as follows: (1 What are the learning styles  possessed by students?, (2 What are the dominant learning styles of Female Students in University Level?, and (3 How do those learning styles influence students’ level of study?.The data percentages show that most of students in each class have visual learning style by the percentage (A:65,21%, B:73,17%, C:66,67%, D:73,91%. The second highest numbers also happens to Kinesthetic learning style  (A:69,56%, B:48,78%, C:59,532%, D:65,22% and Individual learning style (A:73,91%, B:43,90%, C:47,62%, D:69,56%. From those data, it can be concluded that more than a half female students in that university are visual, kinesthetic and auditory learners. Tactile learnes are only between 40-50 % of students. And the least percentage of students are auditory and group learners. Based on the result, the learning styles of every class are different. The phenomena shows that there are no special kinds of learning styles that can determine level of study.         Keywords: learning style, visual, kinesthetic, auditory,  tactile

  17. Pre-Service Teachers’ Attitudes Toward Teaching Science and Their Science Learning at Indonesia Open University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadi SUPRAPTO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on attitudes toward (teaching science and the learning of science for primary school among pre-service teachers at the Open University of Indonesia. A three-year longitudinal survey was conducted, involving 379 students as pre-service teachers (PSTs from the Open University in Surabaya regional office. Attitudes toward (teaching science’ (ATS instrument was used to portray PSTs’ preparation for becoming primary school teachers. Data analyses were used, including descriptive analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. The model fit of the attitudes toward (teaching science can be described from seven dimensions: self-efficacy for teaching science, the relevance of teaching science, gender-stereotypical beliefs, anxiety in teaching science, the difficulty of teaching science, perceived dependency on contextual factors, and enjoyment in teaching science. The results of the research also described science learning at the Open University of Indonesia looks like. Implications for primary teacher education are discussed.

  18. Effect of Blended-Learning on Academic Achievement of Students in the University of Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruba Obiedat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of blended learning on the academic achievement of students in the University of Jordan. To gain in depth understanding of the phenomena under investigation, survey method is employed to collect natural data. For the sake of respondent convince all the questions asked in this survey are directed in Arabic language. Conventional sampling technique is employed due to the subjectivity of the issue. A sample of (427 students from King Abdulla II School for Information Technology at Jordan University are randomly selected. SPSS10 software is used to make statistical analysis. The robust checks of the result are made through arithmetic average, standard deviation statistics and Pearson correlation matrix. Statistical results of the study report that there is a significant and positive impact of blended learning on academic achievement of the students in university of Jordan.

  19. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Gillian; Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D

    2015-06-25

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning.

  20. An incremental procedure model for e-learning projects at universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahlke, Friedrich

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available E-learning projects at universities are produced under different conditions than in industry. The main characteristic of many university projects is that these are realized quasi in a solo effort. In contrast, in private industry the different, interdisciplinary skills that are necessary for the development of e-learning are typically supplied by a multimedia agency.A specific procedure tailored for the use at universities is therefore required to facilitate mastering the amount and complexity of the tasks.In this paper an incremental procedure model is presented, which describes the proceeding in every phase of the project. It allows a high degree of flexibility and emphasizes the didactical concept – instead of the technical implementation. In the second part, we illustrate the practical use of the theoretical procedure model based on the project “Online training in Genetic Epidemiology”.

  1. Attitude, Knowledge and Skill of Medical Students Toward E-Learning Kerman University Of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okhovati M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available  Aims: According to the development of e-learning and its high efficiency on the development of Iran’s universities, level of knowledge and the attitude of the students to this modern method of education and indeed students’ skills in using it needed to be assessed to improve the quality and quantity of universities’ education. This study aimed to determine the attitude, knowledge and skill of medical students toward e-learning at Kerman University of Medical Sciences.  Instrument & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study that was performed in 2013, 196 students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences were selected using proportional stratified sampling method. The research instrument was a valid and reliable questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient, ANOVA and independent T tests by SPSS 19 software.  Findings: The level of knowledge and skill of the students toward e-learning was “moderate” and their attitude was “high”. There were significant relationships between knowledge and skill (p=0.001 r=0.82 and also knowledge and attitude (p=0.001 r=0.37 but there was no significant relationship between skill and attitude (p=0.35 r=0.82. The scores of knowledge and skill were significantly different according to sex, but attitude had no significant difference with sex.  Conclusion: Kerman University of Medical Sciences’ students have a positive attitude to e-learning but according to their moderate knowledge and skills, performing this method of learning is not welcomed in this university.

  2. Adopting a blended approach to learning: Experiences from Radiography at Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockbain, M.M.; Blyth, C.M.; Bovill, C.; Morss, K.

    2009-01-01

    The perspective of the radiography teaching team at Queen Margaret University (QMU) was that a transmission mode of programme delivery was sub-optimal in helping students to learn and make links between theory and practice. Programme redesign adopted a blended learning approach with both face-to-face and online learning aimed at enhancing the students' control over their own learning. Online tasks within Web Classroom Tools (WebCT) were used as an integral part of careful programme design, which resulted in a programme enabling synthesis of the skills, knowledge and competencies acquired in the academic and clinical environments. With the move towards a more learner-centred, blended educational experience for the students the lecturers' role shifted to that of facilitator with WebCT providing the tutor with a more transparent view of student learning. Lecturers plan learning activities that build upon the skills students have developed through learning in groups, online and in class. The explicit connections that now exist between the academic programme and the opportunities for applying knowledge in practice allow students to engage more deeply in their learning.

  3. Learning styles of students of Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojat Rashidi-jahan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Understanding the learning styles of students may help educational planning and improve the learning. This study aims to assess learning styles, and relevant determinants, of students who study in various disciplines of medical sciences at Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences (BUMS in 2012. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 180 students from BUMS were selected randomly. Data were collected sing the Kolb learning style questionnaire during April/May 2012. One-way ANOVA, Student t-test, Chi-square or Fisher exact tests were used for analyzing the data. Results: The mean age of participants was 29.3±7.0, majority of them were males. The preferred learning styles were diverger (76.7%, accommodator (12.8%, assimilator (7.8% and converger (2.8% respectively. The results showed that the factors such as age, sex, marriage status, father and mother education, grade point average (GPA and academic degree could be important to determine learning style characteristics of students. The findings also indicate that the preferred learning style among the students with different GPAs or academic degrees are not different considerably. Conclusion: Regarding the most preferred leaning style by the, proper planning to address proper teaching styles according to the preferred learning styles is necessary.

  4. The Management of eLearning at University of KKU, Abha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Al-Saif

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available e-Learning, of late, has been witnessing an unprecedented expansion as an opportunity for higher education. This expanding alternative mode calls for ensuring and imparting a sound and qualitative education. So the present case study made an attempt to discuss key aspects of a quality management model for eLearning currently operating at the University of KKU and illustrates the issues related to the quality dimensions of e-learning. Some of these dimensions are: learning process, administrative processes, teaching materials, resources and SWOT (Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities, Threats analysis etc. This study reiterates the relevance of imparting qualitative education through e-learning for quality improvement in ways that facilitate how staff are empowered and supported to develop meaningful eLearning resources for students, how quality improvement is managed, and how organizational learning takes place. The findings of the study further demonstrate that if the concept of e-learning is imparted with a better approach and perspective, the reach will be phenomenal.

  5. The Learning Exchange: A Shared Space for the University of British Columbia and Vancouver's Downtown Eastside Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towle, Angela; Leahy, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The Learning Exchange was established by the University of British Columbia (UBC) in 1999 in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside (DTES). The challenge has been to create a shared space for learning exchanges between two very different communities: a research-intensive university and an inner city area most commonly depicted as a place of hopelessness.…

  6. Teachers' Perceptions of the Learning Environment and Their Knowledge Base in a Training Program for Novice University Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Christine; Fendler, Jan; Seidel, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Despite the complexity of teaching, learning to teach in universities is often "learning by doing". To provide novice university teachers with pedagogic teaching knowledge and to help them develop specific teaching objectives, we created a structured, video-based, one-year training program. In focusing on the core features of…

  7. Developing eLearning Technologies to Implement Competency Based Medical Education: Experiences from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagunwa, Thomas; Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the practical experience of developing an eLearning technology as a tool to implement Competency-based Medical Education (CBME) in Tanzania medical universities, with a specific focus on Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences. The paper provides a background to eLearning and the early attempt to adopt it in 2006 at…

  8. The State of Ethical Learning of Students in the Spanish University System: Considerations for the European Higher Education Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxarrais, Maria Rosa; Esteban, Francisco; Mellen, Teodor

    2015-01-01

    With the establishment of the European higher education area (EHEA), the ethical learning of students is a matter of central importance in European universities. This paper examines the current state of ethical learning of students in the Spanish university system. We present the results of a descriptive survey, which used a training model for…

  9. Transformational and Passive Leadership: An Initial Investigation of University Instructors as Leaders in a Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogler, Ronit; Caspi, Avner; Roccas, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated whether students perceive their university instructors in a virtual learning environment as leaders. Referring to the full range leadership theory (FRLT), we examined the effects of transformational and passive leadership styles of university instructors on students' satisfaction and learning outcomes. Completed web-based…

  10. Use of Multimedia in Teaching and Learning of Political Science in University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udim, Davies Kelvin; Etim, Eyo Akon

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the use of multimedia in teaching and learning of political science in University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. A survey research was adopted and the tool employed for this research study was a questionnaire titled "Use of Multimedia in Teaching and Learning of Political Science in University of Uyo" (UMTLPSUU).…

  11. An Exploration into First-Year University Students' Approaches to Inquiry and Online Learning Technologies in Blended Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Robert A.; Bliuc, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    The use of online learning technologies in experiences of inquiry is increasingly ubiquitous in university contexts. In blended environments, research into university experiences suggests that student approaches to learning are a key determiner of the quality of outcomes. The purpose of this study was to develop relevant measures which help…

  12. A Model of e-Learning by Constructivism Approach Using Problem-Based Learning to Develop Thinking Skills for Students in Rajaghat University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutimarrungson, Werayut; Pumipuntu, Sangkom; Noirid, Surachet

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to develop a model of e-learning by using Problem-Based Learning--PBL to develop thinking skills for students in Rajabhat University. The research is divided into three phases through the e-learning model via PBL with Constructivism approach as follows: Phase 1 was to study characteristics and factors through the model to…

  13. Partnering International Universities to Enhance Climate Literacy through Interdisciplinary, Cross-Cultural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, L. A.; Polk, J.; Strenecky, B.

    2015-12-01

    The climate change phenomenon will present complex, far-reaching challenges and opportunities, which will require leaders well-versed in interdisciplinary learning and international understanding. In an effort to develop the next generation of future leaders prepared for these challenges and opportunities, faculty from Western Kentucky University (WKU) and the University of Akureyri (UNAK), Iceland partnered to co-teach a course in climate change science and communication in Iceland. Students from both Institutions participated in the course to further enhance the cross-learning opportunity presented to the students. The 11-day course stationed out of three cities in Iceland, including Reykjavík, Vik, and Akureyri, the Icelandic gateway to the Arctic. In addition to undertaking field experiences such as hiking on glaciers, exploring ice caves, and touring geothermal plants, the group also hosted forums to discuss climate change with members of the Icelandic community, and completed The $100 Solution™ service-learning projects. A culminating point of the study abroad experience was a presentation by the students to persons from the University of Akureyri and representatives from the neighboring Icelandic communities about what they had learned about climate change science and communication during their travels. Through this experience, students were able to share their knowledge, which in turn gave them a deeper understanding of the issues they were learning throughout the study abroad program. In short, the program combined interdisciplinary learning, service-learning, and international understanding toward the goal of preparing the leaders of tomorrow with the skills to address climate change challenges.

  14. The relationship between English language learning strategies and proficiency of pre-university students: A study case of UMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiram, Johannah Jamalul; Sulaiman, Jumat; Swanto, Suyansah; Din, Wardatul Akmam

    2014-07-01

    This paper seeks to investigate the relationship between language learning strategies and proficiency in English. Fifty-six pre-university students (22 males, 34 females) of University Malaysia Sabah participated in this study. Oxford's Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) self-report questionnaire was adopted to identify the students' language learning strategies, whereas their proficiencies were judged based on their Malaysian University English Test (MUET) Results. Pearson's correlation coefficient, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and the t-test were utilized to make statistical interpretation about the relationship. The knowledge obtained from this study will be helpful for future studies on how to improve the quality of learning and proficiency in English.

  15. Immersive Virtual Reality in a University Setting: Creating an Authentic Learning Environment Through the Virtual Golden Foods Corporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ros A. Yahaya

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An authentic learning environment is learning that involves real world problems that are relevant to the learners and relate to their real life experience. Research indicates that Information and Communication Technology (ICT tools can facilitate in creating authentic learning environment, thus improving student learning, interaction and satisfaction. Previous research has focused on using various forms of ICT such as online learning and web-based learning into the classroom. However, little attempt has been made to investigate the effectiveness of incorporating immersive Virtual Reality (VR technology into the university classroom. Virtual Golden Foods Corporation (VGFC is a simulated Virtual Reality (VR organization being developed for use in teaching and learning at a large technology based university in Australia. This study focuses on authentic learning environment where students learn about decision making in complex business contexts throughout the semester which culminates in immersive VR exposure. The findings report that immersive VR environment helps to increase students’ understanding of decision making concepts.

  16. IntlUni - The Challenges of the Multilingual and Multicultural Learning Space in the International University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    learning space, and to develop recommendations for how higher education institutions may implement and ensure the sustainability of quality teaching and learning in this space. IntlUni is a three-year Erasmus Academic Network (2012-2015) and has received financial support from the European Commission......IntlUni: The challenges of the multilingual and multicultural learning space in the international university The past decade has witnessed an unprecedented increase in the internationalisation of higher education. This means that more people in higher education than ever before are teaching...... and learning through the medium of a language other than their own first languages. What are the implication of this for lecturers and students? And what are the implications for this for the quality of European higher education programmes? Taking it for granted that the internationalisation of higher...

  17. Adoption of Mobile Learning Among Distance Education Students in Universiti Sains Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munirah Rosli

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in order to investigate whether mobile learning using Short Message Service (SMS was a method of learning adopted by the students enrolled in the School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia. As adult learners who are in vocation, time and isolation are the bane of self-study. Since all the students own a mobile device that can receive SMS, educational messages can be sent directly to their devices. This experimental study explored the impact of learner’s characteristic, learning design and learning environment to their adoptability. This study utilised two models of data analysis, the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS Version 12.0 and the Rasch model analysis for measurement. The analysis was conducted on a sample of 105 students based on gender, age, ethnicity, programme of study and mobile device ownership. The students were from four different courses which are Bachelors of Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Social Science and Bachelor of Management. The questionnaire-answer session were administered by the respective course managers in their tutorial sessions during the annual residential intensive course in the main campus of the Universiti Sains Malaysia. The result indicated that mobile learning has helped them to pace their studies. By using mobile learning, learners easily get any information that they need at anytime anywhere. Learners would also like to take another mobile learning assisted course if the courses are relevant to their learning needs. Furthermore, the SMS educational content received through their hand phone are easily remembered.

  18. NOTE FOR EDITOR: Development An Instrument To Measure 
University Students' Attitude Towards E-Learning

    OpenAIRE

    MEHRA, Vandana; OMIDIAN, Faranak

    2015-01-01

    The study of student’s attitude towards e-learning can in many ways help managers better prepare in light of e-learning for the future. This article describes the process of the development of an instrument to measure university students’ attitude towards e-learning. The scale was administered to 200 University students from two countries (India and Iran) .The 83-item attitude towards e-learning scale was developed on six domains as Perceived usefulness ; Intention to adopt e-learning ; Ease...

  19. NOTE FOR EDITOR: Development An Instrument To Measure 
University Students' Attitude Towards E-Learning

    OpenAIRE

    MEHRA, Vandana; OMIDIAN, Faranak

    2012-01-01

    The study of student’s attitude towards e-learning can in many ways help managers better prepare in light of e-learning for the future. This article describes the process of the development of an instrument to measure university students’ attitude towards e-learning. The scale was administered to 200 University students from two countries (India and Iran) .The 83-item attitude towards e-learning scale was developed on six domains as Perceived usefulness ; Intention to adopt e-learning ; Ease...

  20. Campus Life for International Students: Exploring Students' Perceptions of Quality Learning Environment at a Private University in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Ernest Lim Kok; Khoo-Lattimore, Catheryn

    2012-01-01

    The number of international students enrolling at higher learning institutions in Malaysia is increasing each year. However, the quality of learning environment is not always easy to measure, particularly for private universities which are not financially aided by the government, where the learning environment is characterized by their physical…

  1. Google apps for virtual learning communities development: strengthening english language skills in an university environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Intriago

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This action research project aims to strengthen English language reading comprehension and speaking skills in college students through the use of Google Apps and Literature Circles (LCs in virtual communities for learning. Method: The study involved 70 students at a public university in Ecuador. The educational intervention lasted a semester, included the implementation of LCs virtually and in person with a phase of independent reading and another for the discussion. 14 learning communities were organized and students assumed specific roles in order to warranty equality participation. The “Google Apps” were chosen for their ease of access. To monitor the progress of learning English, a pretest and a posttest were applied using the Preliminary English Test (PET by Cambridge University, whose validity and reliability are amply recognized internationally. Results: It showed an improvement of the reading comprehension and speaking skills in English Language in the participants group, who went from A1 to B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL at the end of the process. Conclusion: it is confirmed that the use of “Google Apps” aided in the building of virtual learning communities to support the second language acquisition process (L2 in the university context.

  2. Eliminating educational Inequality through e-learning: the case of Virtual University of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Muhammad Din

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at examining the role of e-learning in combating the issues of inequality in terms of access and quality in the field of higher education in Pakistan. The education system in Pakistan is mainly characterized by educational disparity. The standard of education is directly proportional to the investment students make in the form of registration and fees. Another important issue is the non-availability of reputed educational institutes in small towns and villages. Unfortunately, very few people from rural areas have access to quality higher education. Virtual University of Pakistan through its distance e-learning mode has come forward to break this trend in social inequality by providing equal educational opportunities to all social classes through its affordable fee structure yet ensuring high standards of teaching. For the purpose of testing these assumptions with reference to a Virtual education system, the existing patterns of enrollment, income structure of guardian/students, professors’ profile, and alumni’s profile data were obtained from IT department of Virtual University of Pakistan. Descriptive statistics and independent sample t-test were used for data analysis. It could be ascertained from the conclusion that Virtual University of Pakistan has successfully broken the chain of educational inequality through its e-learning mode. In case of virtual education, discrimination on the basis of gender, social class and location, is no more applicable. The findings of current research have invalidated the existence of inequality in the e-learning system.

  3. Perceptions of Students and Clinical Instructors of Academic Learning Environments at Yazd University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh Montazeri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this cross sectional study is to gain insight into the students and clinical instructors’ perception of learning environments at Yazd medical University in 2012. Various aspects of environment are compared between courses, gender and age. Students and instructors’ perspectives are reported. Methods: The sample consisted of 158 undergraduate students in their final year of graduation in the nursing, anesthesia, operating room, laboratory, radiology, midwifery courses and their 20 clinical instructors at Yazd University. Data were obtained using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM. Scores were compared across grouping variables identified via demographic information. Results: Scores were fairly high for both students and clinical instructors (M=110.0; SD=21.2 and M=93.1; SD=10.3 respectively, indicating an overall positive perception of learning environments between both groups. The perception of atmosphere subscale (PA received the highest mean grade by both groups. Total DREEM scores didn’t vary significantly between courses (p>0.05 but the results of ANOVA test showed significant differences only for perception of teaching and perception of atmosphere domains. There was not a significant association between females and males regarding total DREEM score (p>0.05. Conclusions: The more positive than negative perception held by the Yazd University health science students and instructors is hopefully indicative of a favorable teaching-learning environment. Overall; teachers’ attention to principles of educational design and setting a favorable environment to promote better learning is recommended.

  4. ELECTRONIC MEDIA LEARNING MATERIALS OF INDIRA GANDHI NATIONAL OPEN UNIVERSITY, INDIA: An Analytical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Roy. V.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU in 1985 has been a milestone in the growth of higher education in India. A very special feature of the University is that a composite of several instructional methods in practice are aimed at giving effective support to distance learners. Self-instructional print materials are the mainstay of the courseware. Besides this, at the support centres, the learners attend a few face-to-face counselling sessions and get access to audio-video materials stocked in the library. Gyandarshan and Gyanvani, the educational television and radio channels broadcast programmes with academic content. The curriculum-based audio-video programmes developed by the University are supplementary in nature. This blending of traditional printed self-learning materials with electronic courseware is a conscious decision of the University which is intended to enhance the quality and effectiveness of learning. Over the years, audio and video cassettes have made way for digital compact discs. Resultant development in information and communication technology heralded virtual campus initiatives of IGNOU, conspicuous among them being the creation of eGyanKosh, the digital repository of the learning materials of IGNOU. Nevertheless, majority of the academic programmes are not being provided audio video supports. The paper analyses the application of electronic media in IGNOU’s course delivery platform.

  5. Nursing students at a university - a study about learning style preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Karin

    2014-12-01

    In most adult education, teachers use methods that assume all students learn in the same way. But knowledge of students' learning style preferences highlights the importance of adequate teaching and learning adaptation. The aim of the study was to describe and compare final year nursing students' learning style preferences in two campuses during three semesters. A further aim was to identify differences between learning style preferences and personal characteristics. A descriptive cross-sectional study using the Productivity Environmental Preference Survey (PEPS) questionnaire was conducted at a Swedish rural university. Three semester groups with 263 nursing students participated in 2012-2013. The majority of the students were 'flexible' in their learning style preferences and had none or few strong preferences. Students with strong preferences preferred high structure (75%) and an authority figure present (40%). About a third were highly auditory, tactile and/or kinesthetic while 8% were highly visual. Few significant differences were revealed between the groups of campuses and the groups of semesters or between learning style preferences and upper secondary school and care experience. There were no significant differences between learning style preferences and age and assistant nurse graduation. More women than men were highly motivated, auditory, tactile and kinesthetic and preferred structure and mobility. The PEPS questionnaire provides nursing students with self-awareness regarding their strengths and shortcomings in learning and teachers with a valuable and practical basis for their selection of adapted individual and group teaching methods. The findings suggest the need for wide variation and interactive teaching approaches, conscious didactic actions between cooperating teachers and conscious learning strategies for nursing students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Learning styles of first-year medical students attending Erciyes University in Kayseri, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykan, Zeynep; Naçar, Melis

    2007-06-01

    Educational researchers postulate that every individual has a different learning style. The aim of this descriptive study was to determine the learning styles of first-year medical students using the Turkish version of the visual, auditory, read-write, kinesthetic (VARK) questionnaire. This study was performed at the Department of Medical Education of Erciyes University in February 2006. The Turkish version of the VARK questionnaire was administered to first-year medical students to determine their preferred mode of learning. According to the VARK questionnaire, students were divided into five groups (visual learners, read-write learners, auditory learners, kinesthetic learners, and multimodal learners). The unimodality preference was 36.1% and multimodality was 63.9%. Among the students who participated in the study (155 students), 23.3% were kinesthetic, 7.7% were auditory, 3.2% were visual, and 1.9% were read-write learners. Some students preferred multiple modes: bimodal (30.3%), trimodal (20.7%), and quadmodal (12.9%). The learning styles did not differ between male and female students, and no statistically significant difference was determined between the first-semester grade average points and learning styles. Knowing that our students have different preferred learning modes will help the medical instructors in our faculty develop appropriate learning approaches and explore opportunities so that they will be able to make the educational experience more productive.

  7. Roles and Domains to Teach in Online Learning Environments: Educational ICT Competency Framework for University Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasch, Teresa; Alvarez, Ibis; Espasa, Anna

    This chapter is aimed at presenting an integrated framework of the educational information and communications technology (ICT) competencies that university teachers should have to teach in an online learning environment. Teaching through ICT in higher education involves performing three main roles - pedagogical, socialist, and design/planning - and also two cross-cutting domains that arise from the online environment: technological and managerial. This framework as well as the competencies for university teachers associated with it were validated at a European level by a dual process of net-based focus groups of teachers and teacher trainers in each of the participating countries in a European Project (Elene-TLC) and an online Delphi method involving 78 experts from 14 universities of ten European countries. The competency framework and the examples provided in the chapter are the basis for designing innovative professional development activities in online university environments.

  8. Project-based learning in the teaching-learning process university. A longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandoval Hamón Leyla Angélica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Higher Education Area promotes the change in teaching-learning, where students have a more active role in their educational process. The main objective of this work is to analyse the use of an alternative proposal, focus in student-based teamwork activities, who seek to favour the acquisition and deepening of knowledge and skills. The implementation of this research was carried out by means of a longitudinal study in the subject of the degree of Economics, with the development of the methodology of Project Based Learning integrating the ICTs and improving the evaluation process (e.g. establishing headings and psychometric analysis of knowledge tests. The results of the research showed an improvement in the learning process from the observation, collection of works, analysis of knowledge tests and the official survey by students to assess the activity and the development of their competitors.

  9. The role of critical thinking skills and learning styles of university students in their academic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZOHRE GHAZIVAKILI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The current world needs people who have a lot of different abilities such as cognition and application of different ways of thinking, research, problem solving, critical thinking skills and creativity. In addition to critical thinking, learning styles is another key factor which has an essential role in the process of problem solving. This study aimed to determine the relationship between learning styles and critical thinking of students and their academic performance in Alborz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross-correlation study was performed in 2012, on 216 students of Alborz University who were selected randomly by the stratified method. The data was obtained via a three-part questionnaire included demographic data, Kolb standardized questionnaire of learning style and California critical thinking standardized questionnaire. The academic performance of the students was extracted by the school records. The validity of the instruments was determined in terms of content validity, and the reliability was gained through internal consistency methods. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was found to be 0.78 for the California critical thinking questionnaire. The Chi Square test, Independent T-test, one way ANOVA and Pearson Correlation test were used to determine relationship between variables. The Package SPSS14 statistical software was used to analyze data with a significant level of p<0.05. Results: Our findings indicated the significant difference of mean score in four learning style, suggesting university students with convergent learning style have better performance than other groups. Also learning style had a relationship with age, gender, field of study, semester and job. The results about the critical thinking of the students showed that the mean of deductive reasoning and evaluation skills were higher than that of other skills and analytical skills had the lowest mean and there was a positive significant

  10. Autonomous Pluralistic Learning Strategies among Mexican Indigenous and Minority University Students Learning English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despagne, Colette

    2015-01-01

    This critical ethnographic case study draws on Indigenous and minority students' process of learning English as a Foreign Language (EFL) in Mexico. The study specifically focuses on students who enrolled in a program called "A Wager with the Future." The aim of the study is to identify and understand contributing factors in these…

  11. Batallas del pasado en tiempo presente. «Guerra antigua», civilización y pensamiento local en Lípez (dpto. de Potosí, Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Batailles du passé au temps présent : «guerre ancienne», civilisation et pensée locale à Lípez (dép. de Potosi, Bolivie Résumé: Cette étude considère que la tradition orale à propos de la «guerre ancienne» peut contribuer, de façon intéressante, à l’interprétation de la violence dans le passé. Nous nous rapprocherons ainsi, à partir de la pensée locale, de l’analyse que les gens de Lípez (dép. de Potosí, Bolivie font sur certaines ruines et à un registre archéologique qui révèle des indices de situations de tension à l’intérieur du groupe et de conflits armés aux époques pré-incasique et incasique. Pour ce faire, nous comparerons les résultats obtenus en archéologie avec cette autre recréation historique en provenance d’une tradition orale qui, outre les allusions à la conception du Temps, approfondit la conception même de l’Autre et réfléchit sur les origines et les formes de la guerre dans le passé. Este trabajo considera que la tradición oral acerca de la «guerra antigua» puede contribuir de manera interesante a la interpretación de la violencia en el pasado. Nos acercaremos así al análisis que, desde el pensamiento local, aplican las gentes de Lípez (dpto. de Potosí, Bolivia a unas ruinas y a un registro arqueológico que apuntan a situaciones de tensión intergrupal y conflictos armados en épocas preincaica e incaica. En este sentido, contrastaremos los resultados obtenidos por la arqueología con aquella otra recreación histórica proveniente de una tradición oral que, además de hablar de la concepción del tiempo, ahonda en la propia concepción del Otro pretérito y reflexiona sobre los orígenes y formas de la guerra en el pasado Battles of the past in present time: «ancient warfare», civilization and local knowledge in Lípez (Department of Potosi, Bolivia Abstract: This paper argues that oral tradition about “ancient warfare” can contribute to the interpretation of

  12. A Social Contract for University-Industry Collaboration: A Case of Project-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Tero

    This study determines a social contract for a form of university-industry collaboration to a project-based learning environment in close collaboration with industry. The author's previous studies on moral conflicts in a project-based learning (PjBL) environment and his 5-year engagement in the PjBL environment are used as background knowledge, and John Rawls' veil of ignorance is used as a method in the contract formulation. Fair and impartial treatment of actors is strived for with the contract which constitutes of sets of obligations for each party, students, clients, and university (instructors) in the chosen project course. With the contract fair and impartial treatment of actors is strived for and the most dilemmatic moral conflicts are tried to be avoided. The forming of the social contract is evaluated, and implications for research and collaborations in practice are offered.

  13. The relationship between English language learning strategies and gender among pre-university students: An overview of UMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiram, Johannah Jamalul; Sulaiman, Jumat; Swanto, Suyansah; Din, Wardatul Akmam

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to analyze the effects psychological gender differences on the relationship between language learning strategies and their proficiency in English language for pre-university students. Previous researchers found that the more employment of language learning strategies, the more successful the learners are and those with higher level of strategy use are female rather than male. In this study, fifty-six pre-university students (22 males, 34 females) of University Malaysia Sabah participated in this study. Oxford's Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) self-report questionnaire was adopted to identify the students' language learning strategies, whereas their proficiencies were based on their Malaysian University English Test (MUET) results. Pearson's correlation coefficient, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the t-test were utilized to make statistical interpretation about the relationship. The knowledge obtained from this study will be helpful for future studies on how to improve the quality of learning and proficiency in English.

  14. Google Translate as a Supplementary Tool for Learning Malay: A Case Study at Universiti Sains Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bahri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper examines the use of Google Translate as a supplementary tool for helping international students at Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM to learn and develop their knowledge and skills in learning Bahasa Malaysia (Malay Language. The participants of the study were 16 international students at the School of Languages, Literacies, and Translation, USM who had registered for the LKM 100 Bahasa Malaysia (I course. Based on the literature review, analysis of the collected data, and an assessment of the course content and activities inside and outside the language classroom, the findings suggest that most international students at USM recognize Google Translate as an effective supplementary tool for learning vocabulary, writing, and reading in Bahasa Malaysia. In fact, some students reported that they could optimally benefit from their self-learning if they were assisted to use Google Translate effectively. Moreover, using Google Translate for doing classroom tasks and activities can encourage students to study independently, and to shape their own strategies for solving language learning problems. Keywords: Google Translate, supplementary tool, translation, language learning, Bahasa Malaysia

  15. Attitude and Incentives of Payam-e-Noor University Academics regarding e-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Mousavi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to investigate attitude and incentives of academic staff on e-learning lecturing in all Payam-e-Noor Universities of Ardabil province, Iran. The target population of the study comprised of 600 lecturers out of which a sample of 160 participants was randomly selected. In this descriptive correlational research, a self-made questionnaire was administered after securing its validity and reliability. Data revealed that all participants had positive attitudes towards e-learning. Factor analysis explored four factors influencing instructors' attitude towards e-learning –i.e. improving educational effectiveness via e-learning; developing the instructor and student rapport; introducing legal and spiritual support for e-learning’s input and output; and finally incorporating traditional and electronic learning. Moreover, personal interest of the lecturers regarding information technology applications in educational settings, their continuous career development and participation in e-learning projects were proved to be the most important incentives of the respondents.

  16. Learners’ Perception on Security Issues in M-learning (Nigerian Universities Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaibu Adekunle Shonola

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of modern technology, mobile phones and smartphones are used not only for calling and text messages but also for banking and social networking. Recent developments in technology have made the use of mobile devices feasible in other sectors such as education and government. While educators are using mobile devices as teaching aids, students are also using them as learning tools.  In some cases the developers of mobile learning in universities are making m-learning apps without serious consideration for security aspects whereas the handheld devices pose a serious threat to confidentiality, integrity and privacy of users including the learners. As a case study, this paper investigates the security concerns that students may have with the introduction of m-learning in higher education institutions in Nigeria and how this impacts on their learning. It examines the effects of security threats in m-learning on students and provides recommendations for alleviating these threats. Photo credit: "Sysop actions of la cabale camembière - croped" by PierreSelim - Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sysop_actions_of_la_cabale_camembi%C3%A8re_-_croped.jpg#mediaviewer/

  17. THE FIRST RESULTS OF AN IMPLEMENTATION OF THE ACTIVE LEARNING PARADIGM IN UNIVERSITY PHYSICS

    OpenAIRE

    Sliško, Josip; Medina Hernández, Rebeca

    2006-01-01

    Putting students in the center of the educational process and using the results of educational research are basic characteristics of an important movement whose objective is learning improvement in many university courses. For mechanics courses there is experimental evidence that pedagogy with “active students” gives better results than pedagogy with “active professor and passive students”. In this article we present the first results of an implementation of a pedagogy which promotes active s...

  18. Organizational learning, entrepreneurial orientation, and the role of university engagement in SMEs

    OpenAIRE

    Dada, Lola; Fogg, Helen

    2016-01-01

    This article analyses the effect of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) on organizational learning (OL) in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and the role of business/university engagement on the relationship between these two constructs. A cross-sectional research design, drawing upon a postal questionnaire survey, was employed to collect data from a sample of 206 UK SMEs. The results obtained from both the regression and moderated regression analyses revealed that EO positively impacts ...

  19. Learning spaces in the countryside: university students and the Harper assemblage

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, P.A.

    2017-01-01

    Using the concepts of affect and assemblage, this paper expands the boundaries of the geographies of education by shifting the student focus from the urban to the rural. Based on the findings of student interviews, it demonstrates how a multiscalar and diversely constituted network of material and non-material things (including buildings, animals and plants) coalesces with students to create affective atmospheres of learning in a specialist agri-food and land-based rural university. This lear...

  20. Problem-based Learning and Problem Finding Among University Graduate Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ankit, A, Ravankar; Shotaro, Imai; Michiyo, Shimamura; Go, Chiba; Taichi, Takasuka

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, problem-based learning (PBL) techniques have been gaining momentum in schools and university curricula around the world. The main advantage of the PBL method is that it promotes creative problem solving, improves cognition and enhances overall thought processes in learners. For most PBL-style programmes, problem solving is at the core, although the notion of problem discovery or problem finding is not seriously considered. In most cases, students are always presen...

  1. Integrating ICT in English Language Learning: Students’ Perceptions of a State University in Jambi Province

    OpenAIRE

    Oktalia, Dwi; Ngadiso, Ngadiso; Supriyadi, Slamet

    2018-01-01

    This research was done in order to know students‘ perception toward integrating ICT in English Language Learning and also to find out problem that may faced by students during the ICT integration. This research used quantitative method in order to describe students‘ perception toward the use of ICT in ELL. This research involved English students from a state university in Jambi province as the respondents. The data were collected by using questionnaires adapted from Chutopama (2004). The ques...

  2. Status of Utilizing Social Media Networks in the Teaching-Learning Process at Public Jordanian Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Muneera Abdalkareem Alshdefait; Mohammad . S. Alzboon

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed at finding out the status of utilizing social media networks in the teaching-learning process at public Jordanian Universities. To achieve the goal of the study, the descriptive developmental method was used and a questionnaire was developed, consisting of (35) statements. The questionnaire was checked for its validity and reliability. Then it was distributed to a sample of (382) male and female students from the undergraduate and graduate levels. The study results showed tha...

  3. PROFICIENCY LEVEL AND LANGUAGE LEARNING STRATEGIES AMONG JORDANIAN STUDENTS AT UNIVERSITI UTARA MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Jaradat, Eshraq Mahmoud Mustafa; Bakrin, Haryati

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between proficiency level and language learning strategies (LLSs) among Jordanian students enrolled at Universiti Utara Malaysia. The frequency level of the LLSs employed by the students was also investigated. The theoretical foundation for the study was provided by three comprehensive theories which are the Behaviorism, the Cognitive Psychology, and the Schema Theory. The data for the LLSs was obtained from using Oxford’s (1990) Strategy Inventory for Lan...

  4. Collaboration model in e-learning for universities based on agents

    OpenAIRE

    Bernuy, Augusto E.; García, Víctor M.

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the basic requirements that must cover distance education processes (“e-learning”) in universities. We show the concepts of instruction design, an adaptive learning model for evaluating necessities, accreditation, and quality proposal. The experience indicates that to obtain good results we should evaluate the differences between the criteria of the professor and the criteria of the student about: the educative aspects, the user reaction (in each perspective), the reading a...

  5. The impact of the university context on European students' learning approaches and learning environment preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierstra, R.F.A.; Kanselaar, G.; van der Linden, J.L.; Lodewijks, J.G.L.C.; Vermunt, J.D.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes experiences of 610 Dutch students and 241 students from other European countries who studied at least three months abroad within the framework of an international exchange program. The Dutch students went to a university in another European country and the foreign students

  6. Leading Learning: Enhancing the Learning Experience of University Students through Anxiety Auditing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maringe, Felix

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an innovative strategy for auditing university students' anxieties across the study cycle. It discusses the shortcomings of traditional feedback mechanisms and identifies the opportunities that anxiety auditing presents in terms of providing scope for students to discuss and to more directly influence improvement in course…

  7. Investigating Foreign Language Learning Anxiety among Students Learning English in a Public Sector University, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopang, Illahi Bux; Bughio, Faraz Ali; Pathan, Habibullah

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated foreign language anxiety among students of Lasbela University, Baluchistan, Pakistan. The study adopted the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (Horwitz et al., 1986). The respondents were (N = 240) including 26 female and 214 male. The data was run through the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS)…

  8. Promoting Success in the Physical Sciences: The University of Wisconsin's Physics Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, S. M.; Jacob, A. T.

    2002-05-01

    The Physics Learning Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides small group, academic and mentoring support for students enrolled in algebra-based introductory physics courses. Those students accepted into our program are potentially at-risk academically in their physics course or for feeling isolated at the University. They include, among others, students who have not taken high school physics, returning adults, minority students, students with disabilities, and students with English as a second language. A core component of the program is the peer-lead teaching and mentoring groups that match upper level undergraduate physics majors with students potentially at-risk in introductory physics. The tutors receive ongoing training and supervision throughout the year. The program has expanded over the years to include staff tutors, the majority of whom are scientists who seek additional teaching experience. The Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program is run in collaboration with a similar chemistry program at the University of Wisconsin's Chemistry Learning Center. We will describe our Physics Learning Programs and discuss some of the challenges, successes, and strategies used to work with our tutors and students.

  9. The Virtual Health University: An eLearning Model within the Cuban Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardines, José B

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes Cuba's experience with the Virtual Health University (VHU) as a strategic project of INFOMED, promoting creation of an open teaching-learning environment for health sciences education, through intensive and creative use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and a network approach to learning. An analysis of the VHU's main antecedents in its different stages of development provides insight into the strategic reasons that led to the establishment of a virtual university in the national health system during Cuba's so-called Special Period of economic crisis. Using the general objectives of creating, sharing, and collaborating which define the VHU's conceptual-operative framework, the three essential components (subsystems) are described: pedagogical, technological, and managerial, as well as the operative stages of educational design, technological implementation, and teaching-administrative management system. Each component of the model is analyzed in the context of global, modern university trends, towards integration of the face-to-face and distance education approaches and the creation of virtual institutions that assume the technological and pedagogical changes demanded by eLearning.

  10. Linking University Students’ Willingness to Learn to Their Recollections of Motivation at Secondary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gorges

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of recollected school-based motivation on university students’ willingness to use new learning opportunities. Following Eccles’ expectancy-value theory, willingness to learn was conceptualized as task value, which has been found to predict task choice in previous empirical studies. Based on three motivational theories, we suggest two broad motivational dimensions for an economic description of motivational orientations, inward and outward, that should differentially predict the formation of task value. German university students (N = 1580 were asked about their task value for receiving their instructions in English as a foreign language at university and, retrospectively, their motivation in English language class at secondary school. Principal components analysis and confirmatory factor analyses of motivational variables yielded a two-factor solution supporting the differentiation between inward and outward motivational orientation. Inward motivational orientation at school was positively linked to students’ task value in adulthood, even if the individual’s self-concept of ability was controlled. The effects of outward motivation were rather small and tended to be counterproductive. Our findings suggest a complex interplay between past and present motivation and self-concept of ability underlying one’s willingness to learn and to participate in education.

  11. Seven day Lanzarote adventure: seven innovations in university learning and teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavey, Duncan

    2010-05-01

    An annual residential field course in Lanzarote, Canary Islands, gives university students of Environmental Science, Adventure Education, and Primary Science Education diverse opportunities for deep learning that challenges and motivates. Comments from students range from 'the best chemistry lesson ever' to 'life-changing'. Here I reflect on seven strengths from the student experience: (1) Our goal is for students to learn to ask scientific questions. Anyone can answer questions, but only the best scientists can ask questions that matter. (2) Field work fits the diverse learning styles of our diverse students. For example, students model bathymetry using sand and pebbles on a beach; students start to explore social issues around waste disposal on Lanzarote by taking part in a commando raid on a municipal rubbish tip! (3) Students learn from local experts but then learn from each other. For example, half the group explores agricultural practices while the other half explores traditional uses of plants; a student from one group is then paired with a student from the other group for them to teach each other what they have learned. (4) An overview of current research on the island (volcanic origins, indigenous species, trace elements in the wines!) comes from students reflecting on abstracts of 25 recent papers from mainstream journals and sharing their understanding with each other. (5) We replicate a real world experience. One part of the student assessment requires them to write a grant application for a scientific research project using the real-world pro forma and meeting the criteria set out by the real-world funding agency. (6) Students work as teams to write these grant applications (as they would do in the real world). They receive a single mark for their work, but the students then divide the mark among themselves according to the quality of the contributions they have made. In this way the university teachers assess the product, and the students assess the

  12. Innovations in technology and the online learning environment: A case study of inter-university collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen ZANETTA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study of online learning. It is based on the researcher’s participation in an inter-university collaborative module at two higher education institutions in South Africa and the United States from August to December 2001. The paper addresses the advantages and disadvantages of the online learning environment and learning in a Virtual Classroom. It provides a critical interpretation of the virtual classroom experienced in this collaboration between institutions. It finds that there are benefits from applying this technology in educational practices and programs particularly in the African context where a large majority of school-leaving learners have little or no access to higher education. However, it also expounds the NEPAD (New Partnership for Africa’s Development initiative to produce ICT in schools throughout Africa to fulfil the Millennium Development Goals on education in developing countries.

  13. Metacognition in a process of autonomous and cooperative learning in the university classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Pérez de Albéniz Iturriaga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the new framework of the European Higher Education Area, teaching should be guided and managed in light of students learning. Students need to activate the necessary competencies to carry out an autonomous learning. In this context, an experience was conducted in the subject Psychology of Education with the first year Pre-service Elementary School Teachers from theUniversity ofLa Rioja. The objective was to know the metacognitive analysis made by students when they had to do tasks that required both autonomous and cooperative strategies. As expected, results from the metacognitive analysis revealed a positive evaluation of this methodology. Moreover, students reported having achieved a better mastery of contents worked through the autonomous and cooperative development in comparison with those worked through common strategies based on receptive learning.

  14. A STUDY ON LEARNING APPROACHES USED AMONG POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS IN RESEARCH UNIVERSITY

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    Roziana Shaari

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to determine the method of learningapproaches adopted by post-graduate students in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia(UTM and to identifywhether these approaches are associated with demographic factors (age, gender,main streams, mode of study and working experience. Participants included 354post-graduate students from different faculties inUTM whereas questionnaireswere distributed via email and throughdesignated contact person. The One-WayAnalysis of Variance (ANOVA revealed that there were significant differenceson the usage of the three post-graduates’ learningapproaches across age, mainstreams and years of working experience. Significance was not seen betweenlearning approaches on gender and mode of study. Deep approach was found to bepreferred approaches to their learning methods. Ourinvestigation suggests thatapproach to learning should be included in their academics, however thesuggestion is tailored according on the tasks givento the students. Hence, weconcluded that further investigation could be carried out the effect of learningenvironment towards students dynamic in learning.

  15. Ready to learn physics: a team-based learning model for first year university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parappilly, Maria; Schmidt, Lisa; De Ritter, Samantha

    2015-09-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an established model of group work which aims to improve students' ability to apply discipline-related content. TBL consists of a readiness assurance process (RAP), student groups and application activities. While TBL has not been implemented widely in science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines, it has been effective in improving student learning in other disciplines. This paper describes the incorporation of TBL activities into a non-calculus based introductory level physics topic—Physics for the Modern World. Students were given pre-class preparation materials and an individual RAP online test before the workshops. The pre-workshop individual RAP test ensured that all students were exposed to concept-based questions before their workshops and motivated them to use the preparatory materials in readiness for the workshop. The students were placed into random teams and during the first part of the workshop, the teams went through a subset of the quiz questions (team RAP test) and in the remaining time, teams completed an in-class assignment. After the workshop students were allowed another attempt at the individual RAP test to see if their knowledge had improved. The ability of TBL to promote student learning of key concepts was evaluated by experiment using pre- and post- testing. The students’ perception of TBL was monitored by discussion posts and survey responses. Finally, the ability of TBL to support peer-peer interaction was evaluated by video analysis of the class. We found that the TBL process improved student learning; students did interact with each other in class; and the students had a positive view of TBL. To assess the transferability of this model to other topics, we conducted a comparison study with an environmental science topic which produced similar results. Our study supports the use of this TBL model in science topics.

  16. Measuring Responsibility and Cooperation in Learning Teams in the University Setting: Validation of a Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-del-Barco, Benito; Mendo-Lázaro, Santiago; Felipe-Castaño, Elena; Fajardo-Bullón, Fernando; Iglesias-Gallego, Damián

    2018-01-01

    Cooperative learning are being used increasingly in the university classroom, in order to promote teamwork among students, improve performance and develop interpersonal competences. Responsibility and cooperation are two fundamental pillars of cooperative learning. Team members’ responsibility is a necessary condition for the team’s success in the assigned tasks. Students must be aware that they depend on each other and should make their maximum effort. On the other hand, in efficient groups, the members cooperate and pool their efforts to achieve the proposed goals. In this research, we propose to create a Questionnaire of Group Responsibility and Cooperation in Learning Teams (CRCG). Participants in this work were 375 students from the Faculty of Teacher Training of the University of Extremadura (Spain). The CRCG has very acceptable psychometric characteristics, good internal consistency, and temporal reliability. Moreover, structural equation analysis allowed us to verify that the latent variables in the two factors found are well defined and, therefore, their assessment is adequate. Besides, we found high significant correlations between the Learning Team Potency Questionnaire (CPEA) and the total score and the factors of the CRCG. This tool will evaluate cooperative skills and offer faculty information in order to prepare students for teamwork and conflict resolution. PMID:29593622

  17. Learning analytics for smart campus: Data on academic performances of engineering undergraduates in Nigerian private university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segun I. Popoola

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Empirical measurement, monitoring, analysis, and reporting of learning outcomes in higher institutions of developing countries may lead to sustainable education in the region. In this data article, data about the academic performances of undergraduates that studied engineering programs at Covenant University, Nigeria are presented and analyzed. A total population sample of 1841 undergraduates that studied Chemical Engineering (CHE, Civil Engineering (CVE, Computer Engineering (CEN, Electrical and Electronics Engineering (EEE, Information and Communication Engineering (ICE, Mechanical Engineering (MEE, and Petroleum Engineering (PET within the year range of 2002–2014 are randomly selected. For the five-year study period of engineering program, Grade Point Average (GPA and its cumulative value of each of the sample were obtained from the Department of Student Records and Academic Affairs. In order to encourage evidence-based research in learning analytics, detailed datasets are made publicly available in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet file attached to this article. Descriptive statistics and frequency distributions of the academic performance data are presented in tables and graphs for easy data interpretations. In addition, one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and multiple comparison post-hoc tests are performed to determine whether the variations in the academic performances are significant across the seven engineering programs. The data provided in this article will assist the global educational research community and regional policy makers to understand and optimize the learning environment towards the realization of smart campuses and sustainable education. Keywords: Smart campus, Learning analytics, Sustainable education, Nigerian university, Education data mining, Engineering

  18. Community–University Partnerships: Using Participatory Action Learning and Action Research (PALAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Kearney

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article positions participatory action learning and action research (PALAR as a preferred methodology for community-university partnerships to achieve a holistic outcome that benefits the common interest. Evidence for this claim is illustrated through case studies of two community engagement programs, one in South Africa and the other in Australia. The South African study explains how relationships, reflection and recognition (the three R’s of PALAR are important elements that promote a truly participatory approach to knowledge creation and practical improvement in social circumstances. The Australian study then highlights what can be achieved. It does this by showing the potential for PALAR participants to learn how to design and implement a community engagement program, and how to cascade their own learning into their community to improve educational opportunities. Both studies demonstrate PALAR’s potential to disrupt traditional understandings of the research process, particularly in terms of researcher–participant relationships. At the same time, both studies identify the challenges arising from the theoretical and practical implications of PALAR as an approach to community development. This article is therefore significant for universities and funding organisations engaging in community-based research and development through partnerships, specifically in contexts of disadvantage. Keywords: Participatory action learning and action research, PALAR, community development, community engagement, community partnerships, disadvantaged communities, higher education.

  19. Measuring Responsibility and Cooperation in Learning Teams in the University Setting: Validation of a Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito León-del-Barco

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative learning are being used increasingly in the university classroom, in order to promote teamwork among students, improve performance and develop interpersonal competences. Responsibility and cooperation are two fundamental pillars of cooperative learning. Team members’ responsibility is a necessary condition for the team’s success in the assigned tasks. Students must be aware that they depend on each other and should make their maximum effort. On the other hand, in efficient groups, the members cooperate and pool their efforts to achieve the proposed goals. In this research, we propose to create a Questionnaire of Group Responsibility and Cooperation in Learning Teams (CRCG. Participants in this work were 375 students from the Faculty of Teacher Training of the University of Extremadura (Spain. The CRCG has very acceptable psychometric characteristics, good internal consistency, and temporal reliability. Moreover, structural equation analysis allowed us to verify that the latent variables in the two factors found are well defined and, therefore, their assessment is adequate. Besides, we found high significant correlations between the Learning Team Potency Questionnaire (CPEA and the total score and the factors of the CRCG. This tool will evaluate cooperative skills and offer faculty information in order to prepare students for teamwork and conflict resolution.

  20. Measuring Responsibility and Cooperation in Learning Teams in the University Setting: Validation of a Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Del-Barco, Benito; Mendo-Lázaro, Santiago; Felipe-Castaño, Elena; Fajardo-Bullón, Fernando; Iglesias-Gallego, Damián

    2018-01-01

    Cooperative learning are being used increasingly in the university classroom, in order to promote teamwork among students, improve performance and develop interpersonal competences. Responsibility and cooperation are two fundamental pillars of cooperative learning. Team members' responsibility is a necessary condition for the team's success in the assigned tasks. Students must be aware that they depend on each other and should make their maximum effort. On the other hand, in efficient groups, the members cooperate and pool their efforts to achieve the proposed goals. In this research, we propose to create a Questionnaire of Group Responsibility and Cooperation in Learning Teams (CRCG) . Participants in this work were 375 students from the Faculty of Teacher Training of the University of Extremadura (Spain). The CRCG has very acceptable psychometric characteristics, good internal consistency, and temporal reliability. Moreover, structural equation analysis allowed us to verify that the latent variables in the two factors found are well defined and, therefore, their assessment is adequate. Besides, we found high significant correlations between the Learning Team Potency Questionnaire (CPEA) and the total score and the factors of the CRCG. This tool will evaluate cooperative skills and offer faculty information in order to prepare students for teamwork and conflict resolution.

  1. The role of critical thinking skills and learning styles of university students in their academic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    GHAZIVAKILI, ZOHRE; NOROUZI NIA, ROOHANGIZ; PANAHI, FARIDE; KARIMI, MEHRDAD; GHOLSORKHI, HAYEDE; AHMADI, ZARRIN

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Current world needs people who have a lot of different abilities such as cognition and application of different ways of thinking, research, problem solving, critical thinking skills and creativity. In addition to critical thinking, learning styles is another key factor which has an essential role in the process of problem solving. This study aimed to determine the relationship between learning styles and critical thinking of students and their academic performance in Alborz University of Medical Science. Methods: This cross-correlation study was performed in 2012, on 216 students of Alborz University who were selected randomly by the stratified random sampling. The data was obtained via a three-part questionnaire included demographic data, Kolb standardized questionnaire of learning style and California critical thinking standardized questionnaire. The academic performance of the students was extracted by the school records. The validity of the instruments was determined in terms of content validity, and the reliability was gained through internal consistency methods. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was found to be 0.78 for the California critical thinking questionnaire. The Chi Square test, Independent t-test, one way ANOVA and Pearson correlation test were used to determine relationship between variables. The Package SPSS14 statistical software was used to analyze data with a significant level of pcritical thinking of the students showed that the mean of deductive reasoning and evaluation skills were higher than that of other skills and analytical skills had the lowest mean and there was a positive significant relationship between the students’ performance with inferential skill and the total score of critical thinking skills (pcritical thinking had significant difference between different learning styles. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the learning styles, critical thinking and academic performance are significantly associated

  2. Post-graduation survey of the impact of geoscience service-learning courses at Wesleyan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    OConnell, S.; Ptacek, S.; Diver, K.; Ku, T. C.; Resor, P. G.; Royer, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    The benefits of service-learning courses are extolled in numerous papers and include increases in student: engagement with the material and the world, self-efficacy, and awareness of personal values. This approach to education allows students to develop skills that may not be part of many lecture-style or even laboratory class formats, such as problem solving, scientific communication, group work and reflection. Service learning requires students to move to the upper level of Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive skills: analyzing, evaluating, and creating. In a broader context, service learning offers two distinct benefits for the geosciences. First, service learning offers an opportunity for both the students and community to see the utility of geoscience in their lives and what geoscientists do. Considering the general lack of knowledge about geosciences this is an important public relations opportunity. Second, some studies have shown that the benefits of a service-learning approach to education results in higher performance by underrepresented minority students, students that the geosciences need to attract in an increasingly diverse society. Since 2006, four different service-learning courses have been offered by the Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences at Wesleyan University to both majors and non-majors. They are Environmental Geochemistry (core course), Geographic Information Systems (elective), Science on the Radio (first-year seminar), and Soils (elective). Almost 250 graduates have taken these courses. Graduates were surveyed to discover what they gained by taking a service-learning course and if, and how, they use the skills they learned in the course in their post-college careers.

  3. University career centres – venues of non-formal learning for students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Žnidaršič Žagar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Incorporation of young people, including tertiary graduates, into the labour market is facing stagnation in Slovenia. Besides external factors that are beyond the control of an individual, good employability also depends on personal characteristics of the employment seeker. Awareness of the importance of good employability means empowering and strengthening individuals through process of lifelong learning, thus enabling them to find and retain sustainable employment within the labour market. This consequently enables them to fulfil their career goals and creatively contribute to their own personal satisfaction and success, as well as that of society as a whole. Universities in Slovenia have established careers centres. The University of Ljubljana opened its first careers centre years ago (in 2008, and we are now beginning to see the results, which are similar to those achieved by careers centres of other European universities. This confirms that promotion and facilitation of good employability is more effective when careers centres are closely involved in the study process.

  4. A learning rule for very simple universal approximators consisting of a single layer of perceptrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Peter; Burgsteiner, Harald; Maass, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    One may argue that the simplest type of neural networks beyond a single perceptron is an array of several perceptrons in parallel. In spite of their simplicity, such circuits can compute any Boolean function if one views the majority of the binary perceptron outputs as the binary output of the parallel perceptron, and they are universal approximators for arbitrary continuous functions with values in [0,1] if one views the fraction of perceptrons that output 1 as the analog output of the parallel perceptron. Note that in contrast to the familiar model of a "multi-layer perceptron" the parallel perceptron that we consider here has just binary values as outputs of gates on the hidden layer. For a long time one has thought that there exists no competitive learning algorithm for these extremely simple neural networks, which also came to be known as committee machines. It is commonly assumed that one has to replace the hard threshold gates on the hidden layer by sigmoidal gates (or RBF-gates) and that one has to tune the weights on at least two successive layers in order to achieve satisfactory learning results for any class of neural networks that yield universal approximators. We show that this assumption is not true, by exhibiting a simple learning algorithm for parallel perceptrons - the parallel delta rule (p-delta rule). In contrast to backprop for multi-layer perceptrons, the p-delta rule only has to tune a single layer of weights, and it does not require the computation and communication of analog values with high precision. Reduced communication also distinguishes our new learning rule from other learning rules for parallel perceptrons such as MADALINE. Obviously these features make the p-delta rule attractive as a biologically more realistic alternative to backprop in biological neural circuits, but also for implementations in special purpose hardware. We show that the p-delta rule also implements gradient descent-with regard to a suitable error measure

  5. The summer school students’ viewpoints about important factors in learning, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

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    LEILA BAZRAFCAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The main goal of education is learning and change in behavior which has been revolutionized in the 21st century due to the rapid and widespread changes in science. The traditional approach to education does no longer meet the learners’ needs, necessitating new changes in educational curricula. This study was designed to determine the factors influencing learning in the 21st century and find out the students’ viewpoints on this issue. Methods: This is a descriptive study aiming at determining the students’ views on new approaches to learning in the 21st century. To do so, a researcher-made questionnaire was designed. It contained 30 questions in 3 sections including demographic data, background questions and two open questions about their suggestions and criticisms. The reliability and validity of the questionnaire was pilot-tested and measured, which proved to be describable. 150 students participating in university summer schools in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences were enrolled. The questionnaires were sent to the students in person and through electronic mails. The students were asked to return the completed questionnaires to the given email address. The data were analyzed in SPSS, version 14, using descriptive statistics of frequency, mean, percentage and standard deviation and t-test. P<0. 05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: 150 questionnaires were appropriately filled out and given to the researchers. The results indicated that, according to the students, 6 factors including the use of computer in teaching, enhancement of virtual learning, the use of mobile in relations, enjoyment of electronic learning contexts, the learning focus on attitudes and the facilitating role of the lectures were the most influential factors in learning. On the other hand, the government’s responsibility and responsiveness, creativity and risk taking, increase in the social relationship among the learners, focus on

  6. Undergraduate paramedic students' attitudes to e-learning: findings from five university programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Munro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Computers and computer-assisted instruction are being used with increasing frequency in the area of undergraduate paramedic education. Paramedic students' attitudes towards the use of e-learning technology and computer-assisted instruction have received limited attention in the empirical literature to date. The objective of this study was to determine paramedic students' attitudes towards e-learning. A cross-sectional methodology was used in the form of a paperbased survey to elicit students' attitudes to e-learning using three standardised scales. Convenience sampling was used to sample a cross-section of paramedic students at five universities during semester 1 of 2009. The scales used were: the Computer Attitude Survey (CAS, the Online Learning Environment Survey (OLES, and the Attitude Toward CAI Semantic Differential Scale (ATCAISDS. There were 339 students who participated. Approximately onehalf (57.7% were female and most (76.0% were under 24 years of age. Moderate results were noted for the CAS general and education subscales. The CAS results were broadly corroborated by the OLES, although a statistically significant difference between participants preferred and actual results on the OLES Computer Usage subscale identified that participants would prefer to use computers less than they actually do. Similarly, the ATCAISDS found participants were largely ambivalent towards computers. As paramedic degree programs continue to emerge and develop, careful consideration should be given to the usability and utility of various e-learning approaches.

  7. Writing in learning/teaching in French (study case- freshmen “Alexander Xhuvani” University students

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    Leonarda Myslihaka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Writing plays an important role in teaching and learning foreign languages. Students that can write in a foreign language have to verify their grammar, lexical and semantic performance and it is the role of the teacher to assess if students have learned rules correctly. This is both important for their reading and speaking skills and in general students are tested through a writing test. Writing is now an object of research and it is generally accepted that teaching/ learning cannot be performed out of the communicative acts. Students are required to produce and interpret different documents such as leaflets, journal articles etc. in a foreign language, in this case in French. The idea is that if you want to own the writing competency, you have to know very well both the lingual and contextual structure. This paper is a based on a research conducted with the first year students, studying French at the “Alexander Xhuvani” University, Elbasan, Albania, taking in consideration the lingual, psychological and social factors that affect writing. From the conclusions was clear that students had difficulties in writing due to their limited lingual competencies that leads them to orthographical mistakes etc. We also noted that students are eager to acquire this competency because learning a language through writing does not merely mean to learn syntax but it also requires a de – contextualization and creating a chance for students to get in touch with everyday language texts.

  8. Source of learning basic clinical skills by medical interns Tehran University of Medical Sciences

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    Meshkani Z

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effective clinical teaching is a major objective in general practitioner’s education at medical schools. Purpose: To identify the sources of clinical skills learning that medical student experience Methods: In this cross sectional study, interns of Tehran medical university who spent at least 12 months of their internship answered a questionnaire on the sources of clinical skills training. Chi2 test was used to examine the association of source of learning and students,’ specification such as sex, score of pre –internship exam, and marital status. Results: All 250 interns who were eligible participated. Over all 46.60% interns learned their clinical skills from residents or clinical teachers, 29.61% observed others performing the procedures, 16.25 learned the skills from hospital staff or nurses, 7.54% practiced their knowledge when confronted to an emergency situation Conclusion: Our results warrant a more attentive approach to clinical skills (specially procedural skills training Key words: LEARNING RESOURCES

  9. Knowledge, Attitude and Faculty Members’ performance on e-Learning in Tehran University of Medical Sciences

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    Aeen Mohammadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : E-learning is used in the worldwide in higher education to improve the quality of the learning experience by students; at the same time using this approach requires behavioral changes in the faculty members. One of the steps in the implementation and monitoring of e-learning, is audience analysis using techniques such as knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP. This study investigates the knowledge, attitude and faculty members’ performance of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS on e-learning. Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014-15 through a research-made questionnaire. Face validity was determined by expert opinion, Cronbach’s alpha was measured to assess the reliability and its construct validity was investigated through exploratory factor analysis. . The questionnaire was e-mailed to all TUMS faculty members . 218 faculty members responded to the questionnaire. Results: The reliability score of the questionnaire was assessed using Cronbach alphs, and it was 0.79. Exploratory factor analysis of the attitude part of the questionnaire produced a single factor that explained 53% of the variance. The results showed the positive attitude of faculty members regarding e-learning, although their knowledge and practice scores was less than half of the total score. There wass not found any meaningful differences between knowledge, attitude and performance of the participants based on sex, rank and work experience. ANOVA test showed that the difference of scores among schools was statistically significant (  = 0.000;  = 0.003 and  = 0.000, respectively. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed the state of knowledge, attitude and faculty members’ performance of TUMS on e-learning. Over the past years, TUMS has established suitable e-learning infrastructure such as educational websites and virtual programs as well as training workshop for faculty members. The results of this study can

  10. Incorporating Wiki Technology in a Traditional Biostatistics Course: Effects on University Students’ Collaborative Learning, Approaches to Learning and Course Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S.M. Fong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of incorporating wiki technology in an under-graduate biostatistics course for improving university students’ collaborative learning, approaches to learning, and course performance. Methodology: During a three year longitudinal study, twenty-one and twenty-four undergraduate students were recruited by convenience sampling and assigned to a wiki group (2014-2015 and a control group (2013-2014 and 2015-2016, respectively. The students in the wiki group attended face-to-face lectures and used a wiki (PBworks weekly for online- group discussion, and the students in the control group had no access to the wiki and interacted face-to-face only. The students’ collaborative learning, approaches to learning, and course performance were evaluated using the Group Process Questionnaire (GPQ, Revised Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F and course results, respectively, after testing. Findings: Multivariate analysis of variance results revealed that the R-SPQ-2F surface approach score, surface motive and strategy subscores were lower in the wiki group than in the control group (p < 0.05. The GPQ individual accountability and equal opportunity scores (components of collaboration were higher in the wiki group than in the control group (p < 0.001. No significant between-groups differences were found in any of the other outcome variables (i.e., overall course result, R-SPQ-2F deep approach score and subscores, GPQ positive interdependence score, social skills score, and composite score. Looking at the Wiki Questionnaire results, the subscale and composite scores we obtained were 31.5% to 37.7% lower than the norm. The wiki was used at a frequency of about 0.7 times per week per student. Recommendations for Practitioners: Using wiki technology in conjunction with the traditional face-to-face teaching method in a biostatistics course can enhance some aspects of undergraduate students’ collaborative learning

  11. The role of critical thinking skills and learning styles of university students in their academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazivakili, Zohre; Norouzi Nia, Roohangiz; Panahi, Faride; Karimi, Mehrdad; Gholsorkhi, Hayede; Ahmadi, Zarrin

    2014-07-01

    The Current world needs people who have a lot of different abilities such as cognition and application of different ways of thinking, research, problem solving, critical thinking skills and creativity. In addition to critical thinking, learning styles is another key factor which has an essential role in the process of problem solving. This study aimed to determine the relationship between learning styles and critical thinking of students and their academic performance in Alborz University of Medical Science. This cross-correlation study was performed in 2012, on 216 students of Alborz University who were selected randomly by the stratified random sampling. The data was obtained via a three-part questionnaire included demographic data, Kolb standardized questionnaire of learning style and California critical thinking standardized questionnaire. The academic performance of the students was extracted by the school records. The validity of the instruments was determined in terms of content validity, and the reliability was gained through internal consistency methods. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was found to be 0.78 for the California critical thinking questionnaire. The Chi Square test, Independent t-test, one way ANOVA and Pearson correlation test were used to determine relationship between variables. The Package SPSS14 statistical software was used to analyze data with a significant level of pstudents with convergent learning style have better performance than other groups. Also learning style had a relationship with age, gender, field of study, semester and job. The results about the critical thinking of the students showed that the mean of deductive reasoning and evaluation skills were higher than that of other skills and analytical skills had the lowest mean and there was a positive significant relationship between the students' performance with inferential skill and the total score of critical thinking skills (pskills and deductive reasoning had significant

  12. The Role of Social Identification as University Student in Learning: Relationships between Students' Social Identity, Approaches to Learning, and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliuc, Ana-Maria; Ellis, Robert A.; Goodyear, Peter; Hendres, Daniela Muntele

    2011-01-01

    This article describes research exploring the relationship between students' self-perceptions in the context of university learning (i.e. student social identity), their approaches to learning, and academic achievement. The exploration of these inter-related aspects requires a mix of theoretical approaches, that is, in this research both social…

  13. Challenging the empowerment expectation: Learning, alienation and design possibilities in community-university research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Curnow

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As community-university partnerships have become mainstream, researchers have argued that these approaches have the potential to be transformative, supporting community learning and creating capacity for community development. While this remains the dominant narrative of community research, some researchers have questioned the impacts of community research on frontline community, or peer, researchers who represent partnerships in their communities. These studies complicate the narrative, suggesting that learning and capacity building are not straightforward processes. While on the whole community-university partnerships tend to be empowering for community researchers, research is needed to understand the experiences of community researchers for whom this is not the case. My research examines a Toronto-based community-university participatory action research partnership, asking what community researchers learnt through their participation. I argue that, while community researchers learnt a great deal from their participation, the overall impact was not empowerment, but alienation. They did have their knowledge of community validated, and they built research skills, developed grievances through their conversations with neighbours and interrogated the links between grievances, all of which were important aspects of their participation. However, through the process they developed, or entrenched, a sense of powerlessness and dependence on the university researchers to take up their cause politically. This contradicts the aspirations of community-university partnership models, especially participatory action research, and raises questions about the inevitability of empowering social action stemming from these research projects. I argue that the disempowerment that the community researchers reported points to the need for community research to be embedded within existing social action organisations and infrastructure to provide clearer pathways to

  14. Courses for tutors in problem-based learning. Current challenges at four Swedish universities

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    Helen Susan Setterud

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The key role of the tutor in problem-based learning (PBL is to help students become selfregulated learners. Tutors need training to acquire the necessary facilitating skills for this task. The aim of this article is to describe and discuss how PBL tutor training is currently arranged at four universities in Sweden: Linköping University, Lund Medical Faculty, Uppsala Medical School and Örebro School of Medicine. Moreover, we seek to analyse how the content and format of the tutor training courses correspond to the desired skills and competencies for PBL tutors described in the literature. We draw especially on work coming out of three pioneering universities for PBL: McMaster University, Canada; Maastricht University, The Netherlands; and Linköping University, Sweden. One aim has been to construct a framework for analysis that uses categories specifying the knowledge base, capabilities and skills to support students’ learning processes which characterise the full-fledged PBL tutor. For this framework, we have used the following categories: Knowledge of PBL and pedagogical theories, Personal traits, Student-centeredness, Ability to handle group processes, and Subject knowledge. We collected descriptions of the course design and content from the four universities, and assessed to what extent these categories were represented within the courses. Our results show that all categories inform the course content at all four universities, though the design varies between courses. In summary, we show that the four PBL tutor training courses are all designed to enable participants to experience PBL first-hand both as members of a tutorial group and as tutors. They all also include a theoretical base and offer opportunities for discussion and reflection with peers; however, there are some differences in design between the courses. According to participants, all four courses provide good preparation for the tutor role. Yet, we see a need for the

  15. Feasibility analysis of a system of education B-learning: case study University of san Buenaventura

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    Lilian Karina DeArco-Paternina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the feasibility of implementing the educational modality known as Blended learning in the specialization of petroleum refining and basic petrochemical processes engineering at the University of San Buenaventura, Cartagena branch. For this purpose, information was collected through virtual surveys carried out on the target population, the study of the economic and financial viability of the project was carried out and the results were presented to the corresponding entities of the University. Within the study, we identified nine drivers or agents motivating decision as well as the financial viability obtained through indicators such as net present value and internal rate of return. As a result, it was determined that the implementation of this modality creates a great business opportunity for the University, aligned with its corporate education strategy and with a spirit of service to the community. Consequently, this specialization could be carried out in the B-learning mode, due to the lack of time of the target population to attend one hundred percent classroom sessions and to the fact that the institution has the technological platform, financial support and Nationwide recognition.

  16. University Students Use of Computers and Mobile Devices for Learning and Their Reading Speed on Different Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpofu, Bongeka

    2016-01-01

    This research was aimed at the investigation of mobile device and computer use at a higher learning institution. The goal was to determine the current use of computers and mobile devices for learning and the students' reading speed on different platforms. The research was contextualised in a sample of students at the University of South Africa.…

  17. Determining Distance Education Students' Readiness for Mobile Learning at University of Ghana Using the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagoe, Michael Ayitey; Abakah, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile technologies in the classroom is transforming teaching and learning in higher institutions. This study investigated University of Ghana Distance Education students' perceptions toward mobile learning. The paper using the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) explained how students' beliefs influenced students' intention to adopt…

  18. The Relationships between Epistemic Beliefs in Biology and Approaches to Learning Biology among Biology-Major University Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between students' epistemic beliefs in biology and their approaches to learning biology. To this end, two instruments, the epistemic beliefs in biology and the approaches to learning biology surveys, were developed and administered to 520 university biology students, respectively. By and…

  19. Evaluation of Arabic Language Learning Program for Non-Native Speakers in Saudi Electronic University According to Total Quality Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alowaydhi, Wafa Hafez

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed at standardizing the program of learning Arabic for non-native speakers in Saudi Electronic University according to certain standards of total quality. To achieve its purpose, the study adopted the descriptive analytical method. The author prepared a measurement tool for evaluating the electronic learning programs in light…

  20. The Effects of Using a Wiki on Student Engagement and Learning of Report Writing Skills in a University Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, David L.; Hood, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    A wiki was used as part of a blended learning approach to promote collaborative learning among students in a first year university statistics class. One group of students analysed a data set and communicated the results by jointly writing a practice report using a wiki. A second group analysed the same data but communicated the results in a…

  1. Creating an Environment Conducive to Active and Collaborative Learning: Redesigning Introduction to Sociology at a Large Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C. C.; Prohaska, A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2003 a Southeastern research university undertook the redesign of an introductory sociology course in order to improve student success by adding active and collaborative learning activities that gave students greater responsibility for learning. The new "hybrid" course provides most course materials online, requires electronic…

  2. Applying Universal Design for Learning and the Inclusion Spectrum for Students with Severe Disabilities in General Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Michelle; Miller, Nancy; Black, Ken

    2017-01-01

    General physical education (GPE) affords many opportunities for students with and without disabilities to interact and develop positive peer relationships. This case study describes one teacher's use of collaborative practices, universal design for learning (UDL), and the inclusion spectrum to create an accessible learning environment in which the…

  3. Effects of System's and User's Characteristics on E-Learning Use: A Study at Universiti Malaysia Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kian-Sam; Cheng, Julia Lee Ai; Liau, Tet-Loke

    2005-01-01

    The benefits of an e-learning system will not be maximised if learners do not use the system. This study was conducted with 26 postgraduate students at a faculty in Universiti Malaysia Sarawak taking an on-campus course supplemented with an e-learning system. The purpose of the study was to determine which factors were related to intention to use…

  4. How Do Students Use Their Mobile Devices to Support Learning? A Case Study from an Australian Regional University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Helen; Murphy, Angela; Johnson, Chris; Carter, Brad; Lane, Michael; Midgley, Warren; Hafeez-Baig, Abdul; Dekeyser, Stijn; Koronios, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Though universities are eager to leverage the potential of mobile learning to provide learning flexibly, most balk at the cost of providing students with mobile hardware. The practice of "bring your own device" (BYOD) is often mooted as a cost-effective alternative. This paper provides a snapshot of student ownership of mobile devices at…

  5. What Challenges and Benefits Can Non-Formal Law and Language Integrated Learning Bring to University Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabekova, Atabekova; Gorbatenko, Rimma; Belousov, Aleksandr; Grebnev, Ruslan; Sheremetieva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The paper explores the ways in which non-formal content and language integrated learning within university studies can affect students' academic progress. The research has included theoretical and empirical studies. The article focuses on the observation of students' learning process, draws attention to challenges and benefits students experienced…

  6. Understanding E-Learning Adoption among Brazilian Universities: An Application of the Decomposed Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Luiz Miguel Renda; Okazaki, Shintaro

    2013-01-01

    This study sheds light on the organizational dimensions underlying e-learning adoption among Brazilian universities. We propose an organizational e-learning adoption model based on the decomposed theory of planned behavior (TPB). A series of hypotheses are posited with regard to the relationships among the proposed constructs. The model is…

  7. On the Role of Discipline-Related Self-Concept in Deep and Surface Approaches to Learning among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platow, Michael J.; Mavor, Kenneth I.; Grace, Diana M.

    2013-01-01

    The current research examined the role that students' discipline-related self-concepts may play in their deep and surface approaches to learning, their overall learning outcomes, and continued engagement in the discipline itself. Using a cross-lagged panel design of first-year university psychology students, a causal path was observed in which…

  8. Formative Reflections of University Recreation Science Students in South Africa as Catalyst for an Adapted Service-Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslin, Anneliese; van der Klashorst, Engela; Kluka, Darlene A.; van Wyk, Johannes G. U.

    2016-01-01

    Community-university partnerships through service-learning have progressively developed as part of institutions of higher education's mission statements. This paper explores the qualitative reflections of 410 undergraduate students enrolled in an academic recreation science course on a first time service-learning experience in South Africa. The…

  9. Teaching Power Electronics with a Design-Oriented, Project-Based Learning Method at the Technical University of Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Hansen, Claus Thorp; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Power electronics is a fast-developing technology within the electrical engineering field. This paper presents the results and experiences gained from applying design-oriented project-based learning to switch-mode power supply design in a power electronics course at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Project-based learning (PBL) is known…

  10. Reflections on Online Learning Designs and Cross-Institutional Research Collaborations: Revisiting "Classrooms without Walls" in Two Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Dolene; van Rensburg, Henriette; Clark, Damien; Harreveld, R. E.; Beer, Colin; Danaher, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    The article on which this paper reflects ["Exploring a Cross-Institutional Research Collaboration and Innovation: Deploying Social Software and Web 2.0 Technologies to Investigate Online Learning Designs and Interactions in Two Australian Universities"] presented elements of a research project investigating learning interactions in…

  11. Are We There Yet? A Progress Report from Three Turkish University Pioneers in Distance Education and E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latchem, Colin; Simsek, Nurettin; Balta, Ozlem Cakir; Torkul, Orhan; Cedimoglu, I. Hakki; Altunkopru, Alpaslan

    2009-01-01

    The international literature provides little in-depth analysis of distance education and e-learning activities, achievements, and challenges in Turkish higher education other than the country's mega-university, Anadolu. This paper examines the development of, and lessons to be learned from, such undertakings by three pioneers--two regular state…

  12. Learning Styles: The Experience of the Medical School at the University of Nuevo León, Mexico

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    Pedro César Cantú-Martínez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to clarify the learning style of students in the Medical School at the Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon (Mexico. In this research participated 333 students, men and women. They responded to a Honey-Alonso questionnaire to determine their learning styles. The results showed that the participants tend to possess a reflective and pragmatic learning style, which is consistent with the orientation of their professional preparation, and with other similar studies.

  13. Students' attitudes toward the use of the Internet for learning: A study at a university in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ming-Koon Kuek; Abang Ahmad Ridzuan; Kian-Sam Hong

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the success of a technology and Internet-enriched teaching and learning environment in molding positive attitudes among students toward using the Internet for learning at a university in Malaysia. Students were provided with computers facilities, required to complete two compulsory generic courses in information technology, and the lecturers actively encouraged the use of information technology, in particular, the Internet in the teaching and learning processes. Result...

  14. The learning competence in teacher education programs in four Colombian universities

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    Lida Cruz Jerónimo-Arango

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning Competence is one of the most important twenty-first century skills. Objective: To identify and compare the levels of learning competence among students who are starting and finishing undergraduate and postgraduate programs in Education in four Colombian universities. Method: It is a research with descriptive scope of quantitative character. A non-probabilistic sampling of opportunity was used in which 581 students participated, enrolled in the first and last semester and postgraduate in Education to whom the Learning Competency Scale (LCS was applied. The data were analyzed with the statistical platform SPSS version 23. Results: The outcome shows significant differences between first-semester of undergraduate students and students of the last semester of postgraduate, but not the same for students who are completing their undergraduate formation. Conclusion: The scale of the learning competence is a valid instrument to measure the progress of this said competence in the population studied. The imperfect development of this competence may be due to the fact that it is possible that in the first years of formation, the participants in this study were unaware of the existence of this competence and have had no experience what it means to obtain it, they consequently assume it as acquired. © Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Sociales.

  15. Mobile devices and augmented reality in the learning process of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cabero Alemanra

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality is an emerging technology having more and more influence on teaching. Together with it, mobile technology is drawn as one of the most effective pairing to support a meaningful and omnipresent learning. However, for it to be able to work with validity, the student must be motivated to use them during the training process, so that the learning process can work with validity. By means of the application of the Instructional Material Motivational Survey by Keller (1983, we have tried to determine the degree of motivation that students, from the Degree of Pedagogy at Seville University (N=148, have about the usage in the  classroom of notes enriched through Augmented Reality and available in mobile devices. Through an application designed exclusively for the subject, it has been valued in a positive way by the students who participate in this research. Moreover, we can highlight that the main finding achieved has been the narrow relationship between the students' motivation to use the enriched notes and the degree of success in the subject when using them. Likewise, we can confirm that Augmented Reality benefits the learning process. Therefore, we conclude the validity and viability of such a paring related to the achievement of an improvement in the students' learning results.

  16. Active learning in the space engineering education at Technical University of Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Jacobo; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Lapuerta, Victoria; Ezquerro Navarro, Jose Miguel; Cordero-Gracia, Marta

    This work describes the innovative activities performed in the field of space education at the Technical University of Madrid (UPM), in collaboration with the center engaged by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Spain to support the operations for scientific experiments on board the International Space Station (E-USOC). These activities have been integrated along the last academic year of the Aerospatiale Engineering degree. A laboratory has been created, where the students have to validate and integrate the subsystems of a microsatellite by using demonstrator satellites. With the acquired skills, the students participate in a training process centered on Project Based Learning, where the students work in groups to perform the conceptual design of a space mission, being each student responsible for the design of a subsystem of the satellite and another one responsible of the mission design. In parallel, the students perform a training using a ground station, installed at the E-USOC building, which allow them to learn how to communicate with satellites, how to download telemetry and how to process the data. This also allows students to learn how the E-USOC works. Two surveys have been conducted to evaluate the impact of these techniques in the student engineering skills and to know the degree of satisfaction of students with respect to the use of these learning methodologies.

  17. Evaluation of ultrasound training in the problem based learning radiography curriculum at Makerere University, Uganda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsie, Kiguli-Malwadde; Gonzaga, Mubuuke A.; Francis, Businge; Rebecca, Nakatudde; Stephen, Bule

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The College of Health Sciences (CHS), Makerere University has been training health professionals since 1924. Six years ago, there was a curriculum change to Problem Based Learning/Community based Education and Service (PBL/COBES). A SPICES model (Student centered, problem based, integrated, community based, electives, systematic) was adopted and defined to suit the CHS environment. The radiography program is 3 years in length which involves Ultrasound as an important part of the training. It was a challenge to adopt the new PBL method of learning after having a lecture-based pedagogical method for over 80 years. Objective: To implement the training of ultrasound in the PBL radiography curriculum as well as evaluate the opinions of the staff and students about Ultrasound training in the new curriculum. Methodology: A participatory approach was used. Workshops were conducted and objectives for ultrasound courses refined. Scenarios were written for use in the PBL sessions. A retrospective review of student performance in the ultrasound courses was carried out. A cross-sectional survey involving teachers and current radiography students was also carried out to evaluate learning of ultrasound using the PBL approach. Results: Students have consistently excelled in ultrasound courses using the PBL approach of learning. Both teachers and students rated the teaching of ultrasound to radiography students as being highly important and supported the new approach to training. Conclusion: Ultrasound training using PBL has been successfully implemented. However, this is still an ongoing process and will require the total commitment of both students and teachers.

  18. The Role of Social Factors in Iranian University Students' Predispositions towards Autonomous Language Learning

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    Sara Kashefian Naeeini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the demands of the changing world, students should become endowed with the ability to learn perpetually and regard learning as a life-long enterprise. This study investigated those learners belief which showed learners’ predispositions toward autonomy  and some social factors such as gender, academic achievement, marital status and age were taken into consideration. All BA and MA students majoring in English Literature at the department of Foreign Languages of Shiraz University of Iran were involved. The data were collected through a questionnaire the items of which were obtained from two questionnaires by Cotterall (1995 and Cotterall (1999 which were incorporated into a five-point Likert-type rating scale. Factor analysis of responses of students revealed the existence of five underlying factors for learner autonomy which were learner independence, dependence on the teacher, learner confidence, attitudes towards language learning and self-assessment. Based on t-test for independent samples and Analysis of Variance it came to light that age and gender did not have impact on students’ readiness for autonomy while martial statues influenced students’  self-assessment. Moreover, good academic achievement positively influenced their predispositions towards autonomous language learning.

  19. The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, S. M.; Watson, L. E.; Hooper, E.; Huesmann, A.; Schenker, B.; Timbie, P.; Rzchowski, M.

    2013-03-01

    The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides academic support and small-group supplemental instruction to students studying introductory algebra-based and calculus-based physics. These classes are gateway courses for majors in the biological and physical sciences, pre-health fields, engineering, and secondary science education. The Physics Learning Center offers supplemental instruction groups twice weekly where students can discuss concepts and practice with problem-solving techniques. The Center also provides students with access on-line resources that stress conceptual understanding, and to exam review sessions. Participants in our program include returning adults, people from historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, students from families in lower-income circumstances, students in the first generation of their family to attend college, transfer students, veterans, and people with disabilities, all of whom might feel isolated in their large introductory course and thus have a more difficult time finding study partners. We also work with students potentially at-risk for having academic difficulty (due to factors academic probation, weak math background, low first exam score, or no high school physics). A second mission of the Physics Learning Center is to provide teacher training and leadership experience for undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors. These Peer Tutors lead the majority of the weekly group sessions in close supervision by PLC staff members. We will describe our work to support students in the Physics Learning Center, including our teacher-training program for our undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors

  20. The Model of Problem Based Learning in Practice: Evidence from Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    into practice when they go through solving such problems. At the end of the day, the PBL based teaching is assessed based on the success of the problems solved, e.g., in the form of solution(s) provided, their creativity, innovation and applicability. Moreover, PBL-based teaching can identify theoretical gaps......The aim of this paper is to share an experience from Aalborg University on the application of Problem Based Learning (PBL) model, with a specific example from a bachelor studies. PBL model has now been acknowledged worldwide as a powerful tool that allows students, faculty members and industry...... practitioners engage in multi-disciplinary, collaborative and geographically distributed activities. The key word in the model is ‘problem’ – a problem that is correctly formulated eventually affects the process of learning. It is also linked to the intended outcome of the PBL based teaching, whereby students...