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Sample records for learning sessions part

  1. 76 FR 50224 - Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ...] Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center for... (CMS). This two-day training session is the second Accelerated Development Learning Session (ADLS.... Through Accelerated Development Learning Sessions (ADLS), the Innovation Center will test whether...

  2. 76 FR 66931 - Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ...] Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center for... Services (CMS). This two-day training session is the third and final Accelerated Development Learning... the quality of care for beneficiaries. Through Accelerated Development Learning Sessions (ADLS), the...

  3. A Faculty Development Session or Resident as Teacher Session for Didactic and Clinical Teaching Techniques; Part 1 of 2: Engaging Learners with Effective Didactic Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Boysen-Osborn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This workshop is intended for faculty members in an emergency medicine (or other residency program, but is also appropriate for chief residents and medical student educators, including basic science faculty. Introduction: Faculty development sessions are required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and enhance the learning environment within residency programs. Resident as teacher sessions are important in helping residents transition from junior learners to supervisors of medical students and junior residents. Part I of this two-part workshop introduces learners to effective techniques to engaging learners during didactic sessions. Objectives: By the end of this workshop, the learner will: 1 describe eight teaching techniques that encourage active learning during didactic sessions; 2 plan a didactic session using at least one of eight new teaching techniques for didactic instruction. Methods: This educational session is uses several blended instructional methods, including team-based learning (classic and modified, the flipped classroom, audience response systems, pause procedures in order to demonstrate effective didactic teaching techniques.

  4. A Faculty Development Session or Resident as Teacher Session for Clinical and Clinical Teaching Techniques; Part 2 of 2: Engaging Learners with Effective Clinical Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Boysen-Osborn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This workshop is intended for faculty members in an emergency medicine (or other residency program, but is also appropriate for chief residents and medical student clerkship educators. Introduction: Faculty development sessions are required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and enhance the learning environment within residency programs. Resident as teacher sessions are important in helping residents transition from junior learners to supervisors of medical students and junior residents. Part I of this two-part workshop introduces learners to effective techniques to engaging learners with clinical and bedside teaching. Objectives: By the end of this workshop, the learner will: 1 describe and implement nine new clinical teaching techniques; 2 implement clinical teaching techniques specific to junior and senior resident learners. Methods: This educational session is uses several blended instructional methods, including team- based learning (modified, the flipped classroom, audience response systems, pause procedures.

  5. Less is more: latent learning is maximized by shorter training sessions in auditory perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Katharine; Moore, David R; Sohoglu, Ediz; Amitay, Sygal

    2012-01-01

    The time course and outcome of perceptual learning can be affected by the length and distribution of practice, but the training regimen parameters that govern these effects have received little systematic study in the auditory domain. We asked whether there was a minimum requirement on the number of trials within a training session for learning to occur, whether there was a maximum limit beyond which additional trials became ineffective, and whether multiple training sessions provided benefit over a single session. We investigated the efficacy of different regimens that varied in the distribution of practice across training sessions and in the overall amount of practice received on a frequency discrimination task. While learning was relatively robust to variations in regimen, the group with the shortest training sessions (∼8 min) had significantly faster learning in early stages of training than groups with longer sessions. In later stages, the group with the longest training sessions (>1 hr) showed slower learning than the other groups, suggesting overtraining. Between-session improvements were inversely correlated with performance; they were largest at the start of training and reduced as training progressed. In a second experiment we found no additional longer-term improvement in performance, retention, or transfer of learning for a group that trained over 4 sessions (∼4 hr in total) relative to a group that trained for a single session (∼1 hr). However, the mechanisms of learning differed; the single-session group continued to improve in the days following cessation of training, whereas the multi-session group showed no further improvement once training had ceased. Shorter training sessions were advantageous because they allowed for more latent, between-session and post-training learning to emerge. These findings suggest that efficient regimens should use short training sessions, and optimized spacing between sessions.

  6. Implementing Problem-Based Learning in the Counseling Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kimberly R.

    This study examined the use of problem-based learning (PBL) in an actual counseling session and the effects on student assertiveness skills. A group of seventh-grade students, who were all victims of bullies, participated in the study. The students, two boys and one girls, were 13 and 14 years old. Teachers rated the level of assertiveness skills…

  7. Discussion summary of session 4: strategy for 2012 (part II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruning, O.; Ponce, L.

    2012-01-01

    The fourth session of the 2012 LHC Performance Workshop included the following topics: -) beam Energy (it was decided to step back in energy from 4 TeV to 3.5 TeV in case of excessive number of quenches), -) optics options, -) collimation settings and performance, -) performance reach in the LHC for 2012, -) MD plans in 2012, and -) Ions in 2012

  8. Session: What can we learn from developed wind resource areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelander, Carl; Erickson, Wally

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was composed of two parts intended to examine what existing science tells us about wind turbine impacts at existing wind project sites. Part one dealt with the Altamont Wind Resource area, one of the older wind projects in the US, with a paper presented by Carl Thelander titled ''Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: A Case Study, Part 1''. Questions addressed by the presenter included: how is avian habitat affected at Altamont and do birds avoid turbine sites; are birds being attracted to turbine strings; what factors contribute to direct impacts on birds by wind turbines at Altamont; how do use, behavior, avoidance and other factors affect risk to avian species, and particularly impacts those species listed as threatened, endangered, or of conservation concern, and other state listed species. The second part dealt with direct impacts to birds at new generation wind plants outside of California, examining such is sues as mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts from terrestrial wind projects, species and numbers killed per turbine rates/MW generated, impacts to listed threatened and endangered species, to USFWS Birds of Conservation Concern, and to state listed species. This session focused on newer wind project sites with a paper titled ''Bird Fatality and Risk at New Generation Wind Projects'' by Wally Erickson. Each paper was followed by a discussion/question and answer period.

  9. Students' perception towards the problem based learning tutorial session in a system-based hybrid curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Drees, Abdulmajeed A; Khalil, Mahmoud S; Irshad, Mohammad; Abdulghani, Hamza M

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate students' perception towards the problem based learning (PBL) session in a system-based hybrid curriculum. We conducted a cross-sectional study in the College of Medicine, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia at the end of the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey questionnaire was self-administered, and examined perceptions of PBL session benefits, appropriate running of sessions, and tutor's roles. Out of 510 students, 275 (53.9%) completed the questionnaire. Most of the students reported that PBL sessions were helpful in understanding basic sciences concepts (p=0.04). In addition, they agreed that PBL sessions increased their knowledge of basic sciences (p=0.01). Most students reported that PBL sessions encouraged self-directed learning, collaborative learning, and improved decision making skills. However, 54.5% of students reported lack of proper training before starting the PBL sessions, and only 25.1% of students agreed that the teaching staff are well prepared to run the sessions. Most students used the internet (93.1%), lecture notes (76.7%), and books (64.4%) as learning resources. Most students reported repetition of topics between PBL sessions and lectures (p=0.07). The study highlighted the significant role of PBL in a system-based hybrid curriculum and helped students improve their knowledge and different learning skills. Students and staff training is required before the utilizing the PBL as an instructional method.

  10. Studying different tasks of implicit learning across multiple test sessions conducted on the web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner eSævland

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Implicit learning is usually studied through individual performance on a single task, with the most common tasks being Serial Reaction Time task (SRT; Nissen and Bullemer, 1987, Dynamic System Control task (DSC; (Berry and Broadbent, 1984 and artificial Grammar Learning task (AGL; (Reber, 1967. Few attempts have been made to compare performance across different implicit learning tasks within the same experiment. The current experiment was designed study the relationship between performance on the DSC Sugar factory task (Berry and Broadbent, 1984 and the Alternating Serial Reaction Time task (ASRT; (Howard and Howard, 1997. We also addressed another limitation to traditional implicit learning experiments, namely that implicit learning is usually studied in laboratory settings over a restricted time span lasting for less than an hour (Berry and Broadbent, 1984; Nissen and Bullemer, 1987; Reber, 1967. In everyday situations, implicit learning is assumed to involve a gradual accumulation of knowledge across several learning episodes over a larger time span (Norman and Price, 2012. One way to increase the ecological validity of implicit learning experiments could be to present the learning material repeatedly across shorter experimental sessions (Howard and Howard, 1997; Cleeremans and McClelland, 1991. This can most easily be done by using a web-based setup that participants can access from home. We therefore created an online web-based system for measuring implicit learning that could be administered in either single or multiple sessions. Participants (n = 66 were assigned to either a single-session or a multi-session condition. Learning and the degree of conscious awareness of the learned regularities was compared across condition (single vs. multiple sessions and tasks (DSC vs. ASRT. Results showed that learning on the two tasks was not related. However, participants in the multiple sessions condition did show greater improvements in reaction

  11. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Gillian; Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D

    2015-06-25

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning.

  12. USE OF MULTIPLE RESPONSE QUESTIONS (MRQS DURING LECTURE SESSIONS AS A TOOL TO ENHANCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Lecture classes are time tested solid method of teaching and have lot of advantages and few disadvantages. The main drawback is its unidirectional monotonous nature and many a time students fail to concentrate and understand especially when the sessions are long, and from the students’ point of view, many are boring too. Lecture sessions are still continued because of its various advantages. There are many methods tried to improve efficacy and effectiveness of lecture sessions including reinforcement, questions and discussions. There are many studies incorporating multiple choice questions (MCQs in lecture sessions for this purpose, with positive results. These sessions evoke creative thinking and enhance learning. For this purpose MCQs are to be prepared with care considering the areas to be covered. In order to make lecture classes more impressive, interesting and effective, we tried introducing a short multiple response session in between, along with some rewards for correct responses in terms of study materials. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To study the impact of incorporation of MRQs during theory sessions to enhance the efficacy of teaching- learning process MATERIAL AND METHODS Study was conducted in a private medical college in Calicut. We surveyed 169 MBBS students initially with questionnaire covering various aspects of a lecture classes in general. For the next 6 months we incorporated MRQs in routine theory classes. Survey was then conducted again on the same group using same questionnaire and the results were compared. Scores were given according to performance, a maximum of 5 per question. RESULTS After 6 months the data showed substantial improvement in the understanding pattern of students. The average score regarding the usefulness increased from 3.57 to 3.91. After the intervention a substantial number agreed that the sessions have become more interesting, the score changed from 2.99 to 3.87. This also increased the

  13. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 1. Opening Session, Panel Session, Shock Analysis Shock Testing, Isolation and Damping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-01

    ORTHOTROPIC PLATES WITH VARIOUS ,I PLANFORMS AND EDGE CONDITIONS C.W. Bert, The University of Oklahoma, Norman , OK - -’ DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF LAMINATED...EVALUATION OF AN ADAPTIVE FILTER AS A DIGITAL TRACKING FILTER D.O. Smallwood and D.L. Gregory, Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM TOTAL MISSION ENVIRONMENTAL...June 1967. ration Bulletin No. 40, Part 2, 1969. 6. J. P. Barthmaier, "Shock Testing Under 2. D. 0. Smallwood , "Time History Synthesis Minicomputer

  14. Facilitation of learning: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Tyler; Trish, Houghton; Barry, Debbie

    2016-04-06

    This article, the fourth in a series of 11, discusses the context for the facilitation of learning. It outlines the main principles and theories for understanding the process of learning, including examples which link these concepts to practice. The practical aspects of using these theories in a practice setting will be discussed in the fifth article of this series. Together, these two articles will provide mentors and practice teachers with knowledge of the learning process, which will enable them to meet the second domain of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice on facilitation of learning.

  15. Aviation Safety Risk Modeling: Lessons Learned From Multiple Knowledge Elicitation Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxhoj, J. T.; Ancel, E.; Green, L. L.; Shih, A. T.; Jones, S. M.; Reveley, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aviation safety risk modeling has elements of both art and science. In a complex domain, such as the National Airspace System (NAS), it is essential that knowledge elicitation (KE) sessions with domain experts be performed to facilitate the making of plausible inferences about the possible impacts of future technologies and procedures. This study discusses lessons learned throughout the multiple KE sessions held with domain experts to construct probabilistic safety risk models for a Loss of Control Accident Framework (LOCAF), FLightdeck Automation Problems (FLAP), and Runway Incursion (RI) mishap scenarios. The intent of these safety risk models is to support a portfolio analysis of NASA's Aviation Safety Program (AvSP). These models use the flexible, probabilistic approach of Bayesian Belief Networks (BBNs) and influence diagrams to model the complex interactions of aviation system risk factors. Each KE session had a different set of experts with diverse expertise, such as pilot, air traffic controller, certification, and/or human factors knowledge that was elicited to construct a composite, systems-level risk model. There were numerous "lessons learned" from these KE sessions that deal with behavioral aggregation, conditional probability modeling, object-oriented construction, interpretation of the safety risk results, and model verification/validation that are presented in this paper.

  16. Closing session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This part makes a summary of the different sessions and discussions of the workshop in a series of slide presentations: Summary of Opening Session; Summary of Session 1: Analysis of External Hazard Potential; Summary of session 2: Specific features of analysis and modeling of particular natural external hazards; Summary of session-3: Practices and research efforts on natural external events PSA; Summary of session 4: Modeling of NPP response to natural external events in PSA; Summary of session 5: Seismic Risk Analysis; Summary of session 6: Use of external events PSA with the focus on regulatory body role; Facilitated discussion 1 summary: Where do we stand in the analysis of external events?; Summary Facilitated Discussion 2: Findings and Good Practices for External Events Analysis

  17. Improving Accuracy and Temporal Resolution of Learning Curve Estimation for within- and across-Session Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabelow, Karsten; König, Reinhard; Polzehl, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of learning curves is ubiquitously based on proportions of correct responses within moving trial windows. Thereby, it is tacitly assumed that learning performance is constant within the moving windows, which, however, is often not the case. In the present study we demonstrate that violations of this assumption lead to systematic errors in the analysis of learning curves, and we explored the dependency of these errors on window size, different statistical models, and learning phase. To reduce these errors in the analysis of single-subject data as well as on the population level, we propose adequate statistical methods for the estimation of learning curves and the construction of confidence intervals, trial by trial. Applied to data from an avoidance learning experiment with rodents, these methods revealed performance changes occurring at multiple time scales within and across training sessions which were otherwise obscured in the conventional analysis. Our work shows that the proper assessment of the behavioral dynamics of learning at high temporal resolution can shed new light on specific learning processes, and, thus, allows to refine existing learning concepts. It further disambiguates the interpretation of neurophysiological signal changes recorded during training in relation to learning. PMID:27303809

  18. Improving Accuracy and Temporal Resolution of Learning Curve Estimation for within- and across-Session Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Deliano

    Full Text Available Estimation of learning curves is ubiquitously based on proportions of correct responses within moving trial windows. Thereby, it is tacitly assumed that learning performance is constant within the moving windows, which, however, is often not the case. In the present study we demonstrate that violations of this assumption lead to systematic errors in the analysis of learning curves, and we explored the dependency of these errors on window size, different statistical models, and learning phase. To reduce these errors in the analysis of single-subject data as well as on the population level, we propose adequate statistical methods for the estimation of learning curves and the construction of confidence intervals, trial by trial. Applied to data from an avoidance learning experiment with rodents, these methods revealed performance changes occurring at multiple time scales within and across training sessions which were otherwise obscured in the conventional analysis. Our work shows that the proper assessment of the behavioral dynamics of learning at high temporal resolution can shed new light on specific learning processes, and, thus, allows to refine existing learning concepts. It further disambiguates the interpretation of neurophysiological signal changes recorded during training in relation to learning.

  19. Active-learning laboratory session to teach the four M's of diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbishire, Patricia L; Plake, Kimberly S; Nash, Christiane L; Shepler, Brian M

    2009-04-07

    To implement an active-learning methodology for teaching diabetes care to pharmacy students and evaluate its effectiveness. Laboratory instruction was divided into 4 primary areas of diabetes care, referred to by the mnemonic, the 4 M's: meal planning, motion, medication, and monitoring. Students participated in skill-based learning laboratory stations and in simulated patient experiences. A pretest, retrospective pretest, and posttest were administered to measure improvements in students' knowledge about diabetes and confidence in providing care to diabetes patients. Students knowledge of and confidence in each area assessed improved. Students enjoyed the laboratory session and felt it contributed to their learning. An active-learning approach to teaching diabetes care allowed students to experience aspects of the disease from the patient's perspective. This approach will be incorporated in other content areas.

  20. Inquiring into the Dilemmas of Implementing Action Learning. Innovative Session 6. [Concurrent Innovative Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorks, Lyle; Dilworth, Robert L.; Marquardt, Michael J.; Marsick, Victoria; O'Neil, Judy

    Action learning is receiving increasing attention from human resource development (HRD) practitioners and the HRD management literature. Action learning has been characterized as follows: (1) working in small groups to take action on meaningful problems while seeking to learn from having taken the specified action lies at the foundation of action…

  1. A model for the use of blended learning in large group teaching sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Cristan; Velan, Gary M; Pryor, Wendy M; Kumar, Rakesh K

    2017-11-09

    Although blended learning has the potential to enhance the student experience, both in terms of engagement and flexibility, it can be difficult to effectively restructure existing courses. To achieve these goals for an introductory Pathology course, offered to more than 250 undergraduate students at UNSW Sydney, we devised a novel approach. For each topic presented over 2-3 weeks, a single face-to-face overview lecture was retained. The remaining content that had previously been delivered as conventional lectures was converted into short (12-18 min) online modules. These were based on lecture slides with added animations/highlights, plus narration using edited excerpts of previous lecture recordings. The modules also incorporated interactive questions and review quizzes with feedback which used various question types. Modules were developed in PowerPoint and iSpring and uploaded to Moodle as SCORM packages. Each topic concluded with an interactive large-group session focussing on integration of the content, with in-class questions to which students could respond via the Echo360 Active Learning Platform (ALP). Overall, more than 50% of face-to-face lecture time was replaced by online modules and interactive large-group sessions. Quantitative evaluation data included usage statistics from 264 students and feedback via online survey responses from 41 students. Qualitative evaluation data consisted of reflective commentaries from 160 student ePortfolios, which were analysed to identify factors affecting learning benefits and user acceptability. All of the modules were completed by 74% of students and on average, 83.1% of students eventually passed the optional review quizzes. Notably, 88.4% of students responded to in-class questions during the integration and feedback sessions via the ALP. Student reflections emphasised that the modules promoted understanding, which was reinforced through active learning. The modules were described as enjoyable, motivating and were

  2. A model for the use of blended learning in large group teaching sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristan Herbert

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although blended learning has the potential to enhance the student experience, both in terms of engagement and flexibility, it can be difficult to effectively restructure existing courses. To achieve these goals for an introductory Pathology course, offered to more than 250 undergraduate students at UNSW Sydney, we devised a novel approach. Methods For each topic presented over 2–3 weeks, a single face-to-face overview lecture was retained. The remaining content that had previously been delivered as conventional lectures was converted into short (12–18 min online modules. These were based on lecture slides with added animations/highlights, plus narration using edited excerpts of previous lecture recordings. The modules also incorporated interactive questions and review quizzes with feedback which used various question types. Modules were developed in PowerPoint and iSpring and uploaded to Moodle as SCORM packages. Each topic concluded with an interactive large-group session focussing on integration of the content, with in-class questions to which students could respond via the Echo360 Active Learning Platform (ALP. Overall, more than 50% of face-to-face lecture time was replaced by online modules and interactive large-group sessions. Quantitative evaluation data included usage statistics from 264 students and feedback via online survey responses from 41 students. Qualitative evaluation data consisted of reflective commentaries from 160 student ePortfolios, which were analysed to identify factors affecting learning benefits and user acceptability. Results All of the modules were completed by 74% of students and on average, 83.1% of students eventually passed the optional review quizzes. Notably, 88.4% of students responded to in-class questions during the integration and feedback sessions via the ALP. Student reflections emphasised that the modules promoted understanding, which was reinforced through active learning. The

  3. Holistic processing from learned attention to parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Kao-Wei; Richler, Jennifer J; Gauthier, Isabel

    2015-08-01

    Attention helps us focus on what is most relevant to our goals, and prior work has shown that aspects of attention can be learned. Learned inattention to parts can abolish holistic processing of faces, but it is unknown whether learned attention to parts is sufficient to cause a change from part-based to holistic processing with objects. We trained subjects to individuate nonface objects (Greebles) from 2 categories: Ploks and Glips. Diagnostic information was in complementary halves for the 2 categories. Holistic processing was then tested with Plok-Glip composites that combined the kind of part that was diagnostic or nondiagnostic during training. Exposure to Greeble parts resulted in general failures of selective attention for nondiagnostic composites, but face-like holistic processing was only observed for diagnostic composites. These results demonstrated a novel link between learned attentional control and the acquisition of holistic processing. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Evaluation of Brainstorming Session as a Teaching-learning Tool among Postgraduate Medical Biochemistry Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Binita; Jain, Anju; Koner, Bidhan Chandra

    2017-12-01

    The thrust for postgraduate teaching should be self-directed learning with equal participation by all students in academic discussions. Group discussions involve conduction of the discourse by a leader who guides the discussion as well as points out any wrong information. This discourages quieter students from participation with the fear of rebuke. Brainstorming is devoid of all such fallacies with no judgment and reprimand. The aim of this study was to use brainstorming as a teaching-learning tool among postgraduate students of medical biochemistry. The project was commenced after due approvals from the research and ethical committee. The participants were enrolled after informed consent and sensitization. All the pro forma and questionnaires were duly validated by experts. After piloting and incorporation of the suggestions for improvisation, the main sessions were planned and implemented. The response was judged by posttest scores and feedback forms. There was an improvement of understanding of the biochemical concepts as assessed by the posttest scores and solving of a similar clinical problem. The students expressed satisfaction with the conduction, timing, and discussion of the clinical problems. The drawbacks of traditional teaching as expressed during the feedback stage were also taken care of by the brainstorming sessions. Our project made the students and the faculty aware about the utility of brainstorming for teaching purposes in medical education which till now was considered efficacious only for troubleshooting in advertising and management institutions. The students were satisfied with this technique for understanding of biochemical concepts.

  5. CBIOS Science Sessions - 2016 - Part I and III National Symposium on Nanoscience and Biomedical Nanotechnology - Proceedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Monteiro Rodrigues, et al.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available CBiOS Science Sessions - 2016 – Part 1 New methods to explore efficacy and safety of natural origin products; Stefânia Duz Delsin Effectiveness of Hypopressive Exercises in women with pelvic floor dysfunctions; Beatriz Navarro Brazález Indoor air quality in baby rooms: a study about VOC levels; Raquel Rodrigues dos Santos, Ana Sofia Fernandes e Liliana Mendes A medicinal chemistry approach for the development of novel anti-tumor agentes; Maria M. M. Santos Isolation, modelling and phytosome forms of antibacterial and anti-proliferative compounds from Plectranthus spp; Diogo Matias Intellectual Property – Patenting Propriedade Intelectual – Patenteamento Rui Gomes Biomarkers in wastewater; Álvaro Lopes A Contribution for a Better Comprehension of Donkey Dentistry: the Importance of Dental Care; João Brandão Rodrigues Characterization of Lusitano’s Pure Blood Pressure Centers using two pressure plates; Pequito M.; Gomes-Costa M.; Prazeres J.; Bragança M.; Roupa I.; Fonseca R.G.; Abrantes J. Application of photoplethysmography to monitor heart rate in dogs; Rui Assunção, Henrique Silva, João Requicha, Luis Lobo, Luis Monteiro Rodrigues Looking into the oscillatory properties of the laser Doppler flowmetry signal in human microcirculation; Henrique Silva, Hugo Ferreira, Marie-Ange Renault, Alain-Pierre Gadeau, Julia Buján, LM Rodrigues III Symposium of Nanoscience and Biomedical Nanotechnology – Proceedings April 15/04/2016 Lisboa - Universidade Lusófona Honor Commitee /Comissão de Honra Magnífico Reitor da Universidade Lusófona, Mário Moutinho Presidente do Conselho de Administração da Universidade Lusófona, Manuel de Almeida Damásio Sr. Bastonário da Ordem dos Engenheiros, Carlos Matias Ramos Sr. Bastonário da Ordem dos Médicos, José Silva Vice-presidente do Conselho de Enfermagem, Maria José Costa Dias Presidente da Associação Nacional de Farmácias, Paulo Cleto Duarte Presidente da Sociedade Portuguesa de Ci

  6. Exploring Temporal Sequences of Regulatory Phases and Associated Interactions in Low- and High-Challenge Collaborative Learning Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobocinski, Márta; Malmberg, Jonna; Järvelä, Sanna

    2017-01-01

    Investigating the temporal order of regulatory processes can explain in more detail the mechanisms behind success or lack of success during collaborative learning. The aim of this study is to explore the differences between high- and low-challenge collaborative learning sessions. This is achieved through examining how the three phases of…

  7. Can a single session of motor imagery promote motor learning of locomotion in older adults? A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholson VP

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaughan P Nicholson,1 Justin WL Keogh,2–4 Nancy L Low Choy1 1School of Physiotherapy, Australian Catholic University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 2Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Robina, QLD, Australia; 3Human Potential Centre, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand; 4Cluster for Health Improvement, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sunshine Coast, QLD, Australia Purpose: To investigate the influence of a single session of locomotor-based motor imagery training on motor learning and physical performance. Patients and methods: Thirty independent adults aged >65 years took part in the randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted within an exercise science laboratory. Participants were randomly divided into three groups following baseline locomotor testing: motor imagery training, physical training, and control groups. The motor imagery training group completed 20 imagined repetitions of a locomotor task, the physical training group completed 20 physical repetitions of a locomotor task, and the control group spent 25 minutes playing mentally stimulating games on an iPad. Imagined and physical performance times were measured for each training repetition. Gait speed (preferred and fast, timed-up-and-go, gait variability and the time to complete an obstacle course were completed before and after the single training session. Results: Motor learning occurred in both the motor imagery training and physical training groups. Motor imagery training led to refinements in motor planning resulting in imagined movements better matching the physically performed movement at the end of training. Motor imagery and physical training also promoted improvements in some locomotion outcomes as demonstrated by medium to large effect size improvements after training for fast gait speed and timed-up-and-go. There were no training effects on gait variability. Conclusion: A single session

  8. Risk assessment, session 1-4. International conference 1992. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-07-01

    The international conference on Risk Assessment, 5-9 October 1992, London was organised by the Health and Safety Commission of the UK and co-sponsored by a number of regional and international organizations namely: the European Commission, the ILO, the OECD and WHO. The main sessions of the conference cover what risk assessment means, the role of risk assessment in devising policies and regulations; and risk assessment in practice.

  9. Risk assessment, session 1-4. International conference 1992. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The international conference on Risk Assessment, 5-9 October 1992, London was organised by the Health and Safety Commission of the UK and co-sponsored by a number of regional and international organizations namely: the European Commission, the ILO, the OECD and WHO. The main sessions of the conference cover what risk assessment means, the role of risk assessment in devising policies and regulations; and risk assessment in practice

  10. Small group effectiveness during pharmacology learning sessions in a Nepalese medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Pr; Gurung, Sb; Jha, N; Bajracharya, O; Karki, Bms; Thapa, Tp

    2011-01-01

    Small group learning sessions are used in pharmacology at the KIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal. Feedback about student behaviours that enhance and hinder small group effectiveness was obtained. This will help us improve the small group sessions and will also be useful to educators using small groups in other medical schools. The small groups were self-managing with a group leader, time-keeper, recorder and presenter. Small group effectiveness was measured using the Tutorial Group Effectiveness Instrument (TGEI) developed by Singaram and co-authors. The instrument was administered in June 2010 and key findings obtained were shared with students and facilitators. The instrument was administered again in August. The mean cognitive, motivational, demotivational and overall scores were compared among different categories of respondents in June and August. Scores were also compared between June and August 2010. A total of 89 students participated in the study in June and 88 in August 2010. In June, females rated overall group productivity higher compared to males. The cognitive and motivational scores were higher in August 2010 while the demotivational score was lower. The small group effectiveness was higher in August after the educational intervention which utilised feedback about problems observed, theoretical considerations of effective small groups and how this information can be applied in practice.

  11. Small group effectiveness during pharmacology learning sessions in a Nepalese medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar PR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSmall group learning sessions are used in pharmacology atthe KIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal. Feedback aboutstudent behaviours that enhance and hinder small groupeffectiveness was obtained. This will help us improve thesmall group sessions and will also be useful to educatorsusing small groups in other medical schools.MethodThe small groups were self-managing with a group leader,time-keeper, recorder and presenter. Small groupeffectiveness was measured using the Tutorial GroupEffectiveness Instrument (TGEI developed by Singaram andco-authors. The instrument was administered in June 2010and key findings obtained were shared with students andfacilitators. The instrument was administered again inAugust. The mean cognitive, motivational, demotivationaland overall scores were compared among differentcategories of respondents in June and August. Scores werealso compared between June and August 2010.ResultsA total of 89 students participated in the study in June and88 in August 2010. In June, females rated overall groupproductivity higher compared to males. The cognitive andmotivational scores were higher in August 2010 while thedemotivational score was lower.ConclusionThe small group effectiveness was higher in August after theeducational intervention which utilised feedback aboutproblems observed, theoretical considerations of effectivesmall groups and how this information can be applied inpractice.

  12. Pharmacological evidence that both cognitive memory and habit formation contribute to within-session learning of concurrent visual discriminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, Janita; Devan, Bryan; Yin, Pingbo; Sigrist, Emmalynn; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2010-07-01

    The monkey's ability to learn a set of visual discriminations presented concurrently just once a day on successive days (24-h ITI task) is based on habit formation, which is known to rely on a visuo-striatal circuit and to be independent of visuo-rhinal circuits that support one-trial memory. Consistent with this dissociation, we recently reported that performance on the 24-h ITI task is impaired by a striatal-function blocking agent, the dopaminergic antagonist haloperidol, and not by a rhinal-function blocking agent, the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist scopolamine. In the present study, monkeys were trained on a short-ITI form of concurrent visual discrimination learning, one in which a set of stimulus pairs is repeated not only across daily sessions but also several times within each session (in this case, at about 4-min ITIs). Asymptotic discrimination learning rates in the non-drug condition were reduced by half, from approximately 11 trials/pair on the 24-h ITI task to approximately 5 trials/pair on the 4-min ITI task, and this faster learning was impaired by systemic injections of either haloperidol or scopolamine. The results suggest that in the version of concurrent discrimination learning used here, the short ITIs within a session recruit both visuo-rhinal and visuo-striatal circuits, and that the final performance level is driven by both cognitive memory and habit formation working in concert.

  13. Effects of a six-session introductory psychology programme on Year 9 pupils' interest in psychology and approaches to learning

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, E.; De Aguiar Chaves, T.; Dunsmuir, S.

    2015-01-01

    Psychology is a popular UK A-level, despite many pupils having no previous taught experience of it. Prior introduction to psychology teaching could help pupils make more informed choices to study it. This study evaluates a six-session introduction to psychology programme for 20 Year 9 pupils called ‘Myth-Busting the Brain’. A pre-/post-programme questionnaire investigated pupil interest towards future psychology study, interest in the programme and approaches to learning. There wa...

  14. Career anchors and learning plan (part one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Brečko

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is divided into three parts. The first part concentrates on how important career is for an individual, organization and society. The author establishes that understanding of career has changed dramatically and does not only refer to climbing up the career ladder, but also moving off or even down the career ladder. The notion of career, as a lifelong and professional path, encompasses all aspects of human personality and their roles acquired through one's life. On basis of vast and longitudinal research, where the author has studied career anchors of individuals, it is the objective of the author to find out on basis of what grounds do the individuals decide to take certain directions in their careers and how learning contributes to such decisions. As a source the author has used Shein's theory of career anchors. Part one describes in greater detail 8 different career anchors and introduces their main features with the findings of the research, which refer to the analysis of professions (work positions and established career anchors. The author thus verifies the hypothesis that career anchors do exist in our area.

  15. The Flipped Classroom: An active teaching and learning strategy for making the sessions more interactive and challenging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Amber Shamim

    2018-04-01

    Flipping the classroom is a pedagogical model that employs easy to use, readily accessible technology based resources such as video lectures, reading handouts, and practice problems outside the classroom, whereas interactive group-based, problem-solving activities conducted in the classroom. This strategy permits for an extended range of learning activities during the session. Using class time for active learning provides greater opportunity for mentoring and peer to peer collaboration. Instead of spending too much time on delivering lectures, class time can best be utilized by interacting with students, discussing their concerns related to the particular topic to be taught, providing real life examples relevant to the course content, challenging students to think in a broader aspect about complex process and encouraging different team based learning activities.

  16. Learning Physical Examination Skills outside Timetabled Training Sessions: What Happens and Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvivier, Robbert J.; van Geel, Koos; van Dalen, Jan; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Lack of published studies on students' practice behaviour of physical examination skills outside timetabled training sessions inspired this study into what activities medical students undertake to improve their skills and factors influencing this. Six focus groups of a total of 52 students from Years 1-3 using a pre-established interview guide.…

  17. Teaching for Engagement: Part 3: Designing for Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, William J.

    2015-01-01

    In the first two parts of this series, ("Teaching for Engagement: Part 1: Constructivist Principles, Case-Based Teaching, and Active Learning") and ("Teaching for Engagement: Part 2: Technology in the Service of Active Learning"), William J. Hunter sought to outline the theoretical rationale and research basis for such active…

  18. One-single physical exercise session after object recognition learning promotes memory persistence through hippocampal noradrenergic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva de Vargas, Liane; Neves, Ben-Hur Souto das; Roehrs, Rafael; Izquierdo, Iván; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela

    2017-06-30

    Previously we showed the involvement of the hippocampal noradrenergic system in the consolidation and persistence of object recognition (OR) memory. Here we show that one-single physical exercise session performed immediately after learning promotes OR memory persistence and increases norepinephrine levels in the hippocampus. Additionally, effects of exercise on memory are avoided by an intra-hippocampal beta-adrenergic antagonist infusion. Taken together, these results suggest that exercise effects on memory can be related to noradrenergic mechanisms and acute physical exercise can be a non-pharmacological intervention to assist memory consolidation and persistence, with few or no side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effectiveness of a 40-minute Ophthalmologic Examination Teaching Session on Medical Student Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirachin Hoonpongsimanont

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency physicians are among the few specialists besides ophthalmologists who commonly perform ophthalmologic examinations using the slit lamp and other instruments. However, most medical schools in the United States do not require an ophthalmology rotation upon completion. Teaching procedural skills to medical students can be challenging due to limited resources and instructor availability. Our study assesses the effectiveness of a 40-minute hands-on teaching session on ophthalmologic examination for medical students using only two instructors and low-cost equipment. Methods: We performed an interventional study using a convenience sample of subjects. Pre- and post-workshop questionnaires on students’ confidence in performing ophthalmologic examination were administered. We used a paired t-test and Wilcoxon rank test to analyze the data. Results: Of the 30 participants in the study, the mean age was 25 and the majority were first-year medical students. The students’ confidence in performing every portion of the ophthalmologic exam increased significantly after the teaching session. We found that the average confidence level before the teaching session were below 2 on a 1-5 Likert scale (1 being the least confident. Confidence levels in using the slit lamp had the highest improvement among the skills taught (2.17 95% CI [1.84-2.49]. Students reported the least improvement in their confidence in assessing extraocular movements (0.73, 95% CI [0.30-1.71] and examining pupillary function (0.73, 95% CI [0.42-1.04]. We observed the biggest difference in median confidence level in the use of the tonometer (4 with a p-value of <0.05. Conclusion: A 40-minute structured hands-on training session can significantly improve students’ confidence levels in ophthalmologic skills.

  20. Session: Bat ecology related to wind development and lessons learned about impacts on bats from wind development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Greg; Kunz, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two paper presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. It was the first of the sessions to shift the focus to the issue of wind energy development's impacts specifically to bats. The presentations discussed lessons that have been learned regarding direct and indirect impacts on bats and strategies planned to address such issues. Presenters addressed what the existing science demonstrates about land-based wind turbine impacts on bats, including: mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts, species and numbers killed, per turbine rates/per MW generated, and impacts on threatened and endangered species. They discussed whether there is sufficient data for wind turbines and bat impacts for projects in the eastern US, especially on ridge tops. Finally, the subject of offshore impacts on bats was briefly addressed, including what lessons have been learned in Europe and how these can be applied in the U S. Paper one, by Greg Johnson, was titled ''A Review of Bat Impacts at Wind Farms in the US''. Paper two, by Thomas Kunz, was titled ''Wind Power: Bats and Wind Turbines''.

  1. Establishing the minimal number of virtual reality simulator training sessions necessary to develop basic laparoscopic skills competence: evaluation of the learning curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Jordao Duarte

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Medical literature is scarce on information to define a basic skills training program for laparoscopic surgery (peg and transferring, cutting, clipping. The aim of this study was to determine the minimal number of simulator sessions of basic laparoscopic tasks necessary to elaborate an optimal virtual reality training curriculum. Materials and Methods Eleven medical students with no previous laparoscopic experience were spontaneously enrolled. They were submitted to simulator training sessions starting at level 1 (Immersion Lap VR, San Jose, CA, including sequentially camera handling, peg and transfer, clipping and cutting. Each student trained twice a week until 10 sessions were completed. The score indexes were registered and analyzed. The total of errors of the evaluation sequences (camera, peg and transfer, clipping and cutting were computed and thereafter, they were correlated to the total of items evaluated in each step, resulting in a success percent ratio for each student for each set of each completed session. Thereafter, we computed the cumulative success rate in 10 sessions, obtaining an analysis of the learning process. By non-linear regression the learning curve was analyzed. Results By the non-linear regression method the learning curve was analyzed and a r2 = 0.73 (p < 0.001 was obtained, being necessary 4.26 (∼five sessions to reach the plateau of 80% of the estimated acquired knowledge, being that 100% of the students have reached this level of skills. From the fifth session till the 10th, the gain of knowledge was not significant, although some students reached 96% of the expected improvement. Conclusions This study revealed that after five simulator training sequential sessions the students' learning curve reaches a plateau. The forward sessions in the same difficult level do not promote any improvement in laparoscopic basic surgical skills, and the students should be introduced to a more difficult training

  2. Establishing the minimal number of virtual reality simulator training sessions necessary to develop basic laparoscopic skills competence: evaluation of the learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Ricardo Jordão; Cury, José; Oliveira, Luis Carlos Neves; Srougi, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Medical literature is scarce on information to define a basic skills training program for laparoscopic surgery (peg and transferring, cutting, clipping). The aim of this study was to determine the minimal number of simulator sessions of basic laparoscopic tasks necessary to elaborate an optimal virtual reality training curriculum. Eleven medical students with no previous laparoscopic experience were spontaneously enrolled. They were submitted to simulator training sessions starting at level 1 (Immersion Lap VR, San Jose, CA), including sequentially camera handling, peg and transfer, clipping and cutting. Each student trained twice a week until 10 sessions were completed. The score indexes were registered and analyzed. The total of errors of the evaluation sequences (camera, peg and transfer, clipping and cutting) were computed and thereafter, they were correlated to the total of items evaluated in each step, resulting in a success percent ratio for each student for each set of each completed session. Thereafter, we computed the cumulative success rate in 10 sessions, obtaining an analysis of the learning process. By non-linear regression the learning curve was analyzed. By the non-linear regression method the learning curve was analyzed and a r2 = 0.73 (p sessions) to reach the plateau of 80% of the estimated acquired knowledge, being that 100% of the students have reached this level of skills. From the fifth session till the 10th, the gain of knowledge was not significant, although some students reached 96% of the expected improvement. This study revealed that after five simulator training sequential sessions the students' learning curve reaches a plateau. The forward sessions in the same difficult level do not promote any improvement in laparoscopic basic surgical skills, and the students should be introduced to a more difficult training tasks level.

  3. Active involvement of learning disabilities service users in the development and delivery of a teaching session to pre-registration nurses: Students' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Penny; Ooms, Ann; Marks-Maran, Di

    2016-01-01

    A teaching session about service users' experiences of accessing and receiving health and social care was designed and delivered by service users to first year BSc Nursing students. The aim was to enhance students' knowledge, skills and confidence in caring for people with a learning disability. An evaluation research study was undertaking at one university in London into the perceived effectiveness of the teaching session, including students' perceptions of the extent to which the service users' teaching session was useful, the impact of the session, its benefits and challenges and the sustainability of teaching sessions delivered by service users. Data were collected through an online questionnaire. Quantitative analysis was undertaken of Likert-style questions and qualitative analysis was undertaken using the Framework Method. The session impacted on students' knowledge and understanding of people with a learning disability. Students reported that they felt more comfortable and confident interacting with people with a learning disability. In addition, they reflected on their feelings about caring for people with a learning disability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assisting the integration of social media in problem-based learning sessions in the Faculty of Medicine at King Abdulaziz University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Zuhier A; Awan, Almuatazbellah A; Alshawwa, Lana; Tekian, Ara; Park, Yoon Soo

    2018-05-07

    Issues related to traditional Problem-Based Learning (PBL) at King Abdulaziz University Faculty of Medicine (KAU-FOM), including lack of student interaction between sessions and outdated instructional materials have led to the examining the use of social media. This study examines factors affecting the implementation of social media into PBL sessions Methods: Mentored social media activities were incorporated between PBL sessions to third year medical students. Ground rules were set, and students were kept on track with learning objectives and authentic references. An online survey consisting of 18 questions were administered to measure the impact of the social media model embedded between PBL sessions. Feedback showed major improvements in students' learning process as well as identifying areas for improvement. The highest ratings were in participation and communication, knowledge and information gathering, and cooperation and team-building. This paper indicates that incorporating social media could facilitate learning between PBL sessions. Furthermore, guidelines are proposed to help educators implement a social media model into their PBL sessions.

  5. The Public Poster Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine-Rasky, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    This note describes the use of a student poster session as an innovative approach to student learning. The local context for the assignment is provided, followed by a description of the course for which the poster was prepared, details about the assignment including its evaluation, and practical considerations for planning a poster session. The…

  6. Mechanism for Promoting Motivation, Confidence, and Autonomy through Synchronic Communication Sessions in Virtual Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Jorge Andrick Parra; Dallos, Adriana Rocío Lizcano; Ballesteros, Eliécer Pineda

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a mechanism which explains the effect of synchronous communication on students' perception of the training process in virtual learning methodology used in a postgraduate programme at the University of Santander. We use System Dynamics to design a mechanism that integrates motivation, confidence, trust, and autonomy in students.…

  7. Dialog about Psychosocial Issues in Problem-Based Learning Sessions in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was two-fold: to investigate the dialog about psychosocial aspects of health care in problem based learning (PBL) groups in a single medical school; and to describe the factors that learners and PBL facilitators identify as influencing dialog about these issues in PBL groups. Medical education is a…

  8. Optimal Learning in Schools--Theoretical Evidence: Part 4 Metacognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, John

    2017-01-01

    Parts 1 and 2 in this four-part series of articles (Crossland, 2016, 2017a) discussed the recent research from neuroscience linked to concepts from cognitive development that brought Piaget's theories into the 21st century and showed the most effective provision towards more optimal learning strategies. Part 2 reviewed Demetriou's latest thinking…

  9. Parts of the Whole: Learn More, Learn Better

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Wallace

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Building on previous columns in Numeracy, this column analyzes various teaching techniques in terms of their ability to build cognitive schema, extend existing schema, reinforce learning, move mean understanding of a group of students, and reduce variance in understanding of a group. We offer a pedagogical cycle as an example of how to address multiple learning goals using common teaching methods.

  10. Assessment of first-year medical students' perceptions of teaching and learning through team-based learning sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obad, Adam S; Peeran, Ahmed A; Shareef, Mohammad Abrar; Alsheikh, Wissal J; Kalagi, Dana A; AlAmodi, Abdulhadi A; Khan, Tehreem A; Shaikh, Abdul Ahad; Ganguly, Paul; Yaqinuddin, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an emerging teaching and learning strategy being employed in medical schools. The College of Medicine at Alfaisal University has adopted a TBL approach as an instructional method for first-year medical students. The aim of the present study was to describe the TBL method employed at Alfaisal University College of Medicine and to assess first-year medical students' perceptions of this learning modality for the anatomy- and physiology-based blocks/courses in organ systems form of curriculum. A five-point Likert scale questionnaire was structured based on Kirkpatrick's theory and assessed three major domains: reaction, learning, and behavior. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Cronbach's α-coefficient tests were used to assess the validity and reliability of the construct, respectively. CFA showed an adequate validity of the survey and Cronbach's α revealed an acceptable internal uniformity (0.69). A total of 185 respondents rated reaction, learning, and behavior toward introduction of TBL as 3.53 ± 1.01, 3.59 ± 1.12, and 3.57 ± 1.12, respectively. Excellent students rated TBL highly in all major domains compared with borderline students (reaction, behavior, and learning domains with P values of teaching and learning strategy for functional anatomy, and prior involvement in teamwork and academic performance correlates with higher ratings of TBL. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Students' Learning Experiences from Didactic Teaching Sessions Including Patient Case Examples as Either Text or Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Moeller, Martin Holdgaard; Paltved, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore medical students' learning experiences from the didactic teaching formats using either text-based patient cases or video-based patient cases with similar content. The authors explored how the two different patient case formats influenced students......' perceptions of psychiatric patients and students' reflections on meeting and communicating with psychiatric patients. METHODS: The authors conducted group interviews with 30 medical students who volunteered to participate in interviews and applied inductive thematic content analysis to the transcribed...

  12. Professional Learning in Part-time University Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2007-01-01

    The theme of this article is adult students' learning in part-time studies at university level in Denmark. One issue discussed is the interplay of research and teaching in this kind of study programme. Examples are presented from the Master of Learning Processes study programme at Aalborg...

  13. Preparing Instructional Designers for Game-Based Learning: Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Appelman, Bob; Rieber, Lloyd; Van Eck, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Like many rapidly growing industries, advances in video game technology are far outpacing research on its design and effectiveness. Relatively little is understood about how to apply what we know about teaching and learning to optimize game-based learning. For the most part, instructional designers know little about game development and video game…

  14. Post-Session Authentication

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed , Naveed; Jensen , Christian ,

    2012-01-01

    Part 1: Full Papers; International audience; Entity authentication provides confidence in the claimed identity of a peer entity, but the manner in which this goal is achieved results in different types of authentication. An important factor in this regard is the order between authentication and the execution of the associated session. In this paper, we consider the case of post-session authentication, where parties authenticate each other at the end of their interactive session. This use of a...

  15. Learning and Teaching Problems in Part-Time Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman-Dickenson, D. I.

    1988-01-01

    Results of a British survey of the administrations of six universities and six public colleges, employers, and employees who were part-time students are reported and discussed. The survey assessed the perceptions of those groups concerning problems in the instruction and learning of part-time students. (MSE)

  16. A learning apprentice for software parts composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Bradley P.; Holtzman, Peter L.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of the knowledge acquisition component of the Bauhaus, a prototype computer aided software engineering (CASE) workstation for the development of domain-specific automatic programming systems (D-SAPS) is given. D-SAPS use domain knowledge in the refinement of a description of an application program into a compilable implementation. The approach to the construction of D-SAPS was to automate the process of refining a description of a program, expressed in an object-oriented domain language, into a configuration of software parts that implement the behavior of the domain objects.

  17. Effect of an EBM course in combination with case method learning sessions: an RCT on professional performance, job satisfaction, and self-efficacy of occupational physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, Nathalie I. R.; Schaafsma, Frederieke G.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; van Dijk, Frank J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective An intervention existing of an evidence-based medicine (EBM) course in combination with case method learning sessions (CMLSs) was designed to enhance the professional performance, self-efficacy and job satisfaction of occupational physicians. Methods A cluster randomized controlled trial

  18. Service-learning: an integral part of undergraduate public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Suzanne B; Seifer, Sarena D

    2008-09-01

    In 2003, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) described public health as "an essential part of the training of citizens," a body of knowledge needed to achieve a public health literate citizenry. To achieve that end, the IOM recommended that "all undergraduates should have access to education in public health." Service-learning, a type of experiential learning, is an effective and appropriate vehicle for teaching public health and developing public health literacy. While relatively new to public health, service-learning has its historical roots in undergraduate education and has been shown to enhance students' understanding of course relevance, change student and faculty attitudes, encourage support for community initiatives, and increase student and faculty volunteerism. Grounded in collaborative relationships, service-learning grows from authentic partnerships between communities and educational institutions. Through emphasizing reciprocal learning and reflective practice, service-learning helps students develop skills needed to be effective in working with communities and ultimately achieve social change. With public health's enduring focus on social justice, introducing undergraduate students to public health through the vehicle of service-learning as part of introductory public health core courses or public health electives will help ensure that our young people are able to contribute to developing healthy communities, thus achieving the IOM's vision.

  19. Panel Session

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege

    2004-01-01

    In this panel session, four researchers will discuss the role of a theoretical foundation, in particular AT, in the design of information technology based artefacts. The general discussion will take of from a specific examination of the ActAD approach.......In this panel session, four researchers will discuss the role of a theoretical foundation, in particular AT, in the design of information technology based artefacts. The general discussion will take of from a specific examination of the ActAD approach....

  20. Preparing learners with partly incorrect intuitive prior knowledge for learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eOhst

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Learners sometimes have incoherent and fragmented intuitive prior knowledge that is (partly ‘incompatible’ with the to-be-learned contents. Such knowledge in pieces can cause conceptual disorientation and cognitive overload while learning. We hypothesized that a pre-training intervention providing a generalized schema as a structuring framework for such knowledge in pieces would support (reorganizing-processes of prior knowledge and thus reduce unnecessary cognitive load during subsequent learning. Fifty-six student teachers participated in the experiment. A framework group underwent a pre-training intervention providing a generalized, categorical schema for categorizing primary learning strategies and related but different strategies as a cognitive framework for (re-organizing their prior knowledge. Our control group received comparable factual information but no framework. Afterwards, all participants learned about primary learning strategies. The framework group claimed to possess higher levels of interest and self-efficacy, achieved higher learning outcomes, and learned more efficiently. Hence, providing a categorical framework can help overcome the barrier of incorrect prior knowledge in pieces.

  1. Preparing learners with partly incorrect intuitive prior knowledge for learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohst, Andrea; Fondu, Béatrice M. E.; Glogger, Inga; Nückles, Matthias; Renkl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Learners sometimes have incoherent and fragmented intuitive prior knowledge that is (partly) “incompatible” with the to-be-learned contents. Such knowledge in pieces can cause conceptual disorientation and cognitive overload while learning. We hypothesized that a pre-training intervention providing a generalized schema as a structuring framework for such knowledge in pieces would support (re)organizing-processes of prior knowledge and thus reduce unnecessary cognitive load during subsequent learning. Fifty-six student teachers participated in the experiment. A framework group underwent a pre-training intervention providing a generalized, categorical schema for categorizing primary learning strategies and related but different strategies as a cognitive framework for (re-)organizing their prior knowledge. Our control group received comparable factual information but no framework. Afterwards, all participants learned about primary learning strategies. The framework group claimed to possess higher levels of interest and self-efficacy, achieved higher learning outcomes, and learned more efficiently. Hence, providing a categorical framework can help overcome the barrier of incorrect prior knowledge in pieces. PMID:25071638

  2. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution Networks - Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deka, Deepjyoti [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-13

    Limited placement of real-time monitoring devices in the distribution grid, recent trends notwithstanding, has prevented the easy implementation of demand-response and other smart grid applications. Part I of this paper discusses the problem of learning the operational structure of the grid from nodal voltage measurements. In this work (Part II), the learning of the operational radial structure is coupled with the problem of estimating nodal consumption statistics and inferring the line parameters in the grid. Based on a Linear-Coupled(LC) approximation of AC power flows equations, polynomial time algorithms are designed to identify the structure and estimate nodal load characteristics and/or line parameters in the grid using the available nodal voltage measurements. Then the structure learning algorithm is extended to cases with missing data, where available observations are limited to a fraction of the grid nodes. The efficacy of the presented algorithms are demonstrated through simulations on several distribution test cases.

  3. E-learning for Part-Time Medical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Półjanowicz Wiesław

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Distance education undoubtedly has many advantages, such as individualization of the learning process, unified transmission of teaching materials, the opportunity to study at any place and any time, reduction of financial costs for commuting to classes or accommodation of participants, etc. Adequate working conditions on the e-learning portal must also be present, eg. well-prepared, substantive courses and good communication between the participants. Therefore, an important element in the process of conducting e-learning courses is to measure the increase of knowledge and satisfaction of participants with distance learning. It allows for fine-tuning the content of the course and for classes to be properly organized. This paper presents the results of teaching and assessment of satisfaction with e-learning courses in “Problems of multiculturalism in medicine”, “Selected issues of visual rehabilitation” and “Ophthalmology and Ophthalmic Nursing”, which were carried out experimentally at the Faculty of Health Sciences at the Medical University of Bialystok for nursing students for the 2010/2011 academic year. The study group consisted of 72 part-time students who learnt in e-learning mode and the control group of 87 students who learnt in the traditional way. The students’ opinions about the teaching process and final exam scores were analyzed based on a specially prepared survey questionnaire. Organization of e-learning classes was rated positively by 90% of students. The average result on the final exams for all distance learning subjects was at the level of 82%, while for classes taught in the traditional form it was 81%. Based on these results, we conclude that distance learning is as effective as learning according to the traditional form in medical education studies.

  4. Epilepsy and Learning Disabilities: Part 1--Diagnosing and Solving School Learning Disabilities in Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittan, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    This is a six part article intended to give parents the information and strategies they need to cope with their child with epilepsy who may have school learning problems. Epilepsy and seizures affect the classroom in unique ways that can make the learning experience especially challenging for some kids. Fortunately, much can be done to give the…

  5. Breakout Sessions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    Participants are split into small groups for detailed discussion on their chosen topic. To register please click on 'See details' link from the agenda and then on the link to send an email to the session for which you would like to book. Please don't change the subject line of the email.

  6. Differences between the IPA Learning Outcomes Learning Module Part with Conventional Learning Class IV in SDN Jodipan Malang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helda Kusuma Wardani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Perbedaan Hasil Pembelajaran IPA antara Pembelajaran Modul Bagian dengan Pembelajaran Konvensional Kelas IV SD Abstract: The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of learning science a significant difference between the learning modules with conventional learning class section IV in SDN Jodipan Malang and describe the realization of the effectiveness and appeal of learning on learning module and conventional learning section. This quasi-experimental research design was used pre- and post-test design or nonequivalent control group. Testing the hypothesis used t test using SPSS. Conclusions from the results of hypothesis testing is no significant difference between the effectiveness of learning modules with conventional learning section on the topic of the relationship between structure and function of plant roots after the implementation of learning. Minimal realization completeness criteria (KKM classroom learning module parts is very high. Scores posttes conventional learning classes showed no achievement of KKM. Realization appeal the high part of the learning modules according to the whole class learning module sample parts, and the appeal of high-graded conventional learning. KKM realization is directly proportional to the realization of part of the appeal of the learning module. Key Words: learning outcomes, the learning module parts, conventional learning Abstrak: Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menguji perbedaan signifikan keefektifan pembelajaran IPA antara pembelajaran modul bagian dengan pembelajaran konvensional kelas IV di SDN Jodipan Kota Malang dan mendeskripsikan realisasi keefektifan serta daya tarik pembelajaran pada pembelajaran modul bagian maupun pembelajaran konvensional. Penelitian eksperimen kuasi ini menggunakan rancangan pre- and post-test design atau nonequivalent control group design. Pengujian hipotesis digunakan uji t menggunakan SPSS. Simpulan dari hasil uji hipotesis adalah ada perbedaan signifikan antara

  7. A single session of prefrontal cortex transcranial direct current stimulation does not modulate implicit task sequence learning and consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Branislav; Müri, René; Meier, Beat

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is assumed to affect cortical excitability and dependent on the specific stimulation conditions either to increase or decrease learning. The purpose of this study was to modulate implicit task sequence learning with tDCS. As cortico-striatal loops are critically involved in implicit task sequence learning, tDCS was applied above the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In Experiment 1, anodal, cathodal, or sham tDCS was applied before the start of the sequence learning task. In Experiment 2, stimulation was applied during the sequence learning task. Consolidation of learning was assessed after 24 h. The results of both experiments showed that implicit task sequence learning occurred consistently but it was not modulated by different tDCS conditions. Similarly, consolidation measured after a 24 h-interval including sleep was also not affected by stimulation. These results indicate that a single session of DLPFC tDCS is not sufficient to modulate implicit task sequence learning. This study adds to the accumulating evidence that tDCS may not be as effective as originally thought. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of an EBM course in combination with case method learning sessions: an RCT on professional performance, job satisfaction, and self-efficacy of occupational physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenholtz, Nathalie I R; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; van Dijk, Frank J H

    2008-10-01

    An intervention existing of an evidence-based medicine (EBM) course in combination with case method learning sessions (CMLSs) was designed to enhance the professional performance, self-efficacy and job satisfaction of occupational physicians. A cluster randomized controlled trial was set up and data were collected through questionnaires at baseline (T0), directly after the intervention (T1) and 7 months after baseline (T2). The data of the intervention group [T0 (n = 49), T1 (n = 31), T2 (n = 29)] and control group [T0 (n = 49), T1 (n = 28), T2 (n = 28)] were analysed in mixed model analyses. Mean scores of the perceived value of the CMLS were calculated in the intervention group. The overall effect of the intervention over time comparing the intervention with the control group was statistically significant for professional performance (p Job satisfaction and self-efficacy changes were small and not statistically significant between the groups. The perceived value of the CMLS to gain new insights and to improve the quality of their performance increased with the number of sessions followed. An EBM course in combination with case method learning sessions is perceived as valuable and offers evidence to enhance the professional performance of occupational physicians. However, it does not seem to influence their self-efficacy and job satisfaction.

  9. CERN Technical Training 2002: Learning for the LHC! INTRODUCTION TO PVSS: FREE SESSION ON 11.11.2002 (AFTERNOON)

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2002-01-01

    A free-of-charge Introduction to PVSS session will be offered at CERN on November 11, 2002 (afternoon). This course is designed for people interested in SCADA-systems, and will provide an overview of PVSS features and possibilities. The programme will include a presentation of what can be done with the SCADA-system PVSS and of how PVSS is being used at CERN. A session of the complete Basic PVSS course would follow on 12-14 November (cost: 600.- CHF). More information, full programme and online registration by EDH are available from the CERN 2002 Technical Training pages or by contacting Technical.Training@cern.ch

  10. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution Networks - Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deka, Deepjyoti [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-13

    Traditionally power distribution networks are either not observable or only partially observable. This complicates development and implementation of new smart grid technologies, such as those related to demand response, outage detection and management, and improved load-monitoring. In this two part paper, inspired by proliferation of the metering technology, we discuss estimation problems in structurally loopy but operationally radial distribution grids from measurements, e.g. voltage data, which are either already available or can be made available with a relatively minor investment. In Part I, the objective is to learn the operational layout of the grid. Part II of this paper presents algorithms that estimate load statistics or line parameters in addition to learning the grid structure. Further, Part II discusses the problem of structure estimation for systems with incomplete measurement sets. Our newly suggested algorithms apply to a wide range of realistic scenarios. The algorithms are also computationally efficient – polynomial in time– which is proven theoretically and illustrated computationally on a number of test cases. The technique developed can be applied to detect line failures in real time as well as to understand the scope of possible adversarial attacks on the grid.

  11. Use of Interactive Sessions and E-Learning in Teaching Anatomy to First-Year Optometry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Bipasha; Gouldsborough, Ingrid; Gabriel, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Students enrolled in the Optometry program at the University of Manchester are required to take a functional anatomy course during the first year of their studies. Low mean scores in the written examination of this unit for the past two academic years energized staff to rethink the teaching format. Interactive sessions lasting 20 minutes each were…

  12. Learning how to rate video-recorded therapy sessions: a practical guide for trainees and advanced clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Leigh; Bhatia, Maneet; Ulvenes, Pal; Berggraf, Lene; Osborn, Kristin

    2011-06-01

    Watching and rating psychotherapy sessions is an important yet often overlooked component of psychotherapy training. This article provides a simple and straightforward guide for using one Website (www.ATOStrainer.com) that provides an automated training protocol for rating of psychotherapy sessions. By the end of the article, readers will be able to have the knowledge to go to the Website and begin using this training method as soon as they have a recorded session to view. This article presents, (a) an overview of the Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale (ATOS; McCullough et al., 2003a), a research tool used to rate psychotherapy sessions; (b) a description of APA training tapes, available for purchase from APA Books, that have been rated and scored by ATOS trained clinicians and posted on the Website; (c) step-by-step procedures on how ratings can be done; (d) an introduction to www.ATOStrainer.com where ratings can be entered and compared with expert ratings; and (e) first-hand personal experiences of the authors using this training method and the benefits it affords both trainees and experienced therapists. This psychotherapy training Website has the potential to be a key resource tool for graduate students, researchers, and clinicians. Our long-range goal is to promote the growth of our understanding of psychotherapy and to improve the quality of psychotherapy provided for patients.

  13. Effects of a Six-Session Introductory Psychology Programme on Year 9 Pupils' Interest in Psychology and Approaches to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Emma; Chaves, Tahirah De Aguiar; Dunsmuir, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Psychology is a popular UK A-level, despite many pupils having no previous taught experience of it. Prior introduction to psychology teaching could help pupils make more informed choices to study it. This study evaluates a six-session introduction to psychology programme for 20 Year 9 pupils called "Myth-Busting the Brain." A…

  14. Action without Action Planning: The Potential of the Career Thinking Session in Enabling Transformational Career Learning and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassot, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the potential of the Career Thinking Session (CTS) model to career guidance and counselling practice with young people. A qualitative research study is presented, focusing on the case study of a client involved in the transition to higher education. The setting for the research is described and the origins of the CTS are…

  15. Session summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Y.

    2002-01-01

    In the summary session, possible international activities in the field of basic studies on high-temperature engineering were discussed within the framework of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). It was recommended to include topics relevant to fission-product behaviour and safety issues of HTGR in next meeting, in addition to the topics discussed in this meeting. The chairperson of the last session summarised the recommendations to be presented to the NSC into the following five topics as possible international activities: - Basic studies on behaviour of irradiated graphite/carbon and ceramic materials including their composites under both operation and storage conditions. - Development of in-core material characterisation and instrumentation methods. - Improvement in material properties through high-temperature irradiation. - Basic studies on HTGR fuel fabrication and performance including fission-product release. - Basic studies on safety issues of HTGR. It was also recommended that a further information exchange meeting focused on the organisation of the interactive collaboration activity with regard to the above topics be planned in 2003, tentatively in Oarai, Japan. (author)

  16. Session Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliane Lessner, Co-Chair:

    2009-03-01

    A panel discussion session providing a worldwide assessment of the status and experiences of women in physics, paying attention to the different cultures and environments they work in and to how the age of the physicist affects their perspective. We will hear about women physicists in Korea in particular and Asia in general, in Egypt in particular and Africa in general, and in the Caribbean. Six invited speakers will present analyses of the progress being made in promoting women in physics from their personal experiences and as assessed from their participation in the Third International Conference on Women In Physics (ICWIP2008) convened in Seoul, Korea in October 2008. From Albania to Zimbabwe, with representation of all the continents, ICWIP2008 congregated 283 women and men physicists from 57 countries to share the participants' scientific accomplishments and evaluate international progress in improving the status of women in physics. This three-hour session is organized jointly by the Committee on the Status of Women in Physics of the APS (CSWP) and the Forum on International Physics of the APS (FIP). Audience participation in the panel discussion will be strongly encouraged.

  17. Five years of lesson modification to implement non-traditional learning sessions in a traditional-delivery curriculum: A retrospective assessment using applied implementation variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Shaun E; McNair, Bryan; Kiser, Tyree H; Franson, Kari L

    Non-traditional learning (NTL), including aspects of self-directed learning (SDL), may address self-awareness development needs. Many factors can impact successful implementation of NTL. To share our multi-year experience with modifications that aim to improve NTL sessions in a traditional curriculum. To improve understanding of applied implementation variables (some of which were based on successful SDL implementation components) that impact NTL. We delivered a single lesson in a traditional-delivery curriculum once annually for five years, varying delivery annually in response to student learning and reaction-to-learning results. At year 5, we compared student learning and reaction-to-learning to applied implementation factors using logistic regression. Higher instructor involvement and overall NTL levels predicted correct exam responses (p=0.0007 and ptraditional and highest overall NTL deliveries. Students rated instructor presentation skills and teaching methods higher when greater instructor involvement (pmethods were most effective when lower student involvement and higher technology levels (ptraditional-delivery curriculum, instructor involvement appears essential, while the impact of student involvement and educational technology levels varies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. AMEE Guide 32: e-Learning in medical education Part 1: Learning, teaching and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel; Masters, Ken

    2008-06-01

    In just a few years, e-learning has become part of the mainstream in medical education. While e-learning means many things to many people, at its heart it is concerned with the educational uses of technology. For the purposes of this guide, we consider the many ways that the information revolution has affected and remediated the practice of healthcare teaching and learning. Deploying new technologies usually introduces tensions, and e-learning is no exception. Some wish to use it merely to perform pre-existing activities more efficiently or faster. Others pursue new ways of thinking and working that the use of such technology affords them. Simultaneously, while education, not technology, is the prime goal (and for healthcare, better patient outcomes), we are also aware that we cannot always predict outcomes. Sometimes, we have to take risks, and 'see what happens.' Serendipity often adds to the excitement of teaching. It certainly adds to the excitement of learning. The use of technology in support of education is not, therefore, a causal or engineered set of practices; rather, it requires creativity and adaptability in response to the specific and changing contexts in which it is used. Medical Education, as with most fields, is grappling with these tensions; the AMEE Guide to e-Learning in Medical Education hopes to help the reader, whether novice or expert, navigate them. This Guide is presented both as an introduction to the novice, and as a resource to more experienced practitioners. It covers a wide range of topics, some in broad outline, and others in more detail. Each section is concluded with a brief 'Take Home Message' which serves as a short summary of the section. The Guide is divided into two parts. The first part introduces the basic concepts of e-learning, e-teaching, and e-assessment, and then focuses on the day-to-day issues of e-learning, looking both at theoretical concepts and practical implementation issues. The second part examines technical

  19. Implicit motor sequence learning in schizophrenia and in old age: reduced performance only in the third session

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelis, Claudia; de Picker, Livia J.; de Boer, Peter; Dumont, Glenn; Coppens, Violette; Morsel, Anne; Janssens, Luc; Timmers, Maarten; Sabbe, Bernard G. C.; Morrens, Manuel; Hulstijn, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    Although there still is conflicting evidence whether schizophrenia is a neurodegenerative disease, cognitive changes in schizophrenia resemble those observed during normal aging. In contrast to extensively demonstrated deficits in explicit learning, it remains unclear whether implicit sequence

  20. Review for session K - benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    Eight of the papers to be considered in Session K are directly concerned, at least in part, with the Pool Critical Assembly (P.C.A.) benchmark at Oak Ridge. The remaining seven papers in this session, the subject of this review, are concerned with a variety of topics related to the general theme of Benchmarks and will be considered individually

  1. Preclinical endoscopic training using a part-task simulator: learning curve assessment and determination of threshold score for advancement to clinical endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirapinyo, Pichamol; Abidi, Wasif M; Aihara, Hiroyuki; Zaki, Theodore; Tsay, Cynthia; Imaeda, Avlin B; Thompson, Christopher C

    2017-10-01

    Preclinical simulator training has the potential to decrease endoscopic procedure time and patient discomfort. This study aims to characterize the learning curve of endoscopic novices in a part-task simulator and propose a threshold score for advancement to initial clinical cases. Twenty novices with no prior endoscopic experience underwent repeated endoscopic simulator sessions using the part-task simulator. Simulator scores were collected; their inverse was averaged and fit to an exponential curve. The incremental improvement after each session was calculated. Plateau was defined as the session after which incremental improvement in simulator score model was less than 5%. Additionally, all participants filled out questionnaires regarding simulator experience after sessions 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20. A visual analog scale and NASA task load index were used to assess levels of comfort and demand. Twenty novices underwent 400 simulator sessions. Mean simulator scores at sessions 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 were 78.5 ± 5.95, 176.5 ± 17.7, 275.55 ± 23.56, 347 ± 26.49, and 441.11 ± 38.14. The best fit exponential model was [time/score] = 26.1 × [session #] -0.615 ; r 2  = 0.99. This corresponded to an incremental improvement in score of 35% after the first session, 22% after the second, 16% after the third and so on. Incremental improvement dropped below 5% after the 12th session corresponding to the predicted score of 265. Simulator training was related to higher comfort maneuvering an endoscope and increased readiness for supervised clinical endoscopy, both plateauing between sessions 10 and 15. Mental demand, physical demand, and frustration levels decreased with increased simulator training. Preclinical training using an endoscopic part-task simulator appears to increase comfort level and decrease mental and physical demand associated with endoscopy. Based on a rigorous model, we recommend that novices complete a minimum of 12 training

  2. Teach Beyond Your Reach: An instructor’s guide to developing and running successful distance learning classes, workshops, training sessions and more

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Yavuz AKBULUT

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available 237―Teach Beyond Your Reach: An instructor‘s guide to developing and running successful distance learning classes, workshops, training sessions and more‖ serves as a guide for novice andexperienced distance educators to develop anddeliver their own training sessions. The book isconsisted of 234 pages (+xi covering eightinterdependent chapters followed by a usefulappendix of further reading resources, sampleintroductory materials for distance learning and asample lecture. The author, Robin Neidorf,teaches communications and writing through theonline campus of the Univeristy of Phoenix andco-teaches a creative writing course through theUniversity of Gävle in Sweden in addition to herThe book serves as a terrific resource for bothnovice distance educators and as a reference forthose who are more experienced. It lays out mostof the things needed to teach online throughcoaching the readers to understand the currentsituation and pass onto next levels of sophistication in e-learning practices. Two critical things that are emphasized in thebook are interaction as the core of learning, and collaboration among the distance education practitioners. The focus is not on developing Web pages, troubleshooting specific software or providing student support services. Rather, it focuses on therequirements for instruction and underlines where we might need to collaborate with Chapter 1 discusses the tools available for distance learning along with suggestions on how they may be used. Chapter 2 describes the distance population addressingdifferent learning styles, attitudes and generational differences all of which might affect the way students enter the class, and work with the teacher and materials.Chapter 3 and 4 focus on instructional design and development with a particular emphasis on creating content, which is both interactive and in line with learning objectives. Chapter 5 provides ideas on managing the distance classroom with conciseand thoughtful

  3. Using Electronic Classrooms and the World Wide Web to Support Science Teaching and Learning: Interactive Session Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellom, Paul; Fetters, Marcia; Beeth, Michael

    Since technology use in schools has been increasing, teachers want to maximize its use in their classroom to increase student learning. Therefore, accreditation requirements for colleges include integrating computer and information technology with teacher education and professional development programs. This paper describes different models for…

  4. Reflection in Learning through a Self-monitoring Device: Design Research on EEG Self-Monitoring during a Study Session

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Durall

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing availability of self-monitoring technologies has created opportunities for gaining awareness about one’s own behavior and reflecting on it. In teaching and learning, there is interest in using self-monitoring technologies, but very few studies have explored the possibilities. In this paper, we present a design study that investigates a technology (called Feeler that guides students to follow a specific learning script, monitors changes in their electroencephalogram (EEG while studying, and later provides visualization of the EEG data. The results are two-fold: (1 the hardware/software prototype and (2 the conclusions from the proof-of-concept research conducted with the prototype and six participants. In the research, we collected qualitative data from interviews to identify whether the prototype supported students to develop their reflective skills. The thematic analysis of the interviews showed that the Feeler’s learning script and visualization of the EEG data supported greater levels of reflection by fostering students’ curiosity, puzzlement, and personal inquiry. The proof-of-concept research also provided insights into several factors, such as the value of personal experience, the challenge of assumptions, and the contextualization of the data that trigger reflective thinking. The results validate the design concept and the role of the prototype in supporting awareness of and reflection about students’ mental states when they perform academic tasks.

  5. Session Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Cherrill

    2010-02-01

    High-school teachers are amongst the most important contributors to the development of the science and technology workforce of the future. Many of the more than 23,000 US high-school physics teachers are not adequately prepared to teach the subject. Only one-third of them, for example, majored in physics or physics education. Can inadequate teacher preparation be a factor in the poor performance of US students on international assessments of their achievements in science and physics? Since 1995 the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) has been administered four times to many hundreds of thousands of students in over 60 countries. TIMSS is used to measure trends in the mathematics and science knowledge and skills of fourth- and eighth-graders. The Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) has been administered three times since 2000, it focuses on 15-year-olds' capabilities in reading literacy, mathematics literacy, and science literacy. TIMSS Advanced (1995) assessed school-leaving students who have had special preparation in advanced mathematics and physics. In all these studies the US students, including the Advanced Placement physics students, scored below the international average, sometimes in the bottom third of countries! Three speakers have been invited to talk about the physics K-12 education systems in other countries, one that consistently scores at the top of the PISA (Finland) or score much higher than the USA on TIMSS ( various Northern European countries) and significantly better on recent bi-lateral comparisons (China). What can we learn from the physics teaching systems in these high-scoring countries that might be applied in the USA? There will be a panel discussion following the 3 invited talks, audience participation will be encouraged. )

  6. Ann Arbor Session I: Breaking Ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music Educators Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes the first session of the National Symposium on the Applications of Psychology to the Teaching and Learning of Music held at Ann Arbor from October 30 to November 2, 1978. Sessions concerned auditory perception, motor learning, child development, memory and information processing, and affect and motivation. (SJL)

  7. Retirement, Work, and Lifelong Learning; Hearing Before the Special Committee on Aging, Ninety-Fifth Congress, Second Session. Part 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona State Dept. of Economic Planning and Development, Phoenix.

    The transcripts of the testimony given before the Senate Committee by the Chairman of the Civil Service Commission, Alan Campbell, and Stanley Babson, management consultant and former vice president of finance for Technicon Corporation, are presented. Statements address the following issues of concern: age discrimination, management of job skills,…

  8. Learning in shifts of transient attention improves recognition of parts of ambiguous figure-ground displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsson, Arni

    2009-04-24

    Previously demonstrated learning effects in shifts of transient attention have only been shown to result in beneficial effects upon secondary discrimination tasks and affect landing points of express saccades. Can such learning result in more direct effects upon perception than previously demonstrated? Observers performed a cued Vernier acuity discrimination task where the cue was one of a set of ambiguous figure-ground displays (with a black and white part). The critical measure was whether, if a target appeared consistently within a part of a cue of a certain brightness, this would result in learning effects and whether such learning would then affect recognition of the cue parts. Critically the target always appeared within the same part of each individual cue. Some cues were used in early parts of streaks of repetition of cue-part brightness, and others in latter parts of such streaks. All the observers showed learning in shifts of transient attention, with improved performance the more often the target appeared within the part of the cue of the same brightness. Subsequently the observers judged whether cue-parts had been parts of the cues used on the preceding discrimination task. Recognition of the figure parts, where the target had consistently appeared, improved strongly with increased length of streaks of repetition of cue-part brightness. Learning in shifts of transient attention leads not only to faster attention shifts but to direct effects upon perception, in this case recognition of parts of figure-ground ambiguous cues.

  9. Medical Image Data and Datasets in the Era of Machine Learning-Whitepaper from the 2016 C-MIMI Meeting Dataset Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Marc D; Summers, Ronald M; Geis, J Raymond

    2017-08-01

    At the first annual Conference on Machine Intelligence in Medical Imaging (C-MIMI), held in September 2016, a conference session on medical image data and datasets for machine learning identified multiple issues. The common theme from attendees was that everyone participating in medical image evaluation with machine learning is data starved. There is an urgent need to find better ways to collect, annotate, and reuse medical imaging data. Unique domain issues with medical image datasets require further study, development, and dissemination of best practices and standards, and a coordinated effort among medical imaging domain experts, medical imaging informaticists, government and industry data scientists, and interested commercial, academic, and government entities. High-level attributes of reusable medical image datasets suitable to train, test, validate, verify, and regulate ML products should be better described. NIH and other government agencies should promote and, where applicable, enforce, access to medical image datasets. We should improve communication among medical imaging domain experts, medical imaging informaticists, academic clinical and basic science researchers, government and industry data scientists, and interested commercial entities.

  10. Attribute conjunctions and the part configuration advantage in object category learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, J; Hummel, J E

    1996-07-01

    Five experiments demonstrated that in object category learning people are particularly sensitive to conjunctions of part shapes and relative locations. Participants learned categories defined by a part's shape and color (part-color conjunctions) or by a part's shape and its location relative to another part (part-location conjunctions). The statistical properties of the categories were identical across these conditions, as were the salience of color and relative location. Participants were better at classifying objects defined by part-location conjunctions than objects defined by part-color conjunctions. Subsequent experiments revealed that this effect was not due to the specific color manipulation or the role of location per se. These results suggest that the shape bias in object categorization is at least partly due to sensitivity to part-location conjunctions and suggest a new processing constraint on category learning.

  11. Students' Learning Experiences from Didactic Teaching Sessions Including Patient Case Examples as Either Text or Video: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Moeller, Martin Holdgaard; Paltved, Charlotte; Mors, Ole; Ringsted, Charlotte; Morcke, Anne Mette

    2017-10-06

    The aim of this study was to explore medical students' learning experiences from the didactic teaching formats using either text-based patient cases or video-based patient cases with similar content. The authors explored how the two different patient case formats influenced students' perceptions of psychiatric patients and students' reflections on meeting and communicating with psychiatric patients. The authors conducted group interviews with 30 medical students who volunteered to participate in interviews and applied inductive thematic content analysis to the transcribed interviews. Students taught with text-based patient cases emphasized excitement and drama towards the personal clinical narratives presented by the teachers during the course, but never referred to the patient cases. Authority and boundary setting were regarded as important in managing patients. Students taught with video-based patient cases, in contrast, often referred to the patient cases when highlighting new insights, including the importance of patient perspectives when communicating with patients. The format of patient cases included in teaching may have a substantial impact on students' patient-centeredness. Video-based patient cases are probably more effective than text-based patient cases in fostering patient-centered perspectives in medical students. Teachers sharing stories from their own clinical experiences stimulates both engagement and excitement, but may also provoke unintended stigma and influence an authoritative approach in medical students towards managing patients in clinical psychiatry.

  12. Learning and Memory, Part II: Molecular Mechanisms of Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombroso, Paul; Ogren, Marilee

    2009-01-01

    The molecular events that are responsible for strengthening synaptic connections and how these are linked to memory and learning are discussed. The laboratory preparations that allow the investigation of these events are also described.

  13. Optimal Learning in Schools--Theoretical Evidence: Part 2 Updating Piaget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, John

    2017-01-01

    Part 1 in this four-part series of articles discussed Piaget's theories of learning and development (Crossland, 2016). Part 2 explores how post-Piagetian researchers have addressed criticisms of Piaget's theories by linking recent evidence including that from neuroscience. The outcomes show that good teachers make a difference by implementing…

  14. Learning knowledge as an integral part of competencies in higher education: Effects on students' knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bommel, Marijke; Boshuizen, Els; Kwakman, Kitty

    2011-01-01

    Van Bommel, M., Boshuizen, H. P. A., & Kwakman, K. (2010, 25-27 August). Learning knowledge as an integral part of competencies in higher education: Effects on students' knowledge. Paper presented at the 5th EARLI-SIG14 Learning and Professional Development, Munich, Germany.

  15. Brief Overview of Motor Learning and It's Application to Rehabilitation: Part Ⅰ: Motor Learning Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher A Zaino

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1 DEFINITION OF MOTOR LEARNING Motor learning is the study of how we acquire and modify movements.1 The acquisition of motor skills is the process of learning how to do a particular movement (performance), but the real key to therapeutic intervention is being able to affect permanent changes in motor skills via the process of motor learning. Therefore, motor learning is defined as the ability to retain the ability to perform a motor task at a later time. In rehabilitation, it is important to be cognizant of the concepts of acquisition and retention. We can facilitate acquisition,but do little to assist in the retention of the task (learning). Conversely, we can arrange practice such that acquisition is slowed, but we can actually be assisting learning the task. It is important to have a clear goal in mind and work towards the eventual learning of the task to allow full functional use of that skill.

  16. Preparing Instructional Designers for Game-Based Learning: Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Appelman, Bob; Rieber, Lloyd; Van Eck, Richard

    2010-01-01

    As noted in part I of this article (published in "TechTrends 54"(3)), advances in technology continue to outpace research on the design and effectiveness of instructional (digital video) games. In general, instructional designers know little about game development, commercial video game developers know little about training, education and…

  17. Post-Session Authentication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jensen, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    Entity authentication provides confidence in the claimed identity of a peer entity, but the manner in which this goal is achieved results in different types of authentication. An important factor in this regard is the order between authentication and the execution of the associated session....... In this paper, we consider the case of post-session authentication, where parties authenticate each other at the end of their interactive session. This use of authentication is different from session-less authentication (e.g., in RFID) and pre-session authentication (e.g., for access control.) Post......-session authentication, although a new term, is not a new concept; it is the basis of at least a few practical schemes. We, for the first time, systematically study it and present the underlying authentication model. Further, we show that an important class of problems is solvable using post-session authentication...

  18. Optimal Learning in Schools--Theoretical Evidence: Part 3 Individual Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, John

    2017-01-01

    Parts 1 and 2 in this four-part series of articles (Crossland, 2016, 2017) discussed the recent research from neuroscience linked to concepts from cognitive development that brought Piaget's theories into the 21st century and showed the most effective provision towards more optimal learning strategies. Then the discussion moved onto Demetriou's…

  19. The effects of inspecting and constructing part-task-specific visualizations on team and individual learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slof, Bert; Erkens, Gijsbert; Kirschner, Paul A.; Helms-Lorenz, Michelle

    This study examined whether inspecting and constructing different part-task-specific visualizations differentially affects learning. To this end, a complex business-economics problem was structured into three phase-related part-tasks: (1) determining core concepts, (2) proposing multiple solutions,

  20. Energy and water development appropriations for 1994. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session. Part 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Part 5 of the hearings for the Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 1994 contains budget hearings for the Department of Energy. Contained in this volume is the statement of the Secretary of Energy and budget proposals and justifications for Departmental Administration, Energy Research, Nuclear Energy and Commercial Waste Management, Solar and Renewables, and Power Marketing Administrations

  1. Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 5. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This is part 5 of the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committee on appropriations. Included are statements from witnesses of the Secretary of Energy, departmental administration, energy research, renewable energy, nuclear energy, Power Marketing Administration, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  2. Graph Transformation for Consolidation of Creativity Sessions Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolog, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Graph transformation approach for consolidation of creativity sessions results is part of the FP7 EU/IST project idSpace: Tooling of and training for collaborative, distributed product innovation. The goal of graph transformation approach is to provide a tool for merging results of various sessions...... (such as brainstorming sessions), which are represented as graphs, when the session participants- are physically distributed....

  3. Learning by observing: the effect of multiple sessions of action-observation training on the spontaneous movement tempo and motor resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagravinese, Giovanna; Bisio, Ambra; Ruggeri, Piero; Bove, Marco; Avanzino, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The present study was designed to explore the changes in motor performance and motor resonance after multiple sessions of action observation (AO) training. Subjects were exposed to the observation of a video showing finger tapping movements executed at 3Hz, a frequency higher than the spontaneous one (2Hz) for four consecutive days. Motor performance and motor resonance were tested before the AO training on the first day, and on the last day. Results showed that multiple sessions of AO training induced a shift of the speed of execution of finger tapping movements toward the observed one and a change in motor resonance. Before the 3Hz-AO training cortical excitability was highest during the observation of the 2Hz video. This motor resonance effect was lost after one single session of 3Hz-AO training whereas after multiple sessions of 3Hz-AO training cortical excitability was highest during the observation of the 3Hz video. Our study shows for the first time that multiple sessions of AO training are able not only to induce performance gains but also to change the way by which the observer's motor system recognizes a certain movement as belonging to the individual motor repertoire. These results may encourage the development of novel rehabilitative protocols based on multiple sessions of action observation aimed to regain a correct movement when its spontaneous speed is modified by pathologies or to modify the innate temporal properties of certain movements. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Practical Usage of Multiple-Choice Questions as Part of Learning and Self-Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Kangasniemi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The poster describes how the multiple-choice questions could be a part of learning, not only assessing. We often think of the role of questions only in order to test the student's skills. We have tested how questions could be a part of learning in our web-based course of information retrieval in Lapland University. In web-based learning there is a need for high-quality mediators. Mediators are learning promoters which trigger, support, and amplify learning. Mediators can be human mediators or tool mediators. The tool mediators are for example; tests, tutorials, guides and diaries. The multiple-choice questions can also be learning promoters which select, interpret and amplify objects for learning. What do you have to take into account when you are preparing multiple-choice questions as mediators? First you have to prioritize teaching objectives: what must be known and what should be known. According to our experience with contact learning, you can assess what the things are that students have problems with and need more guidance on. The most important addition to the questions is feedback during practice. The questions’ answers (wrong or right are not important. The feedback on the answers are important to guide students on how to search. The questions promote students’ self-regulation and self-evaluation. Feedback can be verbal, a screenshot or a video. We have added a verbal feedback for every question and also some screenshots and eight videos in our web-based course.

  5. Energy and water development appropriations for 1987. Part 6. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Part 6 of the record covers testimony on the budgets and spending needs of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, DOE departmental administration, Power Marketing Administration, and atomic energy defense activities. The latter included testimony from those involved in the Naval Nuclear Propulsion and other nuclear materials and defense programs. Officials of each of the agencies or departments reviewed their budgets in terms of their performance as well as their contribution to the deficit-reducing effort. Documentation supplements each portion of the hearing record

  6. Energy and water development appropriations for 1986. Part 7. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Part 7 of the hearing record covers three areas of the DOE appropriations: Atomic Energy Defense activities, power marketing administrations, and departmental administration. Representatives of DOE and the US Army reviewed the nuclear defense mission and activities under the defense and arms control programs. The administrators of the Alaska, Bonneville, Southeastern, Southwestern, and Western Power Administrations and a representative of the Conservation and Renewable Energy division described programs and budget requirements, as well as estimates of power demands for their regions. Administrative personnel described DOE procedures and explained the budget requests. Supporting documentation accompanies the testimony of the 16 witnesses

  7. Energy and water development appropriations for 1987. Part 9. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Part nine of the hearing record covers testimony pertaining to activities of DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Seven witnesses from DOE, including representatives of the Richland and Savannah River facilities, testified on the safety of US reactors in response to concerns about the Chernobyl accident. At issue was whether US research or power reactors are vulnerable to a similar kind of accident. Witnesses noted DOE's safety record, its recent reviews of oversight procedures, and modifications to correct possible weaknesses in those procedures. Technical safety appraisals at Savannah River were made earlier than originally planned, and other studies will be conducted to ensure that design and engineering will minimize the possibility of an accident. NRC Commissioners and regulators testified at the second day of hearings to describe its efforts to understand what happened at Chernobyl and to outline the differences between the Soviet and US reactors

  8. Secure Execution of Distributed Session Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Alves

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of the SJ Framework for session-based distributed programming is part of recent and ongoing research into integrating session types and practical, real-world programming languages. SJ programs featuring session types (protocols are statically checked by the SJ compiler to verify the key property of communication safety, meaning that parties engaged in a session only communicate messages, including higher-order communications via session delegation, that are compatible with the message types expected by the recipient. This paper presents current work on security aspects of the SJ Framework. Firstly, we discuss our implementation experience from improving the SJ Runtime platform with security measures to protect and augment communication safety at runtime. We implement a transport component for secure session execution that uses a modified TLS connection with authentication based on the Secure Remote Password (SRP protocol. The key technical point is the delicate treatment of secure session delegation to counter a previous vulnerability. We find that the modular design of the SJ Runtime, based on the notion of an Abstract Transport for session communication, supports rapid extension to utilise additional transports whilst separating this concern from the application-level session programming task. In the second part of this abstract, we formally prove the target security properties by modelling the extended SJ delegation protocols in the pi-calculus.

  9. The Pedagogy of the Heart and the Mind--Cultivating Curiosity and a Love of Learning, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This article is the second part of a two-part article on a learning project developed through the Independent Learning Centre (ILC) program at Concordia Lutheran College. The first part of this article can be found in the January 2009 issue of this journal and discusses how the applications of the "AASL Standards for the 21st-Century Learner"…

  10. Multiparty Asynchronous Session Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honda, Kohei; Yoshida, Nobuko; Carbone, Marco

    2016-01-01

    . This work extends the foregoing theories of binary session types to multiparty, asynchronous sessions, which often arise in practical communication-centered applications. Presented as a typed calculus for mobile processes, the theory introduces a new notion of types in which interactions involving multiple......Communication is a central elements in software development. As a potential typed foundation for structured communication-centered programming, session types have been studied over the past decade for a wide range of process calculi and programming languages, focusing on binary (two-party) sessions...... peers are directly abstracted as a global scenario. Global types retain the friendly type syntax of binary session types while specifying dependencies and capturing complex causal chains of multiparty asynchronous interactions. A global type plays the role of a shared agreement among communication peers...

  11. The evaluation process of short training sessions in organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overschie, M.G.F.; Lukosch, H.K.; De Vries, P.

    This paper presents a critical reflection of the evaluation of learning processes in organizations. Based on learning and evaluation theories and concepts we discuss qualitative and quantitative evaluation processes, and its relationship to short training sessions to foster sustainable development.

  12. Learning to deal with crisis in the home: Part 2 - preparing preregistration students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Caroline E; Dickson, Caroline; Lawson, Bill; McMillan, Ailsa; Kelly, Helena

    2015-12-01

    The global shift of health care is from acute services to community and primary care. Therefore, registrants must be prepared to work effectively within diverse settings. This article is the second in a series discussing the preparation of nurses for contemporary health-care challenges in the community. In it, we outline the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulated emergency scenarios within an honours degree-level, pre-registration nursing curriculum in Scotland. Over 3 years, 99 final-year students participated in interactive sessions focusing on recognition and management of the deteriorating patient and emergency care. Clinical scenarios were designed and delivered collaboratively with community practitioners. Debriefing challenged the students to reflect on learning and transferability of skills of clinical reasoning and care management to the community context. Students considered the scenarios to be realistic and perceived that their confidence had increased. Development of such simulation exercises is worthy of further debate in education and practice.

  13. N-Loop Learning: Part I--of Hedgehog, Fox, Dodo Bird and Sphinx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, Bernard L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to encourage greater clarity and stimulate further interest in thorough empirical research in the area of learning levels. The broader motivation here is to urge researchers to not only theorize but also undertake elaborate and much needed empirical work. Design/methodology/approach Part I of the study rests on a…

  14. Learning hardware using multiple-valued logic - Part 2: Cube calculus and architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perkowski, M.A.; Foote, D.; Chen, Qihong; Al-Rabadi, A.; Jozwiak, L.

    2002-01-01

    For Part 1 see ibid. vol.22, no.3 (2002). A massively parallel reconfigurable processor speeds up the logic operators performed in the learning hardware. The approach uses combinatorial synthesis methods developed within the framework of the logic synthesis approach in digital-circuit-design

  15. Part-Time Community College Instructors Teaching in Learning Communities: An Exploratory Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Community colleges have a greater portion of students at-risk for college completion than four-year schools and faculty at these institutions are overwhelmingly and increasingly part-time. Learning communities have been identified as a high-impact practice with numerous benefits documented for community college instructors and students: a primary…

  16. "Scaffolding" of Action Learning within a Part-Time Management Development Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joesbury, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This Account of Practice describes the introduction and development of action learning within a level 5 module of "Communications at Work" delivered as part of a Business & Technology Education Council (BTEC) Professional Certificate in Management (CMS) between 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. This will commence with a personal narrative and…

  17. Learning about the Human Genome. Part 2: Resources for Science Educators. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haury, David L.

    This ERIC Digest identifies how the human genome project fits into the "National Science Education Standards" and lists Human Genome Project Web sites found on the World Wide Web. It is a resource companion to "Learning about the Human Genome. Part 1: Challenge to Science Educators" (Haury 2001). The Web resources and…

  18. Administrative Candidacy: A Process of New-Role Learning--Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, William D., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Reports the initial results of a longitudinal study of the organizational socialization of educational administrators. Part I claims that socialization through the life-cycle may be conceived as a series of learned interpersonal relationships through which individuals build up a repertoire of interpersonal responses that condition new…

  19. Session: Avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating avian and bat impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelander, Carl; Kerlinger, Paul

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question answer period. The session addressed a variety of questions related to avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating the avian and bat impacts of wind power development including: what has been learned from operating turbines and mitigating impacts where they are unavoidable, such as at Altamont Pass WRA, and should there be mitigation measures such as habitat creation or land conservation where impacts occur. Other impact minimization and mitigation approaches discussed included: location and siting evaluations; options for construction and operation of wind facilities; turbine lighting; and the physical alignment/orientation. Titles and authors of the presentations were: 'Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: A Case Study, Part II' by Carl Thelander and 'Prevention and Mitigation of Avian Impacts at Wind Power Facilities' by Paul Kerlinger.

  20. Session: Avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating avian and bat impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thelander, Carl; Kerlinger, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question answer period. The session addressed a variety of questions related to avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating the avian and bat impacts of wind power development including: what has been learned from operating turbines and mitigating impacts where they are unavoidable, such as at Altamont Pass WRA, and should there be mitigation measures such as habitat creation or land conservation where impacts occur. Other impact minimization and mitigation approaches discussed included: location and siting evaluations; options for construction and operation of wind facilities; turbine lighting; and the physical alignment/orientation. Titles and authors of the presentations were: 'Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: A Case Study, Part II' by Carl Thelander and 'Prevention and Mitigation of Avian Impacts at Wind Power Facilities' by Paul Kerlinger

  1. Health education and multimedia learning: educational psychology and health behavior theory (Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Francisco G Soto; Plass, Jan; Kane, William M; Papenfuss, Richard L

    2003-07-01

    When health education researchers began to investigate how individuals make decisions related to health and the factors that influence health behaviors, they referred to frameworks shared by educational and learning research. Health education adopted the basic principles of the cognitive revolution, which were instrumental in advancing the field. There is currently a new challenge to confront: the widespread use of new technologies for health education. To better overcome this challenge, educational psychology and instructional technology theory should be considered. Unfortunately, the passion to incorporate new technologies too often overshadows how people learn or, in particular, how people learn through computer technologies. This two-part article explains how educational theory contributed to the early development of health behavior theory, describes the most relevant multimedia learning theories and constructs, and provides recommendations for developing multimedia health education programs and connecting theory and practice.

  2. Session 8: biofuels; Session 8: Les biocarburants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botte, J.M.

    2006-01-15

    Here are given the summaries of the speeches of Mr Daniel Le Breton (Total): the transports of the future: the role of biofuels; of Mr Pierre Rouveirolles (Renault): the future expectations and needs; of Mr Frederic Monot (IFP): the developments of new generations of biofuels from biomass; of Mr Willem Jan Laan (Unilever): the use of bio resources for food and fuel: a fair competition? All these speeches have been presented at the AFTP yearly days (12-13 october 2005) on the session 8 concerning the biofuels. (O.M.)

  3. A real-time standard parts inspection based on deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuan; Li, XuDong; Jiang, Hongzhi; Zhao, Huijie

    2017-10-01

    Since standard parts are necessary components in mechanical structure like bogie and connector. These mechanical structures will be shattered or loosen if standard parts are lost. So real-time standard parts inspection systems are essential to guarantee their safety. Researchers would like to take inspection systems based on deep learning because it works well in image with complex backgrounds which is common in standard parts inspection situation. A typical inspection detection system contains two basic components: feature extractors and object classifiers. For the object classifier, Region Proposal Network (RPN) is one of the most essential architectures in most state-of-art object detection systems. However, in the basic RPN architecture, the proposals of Region of Interest (ROI) have fixed sizes (9 anchors for each pixel), they are effective but they waste much computing resources and time. In standard parts detection situations, standard parts have given size, thus we can manually choose sizes of anchors based on the ground-truths through machine learning. The experiments prove that we could use 2 anchors to achieve almost the same accuracy and recall rate. Basically, our standard parts detection system could reach 15fps on NVIDIA GTX1080 (GPU), while achieving detection accuracy 90.01% mAP.

  4. CBIOS Science Sessions - 2015 - Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Costa et al.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Redox modulation by SOD mimics in renal cancer: from etiology to progression; Modulação redox por miméticos da SOD no cancro renal: da etiologia à progressão; João Costa. Role of the Notch pathway in female reproductive function; Papel da via Notch na função reprodutiva feminina; Daniel Murta; Marta Batista; Alexandre Trindade; Elisabete Silva; Luisa Mateus; António Duarte; Luís Costa. Skin permeation and in vivo antioxidant activity of gelatin nanoparticles; Permeação cutânea e actividade antioxidante in vivo de nanopartículas de gelatina; Camila Areias de Oliveira Isolation, modeling and phytosome forms of antiproliferative compounds from Plectranthus spp; Isolamento, modelação e formulações fitossomais de compostos antiproliferativos obtidos de plantas do género Plectranthus; Diogo Matias, Marisa Nicolai, A. S. Fernandes, Nuno Saraiva, M. Fátima Simões, Ana Diaz Lanza, Catarina Pinto Reis, Patricia Rijo. Role of SOD mimetics in breast cancer metastization; Papel de miméticos da SOD em metastização do cancro da mama; Ana Catarina Flórido. Royleanone derivatives from Plectranthus grandidentatus and its topical application through drug delivery nanosystems; Derivados de roileanona de Plectranthus grandidentatus e a sua aplicação tópica em nanossistemas para veiculação de fármacos; Filipe Pereira, M. J. Cebola, Rita Sobral, Ana Diaz Lanza, Lia Ascenção, Carlos Afonso, Catarina Pinto Reis, Patrícia Rijo. Research in dental veterinary medicine; Investigação em medicina dentária veterinária; João Filipe Requicha. Marek's disease virus (MDV ibiquitin-specific protease (USP performs critical functions beyond its enzymatic activity during virus replication; O papel das proteases específicas da ubiquitina na replicação viral e oncoginese induzida pelo virus da doença de Marek; Inês M.V. Veiga, Keith W. Jarosinski, Benedikt B. Kaufer, Nikolaus Osterrieder.

  5. CBIOS Science Sessions - 2014 - Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Elisabete Pires et al.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A visit to the past through ancient DNA analysis; Uma visita ao passado através da análise de DNA antigo; Ana Elisabete Pires Molecular and serological evaluation of vector-borne diseases infection in dogs with non-Hodgkin lymphoma; Análise molecular e sorológica da infecção por doenças transmitidas por vetores em cães com linfoma não-Hodgkin; Henriques, J.; Almeida B.; Ramos, J.; Pereira V.; Santos, A.S.; Sousa, R.; Heeney, J.; Dobson, J. & Alves, M. Time-lapse imaging in the IVF laboratory: clinical applications through understanding embryo development; Imagem de "time-lapse" no laboratório FIV: aplicações clínicas através do desenvolvimento embrionário; Ana Sousa Lopes Ionic liquids synthesis and their application in drug delivery systems; Síntese de líquidos iónicos e sua aplicação em sistemas de veiculação; Tânia Almeida

  6. Using session types as an effect system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Orchard

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Side effects are a core part of practical programming. However, they are often hard to reason about, particularly in a concurrent setting. We propose a foundation for reasoning about concurrent side effects using sessions. Primarily, we show that session types are expressive enough to encode an effect system for stateful processes. This is formalised via an effect-preserving encoding of a simple imperative language with an effect system into the pi-calculus with session primitives and session types (into which we encode effect specifications. This result goes towards showing a connection between the expressivity of session types and effect systems. We briefly discuss how the encoding could be extended and applied to reason about and control concurrent side effects.

  7. Self–Evaluation of Distance Learning Study Program as a Part of Internal Quality Assurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radojka Krneta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper features quality assurance of specific distance learning master study program through self-evaluation. This unique program involving e-learning as the program content, as well as delivery method, is presented in the paper from the aspects of its quality assurance. Student evaluation of this study program as a part of the internal quality assurance is performed at the end of every school year in the aim of its quality assurance. Results and conclusions of self-evaluation conducted in this school year by known SEVAQ+ evaluation tool are presented here.

  8. Becoming a Lunari or Taiyo expert: learned attention to parts drives holistic processing of faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Kao-Wei; Richler, Jennifer J; Gauthier, Isabel

    2014-06-01

    Faces are processed holistically, but the locus of holistic processing remains unclear. We created two novel races of faces (Lunaris and Taiyos) to study how experience with face parts influences holistic processing. In Experiment 1, subjects individuated Lunaris wherein the top, bottom, or both face halves contained diagnostic information. Subjects who learned to attend to face parts exhibited no holistic processing. This suggests that individuation only leads to holistic processing when the whole face is attended. In Experiment 2, subjects individuated both Lunaris and Taiyos, with diagnostic information in complementary face halves of the two races. Holistic processing was measured with composites made of either diagnostic or nondiagnostic face parts. Holistic processing was only observed for composites made from diagnostic face parts, demonstrating that holistic processing can occur for diagnostic face parts that were never seen together. These results suggest that holistic processing is an expression of learned attention to diagnostic face parts. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Summary: Hadron dynamics sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, A.S.; Londergan, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Four sessions on Hadron Dynamics were organized at this Workshop. The first topic, QCD Exclusive Reactions and Color Transparency, featured talks by Ralston, Heppelman and Strikman; the second, QCD and Inclusive Reactions had talks by Garvey, Speth and Kisslinger. The third dynamics session, Medium Modification of Elementary Interactions had contributions from Kopeliovich, Alves and Gyulassy; the fourth session Pre-QCD Dynamics and Scattering, had talks by Harris, Myhrer and Brown. An additional joint Spectroscopy/Dynamics session featured talks by Zumbro, Johnson and McClelland. These contributions are reviewed briefly in this summary. Two additional joint sessions between Dynamics and η physics are reviewed by the organizers of the Eta sessions. In such a brief review there is no way the authors can adequately summarize the details of the physics presented here. As a result, they concentrate only on brief impressionistic sketches of the physics topics discussed and their interrelations. They include no bibliography in this summary, but simply refer to the talks given in more detail in the Workshop proceedings. They focus on topics which were common to several presentations in these sessions. First, nuclear and particle descriptions of phenomena are now clearly converging, in both a qualitative and quantitative sense; they show several examples of this convergence. Second, an important issue in hadron dynamics is the extent to which elementary interactions are modified in nuclei at high energies and/or densities, and they illustrate some of these medium effects. Finally, they focus on those dynamical issues where hadron facilities can make an important, or even a unique, contribution to the knowledge of particle and nuclear physics

  10. Linearly Refined Session Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Baltazar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Session types capture precise protocol structure in concurrent programming, but do not specify properties of the exchanged values beyond their basic type. Refinement types are a form of dependent types that can address this limitation, combining types with logical formulae that may refer to program values and can constrain types using arbitrary predicates. We present a pi calculus with assume and assert operations, typed using a session discipline that incorporates refinement formulae written in a fragment of Multiplicative Linear Logic. Our original combination of session and refinement types, together with the well established benefits of linearity, allows very fine-grained specifications of communication protocols in which refinement formulae are treated as logical resources rather than persistent truths.

  11. Workshop: poster session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schell, W.R.; Colgan, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The poster session consisted of a microcosm of projects encompassing the wide range of problems in the radioecology of natural and semi-natural ecosystems. The authors presented a brief resume of the poster at a plenary session during which highlights were pointed out. The range of studies covered microbial transfer, fungi, insects herbicides, lichens, solid speciation of cesium, soil properties, plant cover, transfer factors from soil to plants, uptake by sludge fertilizers, fertilizer remediation and compartmental models for soil-plant uptake. (author)

  12. Session 2: Machine studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assmann, R.W.; Papotti, G.

    2012-01-01

    This document summarizes the talks and discussion that took place in the second session of the Chamonix 2012 workshop concerning results from machine studies performed in 2011. The session consisted of the following presentations: -) LHC experience with different bunch spacings by G. Rumolo; -) Observations of beam-beam effects in MDs in 2011 by W. Herr; -) Beam-induced heating/ bunch length/RF and lessons for 2012 by E. Metral; -) Lessons in beam diagnostics by R. Jones; -) Quench margins by M. Sapinski; and -) First demonstration with beam of the Achromatic Telescopic Squeeze (ATS) by S. Fartoukh. (authors)

  13. Session 7: Reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, R.; Crockford, G.

    2001-01-01

    The reserve session was devoted to some issues that came up through the workshop, which were grouped into three main areas: The Global Accelerator Network, Problems of stress and how to get organized to minimize them, What should an operations group be responsible for? This paper summarizes the discussions that took place. (author)

  14. Session 2: Availability

    CERN Document Server

    Uythoven, J

    2012-01-01

    This session concentrated on the main players affecting the availability of the LHC: the Quench Protection System (QPS), the cryogenics system, the regularly foreseen technical stops and the effect of radiation on equipment failures. A forecast for operation in 2012 was made for all these items.

  15. Summary of Session 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischer, J.

    2004-01-01

    In Session 3, the speakers were dealing with the following topics: Automatization of Feynman Diagram Calculations (FDC), Event generators, Analytical approaches to FDC and various Mathematical innovations related to different physical problems. A more general, 'brainstorming', talk was given by J. Vermaseren as first talk

  16. Summary of Session III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002

  17. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Includes abstracts of 18 special interest group (SIG) sessions. Highlights include natural language processing, information science and terminology science, classification, knowledge-intensive information systems, information value and ownership issues, economics and theories of information science, information retrieval interfaces, fuzzy thinking…

  18. NSSS vendors session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    A transcription of a question and answer session at the 1982 Nuclear Commerce Conference was presented. Standardization of nuclear power plant design, and the effects it would have on Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing and regulations, was of particular interest. Forecasts of the demand for nuclear power for the rest of this country were also discussed

  19. Enhancing Competence in Health Social Work Education through Simulation-Based Learning: Strategies from a Case Study of a Family Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Shelley L.; McInroy, Lauren B.; Bogo, Marion; Thompson, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Simulation-based learning (SBL) is a powerful tool for social work education, preparing students to practice in integrated health care settings. In an educational environment addressing patient health using an integrated care model, there is growing emphasis on students developing clinical competencies prior to entering clinical placements or…

  20. Animal-Assisted Literacy Instruction for Students with Identified Learning Disabilities: Examining the Effects of Incorporating a Therapy Dog into Guided Oral Reading Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treat, Wendy Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Literacy acquisition is imperative to successful academic progress and to successful participation in our society. Students with identified learning disabilities are often among those who struggle to acquire literacy skills. The following dissertation shares the results of a reading intervention study in which nine students with identified…

  1. Teach beyond Your Reach: An Instructor's Guide to Developing and Running Successful Distance Learning Classes, Workshops, Training Sessions, and More. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidorf, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Distance education is enabling individuals to earn college and graduate degrees, professional certificates, and a wide range of skills and credentials. In addition to the expanding role of distance learning in higher education, all types of organizations now offer web-based training courses to employees, clients, and other associates. In this…

  2. Training Sessional Academic Staff to Provide Quality Feedback on University Students' Assessment: Lessons from a Faculty of Law Learning and Teaching Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kelly; Bell, Tamara; Dwyer, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The quality of feedback provided to university students has long been recognised as the most important predictor of student learning and satisfaction. However, providing quality feedback to students is challenging in the current context, in which universities increasingly rely on casualised and inexperienced academic staff to assess undergraduate…

  3. Conceptions and Characterization: An Explanation for the Theory-Practice Gap in Conceptual Change Theory. (Sponsored Session Strand 1 Science Learning, Understanding and Conceptual Change)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijck, van M.W.; Czermak, Charlene M.; Duschl, Richard A.; Kyle, William C.; Sondergeld, Toni

    2009-01-01

    The theory building on conceptual change has led to the paradox that, in order to address teaching-learning processes, research yields an increasingly sophisticated output which alienates the teachers. The aim of this study is to explain the origin of this paradox. Drawing on exemplary data from a

  4. Special Globelics session proposal on: Lessons learned for priority setting and indicators relevant to the impact of research programmes in Europe and Emerging Economies. An evidence-based debate between the research and the policy-shaping community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caloghirou, Y.; Vonortas, N.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this session is to present a coherent set of papers offering useful insights on research priority setting processes/activities and indicators used to measure the impact of research and technology development programmes in Europe and Emerging Economies (Brazil, Chile, Peru and Russia). In particular, the first paper focuses on the research collaborative networks funded by the European Union during the past three decades and offers a comprehensive picture of science-industry collaboration in Europe by using network indicators and providing data on the characteristics and the innovative performance of young firms participating in these networks. The second paper presents three cases of non-traditional indicators for R&D funding agencies from emerging economies and aims at contributing to the discussions on the importance of employing suitable indicators that can complement classic STI indicators. The third paper seeks to provide a critical overview of the recent exercise in the evaluation of public research institutions in Russia. The session (180 min) aims at bringing together researchers from both developed and emerging countries as well as policy makers and will be divided into two parts . The first part will be devoted in papers’ presentation and the second one in papers’ discussion by invited policy experts and officials. (Author)

  5. Session 1 - discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, C.; Richards, K.M.; McKerrow, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    This discussion session of the Landfill Gas-Energy and Environment 90 Conference covered the landfill gas potential, the setting up of the Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation; anticipated developments in the post 1998 period, the problem of smell for those who live near a landfill, and the length of time a landfill site is productive in terms of gas evolution. Relevant regulations in California are briefly discussed. (author)

  6. Parts-based stereoscopic image assessment by learning binocular manifold color visual properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiyong; Yu, Mei; Luo, Ting; Zhang, Yun; Jiang, Gangyi

    2016-11-01

    Existing stereoscopic image quality assessment (SIQA) methods are mostly based on the luminance information, in which color information is not sufficiently considered. Actually, color is part of the important factors that affect human visual perception, and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) and manifold learning are in line with human visual perception. We propose an SIQA method based on learning binocular manifold color visual properties. To be more specific, in the training phase, a feature detector is created based on NMF with manifold regularization by considering color information, which not only allows parts-based manifold representation of an image, but also manifests localized color visual properties. In the quality estimation phase, visually important regions are selected by considering different human visual attention, and feature vectors are extracted by using the feature detector. Then the feature similarity index is calculated and the parts-based manifold color feature energy (PMCFE) for each view is defined based on the color feature vectors. The final quality score is obtained by considering a binocular combination based on PMCFE. The experimental results on LIVE I and LIVE Π 3-D IQA databases demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve much higher consistency with subjective evaluations than the state-of-the-art SIQA methods.

  7. Influencing Work-Related Learning: The Role of Job Characteristics and Self-Directed Learning Orientation in Part-Time Vocational Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijbels, David; Raemdonck, Isabel; Vervecken, Dries

    2010-01-01

    Based on the Demand-Control-Support (DCS) model, the present paper aims to investigate the influence of job characteristics such as job demands, job control, social support at work and self-directed learning orientation on the work-related learning behaviour of workers. The present study was conducted in a centre for part-time vocational education…

  8. Poster session in instructional technology course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniaty, Artina; Fauzi'ah, Lina; Wulan Febriana, Beta; Arlianty, Widinda Normalia

    2017-12-01

    Instructional technology course must be studied by students in order to 1) understand the role of technology in learning, 2) capable of analyzing advantages and disadvantages of using technology in teaching, 3) capable of performing technology in teaching. A poster session in instructional technology course was performed to 1) enhance students' interest in this course and develop students' creativity. The step of this research includes: planning, implementation, and evaluation. The result showed that students' responses towards poster session in instructional technology course were good.

  9. Building Worlds and Learning Astronomy on Facebook Part III: Testing, Launch, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold, J.; Hines, D.; Vidugiris, E.; Goldman, K. H.

    2015-11-01

    James Harold (SSI), Dean Hines (STScI/SSI) and a team at the National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute are developing Starchitect, an end-to-end stellar and planetary evolution game for the Facebook platform. Supported by NSF and NASA, and based in part on a prototype presented at ASP several years ago, Starchitect uses the “sporadic play” model of games such as Farmville, where players might only take actions a few times a day, but may continue playing for months. This paper is an update to a presentation at last year's ASP conference.

  10. IMS Learning Design desde dentro. Una especificación para crear escenarios de aprendizaje online (parte II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgos, Daniel; Berbegal, Nidia; Griffiths, David; Tattersall, Colin; Koper, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Presentamos la segunda entrega de esta tesis desarrollada en el marco del proyecto europeo denominado Understanding New Frameworks of Learning Design (UNFOLD, 2004). Referencia para la primera parte: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/473

  11. A Virtual Learning Environment for Part-Time MASW Students: An Evaluation of the WebCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Charles C.; Tsui, Ming-sum; Chan, Mandy Y. C.; Hong, Joe H.

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the perception of a cohort of social workers studying for a part-time master's program in social work in using the popular Web-based learning platform--World Wide Web Course Tools (WebCT) as a complimentary method of teaching and learning. It was noted that social work profession began incorporating computer technology…

  12. Point Topography and Within-Session Learning Are Important Predictors of Pet Dogs’ (Canis lupus familiaris Performance on Human Guided Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorey, Nicole R.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pet domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris are generally considered successful on object choice tasks, reliably following human points to a target. However, defining the specific topography of the point types utilized and assessing the potential for dogs to generalize their responses across similar point types has received little attention. In Experiment 1, we assessed pet dogs’ performance on an object choice task utilizing nine different point types that varied across the dimensions of movement, duration, and distance. These dimensions reliably predicted the performance of pet dogs on this task. In Experiment 2, pet dogs presented with nine different point types in the order of increasing difficulty performed better on more difficult point types than both naive dogs and dogs experiencing the nine points in the order of decreasing difficulty. In Experiment 3, we manipulated the attentional state of the experimenter (as in perspective taking studies and found that human orientation was not a strong predictor of performance on pointing tasks. The results of this study indicate that dogs do not reliably follow all point types without additional training or experience. Furthermore, dogs appear to continuously learn about the dimensions of human points, adjusting their behavior accordingly, even over the course of experimental testing. These findings bring claims of pet dogs’ spontaneous success on pointing tasks into question. The ability to learn about, and respond flexibly to, human gestures may benefit pet dogs living in human homes more than a spontaneous responsiveness to specific gesture types.

  13. Raymark Public Open House and General Information Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USEPA, CTDEEP, CT DPH, & the Stratford Health Department will host an Open House & General Information Session for Stratford, CT residents to learn more about the Raymark Industries, Inc. Superfund Site, on Tuesday, May 23, 2017...

  14. ICALEPS 2005 : opening session

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    ICALEPCS 2005, the tenth International Conference on Accelerator and Large Experimental Physics Control Systems, will be held in Geneva, Switzerland, 10-14 Oct. 2005 at the International Conference Center Geneva (CICG). ICALEPCS 2005 thus falls in the year that UNESCO has declared the "World Year of Physics". ICALEPCS covers all aspects of control and operation of Experimental Physics facilities such as particle accelerators, particle detectors, optical telescopes, radio telescopes, nuclear fusion facilities like Tokamaks, nuclear reactors, lasers, etc .... Opening session by . A. Daneels (CERN): Introducting ICALEPCS 2005 . C.Lamprecht (Republic & State of Geneva): Welcome speech . J. Lister (EPFL): Welcome speech . J. Engelen (CERN): The machine and experiment challenges of LHC

  15. 98th LHCC meeting Agenda OPEN Session and CLOSED Session

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    OPEN Session on Wednesday, 8 July at 9h00-11h00 in Main Auditorium, Live webcast, followed by CLOSED Session, Conference room 160-1-009 11h20-17h00. CLOSED Session continued on Thursday, 9 July at 9h00-12h30

  16. Ausubel's Theory of Learning and its Application to Introductory Science Part II--Primary Science: An Ausubelian View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J. A. G.

    1982-01-01

    In part 1 (SE 532 193) an outline of Ausubel's learning theory was given. The application of the theory to elementary school science is addressed in this part, clarifying what elementary science means and indicating how it relates to what may be expected to be already known by elementary school children. (Author/JN)

  17. Plans and Activities for 1990 Decennial Census. Part 2: Hearings before the Subcommittee on Census and Population of the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session (May 1, 15, 1986).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U. S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service.

    Hearings on the 1990 Decennial Census were held on May 1, 1986, and May 15, 1986. The May 1 session focused on data processing procedures. Speakers included John G. Keane, Daniel G. Horvitz, William Eddy, Judith S. Rowe, Benjamin F. King, and Stephen E. Fienberg. Topics included automation of address files and questionnaire check-in; dissemination…

  18. Session Types at the Mirror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Padovani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We (redefine session types as projections of process behaviors with respect to the communication channels they use. In this setting, we give session types a semantics based on fair testing. The outcome is a unified theory of behavioral types that shares common aspects with conversation types and that encompass features of both dyadic and multi-party session types. The point of view we provide sheds light on the nature of session types and gives us a chance to reason about them in a framework where every notion, from well-typedness to the subtyping relation between session types, is semantically -rather than syntactically- grounded.

  19. Evaluation of a mock interview session on residency interview skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Kelsey; Karr, Samantha; Nisly, Sarah A; Kelley, Kristi

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of student pharmacist participation in a mock interview session on confidence level and preparation regarding residency interview skills. The study setting was a mock interview session, held in conjunction with student programming at the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Annual Meeting. Prior to the mock interview session, final year student pharmacists seeking residency program placement were asked to complete a pre-session survey assessing confidence level for residency interviews. Each student pharmacist participated in up to three mock interviews. A post-session survey evaluating confidence level was then administered to consenting participants. Following the American Society for Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) Pharmacy Resident Matching Program (RMP), a post-match electronic survey was sent to study participants to determine their perception of the influence of the mock interview session on achieving successful interactions during residency interviews. A total of 59 student pharmacists participated in the mock interview session and completed the pre-session survey. Participants completing the post-session survey (88%, n = 52) unanimously reported an enhanced confidence in interviewing skills following the session. Thirty responders reported a program match rate of 83%. Approximately 97% (n = 29) of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the questions asked during the mock interview session were reflective of questions asked during residency interviews. Lessons learned from this mock interview session can be applied to PGY1 residency mock interview sessions held locally, regionally, and nationally. Students participating in the ACCP Mock Interview Session recognized the importance of the interview component in obtaining a postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) pharmacy residency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Machine Learning and Infrared Thermography for Fiber Orientation Assessment on Randomly-Oriented Strands Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldague, Xavier

    2018-01-01

    The use of fiber reinforced materials such as randomly-oriented strands has grown in recent years, especially for manufacturing of aerospace composite structures. This growth is mainly due to their advantageous properties: they are lighter and more resistant to corrosion when compared to metals and are more easily shaped than continuous fiber composites. The resistance and stiffness of these materials are directly related to their fiber orientation. Thus, efficient approaches to assess their fiber orientation are in demand. In this paper, a non-destructive evaluation method is applied to assess the fiber orientation on laminates reinforced with randomly-oriented strands. More specifically, a method called pulsed thermal ellipsometry combined with an artificial neural network, a machine learning technique, is used in order to estimate the fiber orientation on the surface of inspected parts. Results showed that the method can be potentially used to inspect large areas with good accuracy and speed. PMID:29351240

  1. Generational influences in academic emergency medicine: teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology (part I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Mills, Angela M; Brunett, Patrick H; Promes, Susan B

    2011-02-01

    For the first time in history, four generations are working together-traditionalists, baby boomers, generation Xers (Gen Xers), and millennials. Members of each generation carry with them a unique perspective of the world and interact differently with those around them. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic emergency medicine (EM). Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can help address some common issues encountered in academic EM. Through recognition of the unique characteristics of each of the generations with respect to teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology, academicians have the opportunity to strategically optimize interactions with one another. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  2. Machine Learning and Infrared Thermography for Fiber Orientation Assessment on Randomly-Oriented Strands Parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Henrique; Zhang, Hai; Figueiredo, Alisson; Malheiros, Fernando; Ignacio, Luis Henrique; Sfarra, Stefano; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Guimaraes, Gilmar; Maldague, Xavier

    2018-01-19

    The use of fiber reinforced materials such as randomly-oriented strands has grown in recent years, especially for manufacturing of aerospace composite structures. This growth is mainly due to their advantageous properties: they are lighter and more resistant to corrosion when compared to metals and are more easily shaped than continuous fiber composites. The resistance and stiffness of these materials are directly related to their fiber orientation. Thus, efficient approaches to assess their fiber orientation are in demand. In this paper, a non-destructive evaluation method is applied to assess the fiber orientation on laminates reinforced with randomly-oriented strands. More specifically, a method called pulsed thermal ellipsometry combined with an artificial neural network, a machine learning technique, is used in order to estimate the fiber orientation on the surface of inspected parts. Results showed that the method can be potentially used to inspect large areas with good accuracy and speed.

  3. Generational Influences in Academic Emergency Medicine: Teaching and Learning, Mentoring, and Technology (Part I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Nicholas M.; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Mills, Angela M.; Brunett, Patrick H.; Promes, Susan B.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time in history, four generations are working together – Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers, and Millennials. Members of each generation carry with them a unique perspective of the world and interact differently with those around them. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic emergency medicine (EM). Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can help address some common issues encountered in academic EM. Through recognition of the unique characteristics of each of the generations with respect to teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology, academicians have the opportunity to strategically optimize interactions with one another. PMID:21314779

  4. Detailed session outputs by the groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Session 1 (What are we trying to look at and when should we do it?) discussed the following points: - What are the key characteristics of safety culture that we should look at as nuclear regulators? - Should/can the regulator look at attitudes, values and behaviours as well as processes and documents? - Can safety culture be regarded as a separate topic or is it best considered as part of other regulatory areas e.g. safety management? - When do we/should we gather information about safety culture? Session 2a (How do we gather and interpret data? Tools, methods, resources and competencies needed to gather safety culture data) discussed the following points: - What methods can/do we use to gather data on licensee safety culture? What are their advantages and disadvantages? - How do we ensure that regulatory staff carrying out safety culture interventions are competent to do so - and what knowledge/skills and training are needed? - Who should gather safety culture data for regulatory use - regulators? Specialist contractors or others? Session 2b (How to gather and interpret the data? How to interpret data and codify it, qualitative versus quantitative data) discussed the following points: - How do we make a judgement on licensee safety culture? Do we have adequate indicators/criteria? - Can we meaningfully extrapolate from a finding on one part of plant to the whole organisation? If not, what should we conclude? - Is it meaningful to rate/score licensee safety culture numerically? - Are safety cultures methods mature enough to numerically score? What are the risks of this approach? Session 3 (How can we use the data?) discussed the following points: - How can safety culture data collection be built into existing regulatory activities? - How do we engage with licensees so that they accept and act on safety culture findings? - How do we expect licensees to respond to issues raised? - Is interaction with licensees on safety culture compatible with other regulatory

  5. Instruments for documentation of music therapy sessions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    It is an important part of the clinical music therapy work to document the daily sessions. For the clinician it is necessary to have a brief overview of each session in order to assess the methods and the process, and not least to be able to give clear reports of these issues to other health care...... professionals at staff meetings, conferences, etc. For music therapists with many clients there is not time enough during a working day to provide comprehensive process descriptions in the music therapy log. Therefore instruments that help the clinician in reducing and structuring this information are needed....... Danish and Norwegian music therapist have collaborated on developing a one page sheet with a structured form where they after each music therapy session document their use of methods and techniques in individual music therapy with persons with dementia. With this instrument therapists have easy access...

  6. Does Teaching Mnemonics for Vocabulary Learning Make a Difference? Putting the Keyword Method and the Word Part Technique to the Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The present research tested the effectiveness of the word part technique in comparison with the keyword method and self-strategy learning. One hundred and twenty-one Chinese year-one university students were randomly assigned to one of the three learning conditions: word part, keyword or self-strategy learning condition. Half of the target words…

  7. Formal description of the OSI session layer: session service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sinderen, Marten J.; van Eijk, P.H.J.; Vissers, C.A.; Diaz, M.

    1989-01-01

    The LOTOS formal description of the OSI session service is presented on basis of specification samples from the full description, giving account of how specification styles and session service architectural elements are reflected in the description. Both information (data types) and process

  8. MACHINE LEARNING IMPLEMENTATION FOR THE CLASSIFICATION OF ATTACKS ON WEB SYSTEMS. PART 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Smirnova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of applying machine learning is considered for the classification of malicious requests to a Web application. This approach excludes the use of deterministic analysis systems (for example, expert systems, and based on the application of a cascade of neural networks or perceptrons on an approximate model to the real human brain. The main idea of the work is to enable to describe complex attack vectors consisting of feature sets, abstract terms for compiling a training sample, controlling the quality of recognition and classifying each of the layers (networks participating in the work, with the ability to adjust not the entire network, But only a small part of it, in the training of which a mistake or inaccuracy crept in.  The design of the developed network can be described as a cascaded, scalable neural network.  The developed system of intrusion detection uses a three-layer neural network. Layers can be built independently of each other by cascades. In the first layer, for each class of attack recognition, there is a corresponding network and correctness is checked on this network. To learn this layer, we have chosen classes of things that can be classified uniquely as yes or no, that is, they are linearly separable. Thus, a layer is obtained not just of neurons, but of their microsets, which can best determine whether is there some data class in the query or not. The following layers are not trained to recognize the attacks themselves, they are trained that a set of attacks creates certain threats. This allows you to more accurately recognize the attacker's attempts to bypass the defense system, as well as classify the target of the attack, and not just its fact. Simple layering allows you to minimize the percentage of false positives.

  9. The digital Dalton Plan: Progressive education as integral part of web-based learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Weichhart

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available e-Learning systems increasingly support learning management and self-organized learning processes. Since the latter have been studied in the field of progressive education extensively, it is worthwhile to consider them for developing digital learning environments to support self-regulated learning processes. In this paper we aim at transforming one of the most prominent and sustainable approaches to self-organized learning, the “Dalton Plan” as proposed by Helen Parkhurst. Its assignment structure supports learners when managing their learning tasks, thus triggering self-organized acquisition of knowledge, and its feedback graphs enable transparent learning processes. Since e-learning environments have become common use, rather than creating another system, we propose a modular approach that can be used for extending existing e-learning environments. In order to design a respective component, we interviewed experts in self-organized e-learning. Their input facilitated integrating the Dalton Plan with existing features of e-learning environments. After representing each interview in concept maps, we were able to aggregate them for deriving e-learning requirements conform to the Dalton Plan instruments. In the course of implementing them, particular attention had to be paid to the asynchrony of interaction during runtime. Java Server Faces technology enable the Dalton Plan component to be migrated into existing web 2.0 e-learning platforms. The result was evaluated based on the acquired concept maps, as they also captured the transformation process of the Dalton Plan to e-learning features. The findings encourage embodying further progressive education approaches in this way, since the structured (concept mapping of the Dalton Plan to e-learning features turned out to be accurate. The experts were able to recognize the potential of the approach both in terms of structuring the knowledge acquisition process, and in terms of developing

  10. Mapping of Primary Instructional Methods and Teaching Techniques for Regularly Scheduled, Formal Teaching Sessions in an Anesthesia Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vested Madsen, Matias; Macario, Alex; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    learning as higher quality than sessions with little or no verbal interaction between teacher and learner. A modified Delphi process was used to identify useful teaching techniques. A representative sample of each of the formal teaching session types was mapped, and residents anonymously completed a 5...... formal teaching session. The overall education scores of the sessions as rated by the residents were high....

  11. Learning through Debate during Problem-Based Learning: An Active Learning Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, Sadaf; Latif, Rabia

    2017-01-01

    We explored medical student's views and perceptions of a series of debates conducted during problem-based learning (PBL) practiced as a part of the Spiral curriculum at the Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Saudi Arabia. A series of debates were employed during PBL sessions for second-year female medical students, over the period 2014-2016.…

  12. Attacking Machine Learning models as part of a cyber kill chain

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Tam N.

    2017-01-01

    Machine learning is gaining popularity in the network security domain as many more network-enabled devices get connected, as malicious activities become stealthier, and as new technologies like Software Defined Networking emerge. Compromising machine learning model is a desirable goal. In fact, spammers have been quite successful getting through machine learning enabled spam filters for years. While previous works have been done on adversarial machine learning, none has been considered within...

  13. Student’s Perceptions on Simulation as Part of Experiential Learning in Approaches, Methods, and Techniques (AMT Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marselina Karina Purnomo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Simulation is a part of Experiential Learning which represents certain real-life events. In this study, simulation is used as a learning activity in Approaches, Methods, and Techniques (AMT course which is one of the courses in English Language Education Study Program (ELESP of Sanata Dharma University. Since simulation represents the real-life events, it encourages students to apply the approaches, methods, and techniques being studied based on the real-life classroom. Several experts state that students are able to involve their personal experiences through simulation which additionally is believed to create a meaningful learning in the class. This study aimed to discover ELESP students’ perceptions toward simulation as a part of Experiential Learning in AMT course. From the findings, it could be inferred that students agreed that simulation in class was important for students’ learning for it formed a meaningful learning in class.  DOI: https://doi.org/10.24071/llt.2017.200104

  14. Synchrony in Dyadic Psychotherapy Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    Synchrony is a multi-faceted concept used in diverse domains such as physics, biology, and the social sciences. This chapter reviews some of the evidence of nonverbal synchrony in human communication, with a main focus on the role of synchrony in the psychotherapeutic setting. Nonverbal synchrony describes coordinated behavior of patient and therapist. Its association with empathy, rapport and the therapeutic relationship has been pointed out repeatedly, yet close evaluation of empirical studies suggests that the evidence remains inconclusive. Particularly in naturalistic studies, research with quantitative measures of synchrony is still lacking. We introduce a new empirical approach for the study of synchrony in psychotherapies under field conditions: Motion Energy Analysis (MEA). This is a video-based algorithm that quantifies the amount of movement in freely definable regions of interest. Our statistical analysis detects synchrony on a global level, irrespective of the specific body parts moving. Synchrony thus defined can be considered as a general measure of movement coordination between interacting individuals. Data from a sequence of N = 21 therapy sessions taken from one psychotherapy dyad shows a high positive relationship between synchrony and the therapeutic bond. Nonverbal synchrony can thus be considered a promising concept for research on the therapeutic alliance. Further areas of application are discussed.

  15. Astronauts and cosmonauts during emergency bailout training session

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Using small life rafts, several cosmonauts and astronauts participating in joint Russia - United States space missions take part in an emergency bailout training session in the JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) 25-feet-deep pool. In the

  16. Powered mobility intervention: understanding the position of tool use learning as part of implementing the ALP tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Lisbeth; Durkin, Josephine

    2017-10-01

    To explore the knowledge necessary for adoption and implementation of the Assessment of Learning Powered mobility use (ALP) tool in different practice settings for both adults and children. To consult with a diverse population of professionals working with adults and children, in different countries and various settings; who were learning about or using the ALP tool, as part of exploring and implementing research findings. Classical grounded theory with a rigorous comparative analysis of data from informants together with reflections on our own rich experiences of powered mobility practice and comparisons with the literature. A core category learning tool use and a new theory of cognizing tool use, with its interdependent properties: motivation, confidence, permissiveness, attentiveness and co-construction has emerged which explains in greater depth what enables the application of the ALP tool. The scientific knowledge base on tool use learning and the new theory conveys the information necessary for practitioner's cognizing how to apply the learning approach of the ALP tool in order to enable tool use learning through powered mobility practice as a therapeutic intervention in its own right. This opens up the possibility for more children and adults to have access to learning through powered mobility practice. Implications for rehabilitation Tool use learning through powered mobility practice is a therapeutic intervention in its own right. Powered mobility practice can be used as a rehabilitation tool with individuals who may not need to become powered wheelchair users. Motivation, confidence, permissiveness, attentiveness and co-construction are key properties for enabling the application of the learning approach of the ALP tool. Labelling and the use of language, together with honing observational skills through viewing video footage, are key to developing successful learning partnerships.

  17. Gold' 82 - technical sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viewing, K.

    1983-01-01

    Sulphur-isotope studies had been applied by Dr. I. Lambert to a number of deposits in Western Australia and also to certain samples from Vubachickwe and other deposits in Zimbabwe. A study of the sulphur isotopes at the Dickenson Mine, revealed a wide spread of values in the mineralised zones. Metamorphic processes were likely to be significant in the concentration of gold. The iron formations at the Old Jardine Mine had been unfolded by Dr. W.S. Hallager and the pattern of sedimentation was unraveled. A gold-rich zone was separated by a barren gap from the other part of the mineralised zone. Research was also done on the effects of the metamorphic processes, and the ages of mineralisation

  18. Teaching and learning the geological knowledge as a part of the science education general field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Pérez, Constancio

    2010-05-01

    Since the early 50s of last century the Teaching of Science has undergone a process of continuous development, (Gutiérrez, 1987; Aliberas, Gutierrez and Izquierdo, 1989) to become a scientific discipline largely accepted as such by many different universities worldwide. Besides, the proliferation of publications, magazines, conferences, symposia, meetings, and so on, proves this assertion. In these publications and meetings the Teaching of Science (or Science Education in more general terms) is addressed as a new field of research, teaching and educational innovation focused on the processes of teaching and learning of the experimental sciences (all of them: Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Geology). The study of this discipline is undertaken from different pedagogical, epistemological, psychological and sociological approaches. From this general perspective we can say that over the last two decades each of the sciences has developed specific characteristics so that, today, we could speak about specific didactics for each one of them. In the case of Geology (or Geoscience) Teaching there have been significant contributions from the following fields of research: the students' prior ideas (constructivist approach), the history of geology (as a subject-specific field) and from epistemology (Pedrinaci, E. 2000). The body of geoscience knowledge has an internal logic (as happens with the other science subjects) that allows us to organize the contents to teach, selecting, arranging and establishing proper relations between them. Still geology has a central, transverse, inter-and transdisciplinary character for its relationship with the other sciences. This character makes it appear as one of the disciplines with a huge potential to combine different methodologies of teaching and learning and different learning models already tested in the research field of Physics, Chemistry or Biology Education. Moreover, the most recent term coined for it "geosciences or earth and

  19. A review of results from patient experience surveys during the introduction of group pre-radiotherapy patient information sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, K.; James, S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the survey were to check that group pre-radiotherapy information sessions met patients' needs. The use of virtual technology (VT) through Patient Education And Radiotherapy Learning (PEARL) was incorporated part way through the survey period. Methods: Patients attending group pre-radiotherapy information sessions led by assistant practitioners between March and December 2014 were asked to complete questionnaires after they had attended at least five radiotherapy sessions. Key results: 305 patients attended sessions during the survey period. 129 questionnaires were distributed with 103 returned, resulting in an 80% response rate (Overall rate 34%). 102 (99%) patients responded that they were happy and comfortable to receive their radiotherapy information in a group setting. The majority of patients responded that they felt no additional information should be included. Conclusions and recommendations: The survey highlighted that almost all patients were happy to receive their information in a group setting. Patients attending non PEARL and PEARL sessions indicated high satisfaction levels with no notable differences between the groups. This has allayed MVCC staffs' original concerns that patients may find the use of VT as frightening in patient information sessions, so the centre is now confident to incorporate it in the future. The implementation of these sessions has seemed to be both feasible and an efficient use of staff time. All patients referred for radical breast radiotherapy are now invited to attend. It is recommended that regular patient experience surveys are conducted in the future to ensure they continue to meet patients' needs. - Highlights: • 102 (99%) patients responded happy to receive their information in a group setting. • 86 (83%) patients responded they felt no additional information should be included. • 58 (56%) patients provided complimentary comments about the sessions.

  20. Students' Perceptions of Blended Learning and its Effectiveness As a Part of Second Year Dental Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varthis, Spyridon

    The field of dental medical education is one of the most rapidly evolving fields in education. Newer teaching methods are being evaluated and incorporated in dental institutions. One of the promising new methods is the blended learning approach that may involve a "flipped" instructional sequencing, where online instruction precedes the group meeting, allowing for more sophisticated learning through discussion and critical thinking. The author conducted a mixed method, experimental study that focused on second year dental students' perceptions of blended learning and its effectiveness. A sample size of 40 dental students in their second year from a Northeastern Regional Dental School were invited to participate in this study to evaluate a blended learning approach in comparison to a more traditional lecture format. Students who participated in the study, participated in group problem-solving, responded to Likert-type surveys, completed content exams, and were interviewed individually. Based on Likert survey data and interview responses, the participants in the blended learning treatment reported very positive opinions including positive perceptions of the organization, support of meaningful learning and potential merits for use in dental education. There also was evidence that the blended learning group achieved at least as well as the traditional lecture group, and excelled on certain content test items. The results of this study support the conclusion that blended instruction promotes active, in-depth and self-regulated learning. During blended learning, students set standards or goals regarding their learning, evaluate their progress toward these goals, and then adapt and regulate their cognition, motivation, and behavior in order to accomplish their goals. Overall, the results of this research on blended learning, including the use of problem-based learning in group discussions, supports the merits of incorporating blended earning in dental education curricula.

  1. A cluster randomized controlled trial to assess the impact on intimate partner violence of a 10-session participatory gender training curriculum delivered to women taking part in a group-based microfinance loan scheme in Tanzania (MAISHA CRT01): study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Sheila; Lees, Shelley; Mshana, Gerry; Pilger, Daniel; Hansen, Christian; Kapiga, Saidi; Watts, Charlotte

    2018-04-02

    Worldwide, almost one third (30%) of women who have been in a relationship have experienced physical and/or sexual violence from an intimate partner. Given the considerable negative impacts of intimate partner violence (IPV) on women's physical health and well-being, there is an urgent need for rigorous evidence on violence prevention interventions. The study, comprising a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) and in-depth qualitative study, will assess the impact on women's past year experience of physical and/or sexual IPV of a participatory gender training curriculum (MAISHA curriculum) delivered to women participating in group-based microfinance in Tanzania. More broadly, the study aims to learn more about the factors that contribute to women's vulnerability to violence and understand how the intervention impacts on the lives of women and their families. Sixty-six eligible microfinance loan groups are enrolled and randomly allocated to: the 10-session MAISHA curriculum, delivered over 20 weeks (n = 33); or, to no intervention (n = 33). Study participants are interviewed at baseline and at 24 months post-intervention about their: household; partner; income; health; attitudes and social norms; relationship (including experiences of different forms of violence); childhood; and community. For the qualitative study and process evaluation, focus group discussions are being conducted with study participants and MAISHA curriculum facilitators. In-depth interviews are being conducted with a purposive sample of 18 participants. The primary outcome, assessed at 24 months post-intervention, is a composite of women's reported experience of physical and/or sexual IPV during the past 12 months. Secondary outcomes include: reported experience of physical, sexual and emotional/psychological IPV during the past 12 months, attitudes towards IPV and reported disclosure of IPV to others. The study forms part of a wider programme of research (MAISHA) that includes

  2. MACHINE LEARNING IMPLEMENTATION FOR THE CLASSIFICATION OF ATTACKS ON WEB SYSTEMS. PART 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Smirnova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of applying machine learning for the classification of malicious requests to aWeb application is considered. This approach excludes the use of deterministic analysis systems (for example, expert systems,and is based on the application of a cascade of neural networks or perceptrons on an approximate model to the real humanbrain. The main idea of the work is to enable to describe complex attack vectors consisting of feature sets, abstract terms forcompiling a training sample, controlling the quality of recognition and classifying each of the layers (networks participatingin the work, with the ability to adjust not the entire network, but only a small part of it, in the training of which a mistake orinaccuracy crept in. The design of the developed network can be described as a cascaded, scalable neural network.When using neural networks to detect attacks on web systems, the issue of vectorization and normalization of features isacute. The most commonly used methods for solving these problems are not designed for the case of deliberate distortion ofthe signs of an attack.The proposed approach makes it possible to obtain a neural network that has been studied in more detail by small features,and also to eliminate the normalization issues in order to avoid deliberately bypassing the intrusion detection system. Byisolating one more group of neurons in the network and teaching it to samples containing various variants of circumvention ofthe attack classification, the developed intrusion detection system remains able to classify any types of attacks as well as theiraggregates, putting forward more stringent measures to counteract attacks. This allows you to follow the life cycle of theattack in more detail: from the starting trial attack to deliberate sophisticated attempts to bypass the system and introducemore decisive measures to actively counteract the attack, eliminating the chances of a false alarm system.

  3. Executive summary. Session summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of stopping and/or delaying the progression of a core melt accident by the use of a recovered water source or by taking benefit of specific engineered systems is taken into account in a number of PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) studies. The likelihood to stop the progression of a core melt-down accident by water injection is generally considered as high in the early phase of core degradation and depends on reactor specific features, nevertheless even in later sequences, e.g. during the relocation in the lower head, cooling still can be achieved but depends on reactor specific features and the accident scenario.. Ongoing, starting and planned experimental programmes address the coolability issues in the different relevant configurations, i.e. reflooding of bundles, debris beds, molten pools and Reactor Pressure Vessel external cooling. There is still a difficulty with present models to predict reliably if reflooding during the early core degradation would or not trigger a cladding oxidation runaway. Whether this is due to deficiencies in thermal-hydraulics description or problems for taking into account the oxidation of melts is a matter of discussion. The code developments are promisingly directed towards a more mechanistic approach using a porous medium modelling able to treat the different configurations of a degraded core. Secondly, the models to describe adequately the relocation of parts of the molten core to the lower head and the debris bed formation still need further development and qualification. Their validation is expected against the results of ongoing experimental programmes. The transposition of results to the reactor scale where multi-dimensional effects are expected needs to be evaluated, all the more as larger scale experiments are probably not feasible

  4. Intra-session and inter-session variability of nitric oxide pulmonary diffusing capacity in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Thomas; Benden, Christian; Maggi-Beba, Marion; Kriemler, Susi; van der Lee, Ivo; Dressel, Holger

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated the intra-session and inter-session variability of the diffusing capacity of nitric oxide (DLNO), carbon monoxide (DLCO), alveolar-capillary membrane diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DMCO) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Patients performed single-breath diffusing capacity measurements during all of 3 consecutive study visits. Precision of gas diffusing parameters was quantified by within-subject standard deviation (SD ws ) and coefficient of variation (CV). Intra-session and inter-session reproducibility was determined by SD ws *2.77. 15 clinically stable patients were included. The intra-session precision of gas diffusing parameters improved over the study visits. The inter-session SD ws for DLNO, DLCO, DMCO, and Vc was 4.8, 1.3, 2.4, and 4.3, respectively. Reproducibility was 13.3, 3.8, 6.7 and 12.0mLmin -1 mmHg -1 ; CV was 4.4, 4.7, 4.4 and 5.8%, respectively. The intra-session variability of DLNO, DLCO, DMCO and Vc improves with breath-hold maneuver training in test-naïve patients with CF, indicating a learning effect. Inter-session reproducibility data are lower than those previously reported in healthy subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Practitioner of Cooperative Learning as Part of Novice Teachers' Professional Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Puji

    2016-01-01

    This paper identifies challenges that English as a foreign language (EFL) novice teachers in Indonesia may face in developing a professional identity, which, in this paper, refers to becoming a practitioner of cooperative learning. Cooperative learning is a mandated teaching method both in the 2006 and 2013 Indonesian curriculum, and is under the…

  6. The Three-Part Harmony of Adult Learning, Critical Thinking, and Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Adult learning, critical thinking, and decision-making are fields that receive attention individually, although they are interspersed with elements of each other's theories and philosophies. In addressing adult learning precepts, it is essential to include critical thinking and decision-making. One without the other creates weakness; all must be…

  7. Insider Research as Part of a Master's Programme: Opportunities Lost and Found within Action Learning Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Chloe; Lawless, Aileen; Eades, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    This account explores the role of action learning during and after an educational programme. We focus on the final stage of a master's programme and the insider research that is a key feature in many UK universities. Researching within one's own organization should lead to individual and organizational learning. However, there is relatively little…

  8. Engineering students' conceptions of entrepreneurial learning as part of their education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Täks, Marge; Tynjälä, Päivi; Kukemelk, Hasso

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine what kinds of conceptions of entrepreneurial learning engineering students expressed in an entrepreneurship course integrated in their study programme. The data were collected during an entrepreneurship course in Estonia that was organised for fourth-year engineering students, using video-recorded group interviews (N = 48) and individual in-depth interviews (N = 16). As a result of the phenomenographic analysis, four qualitatively distinctive conceptions of entrepreneurial learning were discerned. Entrepreneurial learning was seen to involve (1) applying entrepreneurial ideas to engineering, (2) understanding entrepreneurial issues in a new way, (3) action-oriented personal development, and (4) self-realising through collective effort. These qualitatively distinct categories differed from each other in four dimensions of variation: nature of learning, response to pedagogy, relation to teamwork, and learning outcomes.

  9. Cyber-bullying and incivility in an online learning environment, part 2: promoting student success in the virtual classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cynthia M; Ahten, Sara; Werth, Loredana

    2012-01-01

    The appeal of online learning has increased dramatically among nurses who are pursuing higher-education opportunities. However, online learning has created potential avenues for uncivil behaviors that can affect student satisfaction, performance, and retention. This is the second of 2 articles detailing a study to empirically measure nursing faculty and student perceptions of an online learning environment (OLE). Part 1, in the July/August 2012 issue, described the quantitative results including the types and frequency of uncivil behaviors and the extent to which they are perceived to be a problem in online courses. In this portion of the study, the authors discuss the qualitative findings, including the challenges and advantages of the OLE, specific ways to foster civility, and strategies to promote student success and retention.

  10. Learning and Study Strategies Inventory subtests and factors as predictors of National Board of Chiropractic Examiners Part 1 examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Christine M; Dalton, Leanne; Tepe, Rodger E

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to extend research on the relationship between chiropractic students' learning and study strategies and national board examination performance. Sixty-nine first trimester chiropractic students self-administered the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Linear trends tests (for continuous variables) and Mantel-Haenszel trend tests (for categorical variables) were utilized to determine if the 10 LASSI subtests and 3 factors predicted low, medium and high levels of National Board of Chiropractic Examiners (NBCE) Part 1 scores. Multiple regression was performed to predict overall mean NBCE examination scores using the 3 LASSI factors as predictor variables. Four LASSI subtests (Anxiety, Concentration, Selecting Main Ideas, Test Strategies) and one factor (Goal Orientation) were significantly associated with NBCE examination levels. One factor (Goal Orientation) was a significant predictor of overall mean NBCE examination performance. Learning and study strategies are predictive of NBCE Part 1 examination performance in chiropractic students. The current study found LASSI subtests Anxiety, Concentration, Selecting Main Ideas, and Test Strategies, and the Goal-Orientation factor to be significant predictors of NBCE scores. The LASSI may be useful to educators in preparing students for academic success. Further research is warranted to explore the effects of learning and study strategies training on GPA and NBCE performance.

  11. The value of the pre-hospital learning environment as part of the emergency nursing programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonett van Wyk

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: The research findings support the value and continuation of utilising the pre-hospital clinical learning environment for placing post-basic emergency nursing students when enrolled in the emergency nursing programme.

  12. Flexible Learning and Teaching: Looking Beyond the Binary of Full-time/Part-time Provision in South African Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara M Jones

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper engages with literature on flexible learning and teaching in order to explore whether it may be possible, within the South African context, to have flexible learning and teaching provide a third way which goes beyond the current practice of full-time/part-time provision. This binary classification of students is a proxy for day-time/after-hours delivery.  The argument is made that effective, flexible learning and teaching requires a fundamental shift in thinking about learning and teaching in higher education that moves us beyond such binaries. The paper proposes that in order to ensure access and success for students, ‘common knowledge’ (Edwards, 2010 will need to be co-constructed which understands flexible learning and teaching in ways which will meet needs of a diversity of students, including working students. It will require ‘resourceful leadership’ (Edwards, 2014 within the university that recognises, enhances and gives purpose to the capability of colleagues at every level of the systems they lead. Also, it will require the building of ‘common knowledge’ between certain sectors of universities and particular workplaces.

  13. Poster Session B

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    B.1 Development of a Proximity Labeling Method to Identify the Protein Targets of Bioactive Small Molecules Zachary Hill, Min Zhuang, James Wells University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA Identifying the direct protein targets of a bioactive small molecule gives insight into the compound's mechanism of action, its efficacy, and possible toxicity. Target identification is becoming an increasingly important part of the drug- development process. However, given the transient and heterogeneous nature of interactions between small molecules and proteins, this step is often difficult, greatly slowing the development of new therapeutics. For this reason, new methods to rapidly identify the direct protein targets of bioactive small molecules are of great importance. Enrichment strategies coupled with quantitative mass spectrometry have shown great promise in target identification. Here we will present our progress toward developing an engineered enzymatic tagging method that enables specific labeling and enrichment of protein targets from complex lysates. This method couples the binding of a small molecule to a proximity-based labeling event. Labeled target proteins are enriched and subsequently identified using quantitative LC-MS/MS. We will discuss several variations of this method, and highlight our progress towards applying proximity labeling to small-molecule target identification and validation. B.2 Modelling Atherosclerosis: Molecular Changes in the Ascending Aorta of Cholesterol-fed Rabbits Jingshu Xu1,2, Mia Jüllig1,2, Martin J. Middleditch1,2, Garth J.S. Cooper1,2,3,4 1School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, New Zealand; 2Maurice Wilkins Centre for Molecular Biodiscovery, Faculty of Science, University of Auckland, New Zealand; 3Department of Pharmacology, Medical Sciences Division, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; 4Centre for Advanced Discovery and Experimental Therapeutics, NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre, the University of

  14. Resume and discussion of session on direct heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    A conference divides into sessions, but the physics does not always respect such divisions. I found the subject of barrier penetrabilities viewed in a coupled channels picture new, exciting and central to all heavy-ion reaction dynamics. The subject was discussed in bits and pieces over three different sessions, partly in the talks by Winther, Landowne, Braun-Munzinger and Broglia, and partly from the floor by the same people and by Smilanski, I have concentrated on that subject alone and I therefore must apologize to the speakers in my session who covered different material, that definitely merited further discussions. Also, I apologize to other session chairmen, whose territory I have invaded. (orig.)

  15. Intercollegiate Sports (Part 2). Hearings before the Subcommittee on Commerce, Consumer Protection, and Competitiveness of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session (June 23 and August 4, 1993).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    The House of Representatives Subcommittee on Commerce, Consumer Protection, and Competitiveness met to hear testimony on sex discrimination in secondary and college level athletic programs. The witnesses on the first panel were all current or former college students and plaintiffs in four recent and significant Title IX cases. Title IX was part of…

  16. Human Reliability Analysis: session summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The use of Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) to identify and resolve human factors issues has significantly increased over the past two years. Today, utilities, research institutions, consulting firms, and the regulatory agency have found a common application of HRA tools and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). The ''1985 IEEE Third Conference on Human Factors and Power Plants'' devoted three sessions to the discussion of these applications and a review of the insights so gained. This paper summarizes the three sessions and presents those common conclusions that were discussed during the meeting. The paper concludes that session participants supported the use of an adequately documented ''living PRA'' to address human factors issues in design and procedural changes, regulatory compliance, and training and that the techniques can produce cost effective qualitative results that are complementary to more classical human factors methods

  17. Sessions and Separability in Security Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Marco; Guttman, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Despite much work on sessions and session types in non- adversarial contexts, session-like behavior given an active adversary has not received an adequate definition and proof methods. We provide a syntactic property that guarantees that a protocol has session-respecting executions. Any uncomprom......Despite much work on sessions and session types in non- adversarial contexts, session-like behavior given an active adversary has not received an adequate definition and proof methods. We provide a syntactic property that guarantees that a protocol has session-respecting executions. Any...

  18. Learning Together; part 2: training costs and health gain - a cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Katherine; Riches, Wendy; Macaulay, Chloe; Spicer, John

    2017-01-01

    Learning Together is a complex educational intervention aimed at improving health outcomes for children and young people. There is an additional cost as two doctors are seeing patients together for a longer appointment than a standard general practice (GP) appointment. Our approach combines the impact of the training clinics on activity in South London in 2014-15 with health gain, using NICE guidance and standards to allow comparison of training options. Activity data was collected from Training Practices hosting Learning Together. A computer based model was developed to analyse the costs of the Learning Together intervention compared to usual training in a partial economic evaluation. The results of the model were used to value the health gain required to make the intervention cost effective. Data were returned for 363 patients booked into 61 clinics across 16 Training Practices. Learning Together clinics resulted in an increase in costs of £37 per clinic. Threshold analysis illustrated one child with a common illness like constipation needs to be well for two weeks, in one Practice hosting four training clinics for the clinics to be considered cost effective. Learning Together is of minimal training cost. Our threshold analysis produced a rubric that can be used locally to test cost effectiveness at a Practice or Programme level.

  19. Part Two: Learning Science Through Digital Video: Student Views on Watching and Creating Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The use of digital video for science education has become common with the wide availability of video imagery. This study continues research into aspects of using digital video as a primary teaching tool to enhance student learning in undergraduate science courses. Two survey instruments were administered to undergraduate non-science majors. Survey One focused on: a) What science is being learned from watching science videos such as a "YouTube" clip of a volcanic eruption or an informational video on geologic time and b) What are student preferences with regard to their learning (e.g. using video versus traditional modes of delivery)? Survey Two addressed students' perspectives on the storytelling aspect of the video with respect to: a) sustaining interest, b) providing science information, c) style of video and d) quality of the video. Undergraduate non-science majors were the primary focus group in this study. Students were asked to view video segments and respond to a survey focused on what they learned from the segments. The storytelling aspect of each video was also addressed by students. Students watched 15-20 shorter (3-15 minute science videos) created within the last four years. Initial results of this research support that shorter video segments were preferred and the storytelling quality of each video related to student learning.

  20. The use of EMG biofeedback for learning of selective activation of intra-muscular parts within the serratus anterior muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, A; Mork, P J; Andersen, L L

    2010-01-01

    the serratus anterior with visual EMG biofeedback, while the activity of four parts of the serratus anterior and four parts of the trapezius muscle was recorded. One subject was able to selectively activate both the upper and the lower serratus anterior respectively. Moreover, three subjects managed...... to selectively activate the lower serratus anterior, and two subjects learned to selectively activate the upper serratus anterior. During selective activation of the lower serratus anterior, the activity of this muscle part was 14.4+/-10.3 times higher than the upper serratus anterior activity (P....05). The corresponding ratio for selective upper serratus vs. lower serratus anterior activity was 6.4+/-1.7 (Ptimes higher synergistic activity of the lower trapezius compared with the upper trapezius (P

  1. A Student Experience of Peer Assisted Study Sessions in Physiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Gisela; Rose, Andrew; Bennet, Tracey; Jaques, Katrina; Rippon, Zoe; van der Meer, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS) were introduced as an optional learning experience in a Bachelor of Physiotherapy programme. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of PASS from the student perspective. Eight third year physiotherapy students who had participated in PASS during their second year of training attended a focus group, at…

  2. Special Session 4: Astronomy Education between Past and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Greve, Jean-Pierre

    2010-11-01

    The special session aims at discussing an integrated approach of the different efforts to increase and promote the teaching and learning of astronomy in the world, with emphasis on developing countries. To this end, attention will be given to research on education, specifically in the field of physics, to best practices of the use of astronomy in educational systems (specifically in developing countries), and to innovative learning initiatives other than formal education. The Special Session aims also at creating a universal perspective wherein modern (post-Copernican) astronomy will presented as an intellectual cumulus. The objective of the session is to disseminate best practices in teaching and learning activities of astronomy and to give an opportunity to learn about initiatives in different cultural and socio-economic settings. The special session also wants to give food-for-thought and proposals for reflection for an integrative approach, and for optimization processes, to enhance the interest in astronomy and its role as a trigger towards science education in the educational systems, with emphasis on the developing countries. The outcome should be a sensitization of teachers and students alike to the concept of a universal history of astronomy and creation of some reliable source material which can be used as a teaching aid in a culture-specific context. The outcome could be a set of recommendations for future integrated actions, and eventually recommendations on new initiatives, framed into the new decadal policy plan.

  3. Discussant Remarks on Session: Statistical Aspects of Measuring the Internet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, Les

    1999-04-02

    These remarks will briefly summarize what we learn from the talks in this session, and add some more areas in Internet Measurement that may provide challenges for statisticians. It will also point out some reasons why statisticians may be interested in working in this area.

  4. A report on the UN special session on disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Slow progress in disarmament led many of the United Nations Member States, particularly the non-aligned countries, to request the convening of a Special Session of the General Assembly Devoted to Disarmament. The idea of such a special session had evolved over the past few years as an alternative to a World Disarmament Conference and in contrast to the limited possibilities for discussion provided by a regular session of the General Assembly. A special session was perceived as offering the appropriate opportunity to discuss comprehensive disarmament in a practically universal forum The decision to hold the special session was taken by the General Assembly on 21 December 1976 by resolution 31/189 B, which also established a Preparatory Committee to examine all questions relevant to the special session. Fifty-four countries were appointed members of the Preparatory Committee, which met in five sessions. The United Nations Special Session on Disarmament (SSOD) was held in New York from May 23 to June 30, 1978. One hundred and forty-five nations attended and this was the first time since the Disarmament Conference of 1932 that virtually all countries of the world met to discuss all aspects of disarmament. The agenda for the SSOD included inter alia: a review and appraisal of the present international situation, the adoption of a Declaration on Disarmament, the adoption of a Programme of Action on Disarmament, a review of the role of the UN in disarmament and of the international machinery for negotiations on disarmament, including, in particular, the question of convening a world disarmament conference. The various proposals made at the sessions of the Preparatory Committee and at the SSOD itself were consolidated into one document. Consensus on this Final Document was reached on June 30, the concluding day of the session. The Final Document consists of three major parts: Declaration of Principles, Programme of Action and Disarmament Machinery

  5. Mathematics on the Move: Using Mobile Technologies to Support Student Learning (Part 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Catherine; Northcote, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Continuing the series of articles on teaching mathematics with technology, this article furthers the authors' exploration of the use of a range of mobile technologies to enhance teachers' practices in the primary mathematics classroom. In Part 1 of this article, the authors explored the use of the iPod Touch and iPad. In Part 2, they explore…

  6. Engineering Students' Conceptions of Entrepreneurial Learning as Part of Their Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Täks, Marge; Tynjälä, Päivi; Kukemelk, Hasso

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine what kinds of conceptions of entrepreneurial learning engineering students expressed in an entrepreneurship course integrated in their study programme. The data were collected during an entrepreneurship course in Estonia that was organised for fourth-year engineering students, using video-recorded group…

  7. "I'm Never Going to Be Part of It": Identity, Investment and Learning Korean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearing, Nigel; Roger, Peter

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the willingness of 14 English-speaking EFL instructors living and working in South Korea to invest in practices connected with learning and using the Korean language. A model of investment for the "new world order" (Darvin, R., and B. Norton. 2015. "Identity and a Model of Investment in Applied…

  8. Can Animations Effectively Substitute for Traditional Teaching Methods? Part II: Potential for Differentiated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorius, Roberto Ma.; Santos, Rhodora; Dano, Judith B.; Gutierrez, Jose J.

    2010-01-01

    Animations were prepared using Adobe Flash MX and tested on elementary (3rd-5th grade) and secondary chemistry students. A pre- and post-test study was used to compare the learning gains of students who received the animations with those who received textbook reading time and discussion in class. The control and experimental groups were further…

  9. The value of the pre-hospital learning environment as part of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Professional nurses enrolled in a post-basic emergency nursing programme presented at a tertiary nursing education institution in South Africa are placed in different clinical learning environments to reach the set clinical outcomes and gain appropriate clinical experience. These students are placed in the ...

  10. Diagnosing and Solving School Learning Disabilities in Epilepsy: Part 5, School and Psychological Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittan, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    In the last article, the author covered the social and psychological causes to learning difficulty that can be created by epilepsy. Over the last two articles, the author gained a fairly complete picture of problems that may be due to the physical disorder of epilepsy and problems due to its unique impact on the social aspects of the classroom. In…

  11. Reading comprehension as part of the teaching learning process of English for specific purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaima Rosa Reyes Piñero

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents and characterizes a system of interdisciplinary tasks which contributes to reading comprehension as a basic objective of the teaching learning process of English in the first year students of Marxism-Leninism and History career of the University of Pedagogical Sciences in Pinar del Río.

  12. Diagnosing and Solving School Learning Disabilities in Epilepsy: Part 2--A List of Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittan, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The possible causes of learning difficulties in children with epilepsy are long and complex. In order to see that a child is given an adequate evaluation, an understanding of what these many causes are and how those causes may be interrelated is necessary. This article discusses the first three of the six categories of the causes: (1) Organic; (2)…

  13. The value of the pre-hospital learning environment as part of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Four major themes were identified: an unpredictable environment, role players in emergency medical services, team work, and competencies. Conclusion: The research findings support the value and continuation of utilising the prehospital clinical learning environment for placing post-basic emergency nursing ...

  14. Energy and water development appropriations for Fiscal year 1986. Part 2. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session on H.R. 2959

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Part 2 of the hearing record covers testimony on H.R. 2959 by representatives of DOE and selected agencies within the department. The volume opens with an overview of DOE-sponsored water programs and budget justifications by Energy Secretary Herrington and supporting witnesses. Witnesses on subsequent days defended the budgets of the radioactive waste management programs, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the five federal power marketing administrations, the solar and renewable programs, the Office of Energy Research, and the atomic energy defense activities. Witnesses described research and development programs and responded to the questions of committee members concerning the fiscal year 1986 budget for DOE

  15. Superfund oversight. Hearing before the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session to receive testimony from Rita M. Lavelle, February 23, 1983. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Part 1 of the hearing record covers the testimony of Rita M. Lavelle, former Assistant Administrator for Solid Waste and Emergency Response of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Lavelle was asked to respond to charges against her performance and to describe how policy decisions are made at the agency. At issue were criticisms that EPA administrators were obstructing the implementation of environmental laws. Lavelle accused critics of undermining the agency's effectiveness and credibility in their handling of her departure from EPA, and responded to questions on her relationships with agency personnel. (DCK)

  16. Cyber-bullying and incivility in the online learning environment, Part 1: Addressing faculty and student perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cynthia M; Werth, Loredana; Ahten, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Online learning has created another potential avenue for incivility. Cyber-bullying, a form of incivility that occurs in an electronic environment, includes posting rumors or misinformation, gossiping, or publishing materials that defame and humiliate others. This is the first of 2 articles detailing a study to empirically measure nursing faculty and student perceptions of incivility in an online learning environment (OLE). In this article, the authors discuss the quantitative results including the types and frequency of uncivil behaviors and the extent to which they are perceived to be a problem in online courses. Part 2 in the September/October issue will describe challenges and advantages of the OLE, discuss specific ways to foster civility, and present strategies to promote student success and retention.

  17. Innovation in POPBL teaching and learning methods by embedding individual activities as an integrated part of project work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby, Egon; W., Hans Henrik; Kørnøv, Lone

    2005-01-01

    activity embedded as an integrated part of the project work. Students work in the solution phase of the project on an individual activity that is separately assessed. The results of these individual activities form the platform for students’ final work with the project as a team. They have to evaluate......In this paper, the authors describe a way to increase student learning through social constructed teamwork by adding an individual activity to the project work. This can be achieved not just by adding an individual activity outside or parallel to the project work, but by having the individual...... the individual solutions and find the one solution to work on in the final phases of the project. On top of that, it helps train students’ abilities to make evaluations among various solutions of which one is their own, thereby learning how to evaluate their personal solutions against another person’s solutions...

  18. Evaluation of an interactive, case-based review session in teaching medical microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, Earl L; Kisamore, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    Background Oklahoma State University-Center for Health Sciences (OSU-CHS) has replaced its microbiology wet laboratory with a variety of tutorials including a case-based interactive session called Microbial Jeopardy!. The question remains whether the time spent by students and faculty in the interactive case-based tutorial is worthwhile? This study was designed to address this question by analyzing both student performance data and assessing students' perceptions regarding the tutorial. Methods Both quantitative and qualitative data were used in the current study. Part One of the study involved assessing student performance using archival records of seven case-based exam questions used in the 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007 OSU-CHS Medical Microbiology course. Two sample t-tests for proportions were used to test for significant differences related to tutorial usage. Part Two used both quantitative and qualitative means to assess student's perceptions of the Microbial Jeopardy! session. First, a retrospective survey was administered to students who were enrolled in Medical Microbiology in 2006 or 2007. Second, responses to open-ended items from the 2008 course evaluations were reviewed for comments regarding the Microbial Jeopardy! session. Results Both student performance and student perception data support continued use of the tutorials. Quantitative and qualitative data converge to suggest that students like and learn from the interactive, case-based session. Conclusion The case-based tutorial appears to improve student performance on case-based exam questions. Additionally, students perceived the tutorial as helpful in preparing for exam questions and reviewing the course material. The time commitment for use of the case-based tutorial appears to be justified. PMID:19712473

  19. Evaluation of an interactive, case-based review session in teaching medical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, Earl L; Kisamore, Jennifer L

    2009-08-27

    Oklahoma State University-Center for Health Sciences (OSU-CHS) has replaced its microbiology wet laboratory with a variety of tutorials including a case-based interactive session called Microbial Jeopardy!. The question remains whether the time spent by students and faculty in the interactive case-based tutorial is worthwhile? This study was designed to address this question by analyzing both student performance data and assessing students' perceptions regarding the tutorial. Both quantitative and qualitative data were used in the current study. Part One of the study involved assessing student performance using archival records of seven case-based exam questions used in the 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007 OSU-CHS Medical Microbiology course. Two sample t-tests for proportions were used to test for significant differences related to tutorial usage. Part Two used both quantitative and qualitative means to assess student's perceptions of the Microbial Jeopardy! session. First, a retrospective survey was administered to students who were enrolled in Medical Microbiology in 2006 or 2007. Second, responses to open-ended items from the 2008 course evaluations were reviewed for comments regarding the Microbial Jeopardy! session. Both student performance and student perception data support continued use of the tutorials. Quantitative and qualitative data converge to suggest that students like and learn from the interactive, case-based session. The case-based tutorial appears to improve student performance on case-based exam questions. Additionally, students perceived the tutorial as helpful in preparing for exam questions and reviewing the course material. The time commitment for use of the case-based tutorial appears to be justified.

  20. Evaluation of an interactive, case-based review session in teaching medical microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisamore Jennifer L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oklahoma State University-Center for Health Sciences (OSU-CHS has replaced its microbiology wet laboratory with a variety of tutorials including a case-based interactive session called Microbial Jeopardy!. The question remains whether the time spent by students and faculty in the interactive case-based tutorial is worthwhile? This study was designed to address this question by analyzing both student performance data and assessing students' perceptions regarding the tutorial. Methods Both quantitative and qualitative data were used in the current study. Part One of the study involved assessing student performance using archival records of seven case-based exam questions used in the 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007 OSU-CHS Medical Microbiology course. Two sample t-tests for proportions were used to test for significant differences related to tutorial usage. Part Two used both quantitative and qualitative means to assess student's perceptions of the Microbial Jeopardy! session. First, a retrospective survey was administered to students who were enrolled in Medical Microbiology in 2006 or 2007. Second, responses to open-ended items from the 2008 course evaluations were reviewed for comments regarding the Microbial Jeopardy! session. Results Both student performance and student perception data support continued use of the tutorials. Quantitative and qualitative data converge to suggest that students like and learn from the interactive, case-based session. Conclusion The case-based tutorial appears to improve student performance on case-based exam questions. Additionally, students perceived the tutorial as helpful in preparing for exam questions and reviewing the course material. The time commitment for use of the case-based tutorial appears to be justified.

  1. Using a Smartphone App and Coaching Group Sessions to Promote Residents' Reflection in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könings, Karen D; van Berlo, Jean; Koopmans, Richard; Hoogland, Henk; Spanjers, Ingrid A E; ten Haaf, Jeroen A; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J G

    2016-03-01

    Reflecting on workplace-based experiences is necessary for professional development. However, residents need support to raise their awareness of valuable moments for learning and to thoughtfully analyze those learning moments afterwards. From October to December 2012, the authors held a multidisciplinary six-week postgraduate training module focused on general competencies. Residents were randomly assigned to one of four conditions with varying degrees of reflection support; they were offered (1) a smartphone app, (2) coaching group sessions, (3) a combination of both, or (4) neither type of support. The app allowed participants to capture in real time learning moments as a text note, audio recording, picture, or video. Coaching sessions held every two weeks aimed to deepen participants' reflection on captured learning moments. Questionnaire responses and reflection data were compared between conditions to assess the effects of the app and coaching sessions on intensity and frequency of reflection. Sixty-four residents participated. App users reflected more often, captured more learning moments, and reported greater learning progress than nonapp users. Participants who attended coaching sessions were more alert to learning moments and pursued more follow-up learning activities to improve on the general competencies. Those who received both types of support were most alert to these learning moments. A simple mobile app for capturing learning moments shows promise as a tool to support workplace-based learning, especially when combined with coaching sessions. Future research should evaluate these tools on a broader scale and in conjunction with residents' and students' personal digital portfolios.

  2. An exploration of tutors' experiences of facilitating problem-based learning. Part 2--implications for the facilitation of problem based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haith-Cooper, Melanie

    2003-01-01

    This paper is the second of two parts exploring a study that was undertaken to investigate the role of the tutor in facilitating problem-based learning (PBL). The first part focussed on the methodological underpinnings of the study. This paper aims to focus on the findings of the study and their implications for the facilitation of PBL. Six essential themes emerged from the findings that described the facilitation role. The tutors believed that their facilitation role was essentially structured around the decision of when to intervene and how to intervene in the PBL process. Modelling and non-verbal communication were seen as essential strategies for the facilitator. Underpinning these decisions was the need to trust in the philosophy of PBL. However, within many of the themes, there was a divergence of opinion as to how the role should actually be undertaken. Despite this, these findings have implications for the future role of PBL facilitators in Health Professional Education.

  3. Health and the environment miscellaneous (Part 1). Hearings before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, May 6, 1985 and September 20, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Part one of the record covers three days of hearings on reauthorization of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CSPC), health problems of Hispanics, and legislation relating to the Radiation Research Reorganization Act of 1985. Budget cuts and administration efforts to abolish the CSPC have eroded the agency. The five witnesses who addressed the problem of consumer risks represented the CSPC, the Chamber of Commerce, and the legal sector. Testimony on the needs of Hispanics for access to the health care system in terms of how a lack of health services increases the incidence and risk of disease and death came from six witnesses from the medical profession, labor unions, and public health and social service workers. Testimony on the radiation research reorganization brought out controversy over DOE's obligation to evaluate the health effects of its nuclear weapons research programs. The eight witnesses included labor leaders, biomedical research scientists, DOE, and health agencies. Material submitted for the record follows each day's testimony

  4. The value of the pre-hospital learning environment as part of the emergency nursing programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonett van Wyk

    2015-10-01

    Objective: The study explored the views of the emergency nurse students regarding the value of rotating through the pre-hospital learning environment during an emergency nursing programme. Methods: A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual research design using an Appreciative Inquiry approach was used to collect the data. Through purposive sampling a total of 45 emergency nursing students participated. Data was collected by means of selfreported Appreciative Inquiry interview guides and individual Appreciative Inquiry interviews.The data was analysed using content analysis. Results: Four major themes were identified: an unpredictable environment, role players in emergency medical services, team work, and competencies. Conclusion: The research findings support the value and continuation of utilising the prehospital clinical learning environment for placing post-basic emergency nursing students when enrolled in the emergency nursing programme.

  5. Topical Session on Materials Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    At its second meeting, in Paris, 5-7 December 2001, the WPDD held two topical sessions on the D and D Safety Case and on the Management of Materials from D and D, respectively. This report documents the topical session on the management of materials. Presentations during the topical session covered key aspects of the management of materials and meant to provide an exchange of information and experience, including: Experience and lessons learnt from VLLW and non-radioactive material management in Spain and Germany with special attention to recycling (How specific solutions came about? Are there 'generic' examples for wider adoption?); Risk assessment of recycling and non-recycling: a CPD study; Waste acceptance issues within different national contexts (What constraints are there on the waste receiving body and what flexibility can the latter have? What constraints does this impose on D and D implementers? What about wastes are without current solution? What needs to be done? What about large items and 'difficult' waste in general?); Radiological characterisation of materials during decommissioning, particularly difficult situations - large volumes, large items,.. wastes, heterogeneous streams (What examples of established practice? What are the approaches or aspects that set the regulatory requirements? How can the flow rates be large but the answers acceptable? How much is needed to be known for later action, e. g., disposal, release, protection of worker, etc.); Radiological characterisation of buildings as they stand, in order to allow conventional demolition (What are strategies for optimisation of characterisation? How much needs to be known to take action later? e.g. for storage, disposal, release, cost estimation and ALARA? What needs to be done in advance and after decommissioning/dismantling?). At the end of each presentation time was allotted for discussion of the paper. Integral to the Topical Session was a facilitated plenary discussion on the topical

  6. Kaiser Permanente's performance improvement system, Part 4: Creating a learning organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Lisa; Dearing, James W; Staley, Paul; Harvey, Patti; Fahey, Linda; Kuruppu, Francesca

    2011-12-01

    In 2006, recognizing variations in performance in quality, safety, service, and efficiency, Kaiser Permanente leaders initiated the development of a performance improvement (PI) system. Kaiser Permanente has implemented a strategy for creating the systemic capacity for continuous improvement that characterizes a learning organization. Six "building blocks" were identified to enable Kaiser Permanente to make the transition to becoming a learning organization: real-time sharing of meaningful performance data; formal training in problem-solving methodology; workforce engagement and informal knowledge sharing; leadership structures, beliefs, and behaviors; internal and external benchmarking; and technical knowledge sharing. Putting each building block into place required multiple complex strategies combining top-down and bottom-up approaches. Although the strategies have largely been successful, challenges remain. The demand for real-time meaningful performance data can conflict with prioritized changes to health information systems. It is an ongoing challenge to teach PI, change management, innovation, and project management to all managers and staff without consuming too much training time. Challenges with workforce engagement include low initial use of tools intended to disseminate information through virtual social networking. Uptake of knowledge-sharing technologies is still primarily by innovators and early adopters. Leaders adopt new behaviors at varying speeds and have a range of abilities to foster an environment that is psychologically safe and stimulates inquiry. A learning organization has the capability to improve, and it develops structures and processes that facilitate the acquisition and sharing of knowledge.

  7. Graduate Education and Simulation Training for CBRNE Disasters Using a Multimodal Approach to Learning. Part 2: Education and Training from the Perspectives of Educators and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    quantify learning effectiveness and retention rates by comparing didactic lectures, reading, audiovisual presentations, demonstrations, discussion...Graduate Education and Simulation Training   for CBRNE Disasters Using a Multimodal  Approach to  Learning   Part 2: Education and Training from the...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Graduate Education and Simulation Training for CBRNE Disasters Using a Multimodal 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Approach to Learning

  8. Beam instability Workshop - plenary sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to provide a review of the mechanisms of limiting beam instabilities, their cures, including feedback, and beam measurement for synchrotron radiation light sources. 12 plenary sessions took place whose titles are: 1) challenging brilliance and lifetime issues with increasing currents; 2) limiting instabilities in multibunch; 3) experience from high currents in B factories; 4) longitudinal dynamics in high intensity/bunch; 5) Transverse instabilities for high intensity/bunch; 6) working group introduction from ESRF experience; 7) impedance modelling: simulations, minimization; 8) report on the broadband impedance measurements and modelling workshop; 9) feedback systems for synchrotron light sources; 10) beam instabilities diagnostics; 11) harmonic cavities: the pros and cons; and 12) experimental study of fast beam-ion instabilities at PLS. This document gathers the 12 articles that were presented during these sessions

  9. Beam instability Workshop - plenary sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to provide a review of the mechanisms of limiting beam instabilities, their cures, including feedback, and beam measurement for synchrotron radiation light sources. 12 plenary sessions took place whose titles are: 1) challenging brilliance and lifetime issues with increasing currents; 2) limiting instabilities in multibunch; 3) experience from high currents in B factories; 4) longitudinal dynamics in high intensity/bunch; 5) Transverse instabilities for high intensity/bunch; 6) working group introduction from ESRF experience; 7) impedance modelling: simulations, minimization; 8) report on the broadband impedance measurements and modelling workshop; 9) feedback systems for synchrotron light sources; 10) beam instabilities diagnostics; 11) harmonic cavities: the pros and cons; and 12) experimental study of fast beam-ion instabilities at PLS. This document gathers the 12 articles that were presented during these sessions.

  10. National Sessions of Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sociedad Argentina de Radioproteccion

    2012-01-01

    The Radioprotection Argentine Society (SAR) was organized the National Sessions on Radiation Protection 2012 in order to continue the exchange in the radiation protection community in the country, on work areas that present a challenge to the profession. The new recommendations of the ICRP and the IAEA Safety Standards (2011), among others, includes several topics that are necessary to develop. The SAR wants to encourage different organizations from Argentina, to submit projects that are developing in order to strengthen radiation protection.

  11. Scientific conference proceedings. Session 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartosek, V.

    1985-01-01

    The Radiochemical Technology session met at UJV Rez on June 7, 1985 to hear 13 papers of which 11 were incorporated in INIS. The papers inform of results attained in the field of processing liquid radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants, processing spent nuclear fuel using the fluoride process, of the separation of fission products by dicarbolide extraction, the chemistry of complex uranium compounds, etc. The cooperation of UJV with VUJE and VUCHZ is also dealt with. (E.S.)

  12. Validation of the learning transfer system inventory in the South African context (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W J Coetsee

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to validate the Learning Transfer System Inventory (LTSI in the South African context. The sample used in this study was a convenience sample of 240 employees working for a Banking group. Exploratory factor analysis of the LTSI was used to determine if an interpretable factor structure of latent transfer system constructs when applied in the South African context could be identified. From the results it appears that the factor structure of the LTSI, as revealed by means of the exploratory approach, appears differently in the South African context.

  13. Exhibition Session of the exp.at’11 International Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Cardoso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Man has been the humanity’s engineer for ages - human knowledge has been continuously built on conceptualization based on constant learning by doing activities. The observation and understanding of concepts and principles in action are the bases of the experimental activity leading to the correlation between reality and theory. Experimental activities are really important, contributing to prepare the future engineers for solving practical problems and for consolidating theoretical understanding and volatile knowledge based on abstract concepts. Therefore, experimental activity has been an essential part of education and training for engineers and engineering scientists. exp.at’11 (the 1st Experiment@ International Conference has been the first event of a new International Conference Experiment@ series devoted to online experimentation, enlarging the world capabilities in this particular area and contributing to collaborative work in emergent technologies, bringing together engineers, researchers and professionals from different areas. In its Exhibition Session, participants demonstrated their systems within developments of educational, medical and industrial applications.

  14. Teaching childbirth with high-fidelity simulation. Is it better observing the scenario during the briefing session?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerva, Marcos J; Piñel, Carlos S; Martin, Lourdes; Espinosa, Jose A; Corral, Octavio J; Mendoza, Nicolás

    2018-02-12

    The design of optimal courses for obstetric undergraduate teaching is a relevant question. This study evaluates two different designs of simulator-based learning activity on childbirth with regard to respect to the patient, obstetric manoeuvres, interpretation of cardiotocography tracings (CTG) and infection prevention. This randomised experimental study which differs in the content of their briefing sessions consisted of two groups of undergraduate students, who performed two simulator-based learning activities on childbirth. The first briefing session included the observations of a properly performed scenario according to Spanish clinical practice guidelines on care in normal childbirth by the teachers whereas the second group did not include the observations of a properly performed scenario, and the students observed it only after the simulation process. The group that observed a properly performed scenario after the simulation obtained worse grades during the simulation, but better grades during the debriefing and evaluation. Simulator use in childbirth may be more fruitful when the medical students observe correct performance at the completion of the scenario compared to that at the start of the scenario. Impact statement What is already known on this subject? There is a scarcity of literature about the design of optimal high-fidelity simulation training in childbirth. It is known that preparing simulator-based learning activities is a complex process. Simulator-based learning includes the following steps: briefing, simulation, debriefing and evaluation. The most important part of high-fidelity simulations is the debriefing. A good briefing and simulation are of high relevance in order to have a fruitful debriefing session. What do the results of this study add? Our study describes a full simulator-based learning activity on childbirth that can be reproduced in similar facilities. The findings of this study add that high-fidelity simulation training in

  15. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 2. Opening Session, Panel Sessions, Seismic, Special Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    within the depot repair process. It was the practice of the repair activity to sequentially remove and replace suspect modules until the unit from...Configuration Fitrure 1 is a schematic representation of a tvpiral equipment-support structure. Fquip- ment frame lineups are tied together at the...ftx^ level by cross-aisle cable racks and steel ancle braces (indicated as lineup bracesi. On the Common Distribution Frame (CDFt side, the

  16. Evaluating a Pre-Session Homework Exercise in a Standalone Information Literacy Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Joseph E.; Barber, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, researchers evaluate a homework exercise assigned before a standalone information literacy session. Students in a Master of Education program completed a worksheet using the ERIC database thesaurus. The researchers conducted pre- and posttests within a single library session to assess student learning, using a control group for…

  17. Real remote physics experiments across Internet-- inherent part of Integrated e-Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantisek Lustig

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract— The implementation of the real remote experiments across the Internet into teaching process, up till now not available, enables introduction of Integrated e-Learning, composed of three components: the real remote experiments across the Internet, the simulation applets and the electronic interactive textbooks. We present here the prospective remote laboratory system with data transfer using Intelligent School Experimental System (ISES as hardware and ISES WEB Control kit as software. This approach enables the simple construction of remote experiments without building any hardware and virtually no programming, only with paste and copy approach of pre-built typical blocks as camera view, controls, graphs, displays etc. In conclusion we summarize the achieved experience with remote experiments.

  18. Proceedings of the Topical Sessions on Media Relations held in June 2004 and 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    An effective media strategy, including timely interaction with them is an indispensable tool for organisations or institutions involved in radioactive waste management. With this in mind, the Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) set up a Group on Communication and Outreach with a twofold objective: to assist FSC members in communicating with the radioactive waste management community, to assist FSC members in reaching a broader public. As part of this assignment, the Group organised two Topical Sessions on media strategy, in conjunction with the 2004 and 2005 FSC meetings. The main objective was to learn about the functioning of the media organisations, their structures and needs, with speakers chosen to represent the range of such media, as well as different countries and varying radioactive waste situations that may serve as illustrative examples, given the vast differences that may prevail between local, national, and international radioactive waste management situations and their treatment by the media. The sessions were attended by representatives of policy makers, regulators and implementers from the FSC organisations. The presentations and discussions illustrated current media strategies, best practices, successes and failures and lessons learn. These proceedings consist of a summary of the main points made by each speaker as well a collation of their papers

  19. Upcoming training sessions (up to end October) - Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Please find below a list of training sessions scheduled to take place up to the end of October with places available.   Safety and Language courses are not included here, you will find an up-to-date list in the Training Catalogue. If you need a course which is not featured  in the catalogue, please contact one of the following: your supervisor, your Departmental Training Officer or the relevant learning specialist. Leadership Training           Training Course Title Next Session Language Duration Available places Needed to maintain the session Driving for Impact and Influence 13-Sep-2016 to 14-Sep-2016 French 2 days 4 0 Essentials of People Management for CERN Supervisors (Adapted from CDP for CERN Supervisors) 22-Sep-2016 to 23-Sep-2016, 18-Nov-2016, 17-Jan-2017 to 18-Jan-2017 English 5 days 5 0 Eléments essentiels de la gestion du personnel pour les superviseurs (adapt&a...

  20. Working session 3: Tubing integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, C.; Strosnider, J.

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-three individuals representing nine countries (Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, France, Japan, the Slovak Republic, Spain, the UK, and the US) participated in the session on tube integrity. These individuals represented utilities, vendors, consultants and regulatory authorities. The major subjects discussed by the group included overall objectives of managing steam generator tube degradation, necessary elements of a steam generator degradation management program, the concept of degradation specific management, structural integrity evaluations, leakage evaluations, and specific degradation mechanisms. The group's discussions on these subjects, including conclusions and recommendations, are summarized in this article

  1. CIME Session on Pluripotential Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Patrizio, Giorgio; Berteloot, Francois; Demailly, Jean Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotential theory is a very powerful tool in geometry, complex analysis and dynamics. This volume brings together the lectures held at the 2011 CIME session on "pluripotential theory" in Cetraro, Italy. This CIME course focused on complex Monge-Ampére equations, applications of pluripotential theory to Kahler geometry and algebraic geometry and to holomorphic dynamics. The contributions provide an extensive description of the theory and its very recent developments, starting from basic introductory materials and concluding with open questions in current research.

  2. Summary of spin physics sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1988-01-01

    The list of topics in the many talks given during the Spin Physics sessions of this Intersections conference is nearly as long as the one of this conference: P and T Violation NN Interaction πp and πd Elastic Scattering Nuclear Matter Spin Effects Muon (g-2) Polarized Proton Beams Polarized Gas Targets This points to the almost trivial fact that spin is fundamental to our understanding of nuclear and particle physics. I will discuss in some detail only four of these topics. Needless to say this choice is very much personally biased and I apologize to all the speakers whose excellent contributions I did not include

  3. Session du Conseil du CERN : le ministre britannique, Robert Jackson, souligne l'intérêt de on pays pour l'avenir du CERN : décisions du Conseil pour la mise en oeuvre des recommandations du Comité d'évaluation du CERN: départ anticipé pour 200 membres au moins du personnel - mise à jour de la méthode de calcule pour les contributions des Etats Membres au budget

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1988-01-01

    Session du Conseil du CERN : le ministre britannique, Robert Jackson, souligne l'intérêt de on pays pour l'avenir du CERN : décisions du Conseil pour la mise en oeuvre des recommandations du Comité d'évaluation du CERN: départ anticipé pour 200 membres au moins du personnel - mise à jour de la méthode de calcule pour les contributions des Etats Membres au budget

  4. A behavior analytic analogue of learning to use synonyms, syntax, and parts of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Philip N; Ellenwood, David W; Madden, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Matching-to-sample and sequence training procedures were used to develop responding to stimulus classes that were considered analogous to 3 aspects of verbal behavior: identifying synonyms and parts of speech, and using syntax. Matching-to-sample procedures were used to train 12 paired associates from among 24 stimuli. These pairs were analogous to synonyms. Then, sequence characteristics were trained to 6 of the stimuli. The result was the formation of 3 classes of 4 stimuli, with the classes controlling a sequence response analogous to a simple ordering syntax: first, second, and third. Matching-to-sample procedures were then used to add 4 stimuli to each class. These stimuli, without explicit sequence training, also began to control the same sequence responding as the other members of their class. Thus, three 8-member functionally equivalent sequence classes were formed. These classes were considered to be analogous to parts of speech. Further testing revealed three 8-member equivalence classes and 512 different sequences of first, second, and third. The study indicated that behavior analytic procedures may be used to produce some generative aspects of verbal behavior related to simple syntax and semantics.

  5. Working session 1: Tubing degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharshafdjian, G.; Turluer, G.

    1997-01-01

    A general introductory overview of the purpose of the group and the general subject area of SG tubing degradation was given by the facilitator. The purpose of the session was described as to open-quotes develop conclusions and proposals on regulatory and technical needs required to deal with the issues of SG tubing degradation.close quotes Types, locations and characteristics of tubing degradation in steam generators were briefly reviewed. The well-known synergistic effects of materials, environment, and stress and strain/strain rate, subsequently referred to by the acronym open-quotes MESSclose quotes by some of the group members, were noted. The element of time (i.e., evolution of these variables with time) was emphasized. It was also suggested that the group might want to consider the related topics of inspection capabilities, operational variables, degradation remedies, and validity of test data, and some background information in these areas was provided. The presentation given by Peter Millet during the Plenary Session was reviewed; Specifically, the chemical aspects and the degradation from the secondary side of the steam generator were noted. The main issues discussed during the October 1995 EPRI meeting on secondary side corrosion were reported, and a listing of the potential SG tube degradations was provided and discussed

  6. Y-Notes; Introductory Sessions on Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This chapter is divided into next parts: What is 'Y-Notes ; Young generation opening session; Nuclear education and transfer of know-how; Nuclear technology; Other applications of nuclear technology; Nuclear programs and technical cooperation; Political aspects; Environment and safety; Communication and public perception; Economics; Fuel cycle challenges; Video

  7. Supporting learning and promoting conceptual change with box and AVOW diagrams. Part 1: Representational design and instructional approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Peter C.-H.; Shipstone, David M.

    2003-02-01

    A new approach to the teaching of electricity is described that uses box and AVOW diagrams, novel representations of the properties of the electric circuit which portray current, voltage, resistance and power. The diagrams have been developed as aids to learning, understanding and problem solving. They also have the potential to promote conceptual change by challenging a number of commonly held misconceptions. The diagrams have been incorporated into A-level teaching materials on d.c. circuit theory and the rationale for this approach is contrasted with a number of strategies that have previously been reported. Part 2 of this paper (Cheng and Shipstone, International Journal of Science Education, in press) will present the results of preliminary school-based trials.

  8. Two Approaches to Reactor Decommissioning: 10 CFR Part 50 License Termination and License Amendment, Lessons Learned from the Regulatory Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, B.A.; Buckley, J.T.; Craig, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Trojan Nuclear Plant (Trojan) and Maine Yankee Nuclear Plant (Maine Yankee) were the first two power reactors to complete decommissioning under the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) License Termination Rule (LTR), 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E. The respective owners' decisions to decommission the sites resulted in different approaches to both the physical aspects of the decommissioning, and the approach for obtaining approval for completing the decommissioning in accordance with regulations. Being in different States, the two single-unit pressurized water reactor sites had different State requirements and levels of public interest that impacted the decommissioning approaches. This resulted in significant differences in decommissioning planning, conduct of decommissioning operations, volumes of low- level radioactive waste disposed, and the final status survey (FSS) program. While both licensees have Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations (ISFSIs), Trojan obtained a separate license for the ISFSI in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR Part 72 and terminated their 10 CFR Part 50 license. Maine Yankee elected to obtain a general license under 10 CFR Part 50 for the ISFSI and reduce the physical site footprint to the ISFSI through a series of license amendments. While the NRC regulations are flexible and allow different approaches to ISFSI licensing there are separate licensing requirements that must be addressed. In 10 CFR 50.82, the NRC mandates public participation in the decommissioning process. For Maine Yankee, public input resulted in the licensee entering into an agreement with a concerned citizen group and resulted in State legislation that significantly lowered the dose limit below the NRC radiological criteria of 25 mrem (0.25 mSv) per year (yr) in 10 CFR 20.1402 for unrestricted use. The lowering of the radiological criteria resulted in a significant dose modeling effort using site-specific Derived Concentrations Guideline Levels (DCGLs

  9. Evaluating a Pre-session Exercise in a Standalone Information Literacy Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E. Goetz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, researchers evaluate a homework exercise assigned before a standalone information literacy session. Students in a Master of Education program completed a worksheet using the ERIC database thesaurus. The researchers conducted pre- and posttests within a single library session to assess student learning, using a control group for comparison. The treatment group did not demonstrate better thesaurus skills than students who had regular library instruction alone, but results pointed the way to targeted improvements of pre-session learning materials. This approach could inform other information literacy homework applications such as flipping the classroom.

  10. Upcoming training sessions (up to end October) - Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Please find below a list of training sessions scheduled to take place up to the end of October with places available.   Safety and Language courses are not included here, you will find an up-to-date list in the Training Catalogue. If you need a course which is not featured  in the catalogue, please contact one of the following: your supervisor, your Departmental Training Officer or the relevant learning specialist.  

  11. Working session 2: Tubing inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, J.; Tapping, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    This session was attended by delegates from 10 countries, and four papers were presented. A wide range of issues was tabled for discussion. Realizing that there was limited time available for more detailed discussion, three topics were chosen for the more detailed discussion: circumferential cracking, performance demonstration (to focus on POD and sizing), and limits of methods. Two other subsessions were organized: one dealt with some challenges related to the robustness of current inspection methods, especially with respect to leaving cracked tubes in service, and the other with developing a chart of current NDE technology with recommendations for future development. These three areas are summarized in turn, along with conclusions and/or recommendations. During the discussions there were four presentations. There were two (Canada, Japan) on eddy current probe developments, both of which addressed multiarray probes that would detect a range of flaws, one (Spain) on circumferential crack detection, and one (JRC, Petten) on the recent PISC III results

  12. Cinema Sessions in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ignacio MORETA-VELAYOS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For a long time films have been used in teaching and at various levels of professional training  and more specifically in the medical area. In this case, through the description of a project developed in a Primary Care Health Center, we intend to justify the use of movies as a tool that could ease, the sometimes difficult task of continued education among Primary Care professionals. We propose different aspects of everyday practice in which cinema can be potentially useful, as well as the way to include it in the Plan of Continued Education of the Centre and its accreditation.Films and issues discussed in each session, and the project evaluation, are detailed.

  13. DWPF recycle minimization: Brainstorming session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, R.A.; Poirier, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The recycle stream from the DWPF constitutes a major source of water addition to the High Level Waste evaporator system. As now designed, the entire flow of 3.5 to 6.5 gal/min (at sign 25% and 75% attainment, respectively), or 2 gal/min during idling, flow to the 2H evaporator system (Tank 43). Substantial improvement in the HLW water balance and tank volume management is expected if the DWPF recycle to the HLW evaporator system can be significantly reduced. A task team has been appointed to study alternatives for reducing the flow to the HLW evaporator system and make recommendations for implementation and/or further study and evaluation. The brainstorming session detailed in this report was designed to produce the first cut options for the task team to further evaluate

  14. Celebrating the tenth conference session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Full text: This number of the Bulletin appears during a month when the tenth regular session of the Agency's General Conference is being held. It is fitting that among the special arrangements made to give added significance to such an historical landmark should be an opening address by Herr Franz Jonas, Federal President of the host country, Austria. The Festsaal of the Kongresszentrum, in the Hofburg, has now been the centre for every annual session held in Austria, except the first. On that occasion, recorded in the photograph on the cover, the Konzerthaus was made available. A commemorative series of talks dealing with topics of particular interest in the international development of the peaceful uses of atomic energy, delivered by scientists of world distinction was another idea which will add much profound thought to the records of nuclear energy. Under the chairmanship of Professor L.C. Prado, with Dr. W.B. Lewis as Moderator, the subjects chosen by the participants were : The Impact of Atomic Energy in our Society - Sir John Cockcroft; Nuclear Power Systems and their Technical Potentialities - Prof. Alexandre Leipunski; The Commercial Future of Nuclear Power - Dr. William Webster; Nuclear Science in Life Sciences - Dr. A.R. Gopal-Ayengar; Fundamental Research in Atomic Energy Centres - Prof. Louis Neel. These speeches will be reproduced in full in the Agency's Atomic Energy Review. The pages of this issue of the Bulletin are intended to give indications of the stage which the Agency has now reached in some, but by no means all, of its activities in promoting the techniques of atomic energy for the benefit of mankind. (author)

  15. Mini-conference and Related Sessions on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hantao Ji

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of some major physics issues and future perspectives discussed in the Mini-Conference on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics. This Mini-conference, sponsored by the Topical Group on Plasma Astrophysics, was held as part of the American Physical Society's Division of Plasma Physics 2003 Annual Meeting (October 27-31, 2003). Also included are brief summaries of selected talks on the same topic presented at two invited paper sessions (including a tutorial) and two contributed focus oral sessions, which were organized in coordination with the Mini-Conference by the same organizers

  16. Mini-conference and Related Sessions on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantao Ji

    2004-02-27

    This paper provides a summary of some major physics issues and future perspectives discussed in the Mini-Conference on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics. This Mini-conference, sponsored by the Topical Group on Plasma Astrophysics, was held as part of the American Physical Society's Division of Plasma Physics 2003 Annual Meeting (October 27-31, 2003). Also included are brief summaries of selected talks on the same topic presented at two invited paper sessions (including a tutorial) and two contributed focus oral sessions, which were organized in coordination with the Mini-Conference by the same organizers.

  17. Summary of session D2: quantum aspects of cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojowald, Martin

    2008-01-01

    This is a summary of talks about quantum aspects of cosmology. Topics involve the properties of quantum matter fields on an expanding spacetime as well as issues in the quantization of gravity itself. This session had three parts, one of which was in a joint session with quantum aspects of black holes (D1) and other quantum aspects (D3). The first block of talks was related to quantum aspects of field theories on a classical spacetime (with possible back-reaction), while the second block dealt in several ways with quantizations of gravity itself. The two talks in the combined session discussed issues in quantum theory on de Sitter space and will therefore be included here in the summary of the first block. For each talk, a reference is given for further details

  18. Practical session assessments in human anatomy: Weightings and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Aaron C; Chan, Siew-Pang; Schuijers, Johannes A

    2016-07-08

    Assessment weighting within a given module can be a motivating factor for students when deciding on their commitment level and time given to study a specific topic. In this study, an analysis of assessment performances of second year anatomy students was performed over four years to determine if (1) students performed better when a higher weighting was given to a set of practical session assessments and (2) whether an improved performance in the practical session assessments had a carry-over effect on other assessment tasks within that anatomy module and/or other anatomy modules that follow. Results showed that increasing the weighting of practical session assessments improved the average mark in that assessment and also improved the percentage of students passing that assessment. Further, it significantly improved performance in the written end-semester examination within the same module and had a carry-over effect on the anatomy module taught in the next teaching period, as students performed better in subsequent practical session assessments as well as subsequent end-semester examinations. It was concluded that the weighting of assessments had significant influences on a student's performance in that, and subsequent, assessments. It is postulated that practical session assessments, designed to develop deep learning skills in anatomy, improved efficacy in student performance in assessments undertaken in that and subsequent anatomy modules when the weighting of these assessments was greater. These deep learning skills were also transferable to other methods of assessing anatomy. Anat Sci Educ 9: 330-336. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  19. Session Report - S. Voinis (Andra)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voinis, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The session addressed key issues related to the industrial feasibility of construction. It covered the implementer and regulator points of view. The conclusions derive from three presentations completed by the outcomes of six WG. At the Morsleben Repository, Germany, the licensing of the closure of the repository has been initiated by BfS. The closure concept is based on extensive backfilling with salt concrete complemented by seals. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing such a seal structure an in-situ experiment is performed in a drift of the repository. In the UK, the framework for implementing geological disposal of the higher activity radioactive waste is described in the White Paper published by the UK Government in June 2008. The process to site a facility will be staged and based on voluntarism and partnership with local communities. This process is in its early stage. The paper outlines the work being undertaken by the NDA. In canada, Ontario Power Generation (OPG) has submitted information required for a CNSC licence to prepare the site and construct a DGR for the disposal of low and intermediate level waste from the operation of their nuclear power reactors. That submission includes an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), as required for a Panel Review under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA), and the information required for a licence application under the NSCA Regulations. Discussions between the proponent and the regulator in the pre-licensing phase, clarified CNSC expectations for the characterization of the site and for the development of the EIS and application. They also helped to ensure that OPG understood these expectations. Outcomes WG session-1: - Start with construction but during operational phase: Simultaneous construction and operation activities. - Need for technical requirements/criteria: So that it can be judged whether 'products' meet the requirements; LT safety issues to be considered during

  20. Evaluating distance-based clustering for user (browse and click) sessions in a domain-specific collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinhauer, Jeremy; Delcambre, Lois M.L.; Lykke, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    to the question that they are answering. Since a large class of machine learning algorithms use a distance measure at the core, we evaluate the suitability of common machine learning distance measures to distinguish sessions of users searching for the answer to same or different questions. We found that two......We seek to improve information retrieval in a domain-specific collection by clustering user sessions from a click log and then classifying later user sessions in real time. As a preliminary step, we explore the main assumption of this approach: whether user sessions in such a site are related...

  1. Session II-D. Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The objectives of the Systems Task in the NWTS Program include: development of program requirements, allocation of the requirements to subsystems or tasks, integration of the task activities towards meeting the overall requirements, and assessment of progress towards achievement of the program mission. The Systems Task also includes a number of ancillary activities which are necessary to the program but which do not logically fall into other work-breakdown structure elements. Activities in the Systems Task, which in the NWTS Program are conducted at both the program and project levels, are generally grouped under the heading systems engineering and include identification of requirements, development of a baseline, integration of the system, baseline control, functional analyses, trade-off studies, and system analyses. The following papers in this session address some of the activities and progress that was achieved in the Systems Task in FY 1981: (1) waste isolation system alternatives: a cost comparison; (2) BWIP technical integration and control; (3) BWIP performance evaluation process: a criteria based method; (4) impacts of waste age; (5) systems studies of subseabed disposal; and (6) systems studies of waste transportation

  2. The Citizen Science Program "H2O SOS: Help Heal the Ocean—Student Operated Solutions: Operation Climate Change" teaches middle and high school students about ocean threats related to climate change through hands-on activities and learning experiences in the field. This is a continuation of the Program presented last year at the Poster Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, N. K.; Wood, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    TThe Citizen Science Program H2O SOS: Help Heal the Ocean—Student Operated Solutions: Operation Climate Change, teaches middle and high school students about ocean threats related to climate change through hands-on activities and learning experiences in the field. During each session (in-class or after-school as a club), students build an understanding about how climate change impacts our oceans using resources provided by ExplorOcean (hands-on activities, presentations, multi-media). Through a student leadership model, students present lessons to each other, interweaving a deep learning of science, 21st century technology, communication skills, and leadership. After participating in learning experiences and activities related to 6 key climate change concepts: 1) Introduction to climate change, 2) Increased sea temperatures, 3) Ocean acidification, 4) Sea level rise, 5) Feedback mechanisms, and 6) Innovative solutions. H2O SOS- Operation Climate change participants select one focus issue and use it to design a multi-pronged campaign to increase awareness about this issue in their local community. The campaign includes social media, an interactive activity, and a visual component. All participating clubs that meet participation and action goals earn a field trip to Ocean Quest where they dive deeper into their selected issue through hands-on activities, real-world investigations, and interviews or presentations with experts. In addition to self-selected opportunities to showcase their focus issue, teams will participate in one of several key events identified by Ocean Quest.

  3. Is LabTutor a helpful component of the blended learning approach to biosciences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Amelia; Efstathiou, Nikolaos; Lameu, Paula

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the use of LabTutor (a physiological data capture and e-learning package) in bioscience education for student nurses. Knowledge of biosciences is important for nurses the world over, who have to monitor and assess their patient's clinical condition, and interpret that information to determine the most appropriate course of action. Nursing students have long been known to find acquiring useable bioscience knowledge challenging. Blended learning strategies are common in bioscience teaching to address the difficulties students have. Student nurses have a preference for hands-on learning, small group sessions and are helped by close juxtaposition of theory and practice. An evaluation of a new teaching method using in-classroom voluntary questionnaire. A structured survey instrument including statements and visual analogue response format and open questions was given to students who participated in Labtutor sessions. The students provided feedback in about the equipment, the learning and the session itself. First year (n = 93) and third year (n = 36) students completed the evaluation forms. The majority of students were confident about the equipment and using it to learn although a few felt anxious about computer-based learning. They all found the equipment helpful as part of their bioscience education and they all enjoyed the sessions. This equipment provides a helpful way to encourage guided independent learning through practice and discovery and because each session is case study based and the relationship of the data to the patient is made clear. Our students helped to evaluate our initial use of LabTutor and found the sessions enjoyable and helpful. LabTutor provides an effective learning tool as part of a blended learning strategy for biosciences teaching. Improving bioscience knowledge will lead to a greater understanding of pathophysiology, treatments and interventions and monitoring. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Pericles Should Learn to Fix a Leaky Pipe – Why Trial Advocacy Should Become Part of the LLB Curriculum (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem H Gravett

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a sad fact that at most university law schools in South Africa, a student can graduate without ever having set foot in a courtroom, and without ever having spoken to, or on behalf of, a person in need of advice or counsel. The past several years have witnessed a swelling chorus of complaints that the current LLB curriculum produces law graduates who were "out of their depth" in practice. My purpose is to make a case for the inclusion in the LLB curriculum of a course in trial advocacy. This endeavour of necessity invokes the broader debate over the educational objectives of a university law school – a debate memorably framed by William Twining as the two polar images of "Pericles and the plumber". My thesis is that the education of practising lawyers should be the primary mission of the university law school. The first part of this contribution is a response to those legal academics who hold that the role of the law school is to educate law students in the theories and substance of the law; that it is not to function as a trade school or a nursery school for legal practice. With reference to the development of legal education in the United States, I argue that the "education/training" dichotomy has been exposed as a red herring. This so-called antithesis is false, because it assumes that a vocational approach is necessarily incompatible with such values as free inquiry, intellectual rigour, independence of thought, and breadth of perspective. The modern American law school has shown that such so-called incompatibility is the product of intellectual snobbery and devoid of any substance. It is also often said that the raison d'être of a university legal education is to develop in the law student the ability "to think like a lawyer". However, what legal academics usually mean by "thinking like a lawyer" is the development of a limited subset of the skills that are of crucial importance in practising law: one fundamental cognitive skill

  5. Game Plan: In Part One of This Two-Part Series, Technology & Learning Looks at the Challenges of Using Games to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLester, Susan

    2005-01-01

    When one considers it was only 10 or so years ago that some experts were questioning the appropriateness of multimedia and other "frills" as learning tools, it's not surprising that the idea of using games as a core instructional resource remains controversial. But in an age in which major corporations and the U.S. military are relying on…

  6. Secondary Special Education. Part I: The "Stepping Stone Model" Designed for Secondary Learning Disabled Students. Part II: Adapting Materials and Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Barbara

    The paper describes the Stepping Stone Model, a model for the remediation and mainstreaming of secondary learning disabled students and the adaptation of curriculum and materials for the model. The Stepping Stone Model is designed to establish the independence of students in the mainstream through content reading. Five areas of concern common to…

  7. Fit, Healthy, and Ready To Learn: A School Health Policy Guide. Part II: Policies To Promote Sun Safety and Prevent Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Katherine

    This publication is a supplementary chapter to "Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn: A School Health Policy Guide; Part I: General School Health Policies, Physical Activity, Healthy Eating, and Tobacco-Use Prevention." It discusses various aspects of a complete school policy and plan to promote sun safety. The first section "Purpose…

  8. A comparison of classroom and online asynchronous problem-based learning for students undertaking statistics training as part of a Public Health Masters degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, N; Verstegen, D M L; Tan, F E S; O'Connor, S J

    2013-05-01

    This case-study compared traditional, face-to-face classroom-based teaching with asynchronous online learning and teaching methods in two sets of students undertaking a problem-based learning module in the multilevel and exploratory factor analysis of longitudinal data as part of a Masters degree in Public Health at Maastricht University. Students were allocated to one of the two study variants on the basis of their enrolment status as full-time or part-time students. Full-time students (n = 11) followed the classroom-based variant and part-time students (n = 12) followed the online asynchronous variant which included video recorded lectures and a series of asynchronous online group or individual SPSS activities with synchronous tutor feedback. A validated student motivation questionnaire was administered to both groups of students at the start of the study and a second questionnaire was administered at the end of the module. This elicited data about student satisfaction with the module content, teaching and learning methods, and tutor feedback. The module coordinator and problem-based learning tutor were also interviewed about their experience of delivering the experimental online variant and asked to evaluate its success in relation to student attainment of the module's learning outcomes. Student examination results were also compared between the two groups. Asynchronous online teaching and learning methods proved to be an acceptable alternative to classroom-based teaching for both students and staff. Educational outcomes were similar for both groups, but importantly, there was no evidence that the asynchronous online delivery of module content disadvantaged part-time students in comparison to their full-time counterparts.

  9. Construction of group exercise sessions in geriatric inpatient rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Marjo; Talvitie, Ulla; Cattan, Mima; Karppi, Sirkka-Liisa

    2008-01-01

    There is little knowledge about the ways geriatric physiotherapy is being carried out in practice and about the situational construction of formal policies for promoting physical activity. This article examines how professional physiotherapists and frail community-dwelling older adults as their clients use talk and action to construct a group exercise session in an inpatient rehabilitation setting in Finland. The analysis of 7 group exercise sessions with a total of 52 clients and 9 professional physiotherapists revealed 3 different practitioner approaches, which served different functions in older adults' empowerment and lifestyle activity change. The highly structured approach favored taciturn physical performances completed independently and successfully by frail older adults. The guided exercise approach with individualized guidance encouraged occasional coconstruction of shared understanding of learning the exercises. The circuit training approach facilitated occasional self-regulation by the clients. The results of this study indicate that a combination of different approaches is required to address the multifaceted needs of heterogeneous frail older adults.

  10. Undergraduate Researchers and the Poster Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gail; Green, Raymond

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduates presented original research in classroom poster sessions open to students, faculty, and friends. We assessed the reaction of the students to the experience and their reported change in their interest in presenting at conferences. Students enjoyed the poster session experience and indicated they preferred this method over other…

  11. Multiparty session types as coherence proofs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Marco; Montesi, Fabrizio; Schürmann, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    We propose a Curry–Howard correspondence between a language for programming multiparty sessions and a generalisation of Classical Linear Logic (CLL). In this framework, propositions correspond to the local behaviour of a participant in a multiparty session type, proofs to processes, and proof nor...

  12. Summary of southeastern group breakout sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob Ford; Charles P. Nicholson

    1993-01-01

    The breakout sessions held by the southeastern representatives at the Partners In Flight meeting in Colorado were extremely well attended Most states were represented, as well as several federal agencies (including USFS, USFWS, TVA, EPA), and non-government organizations. Two sessions were held, one to discuss a strategy of management by...

  13. Summary of the session on other effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.

    1997-07-01

    The theme of this workshop is to discuss the effects of foreign particles on the native beam in a storage ring. This paper summarizes the session on effects not covered in sessions on fast ion instability, electron cloud instability, and cures. The topics discussed are the beam, the foreign particle, how are foreign particles trapped, and how do foreign particles and beam couple

  14. BILATERAL SINGLE SESSION URETEROSCOPY FOR URETERAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the feasibility, safety and success rate of bilateral single session rigid retrograde ureteroscopy (URS) for bilateral ureteral calculi. Patients and Methods: Thirty-five patients underwent bilateral single session ureteroscopic calculus removal. Results: Out of 70 renal units in 35 patients treated, ...

  15. Summary of Technical Sessions - Summary and Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Technical Session 1 - Development achievements of BEPU methods and State of the Art: The objective of this session was to present the different approaches dealing with Best Estimate codes and uncertainties evaluations. Existing methods were summarized and different papers were focused on specific methods stressing their bases, peculiarities, advantages and limitations. As a result of the session a picture of the current State of the Art was obtained. The session comprised six papers. Technical Session 2 - International comparative activities: This session had as a main objective to review the activities launched in the past and present from the NEA in connection with BEPU methods, with focus on the applicability of conclusions derived from former benchmarks like UMS, the main outcomes of the recently finished BEMUSE project, and the objectives and relevance of UAM and PREMIUM projects. The session comprised four papers. Technical Session 3 - Applications: Licensing, safety analysis support, regulatory body views and industry activities: This session focused on the application of current methods in safety analyses. Contributions from industry, technical safety organizations and regulatory bodies were provided. As a result, a view of the penetration of BEPU methods in current safety analyses was obtained, as well as an indication of the evolution in the near future. Elements such as licensing practices, assessment process, etc. were considered. The session comprised nine papers. Technical Session 4. BEPU methods extension to new fields The session addressed the extension of BEPU methods beyond their current use. By now such methods are mainly applied to classic deterministic environment but it is believed that their benefits could be extended to other fields. Seven papers were presented in the session dealing with subjects that fit in the objectives established in the workshop programme. The papers cover areas like: extension to CFD, quantification of global safety

  16. Orbitofrontal cortex inactivation impairs between- but not within-session Pavlovian extinction: an associative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayi, Marios C; Killcross, Simon

    2014-02-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is argued to be the neural locus of Pavlovian outcome expectancies. Reinforcement learning theories argue that extinction learning in Pavlovian procedures is caused by the discrepancy between the expected value of the outcome (US) that is elicited by a predictive stimulus (CS), and the lack of experienced US. If the OFC represents Pavlovian outcome expectancies that are necessary for extinction learning, then disrupting OFC function prior to extinction training should impair extinction learning. This was tested. In experiment 1, Long Evans rats received infusions of saline or muscimol targeting the lateral OFC prior to three appetitive Pavlovian extinction sessions. Muscimol infused into the OFC disrupted between-session but not within-session extinction behaviour. This finding was not due to muscimol infusions disrupting the memory consolidation process per se as there was no effect of muscimol infusion when administered immediately post session (experiment 2). These findings support a role for the OFC in representing outcome expectancies that are necessary for learning. A number of ways in which disrupting outcome expectancy information might block learning will be discussed in the context of traditional associative learning theories and the associative structures they depend on. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring students' perceptions on the use of significant event analysis, as part of a portfolio assessment process in general practice, as a tool for learning how to use reflection in learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Andrew J; Vermunt, Jan D; Kinnersley, Paul; Houston, Helen

    2007-03-30

    Portfolio learning enables students to collect evidence of their learning. Component tasks making up a portfolio can be devised that relate directly to intended learning outcomes. Reflective tasks can stimulate students to recognise their own learning needs. Assessment of portfolios using a rating scale relating to intended learning outcomes offers high content validity. This study evaluated a reflective portfolio used during a final-year attachment in general practice (family medicine). Students were asked to evaluate the portfolio (which used significant event analysis as a basis for reflection) as a learning tool. The validity and reliability of the portfolio as an assessment tool were also measured. 81 final-year medical students completed reflective significant event analyses as part of a portfolio created during a three-week attachment (clerkship) in general practice (family medicine). As well as two reflective significant event analyses each portfolio contained an audit and a health needs assessment. Portfolios were marked three times; by the student's GP teacher, the course organiser and by another teacher in the university department of general practice. Inter-rater reliability between pairs of markers was calculated. A questionnaire enabled the students' experience of portfolio learning to be determined. Benefits to learning from reflective learning were limited. Students said that they thought more about the patients they wrote up in significant event analyses but information as to the nature and effect of this was not forthcoming. Moderate inter-rater reliability (Spearman's Rho .65) was found between pairs of departmental raters dealing with larger numbers (20-60) of portfolios. Inter-rater reliability of marking involving GP tutors who only marked 1-3 portfolios was very low. Students rated highly their mentoring relationship with their GP teacher but found the portfolio tasks time-consuming. The inter-rater reliability observed in this study should

  18. Impact of the Extended Learning Opportunities Summer Adventures in Learning (ELO SAIL) Program on Student Academic Performance: Part 1, Results from Fall 2012 to Fall 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper-Martin, Elizabeth; Wolanin, Natalie; Jang, Seong; Modarresi, Shahpar; Zhao, Huafang

    2016-01-01

    Extended Learning Opportunities Summer Adventures in Learning (ELO SAIL) is a Montgomery County Public Schools summer program for students in all Title I elementary schools; it targets students who will be in kindergarten-Grade 2 in the fall following the program. This report analyzed demographic characteristics of attendees and the impact of the…

  19. Effects of Post-Session Wheel Running on Within-Session Changes in Operant Responding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Kenjiro

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the effects of post-session wheel running on within-session changes in operant responding. Lever-pressing by six rats was reinforced by a food pellet under a continuous reinforcement (CRF) schedule in 30-min sessions. Two different flavored food pellets were used as reinforcers. In the wheel conditions, 30-min operant-sessions…

  20. Session-RPE for quantifying the load of different youth basketball training sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, C; Tessitore, A; Gasperi, L; Gomez, Mar

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate youth basketball training, verifying the reliability of the session-RPE method in relation to session duration (session) categories. Six male youth basketball players (age, 16.5±0.5 years; height, 195.5±6.75 cm; body mass, 93.9±10.9 kg; and body mass index, 23.6±2.8 kg.m -2 ) were monitored (HR, type and duration of workouts) during 15 (66 individual) training sessions (80±26 minutes). Edwards' HR method was used as a reference measure of internal training load (ITL); the CR-10 RPE scale was administered 30 minutes after the end of each session. The results obtained showed that all comparisons between different session durations and workout portions revealed effects in term of Edwards' ITLs except for warm-up portions. Moderate to strong relationships between Edwards' and session- RPE methods emerged for all sessions (r = .85, P sessions (r range = .79 - .95, P session durations (session-RPE to monitor the ITL, regardless of session durations and workout portions.

  1. Session-RPE for quantifying the load of different youth basketball training sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lupo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate youth basketball training, verifying the reliability of the session-RPE method in relation to session duration (< and ≥ 80 minutes and workout typology (reduced and high warm-up, conditioning, technical, tactical, game portions within a single session categories. Six male youth basketball players (age, 16.5±0.5 years; height, 195.5±6.75 cm; body mass, 93.9±10.9 kg; and body mass index, 23.6±2.8 kg.m-2 were monitored (HR, type and duration of workouts during 15 (66 individual training sessions (80±26 minutes. Edwards’ HR method was used as a reference measure of internal training load (ITL; the CR-10 RPE scale was administered 30 minutes after the end of each session. The results obtained showed that all comparisons between different session durations and workout portions revealed effects in term of Edwards’ ITLs except for warm-up portions. Moderate to strong relationships between Edwards’ and session- RPE methods emerged for all sessions (r = .85, P < .001, player’s sessions (r range = .79 - .95, P < .001, session durations (< 80 minutes: r = .67, P < .001; ≥ 80 minutes: r = .75, P < .001, and workout portions (r range = .78 - .89, P range = .002 - < .001. The findings indicated that coaches of youth basketball players can successfully use session-RPE to monitor the ITL, regardless of session durations and workout portions.

  2. Feedback from European Social Partners as Part of the Consultation on the Commission's Memorandum on Lifelong Learning. Supporting Document to the Communication from the Commission Making a European Area of Lifelong Learning a Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document provides European social partners' responses to the Commission's memorandum on lifelong learning. Part 1, Opinion of the European Center of Enterprises, makes comments and proposals related to the memorandum's six key messages, which are new basic skills for all; more investment in human resources; innovation in teaching and…

  3. Learning Python

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lutz, Mark; Ascher, David

    1999-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv Part I. Getting Started 1. A Python Q&A Session Why Do People Use Python? Is Python a Scripting Language? Okay, But What's the Downside? Who Uses Python Today...

  4. Learning Python

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lutz, Mark; Ascher, David

    2004-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv Part I. Getting Started 1. A Python Q&A Session Why Do People Use Python? Is Python a Scripting Language? Okay, But What's the Downside? Who Uses Python Today...

  5. Modified Team-Based Learning Strategy to Improve Human Anatomy Learning: A Pilot Study at the Universidad Del Norte in Barranquilla, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Emilio G.; Tuesca, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    As part of an institutional program sponsored by the Centre for Teaching Excellence at the Universidad del Norte, Barranquilla, Colombia, we developed an educational research study on two sessions of human anatomy in which we combined team-based learning (TBL) and the use of iPads. Study data included the TBL, assessments applied during the…

  6. A Look at Relationships (Part I: Supporting Theories of STEM Integrated Learning Environment in a Classroom - A Historical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Saito

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the authors address STEM pedagogies that relate to “integration” issues and to their implementation. Referring to past discussions on transdisciplinary teaching and learning (“transdisciplinarity”, the authors claim that STEM integration might lead to synergy between each of four disciplines, and the interaction of those learnings might have mutual benefits as well as disadvantages. Hence, although educators often find it difficult to leave discrete disciplines in which they studied, learning in an integrated environment that focuses on student-centered learning, could or should differ from teaching in traditional classes. Learning in the STEM Integrated Learning Environment has certain features: 1 learning is not necessarily included in and assessed by disciplines as in traditional classes; 2 learning within and across networks of learners has relationships beyond STEM disciplines; and 3 thus, the environment would be structured by vectors of those relationships. If so, teachers are expected to prepare for interactions among STEM areas of learning.

  7. Attitude to e-learning among newly qualified doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Jason; Clapham, Michael

    2014-02-01

    e-Learning plays an increasingly important role in medical education. Much research has focused on the evaluation of individual modules among medical students or more senior trainee doctors. We studied the attitude of newly qualified foundation level-1 doctors (FY1s) towards a blended learning programme to gain insight into the perceived role of e-learning in relation to classroom and experiential learning. The blended learning strategy consisted of weekly 3-hour sessions of lectures and flexible e-learning sessions. A questionnaire survey was conducted among 54 per cent (37/69) of FY1 doctors, towards the end of their first year post qualification. The majority of FY1s had to carry out additional e-learning outside of work. When asked where was best to carry out e-learning, 54 per cent preferred to e-learn both at work and at home, whereas 38 per cent preferred to e-learn outside of work exclusively. An equal preference for a classroom-only strategy and a blended programme was reported. Seventy-three per cent of the FY1s thought that e-learning should not be part of their compulsory weekly teaching programme. Fifty-four per cent of FY1s thought that e-learning had been useful for their education and training in their FY1 year. The e-learning package cited as being most useful was the safe prescribing e-programme, pioneered locally. Newly qualified doctors value e-learning as an adjunct to experiential and lecture-based teaching, and most prefer it as part of a blended learning programme at work or at home. Medical educators must place equal emphasis on the delivery and administration of e-learning as well as on the course design. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Do User (Browse and Click) Sessions Relate to Their Questions in a Domain-specific Collection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinhauer, Jeremy; Delcambre, Lois M.L.; Lykke, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    relate to the question that they are answering. The contribution of this paper is the evalua-tion of the suitability of common machine learning metrics (measuring the dis-tance between two sessions) to distinguish sessions of users searching for the answer to same or different questions. We found...... that sessions for people an-swering the same question are significantly different that those answering dif-ferent questions, but results are dependent on the distance metric used. We ex-plain why some distance metrics performed better than others....

  9. The Effectiveness of Peer Taught Group Sessions of Physiotherapy Students within the Clinical Setting: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Dee; Jelsma, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate whether learning from peers, learning from a clinical educator, or being the peer teacher during clinical group sessions was more effective at enhancing student learning outcomes for different health conditions. A secondary aim was to determine which method students found more satisfactory. Physiotherapy students at…

  10. Flexible session management in a distributed environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Zach; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Bradley, Dan; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Tannenbaum, Todd; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Sfiligoi, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Many secure communication libraries used by distributed systems, such as SSL, TLS, and Kerberos, fail to make a clear distinction between the authentication, session, and communication layers. In this paper we introduce CEDAR, the secure communication library used by the Condor High Throughput Computing software, and present the advantages to a distributed computing system resulting from CEDAR's separation of these layers. Regardless of the authentication method used, CEDAR establishes a secure session key, which has the flexibility to be used for multiple capabilities. We demonstrate how a layered approach to security sessions can avoid round-trips and latency inherent in network authentication. The creation of a distinct session management layer allows for optimizations to improve scalability by way of delegating sessions to other components in the system. This session delegation creates a chain of trust that reduces the overhead of establishing secure connections and enables centralized enforcement of system-wide security policies. Additionally, secure channels based upon UDP datagrams are often overlooked by existing libraries; we show how CEDAR's structure accommodates this as well. As an example of the utility of this work, we show how the use of delegated security sessions and other techniques inherent in CEDAR's architecture enables US CMS to meet their scalability requirements in deploying Condor over large-scale, wide-area grid systems.

  11. Flexible session management in a distributed environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Zach; Bradley, Dan; Tannenbaum, Todd; Sfiligoi, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Many secure communication libraries used by distributed systems, such as SSL, TLS, and Kerberos, fail to make a clear distinction between the authentication, session, and communication layers. In this paper we introduce CEDAR, the secure communication library used by the Condor High Throughput Computing software, and present the advantages to a distributed computing system resulting from CEDAR's separation of these layers. Regardless of the authentication method used, CEDAR establishes a secure session key, which has the flexibility to be used for multiple capabilities. We demonstrate how a layered approach to security sessions can avoid round-trips and latency inherent in network authentication. The creation of a distinct session management layer allows for optimizations to improve scalability by way of delegating sessions to other components in the system. This session delegation creates a chain of trust that reduces the overhead of establishing secure connections and enables centralized enforcement of system-wide security policies. Additionally, secure channels based upon UDP datagrams are often overlooked by existing libraries; we show how CEDAR's structure accommodates this as well. As an example of the utility of this work, we show how the use of delegated security sessions and other techniques inherent in CEDAR's architecture enables US CMS to meet their scalability requirements in deploying Condor over large-scale, wide-area grid systems.

  12. Flexible session management in a distributed environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Zach; Bradley, Dan; Tannenbaum, Todd [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sfiligoi, Igor, E-mail: zmiller@cs.wisc.ed [Fermi National Acceleartor Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Many secure communication libraries used by distributed systems, such as SSL, TLS, and Kerberos, fail to make a clear distinction between the authentication, session, and communication layers. In this paper we introduce CEDAR, the secure communication library used by the Condor High Throughput Computing software, and present the advantages to a distributed computing system resulting from CEDAR's separation of these layers. Regardless of the authentication method used, CEDAR establishes a secure session key, which has the flexibility to be used for multiple capabilities. We demonstrate how a layered approach to security sessions can avoid round-trips and latency inherent in network authentication. The creation of a distinct session management layer allows for optimizations to improve scalability by way of delegating sessions to other components in the system. This session delegation creates a chain of trust that reduces the overhead of establishing secure connections and enables centralized enforcement of system-wide security policies. Additionally, secure channels based upon UDP datagrams are often overlooked by existing libraries; we show how CEDAR's structure accommodates this as well. As an example of the utility of this work, we show how the use of delegated security sessions and other techniques inherent in CEDAR's architecture enables US CMS to meet their scalability requirements in deploying Condor over large-scale, wide-area grid systems.

  13. Flexible session management in a distributed environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Zach; Bradley, Dan; Tannenbaum, Todd; Sfiligoi, Igor

    2010-04-01

    Many secure communication libraries used by distributed systems, such as SSL, TLS, and Kerberos, fail to make a clear distinction between the authentication, session, and communication layers. In this paper we introduce CEDAR, the secure communication library used by the Condor High Throughput Computing software, and present the advantages to a distributed computing system resulting from CEDAR's separation of these layers. Regardless of the authentication method used, CEDAR establishes a secure session key, which has the flexibility to be used for multiple capabilities. We demonstrate how a layered approach to security sessions can avoid round-trips and latency inherent in network authentication. The creation of a distinct session management layer allows for optimizations to improve scalability by way of delegating sessions to other components in the system. This session delegation creates a chain of trust that reduces the overhead of establishing secure connections and enables centralized enforcement of system-wide security policies. Additionally, secure channels based upon UDP datagrams are often overlooked by existing libraries; we show how CEDAR's structure accommodates this as well. As an example of the utility of this work, we show how the use of delegated security sessions and other techniques inherent in CEDAR's architecture enables US CMS to meet their scalability requirements in deploying Condor over large-scale, wide-area grid systems.

  14. Ethics case reflection sessions: Enablers and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdson, Cecilia; Molewijk, Bert; Lützén, Kim; Blomgren, Klas; Pergert, Pernilla

    2018-03-01

    In previous research on ethics case reflection (ECR) sessions about specific cases, healthcare professionals in childhood cancer care were clarifying their perspectives on the ethical issue to resolve their main concern of consolidating care. When perspectives were clarified, consequences in the team included 'increased understanding', 'group strengthening' and 'decision grounding'. Additional analysis of the data was needed on conditions that could contribute to the quality of ECR sessions. The aim of this study was to explore conditions for clarifying perspectives during ECR sessions. Data were collected from observations and interviews and the results emerged from an inductive analysis using grounded theory. Participants and research context: Six observations during ECR sessions and 10 interviews were performed with healthcare professionals working in childhood cancer care and advanced paediatric homecare. Ethical considerations: The study was approved by a regional ethical review board. Participants were informed about their voluntary involvement and that they could withdraw their participation without explaining why. Two categories emerged: organizational enablers and barriers and team-related enablers and barriers. Organizational enablers and barriers included the following sub-categories: the timing of the ECR session, the structure during the ECR session and the climate during the ECR session. Sub-categories to team-related enablers and barriers were identified as space for inter-professional perspectives, varying levels of ethical skills and space for the patient's and the family's perspectives. Space for inter-professional perspectives included the dominance of a particular perspective that can result from hierarchical positions. The medical perspective is relevant for understanding the child's situation but should not dominate the ethical reflection. Conditions for ECR sessions have been explored and the new knowledge can be used when training

  15. Students perceive healthcare as a valuable learning environment when accepted as a part of the workplace community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg-Martinell, Ann; Hult, Håkan; Henriksson, Peter; Kiessling, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The healthcare system is complex and the education of medical and nursing students is not always a priority within it. However, education offered at the point of care provides students with opportunities to apply knowledge, and to develop the necessary skills and attitudes needed to practice their future profession. The major objective of this study was to identify students' views of generic aspects of the healthcare environment that influences their progress towards professional competence. We collected free text answers of 75 medical students and 23 nursing students who had completed an extensive questionnaire concerning their learning in clinical wards. In order to obtain richer data and a deeper understanding, we also interviewed a purposive sample of students. Qualitative content analysis was conducted. We identified three themes: (1) How management, planning and organising for learning enabled content and learning activities to relate to the syllabus and workplace, and how this management influenced space and resources for supervision and learning; (2) Workplace culture elucidated how hierarchies and communication affected student learning and influenced their professional development and (3) Learning a profession illustrated the importance of supervisors' approaches to students, their enthusiasm and ability to build relationships, and their feedback to students on performance. From a student perspective, a valuable learning environment is characterised as one where management, planning and organising are aligned and support learning. Students experience a professional growth when the community of practice accepts them, and competent and enthusiastic supervisors give them opportunities to interact with patients and to develop their own responsibilities.

  16. IMS Learning Design desde dentro. Una especificación para crear escenarios de aprendizaje online (parte I)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgos, Daniel; Berbegal, Nidia; Griffiths, David; Tattersall, Colin; Koper, Rob

    2005-01-01

    IMS Learning Design, IMS LD de ahora en adelante (IMS, 2003), es una especificación centrada en formación online o e-learning y que permite modelar programaciones curriculares o lecciones presenciales de forma que puedan ser seguidas online, construyendo lo que se denomina Unidades de Aprendizaje

  17. Race to the Top--Early Learning Challenge: An Analysis of Impact on IDEIA, Part C Early Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohjanen, Sharon L.

    2016-01-01

    Infants and toddlers who live in poverty are more likely to experience developmental delays or disabilities and less likely to access early intervention (EI) services. The federal initiative Race to the Top--Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) was designed to increase access to high quality early learning programs for children at risk for…

  18. Pericles Should Learn to Fix a Leaky Pipe – Why Trial Advocacy Should Become Part of the LLB Curriculum (Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem H Gravett

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The inescapable reality is that most law school graduates are headed for professional life. This means that law schools have some accountability for the competence of their graduates, and thus an educational responsibility to offer their students instruction in the basic skills of legal representation. The most obvious and direct gain from the university law school offering more training in the generally neglected applied legal skills of trial advocacy, interviewing, counselling, drafting and negotiation, is the benefit to students in helping them bridge the gap between traditional basic legal education and practice. Although I strongly believe that the LLB curriculum should also include courses in legal writing, negotiation, client counselling, and witness interviewing, I emphasise adding a clinical course in trial advocacy to the LLB curriculum for a number of specific reasons. Trial advocacy consists of a set of skills that transcends the walls of the courtroom. It is difficult to conceive of a practising lawyer who does not, in some way and at some time, utilise the skills of advocacy - fact analysis, legal integration and persuasive speech. Even the technical "forensic skills" of trial advocacy, such as courtroom etiquette and demeanour, learning how to phrase a question to elicit a favourable response, and making an effective oral presentation, transfer readily to a wide range of applications within both the legal and business worlds. In addition to learning how to prepare and present a trial from the opening speech through to the closing argument, in a trial advocacy course students would also learn to apply procedural, substantive and ethical rules of law to prove or defend a cause of action. Moreover, if university law schools fail to contribute to establishing a substantial body of competent trial lawyers, our failure will ultimately take its toll on our system of justice. The quality of courtroom advocacy directly affects the rights

  19. On the Effectiveness of Supplemental Instruction: A Systematic Review of Supplemental Instruction and Peer-Assisted Study Sessions Literature between 2001 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Phillip; van der Meer, Jacques; Skalicky, Jane; Cowley, Kym

    2014-01-01

    Supplemental instruction (SI)--variously known as peer-assisted learning, peer-assisted study sessions, and other names--is a type of academic support intervention popular in higher education. In SI sessions, a senior student facilitates peer learning between undergraduates studying a high-risk course. This article presents a systematic review of…

  20. Learning styles: The learning methods of air traffic control students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dontae L.

    In the world of aviation, air traffic controllers are an integral part in the overall level of safety that is provided. With a number of controllers reaching retirement age, the Air Traffic Collegiate Training Initiative (AT-CTI) was created to provide a stronger candidate pool. However, AT-CTI Instructors have found that a number of AT-CTI students are unable to memorize types of aircraft effectively. This study focused on the basic learning styles (auditory, visual, and kinesthetic) of students and created a teaching method to try to increase memorization in AT-CTI students. The participants were asked to take a questionnaire to determine their learning style. Upon knowing their learning styles, participants attended two classroom sessions. The participants were given a presentation in the first class, and divided into a control and experimental group for the second class. The control group was given the same presentation from the first classroom session while the experimental group had a group discussion and utilized Middle Tennessee State University's Air Traffic Control simulator to learn the aircraft types. Participants took a quiz and filled out a survey, which tested the new teaching method. An appropriate statistical analysis was applied to determine if there was a significant difference between the control and experimental groups. The results showed that even though the participants felt that the method increased their learning, there was no significant difference between the two groups.

  1. Mapping of Primary Instructional Methods and Teaching Techniques for Regularly Scheduled, Formal Teaching Sessions in an Anesthesia Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vested Madsen, Matias; Macario, Alex; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we examined the regularly scheduled, formal teaching sessions in a single anesthesiology residency program to (1) map the most common primary instructional methods, (2) map the use of 10 known teaching techniques, and (3) assess if residents scored sessions that incorporated active learning as higher quality than sessions with little or no verbal interaction between teacher and learner. A modified Delphi process was used to identify useful teaching techniques. A representative sample of each of the formal teaching session types was mapped, and residents anonymously completed a 5-question written survey rating the session. The most common primary instructional methods were computer slides-based classroom lectures (66%), workshops (15%), simulations (5%), and journal club (5%). The number of teaching techniques used per formal teaching session averaged 5.31 (SD, 1.92; median, 5; range, 0-9). Clinical applicability (85%) and attention grabbers (85%) were the 2 most common teaching techniques. Thirty-eight percent of the sessions defined learning objectives, and one-third of sessions engaged in active learning. The overall survey response rate equaled 42%, and passive sessions had a mean score of 8.44 (range, 5-10; median, 9; SD, 1.2) compared with a mean score of 8.63 (range, 5-10; median, 9; SD, 1.1) for active sessions (P = 0.63). Slides-based classroom lectures were the most common instructional method, and faculty used an average of 5 known teaching techniques per formal teaching session. The overall education scores of the sessions as rated by the residents were high.

  2. Teaching Students about Research: Classroom Poster Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley-Long, Kathleen; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Finds that undergraduate students in an introductory psychology class acquired more favorable attitudes toward research as a result of their active participation in the creation and presentation of a poster that illustrates their independent work. Appends poster session instructions. (RS)

  3. Work session on the SAR. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, K.

    1980-01-01

    The present paper contains the tables of the contribution of K. Burkart 'Work Session on the SAR' to the IAEA Interregional Training Course held in Sept/Oct. 1980 at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe. (RW)

  4. Session summary: Electronics, triggering and data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rescia, S.

    1991-12-01

    The session focused on the requirements for calorimetry at the SSC/LHC. Results on new readout techniques, calibration, radiation hard electronics and semiconductor devices, analog and digital front and electronics, and trigger strategies are presented

  5. Within-session spacing improves delayed recall in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigterman, Jessica R; Simone, Patricia M; Bell, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    Multiple retrievals of a memory over a spaced manner improve long-term memory performance in infants, children, younger and older adults; however, few studies have examined spacing effects with young school-age children. To expand the understanding of the spacing benefit in children, the current study presented weakly associated English word-pairs to children aged 7-11 and cued their recall two times immediately (massed), after a delay of 5 or 10 items (spaced) or not at all (control). After this encoding session with or without two retrievals, participants were tested two times for memory of all word-pairs: immediately and 30 minutes after the encoding session. Multiple retrievals significantly improved memory on the tests. However, words repeated in a spaced design were remembered at higher rates than those that were massed, while gap size between repetitions (5 or 10) did not differentially impact performance. The data show that a within-session spacing strategy can benefit children's ability to remember word-pairs after 30 minutes. Thus, asking students to recall what they have learned within a lesson is a technique that can be used in a classroom to improve long-term recall.

  6. Interactive problem-solving sessions in an introductory bioscience course engaged students and gave them feedback, but did not increase their exam scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, James P

    2017-10-02

    Active learning, including the promotion of student interactivity in lectures, has been found to improve student engagement and performance in university science classes. This letter describes the use of Pearson's Learning Catalytics to run regular, formatively assessed problem-solving sessions as part of the semiflipped redesign of an introductory level university bioscience course. Students found the problem-solving sessions more engaging than a traditional lecture, and felt that they were receiving better feedback on their progress in the course. Their participation in the problem-solving sessions was strongly associated with their performance in the course's summative assessments, making it possible to identify and assist probable poor performers early in the course. Other measures of student engagement with the course were not improved, and neither were their average exam grades when compared with their grades in a course which had not been redesigned. Possible reasons for this are discussed. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Summary of the relativistic heavy ion sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The topics covered in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Sessions span four orders of magnitude in energy in the laboratory and a few more in theory. In the two years since the last Intersections conference, experiments in the field of very high energy heavy ion research have begun at CERN and Brookhaven. The prime motivation for these experiments is the possibility of forming quark matter. This paper is a review of the topics covered in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Sessions

  8. Round table discussion during session 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aebersold, M.

    2004-01-01

    The round table discussions of the first session of the Belgium Workshop addressed the following questions: - Accepting or refusing a person, an institution or a grouping as a legitimate Stakeholder who makes the decision and how? - How are the local partnerships built and organised? - How to obtain community support for the partnership's legitimate decisions/findings? - Experience teaches that no decision is reached solely by formal and legal processes. What role do informal processes play? - How can the informal procedures be accepted? Do they need to be made explicit? Discussion took place after the plenary presentations, at tables grouping Belgian stakeholders and FSC delegates. After the discussion, each table's findings were reported to the plenary. Most of the discussion concerned the local partnerships. Important findings were that the statutes for the partnerships were developed by the partnerships themselves and there were no legally binding rules handed down by the federal level. The partnerships are part of an informal process. A legally binding participation (i.e. within the EIA) will be initiated at a later stage. As the partnerships function outside of the formal legal procedure, they can function in a more flexible way. It was noted that the partnerships make recommendations, but it is not clear what the government will do with these recommendations. It was also argued that the process may cause conflicts between neighboring communities. As in other contexts visited by the FSC, the importance of the right of veto of the community was stressed, although this may cause a conflict between technical suitability and social acceptance. Access of the community to the local partnership is necessary. Finally it was accepted that time is needed to explain the recommendations to the broader community before any decisions are taken. (author)

  9. Reporting session of UWTF operation. Compilation of documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Kaoru; Togashi, Akio; Irinouchi, Shigenori

    1999-07-01

    This is the compilation of the papers and OHP transparencies presented, as well as discussions and comments, on the occasion of UWTF reporting session. UWTF stands for The Second Uranium Waste Treatment Facility, which was constructed for compression of metallic wastes and used filters, which are parts of uranium bearing solid wastes generated from Tokai Works, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute. UWTF has been processing wastes since June 4 1998. In the session, based on the one year experience of UWTF operation, the difficulties met and the suggestions to the waste sources are mainly discussed. A brief summary of the UWTF construction, description of waste treatment process, and operation report of fiscal year 1998 are attached. (A. Yamamoto)

  10. Assessing treatment integrity in cognitive-behavioral therapy: comparing session segments with entire sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, Florian; Grikscheit, Florian; Höfling, Volkmar; Stangier, Ulrich

    2014-07-01

    The evaluation of treatment integrity (therapist adherence and competence) is a necessary condition to ensure the internal and external validity of psychotherapy research. However, the evaluation process is associated with high costs, because therapy sessions must be rated by experienced clinicians. It is debatable whether rating session segments is an adequate alternative to rating entire sessions. Four judges evaluated treatment integrity (i.e., therapist adherence and competence) in 84 randomly selected videotapes of cognitive-behavioral therapy for major depressive disorder, social anxiety disorder, and hypochondriasis (from three different treatment outcome studies). In each case, two judges provided ratings based on entire therapy sessions and two on session segments only (i.e., the middle third of the entire sessions). Interrater reliability of adherence and competence evaluations proved satisfactory for ratings based on segments and the level of reliability did not differ from ratings based on entire sessions. Ratings of treatment integrity that were based on entire sessions and session segments were strongly correlated (r=.62 for adherence and r=.73 for competence). The relationship between treatment integrity and outcome was comparable for ratings based on session segments and those based on entire sessions. However, significant relationships between therapist competence and therapy outcome were only found in the treatment of social anxiety disorder. Ratings based on segments proved to be adequate for the evaluation of treatment integrity. The findings demonstrate that session segments are an adequate and cost-effective alternative to entire sessions for the evaluation of therapist adherence and competence. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements. (a) A VE session manager may be selected by the VE team for each examination session. The VE session...

  12. Combining research in physical chemistry and chemical education: Part A. The femtosecond molecular dynamics of small gas-phase anion clusters. Part B. Surveying student beliefs about chemistry and the development of physical chemistry learning tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, Jack

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation combines work in the areas of experimental physical chemistry and chemical education. In the area of physical chemistry, femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is used to interrogate the time-dependence for energy redistribution, solvent reorientation, and dissociation dynamics in small gas-phase anion clusters. The chemical education research addressed in this manuscript include the development and validation of a survey to measure students' beliefs about chemistry and the learning of chemistry and the development and testing of learning tutorials for use in undergraduate physical chemistry courses in thermodynamics and kinetics. In the first part of this dissertation, the Cu(CD3OD) dynamics are investigated using a combination of femtosecond pump-probe experiments and ab initio calculations. Dissociation of this complex into Cu and CD3OD occurs on two distinct time scales: 3 and 30 ps, which arise, respectively, from the coupling of intermolecular solvent rotations and excited methyl rotor rotation into the Cu-O dissociation component upon electron photodetachment of the precursor anion. In the second part of this dissertation, the time-resolved recombination of photodissociated IBr-(CO2)n (n = 5 - 10) cluster anions is investigated. Upon excitation to the A' 2pi 1/2 state of the chromophore, the bare anion results in I- and Br products, upon solvation with CO2, the IBr- chromophore regains near-IR absorption after recombination and vibrational relaxation on the ground electronic state. The recombination times vary with the number of solvent molecules from 12 ps for n = 5 to 900 ps for n = 10. Extensive electronic structure and non-adiabatic molecular dynamic simulations provide a framework to understand this behavior. In the third part of this dissertation, the modification and validation of the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) for use in chemistry is presented in detail. The CLASS survey is designed to measure student

  13. Attendance at NHS mandatory training sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Darren

    2015-02-17

    To identify factors that affect NHS healthcare professionals' attendance at mandatory training sessions. A quantitative approach was used, with a questionnaire sent to 400 randomly selected participants. A total of 122 responses were received, providing a mix of qualitative and quantitative data. Quantitative data were analysed using statistical methods. Open-ended responses were reviewed using thematic analysis. Clinical staff value mandatory training sessions highly. They are aware of the requirement to keep practice up-to-date and ensure patient safety remains a priority. However, changes to the delivery format of mandatory training sessions are required to enable staff to participate more easily, as staff are often unable to attend. The delivery of mandatory training should move from classroom-based sessions into the clinical area to maximise participation. Delivery should be assisted by local 'experts' who are able to customise course content to meet local requirements and the requirements of different staff groups. Improved arrangements to provide staff cover, for those attending training, would enable more staff to attend training sessions.

  14. Multiparty Session Types as Coherence Proofs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Marco; Montesi, Fabrizio; Schürmann, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    We propose a Curry-Howard correspondence between a language for programming multiparty sessions and a generalisation of Classical Linear Logic (CLL). In this framework, propositions correspond to the local behaviour of a participant in a multiparty session type, proofs to processes, and proof...... normalisation to executing communications. Our key contribution is generalising duality, from CLL, to a new notion of n-ary compatibility, called coherence. Building on coherence as a principle of compositionality, we generalise the cut rule of CLL to a new rule for composing many processes communicating...... in a multiparty session. We prove the soundness of our model by showing the admissibility of our new rule, which entails deadlock-freedom via our correspondence....

  15. Intersections and Unions of Session Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coşku Acay

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Prior work has extended the deep, logical connection between the linear sequent calculus and session-typed message-passing concurrent computation with equi-recursive types and a natural notion of subtyping. In this paper, we extend this further by intersection and union types in order to express multiple behavioral properties of processes in a single type. We prove session fidelity and absence of deadlock and illustrate the expressive power of our system with some simple examples. We observe that we can represent internal and external choice by intersection and union, respectively, which was previously suggested by Padovani for a different language of session types motivated by operational rather than logical concerns.

  16. Flexible Pedagogies: Part-Time Learners and Learning in Higher Education. Flexible Pedagogies: Preparing for the Future Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinden, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This publication focuses on national and international policy initiatives to develop a better understanding of part-time learners and the types of flexibility that may enhance their study especially pedagogically. As part of our five-strand research project "Flexible Pedagogies: preparing for the future" it: (1) highlights the challenges…

  17. The learning machine in quantitative chemical analysis : Part I. Anodic Stripping Voltammetry of Cadmium, Lead and Thallium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.; Jasink, G.

    1978-01-01

    The linear learning machine method was applied to the determination of cadmium, lead and thallium down to 10-8 M by anodic stripping voltammetry at a hanging mercury drop electrode. With a total of three trained multicategory classifiers, concentrations of Cd, Pb and Tl could be predicted with an

  18. Part-Time Learners in Open and Distance Learning: Revisiting the Critical Importance of Choice, Flexibility and Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, John; Rose-Adams, John

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we argue that, if open learning seeks to (re)assert a social justice mission, issues of openness and flexibility are more critical than ever. Drawing on qualitative data from a National Union of Students Wales/Open University study, which explored, in the voices of Welsh students, the identity, motivation and barriers faced by…

  19. Clinical pharmacy academic career transitions: Viewpoints from the field part 3: Learning when and how to say yes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffres, Meghan N; Blackmer, Allison B; Thompson, Angela M; Glode, Ashley E; Mahyari, Nila; Thompson, Megan

    2018-02-01

    The six authors of this commentary series, who have recently transitioned into or within an academic career, discuss challenging aspects of an academic career change. This is Part 3 of a three-part commentary series that focuses on when and how to say yes to the multitude of opportunities available to pharmacy practice faculty. Part 1 discusses feedback, evaluation, and advancement. Part 2 explains distribution of effort (DOE) and how to marry the different components of teaching, research, and service. While the entire series is intended to be read in continuity, faculty, or those interested in pursuing a career in pharmacy academia, can refer to Part 3 as a reference on how to screen opportunities within academia to maximize professional and personal growth and minimize career burnout. Schools of pharmacy may utilize this as a tool for new faculty members during orientation to help ensure faculty success. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Proceedings of the Topical Session on Applying Decommissioning Experience to the Design and Operation of New Nuclear Power Plants. Topical Session of the 9. Meeting of the WPDD Held in Senec, Slovak Republic 12-13 November 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noviello, Luigi; O'Sullivan, Patrick; Laurent, Gerard; Tuomisto, Harri; Metcalfe, Doug; Duncan, Allan

    2009-01-01

    At its ninth meeting, the WPDD held a topical session on Applying Decommissioning Experience to the Design and Operation of New Plants. In preparation for this, a survey was issued to reactor design organisations, electricity producers and safety authorities and responses were compiled into a summary report that provided a basis for discussion at the topical session. This report is in two parts: Part A documents the topical session, summarising the main points from the presentations and discussions and including the rapporteurs' reports. Part B provides a summary compilation of the responses received to the survey undertaken prior to the topical session. The topical session facilitated an exchange of information and experience between policy makers, regulators, electricity producers, design organisations and decommissioners on approaches and experiences to taking account of decommissioning considerations in the design of third generation reactor systems

  1. Summary of Session 2 "Machine Studies"

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R W

    2012-01-01

    This document summarizes the talks and discussion that took place in the second session of the Chamonix 2012 workshop concerning results from machine studies performed in 2011. The session consisted of the following presentations: “LHC experience with different bunch spacings” by G. Rumolo; “Observations of beam-beam effects in MDs in 2011” by W. Herr; “Beam-induced heating/ bunch length/RF and lessons for 2012” by E. Metral; “Lessons in beam diagnostics” by R. Jones; “Quench margins” by M. Sapinski; “First demonstration with beam of the Achromatic Telescopic Squeeze (ATS)” by S. Fartoukh.

  2. Summary of Session 2 'Machine Studies'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, R W; Papotti, G [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    This document summarizes the talks and discussion that took place in the second session of the Chamonix 2012 workshop concerning results from machine studies performed in 2011. The session consisted of the following presentations: “LHC experience with different bunch spacings” by G. Rumolo; “Observations of beam-beam effects in MDs in 2011” by W. Herr; “Beam-induced heating/ bunch length/RF and lessons for 2012” by E. Metral; “Lessons in beam diagnostics” by R. Jones; “Quench margins” by M. Sapinski; “First demonstration with beam of the Achromatic Telescopic Squeeze (ATS)” by S. Fartoukh. (author)

  3. Customized Videos on a YouTube Channel: A beyond the Classroom Teaching and Learning Platform for General Chemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranga, Jayashree S.

    2017-01-01

    Videos are an integral part of online courses. In this study, customized YouTube videos were explored as teaching and learning materials in place of face-to-face discussion sessions in General Chemistry courses. The videos were created using a budget-friendly and interactive app on an iPad. The customized YouTube videos were available to students…

  4. 48{sup th} Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT 2017). Key topic / Enhanced safety and operation excellence. Technical session: Operation and safety of nuclear installations, fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollands, Thorsten [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany). Bereich Reaktorsicherheitsforschung

    2017-12-15

    The sessions Fuel and Materials and Containment and SFP, as part of the Technical Sessions Operation and Safety of Nuclear Installations, Fuel implemented in the Key Topic Enhanced Safety and Operation Excellence were chaired by Dr. Thorsten Hollands (Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH) and Dr. Erwin Fischer (PreussenElektra GmbH) who was the keynote coordinator for the Technical Sessions. Both sessions consist of a keynote lecture followed by technical presentations.

  5. Language Learning within Academic Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, George M.

    This paper reports on a research project that examined nonnative Southampton University (England) students' attitudes to continued language learning and the importance of language learning and cultural adaptation. A survey was administered to pre-sessional and in-sessional students that included information on background, past and present language…

  6. Automated Session-Quality Assessment for Human Tutoring Based on Expert Ratings of Tutoring Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Benjamin D.; Morrison, Donald M.; Samei, Borhan

    2015-01-01

    Archived transcripts from tens of millions of online human tutoring sessions potentially contain important knowledge about how online tutors help, or fail to help, students learn. However, without ways of automatically analyzing these large corpora, any knowledge in this data will remain buried. One way to approach this issue is to train an…

  7. Training Sessions and Materials Present Ways to Improve System Efficiency: OIT Technical Assistance Fact Sheet: Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericksen, E.

    1999-01-01

    Interested in learning about innovative ways to improve the efficiency of your plant's steam, electric motor, and compressed air systems? This US Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technologies fact sheet offers information regarding training sessions, teleconferences, and various training materials to teach you and your company ways to reduce energy use, save money, and reduce waste and pollution through system optimization

  8. Proceedings of the sixth international symposium on methodologies for intelligent systems (Poster Session)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harber, K.S. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    This volume contains papers which have been selected for the poster Session at the Sixth International Symposium for Intelligent Systems held October 1991, The following major areas were covered: expert systems; intelligent databases; knowledge representation; learning and adaptive systems; and logic for artificial intelligence. Nineteen full papers are included. (GHH)

  9. Changing International Student and Business Staff Perceptions of In-Sessional EAP: Using the CEM Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Diane; Porter, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the question of whether the existing approach to EAP delivery implemented at the University of Northumbria is supporting the learning needs of the international student body. In addressing this the article documents the background, research and preliminary findings relating to provision of an in-sessional English for…

  10. Teaching Medical Students About "The Conversation": An Interactive Value-Based Advance Care Planning Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Hillary D; Dukes, Joanna; Church, Skotti; Abbott, Jean; Youngwerth, Jean M

    2018-02-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) promotes care consistent with patient wishes. Medical education should teach how to initiate value-based ACP conversations. To develop and evaluate an ACP educational session to teach medical students a value-based ACP process and to encourage students to take personal ACP action steps. Groups of third-year medical students participated in a 75-minute session using personal reflection and discussion framed by The Conversation Starter Kit. The Conversation Project is a free resource designed to help individuals and families express their wishes for end-of-life care. One hundred twenty-seven US third-year medical students participated in the session. Student evaluations immediately after the session and 1 month later via electronic survey. More than 90% of students positively evaluated the educational value of the session, including rating highly the opportunities to reflect on their own ACP and to use The Conversation Starter Kit. Many students (65%) reported prior ACP conversations. After the session, 73% reported plans to discuss ACP, 91% had thought about preferences for future medical care, and 39% had chosen a medical decision maker. Only a minority had completed an advance directive (14%) or talked with their health-care provider (1%). One month later, there was no evidence that the session increased students' actions regarding these same ACP action steps. A value-based ACP educational session using The Conversation Starter Kit successfully engaged medical students in learning about ACP conversations, both professionally and personally. This session may help students initiate conversations for themselves and their patients.

  11. Undergraduate Seminars: The Poster Session Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chute, Douglas L.; Bank, Barry

    1983-01-01

    A good alternative to the undergraduate psychology seminar is the poster session. During the course each student wrote a review paper. For use in his/her class presentation, the student provided the following information on poster paper: title, author, abstract, a few graphs or illustrations from the literature, conclusions, and references. (RM)

  12. IAEA General Conference begins annual session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The document gives general information about the opening and the programme of the 45th regular session of the IAEA General Conference (17-21 September 2001, Austria Center Vienna). The conference is attended by ministers and high-level governmental representatives from 132 Member States of the IAEA

  13. IAEA General Conference begins annual session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document gives general information about the opening and the programme of the 44th regular session of the IAEA General Conference (18 -22 September 2000, Austria Center Vienna). The conference is attended by ministers and high-level governmental representatives from 130 Member States of the IAEA

  14. Declarative interpretations of session-based concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cano, Mauricio; Rueda, Camilo; López-Acosta, Hugo-Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Session-based concurrency is a type-based approach to the analysis of communication-intensive systems. Correct behavior in these systems may be specified in an operational or declarative style: the former defines how interactions are structured; the latter defines governing conditions...

  15. Working session 4: Preventative and corrective measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.; Slama, G.

    1997-01-01

    The Preventive and Corrective Measures working session included 13 members from France, Germany, Japan, Spain, Slovenia, and the United States. Attendee experience included regulators, utilities, three steam generator vendors, consultants and researchers. Discussions centered on four principal topics: (1) alternate materials, (2) mechanical mitigation, (3) maintenance, and (4) water chemistry. New or replacement steam generators and original equipment steam generators were separately addressed. Four papers were presented to the session, to provide information and stimulate various discussion topics. Topics discussed and issues raised during the several meeting sessions are provided below, followed by summary conclusions and recommendations on which the group was able to reach a majority consensus. The working session was composed of individuals with diverse experience and varied areas of specialized expertise. The somewhat broad range of topics addressed by the group at times saw discussion participation by only a few individuals. As in any technical meeting where all are allowed the opportunity to speak their mind, straying from an Individual topic was not unusual. Where useful, these stray topics are also presented below within the context In which they occurred. The main categories of discussion were: minimize sludge; new steam generators; maintenance; mechanical mitigation; water chemistry

  16. 9. Biennial session of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    As every two years the 9th biennial session of nuclear physics shall try to make a survey of the recent experimental developments as well as the evolution of the theoretical ideas in Nuclear Physics. Communications are indexed and analysed separately

  17. Summary of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.W.

    1988-07-01

    This paper briefly discusses the topics covered in the relativistic heavy ion in sessions. The prime motivation for these investigations is the possibility of forming quark matter, therefore the formation of a quark-gluon plasma. Topics on suppression of J//psi/ production, th equation of state of nuclear matter, transverse energy distributions and two pion interferometry techniques are discussed. 38 refs

  18. An Erlang Implementation of Multiparty Session Actors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Fowler

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available By requiring co-ordination to take place using explicit message passing instead of relying on shared memory, actor-based programming languages have been shown to be effective tools for building reliable and fault-tolerant distributed systems. Although naturally communication-centric, communication patterns in actor-based applications remain informally specified, meaning that errors in communication are detected late, if at all. Multiparty session types are a formalism to describe, at a global level, the interactions between multiple communicating entities. This article describes the implementation of a prototype framework for monitoring Erlang/OTP gen_server applications against multiparty session types, showing how previous work on multiparty session actors can be adapted to a purely actor-based language, and how monitor violations and termination of session participants can be reported in line with the Erlang mantra of "let it fail". Finally, the framework is used to implement two case studies: an adaptation of a freely-available DNS server, and a chat server.

  19. Posters. [Poster Session at AHRD Conference, 2001].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    The first of the papers in this poster session, "Developing the Employment Brand: Targeting MBA Campus Hires" (Diane M. Bergeron), posits that employment branding benefits both individuals and organizations. It functions as a campus recruiting tool in a competitive labor market and communicates the organization's values and work…

  20. Blended Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Bauerová, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is focused on a new approach of education called blended learning. The history and developement of Blended Learning is described in the first part. Then the methods and tools of Blended Learning are evaluated and compared to the traditional methods of education. At the final part an efficient developement of the educational programs is emphasized.

  1. [Training of residents in obstetrics and gynecology: Assessment of an educational program including formal lectures and practical sessions using simulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, A; El Haloui, O; Breaud, J; Chevalier, D; Antomarchi, J; Bongain, A; Boucoiran, I; Delotte, J

    2015-01-01

    Evaluate an educational program in the training of residents in gynecology-obstetrics (GO) with a theory session and a practical session on simulators and analyze their learning curve. Single-center prospective study, at the university hospital (CHU). Two-day sessions were leaded in April and July 2013. An evaluation on obstetric and gynecological surgery simulator was available to all residents. Theoretical knowledge principles of obstetrics were evaluated early in the session and after formal lectures was taught to them. At the end of the first session, a satisfaction questionnaire was distributed to all participants. Twenty residents agreed to participate to the training sessions. Evaluation of theoretical knowledge: at the end of the session, the residents obtained a significant improvement in their score on 20 testing knowledge. Obstetrical simulator: a statistically significant improvement in scores on assessments simulator vaginal delivery between the first and second session. Subjectively, a larger increase feeling was seen after breech delivery simulation than for the cephalic vaginal delivery. However, the confidence level of the resident after breech delivery simulation has not been improved at the end of the second session. Simulation in gynecological surgery: a trend towards improvement in the time realized on the peg-transfer between the two sessions was noted. In the virtual simulation, no statistically significant differences showed, no improvement for in salpingectomy's time. Subjectively, the residents felt an increase in the precision of their gesture. Satisfaction: All residents have tried the whole program. They considered the pursuit of these sessions on simulators was necessary and even mandatory. The approach chosen by this structured educational program allowed a progression for the residents, both objectively and subjectively. This simulation program type for the resident's training would use this tool in assessing their skills and develop

  2. Session-RPE for quantifying load of different youth taekwondo training sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Corrado; Capranica, Laura; Cortis, Cristina; Guidotti, Flavia; Bianco, Antonino; Tessitore, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    The session rating of perceived exertion (session-RPE) proved to be a valuable method to quantify the internal training load (ITL) in taekwondo. However, no study validated this method in youth taekwondo athletes performing different training sessions. Thus this study aimed at evaluating the reliability of the session-RPE to monitor the ITL of prepubescent taekwondo athletes during pre-competitive (PC) and competitive (C) training sessions. Five female (age: 12.0±0.7 y; height: 1.54±0.08 m; body mass: 48.8±7.3 kg) and four male (age: 12.0±0.8 yrs; height: 1.55±0.07 m; body mass: 47.3±5.3 kg) taekwondo athletes were monitored during 100 individual sessions (PC: N.=33; C: N.=67). The Edwards' HR method was used as reference measure of ITL; the CR-10 RPE scale was administered at 1- and 30-minutes from the end of each session. No difference for gender emerged. The ITLs of C (Edwards: 228±40 arbitrary units, AU) resulted higher than that of PC (192±26 AU; P=0.04). Although all training typologies and data collections achieved significant correlations between Edwards' and session-RPE methods, a large relationship (r =0.71, Psessions evaluated at 30 minutes of the recovery phases. Findings support coaches of prepubescent taekwondo athletes to successfully use session-RPE to monitor the ITL of different training typologies. However, PC training evaluated at 30 minutes of the recovery phase represents the best condition for a highly reliable ITL perception.

  3. Poster Sessions in Marketing Education: An Empirical Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Nicole; Sutton-Brady, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Poster sessions provide a creative and stimulating alternative to traditional assessment methods in marketing. Poster sessions, as a means of assessment, have long been used in science fields. This article presents the successful implementation of poster sessions as a means of assessment in a postgraduate unit of study. Poster sessions in…

  4. A National Study Assessing the Teaching and Learning of Introductory Astronomy; Part I: The Effect of Interactive Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, E. E.; Rudolph, A. L.; Brissenden, G.; Schlingman, W. M.

    2011-09-01

    We present the results of a national study on the teaching and learning of astronomy taught in general education, non-science major, introductory astronomy courses (Astro 101). Nearly 4000 students enrolled in 69 sections of Astro 101 taught at 31 institutions completed (pre- and post- instruction) the Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory (LSCI) from Fall 2006 to Fall 2007. The classes varied in size from very small (N 4-year colleges and universities. To study how the instruction in different classrooms affected student learning, we developed and administered an Interactivity Assessment Instrument (IAI). This short survey, completed by instructors, allowed us to estimate the fraction of classroom time spent on learner- centered, active-engagement instruction such as Peer Instruction and collaborative tutorials. Pre-instruction LSCI scores were clustered around ˜25% (24 ± 2%), independent of class size and institution type; however, the gains measured varied from about (-)0.07-0.50. The distribution of gain scores indicates that differences were due to instruction in the classroom, not the type of class or institution. Interactivity Assessment Scores (IAS's) ranged from 0%-50%, showing that our IAI was able to distinguish between classes with higher and lower levels of interactivity. A comparison of class-averaged gain score to IAS showed that higher interactivity classes (IAS > 25%) were the only instructional environments capable of reaching the highest gains ( > 0.30). However, the range of gains seen for both groups of classes was quite wide, suggesting that the use of interactive learning strategies is not sufficient by itself to achieve high student gain.

  5. Mobile learning devices in the workplace: 'as much a part of the junior doctors' kit as a stethoscope'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimond, Rebecca; Bullock, Alison; Lovatt, Joseph; Stacey, Mark

    2016-08-17

    Smartphones are ubiquitous and commonly used as a learning and information resource. They have potential to revolutionize medical education and medical practice. The iDoc project provides a medical textbook smartphone app to newly-qualified doctors working in Wales. The project was designed to assist doctors in their transition from medical school to workplace, a period associated with high levels of cognitive demand and stress. Newly qualified doctors submitted case reports (n = 293) which detail specific instances of how the textbook app was used. Case reports were submitted via a structured online form (using Bristol Online Surveys - BOS) which gave participants headings to elicit a description of: the setting/context; the problem/issue addressed; what happened; any obstacles involved; and their reflections on the event. Case reports were categorised by the purpose of use, and by elements of the quality improvement framework (IoM 2001). They were then analysed thematically to identify challenges of use. Analysis of the case reports revealed how smartphones are a viable tool to address clinical questions and support mobile learning. They contribute to novice doctors' provision of safe, effective, timely, efficient and patient-centred care. The case reports also revealed considerable challenges for doctors using mobile technology within the workplace. Participants reported concern that using a mobile phone in front of patients and staff might appear unprofessional. Mobile phones blur boundaries between the public and private, and the personal and professional. In contrast to using a mobile as a communication device, using a smartphone as an information resource in the workplace requires different rituals. Uncertain etiquette of mobile use may reduce the capacity of smartphone technology to improve the learning experience of newly qualified doctors.

  6. Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Laabidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays learning technologies transformed educational systems with impressive progress of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT. Furthermore, when these technologies are available, affordable and accessible, they represent more than a transformation for people with disabilities. They represent real opportunities with access to an inclusive education and help to overcome the obstacles they met in classical educational systems. In this paper, we will cover basic concepts of e-accessibility, universal design and assistive technologies, with a special focus on accessible e-learning systems. Then, we will present recent research works conducted in our research Laboratory LaTICE toward the development of an accessible online learning environment for persons with disabilities from the design and specification step to the implementation. We will present, in particular, the accessible version “MoodleAcc+” of the well known e-learning platform Moodle as well as new elaborated generic models and a range of tools for authoring and evaluating accessible educational content.

  7. The first 3 minutes: Optimising a short realistic paediatric team resuscitation training session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKittrick, Joanne T; Kinney, Sharon; Lima, Sally; Allen, Meredith

    2018-01-01

    Inadequate resuscitation leads to death or brain injury. Recent recommendations for resuscitation team training to complement knowledge and skills training highlighted the need for development of an effective team resuscitation training session. This study aimed to evaluate and revise an interprofessional team training session which addressed roles and performance during provision of paediatric resuscitation, through incorporation of real-time, real team simulated training episodes. This study was conducted applying the principles of action research. Two cycles of data collection, evaluation and refinement of a 30-40 minute resuscitation training session for doctors and nurses occurred. Doctors and nurses made up 4 groups of training session participants. Their responses to the training were evaluated through thematic analysis of rich qualitative data gathered in focus groups held immediately after each training session. Major themes included the importance of realism, teamwork, and reflective learning. Findings informed important training session changes. These included; committed in-situ training; team diversity; realistic resources; role flexibility, definition and leadership; increased debriefing time and the addition of a team goal. In conclusion, incorporation of interprofessional resuscitation training which addresses team roles and responsibilities into standard medical and nursing training will enhance preparedness for participation in paediatric resuscitation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Case-based discussion supporting learning and practice in optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Alison; Barnes, Emma; Ryan, Barbara; Sheen, Nik

    2014-09-01

    To enhance continuing professional development and address the risk that professional isolation poses, the UK General Optical Council introduced a requirement for all optometrists to engage in at least one case-based discussion per 3 year cycle of continuing education. In this paper, we explore participants' impression of the acceptability, effectiveness and long-term impact-on-practice of case-based discussion as a mode of continuing education. Case-based discussion participants attended an evening session comprising a lecture and a group discussion. They completed three questionnaires: prior to the session, immediately post-session and 3-4 months post-session. We coded the questionnaires to allow matching. Seventy-five case-based discussion groups were held with 379 participants; 377 completed both pre- and post-questionnaires and 331 (88%) returned a follow-up questionnaire. Case-based discussions were an acceptable method of learning, with many preferring it to distance-learning. Prior to the event, women, employees and part-time workers were more likely to have concerns about participating. In terms of learning, gaps in knowledge were more likely to be revealed in those who work in isolation. The respondents highlighted social aspects, reassurance of practice as well as new learning. Participants significantly improved self-confidence ratings in all key learning areas. At three months post-session, the majority (75%) self-reported that they had implemented their intended changes to practice. The evaluation showed that participants felt that case-based discussion developed their knowledge, notably for sole practitioners, and influenced later workplace practice. The peer interaction of this mode of continuing education can combat professional isolation. © 2014 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2014 The College of Optometrists.

  9. Messengers of the universe: Session IV Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardini, Elisa; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2013-01-01

    Being stable, light and neutral weakly interacting particles, neutrinos are ideal messengers of the deep universe and a channel of choice in particular to explore the very high energy Galactic and Extragalactic sky, playing a synergic role most notably with gamma-ray observations. Neutrino astronomy—long after the SN1987A detection in the MeV range—is mature enough for decisive tests of astrophysical paradigms. Its current status constitutes one of the two big pillars of the “Messengers of the universe” session of the Neutrino Oscillation Workshop 2012. Neutrinos may also play a role in some cosmological contexts, such as the early universe and the dark matter problem. We review both aspects in this session summary report

  10. Buffered Communication Analysis in Distributed Multiparty Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniélou, Pierre-Malo; Yoshida, Nobuko

    Many communication-centred systems today rely on asynchronous messaging among distributed peers to make efficient use of parallel execution and resource access. With such asynchrony, the communication buffers can happen to grow inconsiderately over time. This paper proposes a static verification methodology based on multiparty session types which can efficiently compute the upper bounds on buffer sizes. Our analysis relies on a uniform causality audit of the entire collaboration pattern - an examination that is not always possible from each end-point type. We extend this method to design algorithms that allocate communication channels in order to optimise the memory requirements of session executions. From these analyses, we propose two refinements methods which respect buffer bounds: a global protocol refinement that automatically inserts confirmation messages to guarantee stipulated buffer sizes and a local protocol refinement to optimise asynchronous messaging without buffer overflow. Finally our work is applied to overcome a buffer overflow problem of the multi-buffering algorithm.

  11. Parameterized Concurrent Multi-Party Session Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minas Charalambides

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Session types have been proposed as a means of statically verifying implementations of communication protocols. Although prior work has been successful in verifying some classes of protocols, it does not cope well with parameterized, multi-actor scenarios with inherent asynchrony. For example, the sliding window protocol is inexpressible in previously proposed session type systems. This paper describes System-A, a new typing language which overcomes many of the expressiveness limitations of prior work. System-A explicitly supports asynchrony and parallelism, as well as multiple forms of parameterization. We define System-A and show how it can be used for the static verification of a large class of asynchronous communication protocols.

  12. Electron and muon physics sessions: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, H.E.

    1988-06-01

    The electromagnetic interaction needs no introduction as a probe of the structure of systems on many scales. The continued use of this technique dominated the sessions on Electron and Muon Physics at the Samoset Meeting. The experimental results continue to stimulate large numbers of theorists and the results on polarized deep inelastic muon scattering and their various interpretations permeated beyond these sessions. The breadth of physics attacked with electrons and muons makes a summary such as this rather peculiar. As one of my nuclear physics friends (I think) commented after my summary, ''it was interesting to see Nuclear Physics from a long distance with the telescope inverted.'' The comment may well be applied to this written version of the summary talk. 21 refs

  13. Security analysis of session initiation protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Dobson, Lucas E.

    2010-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The goal of this thesis is to investigate the security of the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP). This was accomplished by researching previously discovered protocol and implementation vulnerabilities, evaluating the current state of security tools and using those tools to discover new vulnerabilities in SIP software. The CVSS v2 system was used to score protocol and implementation vulnerabilities to give them a meaning that was us...

  14. Robust and Scalable DTLS Session Establishment

    OpenAIRE

    Tiloca, Marco; Gehrmann, Christian; Seitz, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    The Datagram Transport Layer Security (DTLS) protocol is highly vulnerable to a form of denial-of-service attack (DoS), aimed at establishing a high number of invalid, half-open, secure sessions. Moreover, even when the efficient pre-shared key provisioning mode is considered, the key storage on the server side scales poorly with the number of clients. SICS Swedish ICT has designed a security architecture that efficiently addresses both issues without breaking the current standard.

  15. Summary of breakout Session A1: A1, surveillance and remote sensing - sensor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The breakout session was well attended and prompted a very informative discussion on the different types of sensor technology. Remote sensing was identified as an important part of oil spill response. The session was divided into four parts and focused on characteristics unique to each of these technologies, the major research and development (R ampersand D) issues, and innovative ideas associated with each sensor technology. The following technologies were discussed: 1. Tactical All Weather Sensor Technology; 2. Strategic All Weather Sensor Technology; 3. Oil on Shoreline; and 4. Miscellaneous Sensor Technology

  16. Safety Training: scheduled sessions in April

    CERN Multimedia

    DGS Unit

    2011-01-01

    The following training courses are scheduled in April. You can find the full Safety Training programme on the Safety Training online catalogue. If you are interested in attending any of the below courses, please talk to your supervisor, then apply electronically via EDH from the course description pages, by clicking on SIGN-UP. Registration for all courses is always open – sessions for the less-requested courses are organized on a demand-basis only. Depending on the demand, a session will be organised later in the year. Biocell Training 26-APR-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in French 26-APR-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) 28-APR-11 to 29-APR-11 (08.00 – 17.30) in French* Sécurité chimique – Introduction 29-APR-11 (09.00 – 11.30) in French (*) session in French with the possibility of receiving the documentation in English   By Isabelle Cusato (H...

  17. Taking part in Nordic collaboration; nursing students' experiences and perceptions from a learning perspective: A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elrond*, Malene; Westerbotn, Margareta; Kneck, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    . Objective To gain an understanding of what nurse students experienced and learned during an intensive course in diabetes together with students and nurse educators from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden and the Faroe Islands. Methods In 2012, an intensive course within the Nordic network, Nordkvist......, was conducted in Faroe Islands with the theme “Nursing — to live a good life with diabetes”. To answer the objective of the study, 26 students conducted written reflections based on two questions. The data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results Through meetings with nurse students...... and educators from the Nordic countries the intensive course strengthened the students' identification with the nursing profession. The students gained new perspectives on diabetes, such as how complex it can be to live with a chronic illness. Because of the difficulties in understanding one another and because...

  18. Comparative analysis of energy impacts of traditional and partly electronic environmental auditing: Learning from the Japanese automotive industry case

    OpenAIRE

    Mbohwa, C

    2008-01-01

    This paper does a comparative analysis and assessment of energy impacts of traditional and partly electronic ISO 14001 environmental management system auditing that using videoconferencing systems. The focus is on the Japanese automotive industry. The idea is to quantify the environmental impacts of auditing and resolve the important question on whether or not the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in environmental auditing reduces environmental impacts in IS...

  19. Ways of Knowing as Learning Styles: Learning MAGIC with a Partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galotti, Kathleen M.; Drebus, David W.; Reimer, Rebecca L.

    2001-01-01

    College student pairs learned a complex card game using a scripted set of turns and written explanations, played the game, rated perceptions of and reactions to the learning session and their partner, and completed the Attitudes Toward Thinking and Learning Scale. Significant differences in perceptions of partners and sessions related to…

  20. Best Practices for Teaching in Summer Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kops, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The goal of a teacher or administrator with responsibility for planning quality learning experiences is to create conditions where the greatest amount of learning can take place for the greatest number of learners. Identifying and using best practices for teaching in compressed formats will help increase the likelihood that such a goal will be…

  1. CT imaging in a large part of the world: what we know and what we can learn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehani, Madan M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes how cooperation among international organizations, as modeled in Europe, can work to improve imaging safety and standards for children throughout the world. This is demonstrated in the mechanisms employed in a large-scale multi-national study on CT imaging safety practices described elsewhere in this issue of Pediatric Radiology. Here we learn approaches through which CT safety standards have been achieved and the international resources available to help in standardizing safety practices in medical imaging. There are unique strengths of the approach in Europe, which has mandatory requirements on member states to facilitate strengthening of radiation protection. Most countries have national regulatory mechanisms for radiation protection in medicine. International organizations play a significant role in supporting projects in lower-resource countries such that a large proportion of radiologic professionals in low-resource countries are trained through assistance by these organizations. Many of these international organizations make it possible for professionals worldwide to download free training material. Collaboration among international organizations and the Image Gently campaign toward consensus with regard to radiation protection can go further than individual opinions in promoting a higher standard of radiation protection around the world. (orig.)

  2. CT imaging in a large part of the world: what we know and what we can learn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehani, Madan M. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    This paper describes how cooperation among international organizations, as modeled in Europe, can work to improve imaging safety and standards for children throughout the world. This is demonstrated in the mechanisms employed in a large-scale multi-national study on CT imaging safety practices described elsewhere in this issue of Pediatric Radiology. Here we learn approaches through which CT safety standards have been achieved and the international resources available to help in standardizing safety practices in medical imaging. There are unique strengths of the approach in Europe, which has mandatory requirements on member states to facilitate strengthening of radiation protection. Most countries have national regulatory mechanisms for radiation protection in medicine. International organizations play a significant role in supporting projects in lower-resource countries such that a large proportion of radiologic professionals in low-resource countries are trained through assistance by these organizations. Many of these international organizations make it possible for professionals worldwide to download free training material. Collaboration among international organizations and the Image Gently campaign toward consensus with regard to radiation protection can go further than individual opinions in promoting a higher standard of radiation protection around the world. (orig.)

  3. Taking part in Nordic collaboration; nursing students' experiences and perceptions from a learning perspective: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerbotn, Margareta; Kneck, Åsa; Hovland, Olav Johannes; Elrond, Malene; Pedersen, Ingrid; Lejonqvist, Gun-Britt; Dulavik, Johild; Ecklon, Tove; Nilsson, Inga-Lill; Sigurdardottir, Árún K

    2015-05-01

    Nordic networking of different kinds has a long tradition aiming to increase collaboration and understanding between citizens in different countries. Cultural competence in relation to health care and nursing is important for clinical nurses and is a central issue in nurse education. To gain an understanding of what nurse students experienced and learned during an intensive course in diabetes together with students and nurse educators from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden and the Faroe Islands. In 2012, an intensive course within the Nordic network, Nordkvist, was conducted in Faroe Islands with the theme "Nursing - to live a good life with diabetes". To answer the objective of the study, 26 students conducted written reflections based on two questions. The data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Through meetings with nurse students and educators from the Nordic countries the intensive course strengthened the students' identification with the nursing profession. The students gained new perspectives on diabetes, such as how complex it can be to live with a chronic illness. Because of the difficulties in understanding one another and because of different mother tongues, the students gained a better understanding of patients' vulnerability in relation to hospital jargon and how it felt to be in an unfamiliar place. The intensive course increased the students' personal and professional growth, cross-cultural competence, and their identification with nursing. Students' understanding of health care in the Nordic countries improved as similarities and differences were recognized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reduced Mental Load in Learning a Motor Visual Task with Virtual 3D Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, A.; Reiner, M.

    2018-01-01

    Distance learning is expanding rapidly, fueled by the novel technologies for shared recorded teaching sessions on the Web. Here, we ask whether 3D stereoscopic (3DS) virtual learning environment teaching sessions are more compelling than typical two-dimensional (2D) video sessions and whether this type of teaching results in superior learning. The…

  5. Student-centred learning in Community Medicine: An experience from Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, S S; Premarajan, K C; L, Subitha; Archana, R; Iswarya, S; A, Sujiv

    2014-01-01

    majority of students found the sessions on innovative teaching-learning and assessment techniques enjoyable, useful and informative. The sessions showed that students took an active part in curriculum planning, execution and evaluation. Copyright 2014, NMJI.

  6. Moderator report on workshop session 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, T.

    2004-01-01

    While much in Stakeholder confidence work is focused on the periods of project conceptualization, siting, and development, eventually a successful waste programme will result in a set of facilities with visual, aesthetic, and other physical impacts on the host community. This most interesting and interactive session explored both the artistic and aesthetic aspects of the waste management process and the relationship among the stakeholders, particularly the affected local communities and those who might help develop both the products and processes associated with implementation. Two insightful presentations were made, followed by a lively panel discussion and interactions with the broader FSC participants. (author)

  7. Parallel Monitors for Self-adaptive Sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Coppo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a data-driven model of self-adaptivity for multiparty sessions. System choreography is prescribed by a global type. Participants are incarnated by processes associated with monitors, which control their behaviour. Each participant can access and modify a set of global data, which are able to trigger adaptations in the presence of critical changes of values. The use of the parallel composition for building global types, monitors and processes enables a significant degree of flexibility: an adaptation step can dynamically reconfigure a set of participants only, without altering the remaining participants, even if the two groups communicate.

  8. Summary of Session 4 "Beam Energy"

    CERN Document Server

    Siemko, A

    2011-01-01

    In this session, the possible scenarios for the beam energy in the LHC 2011 run were discussed. The benefits for the physics reach for physics operations at s larger than 7 TeV were reviewed. The main goal was, however, to establish the necessary information for a sound risk analysis by assessing the probability of thermal runaway and evaluating the consequences of a hypothetical incident. A new technique to improve the knowledge of joint resistances of the cooper busbars and therefore the reliability of the risk analysis has also been discussed.

  9. Summary of the electron accelerators session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1988-10-01

    Since the last High Energy Physics Symposium, there has been considerable progress in the field of polarized electron accelerators. Projects well into construction include the SLC, HERA, and LEP. The status of polarized beams for these projects is discussed in this session. Semiclassical and quantum mechanical calculations of polarizing and depolarizing effects are discussed, for both linear colliders and for storage rings. Substantial progress is continuing in the understanding of depolarizing mechanisms for circular machines. Modelling of these machines is underway. Activities with polarized electron beams at Novosibirsk are described. 8 refs

  10. Individual activities as an integrated part of project work - an innovative approach to project oriented and problem-based learning POPBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby, Egon; Winther, Hans Henrik; Kørnøv, Lone

    2006-01-01

    in an individual activity to subsequently be separately assessed. The results of the individually oriented project work form the platform for final work with the project as a team. The students in each team are expected to evaluate the individual solutions and select the one solution to work on in the final phases......In this paper, the authors describe and, on the basis of a recently conducted survey, evaluate a way to increase student learning through the introduction of an individual project activity to the project oriented and problem-based and team-based project work - POPBL. This can be achieved not just...... by adding an individual activity outside or parallel to the project work, but by having the individual activity embedded as an integrated part of the overall team-based project work. In what the authors have deemed the extended project model, students work individually in the solution phase of the project...

  11. Innovative Software Algorithms and Tools parallel sessions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaines, Irwin

    2001-01-01

    A variety of results were presented in the poster and 5 parallel sessions of the Innovative Software, Algorithms and Tools (ISAT) sessions. I will briefly summarize these presentations and attempt to identify some unifying trends

  12. 78 FR 53497 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Closed Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation... Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee Special Closed Session. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a...), notice is hereby given of a special closed session of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory...

  13. Chapter II: Twenty Eighth General Assembly Business Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert

    2015-08-01

    The President of the IAU, Prof. Robert Williams, welcomed the delegates and members to this first business session of the General Assembly. The President invited the General Secretary, Dr. Ian Corbett, to start the business session.

  14. Music Education and Music Therapy. Introduction to Plenary Session 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2002-01-01

    Chairman's introduction to plenary session on the relationship between music therapy and music pedagogics......Chairman's introduction to plenary session on the relationship between music therapy and music pedagogics...

  15. Safety Training: scheduled sessions in March

    CERN Multimedia

    DGS Unit

    2011-01-01

    The following training courses are scheduled in March. You can find the full Safety Training programme on the Safety Training online catalogue. If you are interested in attending any of the below courses, please talk to your supervisor, then apply electronically via EDH from the course description pages, by clicking on SIGN-UP. Registration for all courses is always open – sessions for the less-requested courses are organized on a demand-basis only. Depending on the demand, a session will be organised later in the year. Biocell Training 08-MAR-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in English 08-MAR-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French 15-MAR-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in French 15-MAR-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French 17-MAR-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in English 17-MAR-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in English 22-MAR-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in French 22-MAR-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French 24-MAR-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in French 24-MAR-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French 29-MAR...

  16. Safety Training: scheduled sessions in May

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle Cusato (HSE Unit)

    2011-01-01

    The following training courses are scheduled in March. You can find the full Safety Training programme on the Safety Training online catalogue. If you are interested in attending any of the below courses, please talk to your supervisor, then apply electronically via EDH from the course description pages, by clicking on SIGN-UP. Registration for all courses is always open – sessions for the less-requested courses are organized on a demand-basis only. Depending on the demand, a session will be organised later in the year.   Biocell Training 10-MAY-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in French 10-MAY-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French 12-MAY-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in English 12-MAY-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in English 19-MAY-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in French 19-MAY-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French 24-MAY-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in English 24-MAY-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in English   Champs Magnétiques 13-MAY-11 (09.30 – 11.30) in French...

  17. Round table discussion during session 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, C.

    2004-01-01

    The round table discussions of the second session of the FSC Belgium Workshop addressed the following questions: - Do local stakeholders have, internally or externally, all the expertise they need in order to address the issues raised by radioactive waste management projects? - Do institutional stakeholders have all the expertise they need to take local impacts into account? - What kinds of expert input are sought and attained by the different stakeholders? - Were any formal methods used to aid local partnerships perform technology assessments? Or other types of assessment? - How to maintain the knowledge and expertise achieved by the stakeholders? Discussion took place after the plenary presentations, at tables grouping Belgian stakeholders and FSC delegates. As in Session I, most of the round table discussion focussed specifically on the experience of the local partnerships. Many insights were shared about the nature and role of expertise in complex decision making. They are summarised below, on the basis of the feedback provided to the plenary by each round table. Some of these insights can be generalised to other contexts. All in all, a profile emerged of the local partnerships as a unique and effective tool to deal with knowledge issues in managing risk. (author)

  18. Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

    2006-10-01

    The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

  19. Comparative analysis of energy impacts of traditional and partly electronic environmental auditing: learning from the Japanese automotive industry case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Mbohwa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper does a comparative analysis and assessment of energy impacts of traditional and partly electronic ISO 14001 environmental management system auditing that using videoconferencing systems. The focus is on the Japanese automotive industry. The idea is to quantify the environmental impacts of auditing and resolve the important question on whether or not the use of information and communication technology (ICT in environmental auditing reduces environmental impacts in ISO 14001 environmental management systems. The main results show that there are no clear energy savings or environmental advantages associated with ICT use in environmental auditing for the set system boundary. However electronic auditing is shown to have clear advantages for stated variables within the model, for example when the distance travelled by the auditors by train and by car is less than 75 km and 17 km per day respectively. A comparison of modes of travel by auditors, shows that rail travel offers the most environmental and energy benefits. It is also noted that travel dominates in terms of energy consumption and environmental burdens compared to all other environmental aspects associated with auditing. The study contributes to knowledge in that among other things, it enables researchers to draw parallels from it applicable to other industrial sectors and other countries. Southern African countries can use this methodology in analysing auditing methods with little or no changes in the model used.

  20. Astronomy and Space Technologies, WILGA 2012; EuCARD Sessions

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2012-01-01

    Wilga Sessions on HEP experiments, astroparticle physics and accelerator technology were organized under the umbrella of the EU FP7 Project EuCARD – European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. This paper is the first part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with photonics and electronics applications in astronomy and space technologies. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the Jubilee XXXth SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2012, May Edition, symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JE...

  1. GLOBAL 2009: Closing speech - the bulk of technical sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2009-01-01

    The author proposes an overview of the content of the hundred technical sessions of the GLOBAL 2009 conference. Thus, he addresses the twelve main issues: the upstream part of the fuel cycle, the present status of used fuel recycling, the waste management strategies and technologies, the transportation and storage of used fuels and radioactive materials, the definitive storage of nuclear wastes, the new technologies for fuel recycling, advanced designs of reactor cores and fuel management, long life radionuclide transmutation systems, the non proliferation issue, material management and options for sustainable fuel cycles, dismantling, decommissioning and resulting material management, transverse topics (technical-economic studies, nuclear energy applications other than electricity production, challenges of sustainable development of nuclear energy, advanced researches)

  2. Mathematics Intensive Summer Session (MISS). Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This final technical report appears in two parts: the report for the 1995 summer MISS program and the report for the 1996 summer MISS program. Copies of the US Department of Energy Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program 1995 Entry Form and 1996 Entry Form completed by all participants were sent to the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education in the fall of 1995 and 1996 respectively. Those forms are on file should they be needed. Attached also is a copy of the Summary of ideas for panel discussions, problem-solving sessions, or small group discussions presented at the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program Project Directors Meeting held in San Antonio, TX, November 12--14, 1995.

  3. CEER 2014 Dedicated Session Proposal: Restoring Water Quality along with Restoring the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    This session focuses on the importance of restoring water quality as part of the larger Gulf of Mexico restoration efforts. Water quality has been identified as a significant indicator of water body condition, and Gulf waters have been impacted by increased urban development, agr...

  4. Hearings Before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate, Ninety-Third Congress, First Session. Nutrition Education--1973. Parts 3, 4, and 5--TV Advertising of Food to Children. Washington, D.C., March 5, 6, and 12, 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

    These hearings before the Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs are organized in several parts (See UD 013 650 for Parts 1, 2, and 2A). The purpose of these hearings is to review the quality of advertising now being directed at children, and the health implications of that advertising; as well as what steps can be taken to use…

  5. Pre-Session Satiation as a Treatment for Stereotypy During Group Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispoli, Mandy; Camargo, Síglia Hoher; Neely, Leslie; Gerow, Stephanie; Lang, Russell; Goodwyn, Fara; Ninci, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Individuals with developmental disabilities may engage in automatically reinforced behaviors that may interfere with learning opportunities. Manipulation of motivating operations has been shown to reduce automatically maintained behavior in some individuals. Considering behavioral indicators of satiation may assist in identifying the point at which an abolishing operation has begun to effect behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of pre-session satiation of automatic reinforcement on subsequent levels of stereotypy and activity engagement during group activities for three males ages 5 to 13 years with developmental disabilities. Following functional analyses with analogue conditions, an alternating treatment design compared a pre-session access to stereotypy condition with a no-pre-session access condition prior to group activity sessions. Results indicated that pre-session satiation of the putative reinforcer produced by stereotypy was effective in decreasing stereotypy and increasing activity engagement during subsequent group activities for all participants. These findings add to the literature supporting the effectiveness of abolishing operations to decrease automatically maintained stereotypy. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. Flipped versus Traditional Classroom Information Literacy Sessions: Student Perceptions and Cognitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torstein Låg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Teaching effectively with limited classroom time is a challenge for information literacy teachers. In the flipped classroom (FC teaching model, information transmission teaching is delivered outside of class, freeing up class time for learning activities. I adopted the FC model in sessions that were previously taught using a traditional classroom (TC model. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the FC model's relative impact on (1 student perceptions of usefulness and quality, and (2 student cognitions about the IL sessions. Responses to evaluation forms from the TC model (N = 65, were compared to those from FC model (N = 78. Students judged usefulness and quality on two 4-point rating scales. Student cognitions were elicited with an open-ended question asking for suggestions for improvement and other comments. Responses to the latter were coded by an assistant blind to the conditions. Ratings were near ceiling and similar for both conditions. Responses to the open-ended question revealed interesting trends. Students in the FC condition provided wordier comments, were more concerned with what they themselves did and could do, and with the subject matter of the session. Students in the TC condition were more concerned with how information was presented to them. Results indicate that the FC teaching model is a viable alternative for IL sessions, and that it may encourage students to engage more with IL and their own learning process.

  7. Topical Session on Funding Issues in Connection with Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants - 9 November 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Set up by the Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC), the WPDD brings together senior representatives of national organisations who have a broad overview of Decommissioning and Dismantling (D and D) issues through their work as regulators, implementers, R and D experts or policy makers. These include representatives from regulatory authorities, industrial decommissioners from the NEA Co-operative Programme on Exchange of Scientific and Technical Information on Nuclear Installation Decommissioning Projects (CPD), and cross-representation from the other NEA Committees. The EC is a member of the WPDD and the IAEA is participating as an observer. This broad participation provides good possibilities for the co-ordination efforts amongst activities in the international programmes. At its fifth meeting, in Paris, 8-10 November 2004, the WPDD held a topical session on the 'Funding Issues in Connection with Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants'. This report documents the topical session on Funding. An agenda of the Topical session can be found in Appendix 1. The topical session was meant to provide an exchange of information and experience on the following issues: Ethical Values; Actual Experiences of Fund Setting and Management; Uncertainties in Funding. At the end of each session time was allotted for a plenary discussion. The Rapporteur reviewed the main points and the lessons learnt at the end of the whole Topical Session. The Topical Session is documented as follows. A summary of the presentations, the country reports, the discussions and the key issues and lessons learnt is given in the main part of this report. The agenda of the Topical session can be found in Appendix 1 and the full papers supporting each presentation are given in Appendix 2. The national presentations on 'Actual experiences of Fund Setting and Management' in session 2 can be found in Appendix 3 and the national presentations on 'Uncertainties in Funding' in session 3 can be found in

  8. Asynchronous Session Types – Exceptions and Multiparty Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Marco; Yoshida, Nobuko; Honda, Kohei

    2009-01-01

    Session types are a formalism for structuring communication based on the notion of session: the structure of a conversation is abstracted as a type which is then used as a basis of validating programs through an associated type discipline. While standard session types have proven to be able to ca...

  9. Working through: In-Session Processes that Promote Between-Session Thoughts and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jesse; Quirk, Kelley; Hilsenroth, Mark J.; Rodolfa, Emil

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether clients' ratings of the working alliance as well as their perception of cognitive-behavioral (CB) and psychodynamic-interpersonal (PI) techniques (delivered by therapists who used both) were associated with clients' intersession processes (i.e., their thoughts about therapy and therapeutic activity between sessions).…

  10. Session A5: hadron spectroscopy, experimental

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, S.

    1978-01-01

    Reports 55 contubutions made by mini-rapporteurs and individual contributors are assembled. It is clear, from the contributions made to this session, that there has been steady progress in solving the problem of the hadron spectroscopy of the old style. The picture on the scalar mesons has become clearer. Among the vector meson group, we started to understand Q mesons, though the situation with A 1 is still not clear. Mesons with higher spin have been found and, in some cases, confirmed. In a sense, the jigsaw puzzle on the mesons is gradually being completed while more complex features are found. The same can be said on the baryons. An active study is in progress in the experiment on the exotic states such as narrow baryonium and dibaryon states. However, owing to the difficulty of such experiments and interpretation of the data, a definitive result is yet to come. 94 references

  11. Session Report - F. Boydon (UK-ONR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boydon, Frans

    2014-01-01

    This report summarises presentations nationally (France, Switzerland, Canada) and identify specific areas of interest followed by general comments observations out of all the presentations in this session about the challenges to the Regulator and the Implementer preparing for construction and operation of geological repositories: stepwise phased approach, early engagement with regulators, the need for regulators to be clear about their expectations including any R and D requirements especially on how to deal with ageing effects, information management both in terms of volume and format, importance of the organisational structure of the license applicant (this structure is likely to evolve with time from that of a design organisation to one of a constructor/contractor to an operator (and constructor combined)), importance for regulators to consider in advance what the challenges of a DGR are and to implement suitable recruitment and training processes for its staff

  12. Report on session 1984-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    During this session the centre changed ownership, so that as from 1st October 1985 it will be operated by Edinburgh, Glasgow and Strathclyde Universities. Aberdeen and St. Andrews are associate members for access to the isotope geology facilities. Other Universities will use the centre on a commercial basis. The research activities are summarized; these are divided into reactor related activities with brief outlines of the projects undertaken in radiochemistry and physics, health physics and nuclear medicine and engineering. The number of analyses undertaken in isotope Geology increased to over 4,000. Sulphur isotope techniques were introduced during the year. The work at the NERC radiocarbon laboratory is also described. The teaching aspects of the reactor and its operation during the year are recorded. There were no problems with the reactor operation and it achieved its highest energy output of 232.5MWH. (U.K.)

  13. Ecole de Physique des Houches: session 96

    CERN Document Server

    Huard, Benjamin; Schoelkopf, Robert; Cugliandolo, Leticia F; Quantum Machines : Measurement and Control of Engineered Quantum Systems

    2014-01-01

    This book gathers the lecture notes of courses given at the 2011 summer school in theoretical physics in Les Houches, France, Session XCVI. What is a quantum machine? Can we say that lasers and transistors are quantum machines? After all, physicists advertise these devices as the two main spin-offs of the understanding of quantum mechanical phenomena. However, while quantum mechanics must be used to predict the wavelength of a laser and the operation voltage of a transistor, it does not intervene at the level of the signals processed by these systems. Signals involve macroscopic collective variables like voltages and currents in a circuit or the amplitude of the oscillating electric field in an electromagnetic cavity resonator. In a true quantum machine, the signal collective variables, which both inform the outside on the state of the machine and receive controlling instructions, must themselves be treated as quantum operators, just as the position of the electron in a hydrogen atom. Quantum superconducting...

  14. Precise subtyping for synchronous multiparty sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangiola Dezani-Ciancaglini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The notion of subtyping has gained an important role both in theoretical and applicative domains: in lambda and concurrent calculi as well as in programming languages. The soundness and the completeness, together referred to as the preciseness of subtyping, can be considered from two different points of view: operational and denotational. The former preciseness has been recently developed with respect to type safety, i.e. the safe replacement of a term of a smaller type when a term of a bigger type is expected. The latter preciseness is based on the denotation of a type which is a mathematical object that describes the meaning of the type in accordance with the denotations of other expressions from the language. The result of this paper is the operational and denotational preciseness of the subtyping for a synchronous multiparty session calculus. The novelty of this paper is the introduction of characteristic global types to prove the operational completeness.

  15. Summary of session C1: experimental gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laemmerzahl, C

    2008-01-01

    The fact that gravity is a metric theory follows from the Einstein equivalence principle. This principle consists of (i) the universality of free fall, (ii) the universality of the gravitational redshift and (iii) the local validity of Lorentz invariance. Many experiments searching for deviations from standard general relativity test the various aspects of the Einstein equivalence principle. Here we report on experiments covering the whole Einstein equivalence principle. Until now all experiments have been in agreement with the Einstein equivalence principle. As a consequence, gravity has to be described by a metric theory. Any metric theory of gravity leads to effects such as perihelion shift, deflection of light, gravitational redshift, gravitational time delay, Lense-Thirring effect, Schiff effect, etc. A particular theory of that sort is Einstein's general relativity. For weak gravitational fields which are asymptotically flat any deviation from Einstein's general relativity can be parametrized by a few constants, the PPN parameters. Many astrophysical observations and space experiments are devoted to a better measurement of the effects and, thus, of the PPN parameters. It is clear that gravity is best tested for intermediate ranges, that is, for distances between 1 m and several astronomical units. It is highly interesting to push forward our domain of experience and to strengthen the experimental foundation of gravity also beyond these scales. This point is underlined by the fact that many quantum gravity and unification-inspired theories suggest deviation from the standard laws of gravity at very small or very large scales. In this session summary we briefly outline the status and report on the talks presented in session C1 about experimental gravitation

  16. Learning behaviour and preferences of family medicine residents under a flexible academic curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Alice; Wong, Eric; Boisvert, Leslie

    2014-11-01

    To determine family medicine residents' learning behaviour and preferences outside of clinical settings in order to help guide the development of an effective academic program that can maximize their learning. Retrospective descriptive analysis of academic learning logs submitted by residents as part of their academic training requirements between 2008 and 2011. London, Ont. All family medicine residents at Western University who had completed their academic program requirements (N = 72) by submitting 300 or more credits (1 credit = 1 hour). Amount of time spent on various learning modalities, location where the learning took place, resources used for self-study, and the objective of the learning activity. A total of 72 residents completed their academic requirements during the study period and logged a total of 25 068 hours of academic learning. Residents chose to spend most of their academic time engaging in self-study (44%), attending staff physicians' teaching sessions (20%),and participating in conferences, courses, or workshops (12%) and in postgraduate medical education sessions (12%). Textbooks (26%), medical journals (20%), and point-of-care resources (12%) were the 3 most common resources used for self-study. The hospital (32%), residents' homes (32%),and family medicine clinics (14%) were the most frequently cited locations where academic learning occurred. While all physicians used a variety of educational activities, most residents (67%) chose self-study as their primary method of learning. The topic for academic learning appeared to have some influence on the learning modalities used by residents. Residents used a variety of learning modalities and chose self-study over other more traditional modalities (eg, lectures) for most of their academic learning. A successful academic program must take into account residents' various learning preferences and habits while providing guidance and training in the use of more effective learning methods and

  17. Progress on white papers from the Demographic Hack Session at WiA IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Dara J.; WiA IV Demographics Hack Session Attendees.

    2018-06-01

    At the Women in Astronomy IV meeting in June 2017, a number of white papers were started as part of the Demographic Hack session. Several of these white papers are intended for submission to the Decadal Survey on topics including, ‘Providing a Timely Review of Input Demographics to Advisory Committees’, and ‘Tying Research Funding to Progress in Inclusion’. In my talk, I will review the content of these white papers and the progress that has been made in writing them. Interested session attendees are encouraged ‘endorse’ the papers by becoming signatories.

  18. 'Ready to hit the ground running': Alumni and employer accounts of a unique part-time distance learning pre-registration nurse education programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Jan; Beretta, Ruth; Kenward, Linda; McDonagh, Lin; Messenger, Julie; Rounce, Jill

    2014-10-01

    This study explored the impact of The Open University's (OU) preregistration nursing programme on students' employability, career progression and its contribution to developing the nursing workforce across the United Kingdom. Designed for healthcare support workers who are sponsored by their employers, the programme is the only part-time supported open/distance learning programme in the UK leading to registration as a nurse. The international literature reveals that relatively little is known about the impact of previous experience as a healthcare support worker on the experience of transition, employability skills and career progression. To identify alumni and employer views of the perceived impact of the programme on employability, career progression and workforce development. A qualitative design using telephone interviews which were digitally recorded, and transcribed verbatim prior to content analysis to identify recurrent themes. Three geographical areas across the UK. Alumni (n=17) and employers (n=7). Inclusion criterion for alumni was a minimum of two years' post-qualifying experience. Inclusion criteria for employers were those that had responsibility for sponsoring students on the programme and employing them as newly qualified nurses. Four overarching themes were identified: transition, expectations, learning for and in practice, and flexibility. Alumni and employers were of the view that the programme equipped them well to meet the competencies and expectations of being a newly qualified nurse. It provided employers with a flexible route to growing their own workforce and alumni the opportunity to achieve their ambition of becoming a qualified nurse when other more conventional routes would not have been open to them. Some of them had already demonstrated career progression. Generalising results requires caution due to the small, self-selecting sample but findings suggest that a widening participation model of pre-registration nurse education for

  19. Interorganizational learning systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalager, Anne-Mette

    1999-01-01

    The occurrence of organizational and interorganizational learning processes is not only the result of management endeavors. Industry structures and market related issues have substantial spill-over effects. The article reviews literature, and it establishes a learning model in which elements from...... organizational environments are included into a systematic conceptual framework. The model allows four types of learning to be identified: P-learning (professional/craft systems learning), T-learning (technology embedded learning), D-learning (dualistic learning systems, where part of the labor force is exclude...... from learning), and S-learning (learning in social networks or clans). The situation related to service industries illustrates the typology....

  20. Breakout Session A: Safety Issues. Report from breakout session and discussion on safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The first issue discussed during the breakout session on safety aspects of accident-tolerant fuels was the objective that must be assigned to the development of such concepts. The first goal should be to avoid, or at least limit, the release of radioactive materials into the environment in case of an accident. This implies that severe accidents (core melt) situations must be avoided. To reach this goal, the core geometry must remain coolable, even for accident scenarios worse than what current fuel designs are able to sustain. There was a consensus that the station blackout (SBO) is a good reference transient to evaluate the potential benefits from new, more robust, fuel designs. With respect to the present situation, the merits of new designs can be analysed with respect to three figures: - the 'grace period', i.e. the additional amount of time before the onset of core melt, during which more recovery actions can be made; - the amount of combustible gases produced; - the amount of radioactive materials released. It is important to note that those three values are not independent from one another. They may be understood as three different ways to measure the improvements arising from accident tolerant fuels. The notion of 'grace period' was discussed and it was suggested that it should be compared to the amount of time needed to switch from normal operation to accident management type of procedures. The participants agreed that the 'grace period' should be counted in hours (or even days but the realism of this last goal was questioned). In other words, there was a consensus that a 'grace period' of some minutes is pointless and definitely not worth the effort of developing and characterising the behaviour of new concepts. Although the purpose of accident-tolerant fuel development is to improve the core robustness in design basis accidents (DBA) and situations somewhat beyond like SBO, it was recognised that new concepts must

  1. Rotational Seismology: AGU Session, Working Group, and Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H.K.; Igel, Heiner; Todorovska, Maria I.; Evans, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Although effects of rotational motions due to earthquakes have long been observed (e. g., Mallet, 1862), nevertheless Richter (1958, p. 213) stated that: 'Perfectly general motion would also involve rotations about three perpendicular axes, and three more instruments for these. Theory indicates, and observation confirms, that such rotations are negligible.' However, Richter provided no references for this claim. Seismology is based primarily on the observation and modeling of three-component translational ground motions. Nevertheless, theoretical seismologists (e.g., Aki and Richards, 1980, 2002) have argued for decades that the rotational part of ground motions should also be recorded. It is well known that standard seismometers are quite sensitive to rotations and therefore subject to rotation-induced errors. The paucity of observations of rotational motions is mainly the result of a lack, until recently, of affordable rotational sensors of sufficient resolution. Nevertheless, in the past decade, a number of authors have reported direct observations of rotational motions and rotations inferred from rigid-body rotations in short baseline accelerometer arrays, creating a burgeoning library of rotational data. For example, ring laser gyros in Germany and New Zealand have led to the first significant and consistent observations of rotational motions from distant earthquakes (Igel et al., 2005, 2007). A monograph on Earthquake Source Asymmetry, Structural Media and Rotation Effects was published recently as well by Teisseyre et al. (2006). Measurement of rotational motions has implications for: (1) recovering the complete ground-displacement history from seismometer recordings; (2) further constraining earthquake rupture properties; (3) extracting information about subsurface properties; and (4) providing additional ground motion information to earthquake engineers for seismic design. A special session on Rotational Motions in Seismology was convened by H

  2. Geriatric and Student Perceptions following Student-led Educational Sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Janzen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to measure the effect of student-led educational events on geriatric patient and student participant perceptions in a community setting. Methods: Students led three events at a senior community center, focusing on learning and memory, sleep hygiene, and arthritis pain. The participants were geriatric patients who themselves were providers of support to homebound peers (“clients” through an independently organized program. Geriatric participants completed pre- and post-event surveys to measure changes in familiarity with the topics. Student participants also completed pre- and post-event surveys that tracked changes in their comfort in working with the geriatric population. Results: Each event demonstrated at least one positive finding for geriatric patients and/or their clients. Students reported increased comfort in working with and teaching the geriatric population following the first and third events, but not the second. Conclusion: Student-led educational sessions can improve perceived health-related knowledge of geriatric participants while simultaneously exposing students to the geriatric patient population. Overall, both students and geriatric participants benefited from these events. Practice Implications: Incorporation of single, student-led educational events could be mutually beneficial to students and the elderly population in the community and easily incorporated into any healthcare curriculum. Funding:This work was supported by a Butler University Innovation Fund Grant. Treatment of Human Subjects: IRB review/approval required and obtained   Type: Original Research

  3. Work session on the SAR. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, K.

    1980-01-01

    In the first part of the present paper, containment isolation, pressurizer systems, valves of coolant systems and volume control systems are described. In the second part residual heat removal systems and the water-steam cycle are dealt with. Then initiation criteria and safety actions as well as malfunctions in the feedwater supply are discussed and finally leakages from the pressurized boundary of the reactor cooling system due to ruptures in connection lines and valve malfunction are considered. (RW)

  4. Session II-H. Regulatory implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzin, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    During FY 1981, the program concepts for implementing the NRC and EPA regulations were formed. These concepts consist of: review and critique of proposed rules; interpretation of rules into practical performance objectives; and planning to achieve compliance of total system performance with the rules. Although still flexible because of the lack of final rules, notable advances in implementation of these concepts were achieved in FY 1981. Technically, proposed and draft rules were evaluated and resulting radionuclide release limits were compared for consistency. For issue identification and resolution activity, six LTR's were initiated, and other topics were identified. In activities leading to total system compliance with regulations, planning and implementation efforts were more clearly defined and integrated. Papers reported in this session are: (1) regulatory implementation concepts and program overview; (2) licensing issue resolution; (3) status of NEPA activities in the NNWSI Program; (4) status of NEPA activities in the ONWI Program; (5) NWTS approach to site characterization reporting; and (6) quality assurance perspectives relative to licensing needs

  5. General Report on the Technical Sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carré, Frank

    2013-01-01

    General Remarks: • Research & Projects on Fast Neutron Reactors & related Fuel Cycles remain at sustained level worldwide; • Active participation in Technical Oral & Poster Sessions & Sustained exchanges; • Emphasis on Safety in the aftermath of Fukushima accident: → Gen-IV initiative on “Common design/safety criteria” in relation with the IAEA; • Diversity & Complementarity of National Projects of near term large power Fast Reactors & Technology Demonstrators of Next Generation Fast Reactors: – Ambitious SFR deployment scenarios of Russia, India, China…; – Near term Demonstrators of LFR technology in Russia; – Active research, promising innovations and plans for demonstrations in all major nuclear countries on SFRs but also LFR, GFR, MSFR… • Continuing improvements & Search for breakthroughs: two approaches with their own rationale & timeline that may complement each other in a global international roadmap. Key role of operating FRs for feedback & testing; • Increasing importance of numerical simulation and basic research; • Attractiveness of Gen-IV systems for Nuclear Education & Training

  6. Session II-J. Sociopolitical initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountain, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    The following papers were presented in this session: (1) state interactions in the NWTS Program; (2) state legislation on nuclear waste disposal; (3) federal legislation - United States House of Representatives; (4) federal legislation - United States Senate; (5) policy aspects of federal-state relations; (6) inplementing a federal-state partnership on repository siting. In the first paper the project manager for the ONWI contractor for sociopolitical research activities discusses the status of state interactions in all of the states covered by the program, including those states where activities are being conducted on federal reservations of the Department of Energy. In the second paper, the legal staff of the Battelle Project Management Division reports on legislative developments affecting the NWTS Program in various states where activities are under way and in states where legislation of interest has been enacted even though there may not be a program presence at this time. Various bills now before Congress and trends in the congressional mood or developing concepts are discussed in papers 3 and 4 by two key members of the Congressional committee. The policy aspects of federal-state relationships as viewed from the general perspective of the National Governors Association are discussed in the fifth paper. The final paper is a discussion on the real-world implementation of federal-state interactions on repository siting, particularly from the state perspective

  7. A Career Guidance Curriculum for Ninth Grade Students. Occupational Cluster Learning Activities. Business-Environmental. Part 1 of 2. Ninth Grade Guidance Project. Project Duration: July 16, 1979, to June 30, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cape May County Vocational Schools, NJ.

    This first of two parts presents learning activities for four occupational clusters of a ninth-grade cluster program. It contains theory and hands-on activities that explore the occupational requirements and working environment of these areas to help students make intelligent decisions of possible career choices based on levels of interest and…

  8. Posthuman learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse, Cathrine

    This book shall explore the concept of learning from the new perspective of the posthuman. The vast majority of cognitive, behavioral and part of the constructionist learning theories operate with an autonomous individual who learn in a world of separate objects. Technology is (if mentioned at all......) understood as separate from the individual learner and perceived as tools. Learning theory has in general not been acknowledging materiality in their theorizing about what learning is. A new posthuman learning theory is needed to keep up with the transformations of human learning resulting from new...... technological experiences. One definition of learning is that it is a relatively permanent change in behavior as the result of experience. During the first half of the twentieth century, two theoretical approaches dominated the domain of learning theory: the schools of thought commonly known as behaviorism...

  9. e-Learning for Lifelong Learning in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Andreasen, Lars Birch

    2010-01-01

    The chapter on 'e-Learning for Lifelong Learning in Denmark' is part of an international White Paper, focusing on educational systems, describing status and characteristics and highlighting specific cases of e-learning and of lifelong learning....

  10. Creating psychological connections between intervention recipients: development and focus group evaluation of a group singing session for people with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Mark; Warmoth, Krystal; Code, Chris; Dean, Sarah; Goodwin, Victoria A; Stein, Ken; Sugavanam, Thavapriya

    2016-02-23

    The study sought to identify key design features that could be used to create a new framework for group-based health interventions. We designed and tested the first session of a group intervention for stroke survivors with aphasia which was aimed at nurturing new psychological connections between group members. The intervention session, a participant focus group and interviews with intervention facilitators were held in a local community music centre in the South West of England. A convenience sample of 10 community-dwelling people with poststroke aphasia participated in the session. Severity of aphasia was not considered for inclusion. Participants took part in a 90-min group singing session which involved singing songs from a specially prepared song book. Musical accompaniment was provided by the facilitators. Participants and group facilitators reported their experiences of participating in the session, with a focus on activities within the session related to the intervention aims. Researcher observations of the session were also made. Two themes emerged from the analysis, concerning experiences of the session ('developing a sense of group belonging') and perceptions of its design and delivery ('creating the conditions for engagement'). Participants described an emerging sense of shared social identity as a member of the intervention group and identified fixed (eg, group size, session breaks) and flexible (eg, facilitator responsiveness) features of the session which contributed to this emergence. Facilitator interviews and researcher observations corroborated and expanded participant reports. Engagement with health intervention content may be enhanced in group settings when intervention participants begin to establish positive and meaningful psychological connections with other group members. Understanding and actively nurturing these connections should be a core feature of a general framework for the design and delivery of group interventions. Published by the

  11. Creating psychological connections between intervention recipients: development and focus group evaluation of a group singing session for people with aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Mark; Warmoth, Krystal; Code, Chris; Dean, Sarah; Goodwin, Victoria A; Stein, Ken; Sugavanam, Thavapriya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The study sought to identify key design features that could be used to create a new framework for group-based health interventions. We designed and tested the first session of a group intervention for stroke survivors with aphasia which was aimed at nurturing new psychological connections between group members. Setting The intervention session, a participant focus group and interviews with intervention facilitators were held in a local community music centre in the South West of England. Participants A convenience sample of 10 community-dwelling people with poststroke aphasia participated in the session. Severity of aphasia was not considered for inclusion. Intervention Participants took part in a 90-min group singing session which involved singing songs from a specially prepared song book. Musical accompaniment was provided by the facilitators. Primary and secondary outcome measures Participants and group facilitators reported their experiences of participating in the session, with a focus on activities within the session related to the intervention aims. Researcher observations of the session were also made. Results Two themes emerged from the analysis, concerning experiences of the session (‘developing a sense of group belonging’) and perceptions of its design and delivery (‘creating the conditions for engagement’). Participants described an emerging sense of shared social identity as a member of the intervention group and identified fixed (eg, group size, session breaks) and flexible (eg, facilitator responsiveness) features of the session which contributed to this emergence. Facilitator interviews and researcher observations corroborated and expanded participant reports. Conclusions Engagement with health intervention content may be enhanced in group settings when intervention participants begin to establish positive and meaningful psychological connections with other group members. Understanding and actively nurturing these connections

  12. Examining Residents' Strategic Mindfulness During Self-Regulated Learning of a Simulated Procedural Skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brydges, Ryan; Hatala, Rose; Mylopoulos, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Simulation-based training is currently embedded in most health professions education curricula. Without evidence for how trainees think about their simulation-based learning, some training techniques may not support trainees' learning strategies. This study explored how residents think about and self-regulate learning during a lumbar puncture (LP) training session using a simulator. In 2010, 20 of 45 postgraduate year 1 internal medicine residents attended a mandatory procedural skills training boot camp. Independently, residents practiced the entire LP skill on a part-task trainer using a clinical LP tray and proper sterile technique. We interviewed participants regarding how they thought about and monitored their learning processes, and then we conducted a thematic analysis of the interview data. The analysis suggested that participants considered what they could and could not learn from the simulator; they developed their self-confidence by familiarizing themselves with the LP equipment and repeating the LP algorithmic steps. Participants articulated an idiosyncratic model of learning they used to interpret the challenges and successes they experienced. Participants reported focusing on obtaining cerebrospinal fluid and memorizing the "routine" version of the LP procedure. They did not report much thinking about their learning strategies (eg, self-questioning). During simulation-based training, residents described assigning greater weight to achieving procedural outcomes and tended to think that the simulated task provided them with routine, generalizable skills. Over this typical 1-hour session, trainees did not appear to consider their strategic mindfulness (ie, awareness and use of learning strategies).

  13. Utilisation of a peer assisted learning scheme in an undergraduate diagnostic radiography module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meertens, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peer to peer support programmes involve students supporting each other in either an educational, social and/or pastoral way. This is now common place in higher education institutes and has been proven to decrease student attrition and improve grades. Aim: To evaluate a peer assisted learning scheme (PALS) within the University of Exeter undergraduate programme, where final year (stage 3) students held extra-curricular teaching sessions in an on-campus X-ray room throughout the academic term to support a first year (stage 1) module introducing basic projectional radiographic examinations, radiation safety, patient care and radiographic equipment. PALS sessions were unstructured and as such could involve roleplaying radiographic examinations, revisiting lecture material and/or discussing hospital placement or pastoral issues. Methods: Brookfield's four lenses of critical reflection were used. 16 of 63 stage 1 students and 9 of 29 stage 3 students were electronically surveyed upon completion of the PALS sessions. Relevant colleagues and educational specialists were also informally interviewed. These were put in context with autobiographical reflections and the existing literature base on PALS. Results: All agreed that the sessions provided a good environment for stage 1 students to improve their practical skills, revise lecture content, and gain confidence for upcoming clinical placements. Stage 3 students gained experience teaching students, an essential role of a graduate radiographer's job. Improvements around recruiting stage 3 peer leaders, sustainability, timetabling and session structure were explored. Conclusion: The PALS proved to be a successful initiative within the undergraduate programme and will be continued into the future. - Highlights: • Peer Assisted Learning Schemes are an established part of higher education. • Peer Assisted Learning Schemes can reduce student attrition and improve grades. • Peer Assisted Learning

  14. Special ways of knowing in science: expansive learning opportunities with bilingual children with learning disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Álvarez, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    The field of bilingual special education is currently plagued with contradictions resulting in a serious underrepresentation of emergent bilinguals with learning disabilities in professional science fields. This underrepresentation is due in large part to the fact that educational systems around the world are inadequately prepared to address the educational needs of these children; this inadequacy is rooted in a lack of understanding of the linguistic and cultural factors impacting learning. Accepting such a premise and assuming that children learn in unexpected ways when instructional practices attend to culture and language, this study documents a place-based learning experience integrating geoscience and literacy in a fourth-grade dual language classroom. Data sources include transcribed audio-taped conversations from learning experience sessions and interviews that took place as six focus children, who had been identified as having specific learning disabilities, read published science texts (i.e. texts unaltered linguistically or conceptually to meet the needs of the readers). My analysis revealed that participants generated responses that were often unexpected if solely analyzed from those Western scientific perspectives traditionally valued in school contexts. However, these responses were also full of purposeful and rich understandings that revealed opportunities for expansive learning. Adopting a cultural historical activity theory perspective, instructional tools such as texts, visuals, and questions were found to act as mediators impacting the learning in both activity systems: (a) teacher- researcher learning from children, and (b) children learning from teachers. I conclude by suggesting that there is a need to understand students' ways of knowing to their full complexity, and to deliberately recognize teachers as learners, researchers, and means to expansive learning patterns that span beyond traditional learning boundaries.

  15. Summary Of Session 5: How Should We Handle Safety?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, M.; Roy, G

    2001-07-01

    This session was originally titled 'Safety: Who cares?' in a fairly provocative way. A clear conclusion of this session and discussions that were held at the workshop is that there is a wide concern for safety among the people in charge of control room operations. This was shown as well by the quality of the seven talks presented in this session on subjects ranging from safety standards to a practical case of a safety incident. (author)

  16. ECG changes after a session of regional intraarterial hyperglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobchenko, Z.A.; Livshits, L.I.

    1988-01-01

    ECG changes after a session of regional intraarterial hyperglycemia (RIH) in 13 patients (the mean age of 49 years) with locally advanced cancer of the tongue, oral mucosa and oropharynx were presented. Taking into account the mean age of patients and the negative ECG time course after a RIH session, the necessity of patients' examination (including ECG after a RIH session and, when indicated, a consultation by a cardiologist) was emphasized

  17. Summary Of Session 5: How Should We Handle Safety?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, M.; Roy, G.

    2001-01-01

    This session was originally titled 'Safety: Who cares?' in a fairly provocative way. A clear conclusion of this session and discussions that were held at the workshop is that there is a wide concern for safety among the people in charge of control room operations. This was shown as well by the quality of the seven talks presented in this session on subjects ranging from safety standards to a practical case of a safety incident. (author)

  18. Secret Sessions of Congress: A Brief Historical Overview

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amer, Mildred

    2005-01-01

    "Secret" or "closed door" sessions of the House of Representatives and Senate are held periodically to discuss business, including impeachment deliberations, deemed to require confidentiality and secrecy...

  19. Secret Sessions of Congress: A Brief Historical Overview

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amer, Mildred

    2004-01-01

    Secret or closed door sessions of the House of Representatives and Senate are held periodically to discuss business, including impeachment deliberations, deemed to require confidentiality and secrecy...

  20. Research on design of dialogue session concerning nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karikawa, Daisuke; Takahashi, Makoto; Yagi, Ekou; Toba, Tae; Kitamura, Masaharu

    2010-01-01

    Toward resolving nuclear conflict, deep dialogue sessions among stakeholders having different opinions concerning nuclear technology are strongly required. In order to realize a fair and constructive dialogue session, it is necessary to pay attention to the design of the dialogue session, e.g., participant selection, agenda setting, facilitation, and rules of dialogue. The basic requirements for a dialogue session have been proposed in this study based on theoretical and empirical analyses of previous dialogue sessions on nuclear issues. The theoretical analysis has been performed based on various aspects concerning defects in nuclear communication mentioned in science and technology studies. The empirical analysis has been performed by analyzing participants' responses and by systematizing practical findings of previous dialogues. The proposed requirements for a dialogue session were utilized for the design and operation of a preliminary attempt of a dialogue session named 'Open Forum for Nuclear Communication.' Through the analysis of data, such as minutes and recorded conversations collected after the session, it has been confirmed that the prespecified requirements have been satisfied. In addition, the participants' responses have shown a high acceptance for an open forum. According to these results, the basic validity and effectiveness of the proposed requirements in the design of a dialogue session have been successfully demonstrated. (author)

  1. CBiOS Science Sessions - 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Alexandre Rodrigues Tavares

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available CBiOS Science Sessions - 2013 - Nutrition: pregnancy counselling website (http://nutricao.ulusofona.pt Nutrição: website de aconselhamento durante a gravidez, Nelson Alexandre Rodrigues Tavares; Relationship between daily water intake and skin physiology, Impacto Cutâneo do consumo dietário de água, Maria Lídia Laginha Mestre Guerreiro da Palma; Development of different types of nanosystems: polymeric, lipid-based and metallic nanoparticles. Desenvolvimento de diferentes tipos de nanosistemas: poliméricos, lipid-based e de nanoparticulas metálicas, Catarina Silva, Patrícia Rijo, Catarina Reis; Interaction between propofol and HES 130/0.4: Chemical, physiological and toxicological. Interação entre Propofol e HES 130/0.4: Química, Fisiológica e Toxicológica, Aura Silva, Ana Ortiz, Carlos Venâncio, Rui Silva, Joaquim Mendes, Paula Guedes, Helena Vala, David Ferreira; Study the potential applicability of the by-products of the Prunus cerasus in promoting health and skin care. Estudo da aplicabilidade dos sub-produtos de Prunus cerasus na promoção de saúde cutânea, Elisabete Maurício, Catarina Rosado, Diaz Diaz Lanza; Cell migration and adhesion - impact of ROS in tumour metastasis Migração celular e adesão - impacto de ROS na metástase tumural, Nuno Saraiva; Bioactive and Non-Conventional Photoprotection Fotoproteção Bioactiva e Não-Convencional, André Rolim Baby.

  2. Maintaining the potential of a psycho-educational program: efficacy of a booster session after an intervention offered family caregivers at disclosure of a relative's dementia diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Francine; Lachance, Lise; Lévesque, Louise; Zarit, Steven Howard; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Booster sessions as a means of maintaining the benefits of psycho-educational programs have received little attention in caregiving research. Caregivers were offered a booster session following participation in a program entitled Learning to Become a Family Caregiver (LBFC) intended to facilitate transition to the caregiver role after diagnostic disclosure of dementia in a relative. The 90-minute booster session served to review program content and afforded the opportunity to discuss and practice learned skills. This study sought to test the efficacy of the booster session in maintaining or recovering program effects at six months post-program. Participants in the program were randomly assigned to a group that received the booster session (n = 31) or a group that did not (n = 29). A third control group was also formed, which continued to receive only the usual care provided in memory clinics. Eligible participants - French-speaking primary caregivers of a relative diagnosed with Alzheimer's in the past nine months - were recruited in memory clinics in Quebec (Canada). Participants were blindly assessed before randomization and six months after the booster session on outcomes associated with a healthy role transition. Prediction analyses revealed one significant positive effect of the booster session: emergence of preparedness to provide care. Moreover, with or without the booster session, the program continued to have a positive effect on psychological distress and contributed to the emergence of self-efficacy in dealing with caregiving situations. The booster session had no significant effect on knowledge of services, planning for future care needs, use of reframing as a coping strategy, perceived informal support, and family conflicts. The limited effect observed is discussed in terms of the booster session's content and intensity. Recommendations are made for designing future research on the effect of booster sessions, including the importance of including a

  3. Authorization of appropriations for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for fiscal years 1982 and 1983 (implementation of Section 110, Public Law 96-295). Oversight hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, February 27, 1981. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Part II of the budget authorization hearings covers the testimony of two panels, one with representatives of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and one with members of the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS). Their testimony focused on section 10 of the authorization law which deals with requirements of systematic safety evaluation of operating reactors. NRC revisions to section 10 have quieted some industry criticisms that the plan will drain manpower and resources without accomplishing anything significant. UCS panelists challenged the NRC to provide objective scientific evidence that nuclear power plants are operating safely. They urged an augmented budget for further safety research. An appendix with additional statements and material follows the testimony

  4. The effect of problem-based learning with cooperative-learning strategies in surgery clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Sevgi; Konan, Ali; Kılıç, Yusuf Alper; Özvarış, Şevkat Bahar; Sayek, Iskender

    2012-01-01

    Cooperative learning is used often as part of the problem-based learning (PBL) process. But PBL does not demand that students work together until all individuals master the material or share the rewards for their work together. A cooperative learning and assessment structure was introduced in a PBL course in 10-week surgery clerkship, and the difference was evaluated between this method and conventional PBL in an acute abdominal pain module. An experimental design was used. No significant differences in achievement were found between the study and control group. Both the study and control group students who scored low on the pretest made the greatest gains at the end of the education. Students in the cooperative learning group felt that cooperation helped them learn, it was fun to study and expressed satisfaction, but they complained about the amount of time the groups had to work together, difficulties of group work, and noise during the sessions. This study evaluated the impact of a cooperative learning technique (student team learning [STL]) in PBL and found no differences. The study confirms that a relationship exists between allocated study time and achievement, and student's satisfaction about using this technique. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Facilitating small groups: how to encourage student learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Many clinicians are involved in medical education, with small group teaching (SGT) forming a significant part of their work. Most facilitate these sessions by experience and common sense: less than one-third of them have received formal training in SGT. Evidence suggests small group productivity depends on good facilitation rather than on topic knowledge. Applying the fundamental concepts of SGT will lead to improvements in the quality of clinicians' teaching and in student learning. Good SGT creates the perfect environment for learning and discussion, without the need for didactic teaching. SGT emphasises the role of students in sharing and discussing their ideas in a safe learning environment, without domination by the tutor. This article provides clinicians with basic requirements for effective session design and planning, explains how to encourage student participation, how to manage students as a group, how to manage student learning, and how to recognise and deal with problems. Active facilitation and group management is the key to success in SGT, and consequently better learning outcomes. Improving the facilitation skills of clinical teachers makes teaching more effective, stimulating, and enjoyable for both tutors and students. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  6. Subjective safety and self-confidence in prehospital trauma care and learning progress after trauma-courses: part of the prospective longitudinal mixed-methods EPPTC-trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häske, David; Beckers, Stefan K; Hofmann, Marzellus; Lefering, Rolf; Grützner, Paul A; Stöckle, Ulrich; Papathanassiou, Vassilios; Münzberg, Matthias

    2017-08-14

    Prehospital trauma care is stressful and requires multi-professional teamwork. A decrease in the number of accident victims ultimately affects the routine and skills and underlines the importance of effective training. Standardized courses, like PHTLS, are established for health care professionals to improve the prehospital care of trauma patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the subjective safety in prehospital trauma care and learning progress by paramedics in a longitudinal analysis. This was a prospective intervention trial and part of the mixed-method longitudinal EPPTC-trial, evaluating subjective and objective changes among participants and real patient care as a result of PHTLS courses. Participants were evaluated with pre/post questionnaires as well as one year after the course. We included 236 datasets. In the pre/post comparison, an increased performance could be observed in nearly all cases. The result shows that the expectations of the participants of the course were fully met even after one year (p = 0.002). The subjective safety in trauma care is significantly better even one year after the course (p < 0.001). Regression analysis showed that (ABCDE)-structure is decisive (p = 0.036) as well as safety in rare and common skills (both p < 0.001). Most skills are also rated better after one year. Knowledge and specific safety are assessed as worse after one year. The courses meet the expectations of the participants and increase the subjective safety in the prehospital care of trauma patients. ABCDE-structure and safety in skills are crucial. In the short term, both safety in skills and knowledge can be increased, but the courses do not have the power to maintain knowledge and specific subjective safety issues over a year. German Clinical Trials Register, ID DRKS00004713 , registered 14. February 2014.

  7. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS). Part III. Oversight hearing before the Subcommittee on Mining, Forest Management, and Bonneville Power Administration of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eight Congress, Second Session, March 28 and August 2, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Part III of the hearing record contains the testimony of Peter Johnson, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Administrator, and Energy Secretary Donald Hodel on the subject of BPA's contracts with the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) in which BPA will assume responsibility of WPPSS nuclear projects 1, 2, and 3. At issue was whether the contracts exceed BPA's authority and the protection of BPA's $1.9 billion invested in the projects. Johnson denied any secret agreements and emphasized that the intent was to preserve the assets for the federal government and federal power system. On the second hearing day, Hodel explained DOE's involvement in the agreements and its concurrence with BPA because of related litigation. An appendix with additional correspondence and statements submitted for the record follows the testimony

  8. LEARNING HOW TO LEARN A LANGUAGE

    CERN Multimedia

    Formation en Langues; Andrée Fontbonne - Tél. 72844; Language Training; Françoise Benz - Tel. 73127; Andrée Fontbonne - Tel. 72844

    2000-01-01

    This bilingual seminar is for anyone who would like to develop learning strategies and skills for learning a foreign language. It is particularly recommended for those wishing to sign up for a 3-month self-study session in the Resource Centre. Languages: French and English. Length: 5 hours a day for one week. Dates: 27 November to December 2000. Price: 490 CHF per person (for a group of 8 people). If you are interested, please enrol through our Web pages.

  9. Energy and the public: public awareness workshop and plenary session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This publication of these two sessions of the conference on February 22 and 23, 1979 was prepared from a verbatim record made by a reporting firm. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the seventeen papers of the public awareness workshops and of the six papers of the plenary session.

  10. Quality Assurance of Assessment and Moderation Discourses Involving Sessional Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Peter; Adie, Lenore; Weir, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance is a major agenda in tertiary education. The casualisation of academic work, especially in teaching, is also a quality assurance issue. Casual or sessional staff members teach and assess more than 50% of all university courses in Australia, and yet the research in relation to the role sessional staff play in quality assurance of…

  11. Speed Posters: An Alternative to Traditional Poster and Podium Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagnes, Lisa D

    2016-08-01

    Speed posters were used as an alternative concurrent session option during a national nursing education conference. The session format was received positively by both participants and presenters, and, as a result, recommendations for use were developed by the conference planners. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(8):344-346. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Type Inference for Session Types in the Pi-Calculus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Eva Fajstrup; Harbo, Jacob Buchreitz; Huttel, Hans

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a direct algorithm for session type inference for the π-calculus. Type inference for session types has previously been achieved by either imposing limitations and restriction on the π-calculus, or by reducing the type inference problem to that for linear types. Our approach...

  13. STS-32 Commander Brandenstein adjusts IMAX camera during training session

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-32 Commander Daniel C. Brandenstein adjusts IMAX camera setting during briefing and training session as technician looks on. The session was conducted in the JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9B. The IMAX camera will be used onboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, during the STS-32 mission.

  14. Summary of Session 5 and 6 'Long Shutdown 1'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordry, F; Foraz, K [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    This paper summarizes the sessions devoted to Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) in the LHC, injectors and experiments. The time frame and start date were discussed, with the main activities from powering tests prior to warm-up up to physics were presented. The session finished with a discussion on the maximum reasonable energy. (author)

  15. 76 FR 42112 - Specialty Crop Committee Stakeholder Listening Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... Specialty Crop Committee Stakeholder Listening Sessions AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA. ACTION: Notice of stakeholder listening sessions. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App 2, the United States Department of Agriculture announces two stakeholder...

  16. Small group presentations for each session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This section presents the results of the questionnaires with the recommendations from the 3 discussion groups. The questions approached are as follows: 1 - Discussion Group 1, 2 and 3 - Senior Management / Organizational Issues: Do Senior Managers understand the root cause analysis (RCA) process? Who in the organization is responsible for RCA? Are there regulatory requirements / influence? Does the culture of the organization affect the RCA process? Specific Recommendations. 2 - Discussion Group 1, 2 and 3 - Systematic Methodology / Tools: What are the challenges in using available analyses tools for identification of Human and Organisational Factors (HOF) in RCA? How do you 'handle' the perceived qualitative/subjective nature of HOF? Is the vocabulary used in RCA methodologies consistent? Will organizational issues be identified in analyses less intensive than RCA? Are you able to identify organizational issues from a single event? Is it difficult to make a clear link between RCA and CAs? What do you do if your scope expands? Recommendations. 3 - Discussion Group 1, 2 and 3 - Team Composition / Attributes: What are the challenges associated in team / individual competence? Is there management / HOF representation on the team? Does the level of the management sponsor affect the willingness of the organization to accept the HOF in RCA? Are RCA results presented to management? Who presents? Recommendations. 4 - Discussion Group 1, 2 and 3 - Learning: How many RCAs are done in a year? Is this sufficient? Could you identify organizational issues using an 'Apparent Cause Analysis' method? Are events with HOF issues trended in your organization? How do you know you have a learning organization? How can you measure the effectiveness of CAs?

  17. Closing the feedback loop: engaging students in large first-year mathematics test revision sessions using pen-enabled screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Diane; Loch, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    How can active learning, peer learning and prompt feedback be achieved in large first-year mathematics classes? Further, what technologies may support these aims? In this article, we assert that test revision sessions in first-year mathematics held in a technology-enhanced lecture theatre can be highly interactive with students solving problems, learning from each other and receiving immediate feedback. This is facilitated by pen-enabled screens and synchronization software. We argue that the educational benefits achievable through the technology do outweigh the technological distractions, and that these benefits can be achieved by focused, targeted one-off sessions and not only by a semester-long, regular approach. Repeat mid-semester test revision sessions were offered on a non-compulsory basis using pen-enabled screens for all students. Students worked practice test questions and marked solutions to mathematical problems on the screens. Students' work was then displayed anonymously for their peers to see. Answers were discussed with the whole class. We discuss outcomes from two offerings of these sessions using student feedback and lecturer reflections and show the impact of participation on self-reported student confidence. Pedagogical approaches that the technology allowed for the first time in a large class are highlighted. Students responded uniformly positively.

  18. Summary record of the topical session at WPDD-10: Management of large components from decommissioning to storage and disposal, 18-19 November 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutzer, Michel

    2010-01-01

    At its tenth meeting, the WPDD held a topical session on Management of Large Components from Decommissioning to Storage and Disposal. The topical session was organised by a new task group of the WPDD that recently began work on this topic. The group is aiming to prepare a technical guide that provides a methodology to assess different management options and facilitates involvement of the different interested parties in the process of selecting the preferred management option. This report is made of 3 parts: Part 1 presents the Main Outcomes of Topical Session on Management of Large Components from Decommissioning to Storage and Disposal (Summary of Presentations and Discussions and Rapporteurs Report); Part 2 presents the Agenda of the Topical Session on Management of Large Components from Decommissioning to Storage and Disposal; and Part 3 is the List of Participants

  19. Effects of structured group psychosocial support sessions on psychosocial wellbeing of children and their caregivers: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humeid, Jasem

    2018-02-21

    Children aged 7-12 years and their caregivers participated in a series of group psychosocial support sessions, using standard manuals specifically developed for facilitating such sessions such as Children Affected by Armed Conflict and Joint Sessions. The sessions used various activities, including drawing, storytelling, folk games, and other activities, to provide participants with opportunities to express their feelings, learn and practice new coping skills, and interact with others. The aim of this study was to measure the effects of structured psychosocial support sessions on the psychosocial wellbeing of children and their caregivers in the Gaza Strip. This descriptive study involved children and female caregivers selected from six locations using a stratified sampling technique. External numerators collected data before and after the group sessions. Two interview questionnaires with questions about psychological and social status were used, one for children and one for caregivers. The caregivers' questionnaire also assessed their psychosocial knowledge. Adult participants and caregivers of participating children provided verbal consent. Data were analysed with SPSS, and a p value less than 0·05 indicated significance. 155 children (77 [50%] boys and 78 [50%] girls) and 155 female caregivers were enrolled from a population of 1720 children (50% boys and 50% girls) and 1720 female caregivers. The sessions improved psychosocial wellbeing in participants, with the average psychosocial wellbeing score increasing from 58% to 87% in children and from 69% to 84% in caregivers. Caregivers' knowledge increased from 70% to 82%. Improvement was found in the various aspects of psychosocial wellbeing. No differences were found with respect to location, sex, and age. Structured group sessions improved psychosocial wellbeing in children and caregivers and improved caregivers' knowledge. Given the design of this study, it is difficult to fully attribute these results to the

  20. Results of the 2010 IGSC Topical Session on Optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    topical session reflected the diversity of optimisation goals that may be pursued in the framework of a geological disposal programme. While optimisation of protection, as defined by ICRP, is regarded as a process to keep the magnitude of individual doses, the number of people exposed, and the likelihood of potential exposure as low as reasonably achievable with economic and social factors being taken into account, optimisation can also be seen as a way of increasing the technical quality and robustness of the whole waste management process. An optimal solution means addressing safety requirements whilst balancing other factors such as the need to use resources efficiently, political and acceptance issues and any other boundary conditions imposed by society. It was noted that optimisation variables are not well defined and could be quite programme-specific. However, the discussion showed a lot of agreement and consensus of views. In particular, the summary noted general agreement on the following points: - Optimisation is a process that can be checked and reviewed and needs to be transparent. Optimisation is therefore a learning process, and as such can contribute to building confidence in the safety case by the demonstration of ongoing learning across the organisation. - Optimisation occurs at each stage of the disposal facility development programme, and is therefore forward looking rather than focussed on re-examining past decisions. Optimisation should be about the right way forward at each stage, making the best decisions to move forward from the present situation based on current knowledge and understanding. - Regulators need to be clear about their requirements and these requirements become constraints on the optimisation process, together with any societal constraints that may be applied in certain programmes. Optimisation therefore requires a permanent dialogue between regulator and implementer. - Once the safety objectives (dose/risk targets and other

  1. Supporting the development of interpersonal skills in nursing, in an undergraduate mental health curriculum: reaching the parts other strategies do not reach through action learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Anna; McNay, Lisa; Dewar, Belinda; McCaig, Marie

    2014-09-01

    The centrality of therapeutic relationships is considered to be the cornerstone of effective mental health nursing practice. Strategies that support the development of these skills and the emotional aspects of learning need to be developed. Action learning is one such strategy. This article reports on a qualitative research study on the introduction of Action Learning Sets (ALS) into a Pre-registration Mental Health Nursing Programme. This teaching and learning methodology was chosen to support the emotional aspects of learning and mental health nursing skills. Four themes were identified: developing skills of listening and questioning in 'real time', enhanced self-awareness, being with someone in the moment--there is no rehearsal and doing things differently in practice. Students and lecturers found the experience positive and advocate for other Pre-registration Mental Health Nursing Programmes to consider the use of ALS within the curriculum. © 2013.

  2. NEDO Forum 2000. Geothermal technology development session (new development of geothermal energy); Chinetsu gijutsu kaihatsu session. Chinetsu energy no shintenkai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    The following themes were presented at this session: (1) geothermal development in the future, (2) the current status of geothermal development and utilization, (3) surveys on the promotion of geothermal development, and (4) verification and investigation on geothermal exploration technologies, development of hot water utilizing power generation plants, and international cooperation on geothermal development and utilization. In Item 2, report was made on the current status of geothermal power plants in Japan and their future development targets, long-term overview of geothermal development, measures and budgets to achieve the targets of geothermal development. In Item 3, it is reported that out of 48 areas completed of the survey (including the new promotion surveyed areas), the areas possible of steam power generation and confirmed of temperatures higher than 200 degrees C are 30 areas, and the areas possible of binary power generation (using down hole pumps) and small to medium scale power generation, confirmed of temperatures of 100 to 200 degrees C are 13 areas. In Item 4, reports were made on the reservoir bed variation exploring method, surveys on deep geothermal resources, a 10-MW demonstration plant, a system to detect well bottom information during excavation of geothermal wells, a technology to collect deep geothermal resources, and a hot-rock using power generation system. In Item 5, geothermal exploration in remote islands in the eastern part of Indonesia, and the IEA cooperation projects were reported. (NEDO)

  3. Summer Session: A Time for Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mola, Monty

    2013-05-01

    Summer is almost here (at least for those of us who teach semesters). Many of us are taking a well-deserved break to spend time with our families, conduct research, travel, and myriad other activities. Some of us, however, will be teaching summer school. For those of us lucky enough to be teaching this summer, we have one suggestion: Be bold! Summer is the ideal time to try something new with your teaching. We have known for some time that alternative pedagogies and engaging teaching strategies can be more effective than traditional lectures as student learning environments. However, even with headlines in The Washington Post proclaiming that the lecture is dead,2 inroads of physics education research-based curricula have been slow to diffuse into the classrooms for the greater population of college physics instructors.3 Many instructors of traditional physics courses see the use of research-based instructional strategies (RBIS) as desirable but risky and time consuming.3 Assuming a traditional physics course structure, both the where and the when each component takes place can also limit the types of engaging pedagogies used.4

  4. Basic steps in establishing effective small group teaching sessions in medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub

    2013-07-01

    Small-group teaching and learning has achieved an admirable position in medical education and has become more popular as a means of encouraging the students in their studies and enhance the process of deep learning. The main characteristics of small group teaching are active involvement of the learners in entire learning cycle and well defined task orientation with achievable specific aims and objectives in a given time period. The essential components in the development of an ideal small group teaching and learning sessions are preliminary considerations at departmental and institutional level including educational strategies, group composition, physical environment, existing resources, diagnosis of the needs, formulation of the objectives and suitable teaching outline. Small group teaching increases the student interest, teamwork ability, retention of knowledge and skills, enhance transfer of concepts to innovative issues, and improve the self-directed learning. It develops self-motivation, investigating the issues, allows the student to test their thinking and higher-order activities. It also facilitates an adult style of learning, acceptance of personal responsibility for own progress. Moreover, it enhances student-faculty and peer-peer interaction, improves communication skills and provides opportunity to share the responsibility and clarify the points of bafflement.

  5. Effects of Changing the Pedagogical Concept of a Part-time BSc in Accounting from Traditional Lectures into an IT-supported Asyncronous and Flexible Learning Concept - Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tage; Holm, Claus; Dalgas, Annemarie

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a change of the pedagogical concept in the second part of a four-year BSc program in Accounting. The program started September 1 1999 when 82 students were enrolled. The change involves a move from traditional lectures to a concept partly based on asynchronous...

  6. Are we ready for blended learning in medical education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneesh Basheer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning has other indirect positive effects as well. One innovative byproduct of blended learning is the flipped classroom; the sequence of events customary to the traditional classroom teaching are reversed.2 Traditional learning starts with the teacher providing a predominant cognitive (knowledge component and requires the students to follow it up with self-study and expansion of knowledge leading to higher levels of learning. The teacher plays the role of subject expert in general. In contrast, the learning material or at least a major part of it is provided to students before the scheduled class. The teacher uses the face to face session to engage students in interactive discussions, group tasks and other activities. This also has the advantage of making the learning process active, learner-centered and more retentive, reducing distraction and promoting higher levels of learning.3,4 Moreover, there is enough data to indicate that students are highly satisfied with the blended learning experience, particularly flipped classrooms.

  7. Embodied Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that psychological discourse fails miserably to provide an account of learning that can explain how humans come to understand, particularly understanding that has been grasped meaningfully. Part of the problem with psychological approaches to learning is that they are disconnected from the integral role embodiment plays in how…

  8. Semi-Automated Discovery of Application Session Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, J.; Jung, J.; Paxson, V.; Koksal, C.

    2006-09-07

    While the problem of analyzing network traffic at the granularity of individual connections has seen considerable previous work and tool development, understanding traffic at a higher level---the structure of user-initiated sessions comprised of groups of related connections---remains much less explored. Some types of session structure, such as the coupling between an FTP control connection and the data connections it spawns, have prespecified forms, though the specifications do not guarantee how the forms appear in practice. Other types of sessions, such as a user reading email with a browser, only manifest empirically. Still other sessions might exist without us even knowing of their presence, such as a botnet zombie receiving instructions from its master and proceeding in turn to carry them out. We present algorithms rooted in the statistics of Poisson processes that can mine a large corpus of network connection logs to extract the apparent structure of application sessions embedded in the connections. Our methods are semi-automated in that we aim to present an analyst with high-quality information (expressed as regular expressions) reflecting different possible abstractions of an application's session structure. We develop and test our methods using traces from a large Internet site, finding diversity in the number of applications that manifest, their different session structures, and the presence of abnormal behavior. Our work has applications to traffic characterization and monitoring, source models for synthesizing network traffic, and anomaly detection.

  9. [The paradoxical effect of persuasive communication in health education sessions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperini, Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the communication dynamics leading to the adoption of new attitudes and cognitions in health education sessions. We examined the verbal interactions at work in persuasive communication in 16 health education sessions. The study found that the medical expertise of the educator and the initial level of commitment of the participants had a positive effect on adherence to recommendations. However, persuasive communication in health education sessions appears to involve a paradoxical process in which criticism of the message can go hand in hand with the expression of an intention to implement new risk-reducing behaviors.

  10. 2011 annual meeting on nuclear technology. Pt. 4. Topical sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenfelder, Christian; Dams, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Summary report on the Topical Session of the Annual Conference on Nuclear Technology held in Berlin, 17 to 19 May 2011: - Nuclear Competence in Germany and Europe. The Topical Session: - Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors -- will be covered in a report in a further issue of atw. The reports on the Topical Sessions: - CFD-Simulations for Safety Relevant Tasks; and - Final Disposal: From Scientific Basis to Application; - Characteristics of a High Reliability Organization (HRO) Considering Experience Gained from Events at Nuclear Power Stations -- have been covered in atw 7, 8/9, and 10 (2011). (orig.)

  11. Predicting E-commerce Consumer Behaviour Using Sparse Session Data

    OpenAIRE

    Thorrud, Thorstein Kaldahl; Myklatun, Øyvind

    2015-01-01

    This thesis research consumer behavior in an e-commerce domain by using a data set of sparse session data collected from an anonymous European e-commerce site. The goal is to predict whether a consumer session results in a purchase, and if so, which items are purchased. The data is supplied by the ACM Recommender System Challenge, which is a yearly challenge held by the ACM Recommender System Conference. Classification is used for predicting whether or not a session made a purchase, as w...

  12. A Multi-Faceted Approach to Inquiry-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudzinski, M. R.; Sikorski, J.

    2009-12-01

    In order to fully attain the benefits of inquiry-based learning, instructors who typically employ the traditional lecture format need to make several adjustments to their approach. This change in styles can be intimidating and logistically difficult to overcome. A stepwise approach to this transformation is likely to be more manageable for individual faculty or departments. In this session, we will describe several features that we are implementing in our introductory geology course with the ultimate goal of converting to an entirely inquiry-based approach. Our project is part of the Miami University initiative in the top 25 enrolled courses to move towards the “student as scholar” model for engaged learning. Some of the features we developed for our course include: student learning outcomes, student development outcomes, out-of-class content quizzes, in-class conceptests, pre-/post-course assessment, reflective knowledge surveys, and daily group activities.

  13. The Concept of a Single-sex Optional Discussion Session in Introductory Astronomy at a Publicly Funded University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawl, S.

    1996-12-01

    The concept of single-sex education for science and mathematics has recently received renewed discussion in both the popular and professional literature. So important is the topic within higher education that the Duke Journal of Gender Law and Policy sponsored a symposium called "Gender & The Higher Education Classroom: Maximizing the Learning Environment" in February 1996 (http://www.duke.edu/ jrd4/djgcnf96.htm). The concept is especially controversial in publicly supported educational institutions. The idea of offering an optional discussion session limited to a single sex in a university-level introductory astronomy course at a State-supported school was considered through discussions with a number of faculty and administrators, and through a questionnaire aimed at determining student attitudes toward the concept. The results of the student questionnaire will be presented. (While the questionnaire results will be seen to be in favor of such an optional discussion session, such sessions have not been offered.)

  14. Visual word learning in adults with dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Kit Wan Kwok

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated word learning in university and college students with a diagnosis of dyslexia and in typically-reading controls. Participants read aloud short (4-letter and longer (7-letter nonwords as quickly as possible. The nonwords were repeated across 10 blocks, using a different random order in each block. Participants returned 7 days later and repeated the experiment. Accuracy was high in both groups. The dyslexics were substantially slower than the controls at reading the nonwords throughout the experiment. They also showed a larger length effect, indicating less effective decoding skills. Learning was demonstrated by faster reading of the nonwords across repeated presentations and by a reduction in the difference in reading speeds between shorter and longer nonwords. The dyslexics required more presentations of the nonwords before the length effect became non-significant, only showing convergence in reaction times between shorter and longer items in the second testing session where controls achieved convergence part-way through the first session. Participants also completed a psychological test battery assessing reading and spelling, vocabulary, phonological awareness, working memory, nonverbal ability and motor speed. The dyslexics performed at a similar level to the controls on nonverbal ability but significantly less well on all the other measures. Regression analyses found that decoding ability, measured as the speed of reading aloud nonwords when they were presented for the first time, was predicted by a composite of word reading and spelling scores (‘literacy’. Word learning was assessed in terms of the improvement in naming speeds over 10 blocks of training. Learning was predicted by vocabulary and working memory scores, but not by literacy, phonological awareness, nonverbal ability or motor speed. The results show that young dyslexic adults have problems both in pronouncing novel words and in learning new written words.

  15. WE-D-204-00: Session in Memory of Franca Kuchnir: Excellence in Medical Physics Residency Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Speakers in this session will present overview and details of a specific rotation or feature of their Medical Physics Residency Program that is particularly exceptional and noteworthy. The featured rotations include foundational topics executed with exceptional acumen and innovative educational rotations perhaps not commonly found in Medical Physics Residency Programs. A site-specific clinical rotation will be described, where the medical physics resident follows the physician and medical resident for two weeks into patient consultations, simulation sessions, target contouring sessions, planning meetings with dosimetry, patient follow up visits, and tumor boards, to gain insight into the thought processes of the radiation oncologist. An incident learning rotation will be described where the residents learns about and practices evaluating clinical errors and investigates process improvements for the clinic. The residency environment at a Canadian medical physics residency program will be described, where the training and interactions with radiation oncology residents is integrated. And the first month rotation will be described, where the medical physics resident rotates through the clinical areas including simulation, dosimetry, and treatment units, gaining an overview of the clinical flow and meeting all the clinical staff to begin the residency program. This session will be of particular interest to residency programs who are interested in adopting or adapting these curricular ideas into their programs and to residency candidates who want to learn about programs already employing innovative practices. Learning Objectives: To learn about exceptional and innovative clinical rotations or program features within existing Medical Physics Residency Programs. To understand how to adopt/adapt innovative curricular designs into your own Medical Physics Residency Program, if appropriate.

  16. WE-D-204-00: Session in Memory of Franca Kuchnir: Excellence in Medical Physics Residency Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Speakers in this session will present overview and details of a specific rotation or feature of their Medical Physics Residency Program that is particularly exceptional and noteworthy. The featured rotations include foundational topics executed with exceptional acumen and innovative educational rotations perhaps not commonly found in Medical Physics Residency Programs. A site-specific clinical rotation will be described, where the medical physics resident follows the physician and medical resident for two weeks into patient consultations, simulation sessions, target contouring sessions, planning meetings with dosimetry, patient follow up visits, and tumor boards, to gain insight into the thought processes of the radiation oncologist. An incident learning rotation will be described where the residents learns about and practices evaluating clinical errors and investigates process improvements for the clinic. The residency environment at a Canadian medical physics residency program will be described, where the training and interactions with radiation oncology residents is integrated. And the first month rotation will be described, where the medical physics resident rotates through the clinical areas including simulation, dosimetry, and treatment units, gaining an overview of the clinical flow and meeting all the clinical staff to begin the residency program. This session will be of particular interest to residency programs who are interested in adopting or adapting these curricular ideas into their programs and to residency candidates who want to learn about programs already employing innovative practices. Learning Objectives: To learn about exceptional and innovative clinical rotations or program features within existing Medical Physics Residency Programs. To understand how to adopt/adapt innovative curricular designs into your own Medical Physics Residency Program, if appropriate.

  17. A Review of the Literature on Social and Emotional Learning for Students Ages 3-8: Teacher and Classroom Strategies that Contribute to Social and Emotional Learning (Part 3 of 4). REL 2017-247

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Conner, Rosemarie; De Feyter, Jessica; Carr, Alyssa; Luo, Jia Lisa; Romm, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Social and emotional learning (SEL) is the process by which children and adults learn to understand and manage emotions, maintain positive relationships, and make responsible decisions. This is the third in a series of four related reports about what is known about SEL programs for students ages 3-8. The report series addresses four issues raised…

  18. Illustrating the body: Cross-sectional and prospective investigations of the impact of life drawing sessions on body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren

    2016-01-30

    Life drawing sessions, where individuals produce drawings of the human figure from observations of a live model, may contain embodying elements that promote healthier body image. Two pilot studies were conducted to test this hypothesis. In Study 1, 138 individuals recruited from life drawing sessions in London, UK, estimated how many sessions they had attended in their lifetime and completed measures of negative and positive body image. In women, greater attendance was significantly associated with higher body appreciation and lower drive for thinness and social physique anxiety. In men, greater attendance was significantly associated with higher body appreciation, but not drive for muscularity or social physique anxiety. In Study 2, 37 women took part in a life drawing session for the first time. Compared to pre-session scores, participants had significantly more positive state body image and appearance satisfaction after the session. The findings of these studies suggest that life drawing may promote healthier body image, particularly among women, but further research is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. ROUNDTABLE - SESSION 2 EXPLOITATION, CONSERVATION AND LEGISLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDSMAN L.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The link between socioeconomics and conservation and the role of legislation in conservation work was discussed in the group with participants from nine European countries. Interest and knowledge among the general public, stakeholders and managers is the key to successful conservation of native crayfish species. Exploitation and conservation do not necessarily exclude each other. A controlled fishery, where it can be sustained, may be an essential tool for conservation by increasing the general awareness and involving more people in the task of protecting the native crayfish species. This strategy is mainly possible for the noble crayfish in the northern part of its distribution, where strong traditions connected to crayfish also exist. A balance between utilisation and overexploitation has to be found and local guidelines for sustainable exploitation produced. Media, the Internet and educational material aimed at schools and stakeholders are excellent ways of reaching a wide audience with information. Universal objectives, rules and regulations at the European level are desirable and the noble crayfish and the stone crayfish should be included in Annex II of the Habitat Directive. Based on this framework detailed regulations are best worked out at the national level, considering the specific crayfish situation in the country. Information about the legislation, the purpose of the legislation and the consequences when not obeying it should be distributed. Stricter regulation of the trade with live alien crayfish is vital because of the associated risk of introducing new diseases and species.

  20. The Neuromuscular, Biochemical, and Endocrine Responses to a Single-Session Vs. Double-Session Training Day in Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Michael J; Cook, Christian J; Drake, David; Costley, Lisa; Johnston, Julie P; Kilduff, Liam P

    2016-11-01

    Johnston, MJ, Cook, CJ, Drake, D, Costley, L, Johnston, JP, and Kilduff, LP. The neuromuscular, biochemical, and endocrine responses to a single-session vs. double-session training day in elite athletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3098-3106, 2016-The aim of this study was to compare the acute neuromuscular, biochemical, and endocrine responses of a training day consisting of a speed session only with performing a speed-and-weights training session on the same day. Fifteen men who were academy-level rugby players completed 2 protocols in a randomized order. The speed-only protocol involved performing 6 maximal effort repetitions of 50-m running sprints with 5 minutes of recovery between each sprint, whereas the speed-and-weights protocol involved the same sprinting session but was followed 2 hours later by a lower-body weights session consisting of 4 sets of 5 backsquats and Romanian deadlift at 85% one repetition maximum. Testosterone, cortisol, creatine kinase, lactate, and perceived muscle soreness were determined immediately before, immediately after, 2 hours after, and 24 hours after both the protocols. Peak power, relative peak power, jump height, and average rate of force development were determined from a countermovement jump (CMJ) at the same time points. After 24-hours, muscle soreness was significantly higher after the speed-and-weights protocol compared with the speed-only protocol (effect size η = 0.253, F = 4.750, p ≤ 0.05). There was no significant difference between any of the CMJ variables at any of the posttraining time points. Likewise, creatine kinase, testosterone, and cortisol were unaffected by the addition of a weight-training session. These data indicate that the addition of a weight-training session 2 hours after a speed session, whereas increasing the perception of fatigue the next day does not result in a difference in endocrine response or in neuromuscular capability.

  1. 78 FR 44922 - Notice of an Education Listening Session Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ... for all interested agricultural education stakeholders. DATES: The Education Listening Session will be..., Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education rearrangement. In the late morning, the audience... their perception of needs and potential improvements in the field of agricultural education. Following...

  2. SESSION V: INTEGRATED APPROACHES IN LAND AND WATER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SESSION V: INTEGRATED APPROACHES IN LAND AND WATER MANAGEMENT RESEARCH/LAND AND WATER MANAGEMENT ECONOMICS AND POLICY - Socioeconomic implications of improved forage species on smallholder farms in Kenya.

  3. An improved anti-leech mechanism based on session identifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbiao; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Han; Lin, Li

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of information technology and extensive requirement of network resource sharing, plenty of resource hotlinking phenomenons appear on the internet. The hotlinking problem not only harms the interests of legal websites but also leads to a great affection to fair internet environment. The anti-leech technique based on session identifier is highly secure, but the transmission of session identifier in plaintext form causes some security flaws. In this paper, a proxy hotlinking technique based on session identifier is introduced firstly to illustrate these security flaws; next, this paper proposes an improved anti-leech mechanism based on session identifier, the mechanism takes the random factor as the core and detects hotlinking request using a map table that contains random factor, user's information and time stamp; at last the paper analyzes the security of mechanism in theory. The result reveals that the improved mechanism has the merits of simple realization, high security and great flexibility.

  4. Astronaut Robert L. Crippen prepares for underwater training session

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Astronaut Robert L. Crippen, STS-7 crew commander, adjusts his extravehicular mobility unit's (EMU) gloves prior to donning his helmet for a training session in the weightless environment test facility (WETF).

  5. What's new in multiple sclerosis spasticity research? Poster session highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Ralf

    2017-11-01

    Each year at the Multiple Sclerosis Experts Summit, relevant research in the field of multiple sclerosis spasticity is featured in poster sessions. The main studies presented at this year's meeting are summarized herein.

  6. Astronauts Armstrong and Scott during photo session outside KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (left), command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot, the Gemini 8 prime crew, during a photo session outside the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Mission Control Center. They are standing in front of a radar dish.

  7. Effects of a single-session assertiveness music therapy role playing protocol for psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement and measure the effectiveness of a single-session assertiveness music therapy role playing protocol for psychiatric inpatients. Participants (N=133) were randomly assigned by group to one of three conditions: (a) Assertiveness Music Therapy, (b) No Music Assertiveness, or (c) Music No Assertiveness. Participants in both assertiveness conditions role played a number of different commonly occurring scenarios at an inpatient psychiatric facility and in the community. There were no significant between-group differences in posttest quality of life, locus of control, or other subscales. However, participants in both assertiveness conditions tended to have slightly higher internal locus of control and overall quality of life scores than participants in the music no assertiveness condition. Additionally, the assertiveness music therapy condition had higher attendance rates than the other conditions. A higher percentage of participants from both the assertiveness music therapy and music no assertiveness conditions indicated they thought their session was the most helpful/therapeutic group therapy session in which they had participated; this was not the case for the assertiveness no music condition. Future research is warranted to measure the effects of protocols that can help psychiatric patients generalize skills learned in treatment.

  8. Astronauts Parise and Jernigan check helmets prior to training session

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Attired in training versions of the Shuttle partial-pressure launch and entry suits, payload specialist Dr. Ronald A Parise (left) and astronaut Tamara E. Jernigan, payload commander, check over their helmets prior to a training session. Holding the helmets is suit expert Alan M. Rochford, of NASA. The two were about to join their crew mates in a session of emergency bailout training at JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF).

  9. Helix Nebula Science Cloud pilot phase open session

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    This Helix Nebula Science Cloud (HNSciCloud) public session is open to everyone and will be webcast. The session will provide the audience with an overview of the HNSciCloud pre-commercial procurement project and the innovative cloud platforms that have been developed. A number of practical use-cases from the physics community will be presented as well as the next steps to be undertaken.

  10. Energy futures project : backgrounder for consultation sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, A.

    2006-05-01

    The National Energy Board periodically publishes a long-term energy and demand report as part of an ongoing monitoring program. The next report is planned for release in 2007. This background document provided background information to ensure that consultation participants have a common understanding of key issues to be addressed during the cross-country consultations that have been planned before the release of the final version of the report. An outline of the proposed analytical approach was presented, as well as details of major assumptions and scenario storylines. Scenario themes included: economic, energy and environmental sustainability; a security-focused world shaped by war and civil strife; and strong global economic growth fueled by the rapid growth of the Chinese and Indian economies. A methodology overview was provided as well as a reference case. Issues related to energy supply included oil; natural gas liquids; natural gas; and electricity. Issues related to energy demand included the residential sector; the commercial sector; the industrial sector; and the transportation sector. Historical trends and forecasts were outlined using the macroeconomic variable of interest. Supply, demand, and supporting infrastructure across all energy forms within a North American and global context were considered. The impact of environmental management strategies were reviewed, as well as the role of the government in shaping policies. It was concluded that the purpose of the final report is to serve as a standard of references for parties interested in Canadian energy issues and trends as well as to inform decision makers of key risks and uncertainties facing the energy future.9 tabs., 1 fig

  11. A single alcohol drinking session is sufficient to enable subsequent aversion-resistant consumption in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Kelly; Wegner, Scott A; Yu, Ji-Hwan; Simms, Jeffrey A; Hopf, F Woodward

    2016-09-01

    Addiction is mediated in large part by pathological motivation for rewarding, addictive substances, and alcohol-use disorders (AUDs) continue to extract a very high physical and economic toll on society. Compulsive alcohol drinking, where intake continues despite negative consequences, is considered a particular obstacle during treatment of AUDs. Aversion-resistant drives for alcohol have been modeled in rodents, where animals continue to consume even when alcohol is adulterated with the bitter tastant quinine, or is paired with another aversive consequence. Here, we describe a two-bottle choice paradigm where C57BL/6 mice first had 24-h access to 15% alcohol or water. Afterward, they drank quinine-free alcohol (alcohol-only) or alcohol with quinine (100 μM), in a limited daily access (LDA) two-bottle-choice paradigm (2 h/day, 5 days/week, starting 3 h into the dark cycle), and achieved nearly binge-level blood alcohol concentrations. Interestingly, a single, initial 24-h experience with alcohol-only enhanced subsequent quinine-resistant drinking. In contrast, mice that drank alcohol-quinine in the 24-h session showed significantly reduced alcohol-quinine intake and preference during the subsequent LDA sessions, relative to mice that drank alcohol-only in the initial 24-h session and alcohol-quinine in LDA sessions. Thus, mice could find the concentration of quinine we used aversive, but were able to disregard the quinine after a single alcohol-only drinking session. Finally, mice had low intake and preference for quinine in water, both before and after weeks of alcohol-drinking sessions, suggesting that quinine resistance was not a consequence of increased quinine preference after weeks of drinking of alcohol-quinine. Together, we demonstrate that a single alcohol-only session was sufficient to enable subsequent aversion-resistant consumption in C57BL/6 mice, which did not reflect changes in quinine taste palatability. Given the rapid development of quinine

  12. Digging deeper into platform game level design: session size and sequential features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Noor; Yannakakis, Georgios N.; Togelius, Julian

    2012-01-01

    A recent trend within computational intelligence and games research is to investigate how to affect video game players’ in-game experience by designing and/or modifying aspects of game content. Analysing the relationship between game content, player behaviour and self-reported affective states...... constitutes an important step towards understanding game experience and constructing effective game adaptation mechanisms. This papers reports on further refinement of a method to understand this relationship by analysing data collected from players, building models that predict player experience...... and analysing what features of game and player data predict player affect best. We analyse data from players playing 780 pairs of short game sessions of the platform game Super Mario Bros, investigate the impact of the session size and what part of the level that has the major affect on player experience...

  13. How does disclosing countertransference affect perceptions of the therapist and the session?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yun-Jy; Hayes, Jeffrey A

    2011-12-01

    Therapist self-disclosure has been theorized and found to have both positive and negative effects. These effects depend, in part, on the nature of the disclosure. This study sought to examine the differential effects of therapist disclosures of more and less resolved countertransference issues on perceptions of therapists and therapy sessions. Using an analogue method, undergraduate participants (N = 116) were randomly assigned to watch one of two videos in which a therapist disclosed personal issues that were relatively resolved or relatively unresolved. As hypothesized, therapist disclosure of issues that were more resolved caused the therapist to be rated as more attractive and trustworthy and instilled greater hope than therapist disclosure of less resolved issues. The type of therapist disclosure, however, did not affect ratings of the expertness of the therapist, the depth or smoothness of the session, or the perceived universality between client and therapist. Implications of the results for the judicious use of self-disclosure are discussed.

  14. Tracking Active Learning in the Medical School Curriculum: A Learning-Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Kellar, Charlyn; Morgan, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Background: Medical education is moving toward active learning during large group lecture sessions. This study investigated the saturation and breadth of active learning techniques implemented in first year medical school large group sessions. Methods: Data collection involved retrospective curriculum review and semistructured interviews with 20 faculty. The authors piloted a taxonomy of active learning techniques and mapped learning techniques to attributes of learning-centered instruction. Results: Faculty implemented 25 different active learning techniques over the course of 9 first year courses. Of 646 hours of large group instruction, 476 (74%) involved at least 1 active learning component. Conclusions: The frequency and variety of active learning components integrated throughout the year 1 curriculum reflect faculty familiarity with active learning methods and their support of an active learning culture. This project has sparked reflection on teaching practices and facilitated an evolution from teacher-centered to learning-centered instruction. PMID:29707649

  15. Tracking Active Learning in the Medical School Curriculum: A Learning-Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Kellar, Charlyn; Morgan, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Medical education is moving toward active learning during large group lecture sessions. This study investigated the saturation and breadth of active learning techniques implemented in first year medical school large group sessions. Data collection involved retrospective curriculum review and semistructured interviews with 20 faculty. The authors piloted a taxonomy of active learning techniques and mapped learning techniques to attributes of learning-centered instruction. Faculty implemented 25 different active learning techniques over the course of 9 first year courses. Of 646 hours of large group instruction, 476 (74%) involved at least 1 active learning component. The frequency and variety of active learning components integrated throughout the year 1 curriculum reflect faculty familiarity with active learning methods and their support of an active learning culture. This project has sparked reflection on teaching practices and facilitated an evolution from teacher-centered to learning-centered instruction.

  16. NEDO Forum 2000. Industrial technology development session; Sangyo gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    This session presented the following subjects: I. IT innovation, II. Bio-seminar, III. Nano-technology, IV. Machine technology seminar, and V. 'Development subsidy project to put industrial technologies into practical use'. The theme in I relates to (1) influence of IT innovation on the society, (2) the theory of semiconductor evolution, (3) the theory of liquid crystal evolution, and (4) the theory of disk evolution. The theme II searches (1) how far have bio-technologies come?, (2) search of human evolution from genes, (3) can human being live up to 150 years by bio-technologies?, and (4) what is a DNA array (chip)?. The theme III covers (1) product innovation in polymers (new polymeric materials brought about by polymer nano-technology, taking polyolefin as an example), and (2) creation of ceramics materials by using nano-technologies. The theme IV relates to (1) ITS changes the car society into this way, (2) the current status and outlook on research and development of micro-machine technologies, and (3) the futuristic society and new industries opened by the Humanoid project. The theme V describes (1) practical application of ultra-small medical device production technologies, (2) development of next generation semiconductor manufacturing resists, (3) development for practical application of an optical brain function imaging device, and (4) development for practical application of new screening technologies toward creation of medicines using genome. (NEDO)

  17. Microvascular Anastomosis: Proposition of a Learning Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Pooneh; Tayebi Meybodi, Ali; Benet, Arnau; Lawton, Michael T

    2018-04-14

    Learning to perform a microvascular anastomosis is one of the most difficult tasks in cerebrovascular surgery. Previous studies offer little regarding the optimal protocols to maximize learning efficiency. This failure stems mainly from lack of knowledge about the learning curve of this task. To delineate this learning curve and provide information about its various features including acquisition, improvement, consistency, stability, and recall. Five neurosurgeons with an average surgical experience history of 5 yr and without any experience in bypass surgery performed microscopic anastomosis on progressively smaller-caliber silastic tubes (Biomet, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida) during 24 consecutive sessions. After a 1-, 2-, and 8-wk retention interval, they performed recall test on 0.7-mm silastic tubes. The anastomoses were rated based on anastomosis patency and presence of any leaks. Improvement rate was faster during initial sessions compared to the final practice sessions. Performance decline was observed in the first session of working on a smaller-caliber tube. However, this rapidly improved during the following sessions of practice. Temporary plateaus were seen in certain segments of the curve. The retention interval between the acquisition and recall phase did not cause a regression to the prepractice performance level. Learning the fine motor task of microvascular anastomosis adapts to the basic rules of learning such as the "power law of practice." Our results also support the improvement of performance during consecutive sessions of practice. The objective evidence provided may help in developing optimized learning protocols for microvascular anastomosis.

  18. [Flipped classroom as a strategy to enhance active learning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2015-03-01

    This paper reviews the introduction of a flipped class for fourth grade dentistry students, and analyzes the characteristics of the learning method. In fiscal 2013 and 2014, a series of ten three-hour units for removable partial prosthodontics were completed with the flipped class method; a lecture video of approximately 60 minutes was made by the teacher (author) and uploaded to the university's e-learning website one week before each class. Students were instructed to prepare for the class by watching the streaming video on their PC, tablet, or smartphone. In the flipped class, students were not given a lecture, but were asked to solve short questions displayed on screen, to make a short presentation about a part of the video lecture, and to discuss a critical question related to the main subject of the day. An additional team-based learning (TBL) session with individual and group answers was implemented. The average individual scores were considerably higher in the last two years, when the flipped method was implemented, than in the three previous years when conventional lectures were used. The following learning concepts were discussed: the role of the flipped method as an active learning strategy, the efficacy of lecture videos and short questions, students' participation in the class discussion, present-day value of the method, cooperation with TBL, the significance of active learning in relation with the students' learning ability, and the potential increase in the preparation time and workload for students.

  19. Topical session proceedings of the 6. IGSC Meeting. The role of monitoring in a safety case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This report summarises the outcomes of a topical session focused on the role of monitoring in a safety case. It was held as part of the 6. plenary meeting of the IGSC. It was attended by 39 participants, representing waste management organisations and regulatory authorities from 15 NEA member countries, the IAEA and the European Commission. The main purpose of this topical session was to create a platform for exchanging views on the key monitoring issues of interest to build confidence in a safety case e.g. relationship with the post-closure phase, functions, requirements, and to determine to what extent the main actions are to be addressed by the IGSC on its ongoing activities on defining the elements of a safety case. The topical session was indeed mainly aimed at exchanging information on: - National strategies or programmes in NEA members' countries. Member countries have organisations planning their own strategy, but some are already, to some extend engaged in implementing monitoring activities, e.g. Posiva Oy, US-DOE-YM, Andra. - Feedback from international projects, e.g. the EC Thematic Network on 'The role of Monitoring in a Phased Approach to Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste', and the IAEA programme of work. - The expectations of regulators, e.g. SKI. Part A of this document summarises the material orally presented and provides the main lessons drawn from the presentations and the discussions that followed them. The overheads presented are compiled without any further elaboration by the NEA Secretariat as Part B of the document. Part C gives the list of participants. The document as a whole provides a synthesis of current issues in monitoring of a deep geological disposal facility

  20. CERN Technical Training 2006: Software and System Technologies Curriculum - Scheduled Course Sessions (October-December 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    he Software and System Technologies Curriculum of the CERN Technical Training Programme offers comprehensive training in C++, Java, Perl, Python, XML, OO programming, JCOP/PVSS, database design and Oracle. In the PERL, C++, OO and Java course series there are some places available on the following course sessions, scheduled until the end of this year: Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML: 17-19 October 2006 (3 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications: 19-20 October 2006 (2 days) JAVA - Level 1: 30 Oct. -1 Nov. 2006 (3 days) PERL 5 - Advanced Aspects: 2 November 2006 (1 day) C++ Programming Part 1 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Design and Programming: 14-16 November 2006 (3 days) JAVA - Level 2: 4-7 December 2006 (4 days) C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls: 12-15 December 2006 (4 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans : 18.20 December 2006 (3 days) All the above sessions will be given in English, at the CERN Training Centre....

  1. Lifelong learning on the market shelf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, Camilla

    2009-01-01

    LEARNING CAPITALISM: Learning has been commodified in many parts of the world, and the growing learning market challenges public education in many ways, says Professor SoongHee Han.......LEARNING CAPITALISM: Learning has been commodified in many parts of the world, and the growing learning market challenges public education in many ways, says Professor SoongHee Han....

  2. Categorized napping, a sensometric tool for food and beverage industry. An application to a hall test session

    OpenAIRE

    Kostov, Belchin Adriyanov

    2010-01-01

    Sensory analysis is the standard analysis of foods made with the senses. Under the name of sensometrics regroup statistical methods address to this type of data. An important application area of sensory analysis is the wine industry. The companies are beginning to see the potential of sensory analysis and they are organizing more hall test sessions every passing day to learn about their products and use these results to improve their production and marketing. However, yet these m thods ...

  3. Summary of Session 1 'Lessons from 2011'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamont, M; Bracco, C [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    288 bunches could be injected, during MD time, for both beams with a good margin between the losses and the BLM dump thresholds. Improvements are still needed to optimize the 25 ns beam in the injector chain and accumulate it in the LHC with a good lifetime; the results are encouraging in view of operation with the designed intensity. Machine Protection, M. Zerlauth (TE-MPE): M. Zerlauth introduced the architecture of the LHC Machine Protection System (MPS). He explained that this is a complex system that checks more than 10000 interlock conditions and has to evolve to follow operational changes, special runs and MD requirements. Vacuum Performance and Lessons for 2012, V. Baglin (TE-VSC): V. Baglin presented a talk on the main vacuum observations made in 2011: dynamic effects induced by the circulating beam (synchrotron radiation and e-clouds) and unexpected local pressure spikes. He explained that the desorption yield in the cold-warm transitions was much worse (factor 50) than in the warm-warm transition due to gas load from the cold part. Emittance Preservation, V. Kain (BE-OP): V. Kain spoke about emittance preservation all along the injectors chain up to collisions in the LHC. She explained that injectors behaved extremely well in 2011 and, for the 50 ns beams and a bunch population higher than nominal, an emittance blowup of 0.4 μm was measured from the PS to the SPS (from design report: 0.5 μm were estimated for 25 ns beams). On the other hand a 20-30% emittance growth is observed between the SPS flattop and LHC collisions. Several methods are used for emittance measurements (wire scanner, BSRT and luminosity) and all methods present some limitations. Moreover measurements in the SPS and in the LHC are not synchronized and refer to different beams.

  4. To Be or Not to Be "Part of Them": Micropolitical Challenges in Mainland Chinese Students' Learning of English in a Multilingual University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuesong

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a longitudinal inquiry into mainland Chinese students' language learning experiences with a focus on their efforts to improve their English competence in a leading English medium University in Hong Kong. The inquiry problematizes an uncritical assumption of a shared pursuit of linguistic competence among different students…

  5. Effect of Instruction Using Students' Prior Knowledge and Conceptual Change Strategies on Science Learning. Part I: Development, Application and Evaluation of Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Mariana G.

    Reported is the development, use, and evaluation of an instructional technique based upon: (1) the assessment of students' prior knowledge; and (2) a theoretical perspective advocated by Ausubel and others which emphasizes the importance of existing knowledge in influencing subsequent concept learning. The experimental group of 46 South African…

  6. Gardening as a Learning Environment: A Study of Children's Perceptions and Understanding of School Gardens as Part of an International Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Rob; Tearle, Penni

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the impact of the early stages of an international project, Gardens for Life (GfL), on children's perceptions of school gardening and on their learning. The project involved 67 schools in England, Kenya and India and focused on the growing of crops, recognising the importance of both the process and product of this activity…

  7. Highlights of the 2nd session of the General Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-01-15

    ' recommendation that the total appropriation for the administrative expenses of the Agency in 1959 shall amount to $5,225,000, and by 58 votes, none against and one abstention that the target for voluntary contributions to the General Fund be set at $1,500,000. A number of separate votes on individual budget items had all resulted in majorities for the original Board of Governors' recommendations. A Special Committee on, the pledging of voluntary contributions to the General Fund from which the operational part of the Agency's programme was to be financed met on 3 October. As Mr. Sterling Cole, Director General, explained unlike the specialized agencies of the UN, the Agency's technical assistance activities, including all fellowships and technical assistance projects and equipment provided at the Agency's expense as well as its functional laboratory will have to be financed at present through voluntary contributions. By the end of the second session of the General Conference, the President was able to announce a total of approximately $ 848,000 pledged by 21 Member States, a number of delegates having indicated their countries' willingness to make contributions, the amount of which would be made known at a later date. All main decisions taken during the second session of the General Conference are listed.

  8. Introduction and Overview of the Industrial Interactive Panel Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, David

    2014-03-01

    A unique industrial panel covering the challenges and needs of various industries and how being innovative is important. The session involves two invited industry speakers (24 minutes each) who will set the stage for the interactive round table panel session. The Panel, led by moderator Mark Bernius (Morgan Advanced Materials), consists of the two invited speakers plus an additional five industry panelists. The first thirty minutes of the panel session has the five additional panelists introducing themselves and their work/company. These introductions could include what they or their company does, sharing one or two technical highlights, listing some challenges or needs for physicists, and what innovation breakthroughs are needed in their industries. The final hour of the session will be highly interactive with questions to the panel coming from the moderator, the audience, and the panelists themselves. Questions that might be addressed include: how physicists are or could be critical in advancing innovation; how can AIP/APS/FIAP help industry get the physics help they need to be innovative (knowledge, the right staff, etc.); what role can students and post docs play in advancing industry's mission; etc. We invite you to participate in this interactive session and ask our industry experts your own interesting and challenging questions. The invited speakers are George Thompson, Intel, and Rick Watkins, Nike. The panel members also include Jason Cleveland, Asylum Research; Robert Doering, Texas Instruments; William Gallagher, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center; James Hollenhorst, Agilent Technologies; and Martin Poitzsch, Schlumberger-Doll Research.

  9. Dogs’ Body Language Relevant to Learning Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masashi; Ohtani, Nobuyo; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary For humans and dogs to live together amiably, dog training is required, and a lack of obedience training is significantly related to the prevalence of certain behavioral problems. To train efficiently, it is important that the trainer/owner ascertains the learning level of the dog. Understanding the dog’s body language helps humans understand the animal’s emotions. This study evaluated the posture of certain dog body parts during operant conditioning. Our findings suggest that certain postures were related to the dog’s learning level during operant conditioning. Being aware of these postures could be helpful to understand canine emotion during learning. Abstract The facial expressions and body postures of dogs can give helpful information about their moods and emotional states. People can more effectively obedience train their dogs if we can identify the mannerisms associated with learning in dogs. The aim of this study was to clarify the dog’s body language during operant conditioning to predict achievement in the test that followed by measuring the duration of behaviors. Forty-six untrained dogs (17 males and 26 females) of various breeds were used. Each session consisted of 5 minutes of training with a treat reward followed by 3 minutes of rest and finally an operant conditioning test that consisted of 20 “hand motion” cues. The operant tests were conducted a total of nine times over three consecutive days, and the success numbers were counted. The duration of the dog’s behavior, focusing on the dog’s eyes, mouth, ears, tail and tail-wagging, was recorded during the operant conditioning sessions before the test. Particular behaviors, including wide-eyes, closed mouth, erect ears, and forward and high tail carriage, without wagging or with short and quick wagging, related to high achievement results. It is concluded that dogs' body language during operant conditioning was related to their success rate. PMID:26479883

  10. 75 FR 34418 - Notice of the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Notice of the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA. ACTION: Notice of stakeholder listening session. SUMMARY: The notice announces the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session. The document contained the wrong date for the...

  11. Learning assessment for students with mental and behavioral disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dræby, Anders

    The session aims at presenting a learning-based model for how to conduct a comprehensive psychological evaluation of the learning resources and challenges amongst students with mental and behavioral disorders. In the learning assessment model the learning resources and challenges of the students...

  12. International Conference-Session of the Section of Nuclear Physics of the Physical Sciences Division of RAS

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    From November 17 to 21, 2014 the Section of Nuclear Physics of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI will hold in MEPhI, Moscow, the International Conference-Session of SNP PSD RAS "Physics of Fundamental Interactions". The program of the session covers basic theoretical and experimental aspects of particle physics and related problems of nuclear physics and cosmology, and will consist of 30-minute highlight and review talks as well as 10-15-minute contributed reports. All highlight talks and part of contributed reports will be presented at plenary sessions of the conference. The remaining reports will be presented at the sections which will be formed after receiving of abstracts. On the recommendation of the Organizing Committee reports and talks containing new unpublished results will be published in special issues of journals "Nuclear Physics" and "Nuclear Physics and Engineering". For the institutions belonging to the Rosatom s...

  13. Towards deductive verification of MPI programs against session types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo R. B. Marques

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Message Passing Interface (MPI is the de facto standard message-passing infrastructure for developing parallel applications. Two decades after the first version of the library specification, MPI-based applications are nowadays routinely deployed on super and cluster computers. These applications, written in C or Fortran, exhibit intricate message passing behaviours, making it hard to statically verify important properties such as the absence of deadlocks. Our work builds on session types, a theory for describing protocols that provides for correct-by-construction guarantees in this regard. We annotate MPI primitives and C code with session type contracts, written in the language of a software verifier for C. Annotated code is then checked for correctness with the software verifier. We present preliminary results and discuss the challenges that lie ahead for verifying realistic MPI program compliance against session types.

  14. Topical Session on the Decommissioning and Dismantling Safety Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Set up by the Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC), the WPDD brings together senior representatives of national organisations who have a broad overview of Decommissioning and Dismantling (D and D) issues through their work as regulators, implementers, R and D experts or policy makers. These include representatives from regulatory authorities, industrial decommissioners from the NEA Cooperative Programme on Exchange of Scientific and Technical Information on Nuclear Installation Decommissioning Projects (CPD), and cross-representation from the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities, the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health, and the RWMC. The EC is a member of the WPDD and the IAEA also participates. This ensures co-ordination amongst activities in these international programmes. Participation from civil society organisations is considered on a case by case basis, and has already taken place through the active involvement of the Group of Municipalities with Nuclear Installations at the first meeting of the WPDD At its second meeting, in Paris, 5-7 December 2001, the WPDD held two topical sessions on the D and D Safety Case and on the Management of Materials from D and D, respectively. This report documents the topical session on the safety case. The topical session was meant to provide an exchange of information and experience on the following issues: What topics should be included in a safety case? Of what should it consist? Is there sufficient and complete guidance nationally and internationally? How do practices differ internationally? Main boundary condition to this session was that it would deal with plants where spent fuel has been removed. Also the topical sessions was kept at a level that makes the most of the varied constituency of the WPDD. Namely, interface issues are important, and issue-identification and discussion was the immediate goal. There was less interest in examining areas where variability amongst national

  15. Report of the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2012, Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions were held for the first time in Los Angeles in 2012, with the most up-to-date basic and clinical science in the field presented and heard by physicians, research scientists, students, and paramedical personnel from 100 countries. Japan accounted for the second highest number of submitted abstracts and the Japanese Circulation Society actively contributed to the success of the AHA Scientific Sessions this year. The Late-Breaking Clinical Trial sessions comprised 27 clinical studies presented in the main hall. The FREEDOM study revealed the superiority of using a coronary artery bypass graft for diabetic multivessel coronary artery diseases over percutaneous coronary intervention using a drug-eluting stent. A new peptide hormone, serelaxin, improved dyspnea in heart failure patients and significantly reduced mortality rates according to the RELAX-AHF study. In the basic sciences, primary necrosis in mitochondria was the hot topic, while genetics, including genome-wide association studies, and epigenetics were strong features of the basic and clinical cardiovascular (CV) science. It was also clear that regenerative medicine is now part of mainstream CV research, with several clinical trials underway and many basic research projects ongoing around the world. Induced pluripotent stem cells in particular have the potential to change CV medicine, and will underpin the next era of regenerative medicine and personal therapies for heart diseases.

  16. CHILDREN’S GIFTEDNESS AND ASSOCIATED PROBLEMS. THE TWICE EXCEPTIONALITY PHENOMENON. GIFTEDNESS AND LEARNING PROBLEMS. GIFTEDNESS AND ATTENTION DEFICIT/ HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER (А REVIEW OF LITERATURE. PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Pylaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with current views, giftedness are considered as the systemic psychic property developing throughout a lifetime, which determines the human possibility of achieving higher (unusual, outstanding results in one or several kinds of activities as compared to other people. People who are endowed with extraordinary abilities may be infrequently called absolutely somatically and mentally healthy. There are data that giftedness in childhood are frequently concurrent with both somatic diseases and different neurological disorders. Many gifted children are diagnosed as having left-handedness, speech disorders, and autoimmune diseases. There are scientific works on the association of giftedness with neurological and psychiatric disorders, including attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, learning problems (dyslexia in particular, autism (including Asperger’s syndrome, bipolar disorder, and migraine. According to the available data, approximately 3–5 % of children fall into a category of intellectually gifted ones; some children (2–5 to 20 % or more of all gifted children according to different findings may have learning problems. The terms “twice-gifted” or “twice-exceptional” are proposed to characterize children with giftedness concurrent with learning problems, attention deficit (including ADHD, or other impairments of cognitive functions and behavior (including oppositional disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. These children need the more attention of teachers and other correction approaches and adaptation methods to be elaborated as compared to the procedures used for gifted children, on the one hand, and for those with learning problems, behavioral and attention disorders, on the other hand. There is a need for the development and further strengthening of strong suits (gift and correction, adaptation of deficits in children with “twice exceptionality”. The review presents the history of studying the

  17. Clarifying perspectives: Ethics case reflection sessions in childhood cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdson, Cecilia; Lützén, Kim; Blomgren, Klas; Pergert, Pernilla

    2016-06-01

    Childhood cancer care involves many ethical concerns. Deciding on treatment levels and providing care that infringes on the child's growing autonomy are known ethical concerns that involve the whole professional team around the child's care. The purpose of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' experiences of participating in ethics case reflection sessions in childhood cancer care. Data collection by observations, individual interviews, and individual encounters. Data analysis were conducted following grounded theory methodology. Healthcare professionals working at a publicly funded children's hospital in Sweden participated in ethics case reflection sessions in which ethical issues concerning clinical cases were reflected on. The children's and their parents' integrity was preserved through measures taken to protect patient identity during ethics case reflection sessions. The study was approved by a regional ethical review board. Consolidating care by clarifying perspectives emerged. Consolidating care entails striving for common care goals and creating a shared view of care and the ethical concern in the specific case. The inter-professional perspectives on the ethical aspects of care are clarified by the participants' articulated views on the case. Different approaches for deliberating ethics are used during the sessions including raising values and making sense, leading to unifying interactions. The findings indicate that ethical concerns could be eased by implementing ethics case reflection sessions. Conflicting perspectives can be turned into unifying interactions in the healthcare professional team with the common aim to achieve good pediatric care. Ethics case reflection sessions is valuable as it permits the discussion of values in healthcare-related issues in childhood cancer care. Clarifying perspectives, on the ethical concerns, enables healthcare professionals to reflect on the most reasonable and ethically defensible care for the child

  18. IFESS 2005 Special Session 5 Artifical Vision. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, James D.

    2005-07-05

    A special session on visual prostheses was held during the Annual Meeting of the International Functional Electrical Stimulation Society (IFESS), in Montreal, Canada, July 5-9, 2005. IFESS is a meeting that typically attracts researchers in implantable nerve stimulators, functional electrical stimulation, and rehabilitation. All of these areas have significant overlap with the retinal prosthesis, but these areas have decades of research behind them. The special session provided a forum for researchers with vast experience in nerve stimulation to interact with leading research in retinal and cortical visual prostheses. The grant paid for the travel and conference costs of the presenters in the session. The session was chaired by James Weiland (the PI on this grant). The session co-chair was Phil Troyk, Ph.D., from the Illinois Institute of Technology. The Department of Energy was acknowledged at the start of the session as the sponsor. The following talks were delivered: Clinical Trial of a Prototype Retinal Prosthesis James Weiland, Ph.D. Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California The U.S. Department of Energy's Artificial Sight Program Elias Greenbaum, Ph.D. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee A 16-Channel stimulator ASIC for use in an intracortical visual prosthesis Phillip R. Troyk, Ph.D. Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois Two approaches to the Optic Nerve Visual Prosthesis Jean Delbeke, M.D. University Cath de Louvain, Louvain, Belgium Design and Implementation of High Power Efficiency Modules for a Cortical Visual Stimulator Mohammad Sawan, Ph.D. Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Canada Remaining funds from the grant were used to support Dr. Weiland's travel to the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology in May 2006, with DOE approval, where several projects, supported by the DOE artificial retina program, were presented.

  19. Learning through debate during problem-based learning: an active learning strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, Sadaf; Latif, Rabia

    2017-09-01

    We explored medical student's views and perceptions of a series of debates conducted during problem-based learning (PBL) practiced as a part of the Spiral curriculum at the Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Saudi Arabia. A series of debates were employed during PBL sessions for second-year female medical students, over the period 2014-2016. Each cohort of students was randomly split into 10 small PBL groups and exposed to weekly PBL activity. Within each group, the students were divided into a proposition half and an opposition half. Students were given 1 wk for debate preparation. The students' responses were recorded on a formulated questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze quantitative data, and results are presented as percentages. The usefulness of debate in alleviating potential difficulties in communicating with patients was agreed to by 69% ( n = 126) of participants. That these sessions evoked critical thinking among students was reported by 78% ( n = 142). This series of debates helped 61% ( n = 111) of students to learn effectively about controversial issues. Seventy-one percent ( n = 130) considered that debate promoted argument generation and interpretation skills. Enhanced ability to analyze and research evidence was reported by 59% ( n = 108) of students. One hundred and thirteen students (62%) agreed that debate helped them to improve clinical decision-making, and 75% of students agreed that debates encouraged tolerance toward diverse viewpoints/convincing strategies. The majority of our medical students found debating enhanced analytic decision-making, communication, and critical thinking skills. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. ITER session at the IAEA fusion energy conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    A highlight of this year's Fusion Energy Conference, held in Lyon, France, on 14-19 October, was the participation by the ITER Parties in both a Special ITER Informal Session and in the Fusion Institute Exhibition at the Paella's des Congres de Lyon. These gave conference participants an opportunity to hear the latest on this collaborative international fusion energy research and development project, and to speak with the experts from each of the four sites being offered for the construction of ITER. The Special ITER Informal Session was held on the evening of 16 October and it was very well attended, with approximately 350 conference participants attending