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Sample records for learning pbl curriculum

  1. Problem based learning (PBL) vs. Case based curriculum in clinical clerkship, Internal Medicine innovated Curriculum, Student prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljarallah, Badr; Hassan, Mohammad Saleh

    2015-04-01

    The vast majority of PBL experience is in basic science courses. Application of classic Problem based learning in clerkship phase is challenging. Although the clinical case is considered a problem, yet solving this problem following the burrow's law has faced hurdles. The difficulties are facing the learner, the teacher and curricula. We implement innovative curriculum for the clerkship year in internal medicine course. We surveyed the student just before coming to an internal medicine course to ask them about continuing PBL or other types of learning in clinical years. A committee was created to study the possible ways to integrate PBL in the course. After multiple brainstorming meeting, an innovated curriculum was implemented. Student surveyed again after they completed their course. The survey is asking them about what is the effect of the implemented curriculum in their skills, attitude, and knowledge. 70% of Students, who finished their basic science in PBL, preferred not to have classical PBL, but more a clinical oriented case based curriculum in the clinical years. After this innovated curriculum, 50-60 % of students who completed it showed a positive response in all aspects of effects including skill, attitude, and knowledge. The Innovated curriculum includes daily morning report, 3 bedside teaching, investigation session, and clinical reasoning weekly, and Lectures up to twice a week. We suggest implementing a curriculum with PBL and case-based criteria in clinical phase are feasible, we are providing a framework with this innovated curriculum.

  2. Integrating Creativity Training into Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) Curriculum in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang

    2012-01-01

    In order to foster creative engineers, a creativity training programme was carried out in medialogy education in a Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) environment at Aalborg University, Denmark. This paper focuses on the question of how engineering students perceive the strategy of integrating...... creativity training into a PBL curriculum. A total of 20 medialogy students in the training programme were interviewed. The data shows that the training programme was thought useful and students get benefits such as gaining project work skills, creative concepts and confidence of being creative. However...

  3. What Makes the Learning of Physiology in a PBL Medical Curriculum Challenging? Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufts, Mark A.; Higgins-Opitz, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    Physiology is an integral component of any medical curriculum. Traditionally, the learning of physiology has relied heavily on systems-based didactic lectures. In 2001, the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine (NRMSM; Durban, South Africa) embarked on a problem-based curriculum in which the learning of physiology was integrated with relevant…

  4. Developing a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum for professionalism and scientific integrity training for biomedical graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nancy L; Peiffer, Ann M; Lambros, Ann; Guthold, Martin; Johnson, A Daniel; Tytell, Michael; Ronca, April E; Eldridge, J Charles

    2010-10-01

    A multidisciplinary faculty committee designed a curriculum to shape biomedical graduate students into researchers with a high commitment to professionalism and social responsibility and to provide students with tools to navigate complex, rapidly evolving academic and societal environments with a strong ethical commitment. The curriculum used problem-based learning (PBL), because it is active and learner-centred and focuses on skill and process development. Two courses were developed: Scientific Professionalism: Scientific Integrity addressed discipline-specific and broad professional norms and obligations for the ethical practice of science and responsible conduct of research (RCR). Scientific Professionalism: Bioethics and Social Responsibility focused on current ethical and bioethical issues within the scientific profession, and implications of research for society. Each small-group session examined case scenarios that included: (1) learning objectives for professional norms and obligations; (2) key ethical issues and philosophies within each topic area; (3) one or more of the RCR instructional areas; and (4) at least one type of moral reflection. Cases emphasised professional standards, obligations and underlying philosophies for the ethical practice of science, competing interests of stakeholders and oversight of science (internal and external). To our knowledge, this is the first use of a longitudinal, multi-semester PBL course to teach scientific integrity and professionalism. Both faculty and students endorsed the active learning approach for these topics, in contrast to a compliance-based approach that emphasises learning rules and regulations.

  5. Learning Effectiveness and Satisfaction of International Medical Students: Introducing a Hybrid-PBL Curriculum in Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiu; Ma, Li; Zhu, Lina; Zhang, Wenli

    2017-01-01

    A biochemistry course is a fundamental but important subject in medical education in China. In recent years, the number of international medical students has increased. Curriculum reform in biochemistry teaching is needed because of the knowledge limitations of students, a close linkage of biochemical content with clinics, the shortcomings of…

  6. Student Integration and Evaluation in Mechatronic Curriculum With PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben O.; Conrad, Finn

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the PBL model used at Aalborg University in the mechanical engineering is shortly presented with emphasis on the mechatronic curriculum. A specific semester with a both theoretical and practical mechatronic content is presented in detail as a reference project for a subsequent discu...... discussion on three potential concerns with respect to the continued succes of problem and project based learning in mechatronics namely: individual assessment, Bologna model and research based teaching...

  7. Learning Radiology in an Integrated Problem-Based Learning (PBL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Faculty of Medicine (FoM) has been training health professions in Uganda since 1924. Five years ago, it decided to change the undergraduate curriculum from traditional to Problem Based Learning (PBL) and adopted the SPICES model. Radiology was integrated into the different courses throughout the 5 ...

  8. Problem-based Learning (PBL in Sociolinguistics as a Way of Encouraging Active Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engku Ibrahim Engku Haliza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The major concern of this paper is to advocate the integration of PBL strategies in classroom instruction as a way of promoting active learning. It is undoubted that the benefits of problem-based learning (PBL are numerous. In the sciences, PBL has been well integrated in the curriculum. This research reports of an experience of integrating problem-based learning in an introductory Sociolinguistics course for 60 undergraduates of a Bachelors of English programme through a semester that ran for 14 weeks. A focused group interview and questionnaire were used to find out the perceptions of the students undergoing the hybrid PBL course. The findings of this study reveal that students generally enjoyed the PBL approach and found that they had little choice but to become active learners. Some challenges faced by the learners were also highlighted. These findings have implications for the integration of PBL in the field of social sciences.

  9. Teaching process competencies in a PBL curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Lise Busk; Hansen, Søren; Kolmos, Anette

    2004-01-01

    The article describes the background in teaching students process competencies in a project-organized and problem-based (PBL) educational system at Aalborg University, and presents an analysis of a course development....

  10. The Integration of Psychomotor Skills in a Hybrid-PBL Dental Curriculum: The Clinical Clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Joanne N.; MacNeil, M. A. J.; Harrison, Rosamund L.; Clark, D. Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Describes the restructuring of clinical clerkships at the University of British Columbia (Canada) dental school as part of a new, hybrid, problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum, focusing on strategies for integrating development of psychomotor skills. Methods of achieving both horizontal and vertical integration of competencies through grouping…

  11. Creating Problem-Based Leadership Learning across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sara E.; Couto, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores problem-based learning (PBL) as effective pedagogy to enhance leadership learning. Through institutional examples, research, and personal experiences, the authors provide a rationale for faculty and staff to utilize PBL across the curriculum.

  12. Evaluating potentialities and constrains of Problem Based Learning curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a research design to evaluate Problem Based Learning (PBL) curriculum potentialities and constrains for future changes. PBL literature lacks examples of how to evaluate and analyse established PBL learning environments to address new challenges posed. The research design......) in the curriculum and a mean to choose cases for further case study (third phase)....

  13. A comparison of course-related stressors in undergraduate problem-based learning (PBL versus non-PBL medical programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Elizabeth E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical students report high levels of stress related to their medical training as well as to other personal and financial factors. The aim of this study is to investigate whether there are differences in course-related stressors reported by medical students on undergraduate problem-based learning (PBL and non-PBL programmes in the UK. Method A cross-sectional study of second-year medical students in two UK medical schools (one PBL and one non-PBL programme was conducted. A 16-question self-report questionnaire, derived from the Perceived Medical Student Stress Scale and the Higher Education Stress Inventory, was used to measure course-related stressors. Following univariate analysis of each stressor between groups, multivariate logistic regression was used to determine which stressors were the best predictors of each course type, while controlling for socio-demographic differences between the groups. Results A total of 280 students responded. Compared to the non-PBL students (N = 197, the PBL students (N = 83 were significantly more likely to agree that: they did not know what the faculty expected of them (Odds Ratio (OR = 0.38, p = 0.03; there were too many small group sessions facilitated only by students resulting in an unclear curriculum (OR = 0.04, p Conclusion There are significant differences in the perceived course-related stressors affecting medical students on PBL and non-PBL programmes. Course designers and student support services should therefore tailor their work to minimise, or help students cope with, the specific stressors on each course type to ensure optimum learning and wellbeing among our future doctors.

  14. A comparison of course-related stressors in undergraduate problem-based learning (PBL) versus non-PBL medical programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Alexander D; Menezes, Darryl A Braganza; McDermott, Helen E; Hibbert, Louise J; Brennan, Sarah-Louise; Ross, Elizabeth E; Jones, Lisa A

    2009-09-13

    Medical students report high levels of stress related to their medical training as well as to other personal and financial factors. The aim of this study is to investigate whether there are differences in course-related stressors reported by medical students on undergraduate problem-based learning (PBL) and non-PBL programmes in the UK. A cross-sectional study of second-year medical students in two UK medical schools (one PBL and one non-PBL programme) was conducted. A 16-question self-report questionnaire, derived from the Perceived Medical Student Stress Scale and the Higher Education Stress Inventory, was used to measure course-related stressors. Following univariate analysis of each stressor between groups, multivariate logistic regression was used to determine which stressors were the best predictors of each course type, while controlling for socio-demographic differences between the groups. A total of 280 students responded. Compared to the non-PBL students (N = 197), the PBL students (N = 83) were significantly more likely to agree that: they did not know what the faculty expected of them (Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.38, p = 0.03); there were too many small group sessions facilitated only by students resulting in an unclear curriculum (OR = 0.04, p academic subjects of interest (OR = 0.40, p = 0.02). They were significantly more likely to disagree that: there was a lack of encouragement from teachers (OR = 3.11, p = 0.02); and that the medical course fostered a sense of anonymity and feelings of isolation amongst students (OR = 3.42, p = 0.008). There are significant differences in the perceived course-related stressors affecting medical students on PBL and non-PBL programmes. Course designers and student support services should therefore tailor their work to minimise, or help students cope with, the specific stressors on each course type to ensure optimum learning and wellbeing among our future doctors.

  15. Globalization of problem-based learning (PBL): cross-cultural implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwee, Matthew Choon-Eng

    2008-03-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is essentially a learning system design that incorporates several educational strategies to optimize student-centered learning outcomes beyond just knowledge acquisition. PBL was implemented almost four decades ago as an innovative and alternative pathway to learning in medical education in McMaster University Medical School. Since then, PBL has spread widely across the world and has now been adopted globally, including in much of Asia. The globalization of PBL has important cross-cultural implications. Delivery of instruction in PBL involves active peer teaching-learning in an open communication style. Consequently, this may pose an apparent serious conflict with the Asian communication style generally dominated by a cultural reticence. However, evidence available, especially from the PBL experience of some senior Korean medical students doing an elective in the University of Toronto Medical School and the cross-cultural PBL experience initiated by Kaohsiung Medical University, strongly suggests creating a conducive and supportive learning environment for students learning in a PBL setting can overcome the perceived cultural barriers; that is, nurture matters more than culture in the learning environment. Karaoke is very much an Asian initiative. The Karaoke culture and philosophy provide a useful lesson on how to create a conducive and supportive environment to encourage, enhance and motivate group activity. Some key attributes associated with Asian culture are in fact consistent with, and aligned to, some of the basic tenets of PBL, including the congruence between the Asian emphasis on group before individual interest, and the collaborative small group learning design used in PBL. Although there are great expectations of the educational outcomes students can acquire from PBL, the available evidence supports the contention the actual educational outcomes acquired from PBL do not really match the expected educational outcomes commonly

  16. Globalization of Problem-based Learning (PBL: Cross-cultural Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Choon-Eng Gwee

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Problem-based learning (PBL is essentially a learning system design that incorporates several educational strategies to optimize student-centered learning outcomes beyond just knowledge acquisition. PBL was implemented almost four decades ago as an innovative and alternative pathway to learning in medical education in McMaster University Medical School. Since then, PBL has spread widely across the world and has now been adopted globally, including in much of Asia. The globalization of PBL has important cross-cultural implications. Delivery of instruction in PBL involves active peer teaching-learning in an open communication style. Consequently, this may pose an apparent serious conflict with the Asian communication style generally dominated by a cultural reticence. However, evidence available, especially from the PBL experience of some senior Korean medical students doing an elective in the University of Toronto Medical School and the cross-cultural PBL experience initiated by Kaohsiung Medical University, strongly suggests creating a conducive and supportive learning environment for students learning in a PBL setting can overcome the perceived cultural barriers; that is, nurture matters more than culture in the learning environment. Karaoke is very much an Asian initiative. The Karaoke culture and philosophy provide a useful lesson on how to create a conducive and supportive environment to encourage, enhance and motivate group activity. Some key attributes associated with Asian culture are in fact consistent with, and aligned to, some of the basic tenets of PBL, including the congruence between the Asian emphasis on group before individual interest, and the collaborative small group learning design used in PBL. Although there are great expectations of the educational outcomes students can acquire from PBL, the available evidence supports the contention the actual educational outcomes acquired from PBL do not really match the expected

  17. Vicarious Learning in PBL Variants for Learning Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podges, Martin; Kommers, Piet

    2017-01-01

    Three different groups in a class of first-year tertiary engineering students had to solve a problem based on a project by applying the distinctive problem-based learning (PBL) approach. Each group's project (PBL project) was then studied by the other two groups after successful completion and demonstration. Each group then had to study the…

  18. The Design and Program Evaluation of a Distributed PBL Curriculum for Training Family Doctors in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaz, Jose B. C.; van der Molen, Henk T.; Mamede, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade Problem-based Learning (PBL) and distance education have been combined as educational approaches in higher education. This combination has been called distributed PBL (dPBL). However, more research is needed to obtain more evidence and deeper insight in how to design and implement dPBL. The present study aims at describing the…

  19. Does a PBL-based medical curriculum predispose training in specific career paths? A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigarides, Jordan; Wingfield, Laura R; Kulendran, Myutan

    2017-01-07

    North American medical schools have used problem-based learning (PBL) structured medical education for more than 60 years. However, it has only recently been introduced in other medical schools outside of North America. Since its inception, there has been the debate on whether the PBL learning process predisposes students to select certain career paths. To review available evidence to determine the predisposition of specific career paths when undertaking a PBL-based medical curriculum. The career path trajectory was determined as measured by official Matching Programs, self-reported questionnaires and surveys, and formally defined career development milestones. A systematic literature review was performed. PubMed, Medline, Cochrane and ERIC databases were analysed in addition to reference lists for appropriate inclusion. Eleven studies fitting the inclusion criteria were identified. The majority of studies showed that PBL did not predispose a student to a career in a specific speciality (n = 7 out of 11 studies, 64%). However, three studies reported a significantly increased number of PBL graduates working in primary care compared to those from a non-PBL curriculum. PBL has been shown not to predispose medical students to a career in General Practice or any other speciality. Furthermore, a greater number of similar studies are required before a definitive conclusion can be made in the future.

  20. Reflections on Remaining Obstacles in a Primary-Care Oriented Pure PBL Curriculum after Twelve Years of Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ottavio, Alberto Enrique; Bassan, Norberto David

    2014-01-01

    A pioneer primary-care oriented pure PBL curriculum, based on constructivism and adult learning theories combined with Morin's complex thinking, was implemented in our medical school since 2002. Regardless of warnings opportunely made because the basic requirements for its successful implementation could not be fully fulfilled in practice, the…

  1. PBL 教学模式在眼科教学中应用的探讨与实践%Probe and Practice into the Tuition of Ophthalmology in a PBL Curriculum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓禹

    2014-01-01

    The curriculum of problem-based learning (PBL)trended to be the new model of medical education.The superior-ities of PBL were evaluated and compared with lecture-based learning (LBL).Introducing PBL into ophthalmology could im-prove educational quality and effectiveness.%PBL 教学法(problem-based learning)即“以问题为基础的讨论式学习”逐渐成为我国医学教育模式改革的趋势。在传统的LBL 教学方法(lecture-based learning)基础上,眼科教学中引入PBL 教学法,提高教学质量。

  2. Theoretical and behavioral features to be considered when planning and implementing a pbl curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D' Ottavio, Alberto Enrique

    2016-01-01

    This work complements former articles about an Argentinean PBL curriculum after twelve years of development. In this context, it points out determined inflexible features linked to its theoretical-pedagogical basis and certain counter-productive behaviors detected in some planners, teachers and students during its design and/or enduring implementation. Hence, reflections are made on learning and adult learning (andragogy) theories. Furthermore, related questions and some aspects to be overcome are presented and analyzed. In this way, it also intends to honestly and responsibly warn well-trained curriculum planners and executors to be cautious when choosing and managing learning theories. Likewise, it complementarily highlights the need of refocusing teachers that, pretending to be forward-looking ones, end up harming what at first proclaimed to benefit: the students.

  3. PBL in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    PBL in Engineering Education: International Perspectives on Curriculum Change presents diverse views on the implementation of PBL from across the globe. The purpose is to exemplify curriculum changes in engineering education. Drivers for change, implementation descriptions, challenges and future...... perspectives are addressed. Cases of PBL models are presented from Singapore, Malaysia, Tunisia, Portugal, Spain and the USA. These cases are stories of thriving success that can be an inspiration for those who aim to implement PBL and change their engineering education practices. In the examples presented......, the change processes imply a transformation of vision and values of what learning should be, triggering a transition from traditional learning to PBL. In this sense, PBL is also a learning philosophy and different drivers, facing diverse challenges and involving different actors, trigger its implementation...

  4. PBL, Social Progress and Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The IRSPBL has collected 53 contributions from 19 different countries, all compiled in this book. The contributions cover a number of relevant PBL topics such as assessment, learning outcomes, students’ engagement, management of change, curriculum and course design, PBL models, PBL application, ICT...

  5. Introducing problem-based learning (PBL) into a foundation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    constructivist case study was located in evaluation research. .... Approval to proceed with this study was granted by the university ethics .... to PBL, students shifted their learning conceptions from mere textbook learning ..... business education.

  6. PBL Trigger Design by Medical Students: An Effective Active Learning Strategy Outside the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiga, Indira Kakkunje; Nayak, Akshatha G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Problem Based Learning (PBL) is known world over as an effective, active learning strategy with many benefits for the student. Usually, in medical schools, PBL triggers are designed by a well-trained group of faculty from basic and clinical sciences. The challenge was whether this task could be given to students in the first year of their curriculum and be executed by them effectively. Aim To enhance active learning, comprehension and critical thinking with a view to promote horizontal and vertical integration between subjects. Materials and Methods Student volunteers of the first year MBBS course (n=10), who had been exposed to the curriculum for approximately 38 weeks and were familiar with the PBL process were recruited for the study. In addition to a handout on the topic ‘gout’, they were given the freedom to access any resource in the university library to construct the PBL triggers. The PBL triggers were vetted by two faculties. In addition to a focus group discussion with students, students’ and faculty’s responses were collected on a Likert scale. Results Students opined that the exercise helped improve their comprehension (100%), critical thinking abilities (90%) and clinical orientation to the topic (100%). They felt that designing a PBL trigger was a relevant active learning strategy (100%) and would help them answer questions on this topic better in the future (90%). The clinicians who examined the PBL triggers, felt that they were of good quality and that the process was a good tool for vertical integration between basic and clinical sciences. Discussion The results prove that students when given a challenge will rise to the occasion. Unfamiliarity with the nuances of a disease did not prevent them from going the extra mile to achieve their target. By taking part in this exercise, students benefitted in many ways and got a holistic understanding of the topic. Conclusion PBL trigger design can be introduced as an active learning

  7. PBL Trigger Design by Medical Students: An Effective Active Learning Strategy Outside the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Maya; Adiga, Indira Kakkunje; Nayak, Akshatha G

    2016-12-01

    Problem Based Learning (PBL) is known world over as an effective, active learning strategy with many benefits for the student. Usually, in medical schools, PBL triggers are designed by a well-trained group of faculty from basic and clinical sciences. The challenge was whether this task could be given to students in the first year of their curriculum and be executed by them effectively. To enhance active learning, comprehension and critical thinking with a view to promote horizontal and vertical integration between subjects. Student volunteers of the first year MBBS course (n=10), who had been exposed to the curriculum for approximately 38 weeks and were familiar with the PBL process were recruited for the study. In addition to a handout on the topic 'gout', they were given the freedom to access any resource in the university library to construct the PBL triggers. The PBL triggers were vetted by two faculties. In addition to a focus group discussion with students, students' and faculty's responses were collected on a Likert scale. Students opined that the exercise helped improve their comprehension (100%), critical thinking abilities (90%) and clinical orientation to the topic (100%). They felt that designing a PBL trigger was a relevant active learning strategy (100%) and would help them answer questions on this topic better in the future (90%). The clinicians who examined the PBL triggers, felt that they were of good quality and that the process was a good tool for vertical integration between basic and clinical sciences. The results prove that students when given a challenge will rise to the occasion. Unfamiliarity with the nuances of a disease did not prevent them from going the extra mile to achieve their target. By taking part in this exercise, students benefitted in many ways and got a holistic understanding of the topic. PBL trigger design can be introduced as an active learning strategy for students in medical schools where PBL is part of the curriculum. It

  8. Introducing problem-based learning (PBL) into a foundation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    second chance learners they cannot be taught by the same traditional methods that ... a shift from content coverage to problem engagement; from lecturing to coaching; and ..... Project on the effectiveness of Problem Based Learning (PBL).

  9. Developing sustainability curriculum using the PBL method in a Chinese context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Su, Liya; Liu, Jingling

    2013-01-01

    traditional, lecture-based pedagogy. This paper reports an educational initiative and research project based on collaboration between Beijing Normal University, China and Aalborg University, Denmark: developing a sustainability curriculum using the methodology of Problem and Project Based Learning (PBL...... generation is based on multiple collection methods, such as survey of students’ feedbacks, interviews with students, and analysis of students’ project reports and reflection essays. This paper summarizes that a sustainability curriculum as proposed in this research can attract students’ interests in not only......Sustainability is receiving increasing amounts of attention in higher education in terms of how it can best be integrated with university curricula. Sustainability is closely related to complexity, innovation, and interdisciplinarity; therefore, it requires alternative approaches rather than...

  10. Design of a virtual PBL learning environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Qvist, Palle; Du, Xiangyun

    2006-01-01

    The technological development has created a need for engineers who are oriented towards a global market, have the ability to be involved in interdisciplinary professional and intercultural teams, and who possess lifelong learning competencies. This entails a demand for new educational programmes...... that are more student-centred. In order to support that development, a new master programme (60 European Credit Transfer System) the Master of Problem Based Learning (MPBL) has been established with the aim to improve engineering education. The master programme addresses staff and is an international distance...... programme capable of recruiting participants from all over the world. In terms of contents, it is organized exemplary according to the problem-based and project-based learning method and the participants have to experiment and develop their own teaching and curriculum. On the virtual learning side...

  11. Problem-based learning (PBL) and public health: an initial exploration of perceptions of PBL in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisham, John W; Martiniuk, Alexandra L C; Negin, Joel; Wright, E P

    2015-03-01

    Worldwide interest in problem-based learning (PBL) has grown in past decades. This article aims to evaluate the perceived effectiveness, appropriateness, benefits, and challenges attributed to the use of PBL in public health education in Vietnam with a view to providing recommendations for curricular design and future policy. Teachers at 2 universities in Hanoi participated in group interviews, and students from these 2 universities completed Likert-style questionnaires. Students and teachers regarded PBL positively. However, there was consensus that hybrid models that used PBL alongside other methods are probably the most beneficial for public health education in Vietnam. Teachers discussed the educational and systematic advantages and difficulties associated with PBL. Themes arising from this analysis may be helpful in guiding future research-namely, regarding the application of PBL in low- and middle-income countries and in public health. Further exploration of the use of PBL hybrid models is discussed. © 2012 APJPH.

  12. Evaluating the impact of a PBL-course for first-year engineering students learning through PBL-projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosgaard, Mette; Spliid, Claus Monrad

    2011-01-01

    The PBL-course for engineering students at Aalborg University provides support for student-groups' project-work and collaborative learning when planning and conducting scientific problem-based project with societal relevance. The results of a survey among some of the groups indicate that the limi...... that the limited experience with the Aalborg PBL Model clearly affects groups' perception of importance of using different PBL-tools. Development of process-competencies depends upon facilitation of reflection and experimentation....

  13. Comparison the Application of PBL (Project Based Learning and PBL (Problem Based Learning Learning Model on Online Marketing Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Dini Mardani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this study are (1 the application of learning PjBL with PBL to improve study results students, (2 assessing the domain affective, cognitive, and psychomotor, (3 the difference study results use the PjBL with PBL to improve study results students. The research is research quantitative and including research apparent experiment (quasi eksperiment by taking sample class two classes X PM 1 as a class experiment and class X PM 2 as a class control. Research instruments used for data collection namely: (1 tests to pretes and postest used to determine the cognitive assessment, (2 sheets observation affective, (3 sheets of the process for the psychomotor. The trial research instruments use the validity and reabilitas. Analysis techniques data using: (1 test a prerequisite analysis consisting of normality test and the homogeneity (2 T test unpaired which ended with the help of computer programs spss. Based on the result of this research can be concluded that: (1 the application of PjBL (Project Based Learning and PBL (Problem Based Learning should be conducted well in accordance syntax learning, (2 assessing the cognitive students have a difference and class experiment having an average higher than class control, (3 assessing the results affective students have a difference and on the application of PjBL is better than PBL.

  14. APPLYING PBL AND ZUVIO TO ENHANCE ENGLISH LEARNING MOTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOR-TYNG WANG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To inspire college students’ English learning motivation, this study proposed to combine Project-Based Learning (PBL with ZUVIO online teaching platform. The traditional teaching methods focus on teachers’ direct instruction in class, which mean that students only receive knowledge from teachers instead of formulating the answers on their own. This also decreases interaction in the classroom and prevents students from collaborating with other peers. However, implementing PBL and ZUVIO would allow students to apply knowledge in the social context and work with their classmates. In this study, two freshman English classes in a private university in central Taiwan were chosen as the sample. The students in both classes were low-level students (CEF A2 level. One class (N = 39 was chosen as the experimental group which had to complete the PBL tasks assigned by the teacher and use peer assessment function in ZUVIO for one academic year. The other class (N = 43 was chosen as the control group which was given the traditional teaching instructions. The results showed that the experimental group performed better on the midterm exam compared to the control group during both semesters (p = 0.001. Additionally, the results of the questionnaire showed that students’ motivation to learn English increased when using PBL and ZUVIO as teaching methods. To cite this document: Bor-Tyng Wang, "Applying PBL and ZUVIO to enhance English learning motivation", International Journal of Cyber Society and Education, Vol. 9, No. 1, pp. 1-16, 2016.

  15. Changing the Curriculum to Problem-Based and Project-Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Problem based and project based learning (PBL) models are implemented all over the world in various versions at curriculum or course level. Due to this development, the conceptual understanding of PBL has become more diverse and sometimes confusing. This chapter summarizes the conceptual work done...... by the UNESCO Chair in PBL in engineering education in order to define PBL as a set of core learning principles that can be applied in practice. The PBL learning principles are formulated within three aspects: learning, social, and content of study. Furthermore, the chapter contains a PBL curriculum model......, which can be used for analysis and development of the curriculum or single courses. Seven elements are identified as important for the planning and implementation of PBL learning principles, and for each of the elements there are several choices to be made. Finally, the chapter presents concrete advice...

  16. PBL, Hands-On/ Digital resources in Geology, (Teaching/ Learning)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Rosa; Santos, Cátia; Carvalho, Sara

    2015-04-01

    The present study reports the elaboration, application and evaluation of a problem-based learning (PBL) program that aims to evaluate the effectiveness in students learning the Rock Cycle theme. Prior research on both PBL and Rock Cycle was conducted within the context of science education so as to elaborate and construct the intervention program. Findings from these studies indicated both the PBL methodology and Rock Cycle as helpful for teachers and students. PBL methodology has been adopted in this study since it is logically incorporated in a constructivism philosophy application and it was expected that this approach would assist students towards achieving a specific set of competencies. PBL is a student-centered method based on the principle of using problems as the starting point for the acquisition of new knowledge. Problems are based on complex real-world situations. All information needed to solve the problem is initially not given. Students will identify, find, and use appropriate resources to complete the exercise. They work permanently in small groups, developing self-directed activities and increasing participation in discussions. Teacher based guidance allows students to be fully engaged in knowledge building. That way, the learning process is active, integrated, cumulative, and connected. Theme "Rock Cycle" was introduced using a problematic situation, which outlined the geological processes highlighted in "Foz do Douro" the next coastline of the school where the study was developed. The questions proposed by the students were solved, using strategies that involved the use of hands-on activities and virtual labs in Geology. The systematization of the selected theme was performed in a field excursion, implemented according to the organizational model of Nir Orion, to The "Foz do Douro" metamorphic complex. In the evaluation of the learning process, data were obtained on students' development of knowledge and competencies through the application of

  17. Renewed roles for librarians in problem-based learning in the medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa

    2011-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a teaching-learning process or method of instruction that is widely used in medical education curricula. Librarians play important roles as facilitators for PBL as well as guides for information resources. Involvement in PBL activities presents unique opportunities to incorporate library resources and instruction into the medical curriculum. This article reviews the problem-based learning method within the conceptual framework of the learning theory of constructivism. It describes how a medical librarian at a U.S. medical school used emerging technologies to facilitate PBL small group case discussions, guide students to quality information resources, and enhance the learning environment for the PBL process.

  18. PBL-GIS in Secondary Geography Education: Does It Result in Higher-Order Learning Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Bui, Elisabeth N.; Chang, Chew-Hung; Lossman, Hans G.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents research on evaluating problem-based learning using GIS technology in a Singapore secondary school. A quasi-experimental research design was carried to test the PBL pedagogy (PBL-GIS) with an experimental group of students and compare their learning outcomes with a control group who were exposed to PBL but not GIS. The…

  19. PBL and beyond: trends in collaborative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, William J; Richards, Boyd F; Mutnick, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Building upon the disruption to lecture-based methods triggered by the introduction of problem-based learning, approaches to promote collaborative learning are becoming increasingly diverse, widespread and generally well accepted within medical education. Examples of relatively new, structured collaborative learning methods include team-based learning and just-in-time teaching. Examples of less structured approaches include think-pair share, case discussions, and the flipped classroom. It is now common practice in medical education to employ a range of instructional approaches to support collaborative learning. We believe that the adoption of such approaches is entering a new and challenging era. We define collaborate learning by drawing on the broader literature, including Chi's ICAP framework that emphasizes the importance of sustained, interactive explanation and elaboration by learners. We distinguish collaborate learning from constructive, active, and passive learning and provide preliminary evidence documenting the growth of methods that support collaborative learning. We argue that the rate of adoption of collaborative learning methods will accelerate due to a growing emphasis on the development of team competencies and the increasing availability of digital media. At the same time, the adoption collaborative learning strategies face persistent challenges, stemming from an overdependence on comparative-effectiveness research and a lack of useful guidelines about how best to adapt collaborative learning methods to given learning contexts. The medical education community has struggled to consistently demonstrate superior outcomes when using collaborative learning methods and strategies. Despite this, support for their use will continue to expand. To select approaches with the greatest utility, instructors must carefully align conditions of the learning context with the learning approaches under consideration. Further, it is critical that modifications are made

  20. Pengembangan Modul Pembelajaran Fisika Berbasis Problem Based Learning (PBL pada Materi Gelombang Bunyi untuk Siswa SMA Kelas XII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Anita Nur Hasanah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The 2013 curriculum emphasizes on Scientific Approach taht tie topic with real context. Either learning model that leads to Scientific Approach that is Problem Based Learning (PBL. So that need to prepare appropriate teaching material to support learning model PBL one of them module independent teaching topic for learners. The aim of these research is describe the Learning Module which is developed that is physic learning module based on PBL of the topic sound wave for senior high school grade XII and examine its feasibility. This development research used 4-D Thiagarajan with modified model. This research has been done in three stages such as define, design, and develop which are restricted until the limited try out. The data collection is used questionnaire. The module validation by 4 validators and limited try out to 10 students. The result of research drawn that material aspect is 3,59 with the suitable criterion, presentation aspect is 3,9 with the suitable criterion, language aspect is 3,41 with the suitable criterion, and the limited try out result got 3,6 with an appropriate criterion. In conclusion, physic learning module based on PBL in sound wave material for senior high school grade XII is applicable. Keywords: Physic Learning Module, Problem Based Learning (PBL, Topic sound wave Pada kurikulum 2013 menekankan pada Scientific Approach yang mengaitkan materi dengan konteks dunia nyata. Salah satu model pembelajaran yang mengarah ke Scientific Approach yaitu Problem Based Learning (PBL. Sehingga perlu dipersiapkan bahan ajar yang tepat untuk mendukung model pembelajaran PBL salah satunya modul yang merupakan bahan ajar mandiri bagi peserta didik. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mendeskripsikan pengembangan modul yaitu modul pembelajaran fisika berbasis PBL pada materi Gelombang Bunyi untuk siswa SMA kelas XII dan menguji kelayakannya.Penelitian pengembangan menggunakan model 4-D Thiagarajan yang sudah di modifikasi. Penelitian ini

  1. Designing, implementing and evaluating an online problem-based learning (PBL) environment--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Manwa L; Bridges, Susan; Law, Sam Po; Whitehill, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been shown to be effective for promoting student competencies in self-directed and collaborative learning, critical thinking, self-reflection and tackling novel situations. However, the need for face-to-face interactions at the same place and time severely limits the potential of traditional PBL. The requirements of space and for meeting at a specific location at the same time create timetabling difficulties. Such limitations need to be tackled before all potentials of PBL learning can be realized. The present study aimed at designing and implementing an online PBL environment for undergraduate speech/language pathology students, and assessing the associated pedagogical effectiveness. A group of eight PBL students were randomly selected to participate in the study. They underwent 4 weeks of online PBL using Adobe Connect. Upon completion of the experiment, they were assessed via a self-reported questionnaire and quantitative comparison with traditional PBL students based on the same written assignment. The questionnaire revealed that all participating students enjoyed online PBL, without any perceived negative effects on learning. Online PBL unanimously saved the students travel time to and from school. Statistical analysis indicated no significant difference in assignment grades between the online and traditional PBL groups, indicating that online PBL learning appears to be similarly effective as traditional face-to-face PBL learning.

  2. The problem-based learning (PBL and health education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Moraes Vignochi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The Problem-Based Learning (Problem-Based Learning - PBL has been recognized worldwide as an approach to promote the acquisition of knowledge by students at the same time that helps them develop skills and professional attitudes desirable. Unlike the conventional methods of teaching that use of application problems after the theory was presented, the PBL uses a problem to start, focus and motivate the learning of new concepts 13. In this approach, the student uses different mental processes, such as ability to raise hypotheses, compare, analyze, interpret, and evaluate and develop the ability to take responsibility for their education 11.12. The methodology of PBL has been a valuable tool in shaping the health care professional, with advantages over the traditional method of teaching. However, for its deployment there is a need for considerable institutional effort. Are necessary adjustments, including changes in the way of evaluation, for changes in mindset about the role of teachers in the process teaching / learning, investment in infrastructure, adaptations of the environment, improvement of libraries and other 19,20,21, 22. The process of change in education will bring many challenges, such as a break with traditional models of education and train health professionals with skills to recover the essential dimension of care: the relationship between humans.

  3. The Guinea Pigs of a Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sarasvathie; McKenna, Sioux

    2016-01-01

    Participants in a study on learning the clinical aspects of medicine in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum repeatedly referred to themselves as "Guinea pigs" at the mercy of a curriculum experiment. This article interrogates and problematises the "Guinea pig" identity ascribed to and assumed by the first cohort of…

  4. An eLearning Standard Approach for Supporting PBL in Computer Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Robles, R.; Diaz-del-Rio, F.; Vicente-Diaz, S.; Linares-Barranco, A.

    2009-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has proved to be a highly successful pedagogical model in many fields, although it is not that common in computer engineering. PBL goes beyond the typical teaching methodology by promoting student interaction. This paper presents a PBL trial applied to a course in a computer engineering degree at the University of…

  5. Application of Problem Based Learning ((PBL) in a Course on Financial Accounting Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaf, Nor Aziah Abdul; Ishak, Zuaini; Hussin, Wan Nordin Wan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to share experiences in teaching a Financial Accounting Principles course using a hybrid problem based learning (PBL) method. The three specific objectives of this paper are to document how the PBL project for this course was developed and managed in class, to compare the academic performance of PBL students with non-PBL…

  6. Implementation of Problem Based Learning (PBL) - in a Malaysian Teacher Education Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borhan, Mohamad Termizi Bin; Yassin, Sopia Md

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes an employment of a Problem Based Learning (PBL) approach in a Malaysian graduate teacher education course. The discussions focus on how PBL was introduced, the PBL tasks and explore issues and benefits perceived by students. Data were obtained from journal reflections......, interviews and field note of observations. All types of data were analyze using inductive analytical approach. The result indicated that students were struggling at the preliminary phase of PBL, require more time in PBL learning process and link the acquisition of skills and group working process as benefits...

  7. A problem-based learning curriculum in transition: the emerging role of the library.

    OpenAIRE

    Eldredge, J D

    1993-01-01

    This case study describes library education programs that serve the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, known for its innovative problem-based learning (PBL) curricular track. The paper outlines the specific library instruction techniques that are integrated into the curriculum. The adaptation of library instruction to a PBL mode of medical education, including the use of case studies, is discussed in detail. Also addressed are the planning processes for the new PBL curriculum schedu...

  8. Application of Project-Based Learning (PBL) to the Teaching of Electrical Power Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, N.; Hesamzadeh, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    Project-based learning (PBL), a learning environment in which projects drive learning, has been successfully used in various courses in the educational programs of different disciplines. However, concerns have been raised as to the breadth of the content covered and, in particular, whether PBL can be applied to specialized subjects without…

  9. PBL - Problem Based Learning for Companies and Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamburg, I; Vladut, G.

    2016-07-01

    Small and medium sized companies (SMEs) assure economic growth in Europe. Generally many SMEs are struggling to survive in an ongoing global recession and often they are becoming reluctant to release or pay for staff training. In this paper we present shortly the learning methods in SMEs particularly the Problem Based Learning (PBL) as an efficient form for SMEs and entrepreneurship education. In the field of Urban Logistics it was developed four Clusters with potential of innovation and research in four European Regions: Tuscany - Italy, Valencia - Spain, Lisbon and Tagus - Portugal, Oltenia – Romania. Training and mentoring for SMEs, are essential to create competitiveness. Information and communication technologies (ICT) support the tutors by using an ICT platform which is in the development. (Author)

  10. Identifying needs to develop a PBL staff development program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prarthana Coffin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Staff development is a crucial element for educational intervention. Recognizing the importance of staff development, this study aims to pin-point suitable methodologies in developing a Problem-Based Learning (PBL academic staff development program for a higher education institute where PBL has become an intervention alternative. The study aims to answer the following research questions 1 how can university academic staff be assisted to acquire pedagogical competences for an initiative of the implementation of PBL curriculum? 2 What kinds of support do university academic staff need in order to maintain PBL implementation? Through a combination of a literature review, interviews with 6 PBL experts which emphasize the importance of PBL facilitators, and document analysis of reflection notes from 18 trainees of a PBL workshop, this study will produce a guideline in developing a PBL Academic Staff Development Program for an institute wishes to implement and retain PBL as the education strategy.

  11. Understanding "Green Chemistry" and "Sustainability": An Example of Problem-Based Learning (PBL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günter, Tugçe; Akkuzu, Nalan; Alpat, Senol

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study uses problem-based learning (PBL) to ensure that students comprehend the significance of green chemistry better by experiencing the stages of identifying the problem, developing hypotheses, and providing solutions within the problem-solving process. Purpose: The aim of this study is to research the effect of PBL implemented…

  12. A comparison of students who chose a traditional or a problem-based learning curriculum after failing year 2 in the traditional curriculum: a unique case study at the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    To canvas perceptions and experiences of students who had failed Year 2 of a traditional medical program and who chose to remain in the conventional program (n = 6) or had swapped to Curriculum 2001 (C2001), a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum (n = 14). A year after their decision regarding curriculum choice, students were canvassed (largely open-ended survey) about this decision and about their perceptions of their curricular experiences. C2001 students were positive about their PBL experiences. Overwhelmingly, their decision to swap streams had been a good one. They identified PBL features as supporting their learning. Repeating traditional curriculum students were, however, more circumspect in their opinions. C2001 students had clearly embraced PBL. They were now medical students, largely because of PBL activities underpinned by a sound educational philosophy. This unique case study has provided additional evidence that PBL students are generally more content with their studies than their conventional curriculum counterparts.

  13. A problem-based learning curriculum in transition: the emerging role of the library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, J D

    1993-07-01

    This case study describes library education programs that serve the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, known for its innovative problem-based learning (PBL) curricular track. The paper outlines the specific library instruction techniques that are integrated into the curriculum. The adaptation of library instruction to a PBL mode of medical education, including the use of case studies, is discussed in detail. Also addressed are the planning processes for the new PBL curriculum scheduled for implementation in 1993, including the activities of library faculty and staff and the probable new role of the library in the new curriculum.

  14. Students' perception towards the problem based learning tutorial session in a system-based hybrid curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Drees, Abdulmajeed A; Khalil, Mahmoud S; Irshad, Mohammad; Abdulghani, Hamza M

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate students' perception towards the problem based learning (PBL) session in a system-based hybrid curriculum. We conducted a cross-sectional study in the College of Medicine, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia at the end of the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey questionnaire was self-administered, and examined perceptions of PBL session benefits, appropriate running of sessions, and tutor's roles. Out of 510 students, 275 (53.9%) completed the questionnaire. Most of the students reported that PBL sessions were helpful in understanding basic sciences concepts (p=0.04). In addition, they agreed that PBL sessions increased their knowledge of basic sciences (p=0.01). Most students reported that PBL sessions encouraged self-directed learning, collaborative learning, and improved decision making skills. However, 54.5% of students reported lack of proper training before starting the PBL sessions, and only 25.1% of students agreed that the teaching staff are well prepared to run the sessions. Most students used the internet (93.1%), lecture notes (76.7%), and books (64.4%) as learning resources. Most students reported repetition of topics between PBL sessions and lectures (p=0.07). The study highlighted the significant role of PBL in a system-based hybrid curriculum and helped students improve their knowledge and different learning skills. Students and staff training is required before the utilizing the PBL as an instructional method.

  15. Understanding `green chemistry' and `sustainability': an example of problem-based learning (PBL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günter, Tuğçe; Akkuzu, Nalan; Alpat, Şenol

    2017-10-01

    Background: This study uses problem-based learning (PBL) to ensure that students comprehend the significance of green chemistry better by experiencing the stages of identifying the problem, developing hypotheses, and providing solutions within the problem-solving process.

  16. Context Impact of Clinical Scenario on Knowledge Transfer and Reasoning Capacity in a Medical Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, A.; Brédart, S.; Bourguignon, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2000, the faculty of Medicine at the University of Liège has integrated problem-based learning (PBL) seminars from year two to seven in its seven-year curriculum. The PBL approach has been developed to facilitate students' acquisition of reasoning capacity. This contextualized learning raises the question of the de- and re-contextualization…

  17. Cooperative Problem-Based Learning (CPBL: A Practical PBL Model for a Typical Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairiyah Mohd-Yusof

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Problem-Based Learning (PBL is an inductive learning approach that uses a realistic problem as the starting point of learning. Unlike in medical education, which is more easily adaptable to PBL, implementing PBL in engineering courses in the traditional semester system set-up is challenging. While PBL is normally implemented in small groups of up to ten students with a dedicated tutor during PBL sessions in medical education, this is not plausible in engineering education because of the high enrolment and large class sizes. In a typical course, implementation of PBL consisting of students in small groups in medium to large classes is more practical. However, this type of implementation is more difficult to monitor, and thus requires good support and guidance in ensuring commitment and accountability of each student towards learning in his/her group. To provide the required support, Cooperative Learning (CL is identified to have the much needed elements to develop the small student groups to functional learning teams. Combining both CL and PBL results in a Cooperative Problem-Based Learning (CPBL model that provides a step by step guide for students to go through the PBL cycle in their teams, according to CL principles. Suitable for implementation in medium to large classes (approximately 40-60 students for one floating facilitator, with small groups consisting of 3-5 students, the CPBL model is designed to develop the students in the whole class into a learning community. This paper provides a detailed description of the CPBL model. A sample implementation in a third year Chemical Engineering course, Process Control and Dynamics, is also described.

  18. The Effectiveness of Problem Based Learning (PBL) on Intermediate Financial Accounting Subject

    OpenAIRE

    Nunuk Suryanti

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to know the effectiveness of Problem Based Learning (PBL) Model comparing to Drill Model on Intermediate Financial Accounting subject. The research was a quasi-experimental research. Population was four classes of Accounting Education students in the year of 2014/2015 at Faculty of Educational Science and Teaching of Riau Islamic University (UIR). Sample was taken by using purposive sampling. Then, it used Problem Based Learning (PBL) at experimental class and Drill Model a...

  19. Pengembangan Paket Nekamedia Matematika Kurikulum 2013 Menggunakan Model Problem Based Learning (Pbl) pada Materi Bangun Ruang Sisi Datar Kelas VIII SMP di Kota Surakarta

    OpenAIRE

    Anggraini, Putri Nurika; Budiyono, Budiyono; Slamet, Isnandar

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to obtain 2013 Curriculum of mathematics mutlimedia kit using Problem Based Learning (PBL) model in plane geometry lesson of eighth grade junior high school in Surakarta which is considered as a valid, practical, and effective to be applied for learning. Furthermore, the goal was to discover whether the student's achievement of plane geometry lesson using the developed mutlimedia kit is better than using the prior product. The study type was Research and Development (R &a...

  20. The «PBL WORKING ENVIRONMENT» as interactive and expert system to learn the problem-based learning method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Correnti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The «PBL working environment» is a virtual environment developed in the framework of SCENE project (profeSsional development for an effeCtive PBL approach: a practical experiENce through ICT-enabled lEarning solution, co-funded by the European Lifelong Learning Program. The «PBL working environment» is devoted to prepare headmasters and teachers of secondary and vocational schools to use Problem-Based Learning (PBL pedagogy effectively. It is a student-centered pedagogy where learners are «actively» engaged in real world problems to solve or challenges to meet. Students develop problem-solving, self-directed learning and team skills. The «PBL working environment» is an virtual tool including three main elements: e-learning platform, virtual facilitator and PBL repository. Teachers, trainers and headmasters/school managers learn the PBL pedagogy by attending an on-line course (e-learning platform delivered through the «inductive method». It allows learners to experience PBL approach, by practicing it stage by stage, and then learn to turn practice into theory by abstracting their experience to build a theoretical understanding. Since generating the proper scenario is the most critical aspect of PBL, after benefiting from the on-line course, users can benefit from a further support: the Virtual Facilitator. It provides tips and hints on how correctly design a problem scenario and by asking questions to collect data on user's specific needs. The Virtual Facilitator is able to provide a/or more suitable example(s which match as closest as possible the teacher/trainer need. Finally, users can share problem scenarios and projects of different subjects of studies and with different characteristics uploaded and downloaded in the PBL repository.

  1. Development of a problem - based learning (PBL) and cooperative learning (CL) transportation engineering course For undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    This study reports the findings of a project that was done during the implementation of a : problem-based learning (PBL) and cooperative learning (CL) elements into an : undergraduate transportation engineering course. The study procedure used the st...

  2. Measuring change in critical thinking skills of dental students educated in a PBL curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardamean, Bens

    2012-04-01

    This study measured the change in critical thinking skills of dental students educated in a problem-based learning (PBL) pedagogical method. The quantitative analysis was focused on measuring students' critical thinking skills achievement from their first through third years of dental education at the University of Southern California. This non-experimental evaluation was based on a volunteer sample of ninety-eight dental students who completed a demographics/academic questionnaire and a psychometric assessment known as the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT). The HSRT produced the overall critical thinking skills score. Additionally, the HSRT generated five subscale scores: analysis, inference, evaluation, deductive reasoning, and inductive reasoning. The results of this study concluded that the students showed no continuous and significant incremental improvement in their overall critical thinking skills score achievement during their PBL-based dental education. Except for the inductive reasoning score, this result was very consistent with the four subscale scores. Moreover, after performing the statistical adjustment on total score and subscale scores, no significant statistical differences were found among the three student groups. However, the results of this study found some aspects of critical thinking achievements that differed by categories of gender, race, English as first language, and education level.

  3. Pengembangan Critical Thinking melalui Penerapan Model PBL (Problem Based Learning) dalam Pembelajaran Sains

    OpenAIRE

    Widowati, Asri

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines to explore how study by using model of Problem Based Learning ( PBL). Basically, this discussion is focussed at model of PBL as an effort in developing cognitive ability, especially critical thinking.Critical thinking including ability think high level (higher order of thinking) representing one of the component in issue intellegence of 21 st century ( Issue of The 21st literacy century). Development of ability of critical thinking in study of science of vital importance b...

  4. The Effect of Model Problem Based Learning (Pbl)

    OpenAIRE

    Safrina, Safrina; Saminan, Saminan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of the application of PBL models of science process skills (PPP) and the understanding of the concept of chemical substances in food at eighth grade students MTsN Meureudu. This study is a descriptive study using the research design one group pretest and posttest design. Samples were 19 eighth grade students MTsN Meureudu school year 2013/2014. Data collected by pretest and posttest to determine the effect of the application of PBL models and observatio...

  5. PBL Across Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    asked for contributions on the following sub- themes: – Approaches to PBL – The learning process (cognitive studies) – Evaluating practice – models and approaches – Theorising practice – Management of change – Learning spaces – Teacher roles in PBLLearning technologies for PBL – Student engagement...

  6. The Effectiveness of the Chemistry Problem Based Learning (PBL) via FB among Pre-University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunar, Mohd Shahir Mohamed; Shaari, Ahmad Jelani

    2017-01-01

    The impact of social media, such as Facebook in various fields including education is undeniable. The main objective of this study is to examine the effect of the interaction between students' learning styles and learning approaches on their achievements in the chemistry subject using the Problem-Based Learning (PBL) method through Facebook. The…

  7. Evaluation of ultrasound training in the problem based learning radiography curriculum at Makerere University, Uganda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsie, Kiguli-Malwadde; Gonzaga, Mubuuke A.; Francis, Businge; Rebecca, Nakatudde; Stephen, Bule

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The College of Health Sciences (CHS), Makerere University has been training health professionals since 1924. Six years ago, there was a curriculum change to Problem Based Learning/Community based Education and Service (PBL/COBES). A SPICES model (Student centered, problem based, integrated, community based, electives, systematic) was adopted and defined to suit the CHS environment. The radiography program is 3 years in length which involves Ultrasound as an important part of the training. It was a challenge to adopt the new PBL method of learning after having a lecture-based pedagogical method for over 80 years. Objective: To implement the training of ultrasound in the PBL radiography curriculum as well as evaluate the opinions of the staff and students about Ultrasound training in the new curriculum. Methodology: A participatory approach was used. Workshops were conducted and objectives for ultrasound courses refined. Scenarios were written for use in the PBL sessions. A retrospective review of student performance in the ultrasound courses was carried out. A cross-sectional survey involving teachers and current radiography students was also carried out to evaluate learning of ultrasound using the PBL approach. Results: Students have consistently excelled in ultrasound courses using the PBL approach of learning. Both teachers and students rated the teaching of ultrasound to radiography students as being highly important and supported the new approach to training. Conclusion: Ultrasound training using PBL has been successfully implemented. However, this is still an ongoing process and will require the total commitment of both students and teachers.

  8. PBL and CDIO: Complementary Models for Engineering Education Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edström, Kristina; Kolmos, Anette

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares two models for reforming engineering education, problem/project-based learning (PBL), and conceive-design-implement-operate (CDIO), identifying and explaining similarities and differences. PBL and CDIO are defined and contrasted in terms of their history, community, definitions, curriculum design, relation to disciplines,…

  9. The Effectiveness of Problem Based Learning (PBL on Intermediate Financial Accounting Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunuk Suryanti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to know the effectiveness of Problem Based Learning (PBL Model comparing to Drill Model on Intermediate Financial Accounting subject. The research was a quasi-experimental research. Population was four classes of Accounting Education students in the year of 2014/2015 at Faculty of Educational Science and Teaching of Riau Islamic University (UIR. Sample was taken by using purposive sampling. Then, it used Problem Based Learning (PBL at experimental class and Drill Model at controlled class. Data was collected by using interview, observation, and tests (pre-test and post-test. Moreover, data were analyzed by using independent sample test. Findings show that there is no any difference of learning outcomes between students who taught by Problem Based Learning (PBL Model and Drill Model on Intermediate Financial Accounting.

  10. Challenges of changing a PBL-related curriculum for 1st year students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram; Kofoed, Lise B.

    2011-01-01

    , teaching and evaluation for the course: Cooperation, Learning and Project Management (CLP). This paper will discuss the implications, based on the students’understanding of the subject matter, the degree of practical use of the course curriculum in their project work, and compare it to the former study...

  11. Examination of Knowledge and NOS in a PBL Curriculum: Comparing the Impact on Pre-service Teachers and Science Career Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleigh, S.; Manda, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    "Those who don't know or can't do, teach". This is a well known statement accepted by many as an adage. It is a statement that implies that the teachers of our science content really do not understand the science. In this study, we examined whether there was some truth in this statement by comparing undergraduates heading towards science careers and undergraduates heading toward science teaching careers. Do teachers really have a different understanding for science than scientists? If so, do they learn differently from each other? Our study examines content knowledge gains and ability to apply and engage in science using the content that is being addressed. We questioned (1)if students in one track engage and develop knowledge and skills more proficiently than another; (2)if the PBL approach is more effective for a particular group of learners; (3)if the PBL environment (virtual/physical) impacts the development and understanding for NOS; and (4) how the engagement of learning through PBL transfers to classroom practice. We used the Problem Based Approach (PBL) in undergraduate courses that covered the science content related to climate change. Project-based learning (PBL) is an approach to science education that has been shown to support student understanding for science concepts by allowing them to apply knowledge to real-world, relevant applications. Recent research has focused on developing teachers' understanding for science by engaging them in learning events that are found in PBL and authentic research approaches (AR)( e.g. Abd-El-Khalick and Lederman, 2000). We used mixed methods to answer each of our questions. Our instruments included a likert scale for the nature of science as argumentation, a concept mapping activity, a written essay, a content exam and an observation protocol for the teaching practice. In this study we included a total of 40 pre-service teachers (online) 30 pre-service teachers (physical classroom) and 35 undergraduates (physical

  12. Perceptions of problem-based learning (PBL) group effectiveness in a socially-culturally diverse medical student population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaram, V S; Dolmans, D H J M; Lachman, N; van der Vleuten, C P M

    2008-07-01

    A key aspect of the success of a PBL curriculum is the effective implementation of its small group tutorials. Diversity among students participating in tutorials may affect the effectiveness of the tutorials and may require different implementation strategies. To determine how students from diverse backgrounds perceive the effectiveness of the processes and content of the PBL tutorials. This study also aims to explore the relationship between students' perceptions of their PBL tutorials and their gender, age, language, prior educational training, and secondary schooling. Data were survey results from 244 first-year student-respondents at the Nelson Mandela School of Medicine at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to verify scale constructs in the questionnaire. Relationships between independent and dependent variables were investigated in an analysis of variance. The average scores for the items measured varied between 3.3 and 3.8 (scale value 1 indicated negative regard and 5 indicated positive regard). Among process measures, approximately two-thirds of students felt that learning in a group was neither frustrating nor stressful and that they enjoyed learning how to work with students from different social and cultural backgrounds. Among content measures, 80% of the students felt that they learned to work successfully with students from different social and cultural groups and 77% felt that they benefited from the input of other group members. Mean ratings on these measures did not vary with students' gender, age, first language, prior educational training, and the types of schools they had previously attended. Medical students of the University of KwaZulu-Natal, regardless of their backgrounds, generally have positive perceptions of small group learning. These findings support previous studies in highlighting the role that small group tutorials can play in overcoming cultural barriers and promoting unity and

  13. An Application of Context- and Problem-Based Learning (C-PBL) into Teaching Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Mukadder; Sozbilir, Mustafa

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the applicability of context- and problem-based learning (C-PBL) into teaching thermodynamics and to examine its influence on the students' achievements in chemistry, retention of knowledge, students' attitudes, motivation and interest towards chemistry. The embedded mixed method design was utilized with a group of 13 chemistry students in a 2-year program of "Medical Laboratory and Techniques" at a state university in an underdeveloped city at the southeastern region of Turkey. The research data were collected via questionnaires regarding the students' attitudes, motivation and interest in chemistry, an achievement test on "thermodynamics" and interviews utilized to find out the applicability of C-PBL into thermodynamics. The findings demonstrated that C-PBL led a statistically significant increase in the students' achievement in thermodynamics and their interest in chemistry, while no statistically significant difference was observed in the students' attitudes and motivation towards chemistry before and after the intervention. The interviews revealed that C-PBL developed not only the students' communication skills but also their skills in using time effectively, making presentations, reporting research results and using technology. It was also found to increase their self-confidence together with the positive attitudes towards C-PBL and being able to associate chemistry with daily life. In light of these findings, it could be stated that it will be beneficial to increase the use of C-PBL in teaching chemistry.

  14. Appreciation of learning environment and development of higher-order learning skills in a problem-based learning medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mala-Maung; Abdullah, Azman; Abas, Zoraini W

    2011-12-01

    This cross-sectional study determined the appreciation of the learning environment and development of higher-order learning skills among students attending the Medical Curriculum at the International Medical University, Malaysia which provides traditional and e-learning resources with an emphasis on problem based learning (PBL) and self-directed learning. Of the 708 participants, the majority preferred traditional to e-resources. Students who highly appreciated PBL demonstrated a higher appreciation of e-resources. Appreciation of PBL is positively and significantly correlated with higher-order learning skills, reflecting the inculcation of self-directed learning traits. Implementers must be sensitive to the progress of learners adapting to the higher education environment and innovations, and to address limitations as relevant.

  15. Interplay between Individual Creativity and Group Creativity in Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) Environment in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang; Kolmos, Anette

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies regard Problem and Project Based Learning (PBL) as providing a learning environment which fosters both individual and group creativity. This paper focuses on the question: In a PBL environment, how do students perceive the interplay between individual and group creativity? Empirica...

  16. Decision PBL: A 4-year retrospective case study of the use of virtual patients in problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Poulton, Terry; Jivram, Trupti

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, St George's University of London (SGUL) replaced their paper-based problem-based learning (PBL) cases with virtual patients for intermediate-level undergraduate students. This involved the development of Decision-Problem-Based Learning (D-PBL), a variation on progressive-release PBL that uses virtual patients instead of paper cases, and focuses on patient management decisions and their consequences. Using a case study method, this paper describes four years of developing and running D-PBL at SGUL from individual activities up to the ways in which D-PBL functioned as an educational system. A number of broad issues were identified: the importance of debates and decision-making in making D-PBL activities engaging and rewarding; the complexities of managing small group dynamics; the time taken to complete D-PBL activities; the changing role of the facilitator; and the erosion of the D-PBL process over time. A key point in understanding this work is the construction and execution of the D-PBL activity, as much of the value of this approach arises from the actions and interactions of students, their facilitators and the virtual patients rather than from the design of the virtual patients alone. At a systems level D-PBL needs to be periodically refreshed to retain its effectiveness.

  17. Metacognição em Grupos de Problem-based Learning (PBL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Vargas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aprendizagem em grupo é um processo que envolve a mobilização de funções cognitivas e desenvolve competências necessárias no decorrer da vida. A Problem-based Learning (PBL, uma proposta de aprendizagem em grupo, enfatiza o desenvolvimento cognitivo e pode potencializar a metacognição. Objetivou-se responder as questões: 1 a PBL é uma metodologia que envolve o desenvolvimento da metacognição? 2 pode-se relacionar os estudos da metacognição no contexto grupal à PBL? Realizou-se o estado do conhecimento do tema, entre 2010 a 2015, contendo os termos metacognition e Problem-based Learning, no portal de periódicos da CAPES. Oito pesquisas foram selecionadas por descreverem evidências empíricas da metacognição em grupos de PBL. A PBL pode ser aplicada aos estudos de aprendizagem em grupo e metacognição, por mobilizar conhecimentos, a tomada de consciência e o autocontrole.

  18. Problembased learning (PBL) including drama games as a motivating learning approach in interprofessional education (IPE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bodil Winther; Hatt, Camusa

    The university have years of experience with interprofessional student groups, from seven different health professions, learning through participating in an interprofessional module. Evaluations have shown a continuos massive challenge concerning the student´s motivation for learning...... and their level of participation in this three-week course of “Conflict management”. To meet these challenges the university started a project within the frame of problembased learning and drama games. The idea was to develop strategies to motivate students and create a dynamic and stimulating learning...... as an important aspect of carrying out a successful PBL course. Among the students, there was a significantly higher level of satisfaction in the experimental classes than in the comparison classes, regarding 10 out of 12 questions asked about both academic achievement and satisfaction with the learning...

  19. Subjective and Objective Evaluation of PBL Outcomes in Preclinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjective and Objective Evaluation of PBL Outcomes in Preclinical Medical Students. ... ABSTRACT: Problem based learning curriculum is widely recognized as a progressive, learner-centered, active learning approach and is currently used in the entire medical curriculum in over 10% of medical schools worldwide.

  20. The Aalborg University PO-PBL Model from a Socio-cultural Learning Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández, Carola Hernández; Ravn, Ole; Valero, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1970’s, Aalborg University has been developing a new pedagogical model in higher education: The Project Oriented – Problem Based Learning (PO-PBL). In particular, the Faculty of Engineering and Science has developed a pedagogical proposal that introduces students to a different type...

  1. The Effects of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) on the Academic Achievement of Students Studying "Electrochemistry"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günter, Tugçe; Alpat, Sibel Kilinç

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) on students' academic achievements in studying "Electrochemistry" within a course on Analytical Chemistry. The research was of a pretest-posttest control group quasi-experimental design and it was conducted with second year students in the Chemistry Teaching Program at…

  2. PBL3.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zotou, Maria; Tambouris, Efthimios; Triantafyllou, Evangelia

    This paper presents the PBL3.0 project that aims at enhancing Problem Based Learning (PBL) with Learning Analytics (LA) and Learning Semantics (LS) in order to produce a new educational paradigm and pilot it to produce relevant policy recommendations. To this end, the project will reach the follo......This paper presents the PBL3.0 project that aims at enhancing Problem Based Learning (PBL) with Learning Analytics (LA) and Learning Semantics (LS) in order to produce a new educational paradigm and pilot it to produce relevant policy recommendations. To this end, the project will reach...

  3. PBL online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Nortvig, Anne-Mette

    2017-01-01

    Problem- and Project-Based Learning (PBL) is a widely used pedagogical method in higher education. Although PBL encourages self-directed learning and works with the students’ own projects and problems, it also includes teacher presentations, discussions and group reflections, both on......-campus and online. Therefore, the teacher’s plans might be relevant to the students’ projects, but that is not always the case. This study investigates how master’s students interact with an online Problem-Based Learning design and examines how technology influences these interactions. The empirical data stem from...... lessons at an online master’s course, and they were collected and analyzed using a netnographic approach. The study finds that concepts like self-directed learning and active involvement of everyone can have very different meanings from the teachers’ and the students’ points of view. If the students do...

  4. Indian medical students' perspectives on problem-based learning experiences in the undergraduate curriculum: One size does not fit all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Bijli; Manjunatha, Shankarappa

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a well-established method for facilitating the learning of basic science concepts in the context of clinical cases. Relevant evidence is lacking regarding PBL's effectiveness and acceptability as perceived by students accustomed to classical traditional teaching in India. Hence, this study gathered students' opinions on PBL versus Traditional teaching methods to generate a foundation for institutional policymaking and ultimately, changes in the policy of regulatory bodies. A total of 773 first year medical students admitted from 2007-2010 in Kasturba Medical College Manipal, Manipal University, India were asked to respond to a 15-item questionnaire evaluating their preferences for PBL or traditional methods such as lectures after undergoing a systematically conducted PBL session in physiology. Their responses were analyzed with an unpaired t-test. Their comments were also collected. PBL scored significantly higher for most items in the questionnaire for "learning efficiency" and "student-teacher relationship". The students' comments highlighted the importance of a trained tutor/facilitator to enhance the learning process. Our students are willing to adapt to the PBL method, although they recognize certain benefits of traditional pedagogy. For learning efficiency and the student-teacher relationship, the students feel that neither method holds an advantage. We recommend that the future medical curriculum in India be a hybrid form of PBL and traditional methods with specific training on the unfamiliar PBL approach for both faculty and students.

  5. Medical student's perspective of problem based learning (PBL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Transkei has completed the first 5 years of its problem-based community oriented teaching curriculum. The use of SWOT analysis to evaluate current and future directions can lead to the successful evolution of any organization. The aim of this study was to obtain a students' ...

  6. Development of a Survey to Examine the Factors that Motivate Secondary Education Teachers' Use of Problem-based Learning (PBL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Huei-Chen

    In this quantitative study, a survey was developed and administered to middle and high school teachers to examine what factors motivated them to implement problem-based learning (PBL). Using Expectancy-Value Theory by Eccles et al. (1983) and Self-Determination Theory by Ryan and Deci (2000b) as the theoretical framework, this instrument measured respondents' perceived competence, support for autonomy and relatedness, and value and cost they placed on implementing PBL. Data analyses indicated that the instrument had good reliability. A 3-factor structure was established by exploratory factor analysis which confirmed the construct validity of the instrument. Value of PBL to teachers and their students was the most dominant factor that motivated teachers to implement it. The second most important factor was their self-efficacy and anxiety about failing this pedagogy, and the third factor was teachers' perceived autonomy, and support from schools and colleagues. Regression models showed the predictive power of the factors on teachers' intention to implement PBL, with their perceptions of the value of PBL being the strongest predictor. Results also indicate that teachers with PBL experience perceived significantly higher levels of competence and support from peers, and placed a higher level of value and perceived less cost in implementing PBL than teachers who had not implemented PBL. Teachers' formal training in PBL played a significant role in positively influencing their perceptions of competence and the value of PBL, and reduced their perceived cost of implementing PBL. This, in turn, enhanced teachers' intention of practicing PBL. For teachers who had previously taught with PBL, their responses to two open-ended questions in this instrument corresponded with the theoretical framework of this study and triangulated well with the quantitative data. These teachers highly valued PBL and they recognized the challenges associated with its implementation. These teachers

  7. Beyond Problem-Based Learning: Using Dynamic PBL in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Tina L.; Randles, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a novel pedagogy, dynamic problem-based learning. The pedagogy utilises real-world problems that evolve throughout the problem-based learning activity and provide students with choice and different data sets. This new dynamic problem-based learning approach was utilised to teach…

  8. [Teaching Bioethics to Students of Medicine with Problem-Based Learning (PBL)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Briceño García, Hugo C; Capella, Dolors; De Castro Vila, Carmen; Farrés, Ramón; Quintanas, Anna; Ramis, Josep; Roca, Rosa; Brunet, Joan

    2015-01-01

    We present the experience of the introduction of the subject of bioethics in a medical school in order to give to the 73 students of 5th degree skills to handle ethical conflicts in their practice. The main teaching method used was problem-based learning (PBL). Skills objectives are described. The course was structured with a theoretical seminar (2 hours of duration), a workshop (2 hours of duration), 4 cases of PBL (24 hours of duration in total) and a role playing workshop (2 hours of duration). The seminar was aimed at the acquisition of theoretical knowledge. The PBL cases provided critical appraisal, obtaining knowledge, and application. The Role Playing set out for the practical demonstration of skills acquired in a simulated environment. A continuous assessment of students was performed throughout their practice on the PBL cases (40% of the final score) and also a final evaluation of the course was carried out via exam (60% of the final score). Students completed a course and faculty evaluation anonymously, which came out with positive results (median score of 8.5/10).

  9. Problem-based learning interventions in a traditional curriculum are an effective learning tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Grant

    2011-12-01

    PubMed, ERIC and PsycLIT. The database search was supplemented with manual search of the electronic archives of the following journals: Academic Medicine, Medical Education, Teaching and Learning in Medicine, Journal of Dental Education and European Journal of Dental Education. Further articles were retrieved from the reference lists of selected papers. The review covered the period 1976-2008. Studies were eligible if they presented original research using PBL in research settings compared with another educational method (at a whole curriculum level or as a single intervention). This review included both randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and comparative studies. Qualitative and quantitative designs were eligible. Three dental educators selected studies. It is not clear that there were predefined criteria. The studies showed considerable heterogeneity in their study designs, characteristics, outcome variables and results. A descriptive review of the data was presented. Sixty-nine studies were initially identified. The authors excluded 17 of these because they could not obtain full texts. Thirteen studies were excluded because they used purely qualitative data. Of the remaining 39 studies six were RCTs and 33 comparative studies. The RCTs gave little information about the curriculum design and used markedly different outcome measurements including test scores, personal characteristics and subjective approaches to learning and experiences. There was no overall difference in student performances between the integrated and the PBL curriculum but a significant difference in favour of these two when compared with a conventional curriculum. A modest advantage of PBL was noted in relational skills, humanistic attitudes and diagnostic accuracy. Test scores did not appear to be influenced by the use of PBL. Though PBL seems to have a good effect on several competencies after graduation no significant effects were observed in lifelong learning attitudes. Comparative studies

  10. Curriculum design for problem-based learning on a volunteer basis: a Yonsei approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Moo Sang; Ahn, Duck Sun

    2002-04-01

    Innovative new medical programs such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) are being developed worldwide. An increasing number of medical schools are starting to introduce these programs into or even to replace the existing curriculum. At Yonsei University College of Medicine (YUCM), we developed our own PBL curriculum and evaluation method. In order to develop a program suitable for our school, we suggest that for trial purposes, a small number of student and teacher volunteers should be selected and that the tutors involved in the program be given adequate training.

  11. Indian medical students’ perspectives on problem-based learning experiences in the undergraduate curriculum: One size does not fit all

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijli Nanda

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Problem-based learning (PBL is a well-established method for facilitating the learning of basic science concepts in the context of clinical cases. Relevant evidence is lacking regarding PBL’s effectiveness and acceptability as perceived by students accustomed to classical traditional teaching in India. Hence, this study gathered students’ opinions on PBL versus Traditional teaching methods to generate a foundation for institutional policymaking and ultimately, changes in the policy of regulatory bodies. Methods: A total of 773 first year medical students admitted from 2007-2010 in Kasturba Medical College Manipal, Manipal University, India were asked to respond to a 15-item questionnaire evaluating their preferences for PBL or traditional methods such as lectures after undergoing a systematically conducted PBL session in physiology. Their responses were analyzed with an unpaired t-test. Their comments were also collected. Results: PBL scored significantly higher for most items in the questionnaire for “learning efficiency” and “student-teacher relationship”. The students’ comments highlighted the importance of a trained tutor/facilitator to enhance the learning process. Conclusion: Our students are willing to adapt to the PBL method, although they recognize certain benefits of traditional pedagogy. For learning efficiency and the student-teacher relationship, the students feel that neither method holds an advantage. We recommend that the future medical curriculum in India be a hybrid form of PBL and traditional methods with specific training on the unfamiliar PBL approach for both faculty and students.

  12. Mobile Learning for Higher Education in PBL Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn; Ryberg, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This study is about the design and development of mobile technologies to support students’ collaboration in groups during project periods in a problem oriented and project based learning environment. The study will take departure in the group work of students in the faculty of Humanities, Aalborg...

  13. Mobile Learning for Higher Education in PBL Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn; Ryberg, Thomas

    This study is about the design and development of mobile technologies to support students’ collaboration in groups during project periods in a problem oriented and project based learning environment. The study will take departure in the group work of students in the faculty of Humanities, Aalborg...

  14. Dental students' perception of their approaches to learning in a PBL programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghparast, H; Ghorbani, A; Rohlin, M

    2017-08-01

    To compare dental students' perceptions of their learning approaches between different years of a problem-based learning (PBL) programme. The hypothesis was that in a comparison between senior and junior students, the senior students would perceive themselves as having a higher level of deep learning approach and a lower level of surface learning approach than junior students would. This hypothesis was based on the fact that senior students have longer experience of a student-centred educational context, which is supposed to underpin student learning. Students of three cohorts (first year, third year and fifth year) of a PBL-based dental programme were asked to respond to a questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F) developed to analyse students' learning approaches, that is deep approach and surface approach, using four subscales including deep strategy, surface strategy, deep motive and surface motive. The results of the three cohorts were compared using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). A P-value was set at approach than the first-year students (P = 0.020). There was a significant decrease in surface strategy from the first to the fifth year (P = 0.003). No differences were found concerning deep approach or its subscales (deep strategy and deep motive) between the mean scores of the three cohorts. The results did not show the expected increased depth in learning approaches over the programme years. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Influence on Learning of a Collaborative Learning Method Comprising the Jigsaw Method and Problem-based Learning (PBL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kayoko; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Masukawa, Hiroyuki; Shimamori, Yoshimitsu

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the practice of active learning has spread, increasingly recognized as an essential component of academic studies. Classes incorporating small group discussion (SGD) are conducted at many universities. At present, assessments of the effectiveness of SGD have mostly involved evaluation by questionnaires conducted by teachers, by peer assessment, and by self-evaluation of students. However, qualitative data, such as open-ended descriptions by students, have not been widely evaluated. As a result, we have been unable to analyze the processes and methods involved in how students acquire knowledge in SGD. In recent years, due to advances in information and communication technology (ICT), text mining has enabled the analysis of qualitative data. We therefore investigated whether the introduction of a learning system comprising the jigsaw method and problem-based learning (PBL) would improve student attitudes toward learning; we did this by text mining analysis of the content of student reports. We found that by applying the jigsaw method before PBL, we were able to improve student attitudes toward learning and increase the depth of their understanding of the area of study as a result of working with others. The use of text mining to analyze qualitative data also allowed us to understand the processes and methods by which students acquired knowledge in SGD and also changes in students' understanding and performance based on improvements to the class. This finding suggests that the use of text mining to analyze qualitative data could enable teachers to evaluate the effectiveness of various methods employed to improve learning.

  16. Status of medical education reform at Saga Medical School 5 years after introducing PBL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yasutomo; Koizumi, Shunzo

    2008-03-01

    In Japan, problem-based learning (PBL) is a relatively new method of educating medical students that is reforming the face of medical education throughout the world, including Asia. It shifts from teacher-centered learning strategies (for example, lectures in large auditoriums) to student-centered, self-directed learning methods (for example, active discussions and problem-solving by students in small groups under the guidance of faculty tutors). Upon a recommendation by the Japan Model Core Curriculum, Saga Medical School introduced a PBL curriculum 5 years ago. A full PBL curriculum was adopted from the McMaster model through Hawaii. A description of how PBL was implemented into the 3rd and 4th year (Phase III curriculum) is given. The overall result has been good. Students who experienced PBL had increased scores on the National Medical License Exam, and Saga increased its ranking from 56th to 19th of the 80 medical schools in Japan. A key step was introduction of the educational scaffolding in PBL Step 0. Students were allowed to see page one of the PBL case, containing the chief complaint, on the weekend before meeting in small groups. Despite a perceived overall benefit to student learning, symptoms of superficial discussions by students have been observed recently. How this may be caused by poor case design is discussed. Other problems, including "silent tutors" and increased faculty workload, are discussed. It is concluded that after 5 years, Saga's implementation of a PBL curriculum has been successful. However, many additional issues, including motivation of students and preparation for PBL in the first 2 years, must still be resolved in the future. This is the first description of the positive and negative outcomes associated with the reform of medical education and the introduction of PBL to a traditional medical school curriculum in Japan.

  17. Status of Medical Education Reform at Saga Medical School 5 Years After Introducing PBL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasutomo Oda

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In Japan, problem-based learning (PBL is a relatively new method of educating medical students that is reforming the face of medical education throughout the world, including Asia. It shifts from teacher-centered learning strategies (for example, lectures in large auditoriums to student-centered, self-directed learning methods (for example, active discussions and problem-solving by students in small groups under the guidance of faculty tutors. Upon a recommendation by the Japan Model Core Curriculum, Saga Medical School introduced a PBL curriculum 5 years ago. A full PBL curriculum was adopted from the McMaster model through Hawaii. A description of how PBL was implemented into the 3rd and 4th year (Phase III curriculum is given. The overall result has been good. Students who experienced PBL had increased scores on the National Medical License Exam, and Saga increased its ranking from 56th to 19th of the 80 medical schools in Japan. A key step was introduction of the educational scaffolding in PBL Step 0. Students were allowed to see page one of the PBL case, containing the chief complaint, on the weekend before meeting in small groups. Despite a perceived overall benefit to student learning, symptoms of superficial discussions by students have been observed recently. How this may be caused by poor case design is discussed. Other problems, including “silent tutors” and increased faculty workload, are discussed. It is concluded that after 5 years, Saga's implementation of a PBL curriculum has been successful. However, many additional issues, including motivation of students and preparation for PBL in the first 2 years, must still be resolved in the future. This is the first description of the positive and negative outcomes associated with the reform of medical education and the introduction of PBL to a traditional medical school curriculum in Japan.

  18. PBL and CDIO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edström, Kristina; Kolmos, Anette

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares two models for reforming engineering education, problem/project-based learning (PBL), and conceive–design–implement–operate (CDIO), identifying and explaining similarities and differences. PBL and CDIO are defined and contrasted in terms of their history, community, definition......, and that PBL and CDIO can play compatible and mutually reinforcing roles, and thus can be fruitfully combined to reform engineering education....... the communities can learn from each other. It is noted that while the two approaches share many underlying values, they only partially overlap as strategies for educational reform. The conclusions are that practitioners have much to learn from each other's experiences through a dialogue between the communities......This paper compares two models for reforming engineering education, problem/project-based learning (PBL), and conceive–design–implement–operate (CDIO), identifying and explaining similarities and differences. PBL and CDIO are defined and contrasted in terms of their history, community, definitions...

  19. PENERAPAN PEMBELAJARAN PROBLEM BASED LEARNING (PBL UNTUK MENINGKATKAN HASIL BELAJAR MATEMATIKA SISWA KELAS IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fida Rahmantika Hadi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe the steps to the application of PBL learning to improve student learning outcomes in the material fractions. This research was a class act. In this study the data source was the teacher and the student. Data collection techniques used in this study consisted of (a observation, (b interviews, and (c test. Methods of data analysis used in this research is descriptive qualitative and descriptive comparative. The steps of learning by PBL method are (1 the stage of cooperation where students formed into groups of 4-5 students, (2 the orientation of students to the problem, namely the provision of problems related to everyday life, (3 organization students to learn independently in a group, (4 guided inquiry groups using worksheets to gather the appropriate information, and (5 develop and present the results of discussions through presentations to the class. The resulting increases in students' mathematics learning of the results of the pre-action test 71.31 and increased in the first cycle to 75.78, on the second cycle increased by 82.63.

  20. PBL and CDIO: complementary models for engineering education development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edström, Kristina; Kolmos, Anette

    2014-09-01

    This paper compares two models for reforming engineering education, problem/project-based learning (PBL), and conceive-design-implement-operate (CDIO), identifying and explaining similarities and differences. PBL and CDIO are defined and contrasted in terms of their history, community, definitions, curriculum design, relation to disciplines, engineering projects, and change strategy. The structured comparison is intended as an introduction for learning about any of these models. It also invites reflection to support the understanding and evolution of PBL and CDIO, and indicates specifically what the communities can learn from each other. It is noted that while the two approaches share many underlying values, they only partially overlap as strategies for educational reform. The conclusions are that practitioners have much to learn from each other's experiences through a dialogue between the communities, and that PBL and CDIO can play compatible and mutually reinforcing roles, and thus can be fruitfully combined to reform engineering education.

  1. PROJECT BASED LEARNING (PBL TO IMPROVE PSYCHOMOTORIC SKILLS: A CLASSROOM ACTION RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Sumarni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the application of project-based learning (PBL to improve student’ psychomotor skills and concept understanding, as well as knowing what PBL contribution to the improvement of student’ psychomotor skills in chemistry learning. The study was conducted in three cycles. Each cycle consisted of planning, implementation, observation, and reflection steps. One set of data consists of student’ psychomotor skills assesment, student’ conceptual understanding and questionnaire responses were obtained from the action research. Learning process was performed in the eleventh grade students included 37 students (10 males and 27 females and 3 collaborators. The successful research was indicated by 85% of students achieve the mastery learning on concept understanding and well on psychomotor aspects. Data collection was performed using documentation method by questionnaire, observations, and tests. Data was analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The results show that all aspects of the psychomotor assessed include sets, mechanical response, complex response, adaptation, and origination were in high category. At the end of the lesson, the project assigned to students were evaluated jointly between teachers and students. The project results in the form of a series of distillation apparatus is applied to separate the natural compounds.

  2. A University's Strategic Adoption Process of an PBL-Aligned eLearning Environment: An Exploratory Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Greg

    2017-01-01

    Much has been written about the promise and peril of technology in education. This paper presents an empirical study that explores how technology can play a pivotal role in student learning and how teaching staff can adopt innovative technology-based approaches in the creation of interactive online problem-based learning (PBL) resources, allowing…

  3. Introducing a technology-enabled problem-based learning approach into a health informatics curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Carolyn J; van Gyn, Geraldine H; Moehr, Jochen R; Lau, Francis Y; Coward, Patricia M

    2004-03-18

    To investigate the effect on learner satisfaction of introducing a technology-enabled problem-based learning (PBL) approach into a health informatics curriculum. Course redesign was undertaken to prepare students for three 4-month work terms and a rapidly changing professional environment upon graduation. Twenty-six Canadian undergraduate students of a redesigned course in biomedical fundamentals completed a midterm questionnaire in 2002. Eight of these students participated in a focus group. Students agreed that seven of nine functions provided by the web-based online course management system enhanced their learning: private email (92.3%), calendaring (88.5%), course notes (88.5%), discussion forums (84.5%), online grades (84.5%) assignment descriptions (80.8%) and online quizzes (80.8%). Although students agreed that two PBL activities enhanced learning (learning to present information) (84.5%) and learning to identify information needed (73.1%), the majority of students (69.2%) expressed a preference for the traditional lecture approach over the PBL approach. Students reported feeling uncertain of what was required of them and related anxiety accounted for most of the negative feedback. These findings give us clear goals for improvement in the course beginning with a comprehensive, carefully guided introduction to the processes of PBL. The positive trends are encouraging for the use of web-enabled courseware and for the further development of the PBL approach.

  4. Successful Project Based Learning (PBL) Across Disciplines Geared Towards Middle School: An Example from a Wetlands PBL Unit in Reno, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, K. L.; Suchy-Mabrouk, A.; Noble, P. J.; Mensing, S. A.; Ewing-Taylor, J.

    2014-12-01

    A growing need for broad dissemination of current scientific research and improved scientific literacy requires new models of professional development that allow for direct collaboration between educators and university researchers. One example is a project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of a study titled, "Reconstructing 2500 years of environmental change at the periphery of Rome: Integrating paleoecology and socioeconomic history to understand human response to climate." This project involves a team of middle school teachers working with researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) to gain first-hand knowledge in multidisciplinary research connecting science and society, and applies a similar approach in the classroom. In 2013, the team's science teacher traveled to Italy as a member of the science research group. A series of workshops introduced the remaining teachers to the research project. Teachers collaborated to develop a Project Based Learning (PBL) unit that incorporated Next Generation Science Standards and encompassed English, Social Studies, Math, and Science curricula using a pedagogical approach different from the single subject-based PBL's usually taught in their school district. The PBL unit draws on the NSF study and focuses on exploring the balance between economic and environmental issues surrounding local wetlands. In May 2014, 160 middle school students worked in groups to create and test a question about physio-chemical parameters in a nearby wetland and used these data to discuss local economic development. Initially, students claimed polarized views of environmental issues or economic development interests; however, during a multimedia session showcasing results, students communicated more informed perspectives that clearly incorporated knowledge gained from their own research. Some students were able to make recommendations for good practices involving planned economic development near the wetland

  5. Implementation of modified team-based learning within a problem based learning medical curriculum: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; Roberts, Chris; Ayton, Tom; Mellis, Craig

    2018-04-10

    While Problem Based Learning (PBL) has long been established internationally, Team-based learning (TBL) is a relatively new pedagogy in medical curricula. Both PBL and TBL are designed to facilitate a learner-centred approach, where students, in interactive small groups, use peer-assisted learning to solve authentic, professionally relevant problems. Differences, however, exist between PBL and TBL in terms of preparation requirements, group numbers, learning strategies, and class structure. Although there are many similarities and some differences between PBL and TBL, both rely on constructivist learning theory to engage and motivate students in their learning. The aim of our study was to qualitatively explore students' perceptions of having their usual PBL classes run in TBL format. In 2014, two iterations in a hybrid PBL curriculum were converted to TBL format, with two PBL groups of 10 students each, being combined to form one TBL class of 20, split into four groups of five students. At the completion of two TBL sessions, all students were invited to attend one of two focus groups, with 14 attending. Thematic analysis was used to code and categorise the data into themes, with constructivist theory used as a conceptual framework to identify recurrent themes. Four key themes emerged; guided learning, problem solving, collaborative learning, and critical reflection. Although structured, students were attracted to the active and collaborative approach of TBL. They perceived the key advantages of TBL to include the smaller group size, the preparatory Readiness Assurance Testing process, facilitation by a clinician, an emphasis on basic science concepts, and immediate feedback. The competitiveness of TBL was seen as a spur to learning. These elements motivated students to prepare, promoted peer assisted teaching and learning, and focussed team discussion. An important advantage of PBL over TBL, was the opportunity for adequate clinical reasoning within the problem

  6. Writing the Book…Literally: The Convergence of Authentic Intellectual Work (AIW) and Project-Based Learning (PBL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmiller, Tom M.; Kruse, Jerrid W.

    2015-01-01

    Using the Project-Based Learning (PBL) and Authentic Intellectual Work (AIW) models, we sought to create coursework that had value beyond the classroom. Refinements in the self-publishing book industry provide the opportunity to present student work to a larger audience and in a different, more engaging format. With the help of free software, our…

  7. Pengaruh Problem Based Learning (PBL Terhadap Kemampuan Heuristik Pemecahan Masalah dan Sikap Matematis Siswa Sekolah Dasar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diding Ruchaedi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian  ini  dilatarbelakangi  oleh rendahnya kemampuan heuristik pemecahan masalah dan  sikap  matematis  siswa  terhadap pelajaran  matematika.  Penelitian  ini  bertujuan  untuk  menelaah perbedaan peningkatan kemampuan pemecahan masalah dan sikap matematis siswa yang menggunakan Problem Based Learning (PBL dengan siswa yang menggunakan pembelajaran konvensional.  Metode  dalam  penelitian  ini menggunakan  desain  kuasi  eksperimen  dengan  subjek penelitian seluruh siswa kelas V SD Negeri Leuwikujang I sebagai kelas eksperimen dan seluruh siswa kelas V SD Negeri Rajawangi I sebagai kelas kontrol.  Instrumen  yang digunakan  adalah  tes  kemampuan  pemecahan masalah  dan  skala  sikap  matematis siswa.  Data  hasil  penelitian  berupa  skor   pra tes  dan  pasca tes  siswa  dianalisis  dengan menggunakan  uji  t  dan  uji  korelasi  Product  Moment  Pearson.  Berdasarkan  hasil analisis  data  diperoleh  kesimpulan  bahwa, siswa  yang mendapatkan  pembelajaran  Problem Based Learning (PBL mengalami  peningkatan  pada  kemampuan  strategi heuristic pemecahan masalah dan sikap matematis yang lebih  baik  dibandingkan  dengan  siswa  yang  mendapatkan  pembelajaran matematika  secara  konvensional.

  8. Does the Curriculum Matter in Peer Mentoring? From Mentee to Mentor in Problem-Based Learning: A Unique Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Peer mentoring has been used for many years by the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine to integrate new students into the academic and social culture of the institution. In 2001, an unusual situation arose. A problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum was introduced and the first cohort in this programme was mentored by senior traditional curriculum…

  9. PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING (PBL) LANGUAGE CASE-CRAFTING MODEL (PBL-LcCRAFT): LANGUAGE-IN-USE AND THE 3R

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd-Ali, Suraini; Baharun, Hazleena; Harun, Haliza; Darmi, Ramiaida; Mat Saad, Noor Saazai; Puteh-Behak, Fariza; Massari, Norhaili; Ahmad Mahir, Normazla

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a new PBL case designmodel for language practitioners that emerged from an action research projecton PBL case-design training for language practitioners. Participants of theaction research project underwent two cycles of PBL case-design training. Datacollection tools consisting of an observation checklist and a series of focusgroup interview were used to collect data from the participants. Data gatheredwere then analyzed using content analysis for emerging themes. Findi...

  10. GIS Enabled PBl Pedagogy: The Effects on Students' Learning in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Laxman, Kumar

    2009-01-01

    In efforts aimed at acquainting learners with "how to learn" skills rather than static content knowledge, more student centric instructional approaches are being increasingly adopted in informing curriculum design and delivery. Technology-rich problem solving environments offer great promise in scaffolding and facilitating…

  11. Support of a Problem-Based Learning Curriculum by Basic Science Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L. Anderson

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Although published reports describe benefits to students of learning in a problem-based, student-centered environment, questions have persisted about the excessive faculty time commitments associated with the implementation of PBL pedagogy. The argument has been put forward that the excessive faculty costs of such a curriculum cannot be justified based upon the potential benefits to students. However, the magnitude of the faculty time commitment to a PBL curriculum to support the aforementioned argument is not clear to us and we suspect that it is also equally unclear to individuals charged with making resource decisions supporting the educational efforts of the institution. Therefore, to evaluate this cost - benefit question, we analyzed the actual basic science faculty time commitment in a hybrid PBL curriculum during the first phase 18 months of undergraduate medical education. The results of this analysis do demonstrate an increase in faculty time commitments but do not support the argument that PBL pedagogy is excessively costly in terms of faculty time. For the year analyzed in this report, basic science faculty members contributed on average of 27.4 hours to the instruction of medical students. The results of the analysis did show significant contributions (57% of instructional time by the clinical faculty during the initial 18 months of medical school. In addition, the data revealed a four-fold difference between time commitments of the four basic science departments. We conclude that a PBL curriculum does not place unreasonable demands on the time of basic science faculty. The demands on clinical faculty, in the context of their other commitments, could not be evaluated. Moreover, this type of analysis provides a tool that can be used to make faculty resource allocation decisions fairly.

  12. Problem-Based Learning (PBL and Student Interest in STEM Careers: The Roles of Motivation and Ability Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie LaForce

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Amid growing concerns about the future of the U.S. economy and workforce, educators and policymakers alike have increasingly emphasized the need to expand the number of students interested in, qualified for and actually pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM. The current study draws on survey responses from a sample of 3852 high school students at inclusive STEM schools across the U.S. to investigate how project- and problem-based learning (PBL may work to address this need. Multivariate regression results indicate that student ratings of PBL are associated with interest in pursuing a career in STEM, as well as with intrinsic motivation for science and students’ ability beliefs for both science and math. Further, mediation analysis using Hayes’ (2014 MEDIATE macro suggests that science intrinsic motivation and ability beliefs mediate the relationship between perceived PBL experiences and student interest in a future STEM career (IFSC. Our results highlight the important potential of PBL for increasing student STEM attitudes and interest in future STEM careers. As one of the only large-scale quantitative analyses of its kind, this study provides critical information for educators, school administrators and policymakers as they continue to seek effective ways of encouraging students to pursue STEM careers.

  13. Comparison of PBL Curricua within Control Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Samaca, Liliana; Nielsen, Kirsten M.; Ramirez, Jose Miguel

    2011-01-01

    During the last twenty years, various forms of PBL have been implemented in diverse educational programs and national policy regulations, and to different extents, ranging from a single course level to an integrated PBL curriculum. This has resulted in a variety of PBL curriculum practices....... In this article, a comparison of two PBL cases will be described in order to study the advantages and disadvantages of the two systems. One case presents a single level comprised of two courses and the other one is an integrated PBL curriculum, and both are focused on control engineering courses. The PBL...

  14. Pengembangan Perangkat Pembelajaran Matematika Berbasis Problem Based Learning (PBL untuk Meningkatkan Kemampuan Pemecahan Masalah Peserta Didik Kelas VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizza Yustianingsih

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian pendahuluan pada kelas VIII SMP di lapangan, masih ditemukan kemampuan pemecahan masalah matematis siswa dalam masalah nyata yang belum optimal dan aktivitas siswa tidak mendukung proses belajar mereka. Salah satu faktornya adalah tidak cocoknya perangkat pembelajaran yang dapat memudahkan pembelajar untuk memperbaiki pemecahan kemampuan matematika dan kemampuan belajar siswa. Dari situ, untuk mendasari melakukan pengembangan perangkat pembelajaran matematika, ada rencana rencana pembelajaran (RPP dan lembar kerja siswa (LKPD berbasis Problem Based Learning (PBL, yang dapat memberikan pengalaman belajar untuk belajar pemecahan masalah dan dapat memberikan efek potensial yang baik pada aktivitas siswa selama proses belajar. Data dikumpulkan melalui observasi, kuesioner, wawancara, dan uji kemampuan pemecahan masalah. Subyek penelitian ini adalah siswa kelas VIII SMP N 3 Sawahlunto. Pengembangan penelitian ini yang digunakan adalah mode Plomp yang terdiri dari tahap awal penelitian, tahap prototipe, dan tahap penilaian. Berdasarkan hasil analisis data, terlihat bahwa alat pembelajaran berdasarkan PBL telah memenuhi kriteria yang valid dalam hal isi dan konstruksi. Peralatan pelajaran telah dianggap praktis dalam hal pelaksanaan dan efisiensi penggunaan waktu oleh guru dan siswa. Alat pelajaran juga efektif dalam hal proses penguasaan presentasi siswa belajar setelah menggunakan pembelajaran berbasis perangkat berbasis pembelajaran lebih besar dari atau sama dengan 75% sedangkan dalam hal hasil rata-rata siswa telah aktif dalam belajar. Kata kunci: Perangkat Pelajaran Matematika, Pemecahan Masalah, PBL.   Abstract. Based on the results of preliminary studies at grade VIII SMP in the field, it is still  found a mathematical problem solving ability of students in real problem who have not optimally and students activities do not support their learning process. One of the  factor is unsuitable of learning tools

  15. Problem Based Learning, curriculum development and change ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Problem Based Learning, curriculum development and change process at ... was started in 1924 and has been running a traditional curriculum for 79 years. ... Methods: The stages taken during the process were described and analysed.

  16. Implementation of team-based learning in year 1 of a PBL based medical program: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; Ayton, Tom; Mellis, Craig

    2016-02-04

    A traditional and effective form of teaching within medical education has been Problem Based Learning (PBL). However, this method of teaching is resource intensive, normally requiring one tutor for every ten students. Team-based learning (TBL) has gained recent popularity in medical education, and can be applied to large groups of up to 100 students. TBL makes use of the advantages of small group teaching and learning, but in contrast to PBL, does not need large numbers of teachers. This study sought to explore the efficacy of using TBL in place of PBL in Year 1 of a medical program. In Year 1 of the medical program, two iterations of TBL, with 20 students, were run following four iterations of PBL within the Cardiology teaching block. Student feedback following PBL and TBL was collected by questionnaire, using closed and open ended questions. Additionally, individual and team tests were held at the beginning of each TBL class, and results of each week were compared. All students (n = 20) participated in the test in week 1, and 18/20 students participated in week 2. In total, 19/20 (95%) of students completed the questionnaires regarding their PBL and TBL experiences. The use of small groups, the readiness assurance tests, immediate feedback from an expert clinician, as well as time efficiency were all aspects of the TBL experience that students found positive. The clinical problem-solving activity, however, was considered to be less effective with TBL. There was a significant improvement (p = 0.004) in students' score from the week 1 assessment (median = 2) to the week 2 (median = 3.5) assessment. Interestingly, all teams but one (Team 1) achieved a lower score on their second week assessment than on their first. However, the lowest performing team in week 1 outperformed all other teams in week 2. Students favoured many aspects of the TBL process, particularly motivation to do the pre-reading, and better engagement in the process. Additionally, the

  17. Transversal knowledge formations in Professional Bachelor Education employing Problem Based Learning (PBL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Verner

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the principles underlying how various knowledge areas blend into transversal formations in two educational contexts employing PBL. Such ‘transversality’ has often been referred to as inter- cross- or trans-disciplinarity. However, these terms are ambiguous, especially...... case studies - Nursing and the Constructing Architect education - have been researched, compared and contrasted in order to demonstrate how institutional practices demonstrate different modalities of transversal knowledge in their PBL-courses. For the purpose of this paper Nursing Education...

  18. An Implementation of Problem-Based Learning (PBL in Postgraduate Engineering Education According to the Students Uma Implementação da Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas (PBL na Pós-Graduação em Engenharia sob a Ótica dos Alunos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Graça Nicoletti Mizukami

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Problem-based Learning (PBL is an instructional method that – contrary to conventional models that place application problems after the introduction of a concept or content – uses a problem to motivate, focus and initiate learning. Besides promoting the construction of knowledge, this methodology aims at the development of skills and attitudes deemed as important for effective professional practice. This research, of a qualitative nature, analyses a PBL implementation developed in a course of the postgraduate engineering curriculum at a public university in Brazil. The data were collected through participant observation, non-structured interviews and an end-of-semester questionnaire, when the students were asked to evaluate the methodology, its advantages and disadvantages and its attainment to the course educational goals, i.e., knowledge, skills and attitudes. Despite increasing their study time and workload, most of the students favored the methodology for providing more motivating and active classes, and for assisting in the development of interpersonal, research and problem-solving skills as well as attitudes such as respect for other points of view, adaptability, self-directed learning, collaboration etc.A Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas ou PBL (Problem-Based Learning, ao contrário do modelo convencional, usa o problema para motivar, focar e iniciar a aprendizagem. Além de promover a construção dos conhecimentos a PBL objetiva o desenvolvimento de habilidades e atitudes tidas como importantes para uma prática profissional efetiva. Este trabalho, uma pesquisa-intervenção de natureza qualitativa, analisa a avaliação de alunos sobre uma implementação da PBL em uma disciplina de pós-graduação em engenharia de uma universidade pública em São Carlos, SP. Os dados utilizados neste trabalho foram coletados por meio de observação participante, entrevistas não estruturadas e de um questionário de final de curso respondido

  19. Teaching science problem based learning (PBL) implementation of rocks and minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Carla; Ruas, Fátima; Godinho, Margarida; Martins, Anabela

    2016-04-01

    Problem Based Learning (PBL) is a teaching methodology based on the Inquiry Teaching approach, which consists of finding a solution to a problem that requires the use of higher-level cognitive skills. It's best carried out in small groups. (I) First the teacher asks some questions related to the implementation of rocks and minerals in the schooĺs area and in our life. (II) Then the teacher leads students to an area of the city (Avenida dos Aliados - Porto) and asks them to look at the buildings and the objects there are. They should take pictures and notes. (III) Finally, in the classroom, the teacher gives an object (phone, CD, lamp, lipstick, dish/cup, etc.) to each group and asks them to do a research to find out what materials they contain or are made of. The teacher helps students to think about where and how they can find information about the subject. Students should proceed with their research by presenting the results to their colleagues, discussing in groups, doing brainstorming and collaborating in the learning process. After the discussion the students must present their conclusions. The main aims are: to report some applications of rocks in society; to recognize the rocks used in some buildings of the region where the school is located; to respect and preserve the traditional architecture of the rocks in each region; and to raise awareness among young people about environmental issues of preservation and sustainability of our planet. The teacher finishes the lesson, asking some other questions: Will it be possible to use the natural resources of other planets? Can human beings use them to their advantage? This educational approach motivates students towards science, helping them to solve problems from their daily life and in collaborative work. The cognitive strand continues to be the most valued for pupils.

  20. Metode Jaringan Syaraf Tiruan Untuk Prediksi Performa Mahasiswa Pada Pembelajaran Berbasis Problem Based Learning (PBL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badieah Badieah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve academic quality in higher education, students’ performance evaluation is becoming important. To prevent increasing failure rate in the course, we need a system that is capable of predicting student’s performance in the end of the course. The research used several factors that are considered to affect students' performance on Problem Based Learning (PBL, such as students’ demography, students’ prior knowledge and group heterogeneity.  The method used in the study was Artificial Neural Network (ANN with backpropagation training algorithm. Total 8 neurons were used as inputs for ANN which were obtained from gender variable (2 neurons, age variable (1 neuron, students’ average knowledge variable (1 neuron, students’ average skill variable (1 neuron and group heterogeneity variable (3 neurons. Several different ANN architecture were tested in the study using 2, 7 and 12 hidden neurons respectively. Each architecture was trained using various different training parameters in order to find the best ANN architecture. Dataset used  in the research were obtained from Academic Information System in Faculty of Dentistry Unissula which contained Adult and Elderly Diseases Course’s participants from year 2009 to 2013. The ANN output were numeric values which represented students’ performance in Adult and Elderly Diseases Course. The output of this study is a system that is able to predict the student performance in block course. The result shows that using 7 hidden neurons in the network combining with 0.5 ,0.1 and  9000 for learning rate, momentum and epoch respectively, were the best ANN architechture and parameters in the study. The MSE obtained from validation test was 0,011926 with correlation coefficient (R 0,796879. The prediction system are expected to help faculty and academic evaluation team to conduct actions to improve student’s academic performance and prevent them from failure in the course.

  1. The Learning Potentials Integrating Social Media or Web 2.0 in a Problem Based Learning (PBL) Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian

    2013-01-01

    during lectures using a same time web 2.0 tool called Etherpad . This activity is going on during the course and gives the teacher a view of where the students have issues related to the theories or methods introduced during lecture. Interesting perspectives on how to integrate social media or web 2......This abstract relates to my PhD research entitled. The PhD is based on research going on at Aalborg University (AAU) within the Faculty of Social Science, meaning that the learning approach taken in this paper is based on the AAU PBL model (Kolmos, Fink, & Krogh, 2004; Kolmos, 2009). The research...... and collaboration among students, and Facebook was chosen among the students as the platform. Scenario 2b is giving the students a presentation to two web 2.0 tools for sharing and collaboration, enabled to support them in their sharing and collaboration as a group (class) and as smaller groups. The tools presented...

  2. Integration of Sustainability in Engineering Education: Why Is PBL an Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Aida

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Education for sustainable development (ESD) is one of the challenges engineering education currently faces. Engineering education needs to revise and change its curriculum to integrate ESD principles and knowledge. Problem based learning (PBL) has been one of the main learning pedagogies used to integrate sustainability in engineering…

  3. ANALISIS DESKRIPTIF DALAM PENERAPAN MODEL PEMBELAJARAN PBL (PROBLEM BASED LEARNING OLEH GURU MATA PELAJARAN EKONOMI SMA NEGERI 1 SLIYEG KABUPATEN INDRAMAYU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheilla Az Zahra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Permasalahan dalam penelitian ini antara lain : (1 Perencanaan pembelajaran PBL oleh guru Ekonomi (2 Pelaksanaan pembelajaran PBL oleh guru Ekonomi di SMAN 1 Sliyeg (3 Evaluasi pembelajaran PBL oleh guru Ekonomi. Metode yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah metode kualitatif. Penelitian ini dilaksanakan di SMA Negeri 1 Sliyeg Kabupaten Indramayu. Alat analisis data adalah analisis interaksi. Teknik pengumpulan data menggunakan wawancara dan dokumentasi. Informan utama adalah guru mata pelajaran Ekonomi. Teknik analisis data dalam penelitian ini meliputi : pengumpulan data, reduksi data, penyajian data, dan penarikan kesimpulan atau verifikasi data. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa guru-guru mata pelajaran Ekonomi di SMAN 1 Sliyeg selalu membuat perangkat pembelajaran di awal semester dan selalu menyusun dan mempersiapkan RPP sebelum mengajar. Pelaksanaan pembelajaran PBL oleh guru Ekonomi sudah cukup baik dan guru pun cukup memahami mengenai PBL dan mendapat respon positif dari siswa. Evaluasi dan penilaian dari guru Ekonomi masing-masing mempunyai cara yang berbeda, seperti quiz dan tanya jawab, lalu guru memberi nilai tambahan kepada siswa yang aktif dalam menjawab. Saran yang diberikan dalam penelitian ini adalah guru sebaiknya meningkatkan pemahaman mengenai pembelajaran PBL. Guru harus lebih berwawasan luas, meningkatkan kretivitas dan inovatif dalam pelaksanaan PBL. Guru harus memperluas wawasan dan lebih kreatif lagi dalam mengembangkan cara evaluasi pada akhir pembelajaran. One of these models is the learning of model PBL (Problem Based Learning. It is expected that a better model of PBL to increase student activity when compared with the model konvesional.So far this learning process is still dominated by a paradigm that states that a knowledge of the facts is to be memorized. Problems in this study include: (1 Planning of PBL learning by teachers of Economics (2 The implementation of PBL learning by Economics teacher at SMAN 1

  4. Application of scl - pbl method to increase quality learning of industrial statistics course in department of industrial engineering pancasila university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, M.; Hidayah, N. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Currently, there has been a change of new paradigm in the learning model in college, ie from Teacher Centered Learning (TCL) model to Student Centered Learing (SCL). It is generally assumed that the SCL model is better than the TCL model. The Courses of 2nd Industrial Statistics in the Department Industrial Engineering Pancasila University is the subject that belongs to the Basic Engineering group. So far, the applied learning model refers more to the TCL model, and field facts show that the learning outcomes are less satisfactory. Of the three consecutive semesters, ie even semester 2013/2014, 2014/2015, and 2015/2016 obtained grade average is equal to 56.0; 61.1, and 60.5. In the even semester of 2016/2017, Classroom Action Research (CAR) is conducted for this course through the implementation of SCL model with Problem Based Learning (PBL) methods. The hypothesis proposed is that the SCL-PBL model will be able to improve the final grade of the course. The results shows that the average grade of the course can be increased to 73.27. This value was then tested using the ANOVA and the test results concluded that the average grade was significantly different from the average grade value in the previous three semesters.

  5. Development of Curriculum of Learning through Photograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keiko; Aoki, Naokazu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki

    A curriculum of an integrated learning using power of photography in the junior highschool was constructed, and was experimented in the class "Seminar for Photographic Expression" of the integrated learning at a junior high school. The center of the curriculum is viewing photographs and self-expression using photography. By comparing the results of questionnaires investigation between before and after the class it is suggested that the curriculum brings about increase in self-esteem, empathy, and motivation for learning. This educational effect is really to foster ability to live self-sufficient lives. On the basis of these results curriculums which can be conducted by anyone at every junior highschool were proposed.

  6. PBL as a Tool for Staff Development in the Educational Transformation towards PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Kolmos, Anette; Qvist, Palle

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Worldwide, the philosophy of problem based and project based learning (PBL) has been implemented as educational models in diverse practice of teaching and learning. Recent years have witnessed more and more educational transformations towards PBL. Despite the diversity of approaches...... and practices in the process of organizational transformation, staff development remains one of key elements in the transformation process in order to teach staff new PBL practice.. A growing body of literature discussing the role of facilitation in PBL, implementation of PBL at different levels in educational...... practice, PBL online; however, little has been documented on the practice of staff development in PBL, especially through online education in the form of PBL. This paper presents the experiences and reflections of using PBL online as a strategy for staff development based on the practice...

  7. A Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) Approach to Motivate Group Creativity in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang; Kolmos, Anette; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    2012-01-01

    in multiple ways in a PBL environment, such as formal and informal group discussions, regular supervisor meetings and sharing leadership. Furthermore, factors such as common goals, support of peers and openness stimulate motivation. However, the students think that a time schedule is a barrier to group...

  8. An experiment with PBL in higher education as appraised by the teacher and students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Roberto de Camargo Ribeiro

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PBL (Problem-based Learning has gained worldwide acceptance as an effective instructional approach that helps students to acquire knowledge as well as develop desired professional skills and attitudes. Contrary to other conventional methods that use problems after theory has been introduced, PBL uses a problem to initiate, focus and motivate the learning of new concepts. This paper presents and discusses the students' and the teacher's viewpoints on the implementation of PBL in an Administration Theory course of an engineering curriculum at a public university in Brazil. The data were collected by means of unstructured interviews, participant observation and an open-ended questionnaire responded by the students at the end of the course. The results show that despite increasing the workload for the teacher and the students, both evaluated PBL positively because it is more motivating and dynamic.

  9. An experiment with PBL in higher education as appraised by the teacher and students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Roberto de Camargo Ribeiro

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available PBL (Problem-based Learning has gained worldwide acceptance as an effective instructional approach that helps students to acquire knowledge as well as develop desired professional skills and attitudes. Contrary to other conventional methods that use problems after theory has been introduced, PBL uses a problem to initiate, focus and motivate the learning of new concepts. This paper presents and discusses the students' and the teacher's viewpoints on the implementation of PBL in an Administration Theory course of an engineering curriculum at a public university in Brazil. The data were collected by means of unstructured interviews, participant observation and an open-ended questionnaire responded by the students at the end of the course. The results show that despite increasing the workload for the teacher and the students, both evaluated PBL positively because it is more motivating and dynamic.

  10. Teaching pharmacology to medical students in an integrated problem-based learning curriculum:an Australian perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Owen L WOODMAN; Agnes E DODDS; Albert G FRAUMAN; Mosepele MOSEPELE

    2004-01-01

    The world-wide move away from the didactic teaching of single disciples to integrated Problem-based Learning (PBL) curricula in medical education has posed challenges for the basic sciences. In this paper we identify two major challenges. The first challenge is the need to describe a core disciplinary curriculum that can be articulated and mapped onto the new structure. We illustrate how the British Pharmacological Society (BPS) Guidelines are used to evaluate the curriculum coverage in the medical course at The University of Melbourne. The second challenge is to ensure that foundational concepts are given adequate emphasis within the new structure, and in particular, that students have the opportunity to pursue these concepts in their self-directed learning. We illustrate one approach to teaching important pharmacological concepts in an integrated curriculum with a case study from the first year curriculum at The University of Melbourne. Finally, we propose the features of an integrated curriculum that facilitates the learning of basic pharmacology in a situation where PBL and integration sets the curriculum framework.

  11. PENINGKATAN KUALITAS PEMBELAJARAN IPA MELALUI MODEL PROBLEM BASED LEARNING (PBL MENGGUNAKAN AUDIOVISUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Eka Wulandari, Sri Hartati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan Penelitian ini untuk meningkatkan kualitas pembelajaran IPA pada siswa kelas IV melalui model PBL menggunakan audiovisual. Penelitian ini menggunakan desain penelitian tindakan kelas yang berlangsung dalam tiga siklus. Data dianalisis dengan menggunakan teknik analisis deskriptif kuantitatif dan kualitatif. Hasil penelitian menunjukan bahwa (1 Keterampilan guru pada siklus I mendapat skor 18, siklus II skor 22, meningkat pada siklus III skor 25.(2 Aktivitas siswa pada siklus I skor 16,8, pada siklus II skor 22, meningkat menjadi 24,4 pada siklus III. (3 Respon siswa pada siklus I dengan persentase 71% siklus II dengan persentase 78%, meningkat 92% pada siklus III (4 Hasil belajar siswa pada siklus I mengalami ketuntasan klasikal sebesar 60%, siklus II sebesar 73%, dan mengalami peningkatan pada siklus III menjadi 94%. Kesimpulan penelitian ini menunjukan model PBL menggunakan audiovisual dapat meningkatkan kualitas pembelajaran IPA yang ditandai dengan meningkatnya keterampilan guru, aktivitas siswa, respon siswa dan hasil belajar siswa.

  12. Teaching Consumer Law Based on PBL Principles within a Workshop Frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Marie Jull

    2017-01-01

    Changing learning objectives was the beginning of rethinking the pedagogical frame of my courses within a traditional law study program. The objectives were changed in order to aim for students becoming better at reflecting on the curriculum. I chose to work within a workshop frame incorporating some of the Aalborg PBL principles. The two courses…

  13. Evaluating a "Second Life" Problem-Based Learning (PBL) Demonstrator Project: What Can We Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Chris; Savin-Baden, Maggi; Conradi, Emily; Poulton, Terry

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a demonstrator project to evaluate how effectively Immersive Virtual Worlds (IVWs) could support problem-based learning. The project designed, created and evaluated eight scenarios within "Second Life" (SL) for undergraduate courses in health care management and paramedic training. Evaluation was…

  14. Teaching Psychosomatic Medicine Using Problem-Based Learning and Role-Playing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heru, Alison M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Problem-based learning (PBL) has been implemented in medical education world-wide. Despite its popularity, it has not been generally considered useful for residency programs. The author presents a model for the implementation of PBL in residency programs. Method: The author presents a description of a PBL curriculum for teaching…

  15. Dental students' evaluation of 2 community-oriented PBL modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, A K; Collinson, S; Croucher, R

    1999-11-01

    To evaluate dental students' perception of 2 problem-based learning (PBL) modules in Dental Public Health implemented within the context of a traditional formal curriculum. 2 dental community modules were implemented with an 8-month interval between them on the same group of dental undergraduates; the first in Term 2 and the second in Term 4 of a 5-year 15-term dental course. At the end of each module, a semi-structured questionnaire was administered to evaluate the introductory lecture, the fieldwork activity and the organisation of the modules. In both modules, students reported gaining insight into the subject matter, skills in teamwork, making presentations and collecting data. Some students in the 1st module needed more time to fulfil their learning objectives and had difficulty in collecting data. In the 2nd module, students reported that they lacked motivation because of the place of the module within their timetable. Opinions differed about groupwork. The content of and interest generated by fieldwork activity was rated more positively in the 2nd module than the 1st. Less positively rated in the 2nd module was the introductory lecture and module organisation. Implementing PBL within a traditional curriculum does not offer uniform outcomes for students. Optimum group size and adequate time are necessary if students are to benefit from PBL. A consistent and continuous PBL approach should be adopted rather than a sporadic one. Further research should establish the optimum balance between PBL and traditional approaches that would allow students to maximise the benefits of both and to identify those students best equipped to benefit from a 'mixed economy' of learning.

  16. Foster Creative Engineers by PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard; Kolmos, Anette

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, Problem and Project Based Learning (PBL) has been employed by a growing number of educational institutions to foster creative engineers. This paper aims to explore how PBL can develop creativity in engineering education. Accordingly, a qualitative case study was carried out...... with a student satellite project (AAUSAT3) in the department of electronic systems at Aalborg University in Denmark. Multiple methods including interviews and observation were employed. The analysis of the empirical data leads to the findings and discussions that PBL can foster creative engineers by providing...... conditions of problem analysis and solving, the shift from teaching to learning and team based projects. This research therefore contributes to both theory and practice in the PBL setting of engineering education....

  17. Dysfunctional problem-based learning curricula: resolving the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim William K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problem-based learning (PBL has become the most significant innovation in medical education of the past 40 years. In contrast to exam-centered, lecture-based conventional curricula, PBL is a comprehensive curricular strategy that fosters student-centred learning and the skills desired in physicians. The rapid spread of PBL has produced many variants. One of the most common is 'hybrid PBL' where conventional teaching methods are implemented alongside PBL. This paper contends that the mixing of these two opposing educational philosophies can undermine PBL and nullify its positive benefits. Schools using hybrid PBL and lacking medical education expertise may end up with a dysfunctional curriculum worse off than the traditional approach. Discussion For hybrid PBL schools with a dysfunctional curriculum, standard PBL is a cost-feasible option that confers the benefits of the PBL approach. This paper describes the signs of a dysfunctional PBL curriculum to aid hybrid PBL schools in recognising curricular breakdown. Next it discusses alternative curricular strategies and costs associated with PBL. It then details the four critical factors for successful conversion to standard PBL: dealing with staff resistance, understanding the role of lectures, adequate time for preparation and support from the administrative leadership. Summary Hybrid PBL curricula without oversight by staff with medical education expertise can degenerate into dysfunctional curricula inferior even to the traditional approach from which PBL emerged. Such schools should inspect their curriculum periodically for signs of dysfunction to enable timely corrective action. A decision to convert fully to standard PBL is cost feasible but will require time, expertise and commitment which is only sustainable with supportive leadership.

  18. Bridging Innovation and Curriculum in Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Fenzhi; Kolmos, Anette; Du, Xiangyun

    2010-01-01

    As innovation is seen as a key factor in economic competitiveness, graduates who can contribute to and participate in innovation are in great need.. Higher education is confronted with the demands that the curriculum practice and learning environments should facilitate innovation and competences...... for innovation. Problem and project based learning has been seen as a strategy for renewing the teaching practice and the learning environment by integrating the competence demands of the curriculum and of work life during the process of education. However, the integrations of innovation into curriculum...... are minor in the problem and project based learning (PBL) literature. Based on theoretical reflections and practical cases in Aalborg University (Denmark), this article presents the basis of PBL knowledge and curriculum conceptualization, and explores a case experience which bridges innovation and PBL...

  19. Developing Critical Thinking of Middle School Students using Problem Based Learning 4 Core Areas (PBL4C) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridza, R.; E Irving, K.

    2017-02-01

    Traditional methods such as rote learning and memorization in teaching science create passive students in science classrooms. The impact of this continuous action for many decades is inactive learners who cannot develop higher order thinking skills. Based on the performance test, students’ critical thinking skill in Public Middle School 3 Pontianak was in low level although their achievement score were higher than school standards. The purpose of this study is to develop critical thinking skills of middle school students using Problem Based Learning 4 Core Areas (PBL4C). The design of this research is classroom action research with two cycles. Data has been collected using observation checklist, rating scale, self and peer assessment. Research findings reveal that students experience development from 11.11% to 88.45% in identifying the problem correctly, 37.03% to 76.92% for sub skills distinguish knowledge and opinion, 18.51% to 65.38% for sub skills providing possible solution, 22.22% to 69.23% for sub skills making decision, and 11.11% to 69.23% for sub skills identifying the impact of the implementation of their solution. In conclusion, the findings indicate that development of students’ critical thinking skills occurs when PBL4C model applied in science classroom. These findings suggest that teachers should act as facilitator in a classroom as well as should provide meaningful learning resources that can benefit students’ critical thinking skills. On the other hand, students should practice constantly to offer a sharp, accurate and appropriate solution.

  20. Kids as Airborne Mission Scientists: Designing PBL To Inspire Kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszalka, Tiffany A.; Grabowski, Barbara L.; Kim, Younghoon

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has great potential for inspiring K-12 learning. KaAMS, a NASA funded project and an example of PBL, was designed to help teachers inspire middle school students to learn science. The students participate as scientists investigating environmental problems using NASA airborne remote sensing data. Two PBL modules were…

  1. Development of a Survey to Examine the Factors That Motivate Secondary Education Teachers' Use of Problem-Based Learning (PBL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Huei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    In this quantitative study, a survey was developed and administered to middle and high school teachers to examine what factors motivated them to implement problem-based learning (PBL). Using Expectancy-Value Theory by Eccles et al. (1983) and Self-Determination Theory by Ryan and Deci (2000b) as the theoretical framework, this instrument measured…

  2. Evaluation of a Problem Based Learning Curriculum Using Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prihatiningsih, Titi Savitri; Qomariyah, Nurul

    2016-01-01

    Faculty of Medicine UGM has implemented Problem Based Learning (PBL) since 1985. Seven jump tutorial discussions are applied. A scenario is used as a trigger to stimulate students to identify learning objectives (LOs) in step five which are used as the basis for self study in step six. For each scenario, the Block Team formulates the LOs which are…

  3. PBL-SEE: An Authentic Assessment Model for PBL-Based Software Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Simone C.

    2017-01-01

    The problem-based learning (PBL) approach has been successfully applied to teaching software engineering thanks to its principles of group work, learning by solving real problems, and learning environments that match the market realities. However, the lack of well-defined methodologies and processes for implementing the PBL approach represents a…

  4. Problem-based learning in a health sciences librarianship course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroff, A; Ancona, A M; Beman, S B; Dodge, A M; Hutchinson, K L; LaBonte, M J; Mays, T L; Simon, D T

    1998-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been adopted by many medical schools in North America. Because problem solving, information seeking, and lifelong learning skills are central to the PBL curriculum, health sciences librarians have been actively involved in the PBL process at these medical schools. The introduction of PBL in a library and information science curriculum may be appropriate to consider at this time. PBL techniques have been incorporated into a health sciences librarianship course at the School of Library and Information Science (LIS) at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee to explore the use of this method in an advanced Library and Information Science course. After completion of the course, the use of PBL has been evaluated by the students and the instructor. The modified PBL course design is presented and the perceptions of the students and the instructor are discussed. PMID:9681169

  5. From PBL tutoring to PBL coaching in undergraduate medical education: an interpretative phenomenological analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Li, Huiping; Pang, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Coaching psychology is of increasing interest to medical educators for its potential benefits as a facilitative method in problem-based learning (PBL). However, the field lacks empirical studies that explore the lived experiences of students and tutors in the PBL coaching process. This study aimed to elicit knowledge regarding medical students' and tutors' experiences and perceptions of PBL coaching in the context of Chinese undergraduate medical education. The qualitative methodology of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was employed. Participants comprised third year medical students (n=20) and PBL tutors (n=5) who have adopted a coaching approach in PBL for a semester. Semi-structured interviews were utilized to obtain a comprehensive understanding of their experiences of PBL coaching. Data analysis followed an iterative four-stage scheme of Biggerstaff and Thompson. Six main themes emerged from diverse experiences and interpretations: 1) mindsets of coaching and learning, 2) the development of learning dispositions and capacities, 3) student group collaboration, 4) tutor-student relationships, 5) personal and professional development, and 6) challenges and difficulties in implementation. It could be concluded that PBL coaching is a dynamic, facilitative process that makes a particular contribution to the learning process from psychological, emotional, and social perspectives, whilst it demonstrates significant overlaps with PBL tutoring in terms of supporting students' cognitive activities in PBL. Further research is needed to identify the barriers and challenges for medical educators to implement coaching in the PBL process.

  6. From PBL tutoring to PBL coaching in undergraduate medical education: an interpretative phenomenological analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coaching psychology is of increasing interest to medical educators for its potential benefits as a facilitative method in problem-based learning (PBL. However, the field lacks empirical studies that explore the lived experiences of students and tutors in the PBL coaching process. This study aimed to elicit knowledge regarding medical students’ and tutors’ experiences and perceptions of PBL coaching in the context of Chinese undergraduate medical education. Methods: The qualitative methodology of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA was employed. Participants comprised third year medical students (n=20 and PBL tutors (n=5 who have adopted a coaching approach in PBL for a semester. Semi-structured interviews were utilized to obtain a comprehensive understanding of their experiences of PBL coaching. Data analysis followed an iterative four-stage scheme of Biggerstaff and Thompson. Results: Six main themes emerged from diverse experiences and interpretations: 1 mindsets of coaching and learning, 2 the development of learning dispositions and capacities, 3 student group collaboration, 4 tutor–student relationships, 5 personal and professional development, and 6 challenges and difficulties in implementation. Conclusions: It could be concluded that PBL coaching is a dynamic, facilitative process that makes a particular contribution to the learning process from psychological, emotional, and social perspectives, whilst it demonstrates significant overlaps with PBL tutoring in terms of supporting students’ cognitive activities in PBL. Further research is needed to identify the barriers and challenges for medical educators to implement coaching in the PBL process.

  7. A Tutorial Programme to Enhance Psychiatry Learning Processes within a PBL-Based Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Sean; Chapman, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a tutorial programme developed at the University of Western Australia (UWA) to enhance medical students' learning processes within problem-based learning contexts. The programme encourages students to use more effective learning approaches by scaffolding the development of effective problem-solving strategies, and by reducing…

  8. Promoting and supporting PBL interests world wide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig; Kolmos, Anette; Moesby, Egon

    2006-01-01

    of projects world wide focusing on institutional change toward a more student centred, project organised, and problem based approach to learning. The Centre is also establishing a UCPBL Global Network on Problem Based Learning in order to facilitate better access to and co-operation within the PBL area.......-Based Learning (PBL) in Engineering Education, an increasing number of universities and engineering schools throughout the world are seeking consultancy and cooperation with Aalborg University. The establishment of UCPBL is therefore a timely opportunity to merge the efforts into one organisational structure...... aiming to promote and support PBL interests worldwide. This paper presents the UCPBL profile and plan of action. This includes a wide range of activities such as promoting research and development within the various PBL models and their implementation; Education and training in PBL through offering...

  9. Developing Clinical Competency in Crisis Event Management: An Integrated Simulation Problem-Based Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, S. Y.; Chen, F. G.; Klainin, P.; Brammer, J.; O'Brien, A.; Samarasekera, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integration of a simulation based learning activity on nursing students' clinical crisis management performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It was hypothesized that the clinical performance of first year nursing students who participated in a simulated learning activity during the PBL session…

  10. Learning through Debate during Problem-Based Learning: An Active Learning Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, Sadaf; Latif, Rabia

    2017-01-01

    We explored medical student's views and perceptions of a series of debates conducted during problem-based learning (PBL) practiced as a part of the Spiral curriculum at the Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Saudi Arabia. A series of debates were employed during PBL sessions for second-year female medical students, over the period 2014-2016.…

  11. Adding problem-based learning tutorials to a traditional lecture-based curriculum: a pilot study in a dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2005-09-01

    This article reports on the implementation of a problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial in our advanced program for second year students within an existing curriculum. The program was opened on the last 5 days of the summer vacation and students could volunteer to be part of the group. Students separated themselves into small groups by random sampling. The PBL tutorials were done during the first 3 days for medical problems according to our original scenarios (based on medical cases), and during the last 2 days, students made presentations of their learning outcomes, using information technology (IT) by themselves. Throughout this program, students were expected to engage in self-learning, except for a 1(1/2)-h group session with a tutor. Assessment was done by attendance at a group session and by portfolio analysis. Following the portfolio analysis, students identified the number of learning issues (group A, 26 +/- 7 issues; group B, 20 +/- 3 issues; group C, 21 +/- 7 issues). Research, by questionnaire, revealed that 84% of the students were strongly interested in each scenario and 95% of the students felt familiar with each scenario. The levels of satisfaction with the tutor were different in the three groups. All of the students were comfortable in the discussion room and IT center. These results suggested that PBL tutorials are supported by the scenario, the tutor, and the location of the group session, as well as by self-learning. Moreover, one of the most important factors for a PBL tutorial that the student is ready for the free discussions and has enough time for individual self-learning.

  12. Project-Based Learning in Post-WWII Japanese School Curriculum: An Analysis via Curriculum Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    In the 2000s, the new national curriculum, dubbed as the "yutori curriculum," introduced a new subject for project-based learning "Integrated Study" as its prominent feature. Comparing curriculum orientations in project-based learning in three historical periods after the WWII including Integrated Study, this paper aims to…

  13. The integration of blended learning into an occupational therapy curriculum: a qualitative reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard-Ashton, Paula; Rothberg, Alan; McInerney, Patricia

    2017-08-17

    This paper presents a critical reflection of the integration of Blended Learning (BL) into an undergraduate occupational therapy curriculum which was delivered through Problem Based Learning (PBL). This is a qualitative reflection of a Participatory Action Research (PAR) study using Brookfield's model for critical reflection of an educator's practice. The model uses four 'lenses' through which to focus enquiry: Lens 1) our autobiography as a learner of practice; Lens 2) our learners' eyes; Lens 3) our colleagues' experiences; and Lens 4) the theoretical literature. Grounded theory analysis was applied to the data. The factors that contributed to successful integration of technology and e-Learning into an existing curriculum, the hurdles that were navigated along the way, and how these influenced decisions and innovation are explored. The core categories identified in the data were "drivers of change" and "outcomes of BL integration". Key situations and pivotal events are highlighted for their role in the process that led to the project maturing. Each lens reflects the successes and hurdles experienced during the study. Brookfield's model provides an objective method of reflection which showed that despite the hurdles, e-Learning was successfully integrated into the curriculum.

  14. Targeting Transfer in a STELLAR PBL Course for Pre-Service Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.; Derry, Sharon J.; Bitterman, Alan; Hatrak, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    Helping students in the professions apply conceptual ideas to the problems of practice is a key goal of problem-based learning (PBL). Because PBL is organized around small, collaborative groups, scaling up PBL to large, heterogeneous classes poses significant challenges for implementation. This study presents a hybrid model that mixes online and face-to-face PBL. The STELLAR system was developed to support online and hybrid PBL courses for pre-service teachers. It allows PBL to be implemented...

  15. Balancing Teaching and Research in a PBL Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    2016-01-01

    as a main function area of a PBL model. However, the research component is not well embedded in a PBL model; most of the time teaching-based research is not considered or is not part of PBL teaching and learning. Hence, this paper studies the reciprocity of research-based teaching and teaching...

  16. PBL in Educational Psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szulevicz, Thomas; Jensen, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses practical and theoretical aspects related to PBL. In the first section of the article, potentials related to professional training of forthcoming educational psychologists following PBL-principles are analyzed. It is argued that PBL constitutes a good platform for creating ...

  17. Effects of conventional and problem-based learning on clinical and general competencies and career development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Geertsma, Jelle; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    OBJECTIVE: To test hypotheses regarding the longitudinal effects of problem-based learning (PBL) and conventional learning relating to students' appreciation of the curriculum, self-assessment of general competencies, summative assessment of clinical competence and indicators of career development.

  18. Is problem-based learning a quality approach to education in health sciences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, C Y

    2001-07-01

    The Faculty of Health Sciences at McMaster University has pioneered, experimented and finally excelled in the application of problem-based learning (PBL) as an entire medical curriculum for the past 35 years. However, the general practice of PBL by other medical schools around the globe has progressed slowly. In theory, PBL as an educational philosophy has long been considered as a quality cognitive concept and was adopted by many medical schools via curriculum reform to improve students' learning attitude. In practice, what is the experimental evidence for PBL meeting the expectation of a quality education in health sciences? How do we differentiate problems associated with PBL philosophy per se from those associated with the ways PBL are handled and implemented? I will address these questions from the perspective of the assessment of performance of students, graduates and practising physicians from the PBL track compared to those from the conventional track based on literature information. Ample evidence suggests that PBL is superior in producing more compassionate physicians and graduates with lifelong learning and leadership quality. But, some educators and administrators are still skeptical that the benefits from PBL may be too marginal to justify the resources required in sustaining it. In this presentation, the assessment of PBL, in both theoretical and practical terms, will be discussed using McMaster PBL as a convenient example because of its relatively long history in practising PBL in medical education.

  19. PBL on Line: A Proposal for the Organization, Part-Time Monitoring and Assessment of PBL Group Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Enric; Gil, Debora; Gurguí, Antoni; Hernández-Sabaté, Aura; Rocarías, Jaume; Poveda, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    This report presents the organisation of PBL (Project Based Learning) for a subject included in the IT engineering degree course. It is the result of 10 years of experience of the implantation and continuous improvement of the PBL class structure. The latest innovations include the experience of part-time monitoring with PBL groups using the Open…

  20. Using Problem-based learning (PBL) in teaching law to social work students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Trine

    legal problems in small groups and the group-work is complemented by a web-based learning space, where the students have the opportunity to ask questions to the teacher. In this paper the motivation, challenges and experiences of introducing a new teaching strategy and pedagogical approach is presented.......In Aalborg, the law teachers have chosen to supply traditional lectures with case-based instruction focused on problem-based learning. The inspiration comes from the "seven jump step" of the Maastricht model, but it has been modified for the purpose of teaching law. The students work with specific...

  1. Convergence of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Tools in Project Based Learning (PBL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamarasseri, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Rapid technological advancement influences the communication and information management as well as knowledge construction. Within the context of new challenges, lifelong learning emerges a fundamental element for the constant development of professionals. So that it dynamically adapts to change and retain a state-of-the-art identity. At present,…

  2. Perbedaan hasil belajar fisika siswa antara model pembelajaran Problem Based Learning (PBL dengan model pembelajaran Prediction, Observation, and Explanation (POE di kelas X SMA Negeri 5 Lubuklinggau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Ariani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui Perbedaan Hasil Belajar Fisika Siswa antara Model Pembelajaran Problem Based Learning (PBL dengan Model Pembelajaran Prediction, Observation, And Explanation (POE di Kelas X SMA Negeri 5 Lubuklinggau Tahun Pelajaran 2015/2016. Jenis penelitian ini adalah penelitian kuantitatif dengan metode penelitian eksperimen semu yang dilaksanakan dengan membandingkan kelompok eksperimen I dan kelompok eksperimen II desain penelitian  ini pre-test post-test group design. Populasi penelitian ini adalah seluruh siswa kelas X SMA Negeri 5 Lubuklinggau Tahun Pelajaran 2015/2016, yang terdiri dari 314 siswa dari 9 kelas. Pengambilan sampel dilakukan secara acak (Simple Random Sampling dengan cara pengundian nomor kelas populasi. Pengumpulan data berupa tes, data tes yang sudah dianalisis dengan uji-t, pada taraf  a= 0,05, diperoleh thitung > ttabel (2,17 > 2,00. Rata-rata akhir hasil belajar fisika kelas eksperimen I sebesar 73,4 sedangkan pada kelas kelas eksperimen II  sebesar 69,14. Sehingga dapat disimpulkan ada Perbedaan Hasil Belajar Fisika Siswa antara Model Pembelajaran Problem Based Learning (PBL Dengan Model Pembelajaran Prediction, Observation, And Explanation (POE Di Kelas X SMA Negeri 5 Lubuklinggau Tahun Pelajaran 2015/2016. The aim of this research was to find out the Comparative Results Between Students Studying Physics Learning Model Problem Based Learning (PBL with Learning Model Prediction, Observation, And Explanation (POE in the Class X SMAN 5 Lubuklinggau 2015/2016 Academic Year . This research was a quantitative research methods of experimental research conducted by comparing the experimental group I and group II experimental research design was a pre-test post-test group design. As the population in this research were all students of class X SMA Negeri 5 Lubuklinggau Academic Year 2015/2016, consisting of 314 students from the ninth grade. Sampling is done randomly (Simple Random Sampling by

  3. Supporting traditional PBL with online discussion forums: a study from Qassim Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamro, Ahmad S; Schofield, Susie

    2012-01-01

    The Qassim Medical School first year curriculum includes a 5-week problem-based learning (PBL) block. Student evaluation has highlighted inadequate feedback and lack of student-student and student-tutor interactions. An online intervention may alleviate this. For each problem, a discussion forum (DF) was created with 14 threads (one for each group) in virtual PBL rooms. Students' and tutors' perceived satisfaction of the intervention was evaluated and types of posts were classified. By the end of the block, all academic staff involved and 123 students (95%) had participated in the DFs. There were around 2800 posts and 28,500 views. All 14 tutors and 102 (78%) students completed the online questionnaire. Of the students, 66 (76%) male and 36 (92%) female students responded. Overall, both students and tutors perceived the intervention positively. Posts included: reforming and finalizing learning objectives, posting the concept map constructed in the face-to-face session and questioning, encouraging and motivating each other. In addition, posts included tutors' feedback and redirection. Blending e-learning with conventional PBL may help overcome student-perceived shortcomings of conventional PBL and improve the learning experience, making learning more interactive and interesting.

  4. Effect of a PBL teaching method on learning about nursing care for patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrue, Marta; Ruiz de Alegría, Begoña; Zarandona, Jagoba; Hoyos Cillero, Itziar

    2017-05-01

    Depression is a worldwide public health problem that requires the attention of qualified health professionals. The training of skilled nurses is a challenge for nursing instructors due to the complexity of this pathology. The aim was to analyse the declarative and argumentative knowledge acquired about depression by students receiving traditional expository instruction versus students receiving problem-based learning instruction. Quasi-experimental study with pre-test and post-test design in experimental and control group to measure differences in the improvement of declarative and argumentative knowledge. Non parametric tests were used to compare the scores between the experimental group and the control group, and between the pre-test and post-test in each group. 114 students participated in the study. Implementation of the study took place during the 2014-2015 academic year in the third year of the Nursing undergraduate degree courses in the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) as part of the Mental Health Nursing subject. The data indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between the two methodologies in regard to declarative knowledge in the care of patients with depression. Nevertheless, the argumentative capacity of the experimental group improved significantly with the problem-based learning methodology (p=0.000). The results of the implementation indicated that problem-based learning was a satisfactory tool for the acquisition of argumentative capacity in depression nursing care. Still, working examples of teaching sequences that bridge the gap between general clinical practice and classroom practice remain an important goal for continuing research in nursing education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 芸術表現教育におけるPBL(Project-BasedLearning)の実践研究

    OpenAIRE

    村上, タカシ

    2009-01-01

    「芸術表現教育におけるPBL(Project-Based Learning)の実践研究」とは、芸術表現活動においては、美術作品(平面作品、立体作品、映像作品、パフォーマンス等の身体表現やワークショップ等)を制作しながら学ぶ造形活動と鑑賞活動があるが個人が個々の表現媒体で平面や立体作品等のビジュアルアーツ作品を創るという従来型の制作やパフォーミングアーツ(身体表現)とは異なり、現代の多様な表現形態を組み込みつつ、プロジェクト型のアートワークも「行為としてのアート」(作品)として捉え、芸術表現活動に位置づけ、大学内の実践授業としてもプロジェクト型授業の一環として学生参加のシステム構築や教材開発等を実践的に研究したものである。...

  6. Learner Perspectives of Online Problem-Based Learning and Applications from Cognitive Load Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) courses have historically been situated in physical classrooms involving in-person interactions. As online learning is embraced in higher education, programs that use PBL can integrate online platforms to support curriculum delivery and facilitate student engagement. This report describes student perspectives of the…

  7. Problem-Based Learning in Communication Systems: Student Perceptions and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John E.; Canavan, Brian; Smith, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a curriculum design for, and subsequent evaluation of, a communications systems course using problem-based learning (PBL) as the instructional methodology. It details the rationale for implementing PBL as well as reporting intended learning outcomes and assessing the students' achievements. (Contains 2 figures and 4 tables.)

  8. Teacher's experiences in PBL: implications for practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Anabela C.; Sousa, Rui M.; Fernandes, Sandra; Cardoso, Elisabete; Carvalho, Maria Alice; Figueiredo, Jorge; Pereira, Rui M. S.

    2016-03-01

    Project-Based Learning (PBL) has been implemented in the first year of the Industrial Engineering and Management programme at the University of Minho, Portugal, since 2004/2005. The purpose of this paper is to analyse and discuss teachers' experiences in PBL in this programme and to explore its implications for student learning and for teaching practices in higher education. For data collection, the research method used was written narratives to these teachers, at the end of the PBL semester. Findings suggest that teachers express a positive view of PBL as a learning approach. They identify student motivation and engagement, along with a better understanding of the application of concepts in real-life situations, as important outcomes of the project for students. Besides this, teachers also highlight the importance of the development of transversal skills by students throughout the project. Recommendations for future work and implications for practice will also be discussed.

  9. Curriculum Q-Learning for Visual Vocabulary Acquisition

    OpenAIRE

    Zaidi, Ahmed H.; Moore, Russell; Briscoe, Ted

    2017-01-01

    The structure of curriculum plays a vital role in our learning process, both as children and adults. Presenting material in ascending order of difficulty that also exploits prior knowledge can have a significant impact on the rate of learning. However, the notion of difficulty and prior knowledge differs from person to person. Motivated by the need for a personalised curriculum, we present a novel method of curriculum learning for vocabulary words in the form of visual prompts. We employ a re...

  10. Problem based learning: tutors' views 5 years after implementation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Curriculum evaluation is key to continuous assurance of quality of ... Activities evaluated included; students assessment, self-directed learning, ... Conclusion: PBL/COBES program was successfully executed and had high ...

  11. College Preparation for Students with Learning Disabilities: A Curriculum Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whinnery, Keith W.

    1992-01-01

    A college preparation curriculum relevant to the needs of students with learning disabilities is presented, focusing on early planning, instructional modifications, strategy instruction, and support services. (JDD)

  12. Curriculum as Environments for Learning: A Practicel Meaning and Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Robert L.; Ghory, Ward J.

    Effective curriculum development and implementation may be achieved by considering the multidimensional nature of the term "curriculum." A definition of curriculum should be considered in terms of its expressed, implied, and emergent dimensions. The expressed dimension is the written statement of learning objectives, sequence of contents, learning…

  13. Innovation and PBL Implementation in Higher Education-Approaches for Educational Change to PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Huichun; Stojcevski, Alex; Du, Xiangyun

    2010-01-01

    organizational profile. In this paper, we review three international universities from different context which are in the process of transforming their traditional education model to PBL one. We discuss their approaches of changing to PBL from three aspects: strategies, levels, as well as time.......As an innovative and promising education approach, PBL(problem and project based learning) has been adopted by various higher education institutions which are attempting to promote teaching and learning outcome, cultivate self learning and problem solving competences, as well as enhance...

  14. Student approaches for learning in medicine: what does it tell us about the informal curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianzhen; Peterson, Raymond F; Ozolins, Ieva Z

    2011-10-21

    It has long been acknowledged that medical students frequently focus their learning on that which will enable them to pass examinations, and that they use a range of study approaches and resources in preparing for their examinations. A recent qualitative study identified that in addition to the formal curriculum, students are using a range of resources and study strategies which could be attributed to the informal curriculum. What is not clearly established is the extent to which these informal learning resources and strategies are utilized by medical students. The aim of this study was to establish the extent to which students in a graduate-entry medical program use various learning approaches to assist their learning and preparation for examinations, apart from those resources offered as part of the formal curriculum. A validated survey instrument was administered to 522 medical students. Factor analysis and internal consistence, descriptive analysis and comparisons with demographic variables were completed. The factor analysis identified eight scales with acceptable levels of internal consistency with an alpha coefficient between 0.72 and 0.96. Nearly 80% of the students reported that they were overwhelmed by the amount of work that was perceived necessary to complete the formal curriculum, with 74.3% believing that the informal learning approaches helped them pass the examinations. 61.3% believed that they prepared them to be good doctors. A variety of informal learning activities utilized by students included using past student notes (85.8%) and PBL tutor guides (62.7%), and being part of self-organised study groups (62.6%), and peer-led tutorials (60.2%). Almost all students accessed the formal school resources for at least 10% of their study time. Students in the first year of the program were more likely to rely on the formal curriculum resources compared to those of Year 2 (p = 0.008). Curriculum planners should examine the level of use of informal

  15. Teaching learning methods of an entrepreneurship curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmi, Keramat; Marzoughi, Rahmatallah; Torkzadeh, Jafar

    2015-10-01

    One of the most significant elements of entrepreneurship curriculum design is teaching-learning methods, which plays a key role in studies and researches related to such a curriculum. It is the teaching method, and systematic, organized and logical ways of providing lessons that should be consistent with entrepreneurship goals and contents, and should also be developed according to the learners' needs. Therefore, the current study aimed to introduce appropriate, modern, and effective methods of teaching entrepreneurship and their validation. This is a mixed method research of a sequential exploratory kind conducted through two stages: a) developing teaching methods of entrepreneurship curriculum, and b) validating developed framework. Data were collected through "triangulation" (study of documents, investigating theoretical basics and the literature, and semi-structured interviews with key experts). Since the literature on this topic is very rich, and views of the key experts are vast, directed and summative content analysis was used. In the second stage, qualitative credibility of research findings was obtained using qualitative validation criteria (credibility, confirmability, and transferability), and applying various techniques. Moreover, in order to make sure that the qualitative part is reliable, reliability test was used. Moreover, quantitative validation of the developed framework was conducted utilizing exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis methods and Cronbach's alpha. The data were gathered through distributing a three-aspect questionnaire (direct presentation teaching methods, interactive, and practical-operational aspects) with 29 items among 90 curriculum scholars. Target population was selected by means of purposive sampling and representative sample. Results obtained from exploratory factor analysis showed that a three factor structure is an appropriate method for describing elements of teaching-learning methods of entrepreneurship curriculum

  16. Teaching learning methods of an entrepreneurship curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KERAMAT ESMI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most significant elements of entrepreneurship curriculum design is teaching-learning methods, which plays a key role in studies and researches related to such a curriculum. It is the teaching method, and systematic, organized and logical ways of providing lessons that should be consistent with entrepreneurship goals and contents, and should also be developed according to the learners’ needs. Therefore, the current study aimed to introduce appropriate, modern, and effective methods of teaching entrepreneurship and their validation Methods: This is a mixed method research of a sequential exploratory kind conducted through two stages: a developing teaching methods of entrepreneurship curriculum, and b validating developed framework. Data were collected through “triangulation” (study of documents, investigating theoretical basics and the literature, and semi-structured interviews with key experts. Since the literature on this topic is very rich, and views of the key experts are vast, directed and summative content analysis was used. In the second stage, qualitative credibility of research findings was obtained using qualitative validation criteria (credibility, confirmability, and transferability, and applying various techniques. Moreover, in order to make sure that the qualitative part is reliable, reliability test was used. Moreover, quantitative validation of the developed framework was conducted utilizing exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis methods and Cronbach’s alpha. The data were gathered through distributing a three-aspect questionnaire (direct presentation teaching methods, interactive, and practical-operational aspects with 29 items among 90 curriculum scholars. Target population was selected by means of purposive sampling and representative sample. Results: Results obtained from exploratory factor analysis showed that a three factor structure is an appropriate method for describing elements of

  17. The impact of an interprofessional problem-based learning curriculum of clinical ethics on medical and nursing students' attitudes and ability of interprofessional collaboration: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Chih; Chan, Te-Fu; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Chin, Chi-Chun; Chou, Fan-Hao; Lin, Hui-Ju

    2013-09-01

    Clinical ethic situations in modern multiprofessional healthcare systems may involve different healthcare professions who work together for patient care. The undergraduate interprofessional education of clinical ethics would help to incubate healthcare students' ability of interprofessional collaboration in solving ethical problems. However, the impact from an interprofessional educational model on student's attitudes and confidence of interprofessional collaboration should be carefully evaluated during the process of curricular development. This study aimed to conduct a pilot interprofessional PBL curriculum of clinical ethics and evaluate the curricular impact on interprofessional students' attitude and confidence of collaborative teamwork. Thirty-six medical and nursing students volunteered to participate in this study and were divided into three groups (medical group, nursing group, and mixed group). Tutors were recruited from the Medical School and the College of Nursing. The pilot curriculum included one lecture of clinical ethics, one PBL case study with two tutorial sessions, and one session of group discussion and feedback. A narrative story with multiple story lines and a multiperspective problem analysis tool were used in the PBL tutorials. The students' self-evaluation of learning questionnaire was used to evaluate students' learning of clinical ethics and interprofessional collaborative skills and attitude. The internal consistency of the questionnaire was measured by Cronbach α, and the criterion-related validity of the questionnaire was evaluated through associations between the dimension scores with the student group by one-way analysis of variance test (ANOVA) test and Tukey-Kramer honestly significant difference (HSD) comparison. There was significant difference among different groups in students' ability and attitudes about "interprofessional communication and collaboration" (p = 0.0184). The scores in the mixed group (37.58 ± 3.26) were higher

  18. PENINGKATAN AKTIFITAS DAN HASIL BELAJAR DENGAN METODE PROBLEM BASIC LEARNING (PBL PADA MATA PELAJARAN TUNE UP MOTOR BENSIN SISWA KELAS XI DI SMK INSAN CENDEKIA TURI SLEMAN TAHUN AJARAN 2015/2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermawan Budi Santoso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to know the increase of learning activityand result using Problem Based Learning in motorbike gasoline Tune-up lesson for students in grade XI SMK Insan Cendekia Sleman. This research is a kind of action research, which in the process applying the PBL method. This research has 4 steps, which are planning, application, observation and reflection. The observation of students activity in applying PBL learning is done by going to the class directly while the learning process is still ongoing. While, the result of student learning is measured by first assessment and final assessment. The result shows that after PBL method which is given to the students there is an increase of learning activity in amount 60%, while the increase of learning result in time of observation is approximately getting 6,5 for average mark First cycle, the average mark is 6,5, while for the second cycle 6,8 and 7,3 for third cycle. These evidences show PBL method application can increase the learning activity and result using Problem Based Learning in motorbike gasoline Tune-up lesson for students in grade XI SMK Insan Cendekia Sleman

  19. Engineering Students: Enhancing Employability Skills through PBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    H, Othman; Mat Daud K., A.; U, Ewon; Salleh B, Mohd; Omar N., H.; Baser J, Abd; Ismail M., E.; A, Sulaiman

    2017-05-01

    As a developing country, Malaysia faces challenging tasks to develop her economy just like many other countries. Nowadays, change involves many aspects like the economy from agriculture to manufacturing, technology from modern to more advanced ones; mindset from traditional to advanced and so on. Previous studies show that one of the major issues facing local graduates is the lack of employability skills. This problem concerns not only the government but undergraduates and institutions alike. From the pedagogical aspect, one of the more effective ways to improve this is through instructional delivery and in this case the use of Problem-based Learning (PBL). The need to adopt PBL should involved applied subjects undertaken by engineering students. Studies have shown that the use of PBL has been proven to make learning more attractive and effective. In this research, we studied the effectiveness of PBL towards enhancing employability skills among engineering undergraduates. This study adopted a combination of qualitative and quantitative approaches. Data was collected using documents analysis. Student samples comprised manufacturing engineering undergraduates from public institutions of higher learning in Malaysia. The results show that student’s employability skills can be enhanced using PBL. In addition, students become more competitive towards making them more relevance with the needs of the industry with regard to employability skills. In conclusion, PBL is a very effective catalyst towards raising the employability skills among engineering undergraduates and should be adopted in all engineering education.

  20. Developing intercultural competencies in a PBL environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Hansen, Carsten Jahn

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the influences of international programs in a problem based, project and group work organized learning (PBL) environment on the development of intercultural competencies. Based on the discussion of the positive effects as well as the observed barriers in the educational...... practice of international programs, this paper suggests that PBL can be a good example of a supportive learning environment in terms of providing students opportunities to develop intercultural competences. However, in order to make the best of international programs as an intercultural learning context...... students from different cultures can learn from each other and develop intercultural competencies together....

  1. Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robi Kroflič

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern curriculum theories emphasize that if we understand the curriculum as a real core substance of education. We have to bear in mind, when planning the curriculum, the whole multitude of factors (curricula which have an influence on the educational impact. In the field of andragogy, we especially have to consider educational needs, and linking the strategies of instruction with those of learning. The best way of realizing this principle is the open strategy of planning the national curriculum and process-developmental strategy of planning with the microandragogic situation. This planning strategy is S1m1lar to the system-integration strategy and Jarvis's model of negotiated curriculum, which derive from the basic andragogic principle: that the interests and capacities of adults for education increase if we enable them to cooperate in the planning and production of the curriculum.

  2. Teaching PBL with Web 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Nina Bonderup; Buus, Lillian

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0-mediated learning activities are associated with a number of potentials for learning. Among these potentials are pedagogical advantages connected with bottom-up user-generation of content; opportunities for organizing flexible learning; and possibilities of supporting the development...... of competences necessary for participating in contemporary society. In this article we report on a study of three cases where web 2.0 activities have been introduced into PBL settings. Our focus is the unexpected challenges teachers may face due to inherent tensions between the practice logic of the educational...... system and that of web 2.0-practices. The study documents the development of viable ways of making use of web 2.0-mediated activities in support of a PBL approach and thus provides existence proof that web 2.0 activities may contribute constructively and productively to learning within a PBL perspective...

  3. Case Study of a Project-Based Learning Course in Civil Engineering Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the use of project-based learning to teach design skills to civil engineering students at University College Dublin (UCD). The paper first considers the development of problem-based leaning (PBL) as a tool in higher education. The general issues to be considered in the design of the curriculum for a PBL module are reviewed.…

  4. Effects of a Technology Supported Project Based Learning (TS-PBL Approach on the Success of a Mobile Application Development Course and the Students’ Opinions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fezile Ozdamli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Similar to traditional desktop software development processes, teamwork is a necessity in the mobile application development process. Thus, the aim of this study is to examine the effects of the technology supported project-based learning approach in mobile application development courses on the academic achievement of students and to clarify the engineering students’ opinions. A total of 130 engineering students from the Department taking mobile application development courses were the participants of this study. The lessons progressed in one group in the form of technology supported project-based learning steps, while in the other group, they were conducted using traditional methods. Based on the results, the practical implementation of a mobile application with a TS-PBL approach in engineering students’ education will be discussed.

  5. Differentiating case-based learning from problem-based learning after a twoday introductory workshop on case-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqil Mohammad Daher

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Considerable overlap exists between case-based learning (CBL and problem-based learning (PBL and differentiating between the two can be difficult for a lot of the academicians. Aims This study gauged the ability of members of medical school, familiar with a problem-based learning (PBL curriculum, to differentiate between case-based learning (CBL and PBL after a two-day workshop on CBL. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to all participants, attending the introductory course on CBL. It was designed to document the basic characteristics of the respondents, their preference for either CBL or PBL, their ability to recognize differences between CBL and PBL, and their overall perception of the course. Results Of the total workshop participants, 80.5 per cent returned the completed questionnaire. The mean age of the respondents was 44.12±12.31 years and women made up a slight majority. Majority favoured CBL over PBL and felt it was more clinical, emphasizes on self-directed learning, provides more opportunities for learning, permits in-depth exploration of cases, has structured environment and encourages the use of all learning resources. On the respondents’ ability to discriminate CBL from PBL, a weighted score of 39.9 per cent indicated a failure on the part of the respondents to correctly identify differences between CBL and PBL. Less than half opined that CBL was a worthwhile progression from PBL and about third would recommend CBL over PBL. Conclusion It seems that majority of the respondents failed to adequately differentiate between CBL and PBL and didn’t favour CBL over PBL.

  6. Interface between problem-based learning and a learner-centered paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Reza

    2011-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has made a major shift in support of student learning for many medical school curricula around the world. Since curricular development of PBL in the early 1970s and its growth in the 1980s and 1990s, there have been growing numbers of publications providing positive and negative data in regard to the curricular effectiveness of PBL. The purpose of this study was to explore supportive data for the four core objectives of PBL and to identify an interface between the objectives of PBL and a learner-centered paradigm. The four core PBL objectives, ie, structuring of knowledge and clinical context, clinical reasoning, self-directed learning, and intrinsic motivation, were used to search MEDLINE, the Education Resources Information Center, the Educator's Reference Complete, and PsycINFO from January 1969 to January 2011. The literature search was facilitated and narrowed if the published study included the following terms: "problem-based learning", "medical education", "traditional curriculum", and one of the above four PBL objectives. Through a comprehensive search analysis, one can find supportive data for the effectiveness of a PBL curriculum in achieving the four core objectives of PBL. A further analysis of these four objectives suggests that there is an interface between PBL objectives and criteria from a learner-centered paradigm. In addition, this review indicates that promotion of teamwork among students is another interface that exists between PBL and a learner-centered paradigm. The desire of medical schools to enhance student learning and a need to provide an environment where students construct knowledge rather than receive knowledge have encouraged many medical schools to move into a learner-centered paradigm. Implementation of a PBL curriculum can be used as a prevailing starting point to develop not only a learner-centered paradigm, but also to facilitate a smooth curricular transition from a teacher-centered paradigm to a

  7. Enhancing Critical Thinking in a PBL Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida; Holgaard, Jette Egelund

    2016-01-01

    Engineering education accreditation bodies emphasize the need for competencies beyond technical expertise. Critical thinking is one of these competencies, which is also considered as a precursor for the development of other competencies such as multidisciplinary collaboration, problem......-solving skills and lifelong learning. There is an urgent need to enhance engineering students’ critical thinking and one way to do this is to make use of active, student-centred learning approaches such as Problem Based Learning (PBL). This study aims to provide a model for understanding and enhancing critical...... thinking in a PBL environment. The development of the model takes its point of departure from a conceptual model for critical thinking that is concretized in a PBL context by including theoretical as well as empirical perspectives. The empirical study was conducted at the Faculty of Engineering and Science...

  8. A comparison of in-class learner engagement across lecture, problem-based learning, and team learning using the STROBE classroom observation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, P Adam; Haidet, Paul; Schneider, Virginia; Searle, Nancy; Seidel, Charles L; Richards, Boyd F

    2005-01-01

    Having recently introduced team learning into the preclinical medical curriculum, evidence of the relative impact of this instructional method on in-class learner engagement was sought. To compare patterns of engagement behaviors among learners in class sessions across 3 distinct instructional methods: lecture, problem-based learning (PBL), and team learning. Trained observers used the STROBE classroom observation tool to measure learner engagement in 7 lecture, 4 PBL, and 3 team learning classrooms over a 12-month period. Proportions of different types of engagement behaviors were compared using chi-square. In PBL and team learning, the amount of learner-to-learner engagement was similar and much greater than in lecture, where most engagement was of the learner-to-instructor and self-engagement types. Also, learner-to-instructor engagement appeared greater in team learning than in PBL. Observed engagement behaviors confirm the potential of team learning to foster engagement similar to PBL, but with greater faculty input.

  9. Comparing problem-based learning students to students in a lecture-based curriculum: learning strategies and the relation with self-study time

    OpenAIRE

    Wijnen, Marit; Loyens, Sofie; Smeets, Guus; Kroeze, Maarten; Molen, Henk

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn educational theory, deep processing (i.e., connecting different study topics together) and self-regulation (i.e., taking control over one’s own learning process) are considered effective learning strategies. These learning strategies can be influenced by the learning environment. Problem-based learning (PBL), a student-centered educational method, is believed to stimulate the use of these effective learning strategies. Several aspects of PBL such as discussions of real-life pro...

  10. Outcomes-Based Authentic Learning, Portfolio Assessment, and a Systems Approach to "Complex Problem-Solving": Related Pillars for Enhancing the Innovative Role of PBL in Future Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of better reconciling individual and collective aspects of innovative problem-solving can be productively addressed to enhance the role of PBL as a key focus of the creative process in future higher education. This should involve "active learning" approaches supported by related processes of teaching, assessment and…

  11. PBL and critical thinking disposition in Chinese medical students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Emmersen, Jeppe; Toft, Egon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of problem-based learning (PBL) and the development of critical thinking disposition (CT) and academic achievement in Chinese medical students using a cross-sectional randomized design. Medical students from China Medical University (CMU....... Total CT score was higher in PBL students (n=170) than non-PBL students (n=83) (304.7±36.8 vs. 279.2±39.4, p ...). There was no significant difference in terms of gender on the total CT score, though minor differences were seen in subscales favoring female PBL students. PBL students had higher CCS scores than non-PBL students, but not significantly (112.8±20.6 vs. 107.3±16.5; p=0.11). There was no significant correlation between CCS...

  12. Does Curriculum 2005 promote successful learning of elementary algebra?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelis Vermeulen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews literature, previous to the development of Curriculum 2005, describing possible causes and solutions for learners’ poor performance in algebra. It then analyses the Revised National Curriculum Statement for Mathematics in an attempt to determine whether it addresses these causes and suggested solutions. This analysis finds that the curriculum to a large extent does address them, but that some are either not addressed, or addressed only implicitly. Consequently, Curriculum 2005 may only partly promote successful learning of elementary algebra.

  13. "What's So Terrible About Swallowing an Apple Seed?" Problem-Based Learning in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meilan; Parker, Joyce; Eberhardt, Jan; Passalacqua, Susan

    2011-10-01

    Problem-Based Learning (PBL), an instructional approach originated in medical education, has gained increasing attention in K-12 science education because of its emphasis on self-directed learning and real-world problem-solving. Yet few studies have examined how PBL can be adapted for kindergarten. In this study, we examined how a veteran kindergarten teacher, who was experienced with PBL in her own learning, adapted PBL to teach students earth materials, a topic emphasized in the new state curriculum standards but students had difficulty understanding. The pre-post tests showed that students improved their content understanding. Analysis of the classroom discourse showed that PBL and the teacher's facilitation strategies provided opportunities for students to develop their questioning skills. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of this study for using PBL in kindergarten classrooms.

  14. Loyalty, Harm and Duty: PBL in a Media Ethics Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Karen L.

    2002-01-01

    Considers how to teach the various areas of mass media in sufficient depth, without sacrificing breadth. Discusses a variation of problem-based learning (PBL) as one possible solution to that educational conundrum. Focuses on a project developed by a group of public relations students using the PBL method. (SG)

  15. Managing the Gap between Curriculum Based and Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Buus, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    /or but rather both/and. In this paper we describe an approach to design and delivery of online courses in computer science which on the one hand is based on a specified curriculum and on the other hand gives room for different learning strategies, problem based learning being one of them. We discuss......Traditionally there has been a clear distinction between curriculum based and problem based approaches to accomplish learning. Preferred approaches depend of course on conviction, culture, traditions and also on the specific learning situation. We will argue that it is not a question of either...

  16. The role of environmental and individual characteristics in the development of student achievement: a comparison between a traditional and a problem-based-learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauber, Stefan K; Hecht, Martin; Nouns, Zineb M; Kuhlmey, Adelheid; Dettmer, Susanne

    2015-10-01

    In medical education, the effect of the educational environment on student achievement has primarily been investigated in comparisons between traditional and problem-based learning (PBL) curricula. As many of these studies have reached no clear conclusions on the superiority of the PBL approach, the effect of curricular reform on student performance remains an issue. We employed a theoretical framework that integrates antecedents of student achievement from various psychosocial domains to examine how students interact with their curricular environment. In a longitudinal study with N = 1,646 participants, we assessed students in a traditional and a PBL-centered curriculum. The measures administered included students' perception of the learning environment, self-efficacy beliefs, positive study-related affect, social support, indicators of self-regulated learning, and academic achievement assessed through progress tests. We compared the relations between these characteristics in the two curricular environments. The results are two-fold. First, substantial relations of various psychosocial domains and their associations with achievement were identified. Second, our analyses indicated that there are no substantial differences between traditional and PBL-based curricula concerning the relational structure of psychosocial variables and achievement. Drawing definite conclusions on the role of curricular-level interventions in the development of student's academic achievement is constrained by the quasi-experimental design as wells as the selection of variables included. However, in the specific context described here, our results may still support the view of student activity as the key ingredient in the acquisition of achievement and performance.

  17. Good supervision and PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    This field study was conducted at the Faculty of Social Sciences at Aalborg University with the intention to investigate how students reflect on their experiences with supervision in a PBL environment. The overall aim of this study was to inform about the continued work in strengthening supervision...... at this faculty. This particular study invited Master level students to discuss: • How a typical supervision process proceeds • How they experienced and what they expected of PBL in the supervision process • What makes a good supervision process...

  18. Innovative Conference Curriculum: Maximizing Learning and Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Nancy; Kranzow, Jeannine

    2012-01-01

    This action research study evaluated the potential of an innovative curriculum to move 73 graduate students toward professional development. The curriculum was grounded in the professional conference and utilized the motivation and expertise of conference presenters. This innovation required students to be more independent, act as a critical…

  19. Deep and surface learning in problem-based learning: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, Diana H J M; Loyens, Sofie M M; Marcq, Hélène; Gijbels, David

    2016-12-01

    In problem-based learning (PBL), implemented worldwide, students learn by discussing professionally relevant problems enhancing application and integration of knowledge, which is assumed to encourage students towards a deep learning approach in which students are intrinsically interested and try to understand what is being studied. This review investigates: (1) the effects of PBL on students' deep and surface approaches to learning, (2) whether and why these effects do differ across (a) the context of the learning environment (single vs. curriculum wide implementation), and (b) study quality. Studies were searched dealing with PBL and students' approaches to learning. Twenty-one studies were included. The results indicate that PBL does enhance deep learning with a small positive average effect size of .11 and a positive effect in eleven of the 21 studies. Four studies show a decrease in deep learning and six studies show no effect. PBL does not seem to have an effect on surface learning as indicated by a very small average effect size (.08) and eleven studies showing no increase in the surface approach. Six studies demonstrate a decrease and four an increase in surface learning. It is concluded that PBL does seem to enhance deep learning and has little effect on surface learning, although more longitudinal research using high quality measurement instruments is needed to support this conclusion with stronger evidence. Differences cannot be explained by the study quality but a curriculum wide implementation of PBL has a more positive impact on the deep approach (effect size .18) compared to an implementation within a single course (effect size of -.05). PBL is assumed to enhance active learning and students' intrinsic motivation, which enhances deep learning. A high perceived workload and assessment that is perceived as not rewarding deep learning are assumed to enhance surface learning.

  20. Implementation of problem-based learning (PBL) approach to improve student’s academic achievement and creativity on the topic of electrolyte and non-electrolyte solutions at vocational school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyu, W.; Kurnia; Syaadah, R. S.

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of study was to investigate the implementation of PBL to improve student’s academic achievement and creativity on the topic of electrolyte and non-electrolye solutions. This study was conducted as a descriptive method with case study design. Subject of this study consisted of 30 students in the class X. Instruments used in the study included tests and observation sheets. Student’s achievement changes is calculated using N-gain formula, hereafter, the data that have been processed then was analyzed descriptively. The results showed that generally academic achievement and creativity of students has increased as indicated by the value of N-gain (0.667; 0.656). The results of the study also showed that there was a correlation with the moderate category between the academic achievement and the student’s creative thinking as indicated by (r = 0.413), meanwhile, the relationship between academic achievement and creativity(r = 0.340) that belongs to the weak category. Implementation of PBL had a good response from students with percentage 80.3%. Based on these findings, PBL is recommended to be applied on the learning process for other chemistry topics that suitable in term of characteristics between learning materials and PBL stages in order to develop academic achievement and creativity of students.

  1. Adapted PBL Practical Exercises: Benefits for Apprentices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monks, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Use was made of adapted problem-based learning (PBL) practical exercises to address the disengagement of apprentices with the existing assembly-style electronic laboratory programme. Apprentices perceived the traditional routines as having little real-world relevance. This detracted from the value and benefit to them of the practical component of…

  2. Motivation, Challenges, Support (MCS) Cycle Model for the Development of PBL Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Costas S.; Nicolaou, Stella A.

    2018-01-01

    Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is well known for enhancing students' problem solving skills and teamwork, while the role of PBL tutors is to facilitate discussion rather than teach. This study used four focus groups to explore PBL tutors' motivation, challenges and support mechanisms, and the relationship between these. The study found that there…

  3. Journey into the Problem-Solving Process: Cognitive Functions in a PBL Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, B. L.; Tan, O. S.; Liu, W. C.

    2016-01-01

    In a PBL environment, learning results from learners engaging in cognitive processes pivotal in the understanding or resolution of the problem. Using Tan's cognitive function disc, this study examines the learner's perceived cognitive functions at each stage of PBL, as facilitated by the PBL schema. The results suggest that these learners…

  4. PBL at Aalborg university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    From the preface: "All the articles in this book have been presented at the International Conference PBL 2006 ABP, that was held in Lima, Peru, July 19th-21th 2006. This conference is part of a series of Pan-American conferences. It is the first time that Aalborg University has participated...

  5. PBL and the Postmodern Condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ole; Jensen, Annie Aarup

    2016-01-01

    . Through discussions of this alleged condition for university curricula development we investigate its connections to the PBL-model. Some of the explored conditions highlight strong potentials for the PBL-model but the postmodern condition also raises a number of changes and challenges in relation...... to the original PBL-model as an educational setting....

  6. Embedding of Authentic Assessment in Work-Integrated Learning Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Anna Maria; Ferns, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary perspectives of higher education endorse a work integrated learning (WIL) approach to curriculum content, delivery and assessment. It is agreed that authenticity in learning relates to real-world experience, however, differentiating and strategically linking WIL provision and facilitation to assessment tasks and collation of authentic…

  7. 3D Game-Based Learning System for Improving Learning Achievement in Software Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su,Chung-Ho; Cheng, Ching-Hsue

    2013-01-01

    The advancement of game-based learning has encouraged many related studies, such that students could better learn curriculum by 3-dimension virtual reality. To enhance software engineering learning, this paper develops a 3D game-based learning system to assist teaching and assess the students' motivation, satisfaction and learning achievement. A…

  8. The Effect of Problem Based Learning (PBL) Instruction on Students' Motivation and Problem Solving Skills of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argaw, Aweke Shishigu; Haile, Beyene Bashu; Ayalew, Beyene Tesfaw; Kuma, Shiferaw Gadisa

    2017-01-01

    Through the learning of physics, students will acquire problem solving skills which are relevant to their daily life. Determining the best way in which students learn physics takes a priority in physics education. The goal of the present study was to determine the effect of problem based learning strategy on students' problem solving skills and…

  9. Outcomes-Based Authentic Learning, Portfolio Assessment, and a Systems Approach to ‘Complex Problem-Solving’: Related Pillars for Enhancing the Innovative Role of PBL in Future Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Richards

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of better reconciling individual and collective aspects of innovative problem-solving can be productively addressed to enhance the role of PBL as a key focus of the creative process in future higher education. This should involve ‘active learning’ approaches supported by related processes of teaching, assessment and curriculum. As Biggs & Tan (2011 have suggested, an integrated or systemic approach is needed for the most effective practice of outcomes-based education also especially relevant for addressing relatively simple as well as more complex problems. Such a model will be discussed in relation to the practical example of a Masters subject conceived with interdisciplinary implications, applications, and transferability: ‘sustainable policy studies in science, technology and innovation’. Different modes of PBL might be encouraged in terms of the authentic kinds of ‘complex problem-solving’ issues and challenges which increasingly confront an interdependent and changing world. PBL can be further optimized when projects or cases also involve contexts and examples of research and inquiry. However, perhaps the most crucial pillar is a model of portfolio assessment for linking and encouraging as well as distinguishing individual contributions to collaborative projects and activities.

  10. Dental Faculty Members' Pedagogic Beliefs and Curriculum Aims in Problem-Based Learning: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergmann, HsingChi; Walker, Judith; Dalrymple, Kirsten R; Shuler, Charles F

    2017-08-01

    The aims of this exploratory study were to explore dental faculty members' views and beliefs regarding knowledge, the dental profession, and teaching and learning and to determine how these views related to their problem-based learning (PBL) instructional practices. Prior to a PBL in dental education conference held in 2011, all attendees were invited to complete a survey focused on their pedagogical beliefs and practices in PBL. Out of a possible 55 participants, 28 responded. Additionally, during the conference, a forum was held in which preliminary survey findings were shared and participants contributed to focus group data collection. The forum results served to validate and bring deeper understanding to the survey findings. The conference participants who joined the forum (N=32) likely included some or many of the anonymous respondents to the survey, along with additional participants interested in dental educators' beliefs. The findings of the survey and follow-up forum indicated a disconnect between dental educators' reported views of knowledge and their pedagogical practices in a PBL environment. The results suggested that the degree of participants' tolerance of uncertainty in knowledge and the discrepancy between their epistemological and ontological beliefs about PBL pedagogy influenced their pedagogical choices. These findings support the idea that learner-centered, inquiry-based pedagogical approaches such as PBL may create dissonance between beliefs about knowledge and pedagogical practice that require the building of a shared understanding of and commitment to curricular goals prior to implementation to ensure success. The methods used in this study can be useful tools for faculty development in PBL programs in dental education.

  11. Conceptualizations on Innovation Competency in a Problem- and Project-Based Learning Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Fenzhi; Kolmos, Anette; de Graaff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Understanding innovation competency is the first step in fostering innovative engineers as conceptualizations can both enhance and inhibit innovative behaviors. Though literature is replete with discussions on conceptualizing innovation competency, there is much disagreement regarding its concepts...... identified by analyzing the narratives of interviewees and coding the transcriptions into pre-prepared categories, based on the theoretical framework inspired by activity theory. The analysis of empirical data indicates a collaborative nature of innovation competency in the PBL curriculum; emphasizes...

  12. Problem-Based Learning and Learning Approach: Is There a Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Michele

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To assess the influence of a graduate-entry PBL (problem-based learning) curriculum on individual learning style; and to investigate the relationship between learning style, academic achievement and clinical reasoning skill. Method: Subjects were first-year medical students completed the Study Process Questionnaire at the commencement, and…

  13. Project Based Learning (PBL) and Webquest: New Dimensions in Achieving Learner Autonomy in a Class at Tertiary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhand, Mohd. Moniruzzaman

    2015-01-01

    Now a day, the buzz word for a language classroom is "learner autonomy" that is defined differently by different experts. The fundamental of learner autonomy, however, is to involve the learning in the teaching and learning process. The term "webquest" is also a new concept to the teachers in this part of the world. A webquest…

  14. The impact of an interprofessional problem-based learning curriculum of clinical ethics on medical and nursing students' attitudes and ability of interprofessional collaboration: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chih Lin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinical ethic situations in modern multiprofessional healthcare systems may involve different healthcare professions who work together for patient care. The undergraduate interprofessional education of clinical ethics would help to incubate healthcare students' ability of interprofessional collaboration in solving ethical problems. However, the impact from an interprofessional educational model on student's attitudes and confidence of interprofessional collaboration should be carefully evaluated during the process of curricular development. This study aimed to conduct a pilot interprofessional PBL curriculum of clinical ethics and evaluate the curricular impact on interprofessional students' attitude and confidence of collaborative teamwork. Thirty-six medical and nursing students volunteered to participate in this study and were divided into three groups (medical group, nursing group, and mixed group. Tutors were recruited from the Medical School and the College of Nursing. The pilot curriculum included one lecture of clinical ethics, one PBL case study with two tutorial sessions, and one session of group discussion and feedback. A narrative story with multiple story lines and a multiperspective problem analysis tool were used in the PBL tutorials. The students' self-evaluation of learning questionnaire was used to evaluate students' learning of clinical ethics and interprofessional collaborative skills and attitude. The internal consistency of the questionnaire was measured by Cronbach α, and the criterion-related validity of the questionnaire was evaluated through associations between the dimension scores with the student group by one-way analysis of variance test (ANOVA test and Tukey-Kramer honestly significant difference (HSD comparison. There was significant difference among different groups in students' ability and attitudes about “interprofessional communication and collaboration” (p = 0.0184. The scores in the mixed group (37

  15. Medical students preference of problem-based learning or traditional lectures in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nahla Khamis; Banjar, Shorooq; Al-Ghamdi, Amal; Al-Darmasi, Moroj; Khoja, Abeer; Turkistani, Jamela; Arif, Rwan; Al-Sebyani, Awatif; Musawa, Al-Anoud; Basfar, Wijdan

    2014-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is the most important educational innovations in the past 4 decades. The objective of the study was to compare between the preference of medical students for PBL and the preference for traditional lectures regarding learning outcomes (e.g., knowledge, attitude, and skills) gained from both methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among medical students who studied the hybrid curriculum (PBL and traditional lectures) in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, in 2011. Data was collected through a pre-constructed, validated, confidentially anonymous, and self-administered questionnaire. Students' perceptions toward PBL and traditional lectures were assessed through their response to 20 statements inquired about both methods of learning using a five-point Likert scale. Descriptive and analytic statistics were performed using SPSS, version 21 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, Ill., USA). Learners preferred PBL more to traditional lectures for better linking the knowledge of basic and clinical sciences (t test=10.15, P .05) was observed regarding the amount of basic knowledge recalled from both methods. Students preferred PBL more to lectures for better learning attitudes, skills, future outcomes, and learning satisfaction (P learn better than lecturing (P traditional lectures for improving most of learning outcome domains, especially, learning attitudes and skills. Introducing hybrid-PBL curriculum in all Saudi universities is highly recommended.

  16. Special Delivery Systems. Self-Esteem Exercises. Learning Disabilities Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molek, Carol

    This publication contains self-esteem exercises and a learning disabilities (LD) curriculum for students with LD in adult basic education programs. The 37 student exercises are designed to build the self-esteem of students with LD. They include self-evaluations, profiles, and checklists. Topics covered are success, decision making, problem…

  17. Curriculum Design of a Flipped Classroom to Enhance Haematology Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcaro, Pauline A.; Jackson, Denise E.; McLaughlin, Patricia M.; O'Malley, Cindy J.

    2016-01-01

    A common trend in higher education is the "flipped" classroom, which facilitates active learning during class. The flipped approach to teaching was instituted in a haematology "major" class and the students' attitudes and preferences for the teaching materials were surveyed. The curriculum design was explicit and involved four…

  18. Improving Curriculum through Blended Learning Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darojat, Ojat

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a study of blended learning pedagogy in open and distance learning (ODL), involving two universities in Southeast Asia, STOU Thailand and UT Indonesia. The purpose of this study is to understand the issues related to the implementation of blended-learning pedagogy. Qualitative case study was employed to optimize my understanding of…

  19. Comparing Problem-Based Learning Students to Students in a Lecture-Based Curriculum: Learning Strategies and the Relation with Self-Study Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnen, Marit; Loyens, Sofie M. M.; Smeets, Guus; Kroeze, Maarten; van der Molen, Henk

    2017-01-01

    In educational theory, deep processing (i.e., connecting different study topics together) and self-regulation (i.e., taking control over one's own learning process) are considered effective learning strategies. These learning strategies can be influenced by the learning environment. Problem-based learning (PBL), a student-centered educational…

  20. Developing an integrated framework of problem-based learning and coaching psychology for medical education: a participatory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Li, Huiping; Pang, Weiguo; Liang, Shuo; Su, Yiliang

    2016-01-05

    Medical schools have been making efforts to develop their own problem-based learning (PBL) approaches based on their educational conditions, human resources and existing curriculum structures. This study aimed to explore a new framework by integrating the essential features of PBL and coaching psychology applicable to the undergraduate medical education context. A participatory research design was employed. Four educational psychology researchers, eight undergraduate medical school students and two accredited PBL tutors participated in a four-month research programme. Data were collected through participatory observation, focus groups, semi-structured interviews, workshop documents and feedback surveys and then subjected to thematic content analysis. The triangulation of sources and member checking were used to ensure the credibility and trustworthiness of the research process. Five themes emerged from the analysis: current experience of PBL curriculum; the roles of and relationships between tutors and students; student group dynamics; development of self-directed learning; and coaching in PBL facilitation. On the basis of this empirical data, a systematic model of PBL and coaching psychology was developed. The findings highlighted that coaching psychology could be incorporated into the facilitation system in PBL. The integrated framework of PBL and coaching psychology in undergraduate medical education has the potential to promote the development of the learning goals of cultivating clinical reasoning ability, lifelong learning capacities and medical humanity. Challenges, benefits and future directions for implementing the framework are discussed in this paper.

  1. Learning Styles of Medical Students Change in Relation to Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurpinar, Erol; Bati, Hilal; Tetik, Cihat

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate if any changes exist in the learning styles of medical students over time and in relation to different curriculum models with these learning styles. This prospective cohort study was conducted in three different medical faculties, which implement problem-based learning (PBL), hybrid, and integrated…

  2. Tracking Active Learning in the Medical School Curriculum: A Learning-Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Kellar, Charlyn; Morgan, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Background: Medical education is moving toward active learning during large group lecture sessions. This study investigated the saturation and breadth of active learning techniques implemented in first year medical school large group sessions. Methods: Data collection involved retrospective curriculum review and semistructured interviews with 20 faculty. The authors piloted a taxonomy of active learning techniques and mapped learning techniques to attributes of learning-centered instruction. Results: Faculty implemented 25 different active learning techniques over the course of 9 first year courses. Of 646 hours of large group instruction, 476 (74%) involved at least 1 active learning component. Conclusions: The frequency and variety of active learning components integrated throughout the year 1 curriculum reflect faculty familiarity with active learning methods and their support of an active learning culture. This project has sparked reflection on teaching practices and facilitated an evolution from teacher-centered to learning-centered instruction. PMID:29707649

  3. Tracking Active Learning in the Medical School Curriculum: A Learning-Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Kellar, Charlyn; Morgan, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Medical education is moving toward active learning during large group lecture sessions. This study investigated the saturation and breadth of active learning techniques implemented in first year medical school large group sessions. Data collection involved retrospective curriculum review and semistructured interviews with 20 faculty. The authors piloted a taxonomy of active learning techniques and mapped learning techniques to attributes of learning-centered instruction. Faculty implemented 25 different active learning techniques over the course of 9 first year courses. Of 646 hours of large group instruction, 476 (74%) involved at least 1 active learning component. The frequency and variety of active learning components integrated throughout the year 1 curriculum reflect faculty familiarity with active learning methods and their support of an active learning culture. This project has sparked reflection on teaching practices and facilitated an evolution from teacher-centered to learning-centered instruction.

  4. PBL融入師資培育教學實習課程之個案研究 Case Study on Applying Problem-Based Learning to the Student Teaching Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    徐靜嫻 Ching-Hsien Hsu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available 能力導向的教育模式已逐漸成為世界各國培育專業人才的重要方式。在此理念下所強調的「問題導向學習」(problem-based learning, PBL),在醫學、護理、科學等領域上的應用,都顯示對於實務人員面對錯綜複雜實務問題的解決能力培養上,有相當不錯的成效。借鏡於這些領域的經驗,本研究目的在探討問題導向學習融入教學實習課程對學生產生之具體學習成效,以及PBL 融入教學實習課程之適切性。本研究以三種量化問卷,蒐集學生對案例問題、PBL 教練行為的適切性,及其在教學知識與技能、學習能力與興趣和專業互動能力等三面向提升的感受。此外,亦藉由上課實錄、學生學習文件、訪談與研究日誌等質性方式,瞭解PBL運作之情形。研究顯示,師資生在教學專業知識與技能、學習能力與興趣,以及專業互動等能力上均有極正向之學習成效;同時,PBL 融入教學實習能提升學生未來面對教學問題的解決能力。 Ability-orientation has become a critical educational model for educating professionals working in many fields across the world. Featuring an ability-orientation approach, the problem-based learning (PBL approach been successfully applied in medical, nursing, and scientific areas. Studies in these areas also show that PBL can effectively provide people with the problem-solving abilities that they require in their professions. In light of these results, this study explores whether PBL can be effectively applied to early-stage teacher programs. The purpose of this research is to apply PBL to the student teaching curriculum to explore its effects. We discovered how PBL can be effectively applied to a curriculum design and what teaching outcomes can be achieved. This study shows that positive effects were observed in the disciplinary knowledge and skills, learning abilities, interests, and

  5. Implementing Collaborative Learning across the Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Patricia A. S.; Tretter, Thomas R.; Kendall-Brown, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Active and collaborative teaching methods increase student learning, and it is broadly accepted that almost any active or collaborative approach will improve learning outcomes as compared to lecture. Yet, large numbers of faculty have not embraced these methods. Thus, the challenge to encourage evidence-based change in teaching is not only how to…

  6. PBL in the Era of Reform Standards: Challenges and Benefits Perceived by Teachers in One Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariman, Nahid; Chrispeels, Janet

    2016-01-01

    We explore teachers' efforts to implement problem-based learning (PBL) in an elementary school serving predominantly English learners. Teachers had an opportunity to implement the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) using PBL in a summer school setting with no test-pressures. To understand the challenges and benefits of PBL implementation, a…

  7. Problem-based learning in pharmacology:a survey of department heads in Taiwan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-tung LAU

    2004-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) requires active student participation and the use of clinical cases as a trigger to learn within a given area. It has gained much attention as a pedagogic alternative in the course of reform in medica education due to information overload. From discipline-based consideration, it is interesting to understand the views of department heads of pharmacology about implementing PBL for their medical students. According to a general survey from the heads of the department of pharmacology across medical schools in Taiwan, we found that although serious reservation about the approach remains, many departments indeed look forward to including PBL component in their pharmacology curriculum.

  8. Improving Information Technology Curriculum Learning Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick L Anderson

    2017-06-01

    The case study research methodology has been selected to conduct the inquiry into this phenomenon. This empirical inquiry facilitates exploration of a contemporary phenomenon in depth within its real-life context using a variety of data sources. The subject of analysis will be two Information Technology classes composed of a combination of second year and third year students; both classes have six students, the same six students. Contribution It is the purpose of this research to show that the use of improved approaches to learning will produce more desirable learning outcomes. Findings The results of this inquiry clearly show that the use of the traditional behaviorist based pedagogic model to achieve college and university IT program learning outcomes is not as effective as a more constructivist based andragogic model. Recommendations Instruction based purely on either of these does a disservice to the typical college and university level learner. The correct approach lies somewhere in between them; the most successful outcome attainment would be the product of incorporating the best of both. Impact on Society Instructional strategies produce learning outcomes; learning outcomes demonstrate what knowledge has been acquired. Acquired knowledge is used by students as they pursue professional careers and other ventures in life. Future Research Learning and teaching approaches are not “one-size-fits-all” propositions; different strategies are appropriate for different circumstances and situations. Additional research should seek to introduce vehicles that will move learners away from one the traditional methodology that has been used throughout much of their educational careers to an approach that is better suited to equip them with the skills necessary to meet the challenges awaiting them in the professional world.

  9. Adopting Problem-Based Learning in Criminology and Criminal Justice Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Young Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available While problem-based learning (PBL has been successfully used in many disciplines for over 30 years, it has not yet been widely adopted by criminal justice instructors. It is a student-centered curriculum that empowers undergraduate students to decide what they learn and to apply their knowledge and skills while solving real-world problems in relevant and authentic contexts. The present study provides an overview of PBL and empirical evidence for the effectiveness of problem-based instruction in many disciplines. This article offers theoretical foundations for adopting PBL in the study of crime and criminal justice. Finally, for scaffolding instructors striving to implement PBL, this article describes possible formats of implementation and also identifies the challenges new PBL instructors may encounter during application and provides specific recommendations.

  10. Global Learning and the School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourn, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The global society of today is one that children and young people are aware of but this has not been fully recognised by education policy-makers despite the efforts and activities of many civil society organisations and the enthusiasm of teachers. Since 2010 in England, a government-sponsored programme, the Global Learning Programme, has been a…

  11. Can Learning Style Predict Student Satisfaction with Different Instruction Methods and Academic Achievement in Medical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurpinar, Erol; Alimoglu, Mustafa Kemal; Mamakli, Sumer; Aktekin, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    The curriculum of our medical school has a hybrid structure including both traditional training (lectures) and problem-based learning (PBL) applications. The purpose of this study was to determine the learning styles of our medical students and investigate the relation of learning styles with each of satisfaction with different instruction methods…

  12. Developing a Learning Progression for Curriculum, Instruction, and Student Learning: An Example from Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonger, Nicole L.; Stephens, Ana; Blanton, Maria; Isler, Isil; Knuth, Eric; Gardiner, Angela Murphy

    2018-01-01

    Learning progressions have been demarcated by some for science education, or only concerned with levels of sophistication in student thinking as determined by logical analyses of the discipline. We take the stance that learning progressions can be leveraged in mathematics education as a form of curriculum research that advances a linked…

  13. Guiding Curriculum Development: Student Perceptions for the Second Language Learning in Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürleyik, Sinan; Akdemir, Elif

    2018-01-01

    Developing curriculum to enhance student learning is the primer purpose of all curricular activities. Availability of recent tools supporting to teach various skills including reading, listening, speaking and writing has opened a new avenue for curricular activities in technology-enhanced learning environments. Understanding the perceptions of…

  14. Análise da Produção Bibliográfica sobre Problem-Based Learning (PBL em Quatro Periódicos Selecionados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Neiline Cavalcante

    Full Text Available RESUMO Trata-se de uma revisão integrativa que analisa as características bibliométricas da produção científica empírica sobre PBL em periódicos de referência em educação médica no Brasil e no mundo, de 2005 a 2014, e recomenda direcionamentos para futuras pesquisas. Dos artigos do corpus, foram extraídos os seguintes dados: ano de publicação, cenário do estudo, objetivos do estudo, tipo de estudo, principais conclusões e diretrizes para pesquisas futuras assinaladas pelos autores. Os artigos publicados nos três periódicos internacionais tiveram por cenário escolas médicas de todos os continentes, sendo que seis estudos são multicêntricos. Os estudos nacionais se concentram nos estados das regiões Sul e Sudeste. Quanto aos objetivos dos estudos analisados, há predominância da busca da efetividade do PBL, ou seja, dos resultados, em termos de desempenho dos alunos, seja na formação ou na prática médica, comparando seu desempenho com o de alunos submetidos aos métodos tradicionais de ensino. Quanto à tendência da quantidade de artigos sobre PBL publicados nos últimos dez anos, observou-se uma significativa redução da quantidade de artigos publicados nos três periódicos internacionais de 2005 a 2010. No caso do periódico nacional, os dados sugerem que a produção científica sobre PBL no Brasil ainda é incipiente. No que se refere aos métodos de pesquisa utilizados nos estudos publicados nos quatro periódicos selecionados, houve predominância dos métodos quantitativos, com predomínio do survey (n = 26. As principais conclusões dos estudos seguem a mesma linha dos objetivos. Elas mostram os resultados positivos do PBL tanto na formação médica quanto em suas repercussão na prática profissional. Quanto às diretrizes para futuras pesquisas, há uma inclinação para a realização de mais estudos que investiguem a efetividade do PBL, assim como mais estudos comparativos. Conclui-se que a pesquisa

  15. Incorporation of peer learning in first MBBS curriculum to enhance metacognition skills

    OpenAIRE

    Manas Kanti Ray; Suranjana Ray

    2012-01-01

    Peer learning can be incorporated in the first MBBS curriculum along with didactic lectures and tutorials. Peer learning is when a student learns from another student who has been trained to explain the topic and discuss it. Peer learning improves domain-specific inquiry skills, supports self-directed learning, and improves metacognition skills. Metacognition is the ability to plan, reason, judge and regulate ways to approach learning a skill or concept. In the midst of curriculum reforms tha...

  16. The Developing Infant Creates a Curriculum for Statistical Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Linda B; Jayaraman, Swapnaa; Clerkin, Elizabeth; Yu, Chen

    2018-04-01

    New efforts are using head cameras and eye-trackers worn by infants to capture everyday visual environments from the point of view of the infant learner. From this vantage point, the training sets for statistical learning develop as the sensorimotor abilities of the infant develop, yielding a series of ordered datasets for visual learning that differ in content and structure between timepoints but are highly selective at each timepoint. These changing environments may constitute a developmentally ordered curriculum that optimizes learning across many domains. Future advances in computational models will be necessary to connect the developmentally changing content and statistics of infant experience to the internal machinery that does the learning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Problem-based learning in academic health education. A systematic literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Polyzois, I

    2010-02-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) arguably represents the most significant development in education over the past five decades. It has been promoted as the curriculum of choice, and since its introduction in the 1960\\'s, has been widely adopted by many medical and dental schools. PBL has been the subject of much published literature but ironically, very little high quality evidence exists to advocate its efficacy and subsequently justify the widespread curriculum change. The purpose of this review is to classify and interpret the available evidence and extract relevant conclusions. In addition, it is the intent to propose recommendations regarding the relative benefits of PBL compared with conventional teaching. The literature was searched using PubMed, ERIC and PsycLIT. Further articles were retrieved from the reference lists of selected papers. Articles were chosen and included according to specific selection criteria. Studies were further classified as randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or comparative studies. These studies were then analysed according to intervention type: whole curricula comparisons and single educational interventions of shorter duration. At the level of RCTs and comparative studies (whole curricula), no clear difference was observed between PBL and conventional teaching. Paradoxically, it was only comparative studies of single PBL intervention in a traditional curriculum that yielded results that were consistently in favour of PBL. Further research is needed to investigate the possibility that multiple PBL interventions in a traditional curriculum could be more effective than an exclusively PBL programme. In addition, it is important to address the potential benefits of PBL in relation to life-long learning of health care professionals.

  18. Understanding the Effects of Time on Collaborative Learning Processes in Problem Based Learning: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommes, J.; Van den Bossche, P.; de Grave, W.; Bos, G.; Schuwirth, L.; Scherpbier, A.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known how time influences collaborative learning groups in medical education. Therefore a thorough exploration of the development of learning processes over time was undertaken in an undergraduate PBL curriculum over 18 months. A mixed-methods triangulation design was used. First, the quantitative study measured how various learning…

  19. An Empirical Study on the Influence of PBL Teaching Model on College Students' Critical Thinking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen

    2018-01-01

    The critical thinking ability is an indispensable ability of contemporary college students, and the PBL teaching model abandons the shortcomings of traditional teaching methods, which is more suitable for the development trend of university curriculum teaching reform in China. In order to understand the influence of PBL teaching mode on college…

  20. Analysis of the Difficulties and Improvement Method on Introduction of PBL Approach in Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Takasei; Sessa, Salvatore

    In the field of international cooperation, it is increasing to introduce Japanese engineering educational model in the developing country to improve the quality of education and research activity. A naive implementation of such model in different cultures and educational systems may lead to several problems. In this paper, we evaluated the Project Based Learning (PBL) class, developed at Waseda University in Japan, and employed to the Egyptian education context at the Egypt-Japan University of Science and Technology (E-JUST) . We found difficulties such as : non-homogeneous student’ s background, disconnection with the student’ s research, weak learning style adaptation, and irregular course conduction. To solve these difficulties at E-JUST, we proposed : the groupware introduction, project theme choice based on student’ s motivation, and curriculum modification.

  1. The PBL projects: where we've been and where we are going

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Judith F.; Massa, Nicholas M.

    2015-10-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional approach in which students learn course content by using a structured approach to collaboratively solving complex real-world problems. PBL addresses widespread industry concern that graduates of technician and engineering programs often have difficulty applying their technical knowledge to novel situations and working effectively in teams. Over the past 9 years, the PBL Projects of the New England Board of Higher Education (Boston, MA) have developed instructional strategies and materials that research shows address industry concerns by improving student learning, retention, critical thinking and problem-solving skills as well as the transfer of knowledge to new situations. In this paper we present a retrospective of the PBL Projects, three National Science Foundation Advanced Technology Education (NSF-ATE) projects that developed twenty interdisciplinary multi-media PBL case studies called "Challenges" in the topic areas of optics/photonics, sustainable technology and advanced manufacturing, provided faculty professional development in the use of PBL in the classroom to teachers across the U.S. and abroad, and conducted research on the efficacy of the PBL method. We will describe the resources built into the Challenges to scaffold the development of students' problem solving and critical thinking skills and the support provided to instructors who wish to create a student-centered classroom by incorporating PBL. Finally, we will discuss plans for next steps and examine strategies for taking PBL to the next level through actual industry-based problem solving experiences.

  2. Complexity Theory and CALL Curriculum in Foreign Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Soleimani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Complexity theory literally indicates the complexity of a system, behavior, or a process. Its connotative meaning, while, implies dynamism, openness, sensitivity to initial conditions and feedback, and adaptation properties of a system. Regarding English as a Foreign/ Second Language (EFL/ESL this theory emphasizes on the complexity of the process of teaching and learning, including all the properties of a complex system. The purpose of the current study is to discuss the role of CALL as a modern technology in simplifying the process of teaching and learning a new language while integrating into the complexity theory. Nonetheless, the findings obtained from reviewing previously conducted studies in this field confirmed the usefulness of CALL curriculum in EFL/ESL contexts. These findings can also provide pedagogical implications for employing computer as an effective teaching and learning tool.

  3. Curriculum learning designs: teaching health assessment skills for advanced nursing practitioners through sustainable flexible learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Les; Wong, Pauline; Hannon, John; Solberg Tokerud, Marte; Lyons, Judith

    2013-10-01

    Innovative curriculum designs are vital for effective learning in contemporary nursing education where traditional modes of delivery are not adequate to meet the learning needs of postgraduate students. This instance of postgraduate teaching in a distributed learning environment offered the opportunity to design a flexible learning model for teaching advanced clinical skills. To present a sustainable model for flexible learning that enables specialist nurses to gain postgraduate qualifications without on-campus class attendance by teaching and assessing clinical health care skills in an authentic workplace setting. An action research methodology was used to gather evidence and report on the process of curriculum development of a core unit, Comprehensive Health Assessment (CHA), within 13 different postgraduate speciality courses. Qualitative data was collected from 27 teaching academics, 21 clinical specialist staff, and 7 hospital managers via interviews, focus groups and journal reflections. Evaluations from the initial iteration of CHA from 36 students were obtained. Data was analyzed to develop and evaluate the curriculum design of CHA. The key factors indicated by participants in the curriculum design process were coordination and structuring of teaching and assessment; integration of content development; working with technologies, balancing specialities and core knowledge; and managing induction and expectations. A set of recommendations emerged as a result of the action research process. These included: a constructive alignment approach to curriculum design; the production of a facilitator's guide that specifies expectations and unit information for academic and clinical education staff; an agreed template for content authors; and the inclusion of synchronous communication for real-time online tutoring. The highlight of the project was that it built curriculum design capabilities of clinicians and students which can sustain this alternative model of online

  4. Introducing Process Competences in a PBL-based Engineering Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soler, José; Andersson, Pernille Hammar

    2013-01-01

    The article describes an experiment in which elements related to generic professional competences, such as group work methodology, project planning, task delegation and communication, have been introduced in an existing course, tailored as a Problem Base Learning (PBL) course in Advanced Telecomm......The article describes an experiment in which elements related to generic professional competences, such as group work methodology, project planning, task delegation and communication, have been introduced in an existing course, tailored as a Problem Base Learning (PBL) course in Advanced...

  5. Mathematical Communication Ability by Grade VII Students Using a Themed Problem Based Learning with Scaffolding on Rectangle Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Didik Adi Saputro; Masrukan Masrukan; Arief Agoestanto

    2017-01-01

    The aim of research to test students' mathematical communication used themed of PBL with scaffolding, themed of PBL and PBL achieve mastery learning;to test students' mathematical communication that used the themed of PBL with scaffolding, themed of PBL and PBL; and to test students' mathematical communication for the low, medium group, and a high-group themed of PBL with scaffolding, themed of PBL and PBL. This type of research is quantitative research. The Population is seventh grade studen...

  6. A case study of secondary teachers facilitating a historical problem-based learning instructional unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecore, John L.

    Current curriculum trends promote inquiry-based student-centered strategies as a way to foster critical thinking and learning. Problem-based learning (PBL), a type of inquiry focusing on an issue or "problem," is an instructional approach taught on the basis that science reform efforts increase scientific literacy. PBL is a constructivist approach to learning real life problems where understanding is a function of content, context, experiences, and learner goals; historical PBL situates the lesson in a historical context and provides opportunities for teaching NOS concepts. While much research exists on the benefits of historical PBL to student learning in general, more research is warranted on how teachers implement PBL in the secondary science curriculum. The purpose of this study was to examine the classroom-learning environment of four science teachers implementing a historical PBL instructional unit to identify the teachers' understandings, successes and obstacles. By identifying teachers' possible achievements and barriers with implementing a constructivist philosophy when executing historical PBL, educators and curriculum designers may improve alignment of the learning environment to constructivist principles. A qualitative interpretive case study guided this research study. The four participants of this study were purposefully and conveniently selected from biology teachers with at least three years of teaching experience, degrees in education, State Licensure, and completion of a PBL workshop. Data collection consisted of pre and post questionnaires, structured interviews, a card sort activity in which participants categorized instructional outcomes, and participant observations. Results indicated that the four teachers assimilated reform-based constructivist practices to fit within their preexisting routines and highlighted the importance of incorporating teachers' current systems into reform-based teacher instruction. While participating teachers

  7. What is the problem in problem-based learning in higher education mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Bettina

    2018-01-01

    Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) emphasise collaborate work on problems relevant to society and emphases the relation between theory and practice. PBL fits engineering students as preparation for their future professions but what about mathematics? Mathematics is not just applied mathematics, but it is also a body of abstract knowledge where the application in society is not always obvious. Does mathematics, including pure mathematics, fit into a PBL curriculum? This paper argues that it does for two reasons: (1) PBL resembles the working methods of research mathematicians. (2) The concept of society includes the society of researchers to whom theoretical mathematics is relevant. The paper describes two cases of university PBL projects in mathematics; one in pure mathematics and the other in applied mathematics. The paper also discusses that future engineers need to understand the world of mathematics as well as how engineers fit into a process of fundamental-research-turned-into-applied-science.

  8. Outcomes of a Self-Regulated Learning Curriculum Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Burton, Erin E.

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe connections among students' views of nature of science in relation to the goals of a curriculum delivered in a unique setting, one where a researcher and two teachers collaborated to develop a course devoted to teaching students about how knowledge is built in science. Students proceeded through a cycle of self-regulated phases, forethought, performance, and self-reflection, during each segment of the curriculum: (a) independent research, (b) knowledge building in the discipline of science, and (c) a citizen science project. Student views were measured at the beginning and end of the course using epistemic network analysis. The pretest map reported student understanding of science as experimentation and indicated three clusters representing the durability of knowledge, empirical evidence, and habits of mind, which were loosely connected and represented knowledge generation as external to personal thinking. The posttest map displayed a broader understanding of scientific endeavors beyond experimentation, a shift toward personal knowledge generation, and indicated a larger number of connections among three more tightly oriented clusters: empirical evidence, habits of mind, and tentativeness. Implications include the potential to build curriculum that purposefully considers reinforcing cycles of learning of the nature of science in different contexts.

  9. Lights, Camera, Project-Based Learning!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Dannon G.; Meaney, Karen S.

    2018-01-01

    A physical education instructor incorporates a teaching method known as project-based learning (PBL) in his physical education curriculum. Utilizing video-production equipment to imitate the production of a televisions show, sixth-grade students attending a charter school invited college students to share their stories about physical activity and…

  10. Self-Paced Prioritized Curriculum Learning With Coverage Penalty in Deep Reinforcement Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhipeng; Dong, Daoyi; Li, Huaxiong; Chen, Chunlin; Zhipeng Ren; Daoyi Dong; Huaxiong Li; Chunlin Chen; Dong, Daoyi; Li, Huaxiong; Chen, Chunlin; Ren, Zhipeng

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, a new training paradigm is proposed for deep reinforcement learning using self-paced prioritized curriculum learning with coverage penalty. The proposed deep curriculum reinforcement learning (DCRL) takes the most advantage of experience replay by adaptively selecting appropriate transitions from replay memory based on the complexity of each transition. The criteria of complexity in DCRL consist of self-paced priority as well as coverage penalty. The self-paced priority reflects the relationship between the temporal-difference error and the difficulty of the current curriculum for sample efficiency. The coverage penalty is taken into account for sample diversity. With comparison to deep Q network (DQN) and prioritized experience replay (PER) methods, the DCRL algorithm is evaluated on Atari 2600 games, and the experimental results show that DCRL outperforms DQN and PER on most of these games. More results further show that the proposed curriculum training paradigm of DCRL is also applicable and effective for other memory-based deep reinforcement learning approaches, such as double DQN and dueling network. All the experimental results demonstrate that DCRL can achieve improved training efficiency and robustness for deep reinforcement learning.

  11. Nursing students evaluation of problem based learning and the impact of culture on the learning process and outcomes: a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kloub, Manal Ibrahim; Salameh, Taghreed Nayel; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluates students' learning experiences in a clinical pediatric nursing course adopting Problem Based Learning (PBL) and investigates how students' cultural background impacts on self directed learning. A mixed-methods approach combining quantitative and qualitative methods was utilized to answer the research objectives. An observational technique for the PBL teaching sessions was employed; and 226 third-year students were asked to complete PBL evaluation questionnaire. Fifty seven percent (n = 130) responses to the questionnaire were analyzed. Overall, students considered PBL to be moderately effective in their learning experience, with a mean of 3.64 (S.D = 1.18). Students qualitative responses fell within four thematic categories including: developing cognitive abilities, independent learning, motivation to learn, and group learning. Difficulties encountered by students were: it is time-consuming, it has unclear objectives, it is a stressful process, and it results in an increased workload. A small number of students indicated that PBL tutorials were boring and complained about lack of contribution from instructors and limited recourses. Learning is intertwined with culture; students' previous educational experiences, uncertainty, English language proficiency, computer resources, gender, and achievement were identified as the most important cultural issues that impact the learning process and outcomes. Successful implementation of PBL does not come easily; teachers should be alert to the issues of culture in designing curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Global network on engineering education research and expertise in PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig; Kolmos, Anette; Moesby, Egon

    2006-01-01

    in order to facilitate better access to and co-operation within the PBL area. One of the absolute important tasks for UCPBL is to provide evidence for the effectiveness of PBL worldwide. Thus, there is a special attempt to establish links between engineering education researchers in this field....... This involves considerations concerning what is engineering education research – and how do we promote research based staff and educational development.......The UCPBL Centre for Problem Based Learning is based at Aalborg University, Denmark, known world-wide for its successful educational approach based on problem oriented project work. Due to more than 30 years of experience in utilizing PBL-learning principles in Engineering Education, an increasing...

  13. Teachers' Perspectives of their roles and student autonomy in a PBL context in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Huichun; Du, Xiangyun

    2015-01-01

    in a PBL context. In particular, we are mainly concerned with teachers’ attitudes towards student learning autonomy in PBL contexts. The data is mainly relied upon in-depth interviews of the teachers who participate in PBL practice from the two cases. When focusing on how teachers perceive student learning...... autonomy, we can note three major patterns. In general, Chinese teachers have a tendency to maintain high interference in student learning process even though they admit the value of giving student learning autonomy. This study further indicates a dilemma between teachers’ intention to encourage students...

  14. Chinese business students’ changes in beliefs and strategy use in a constructively aligned PBL course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Ke; Zhang, Jie; Du, Xiangyun

    2017-01-01

    This study adopted a longitudinal retrospective case study approach to investigate Chinese business students’ transitional learning experience in a problem-based learning (PBL) course with innovative assessment practices. The study focused on students’ beliefs and strategy use in a constructively...... that align social constructivist learning principles with students’ beliefs and strategies. The results also highlight the importance of developing appropriate assessment rubrics to enhance student engagement with PBL learning for improved outcomes....

  15. Portraits of PBL: Course Objectives and Students' Study Strategies in Computer Engineering, Psychology and Physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Madeleine Abrandt

    2000-01-01

    Compares the role of course objectives in relation to students' study strategies in problem-based learning (PBL). Results comprise data from three PBL programs at Linkopings University (Sweden), in physiotherapy, psychology, and computer engineering. Faculty provided course objectives to function as supportive structures and guides for students'…

  16. Influence of PBL with open-book tests on knowledge retention measured with progress tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijne-Penninga, M.; Kuks, J. B. M.; Hofman, W. H. A.; Muijtjens, A. M. M.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.

    The influence of problem-based learning (PBL) and open-book tests on long-term knowledge retention is unclear and subject of discussion. Hypotheses were that PBL as well as open-book tests positively affect long-term knowledge retention. Four progress test results of fifth and sixth-year medical

  17. Jumping the PBL Implementation Hurdle: Supporting the Efforts of K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertmer, Peggy A.; Simons, Krista D.

    2006-01-01

    While problem-based learning (PBL) has a relatively long history of successful use in medical and pre-professional schools, it has yet to be widely adopted by K--12 teachers. This may be due, in part, to the numerous challenges teachers experience when implementing PBL. In this paper, we describe specific hurdles that teachers are likely to…

  18. PBL in Teacher Education: Its Effects on Achievement and Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Tolga; Senemoglu, Nuray

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) as an educational practice continues to have great impact on all levels of education and across different disciplines. The aim of this experimental study is to examine the effects of PBL on prospective teachers' academic achievements and self-regulation. The treatment group (n = 36) and the control group (n = 21)…

  19. Drawing in nursing PBL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2013-08-01

    The implementation of art education in nursing is said to have positive effects on nursing students. Most studies applied visual art dialogues or object design, whereas the effectiveness of drawing as a teaching and learning method is rarely examined and discussed. This paper aimed to discuss the potential and effectiveness of drawing as a learning and teaching method. Four drawings which were created by Hong Kong nursing students are demonstrated and the students' perspectives of how drawing enhanced learning are shown in this paper. Topics on drawing as a fun teaching and learning method and the way it can enhance critical thinking and creativity are also discussed. In conclusion, the activity was a great success, and students enjoyed the learning process and reflected positive comments. However, we cannot conclude that drawing is an effective teaching and learning method based on a single paper, therefore more similar studies should be conducted to investigate this method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Teaching psychosomatic medicine using problem-based learning and role-playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heru, Alison M

    2011-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been implemented in medical education world-wide. Despite its popularity, it has not been generally considered useful for residency programs. The author presents a model for the implementation of PBL in residency programs. The author presents a description of a PBL curriculum for teaching psychosomatic medicine to PGY 2 members in a psychiatry training program. The goals of PBL are to encourage self-directed learning; enhance curiosity, using case-based, contextualized learning; promote collaborative practice; and support patient-centered care. The addition of role-playing exercises helps PGY 2 residents to develop their skills from simply developing a differential diagnosis to being able to construct biopsychosocial formulations, and it provides these residents an opportunity to practice presenting case formulations to the patient and family. Residents and faculty enjoyed the PBL role-playing sessions. Residents wanted the learning objectives given to them rather than generating their own learning objectives, to move through the cases faster, and to receive more information and more cases. Teaching psychosomatic medicine, using PBL and role-playing, allows many of the proposed Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine residency core competencies to be met. However, further refinement of the PBL method needs to take place in order to adapt its use to residency programs.

  1. A problem-based learning curriculum for occupational therapy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royeen, C B

    1995-04-01

    To prepare practitioners and researchers who are well equipped to deal with the inevitable myriad changes in health care and in society coming in the 21st century, a new focus is needed in occupational therapy education. In addition to proficiency in clinical skills and technical knowledge, occupational therapy graduates will need outcome competencies underlying the skills of critical reflection. In this article, the author presents (a) the rationale for the need for change in occupational therapy education, (b) key concepts of clinical reasoning and critical reflection pertaining to the outcome such change in occupational therapy education should address, (c) problem-based learning as a process and educational method to prepare occupational therapists in these competencies, and (d) the experience of the Program in Occupational Therapy at Shenandoah University in Winchester, Virginia, in implementing a problem-based learning curriculum.

  2. Cognitive learning during surgical residency. A model for curriculum evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, R S; Wile, M Z; Persons, M L; Shuck, J M

    1987-02-01

    The program summary of the American Board of Surgery In-Service Training Exam (ABSITE) can be used to quantitate cognitive learning during a surgical residency and to identify areas of curricular weakness in a residency program. Knowledge on each question is categorized as high (known) or low (unknown) depending on the percentage of residents who answered correctly. Knowledge of Level 1 (entry) residents is then compared with Level 5 (exit) residents. Each ABSITE question can thus be categorized on entry versus exit as known-known, unknown-unknown, unknown-known, and known-unknown. Only about half of unknown knowledge on entry appears to become known on exit. Very little knowledge known on entry becomes unknown on exit. Weaknesses in specific subject areas can be readily identified by ranking questions according to the number of exiting residents who answer incorrectly. Use of this technique to quantitate cognitive learning in a residency program may allow objective assessment of changes in curriculum.

  3. The Curriculum for Children with Severe and Profound Learning Difficulties at Stephen Hawking School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The increasing number of children with profound and multiple learning difficulties means that many schools for children with severe learning difficulties are having to review the curriculum that they offer. In addition, these schools are continuing to question whether a subject-based approach, in line with the National Curriculum, is the most…

  4. Problem-Based Learning in the Physical Science Classroom, K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Tom J.; Parker, Joyce; Eberhardt, Janet

    2018-01-01

    "Problem-Based Learning in the Physical Science Classroom, K-12" will help your students truly understand concepts such as motion, energy, and magnetism in true-to-life contexts. The book offers a comprehensive description of why, how, and when to implement problem-based learning (PBL) in your curriculum. Its 14 developmentally…

  5. Pengembangan problem based learning dengan assessment for learning berbantuan smartphone dalam pembelajaran matematika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ridlo Yuwono

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available [Bahasa]: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menghasilkan model Problem Based Learning (PBL menggunakan penilaian Assessment for Learning (AfL berbantuan smartphone, disingkat PBL-AfL-S yang valid, praktis dan efektif untuk mendukung implementasi kurikulum 2013 di SMA. Tahap-tahap pengembangan model PBL-AfL-S terdiri dari penelitian pendahuluan, pengembangan/prototiping, dan evaluasi. Kualitas model PBL-AfL-S mengacu pada kriteria kualitas menurut Nieveen (1999 yaitu valid, praktis, dan efektif. Model PBL-AfL-S diujicobakan di SMA Negeri 3 Klaten dalam dua tahap uji coba. Uji coba tahap I dilaksanakan di kelas XI-IPA 6 dan uji coba tahap II dilaksanakan di kelas XI-IPA 7. Instrumen penelitian terdiri dari: 1 Instrumen penilaian kevalidan komponen model dan perangkat pendukung pembelajaran, 2 Instrumen kepraktisan aktivitas guru dan siswa, dan 3 Instrumen keefektifan yang meliputi angket penilaian diri, lembar penilaian proyek, tes prestasi belajar, dan lembar respon siswa. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa model PBL-AfL-S dan perangkat pembelajarannya telah memenuhi kriteria valid, praktis dan efektif. Kata kunci: Pembelajaran; Masalah; Asesmen; Smartphone [English]: This study aims to develop a Problem Based Learning (PBL model using Assessment for Learning (AFL with smartphone, abbreviated as PBL-AfL-S as valid, practical and effective to support the implementation of the 2013 curriculum in High School. The stages of developing the PBL-AfL-S model consist of preliminary research, development or prototyping, and evaluation. The quality criteria of PBL-AfL-S refer to Nieveen (1999, i.e. valid, practical, and effective. The PBL-AfL-S model was piloted in SMA Negeri 3 Klaten in two phases. Tryout 1 was conducted in class XI-IPA 6 and tryout 2 was in class XI-IPA 7. The research instruments consist of: 1 The validity instrument of the model and its learning support tools, 2 the practicality of the teacher’s and students’ activity, and 3 The

  6. Discussion on methodology to go up and down learning stepladder properly: from a comparative study of supervision in PBL and relationship building in service learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feilberg, Casper; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Jensen, Mogens

    2018-01-01

    This article is a comparative study between a Japanese and a Danish higher educational institution with respect to designing an active learning environment. This study focuses on the pedagogy and supervisor that support students to embody citizenship and/or embodying an academic habitus, in combi......This article is a comparative study between a Japanese and a Danish higher educational institution with respect to designing an active learning environment. This study focuses on the pedagogy and supervisor that support students to embody citizenship and/or embodying an academic habitus...

  7. Curriculum as a support to investigative approach in learning chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomašević Biljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main reasons for low achievement of our students in international tests is the lack of functional, applicable knowledge. Formation of such knowledge demands changing the usual way of implementation of instruction (transfer of ready-made knowledge to learning through performing simple research and practical work. Considering the fact that instruction, as an organised process, takes place in frameworks determined in advance, which are arranged and regulated on the national level by curricula, it is assumed that this kind of approach must originate precisely from curricula, which is not the case in our educational practice. The goal of this paper was to determine the way in which this kind of approach in instruction and learning of chemistry can be supported by the curriculum, in order for it to become a part of regular teaching practice on the national level. The paper presents how different structural components of curricula from eight different educational systems (four European countries, one Asian country, two American federal states and one Canadian province are used to promote and support the importance of research work in instruction and learning of chemistry. The curricula from Slovenia, England, Denmark, Malta, Singapore, North Carolina, Utah and Ontario were analyzed in order to determine the kind of information they offer within structural components and accordingly, the way in which each component promotes research approach to learning chemistry, how it guides the teacher in planning such activities in the classroom, organization and performing instruction, monitoring and evaluating students' achievements.

  8. Curriculum Design of a Flipped Classroom to Enhance Haematology Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcaro, Pauline A.; Jackson, Denise E.; McLaughlin, Patricia M.; O'Malley, Cindy J.

    2016-06-01

    A common trend in higher education is the "flipped" classroom, which facilitates active learning during class. The flipped approach to teaching was instituted in a haematology `major' class and the students' attitudes and preferences for the teaching materials were surveyed. The curriculum design was explicit and involved four major components (1) the preparation of the students; (2) the weekly pre-class work; (3) the in-class active learning strategies and (4) closing the learning loop using formative quizzes. Each of these components is discussed in detail and was informed by sound pedagogical strategies. Several different sources of information and several freely available software tools to engage the students are discussed. Two iterations are reported here, with improved pass rate for the final examination from 47 to 48 % in the traditional class to 56-65 % in the flipped classroom approach. The majority of students (93 and 89 %) came to the class prepared, after viewing the screencasts and engaged fully with the activities within the face-to-face time. The students perceived that solving case studies (93 %) was the most beneficial activity for their learning and this was closely followed by the production of essay plans (71 %). The majority of students recommended that this approach be repeated the following year (69 and 75 %).

  9. Qualitative Research in PBL in Health Sciences Education: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Bridges, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Context: Qualitative methodologies are relatively new in health sciences education research, especially in the area of problem-based learning (PBL). A key advantage of qualitative approaches is the ability to gain in-depth, textured insights into educational phenomena. Key methodological issues arise, however, in terms of the strategies of…

  10. DNA Barcoding and PBL in an Australian Postsecondary College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Joseph; Garard, Helen; Currie, Tina

    2018-01-01

    DNA barcoding is increasingly being introduced into biological science educational curricula worldwide. The technique has a number of features that make it ideal for science curricula and particularly for Project-Based Learning (PBL). This report outlines the development of a DNA barcoding project in an Australian TAFE college, which also combined…

  11. Integrating Sustainability in a PBL Environment for Electronics Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arsat, Mahyuddin; Holgaard, Jette Egelund; de Graaff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    (PBL) has been put forward as a promising pedagogical model and emerged as an opportunity to implement sustainability successfully. Due to the almost forty years of experience in PBL, a case study was carried out at Aalborg University, Denmark to excerpt their experience of integrating sustainability...... in a problem based learning environment. Three electronics engineering project modules were selected as example and empirically supported by constructed interviews with staff and document analysis of selected material. The findings were analysed with a systems approach and presented with reference to three...

  12. Aligning physical learning spaces with the curriculum: AMEE Guide No. 107.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordquist, Jonas; Sundberg, Kristina; Laing, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    This Guide explores emerging issues on the alignment of learning spaces with the changing curriculum in medical education. As technology and new teaching methods have altered the nature of learning in medical education, it is necessary to re-think how physical learning spaces are aligned with the curriculum. The better alignment of learning spaces with the curriculum depends on more directly engaged leadership from faculty and the community of medical education for briefing the requirements for the design of all kinds of learning spaces. However, there is a lack of precedent and well-established processes as to how new kinds of learning spaces should be programmed. Such programmes are essential aspects of optimizing the intended experience of the curriculum. Faculty and the learning community need better tools and instruments to support their leadership role in briefing and programming. A Guide to critical concepts for exploring the alignment of curriculum and learning spaces is provided. The idea of a networked learning landscape is introduced as a way of assessing and evaluating the alignment of physical spaces to the emerging curriculum. The concept is used to explore how technology has widened the range of spaces and places in which learning happens as well as enabling new styles of learning. The networked learning landscaped is explored through four different scales within which learning is accommodated: the classroom, the building, the campus, and the city. High-level guidance on the process of briefing for the networked learning landscape is provided, to take into account the wider scale of learning spaces and the impact of technology. Key to a successful measurement process is argued to be the involvement of relevant academic stakeholders who can identify the strategic direction and purpose for the design of the learning environments in relation to the emerging demands of the curriculum.

  13. How do medical educators design a curriculum that facilitates student learning about professionalism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Glenn; Wang, Shaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study analyses the ways in which curriculum reform facilitated student learning about professionalism. Methods Design-based research provided the structure for an iterative approach to curriculum change which we undertook over a 3 year period. The learning environment of the Personal and Professional Development Theme (PPD) was analysed through the sociocultural lens of Activity Theory. Lave and Wenger’s and Mezirow’s learning theories informed curriculum reform to support student development of a patient-centred and critically reflective professional identity. The renewed pedagogical outcomes were aligned with curriculum content, learning and teaching processes and assessment, and intense staff education was undertaken. We analysed qualitative data from tutor interviews and free-response student surveys to evaluate the impact of curriculum reform. Results Students’ and tutors’ reflections on learning in PPD converged on two principle themes - ‘Developing a philosophy of medicine’ and ‘Becoming an ethical doctor’- which corresponded to the overarching PPD theme aims of communicative learning. Students and tutors emphasised the importance of the unique learning environment of PPD tutorials for nurturing personal development and the positive impact of the renewed assessment programme on learning. Conclusions A theory-led approach to curriculum reform resulted in student engagement in the PPD curriculum and facilitated a change in student perspective about the epistemological foundation of medicine. PMID:26845777

  14. PBL in a multicultural environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carsten Jahn; Du, Xiangyun

    2006-01-01

    , Aalborg University has developed its own version of PBL, based in project work organised in groups of students. The result is a focus on the development of student abilities and competences related to discipline knowledge as well as to cooperation, communication, management and self-reflection. So far...

  15. A Qualitative Study on How Health Professional Students and Their PBL Facilitators Perceive the Use of Mobile Devices during PBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lap Ki; Bridges, Susan M.; Doherty, Iain; Ng, Manwa L.; Jin, Jun; Sharma, Neel; Chan, Nam Kiu; Lai, Henrietta Yan Yu

    2015-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly being used by undergraduate students to access online information in the problem-based learning (PBL) process, initially in the self-directed phase, and more recently within face-to-face tutorials. This qualitative study across three undergraduate health professional programs used semi-structured interviews to…

  16. Aesthetic Learning about, in, with and through the Arts: A Curriculum Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Aesthetic learning is a major issue in arts education. The "method of art" is often expected to facilitate in-depth learning not only in the arts but across the curriculum. This article defines aesthetic learning in terms of a conceptual framework based on two dimensions, one representing the goal and the other the means of aesthetic learning. The…

  17. Job requirements compared to medical school education: differences between graduates from problem-based learning and conventional curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federkeil Gero

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problem-based Learning (PBL has been suggested as a key educational method of knowledge acquisition to improve medical education. We sought to evaluate the differences in medical school education between graduates from PBL-based and conventional curricula and to what extent these curricula fit job requirements. Methods Graduates from all German medical schools who graduated between 1996 and 2002 were eligible for this study. Graduates self-assessed nine competencies as required at their day-to-day work and as taught in medical school on a 6-point Likert scale. Results were compared between graduates from a PBL-based curriculum (University Witten/Herdecke and conventional curricula. Results Three schools were excluded because of low response rates. Baseline demographics between graduates of the PBL-based curriculum (n = 101, 49% female and the conventional curricula (n = 4720, 49% female were similar. No major differences were observed regarding job requirements with priorities for "Independent learning/working" and "Practical medical skills". All competencies were rated to be better taught in PBL-based curriculum compared to the conventional curricula (all p Conclusion Among medical graduates in Germany, PBL demonstrated benefits with regard to competencies which were highly required in the job of physicians. Research and business competence deserve closer attention in future curricular development.

  18. Seven-step problem-based learning in an interaction design course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Nette; Christensen, Hans Peter

    2004-01-01

    The objective in this paper is the implementation of the highly structured seven-step PBL procedure as part of the learning process in a human-computer interaction design course at the Technical University of Denmark, taking into account the common learning processes in PBL and the interaction de...... others in a single course. The evaluation results showed that the students definitely took a deep approach to learning, and indicated clearly that the students had obtained competences not only within the traditional HCI curriculum but also in terms of team-work skills.......The objective in this paper is the implementation of the highly structured seven-step PBL procedure as part of the learning process in a human-computer interaction design course at the Technical University of Denmark, taking into account the common learning processes in PBL and the interaction...... individual reports after each case in the PBL-process in order to explore the students’ inter- and intra-personal team skills development in the learning process. Different qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods have been used to obtain a thorough evaluation of PBL used as a learning method among...

  19. Problem based learning approaches to the technology education of physical therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida M; Aguilar-Ferrándiz, María Encarnación M E; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A Ga; Iglesias-Alonso, Alberto A; Fernández-Fernández, Maria Jesus M J; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen C

    2012-01-01

    Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is a whole-curriculum concept. This study aimed to compare learning preferences and strategies between physical therapy students taught by PBL and those receiving conventional lectures on massage therapy, trauma physical therapy, and electrotherapy, hydrotherapy, and thermotherapy. This quasi-experimental study included 182 male and female students on physical therapy diploma courses at three universities in Andalusia (Spain). The Canfield Learning Skills Inventory (CLSI) was used to assess learning strategies and the Approaches to Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST) to analyze study preferences. At the end of the academic year 2009/10, physical therapy students taught by PBL considered the most important learning strategies to be group work, study organization, relationship of ideas, and academic results. In comparison to conventionally taught counterparts, they considered that PBL reduced lack of purpose, memorizing without relating, the law of minimum effort, and fear of failure. Among these PBL students, the most highly rated study preferences were: organization of course tasks, cordial interaction with the teacher, learning by reading and images, and direct hands-on experience. For these physical therapy students, PBL facilitates learning strategies and study preferences in comparison to conventional teaching.

  20. Beyond the rhetoric of problem-based learning: emancipatory limits and links with andragogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, F

    1999-10-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL), sometimes referred to as enquiry-based learning, is an approach to education that has gained increasing usage within health care in recent years. Its origins very much lie within medical education. The bulk of literature on PBL is optimistic about its potential, especially in relation to nurse education. It is argued here that the benefits of PBL are that it moves toward student-centred education and process-oriented methods that have been taking place for at least 16 years. There are clear links with andragogy although this is not always acknowledged, but the potential move away from emancipatory education inherent in PBL if used without reflection, is inconsistent with andragogy. This article takes a more critical view of the concept and argues that there are significant limits which need to be considered carefully. Apart from the possible move away from the emancipatory aims of education, there is commonly an implicit support of the medical model within PBL which is inappropriate at a time when the limits of medicine are becoming increasingly clear. It is concluded that further debate and research on the approach is necessary, but that as a facilitative strategy PBL does hold some promise. However, it would be inappropriate to use it as a curriculum model if only because it lacks the diversity required of a postmodern curriculum and would not respond effectively to differing student learning styles.

  1. Beyond the Didactic Classroom: Educational Models to Encourage Active Student Involvement in Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Shreeve, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    In a chiropractic college that utilizes a hybrid curriculum model composed of adult-based learning strategies along with traditional lecture-based course delivery, a literature search for educational delivery methods that would integrate the affective domain and the cognitive domain of learning provided some insights into the use of problem-based learning (PBL), experiential learning theory (ELT), and the emerging use of appreciative inquiry (AI) to enhance the learning experience. The purpos...

  2. Problem-based learning in dental education: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassir, Seyed Hossein; Sadr-Eshkevari, Pooyan; Amirikhorheh, Shaden; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to compare the effectiveness of problem-based learning (PBL) with that of traditional (non-PBL) approaches in dental education. The search strategy included electronic and manual searches of studies published up to October 2012. The PICO (Population, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome) framework was utilized to guide the inclusion or exclusion of studies. The search strategy identified 436 articles, seventeen of which met the inclusion criteria. No randomized controlled trial was found comparing the effectiveness of PBL with that of lecture-based approach at the level of an entire curriculum. Three randomized controlled trials had evaluated the effectiveness of PBL at a single course level. The quality assessment rated four studies as being of moderate quality, while the other studies were assessed as being of weak quality. This review concludes that there are a very limited number of well-designed controlled studies evaluating the effectiveness of PBL in dental education. The data in those studies reveal that PBL does not negatively influence the acquisition of factual knowledge in dental students and PBL enhances the ability of students in applying their knowledge to clinical situations. In addition, PBL positively affects students' perceived preparedness.

  3. Teaching practice of the course of Laser Principle and Application based on PBL mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongliang; Lv, Beibei; Wang, Siqi

    2017-08-01

    The primary task of university education is to stimulate students' autonomic learning and cultivate students' creative thinking. This paper put to use problem based learning (PBL) teaching mode, to enable students master flexible knowledge as the goal, and a detailed analysis of the implementation method and concrete measures of PBL teaching reform in the course of Laser Principle and Application, then compared with the former teaching methods. From the feedback of students and teaching experience, we get good teaching effect and prove the feasibility of PBL teaching mode in practice.

  4. The Effect of Project Based Learning in Teaching EFL Vocabulary to Young Learners of English: The Case of Pre-school Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma KİMSESİZ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available English language teaching has newly been introduced to pre-school curriculum in Turkey. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of teaching EFL vocabulary to pre-school children through Project Based Learning (PBL. For this purpose, an experimental design, consisted of observation checklists, exam scores and a short survey, was adopted. Firstly, through a short online survey, 150 kindergarten teachers were asked to specify which techniques they commonly used in their English classes. The primary aim here was to define traditional techniques and the rate of PBL use in Turkey. After defining common techniques, 28 children were randomly assigned to experimental (PBL instruction and control groups (traditional instruction equally and the data was collected in real time classroom setting for 8 weeks. The results showed that (1 PBL was rarely adopted in EFL classes in Turkey, (2 PBL instruction could increase EFL vocabulary learning gains when compared to common methods and (3 young learners were observed to have been more active in PBL classes. The effect of PBL instruction was discussed in local, cognitive and motivational perspectives in the light of previous related research. The potential benefits of further PBL use for young EFL learners and implications were also discussed.

  5. Co-Creating Curriculum in Higher Education: Promoting Democratic Values and a Multidimensional View on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmark, Ulrika; Westman, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses a case study in teacher education in Sweden, focusing on creating spaces for student engagement through co-creating curriculum. It highlights democratic values and a multidimensional learning view as underpinning such endeavors. The main findings are that co-creating curriculum is an ambiguous process entailing unpredictable,…

  6. An Exploratory Analysis of a Middle School Science Curriculum: Implications for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Gregory S.; Hord, Casey

    2016-01-01

    An exploratory study of a middle school curriculum directly aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards was conducted with a focus on how the curriculum addresses the instructional needs of students with learning disabilities. A descriptive analysis of a lesson on speed and velocity was conducted and implications discussed for students with…

  7. The Challenge of Learning Physics before Mathematics: A Case Study of Curriculum Change in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Mei-Shiu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify challenges in implementing a physics-before- 10 mathematics curriculum. Obviously, students need to learn necessary mathematics skills in order to develop advanced physics knowledge. In the 2010 high school curriculum in Taiwan, however, grade 11 science students study two-dimensional motion in physics without…

  8. Is problem-based learning an ideal format for developing ethical decision skills?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. Harasym

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ethical decision making is a complex process, which involves the interaction of knowledge, skills, and attitude. To enhance the teaching and learning on ethics reasoning, multiple teaching strategies have to be applied. A medical ethical reasoning (MER model served as a framework of the development of ethics reasoning and their suggested instructional strategies. Problem-based learning (PBL, being used to facilitate students' critical thinking, self-directed learning, collaboration, and communication skills, has been considered effective on ethics education, especially when incorporated with experiential experience. Unlike lecturing that mainly disseminates knowledge and activates the left brain, PBL encourages “whole-brain” learning. However, PBL has several disadvantages, such as its inefficiency, lack of adequately trained preceptors, and the in-depth, silo learning within a relatively small number of cases. Because each school tends to utilize PBL in different ways, either the curriculum designer or the learning strategy, it is important to maximize the advantages of a PBL session, PBL then becomes an ideal format for refining students' ethical decisions and behaviors.

  9. Interface between problem-based learning and a learner-centered paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimi R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Reza KarimiPacific University School of Pharmacy, Hillsboro, OR, USABackground: Problem-based learning (PBL has made a major shift in support of student learning for many medical school curricula around the world. Since curricular development of PBL in the early 1970s and its growth in the 1980s and 1990s, there have been growing numbers of publications providing positive and negative data in regard to the curricular effectiveness of PBL. The purpose of this study was to explore supportive data for the four core objectives of PBL and to identify an interface between the objectives of PBL and a learner-centered paradigm.Methods: The four core PBL objectives, ie, structuring of knowledge and clinical context, clinical reasoning, self-directed learning, and intrinsic motivation, were used to search MEDLINE, the Education Resources Information Center, the Educator’s Reference Complete, and PsycINFO from January 1969 to January 2011. The literature search was facilitated and narrowed if the published study included the following terms: “problem-based learning”, “medical education”, “traditional curriculum”, and one of the above four PBL objectives.Results: Through a comprehensive search analysis, one can find supportive data for the effectiveness of a PBL curriculum in achieving the four core objectives of PBL. A further analysis of these four objectives suggests that there is an interface between PBL objectives and criteria from a learner-centered paradigm. In addition, this review indicates that promotion of teamwork among students is another interface that exists between PBL and a learner-centered paradigm.Conclusion: The desire of medical schools to enhance student learning and a need to provide an environment where students construct knowledge rather than receive knowledge have encouraged many medical schools to move into a learner-centered paradigm. Implementation of a PBL curriculum can be used as a prevailing starting point to

  10. Performance Anxiety at English PBL Groups Among Taiwanese Medical Students: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Sheng Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Students' performance anxiety can impact negatively on the effectiveness of medical education reform, including performance in problem-based learning (PBL and in using English in discussion. This study aimed to investigate the nature of performance anxiety among Taiwanese medical students in an English-language PBL group. Eighteen Taiwanese, one American and four Asian medical students who were attending an international PBL workshop were enrolled. A questionnaire seeking demographic data and experience in use of PBL and eight questions evaluating performance anxiety were administered. The performance anxiety of Taiwanese medical students was compared to that of the Asians and the one American. Frequencies of each performance anxiety were calculated. The results suggested that the Taiwanese students showed more anxiety than the one student from the United States, but less than other Asian students. The acts of giving a report, being the center of attention, and talking in the PBL group were the most common situations related to anxiety in PBL groups. Using English and working in a new PBL environment are possible sources of anxiety. The presence of anxiety among the Taiwanese medical students in English PBL groups implies the necessity for developing an effective strategy to deal with students' performance anxiety.

  11. Analysing Learning Outcomes in an Electrical Engineering Curriculum Using Illustrative Verbs Derived from Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meda, Lawrence; Swart, Arthur James

    2018-01-01

    Learning outcomes are essential to any curriculum in education, where they need to be clear, observable and measurable. However, some academics structure learning outcomes in a way that does not promote student learning. The purpose of this article is to present the analyses of learning outcomes of an Electrical Engineering curriculum offered at a…

  12. The Innovative Immersion of Mobile Learning into a Science Curriculum in Singapore: an Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daner; Looi, Chee-Kit; Wu, Longkai; Xie, Wenting

    2016-08-01

    With advancements made in mobile technology, increasing emphasis has been paid to how to leverage the affordances of mobile technology to improve science learning and instruction. This paper reports on a science curriculum supported by an inquiry-based framework and mobile technologies. It was developed by teachers and researchers in a multiyear program of school-based research. The foci of this paper is on the design principles of the curriculum and its enactment, and the establishment of a teacher learning community. Through elucidating the design features of the innovative curriculum and evaluating teacher and student involvement in science instruction and learning, we introduce the science curriculum, called Mobilized 5E Science Curriculum (M5ESC), and present a representative case study of how one experienced teacher and her class adopted the curriculum. The findings indicate the intervention promoted this teacher's questioning competency, enabled her to interact with students frequently and flexibly in class, and supported her technology use for promoting different levels of cognition. Student learning was also improved in terms of test achievement and activity performance in and out of the classroom. We propose that the study can be used to guide the learning design of mobile technology-supported curricula, as well as teacher professional development for curriculum enactment.

  13. Nationwide program of education for undergraduates in the field of disaster medicine: development of a core curriculum centered on blended learning and simulation tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Ragazzoni, Luca; Tengattini, Marco; Carenzo, Luca; Della Corte, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, effective models of disaster medicine curricula for medical schools have been established. However, only a small percentage of medical schools worldwide have considered at least basic disaster medicine teaching in their study program. In Italy, disaster medicine has not yet been included in the medical school curriculum. Perceiving the lack of a specific course on disaster medicine, the Segretariato Italiano Studenti in Medicina (SISM) contacted the Centro di Ricerca Interdipartimentale in Medicina di Emergenza e dei Disastri ed Informatica applicata alla didattica e alla pratica Medica (CRIMEDIM) with a proposal for a nationwide program in this field. Seven modules (introduction to disaster medicine, prehospital disaster management, definition of triage, characteristics of hospital disaster plans, treatment of the health consequences of different disasters, psychosocial care, and presentation of past disasters) were developed using an e-learning platform and a 12-hour classroom session which involved problem-based learning (PBL) activities, table-top exercises, and a computerized simulation (Table 1). The modules were designed as a framework for a disaster medicine curriculum for undergraduates and covered the three main disciplines (clinical and psychosocial, public health, and emergency and risk management) of the core of "Disaster Health" according to the World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM) international guidelines for disaster medicine education. From January 2011 through May 2013, 21 editions of the course were delivered to 21 different medical schools, and 524 students attended the course. The blended approach and the use of simulation tools were appreciated by all participants and successfully increased participants' knowledge of disaster medicine and basic competencies in performing mass-casualty triage. This manuscript reports on the designing process and the initial outcomes with respect to learners

  14. Analysing learning outcomes in an Electrical Engineering curriculum using illustrative verbs derived from Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meda, Lawrence; Swart, Arthur James

    2018-05-01

    Learning outcomes are essential to any curriculum in education, where they need to be clear, observable and measurable. However, some academics structure learning outcomes in a way that does not promote student learning. The purpose of this article is to present the analyses of learning outcomes of an Electrical Engineering curriculum offered at a University of Technology in South Africa, in order to determine if academics are structuring them in a way that enables student learning. A qualitative case study is used where the learning outcomes from 33 study guides are reviewed using illustrative verbs derived from Bloom's Taxonomy. Results indicate that 9% of all the learning outcomes are unclear, 10% are unobservable and 23% are unmeasurable. A key recommendation is to provide regular workshops to assist academics in reviewing their learning outcomes using the illustrative verbs derived from Bloom's Taxonomy, thereby ensuring that their learning outcomes promote student learning.

  15. Evaluation of asynchronous E-learning in the geography curriculum: enriching learning quality in Saudi high schools

    OpenAIRE

    Al Dobaikhi, Hend; Woollard, John

    2011-01-01

    The impacts of emerging ICT into educational curricula Asynchronous discussion forumDiscussion groups via e-learning environmentPosting questions and commentsSelf-efficacy in asynchronous e-learning Web community participationCollaborative learning can be fosteredPositive impacts on objectives of educational curriculum

  16. Kindling fires: examining the potential for cumulative learning in a Journalism curriculum

    KAUST Repository

    Kilpert, Leigh

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated context-dependency of learning as an indicator for students\\' potential to continue learning after graduation. We used Maton\\'s theoretical concepts of \\'cumulative\\' and \\'segmented\\' learning, and \\'semantic gravity\\', to look for context-independent learning in students\\' assessments in a Journalism curriculum. We postulated whether the curriculum constrained or enabled cumulative learning. Students\\' responses to assessments were coded by their degree of context-dependency, or semantic gravity. We found that, firstly, students are overly successful in producing context-dependent answers but struggle to deliver context-independent responses. Secondly, students were not effective when they used higher level knowledge principles without the foundation of lower level ones. Lastly, the marking criteria were encouraging markers to reward context-dependent answers over context-independent ones. This study has implications for educators interested in curriculum design that enables cumulative learning in discipline specific contexts. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  17. Effects of tutor-related behaviours on the process of problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, Esther; Yew, Elaine H J; Schmidt, Henk G

    2011-10-01

    Tutors in a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) curriculum are thought to play active roles in guiding students to develop frameworks for use in the construction of knowledge. This implies that both subject-matter expertise and the ability of tutors to facilitate the learning process must be important in helping students learn. This study examines the behavioural effects of tutors in terms of subject-matter expertise, social congruence and cognitive congruence on students' learning process and on their final achievement. The extent of students' learning at each PBL phase was estimated by tracking the number of relevant concepts recalled at the end of each learning phase, while student achievement was based on students' ability to describe and elaborate upon the relationship between relevant concepts learned. By using Analysis of Covariance, social congruence of the tutor was found to have a significant influence on learning in each PBL phase while all of the tutor-related behaviours had a significant impact on student achievement. The results suggest that the ability of tutors to communicate informally with students and hence create a less threatening learning environment that promotes a free flow exchange of ideas, has a greater impact on learning at each of the PBL phases as compared to tutors' subject-matter expertise and their ability to explain concepts in a way that is easily understood by students. The data presented indicates that these tutor-related behaviours are determinants of learning in a PBL curriculum, with social congruence having a greater influence on learning in the different PBL phases.

  18. Status of problem based learning in postgraduate anesthesia teaching: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Chilkoti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anesthesia is a specialized branch of medicine with a very narrow margin of error. Incorporation of problem-based learning (PBL in anesthesia post-graduate (PG teaching enhances the critical thinking and problem-solving skills. It also helps in developing a broader prospective of clinical case scenarios. Case based discussions (CBD are most widely practiced out of all PBL methods in anesthesia PG teaching. Materials and Methods: We conducted an anonymous questionnaire based, cross-sectional survey among 62 anesthesia residents from various medical institutions in a city of Delhi, India. We aimed to assess the current status of PBL by assessing the student satisfaction with CBD in anesthesia PG teaching, educational objectives accomplished with CBD and effectiveness of teaching curriculum in PG teaching with suggested modifications, if any. Result and Conclusion: We observed that CBD is lacking in many important key areas of PBL e.g., formulation of objectives, communication on the content and direction of PBL, facilitation skills, supplementation of inadequacies of CBD. However, CBD seems to be a valid method of PBL in terms of the educational objectives accomplished with it but increased motivation for learning is required. Majority of the students felt that PG teaching curriculum should be centralized, with increased emphasis on open interactive sessions regarding its effectiveness.

  19. Job requirements compared to medical school education: differences between graduates from problem-based learning and conventional curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlett, Christopher L; Doll, Hinnerk; Dahmen, Janosch; Polacsek, Ole; Federkeil, Gero; Fischer, Martin R; Bamberg, Fabian; Butzlaff, Martin

    2010-01-14

    Problem-based Learning (PBL) has been suggested as a key educational method of knowledge acquisition to improve medical education. We sought to evaluate the differences in medical school education between graduates from PBL-based and conventional curricula and to what extent these curricula fit job requirements. Graduates from all German medical schools who graduated between 1996 and 2002 were eligible for this study. Graduates self-assessed nine competencies as required at their day-to-day work and as taught in medical school on a 6-point Likert scale. Results were compared between graduates from a PBL-based curriculum (University Witten/Herdecke) and conventional curricula. Three schools were excluded because of low response rates. Baseline demographics between graduates of the PBL-based curriculum (n = 101, 49% female) and the conventional curricula (n = 4720, 49% female) were similar. No major differences were observed regarding job requirements with priorities for "Independent learning/working" and "Practical medical skills". All competencies were rated to be better taught in PBL-based curriculum compared to the conventional curricula (all p learning/working" (Delta + 0.57), "Psycho-social competence" (Delta + 0.56), "Teamwork" (Delta + 0.39) and "Problem-solving skills" (Delta + 0.36), whereas "Research competence" (Delta--1.23) and "Business competence" (Delta--1.44) in the PBL-based curriculum needed improvement. Among medical graduates in Germany, PBL demonstrated benefits with regard to competencies which were highly required in the job of physicians. Research and business competence deserve closer attention in future curricular development.

  20. Self-directed learning readiness of Asian students: students perspective on a hybrid problem based learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatemia, Lukas D; Susilo, Astrid P; van Berkel, Henk

    2016-12-03

    To identify the student's readiness to perform self-directed learning and the underlying factors influencing it on the hybrid problem based learning curriculum. A combination of quantitative and qualitative studies was conducted in five medical schools in Indonesia. In the quantitative study, the Self Directed Learning Readiness Scale was distributed to all students in all batches, who had experience with the hybrid problem based curriculum. They were categorized into low- and high -level based on the score of the questionnaire. Three focus group discussions (low-, high-, and mixed level) were conducted in the qualitative study with six to twelve students chosen randomly from each group to find the factors influencing their self-directed learning readiness. Two researchers analysed the qualitative data as a measure of triangulation. The quantitative study showed only half of the students had a high-level of self-directed learning readiness, and a similar trend also occurred in each batch. The proportion of students with a high level of self-directed learning readiness was lower in the senior students compared to more junior students. The qualitative study showed that problem based learning processes, assessments, learning environment, students' life styles, students' perceptions of the topics, and mood, were factors influencing their self-directed learning. A hybrid problem based curriculum may not fully affect the students' self-directed learning. The curriculum system, teacher's experiences, student's background and cultural factors might contribute to the difficulties for the student's in conducting self-directed learning.

  1. PBL and critical thinking disposition in Chinese medical students – A randomized cross-sectional stu

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    XiangYun Du

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of problem-based learning (PBL and the development of critical thinking disposition (CT and academic achievement in Chinese medical students using a cross-sectional randomized design. Medical students from China Medical University (CMU were randomized to PBL or non-PBL teaching at the commencement of the study. After five years of study, CT was scored by a Chinese version of the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI-CV. The score achieved on a Computer Case Simulation (CCS test evaluated academic performance. Total CT score was higher in PBL students (n=170 than non-PBL students (n=83 (304.7±36.8 vs. 279.2±39.4, p < 0.01. Subscale CT-scores were significant in favor of PBL in six of the seven subscales (truth seeking, open-mindedness, analyticity, systematicity, inquisitiveness, maturity. There was no significant difference in terms of gender on the total CT score, though minor differences were seen in subscales favoring female PBL students. PBL students had higher CCS scores than non-PBL students, but not significantly (112.8±20.6 vs. 107.3±16.5; p=0.11. There was no significant correlation between CCS scores and CCTDI-CV results. Male students scored slightly higher on the CCS test compared to female students (male 113.4±18.9 vs. female 109.7±19.7, but the difference was not significant. This study concludes that in Chinese medical students, PBL teaching was related to a higher disposition of critical thinking, but not to improved academic skills.

  2. From Print to Digital Platforms: A PBL Framework for Fostering Multimedia Competencies and Consciousness in Traditional Journalism Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Debbie; Kale, Ugur

    2015-01-01

    The project-based learning (PBL) approach closely reflects the tenets of journalism and provides a potential pedagogical guide for transforming traditional journalism education. This study operationalizes and applies a PBL framework in digitizing a print journalism course. The findings illustrate how the presence of seven key elements of PBL…

  3. Investigating Teacher Learning Supports in High School Biology Curricular Programs to Inform the Design of Educative Curriculum Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Carrie J.; Delgado, Cesar; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Krajcik, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Reform efforts have emphasized the need to support teachers' learning about reform-oriented practices. Educative curriculum materials are one potential vehicle for promoting teacher learning about these practices. Educative curriculum materials include supports that are intended to promote both student "and" teacher learning. However, little is…

  4. Introducing PBL to Foreign Studentsin International Engineering Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Dahms, Mona-Lisa; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2007-01-01

    programs to develop process competencies from an intercultural perspective. The POL course has had positive effects in terms of helping foreign students understand PBL and develop learning strategies in a PBL setting. However, our experiences show that issues arising from cultural diversity in educational...... to develop process competencies (i.e. skills in project management, collaboration, communication, etc.) in addition to technical skills. This paper presents the development of a course, the Project Organized Learning (POL) course, which has been designed to assist students in international engineering...... settings are more complex than only integrating foreign students into existing programs. More efforts and better strategies are needed to improve intercultural competencies for teaching staff and students, foreigners as well as locals, in engineering education....

  5. Learners with learning difficulties in mathematics : attitudes, curriculum and methods of teaching mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    D.Ed. The aim of this theses is to find out whether there is any relationship between learners' attitudes and learning difficulties in mathematics: To investigate whether learning difficulties in mathematics are associated with learners' gender. To establish the nature of teachers' perceptions of the learning problem areas in the mathematics curriculum. To find out about the teachers' views on the methods of teaching mathematics, resources, learning of mathematics, extra curricular activit...

  6. Student perceptions of a virtual learning environment for a problem-based learning undergraduate medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leng, Bas A; Dolmans, Diana H J M; Muijtjens, Arno M M; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2006-06-01

    To investigate the effects of a virtual learning environment (VLE) on group interaction and consultation of information resources during the preliminary phase, self-study phase and reporting phase of the problem-based learning process in an undergraduate medical curriculum. A questionnaire was administered to 355 medical students in Years 1 and 2 to ask them about the perceived usefulness of a virtual learning environment that was created with Blackboard for group interaction and the use of learning resources. The students indicated that the VLE supported face-to-face interaction in the preliminary discussion and in the reporting phase but did not stimulate computer-mediated distance interaction during the self-study phase. They perceived that the use of multimedia in case presentations led to a better quality of group discussion than if case presentations were exclusively text-based. They also indicated that the information resources that were hyperlinked in the VLE stimulated the consultation of these resources during self-study, but not during the reporting phase. Students indicated that the use of a VLE in the tutorial room and the inclusion of multimedia in case presentations supported processes of active learning in the tutorial groups. However, if we want to exploit the full potential of asynchronous computer-mediated communication to initiate in-depth discussion during the self-study phase, its application will have to be selective and deliberate. Students indicated that the links in the VLE to selected information in library repositories supported their learning.

  7. Curriculum Issues: Teaching and Learning for Sustainable Development in Developing Countries--Zimbabwe Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambudzo, Ignatius Isaac

    2015-01-01

    The study sought to investigate curriculum issues, teaching and learning for sustainable development in secondary schools in Zimbabwe. Education for sustainable development (ESD) aims at changing the approach to education by integrating principles, values, practices and needs in all forms of learning. Literature has documented the importance of…

  8. The MORPG-Based Learning System for Multiple Courses: A Case Study on Computer Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuo-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at developing a Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game-based (MORPG) Learning system which enabled instructors to construct a game scenario and manage sharable and reusable learning content for multiple courses. It used the curriculum of "Introduction to Computer Science" as a study case to assess students' learning…

  9. Neuropediatrics postgraduate students’ learning process through hidden curriculum at Universidad Nacional de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica María Uscátegui-Daccarett

    2016-07-01

    For this group of students, learning through the hidden curriculum is real and educational, allows having a better approach to patients and acquiring appropriate tools for a successful job performance. Nevertheless, it is still insufficient to address ethical dilemmas such as delivery of bad news and patients’ deaths. Thus, complementing this type of learning with explicit training on bioethics is required.

  10. Competence-Based Blended Learning in Building Automation: Towards a EU Curriculum in "Domotica"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommaruga, L.; De Angelis, E.

    2007-01-01

    A competence-based approach was applied to a blended learning on line distance training in the Euroinno EU project aimed at vocational training in building automation. The current paper describes the experience gathered during the learning process and the definition of the curriculum. A number of issues emerged during the sessions concerning…

  11. How to Implement an E-Learning Curriculum to Streamline Teaching Digital Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Király, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    In the field of teaching, one of the interesting subjects is the research of the fact which didactic methods are good for learning the current curriculum for the students who show a wide range of age, interest, chosen courses, previous studies and motivation. This article introduces the facilities that support the learning process: the…

  12. Organization and Integration of Learning Experiences in a Curriculum: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everwijn, S. E. M.

    1983-01-01

    The literature on "organizers" by Ausubel, Earl, and Tyler provides clues to help teachers and students relate what has been learned in one subject to what is being learned in another. Problems of integration in a curriculum for student nurses are examined, and a solution to these problems is described. (RM)

  13. Physiology Teaching and Learning Experience in a New Modular Curriculum at the National University of Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahutu, Jean Bosco

    2010-01-01

    In the present article, I report on my experience in teaching and learning physiology in the first year of a new modular curriculum at the Faculty of Medicine of the National University of Rwanda. With self-reported questionnaires, I collected learning experience perceptions from 112 students who attended the module of physiology in 2008. The…

  14. PBL – Reflections after 10 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soler, José

    The poster describes course 34357 at DTU, where PBL has been used in the last 10 years. While the course responsibles where not aware initially that the used methodology was PBL, the poster describes the triggering idea for the initial taken choices, i.e. homogenize working methodologies...

  15. Current state of the effectiveness of problem-based learning in prosthodontics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Ehsan; Bassir, Seyed Hossein; Sadr-Eshkevari, Pooyan

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the available literature on the effectiveness of problem-based learning (PBL) in prosthodontics. Both electronic and manual searches were performed by two reviewers. Of the 440 studies identified, ten met the inclusion criteria (Kappa=0.83). Various assessment tools such as standardized examinations (National Board Dental Examination and North East Regional Board of Dental Examiners exam) (22 percent), tutor evaluation (practical and examinations performance) (20 percent), curriculum time (20 percent) and number of units (10 percent), peer evaluation (10 percent), and self-evaluation (100 percent) were used in the included studies. Thirty percent of the studies adopted a control group for all measurements, 30 percent did for only some measurements, and the others lacked any control group. Although 30 percent of the studies implemented a hybrid PBL, the other studies did not mention the type of PBL. Based on the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP), all of the included studies were rated as being of weak quality. Heterogeneity across these studies in outcome variables, study designs, levels of PBL intervention, and study population limits any attempt to generalize the outcomes. The generally poor quality assessment outcomes warrant further studies on the effectiveness of PBL in prosthodontics education compared to a non-PBL curriculum.

  16. Dissemination of an innovative mastery learning curriculum grounded in implementation science principles: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaghie, William C; Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Cohen, Elaine R; Kristopaitis, Theresa; Wayne, Diane B

    2015-11-01

    Dissemination of a medical education innovation, such as mastery learning, from a setting where it has been used successfully to a new and different medical education environment is not easy. This article describes the uneven yet successful dissemination of a simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) curriculum on central venous catheter (CVC) insertion for internal medicine and emergency medicine residents across medical education settings. The dissemination program was grounded in implementation science principles. The article begins by describing implementation science which addresses the mechanisms of medical education and health care delivery. The authors then present a mastery learning case study in two phases: (1) the development, implementation, and evaluation of the SBML CVC curriculum at a tertiary care academic medical center; and (2) the dissemination of the SBML CVC curriculum to an academic community hospital setting. Contextual information about the drivers and barriers that affected the SBML CVC curriculum dissemination is presented. This work demonstrates that dissemination of mastery learning curricula, like all other medical education innovations, will fail without active educational leadership, personal contacts, dedication, hard work, rigorous measurement, and attention to implementation science principles. The article concludes by presenting a set of lessons learned about disseminating an SBML CVC curriculum across different medical education settings.

  17. Effect of problem based approach on medical students’ learning satisfaction and understanding in the histology course topics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Rezaie

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Problem-based learning (PBL is a term used within education for a range of teaching approaches that encourage students to learn through the structured exploration of a problem. Histology comes early in the curriculum and the medical students seem unable to see the value of the content, they don't appear to be motivated to learn the content. This project used PBL to help the students make the connection between the content and clinical aspects.Methods: Thirty six undergraduate medical students, 22 female and 14 male, enrolled in the histology course during the spring semester of 2008. A survey which collected information relative to gender, course load, and workload and study time was used. The subjects were accessory glands of digestive system histology. The course is designed into four units: tree units of salivary glands, pancreas and gall bladder histology, were presented in a traditional lecture format; the fourth unit, liver was presented in a problem-based format that used clinical practice. Assessment focused on three issues of a. student engagement, b. lesson assessment in terms of clarity, interest and usefulness and c. student understanding.Results: Student comments collected during PBL class periods indicate engagement in the topic. In PBL method of teaching most of responses were consistent with the aim of teaching but in traditional classes few responses relate to the objectives at hand. Students had more active partnership in PBL class. Students found PBL class more useful, interesting and clear in terms of subject material than traditional method.Conclusions: In this project student comments collected during PBL class periods indicated more engagement in the topic. Students’ understanding of material were significantly higher and students’ partnership in PBL class was more than traditional classes.Keywords: PBL,HISTOLOGY, STUDENT PARTICIPATION

  18. A Systematic Review of Research on the Use of Problem-Based Learning in the Preparation and Development of School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinger, Philip; Bridges, Edwin M.

    2017-01-01

    Problem: Problem-based learning (PBL) was introduced into the parlance of educational leadership and management almost 30 years ago. During the ensuing decades, a global community of professors, doctoral students, and curriculum designers has built upon early models with the goal of increasing the impact of school leadership preparation. This…

  19. The Effect of Project Based Learning in Teaching EFL Vocabulary to Young Learners of English: The Case of Pre-School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimsesiz, Fatma; Dolgunso¨z, Emrah; Konca, M. Yavuz

    2017-01-01

    English language teaching has newly been introduced to pre-school curriculum in Turkey. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of teaching EFL vocabulary to pre-school children through Project Based Learning (PBL). For this purpose, an experimental design, consisted of observation checklists, exam scores and a short survey,…

  20. Improving education in primary care: development of an online curriculum using the blended learning model

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    Lewin Linda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standardizing the experiences of medical students in a community preceptorship where clinical sites vary by geography and discipline can be challenging. Computer-assisted learning is prevalent in medical education and can help standardize experiences, but often is not used to its fullest advantage. A blended learning curriculum combining web-based modules with face-to-face learning can ensure students obtain core curricular principles. Methods This course was developed and used at The Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and its associated preceptorship sites in the greater Cleveland area. Leaders of a two-year elective continuity experience at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine used adult learning principles to develop four interactive online modules presenting basics of office practice, difficult patient interviews, common primary care diagnoses, and disease prevention. They can be viewed at http://casemed.case.edu/cpcp/curriculum. Students completed surveys rating the content and technical performance of each module and completed a Generalist OSCE exam at the end of the course. Results Participating students rated all aspects of the course highly; particularly those related to charting and direct patient care. Additionally, they scored very well on the Generalist OSCE exam. Conclusion Students found the web-based modules to be valuable and to enhance their clinical learning. The blended learning model is a useful tool in designing web-based curriculum for enhancing the clinical curriculum of medical students.

  1. A course director's perspectives on problem-based learning curricula in biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Harold C

    2002-12-01

    Knowledge of the applications of biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics in the practice of medicine has been and continues to be a vital part of medical students' and continuing education. The technical background and the rapid expansion of information and new applications have made it an arduous task to learn and teach this material within the already crowded medical school curriculum. Problem-based learning (PBL) formats are rapidly being adopted at all levels of education as not only a major paradigm shift in education but also a solution for the instruction of biochemistry in medical school. Designing an effective biochemistry curriculum with PBL-based or lecture-based formats requires an appreciation for their strengths and weakness. The author's experiences in the Double Helix Curriculum at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry (which employs PBL cases and complementing lectures) has shown that students are excited about learning in the PBL environment and explore in depth ways of integrating biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and molecular biology into the practice of medicine. At the same time, complementary lectures greatly enhance uniformity in the quality and, importantly, the accuracy of the students' learning.

  2. The Role of Work-Integrated Learning in Student Preferences of Instructional Methods in an Accounting Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekera, Indra

    2015-01-01

    The role of work-integrated learning in student preferences of instructional methods is largely unexplored across the accounting curriculum. This study conducted six experiments to explore student preferences of instructional methods for learning, in six courses of the accounting curriculum that differed in algorithmic rigor, in the context of a…

  3. Boundary Interaction: Towards Developing a Mobile Technology-Enabled Science Curriculum to Integrate Learning in the Informal Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daner; Looi, Chee-Kit

    2018-01-01

    This paper explores the crossover between formal learning and learning in informal spaces supported by mobile technology, and proposes design principles for educators to carry out a science curriculum, namely Boundary Activity-based Science Curriculum (BAbSC). The conceptualization of the boundary object, and the principles of boundary activity as…

  4. An interdisciplinary complex problem as a starting point for learning: Impact of the PBL method in second-year Environmental engineering students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Saez de Camara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Three courses of the second year degree in Environmental Engineering (Geology and Pedology, Ecology and Economics and Business Administration have been remodeled using the Problem-Based Learning methodology. The proposed problem is a real-life and integrative problem related to their specialization which must be solved in these three courses at the same time. The results reveal that during this experience students were considerably more active, cooperative and involved, and the success rate doubled that of similar engineering courses of the Faculty. Regarding students’ opinion, it should be emphasized that they perceive that this method is functional and encouraging. A high percentage of the students describe the experience as positive or very positive. Additionally, they stated that the Problem-Based Learning promoted the development of skills that, in their own view, are essential for their career, such as teamwork and communication.

  5. Project-based Collaborative learning in distance education in "The Aalborg PBL Model – Progress, Diversity and Challenges" (Eds.: Anette Kolmos, Flemming K. Fink and Lone Krogh)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten; Bajard, C.; Helbo, Jan

    This article describes the experiences drawn from an experiment in transferring positive experience with a project-organised on-campus engineering programme to a technology supported distance education programme. Three years of experience with the Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII)......, didactic adjustments have been made based on feedback, in particular from evaluation questionnaires. This process has been very constructive in approaching the goal: a successful model for project organized learning in distance education.......) programme indicates, however, that adjustments are required in transforming the on-campus model to distance education. The main problem is that while project work is an excellent regulator of the learning process for on-campus students, this does not seem to be the case for off-campus students. Consequently...

  6. Lessons learned from curriculum changes and setting curriculum objectives at the University of Pennsylvania's Earth and Environmental Science Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmochowski, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Recent restructuring of the University of Pennsylvania’s curriculum, including a revised multi-disciplinary Environmental Studies major and a proposed Environmental Science major has led to several changes, including a mandatory junior research seminar. Feedback from students indicates that a more structured curriculum has helped guide them through the multi-disciplinary Environmental Studies major. The addition of mandatory courses in Statistics, Geographical and Environmental Modeling, as well as Economics and Policy has ensured that students have important skills needed to succeed after graduation. We have compiled a curriculum objective matrix to clarify both the broad and focused objectives of our curriculum and how each course helps to fulfill these objectives. An important aspect of both majors is the Senior Thesis. The junior research seminar was recently revised to help students prepare for their thesis research. Topic selection, library research, data presentation, basic research methods, advisor identification, and funding options are discussed. Throughout the course, faculty from within the department lecture about their research and highlight opportunities for undergraduates. In one assignment, students are given a few types of datasets and asked to present the data and error analysis in various formats using different software (SPSS and Excel). The final paper was a research proposal outlining the student’s Senior Thesis. Based on both the university and instructor written course evaluations, students felt they benefited most from writing their senior thesis proposal; doing assignments on data analysis, library research and critical analysis; and the faculty research lectures. The lessons learned in restructuring this flexible major and providing a research seminar in the junior year may benefit other departments considering such changes.

  7. Events of potential learning: how preschoolers produce curriculum at the computer during free play periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Bevemyr

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Swedish preschool curriculum emphasizes children’s learning through play. This means that children’s learning in everyday practice is accomplished through a complex mixture of teacher-led activities and activities the children themselves initiate. When learning is viewed as situated and constituted through social interaction (Lave & Wenger, 1991, almost all social events have learning potential. Consequently, from an educational and a curriculum point of view it is important to raise the question of how children’s learning can be made visible, and determine what kind of learning children’s own initiated (play activities imply. The focus of the paper is on children’s (aged 3-5 years “communities of practice” at the computer during “free play” period in two various Swedish preschools settings. Events of peer interaction are analyzed in detail to illustrate what kind of learning activities are going on at the computer, and to discuss these events of potential learning in relation to the curriculum goals and the educational practice. From a curriculum point of view, the analyses show that the children’s activities at the computer involve a variety of events that might provides for learning that can be viewed as goal-oriented. From the children’s point of view, the project of socialization seems to be the most prominent goal. A crucial point for educational success, however, is to understand not only what the object of learning is, rather what motivates children’s play apprenticeship in their own “communities of practice”.

  8. Competing Issues in Australian Primary Curriculum: Learning from International Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Robyn

    2012-01-01

    There is no doubt that the increasing politicisation of education in an economically rationalist climate is contributing to less equity, access, participation and, therefore, social justice for many Australian primary children. This article initially explores how the development of the impending national Australian curriculum replete with a high…

  9. Curriculum Style and Social Learning. ACER Research Monograph No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Kevin

    The report investigates current practices and attitudes toward social education in twenty schools in Australia. Three different aspects of the curriculum--the ideal, the planned, and the operative--are reflected from viewpoints of the teacher, the student, and the outside observer. Particular attention is paid to the implications of the curriculum…

  10. An active learning curriculum improves fellows' knowledge and faculty teaching skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inra, Jennifer A; Pelletier, Stephen; Kumar, Navin L; Barnes, Edward L; Shields, Helen M

    2017-01-01

    Traditional didactic lectures are the mainstay of teaching for graduate medical education, although this method may not be the most effective way to transmit information. We created an active learning curriculum for Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) gastroenterology fellows to maximize learning. We evaluated whether this new curriculum improved perceived knowledge acquisition and knowledge base. In addition, our study assessed whether coaching faculty members in specific methods to enhance active learning improved their perceived teaching and presentation skills. We compared the Gastroenterology Training Exam (GTE) scores before and after the implementation of this curriculum to assess whether an improved knowledge base was documented. In addition, fellows and faculty members were asked to complete anonymous evaluations regarding their learning and teaching experiences. Fifteen fellows were invited to 12 lectures over a 2-year period. GTE scores improved in the areas of stomach ( p active learning curriculum. Scores in hepatology, as well as biliary and pancreatic study, showed a trend toward improvement ( p >0.05). All fellows believed the lectures were helpful, felt more prepared to take the GTE, and preferred the interactive format to traditional didactic lectures. All lecturers agreed that they acquired new teaching skills, improved teaching and presentation skills, and learned new tools that could help them teach better in the future. An active learning curriculum is preferred by GI fellows and may be helpful for improving transmission of information in any specialty in medical education. Individualized faculty coaching sessions demonstrating new ways to transmit information may be important for an individual faculty member's teaching excellence.

  11. A Discourse On Broadband Technologies And Curriculum Access In Elective Home Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew MCAVOY

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The extent, to which broadband technologies are being considered, when accessing the curriculum, is increasingly evident in traditional learning environments such as schools and colleges. This article explores the impact that these technologies are having on the home schooling community by offering enhanced access and opportunities. It suggests that they have generated improved choices and greater freedoms for learning communities. They have shone a light on the curriculum and removed it from the shadows. The curriculum is no longer the preserve of the educational establishment. The secret garden has been breached by technologies such as broadband and the democratisation of the curriculum is progressively evident as more diverse learning communities are given increased access and control over the curriculum. The author asks how this is being reflected in policy and translated into practice by the home schooling community whilst acknowledging the contemporary nature of broadband technologies and how they are influencing the decision making process of potential home schoolers. Looking to the future, the author suggests that the political agenda is not providing clear direction and that this is being determined by social reform outside the political sphere and largely driven by the consumer. In this case the learner. The relatively current nature of this debate is in itself justification for further research if we are to develop a clearer understanding of how new technologies such as broadband are influencing policy and practice in the home schooling community.

  12. Problem-based learning: Dental student's perception of their education environments at Qassim University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhuwaiter, Shahad S; Aljuailan, Roqayah I; Banabilh, Saeed M

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess perceptions of the Saudi dental students of the problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum and to compare their perceptions among different sex and academic years. Data was collected through a questionnaire-based survey at Qassim College of dentistry. The questionnaire consisted of 19 questions regarding the perception of PBL curriculum and was distributed to 240 students. The chi-square test was used for statistical analysis of the data. Out of the 240 students recruited for this study, 146 returned a complete questionnaire (the response rate was 60.8%). The majority of the students perceived that PBL enhances the ability to speak in front of people (91.1%); improved the ability to find the information using the internet/library (81.5%); enhances the problem-solving skills (71.3%); increases the practice of cooperative and collaborative learning (69.2%); improves the decision-making skills (66.4%). Sixty-five percent ( n = 96) noted that some students dominate whereas others are passive during PBL discussion session. Statistically, significant differences were found in the following variables according to the academic year students assuming before responsibility for their own learning ( P learning ( P knowledge and learning to elaborate and organize their knowledge ( P weakness for improvement ( P learning environment and to take the students recommendations into consideration.

  13. Envisioning Curriculum as Six Simultaneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Hanin; Conner, Lindsey; Mayo, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the discourse of complexity thinking to envision curriculum as six partial and coupled facets that exist simultaneously: curriculum as structure, curriculum as process, curriculum as content, curriculum as teaching, curriculum as learning and curriculum as activity. Such a curriculum is emergent and self-organising. It is emergent…

  14. Investigating Senior Secondary School Students' Beliefs about Further Mathematics in a Problem-Based Learning Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Fatade

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the effect of problem-based learning (PBL on senior secondary school students' beliefs about Further Mathematics in Nigeria within the blueprint of pre-test-post-test non-equivalent control group quasi-experimental design. Intact classes were used and in all, 96 students participated in the study (42 in the experimental group taught with the PBL and 54 in the control group taught using the Traditional Method (TM. One research instrument tagged Beliefs about Further Mathematics Questionnaire (BFMQ, Cronbach alpha (α=.86 was developed and used for the study and data collected were analysed using the descriptive statistics of mean and standard deviation which served as precursor to testing the null hypothesis for the study using an independent samples t-test and analysis of variance. Results showed that participants held strong beliefs about further mathematics and there was a statistically significant difference in the mean post-treatment scores on BFMQ (t=-6.22, p=.000 for t-test and (F(1,95=38.49; p<.001 for ANOVA between students exposed to the PBL and those exposed to the TM, in favour of the PBL group. Based on the results, the study recommended that PBL should be adopted as an instructional strategy for promoting meaningful learning in and enhancing beliefs about further mathematics and efforts should be made to integrate the philosophy of PBL into the preservice teachers' curriculum at the teacher-preparation institutions in Nigeria.

  15. Factors influencing a problem-based learning implementation: A case study of IT courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darus, Norida Muhd; Mohd, Haslina; Baharom, Fauziah; Saip, Mohamed Ali; Puteh, Nurnasran; Marzuki @ Matt, Zaharin; Husain, Mohd Zabidin; Yasin, Azman

    2016-08-01

    IT students must be trained to work efficiently as teamwork. One of the techniques that can be used to train them is through Problem-Based Learning (PBL) approach. The PBL implementation can be influenced by various factors depending on the ultimate goal of the study. This study is focusing on the IT students' perception of the PBL implementation. The student's perception is important to ensure the successfulness of the PBL implementation. Therefore, it is important to identify the factors that might influence the implementation of PBL of IT courses. This study aims to identify some catalyst factors that may influence the PBL implementation of IT courses. The study involved three (3) main phases: identifying PBL implementation factors, constructing a PBL model, and PBL model validation using statistical analysis. Four main factors are identified: PBL Characteristics, PBL Course Assessment, PBL Practices, and PBL Perception. Based on these four factors, a PBL model is constructed. Then, based on the proposed PBL model, four hypotheses are formulated and analyzed to validate the model. All hypotheses are significantly acceptable. The result shows that the PBL Characteristics and PBL Course Assessment factors are significantly influenced the PBL Practices and indirectly influenced the Students' Perception of the PBL Implementation for IT courses. This PBL model can assist decision makers in enhancing the PBL teaching and learning strategy for IT courses. It is also can be tested to other courses in the future.

  16. Modelo PBL en la docencia universitaria de la didáctica de la lengua inglesa / Project Based Learning applied to the teaching of didactics of English language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Asunción Barreras

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Project Based Learning es una aproximación educativa en la que un problema planteado a los alumnos sirve de contexto y estímulo para el aprendizaje. Este artículo plantea su aplicación en la asignatura de didáctica de las lenguas extranjeras del grado de Educación Primaria. Se explicarán las características más importantes de este método para poder entender su aplicación en la asignatura de didáctica y se contextualizará el proyecto en la asignatura y en el grado. La propuesta de este proyecto es una situación realista y el alumno universitario debe dar una respuesta correcta a dicha situación. También se explicará la temporalización del proyecto en la asignatura, sus objetivos, desarrollo del trabajo de los alumnos universitarios por grupos y evaluación del proyecto. Finalmente, se comprobará la versatilidad que esta metodología tiene en la docencia de la didáctica de las lenguas extranjeras, su importancia en el espacio europeo de educación superior y su relación con las herramientas de la Web 2.0. Abstract Project Based Learning is a method based on problem solving as a stimulus for the student to get involved in his process of learning. This paper explains how this method is applied to the subject “didactics of foreign languages” in the Primary Education degree. The main characteristics of this method are exposed so as to understand its application, which is also contextualized both in the subject and the degree. So there is information about timetable of the project in the subject as well as objectives, development of the student groups’ work and assessment. Finally, the reader will know about the versatility of this method in the subject “didactics of foreign languages”, its importance in the European higher education area and its relationship with Web 2.0 tools.

  17. Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) as a Means for School-Based Science Curriculum Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Christi L.

    The challenge of school-based science curriculum change and educational reform is often presented to science teachers and departments who are not necessarily prepared for the complexity of considerations that change movements require. The development of a Professional Learning Community (PLC) focused on a science department's curriculum change efforts, may provide the necessary tools to foster sustainable school-based curriculum science changes. This research presents a case study of an evolving science department PLC consisting of 10 middle school science teachers from the same middle school and their efforts of school-based science curriculum change. A transformative mixed model case study with qualitative data and deepened by quantitative analysis, was chosen to guide the investigation. Collected data worked to document the essential developmental steps, the occurrence and frequency of the five essential dimensions of successful PLCs, and the influences the science department PLC had on the middle school science department's progression through school-based science curriculum change, and the barriers, struggles and inhibiting actions of the science department PLC. Findings indicated that a science department PLC was unique in that it allowed for a focal science departmental lens of science curriculum change to be applied to the structure and function of the PLC and therefore the process, proceedings, and results were directly aligned to and driven by the science department. The science PLC, while logically difficult to set-up and maintain, became a professional science forum where the middle school science teachers were exposed to new science teaching and learning knowledge, explored new science standards, discussed effects on student science learning, designed and critically analyzed science curriculum change application. Conclusions resulted in the science department PLC as an identified tool providing the ability for science departmental actions to lead to

  18. A Study on Teaching Gases to Prospective Primary Science Teachers Through Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senocak, Erdal; Taskesenligil, Yavuz; Sozbilir, Mustafa

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the achievement of prospective primary science teachers in a problem-based curriculum with those in a conventional primary science teacher preparation program with regard to success in learning about gases and developing positive attitudes towards chemistry. The subjects of the study were 101 first year undergraduate students, who were in two different classes and who were taught by the same lecturer. One of the classes was randomly selected as the intervention group in which problem-based learning (PBL) was used, and the other as the control in which conventional teaching methods were used. The data were obtained through use of the gases diagnostic test (GDT), the chemistry attitude scale (CAS), and scales specific to students’ evaluation of PBL such as the peer evaluation scale (PES), self evaluation scale (SES), tutor’s performance evaluation scale (TPES) and students’ evaluation of PBL scale (SEPBLS). Data were analysed using SPSS 10.0 (Statistical Package for Social Sciences). In order to find out the effect of the intervention (PBL) on students’ learning of gases, independent sample t-tests and ANCOVA (analysis of co-variance) were used. The results obtained from the study showed that there was a statistically significant difference between the experimental and control groups in terms of students’ GDT total mean scores and, their attitude towards chemistry, as well as PBL has a significant effect on the development of students’ skills such as self-directed learning, cooperative learning and critical thinking.

  19. Innovative application of a new PBL model to interdisciplinary and intercultural projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard; Du, Xiangyun; Kolmos, Anette

    2010-01-01

    In the knowledge society, learning is not only knowledge acquisition or participation in established social practice. It is also a process of creating new knowledge collaboratively when addressing complex problems which involve interdisciplinary knowledge and innovative thinking. In our research ...... the learning process in the ICT-based, intercultural and interdisciplinary PBL environment of an international student satellite project....

  20. Student Reactions to Learning Theory Based Curriculum Materials in Linear Algebra--A Survey Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Laurel; Vidakovic, Draga; Martin, William O.; Dexter, Scott; Suzuki, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    In this report we examine students' perceptions of the implementation of carefully designed curriculum materials (called modules) in linear algebra courses at three different universities. The curricular materials were produced collaboratively by STEM and mathematics education faculty as members of a professional learning community (PLC) over…

  1. An Investigation of Curriculum Elements for the Enhancement of the Teaching-Learning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohrabi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Any curriculum consists of several components: goals, disposition, duration, needs analysis, learners and teachers, exercises and activities, resources, ways of learning, skills to be acquired, lexis, language structure, and ability assessment. Before setting up a program or course of study, these components should be determined and described in…

  2. Implementation of Writing across the Curriculum (WAC) Learning Approaches in Social Work and Sociology Gerontology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the goals and methods of the international Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) movement in higher education, and WAC-enriched learning approaches that the author used in teaching a social work gerontology practice course and a sociological theories of aging course. The author's in-class, low-stakes, nongraded writing…

  3. Promoting Active Learning of Graduate Student by Deep Reading in Biochemistry and Microbiology Pharmacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ren

    2017-01-01

    To promote graduate students' active learning, deep reading of high quality papers was done by graduate students enrolled in biochemistry and microbiology pharmacy curriculum offered by college of life science, Jiangxi Normal University from 2013 to 2015. The number of graduate students, who participated in the course in 2013, 2014, and 2015 were…

  4. Applying the Kirkpatrick Model: Evaluating an "Interaction for Learning Framework" Curriculum Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, Megan; Whitsed, Craig; Girardi, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Global perspectives and interpersonal and intercultural communication competencies are viewed as a priority within higher education. For management educators, globalisation, student mobility and widening pathways present numerous challenges, but afford opportunities for curriculum innovation. The "Interaction for Learning Framework"…

  5. Learning in/through Everyday Resistance: A Cultural-Historical Perspective on Community Resources and Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    This essay addresses the value of leveraging the unique learning, thinking, and knowledge students develop in home-community spaces for school curriculum. The author explores "everyday resistance" to highlight a particular set of enacted political actions and practices in which students, families, and communities participate to negotiate the…

  6. Sabemos y Podemos: Learning for Social Action. Adult Education Curriculum. English Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rachel

    This adult education curriculum, part of the Aprender Es Poder (To Learn Is Power) program, explores the themes of school success for Latino children, expands the work options and improves the working conditions of Latino adults, and identifies community issues. It is meant to be a resource for English as a Second Language Literacy and adult basic…

  7. Co-operative learning and adaptive instruction in a mathematics curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwel, J.; Herfs, P.G.P.; Mertens, E.H.M.; Perrenet, J.Chr.

    1994-01-01

    The AGO 12 to 16 Project (the acronym AGO stands for the Dutch equivalent of 'Adaptive Instruction and Co-operative Learning') seeks to develop and evaluate a mathematics curriculum which is suitable for mixed-ability groups in secondary education. The research questions we will address here are,

  8. A Nonverbal Language for Imagining and Learning: Dance Education in K-12 Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Judith Lynne

    2008-01-01

    Curriculum theorists have provided a knowledge base concerning aesthetics, agency, creativity, lived experience, transcendence, learning through the body, and the power of the arts to engender visions of alternative possibilities in culture, politics, and the environment. However, these theoretical threads do not reveal the potential of K-12 dance…

  9. Authentic learning tasks within physical education teacher education : redesigning the curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingerland, M.; Weeldenburg, G.; Raijmakers, B.; Borghouts, L.; Vos, S.B.

    2016-01-01

    Teaching PE requires an integrated set of knowledge, skills and attitudes and for optimal development students should be exposed to various meaningful learning situations. However, the current School of Sport Studies PETE curriculum seems to be suboptimal due to compartmentalization and

  10. The Innovative Immersion of Mobile Learning into a Science Curriculum in Singapore: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daner; Looi, Chee-Kit; Wu, Longkai; Xie, Wenting

    2016-01-01

    With advancements made in mobile technology, increasing emphasis has been paid to how to leverage the affordances of mobile technology to improve science learning and instruction. This paper reports on a science curriculum supported by an inquiry-based framework and mobile technologies. It was developed by teachers and researchers in a multiyear…

  11. Designing a Deeply Digital Science Curriculum: Supporting Teacher Learning and Implementation with Organizing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Heather; Severance, Samuel; Penuel, William R.; Quigley, David; Sumner, Tamara; Devaul, Holly

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the impacts of technology (e.g., Chromebooks, Google Drive) on teacher learning and student activity in the development and implementation of a deeply digital high school biology unit. Using design-based implementation research, teachers co-designed with researchers and curriculum specialists a student-centered unit aligned to…

  12. A Method of Developing and Introducing Case-Based Learning to a Preclinical Veterinary Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Emma; Baillie, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Case-based learning (CBL) has been introduced as part of a major review of the veterinary curriculum at the University of Bristol. The initial aim was to improve integration between all first year subjects, i.e., basic science disciplines (anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry), animal management, and professional studies, while highlighting the…

  13. Code to Learn: Where Does It Belong in the K-12 Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-León, Jesús; Robles, Gregorio; Román-González, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of computer programming in K-12 has become mainstream in the last years, as countries around the world are making coding part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical studies that investigate how learning to program at an early age affects other school subjects. In this regard, this paper compares three…

  14. Developing a Curriculum for Initial Teacher Education Using a Situated Learning Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues that the implications of the concept of situated learning are important when developing a curriculum for initial teacher education (ITE). It describes and analyses the use of a model of ITE designed to stimulate discussions promoting the development of professional craft knowledge situated mainly in schools and to connect these…

  15. Curriculum Development for Transfer Learning in Dynamic Multiagent Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    this burden, to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson...for future work an automated way of finding it. The procedure then repeats, with Ms possibly becoming the new Mt, until a curriculum emerges . 3.4 Search...HFO) Half field offense [19] is a subtask of Robocup simulated soccer in which a team of m offensive players try to score a goal against n defensive

  16. IMPACT OF THE PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING CURRICULUM ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (:entred, and to a large extent self-directed. ... 5. Operation learning scale: this scale relates to the reliance on step-by-step logical approach to learning and to the emphasis on factual .... called progressive disclosure method) in order to arrive at a diagnosis ... the students' personality traits more than the mode of learning.

  17. Resident learning across the full range of core competencies through a transitions of care curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavon, Juliessa M; Pinheiro, Sandro O; Buhr, Gwendolen T

    2018-01-01

    The authors developed a Transitions of Care (TOC) curriculum to teach and measure learner competence in performing TOC tasks for older adults. Internal medicine interns at an academic residency program received the curriculum, which consisted of experiential learning, self-study, and small group discussion. Interns completed retrospective pre/post surveys rating their confidence in performing five TOC tasks, qualitative open-ended survey questions, and a self-reflection essay. A subset of interns also completed follow-up assessments. For all five TOC tasks, the interns' confidence improved following completion of the TOC curriculum. Self-confidence persisted for up to 3 months later for some but not all tasks. According to the qualitative responses, the TOC curriculum provided interns with learning experiences and skills integral to performing safe care transitions. The TOC curriculum and a mixed-method assessment approach effectively teaches and measures learner competency in TOC across all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competency domains.

  18. Examining the Gaps between Teaching and Learning in the Technology Curriculum within Taiwan's 9-Year Articulated Curriculum Reform from the Perspective of Curriculum Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuen-Yi; Chang, Liang-Te; Tsai, Fu-Hsing; Kao, Chia-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum reform has frequently focused on the curriculum-development stage, overlooking considerations regarding curriculum implementation, which has led to reform failure. In this study, consideration was placed primarily on the curriculum implementation stage. The gaps between teachers' and students' perceptions of content, learning…

  19. Can learning style predict student satisfaction with different instruction methods and academic achievement in medical education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurpinar, Erol; Alimoglu, Mustafa Kemal; Mamakli, Sumer; Aktekin, Mehmet

    2010-12-01

    The curriculum of our medical school has a hybrid structure including both traditional training (lectures) and problem-based learning (PBL) applications. The purpose of this study was to determine the learning styles of our medical students and investigate the relation of learning styles with each of satisfaction with different instruction methods and academic achievement in them. This study was carried out with the participation of 170 first-year medical students (the participation rate was 91.4%). The researchers prepared sociodemographic and satisfaction questionnaires to determine the characteristics of the participants and their satisfaction levels with traditional training and PBL. The Kolb learning styles inventory was used to explore the learning styles of the study group. The participants completed all forms at the end of the first year of medical education. Indicators of academic achievement were scores of five theoretical block exams and five PBL exams performed throughout the academic year of 2008-2009. The majority of the participants took part in the "diverging" (n = 84, 47.7%) and "assimilating" (n = 73, 41.5%) groups. Numbers of students in the "converging" and "accommodating" groups were 11 (6.3%) and 8 (4.5%), respectively. In all learning style groups, PBL satisfaction scores were significantly higher than those of traditional training. Exam scores for "PBL and traditional training" did not differ among the four learning styles. In logistic regression analysis, learning style (assimilating) predicted student satisfaction with traditional training and success in theoretical block exams. Nothing predicted PBL satisfaction and success. This is the first study conducted among medical students evaluating the relation of learning style with student satisfaction and academic achievement. More research with larger groups is needed to generalize our results. Some learning styles may relate to satisfaction with and achievement in some instruction methods.

  20. Do Learners Like Project in Their English Classes?: Impact of PBL on Students’ Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putri Astawa Ni Luh Putu Ning Septyarini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a study on the effect of Project-Based Learning (PBL on students’ English language learning (ELL attitudes and how the activities influence teaching-learning process in a junior high school in Bali. This research applied an embedded mixed-method design in which the quantitative data were collected using close-ended questionnaires test, and the qualitative data were collected using interview, observation checklist, open-ended questionnaire, and field note. Paired-samples t-test was used to analyse whether or not there is a significant effect on students’ attitude after being taught using PBL, while the qualitative data were analysed descriptively. The analysis shows a significant effect on students’ attitude. PBL enhances students’ learning quality in term of enthusiasm, confidence, and creativity learning ability while it also promotes teacher’s teaching satisfaction. This study supports the implementation of PBL which enhances students’ English Language Learning attitude and teaching-learning process.

  1. Curriculum reform at Chinese medical schools: what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Cheng, Liming; Cai, Qiaoling; Kosik, Russell Olive; Huang, Yun; Zhao, Xudong; Xu, Guo-Tong; Su, Tung-Ping; Chiu, Allen Wen-Hsiang; Fan, Angela Pei-Chen

    2014-12-01

    Curriculum reform at Chinese medical schools has attracted a lot of attention recently. Several leading medical schools in China have undergone exploratory reforms and in so doing, have accumulated significant experience and have made considerable progress. An analysis of the reforms conducted by 38 Chinese medical colleges that were targeted by the government for upgrade was performed. Drawing from both domestic and international literature, we designed a questionnaire to determine what types of curricular reforms have occurred at these institutions and how they were implemented. Major questions touched upon the purpose of the reforms, curricular patterns, improvements in teaching methods post-reform, changes made to evaluation systems post-reform, intra-university reform assessment, and what difficulties the schools faced when instituting the reforms. Besides the questionnaire, relevant administrators from each medical school were also interviewed to obtain more qualitative data. Out of the 38 included universities, twenty-five have undergone major curricular reforms. Among them, 60.0% adopted an organ system-based curriculum model, 32.0% adopted a problem-based curriculum model, and 8.0% adopted a hybrid curriculum model. About 60.0% of the schools' reforms involved both the "pre-clinical" and the "clinical" curricula, 32.0% of the schools' reforms were limited to the "pre-clinical" curricula, and 8.0% of the schools' reforms only involved the "clinical" curricula. Following curricular reform, 60.0% of medical schools experienced an overall reduction in teaching hours, 76.0% reported an increase in their students' clinical skills, and 60.0% reported an increase in their students' research skills. Medical curricular reform is still in its infancy in China. The republic's leading medical schools have engaged in various approaches to bring innovative teaching methods to their respective institutions. However, due to limited resources and the shackle of traditional

  2. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CASE BASED DISCUSSION AS A VALID PROBLEM BASED LEARNING METHOD IN ANAESTHESIA POSTGRADUATE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melveetil S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : CONTEXT: Anaesthesia is a branch of medicine which allows only a very narrow margin of error. Anaesthesia post-graduate (PG teaching with problem-based learning (PBL enhances the critical thinking and problem-solving skills among the students .Among the different problem based learning methods case based discussions (CBD are most widely practiced out of all in anaesthesia PG teaching. METHODS AND MATERIAL: An anonymous questionnaire based, crosssectional survey among 37 anaesthesia residents from two medical institutions in North Kerala, India was conducted. The present survey was designed to assess the effectiveness of case based discussions in anaesthesia PG teaching by assessing the student’s satisfaction with CBD and the suggested modifications if any to improve the current status of teaching. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The CBD as a part of PBL in anesthesia PG teaching in our set up lacks many important aspects of PBL such as formulation of objectives, facilitation skills, communication on direction of PBL and supplementation of inadequacies. A broader, strict and organized implementation of PBL incorporating the key elements of PBL needs emphasis in PG teaching curriculum. Facilitation skill development programs needs motivation and encouragement from the perspective of the academic administrators.

  3. Managing PBL difficulties in an industrial engineering and management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabela Alves

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Project-Based Learning (PBL is considered to be an active learning methodology which can be used to develop both technical and transversal competences in engineering programs. This methodology demands a great deal of work effort from the students and also from the teachers and it requires a meticulous plan and a well-managed project as well. These activities go far beyond the normal activities in traditional lectures, enabling to outpace the difficulties that spur along the way that may be both complex and demotivating. This methodology has been implemented in the Integrated Master Degree on Industrial Engineering and Management (IEM, at one public university in Portugal, since the 2004/2005 academic year. The aim of this paper is to identify and discuss the main difficulties of the implementation of PBL, mainly from the teachers’ perspectives. Additionally, some effective strategies will be recommended to overcome such difficulties. Design/methodology/approach: The perceptions of the teachers were collected through a survey based on six main themes. The participants in the study include eight teachers from the five courses of the first semester of the first year of the IEM program involved in the 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 editions. Findings: Integration of courses in the project; student assessment; growing number of students in each team and the need of physical spaces for them; and compartmentalized knowledge has emerged as the main difficulties. To overcome these difficulties some key strategies were recommended. Originality/value: A new perspective based on course teachers' views and experiences will deepen the understanding of the problems and provide inputs for the development of strategies that may improve the effectiveness of PBL and introduce changes for its successful implementation. These strategies are intended to be transferable to other contexts, as most of the problems and constraints are common to other active learning

  4. Managing PBL difficulties in an industrial engineering and management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, A.; Sousa, R.; Moreira, F.; Carvalho, M.A.; Cardoso, E.; Pimenta, P.; Malheiro, T.; Brito, I.; Fernandes, S.; Mesquita, D.

    2016-01-01

    Project-Based Learning (PBL) is considered to be an active learning methodology which can be used to develop both technical and transversal competences in engineering programs. This methodology demands a great deal of work effort from the students and also from the teachers and it requires a meticulous plan and a well-managed project as well. These activities go far beyond the normal activities in traditional lectures, enabling to outpace the difficulties that spur along the way that may be both complex and demotivating. This methodology has been implemented in the Integrated Master Degree on Industrial Engineering and Management (IEM), at one public university in Portugal, since the 2004/2005 academic year. The aim of this paper is to identify and discuss the main difficulties of the implementation of PBL, mainly from the teachers’ perspectives. Additionally, some effective strategies will be recommended to overcome such difficulties. Design/methodology/approach: The perceptions of the teachers were collected through a survey based on six main themes. The participants in the study include eight teachers from the five courses of the first semester of the first year of the IEM program involved in the 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 editions. Findings: Integration of courses in the project; student assessment; growing number of students in each team and the need of physical spaces for them; and compartmentalized knowledge has emerged as the main difficulties. To overcome these difficulties some key strategies were recommended. Originality/value: A new perspective based on course teachers' views and experiences will deepen the understanding of the problems and provide inputs for the development of strategies that may improve the effectiveness of PBL and introduce changes for its successful implementation. These strategies are intended to be transferable to other contexts, as most of the problems and constraints are common to other active learning approaches. (Author)

  5. Managing PBL difficulties in an industrial engineering and management program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, A.; Sousa, R.; Moreira, F.; Carvalho, M.A.; Cardoso, E.; Pimenta, P.; Malheiro, T.; Brito, I.; Fernandes, S.; Mesquita, D.

    2016-07-01

    Project-Based Learning (PBL) is considered to be an active learning methodology which can be used to develop both technical and transversal competences in engineering programs. This methodology demands a great deal of work effort from the students and also from the teachers and it requires a meticulous plan and a well-managed project as well. These activities go far beyond the normal activities in traditional lectures, enabling to outpace the difficulties that spur along the way that may be both complex and demotivating. This methodology has been implemented in the Integrated Master Degree on Industrial Engineering and Management (IEM), at one public university in Portugal, since the 2004/2005 academic year. The aim of this paper is to identify and discuss the main difficulties of the implementation of PBL, mainly from the teachers’ perspectives. Additionally, some effective strategies will be recommended to overcome such difficulties. Design/methodology/approach: The perceptions of the teachers were collected through a survey based on six main themes. The participants in the study include eight teachers from the five courses of the first semester of the first year of the IEM program involved in the 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 editions. Findings: Integration of courses in the project; student assessment; growing number of students in each team and the need of physical spaces for them; and compartmentalized knowledge has emerged as the main difficulties. To overcome these difficulties some key strategies were recommended. Originality/value: A new perspective based on course teachers' views and experiences will deepen the understanding of the problems and provide inputs for the development of strategies that may improve the effectiveness of PBL and introduce changes for its successful implementation. These strategies are intended to be transferable to other contexts, as most of the problems and constraints are common to other active learning approaches. (Author)

  6. Discussion as media and tool in PBL project-groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spliid, Claus Monrad

    2013-01-01

    on the discussions which groups undertake in their pursuit of problem-solutions fulfilling assessed real-world needs as well as meeting the requirements of the educational program, it is concluded that discussions serve as a media for achieving learning and as a tool for developing skills essential for professional......The Aalborg PBL Model encourages project-management as a way for students to achieve efficiency and effectiveness in their study-projects. This paper looks into how the development of conversation skills relates to project-management as well as other factors. Through analysis of interviews focusing...

  7. Student Satisfaction with Cooperative Learning in an Accounting Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Brian J.; Farrell, Helen M.

    2008-01-01

    Cooperative learning has been introduced into International Accounting, a second year subject at a major Australian university. The purpose was to provide students with a satisfying experience of learning within a social context and to develop their interpersonal, professional and written communication skills. The main data were collected during…

  8. Proposing Community-Based Learning in the Marketing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadwallader, Susan; Atwong, Catherine; Lebard, Aubrey

    2013-01-01

    Community service and service learning (CS&SL) exposes students to the business practice of giving back to society while reinforcing classroom learning in an applied real-world setting. However, does the CS&SL format provide a better means of instilling the benefits of community service among marketing students than community-based…

  9. Using apps for learning across the curriculum a literacy-based framework and guide

    CERN Document Server

    Beach, Richard

    2014-01-01

    How can apps be used to foster learning with literacy across the curriculum? This book offers both a theoretical framework for considering app affordances and practical ways to use apps to build students' disciplinary literacies and to foster a wide range of literacy practices.Using Apps for Learning Across the Curriculumpresents a wide range of different apps and also assesses their value features methods for and apps related to planning instruction and assessing student learning identifies favorite apps whose affordances are most likely to foster certain disciplinary literacies includes reso

  10. Analysis of dermatology resident self-reported successful learning styles and implications for core competency curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratman, Erik J; Vogel, Curt A; Reck, Samuel J; Mukesh, Bickol N

    2008-01-01

    There are different teaching styles for delivering competency-based curricula. The education literature suggests that learning is maximized when teaching is delivered in a style preferred by learners. To determine if dermatology residents report learning style preferences aligned with adult learning. Dermatology residents attending an introductory cutaneous biology course completed a learning styles inventory assessing self-reported success in 35 active and passive learning activities. The 35 learning activities were ranked in order of preference by learners. Mean overall ratings for active learning activities were significantly higher than for passive learning activities (P = 0.002). Trends in dermatology resident learning style preferences should be considered during program curriculum development. Programs should integrate a variety of curriculum delivery methods to accommodate various learning styles, with an emphasis on the active learning styles preferred by residents.

  11. Sustainable Development in the Engineering Curriculum: Teaching and Learning Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Penlington, Roger; Steiner, Simon

    2014-01-01

    This repository of teaching and learning resources is a companion to the 2nd edition of “An Introduction to Sustainable Development in the Engineering Curriculum”, by Roger Penlington and Simon Steiner, originally created by The Higher Education Academy Engineering Subject Centre, Loughborough University. \\ud The purpose of this collection of teaching and learning re-sources is to provide access, with a brief resumé, to materials in curricula reform, recognition awards, and university movemen...

  12. The Impact of the Implementation of the PBL for EFL Interdisciplinary Study in a Local Thai Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coffin, Prarthana

    2013-01-01

    Can Problem-Based Learning (PBL) principles and practices be applied to language education, especially within an academic writing course? The answer to this question remains ambivalent to many language teachers and educators. This study describes how PBL principles are used as the fundamental basis...... the benefits gained in their learning experience from the PBL process. The focused benefits gained in this case are motivation in learning, communication skills, collaborative skills, critical thinking, problem-solving and self-directed learning skills. Furthermore, triangulation between teachers’ perception...... of restructuring English as a foreign language (EFL) writing course, called Writing3, at a Thai university. The study also examines students’ and teachers’ perceptions as related to their learning experiences. The case study involves 182 English major students and 3 English teachers who participated in learning...

  13. Faculty and second-year medical student perceptions of active learning in an integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Alexander; Harris, David M

    2016-12-01

    Patients expect physicians to be lifelong learners who are able to interpret and evaluate diagnostic tests, and most medical schools list the development of lifelong learning in their program objectives. However, lecture is the most often utilized form of teaching in the first two years and is considered passive learning. The current generation of medical students has many characteristics that should support active learning pedagogies. The purpose of this study was to analyze student and faculty perceptions of active learning in an integrated medical curriculum at the second-year mark, where students have been exposed to multiple educational pedagogies. The first hypothesis of the study was that faculty would favor active learning methods. The second hypothesis was that Millennial medical students would favor active learning due to their characteristics. Primary faculty for years 1 and 2 and second-year medical students were recruited for an e-mail survey consisting of 12 questions about active learning and lecture. Students perceived that lecture and passive pedagogies were more effective for learning, whereas faculty felt active and collaborative learning was more effective. Students believed that more content should be covered by lecture than faculty. There were also significant differences in perceptions of what makes a good teacher. Students and faculty both felt that lack of time in the curriculum and preparation time were barriers for faculty. The data suggest that students are not familiar with the process of learning and that more time may be needed to help students develop lifelong learning skills. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  14. Are deep strategic learners better suited to PBL? A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papinczak, Tracey

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if medical students categorized as having deep and strategic approaches to their learning find problem-based learning (PBL) enjoyable and supportive of their learning, and achieve well in the first-year course. Quantitative and qualitative data were gathered from first-year medical students (N = 213). All students completed the Medical Course Learning Questionnaire at the commencement and completion of their first year of medical studies. The instrument measured a number of different aspects of learning, including approaches to learning, preferences for different learning environments, self-efficacy, and perceptions of learning within PBL tutorials. Qualitative data were collected from written responses to open questions. Results of students' performance on two forms of examinations were obtained for those giving permission (N = 68). Two-step cluster analysis of the cohort's responses to questions about their learning approaches identified five clusters, three of which represented coherent combinations of learning approaches (deep, deep and strategic, and surface apathetic) and two clusters which had unusual or dissonant combinations. Deep, strategic learners represented 25.8% of the cohort. They were more efficacious, preferred learning environments which support development of understanding and achieved significantly higher scores on the written examination. Strongly positive comments about learning in PBL tutorials were principally described by members of this cluster. This preliminary study employed a technique to categorize a student cohort into subgroups on the basis of their approaches to learning. One, the deep and strategic learners, appeared to be less vulnerable to the stresses of PBS in a medical course. While variation between individual learners will always be considerable, this analysis has enabled classification of a student group that may be less likely to find PBL problematic. Implications for practice and

  15. Curriculum scholars: Embedding learning and teaching scholarship in first year academic identities. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jones

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This practice report details an institutional innovation designed to enhance academic capacities for curriculum development, with a particular focus on the first year experience (FYE. The authors discuss the appointment of “Curriculum Scholars” in each of the faculties at James Cook University. This innovation can be seen as an example of third generation responses to the challenges of the first year in higher education (FYHE (Kift, Nelson & Clarke, 2010. The report  discusses the question of academic identity and the tension between a discipline-specific identity and identification with the scholarship of teaching and learning. The authors argue that this tension may have significant implications for the success of third generation approaches to the FYE. This tension is the focus of a multi-method research project being developed by the authors. The autoethnographical dimension of this project is described, inviting participants to reflect on their own journeys as academics engaged in learning and teaching.

  16. The implementation of interest-based entrepreneurship curriculum in the Theory of Economics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surjanti, J.; Nugrohoseno, D.; Budiono; Musfidah, H.

    2018-01-01

    College and university are educational institutions and they should be able to design entrepreneurship program in order to strengthen creativity and innovation. Potential grown-up citizens potential is the main problem of national development solved through the role of universities by reconstructing the curriculum based on 2016 Indonesian National Curriculum Framework. The interest of building entrepreneurship becomes the work of all elements which one of them is a university. Reconstructing interest-based entrepreneurship curriculum is the first step to construct characterized economic. Economics lecturers have a responsibility to develop the curriculum. This study aimed to explore the interest in entrepreneurship used to develop the contextual learning using problem-based learning (PBL) method that refers to Universitas Negeri Surabaya’s motto “Growing with character” and integrated into 2016 Indonesian National Curriculum Framework. This study was qualitative explorative. The subjects of the study are 86 students in their first semester. The objective of the study was curriculum development interest-based entrepreneurship in the theory of economics course. The results of the study showed that the interest-based entrepreneurship curriculum was able to reach the targeted learning outcome as well as to create a product in the culinary and services project in Wonorejo mangrove forest according to students’ interests.

  17. The clinical associate curriculum . the learning theory underpinning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Bachelor of Clinical Medical Practice (BCMP) is a new degree at the University of Pretoria (UP), designed to create a new category of mid-level medical workers, namely clinical associates. UP produced its first 44 graduates in 2011. The BCMP created the opportunity to innovate learning and teaching through ...

  18. Curriculum Considerations for Enhancing Baccalaureate Learning for International Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardue, Karen T.; Haas, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    A nursing education program for Israeli students included a final semester in the United States. Program adjustments were made to address English-language fluency, cultural orientation to collectivism, support services for academic writing, and other issues related to the specific learning needs of this population. (SK)

  19. Promoting Social Change through Service-Learning in the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Glenn A.

    2014-01-01

    Service-learning is a high-impact pedagogical strategy embraced by higher education institutions. Direct service based on a charity paradigm tends to be the norm, while little attention is paid to social change-oriented service. This article offers suggestions for incorporating social justice education into courses designed to promote social…

  20. On-line curriculum education for teaching and learning process ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fast growth and rise in number of tertiary institutions in Nigeria has been unpleasantly turning away large numbers of qualified applicants due to lack of facilities. To solve some of these problems, the use of ICT through E-Learning have major role to play. This research work discusses and elaborates the importance of ...

  1. A distance learning model in a physical therapy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, T; Harrison, A L; Hart, A L

    1998-01-01

    In response to the rural health initiative established in 1991, the University of Kentucky has developed an innovative distance learning program of physical therapy instruction that combines classroom lecture and discussion via compressed video technology with laboratory experiences. The authors describe the process of planning, implementing, and evaluating a specific distance learning course in pathomechanics for the professional-level master's-degree physical therapy students at the University of Kentucky. This presentation may serve as a model for teaching distance learning. Descriptions of optimal approaches to preclass preparation, scheduling, course delivery, use of audiovisual aids, use of handout material, and video production are given. Special activities that may enhance or deter the achievement of the learning objectives are outlined, and a problem-solving approach to common problems encountered is presented. An approach to evaluating and comparing course outcomes for the distance learnere is presented. For this particular course, there was no statistically significant difference in the outcome measures utilized to compare the distance learners with the on-site learners.

  2. Learning Histories to YouTube: Learners' Lives as Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the agentive development of a group of first-year Japanese university students. They first individually wrote their language learning histories to grasp what they had been through in their junior and senior high school English education. They then analyzed the histories in small groups, discussing what motivated and…

  3. University Teaching with a Disability: Student Learnings beyond the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Lynnaire; Kotevski, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the learning experience of university students who were tutored by a teacher with quadriplegia mixed type cerebral palsy. It was inspired by Pritchard's [2010. "Disabled People as Culturally Relevant Teachers." "Journal of Social Inclusion" 1 (1): 43-51] argument that the presence of people with a…

  4. Performing Arts in Open and Distance Learning (ODL) Curriculum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two major arguments are presented in this paper. The first one is that the Performing Arts courses constitute programmes that aid the reduction of unemployment in many nations. The second argument is that, based on that premise, the Open and Distance Learning institutions could include it in their curricula to boost the ...

  5. Developing a Simulation-Based Mastery Learning Curriculum: Lessons From 11 Years of Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Cohen, Elaine R; Wayne, Diane B; Siddall, Viva J; McGaghie, William C

    2016-02-01

    Curriculum development in medical education should follow a planned, systematic approach fitted to the needs and conditions of a local institutional environment and its learners. This article describes the development and maintenance of a simulation-based medical education curriculum on advanced cardiac life support skills and its transformation to a mastery learning program. Curriculum development used the Kern 6-step model involving problem identification and general needs assessment, targeted needs assessment, goals and objectives, educational strategies, implementation, and evaluation and feedback. Curriculum maintenance and enhancement and dissemination are also addressed. Transformation of the simulation-based medical education curriculum to a mastery learning program was accomplished after a 2-year phase-in trial. A series of studies spanning 11 years was performed to adjust the curriculum, improve checklist outcome measures, and evaluate curriculum effects as learning outcomes among internal medicine residents and improved patient care practices. We anticipate wide adoption of the mastery learning model for skill and knowledge acquisition and maintenance in medical education settings.

  6. Teaching Environmental Education through PBL: Evaluation of a Teaching Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Clara

    2012-04-01

    If our chosen aim in science education is to be inclusive and to improve students' learning achievements, then we must identify teaching methodologies that are appropriate for teaching and learning specific knowledge. Karagiorgi and Symeo 2005) remind us that instructional designers are thus challenged to translate the philosophy of constructivism into current practice. Thus, research in science education must focus on evaluating intervention programs which ensure the effective construction of knowledge and development of competencies. The present study reports the elaboration, application and evaluation of a problem-based learning (PBL) program with the aim of examining its effectiveness with students learning Environmental Education. Prior research on both PBL and Environmental Education (EE) was conducted within the context of science education so as to elaborate and construct the intervention program. Findings from these studies indicated both the PBL methodology and EE as helpful for teachers and students. PBL methodology has been adopted in this study since it is logically incorporated in a constructivism philosophy application (Hendry et al. 1999) and it was expected that this approach would assist students towards achieving a specific set of competencies (Engel 1997). On the other hand, EE has evolved at a rapid pace within many countries in the new millennium (Hart 2007), unlike any other educational area. However, many authors still appear to believe that schools are failing to prepare students adequately in EE (Walsche 2008; Winter 2007). The following section describes the research that was conducted in both areas so as to devise the intervention program.

  7. A Multidisciplinary PBL Robot Control Project in Automation and Electronic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Houcine; Domínguez, Carlos; Martínez, Juan-Miguel; Perles, Angel; Capella, Juan-Vicente; Albaladejo, José

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a multidisciplinary problem-based learning (PBL) project consisting of the development of a robot arm prototype and the implementation of its control system. The project is carried out as part of Industrial Informatics (II), a compulsory third-year course in the Automation and Electronic Engineering (AEE) degree program at the…

  8. The Impact of PBL on Transferable Skills Development in Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Attention to transferable skills is growing in higher education. Problem-based learning (PBL) is increasingly used in management education for its promising potential to, amongst others, promote transferable skills, including problem-solving, critical thinking and teamwork skills. However, this relationship is seldom assessed. In this study, I use…

  9. PBL as a Framework for Implementing Video Games in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, William R.; Fang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Video games and problem-based learning (PBL) are both significant trends in progressive approaches to education. The literature demonstrates a fit between the two approaches, indicating they may be mutually beneficial. With limited literature on implementing games in the classroom, and a growing body of researchers highlighting the importance of…

  10. Middle School Engineering Problem Solving Using Traditional vs. e-PBL Module Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baele, Loren C.

    This multiple methods (Denzin, 1978) study investigated two instructional approaches, traditional module and electronic Problem-Based Learning instruction (e-PBL), used within a middle school engineering classroom focused on the variables of engagement, content knowledge, student self-assessment and teacher assessment of problem solving solutions. A non-equivalent group quasi-experimental research design (Creswell, 2015) was used on middle school students (N = 100) between those that received traditional module instruction (n = 51) and e-PBL instruction (n = 49). The qualitative approach of triangulation (Jick, 1979) was used to identify emergent themes for both between and within methods of data analysis on student engagement survey responses, two days of field observations notes, and six student interview transcripts. The quantitative results identified that students who received e-PBL instruction self-reported significantly greater engagement than those who received traditional module instruction. Further, there was a significant interaction effect between engineering content knowledge by group and gender as males who received e-PBL instruction had greater growth of content knowledge scores than males receiving traditional instruction, while females who received traditional instruction had greater growth of content knowledge scores than females in the e-PBL group. Through triangulation of the qualitative data, the emergent themes of the study suggest that hands-on learning produces higher levels of reported engagement independent of instructional method. The emergence of problem solving fatigue developed when both study groups reported a decline in engagement when entering into the final phase of the quantitative study suggesting that too many complex, ill-structured problems in rapid succession may negatively impact student engagement. Although females within the treatment group were most engaged, they did not achieve the knowledge growth of the females in the

  11. Measuring the short-term effects of incorporating academic service learning throughout a dental hygiene curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmer-Beck, M; Gadbury-Amyot, C; Williams, K B; Keselyak, N T; Branson, B; Mitchell, T V

    2013-11-01

    Academic service learning (ASL) provides the venue for dental hygiene education to take oral healthcare services directly into communities while at the same time promoting professional responsibility within the student bodies. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively examine the change in pre-existing attitudes and behaviours of dental hygiene students following the incorporation of ASL activities throughout a five-semester dental hygiene curriculum. Seventy-seven first-year dental hygiene students who participated in ASL from the graduating classes of 2008-2010 participated in the study. A survey instrument developed by Shiarella, based on Schwartz's Helping Behaviors Model, was used to assess students' attitudes towards community service. Additionally, questions were developed using Shinnamon's Methods and Strategies for Assessing Service-Learning in the Health Professions. Internal estimates of reliability for scales (Cronbach's α) were all >0.8. The results revealed statistically significant improvements over time in enhanced learning (P = 0.0001), self-awareness (P = 0.0001), sense of volunteerism (P = 0.013), impact on career choices (P = 0.001) and decrease in personal costs (P = 0.0001). There were no significant changes in other subscales over time. Further investigating these domains revealed minimal to no changes in attributes of service learning. Service learning integrated into the dental hygiene curriculum can enhance learning and improve students' self-awareness, sense of volunteerism, career choices and perception of personal costs. In concert with the literature on ASL, these experiences throughout the curriculum have potential for increasing students' awareness of community need and their roles as oral health professionals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Merging Problem-Based Learning with Simulation-Based Learning in the Medical Undergraduate Curriculum: The PAIRED Framework for Enhancing Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Jansen

    2016-01-01

    Lifelong learning is an essential trait that is expected of every physician. The CanMeds 2005 Physician Competency Framework emphasizes lifelong learning as a key competency that physicians must achieve in becoming better physicians. However, many physicians are not competent at engaging in lifelong learning. The current medical education system is deficient in preparing medical students to develop and carry out their own lifelong learning curriculum upon graduation. Despite understanding how physicians learn at work, medical students are not trained to learn while working. Similarly, although barriers to lifelong learning are known, medical students are not adequately skilled in overcoming these barriers. Learning to learn is just as important, if not more, as acquiring the skills and knowledge required of a physician. The medical undergraduate curriculum lacks a specific learning strategy to prepare medical students in becoming an adept lifelong learner. In this article, we propose a learning strategy for lifelong learning at the undergraduate level. In developing this novel strategy, we paid particular attention to two parameters. First, this strategy should be grounded on literature describing a physician’s lifelong learning process. Second, the framework for implementing this strategy must be based on existing undergraduate learning strategies to obviate the need for additional resources, learner burden, and faculty time. In this paper, we propose a Problem, Analysis, Independent Research Reporting, Experimentation Debriefing (PAIRED) framework that follows the learning process of a physician and serves to synergize the components of problem-based learning and simulation-based learning in specifically targeting the barriers to lifelong learning. PMID:27446767

  13. Graduates from a reformed undergraduate medical curriculum based on Tomorrow's Doctors evaluate the effectiveness of their curriculum 6 years after graduation through interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor David CM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1996 Liverpool reformed its medical curriculum from a traditional lecture based course to a curriculum based on the recommendations in Tomorrow's Doctors. A project has been underway since 2000 to evaluate this change. This paper focuses on the views of graduates from that reformed curriculum 6 years after they had graduated. Methods Between 2007 and 2009 45 interviews took place with doctors from the first two cohorts to graduate from the reformed curriculum. Results The interviewees felt like they had been clinically well prepared to work as doctors and in particular had graduated with good clinical and communication skills and had a good knowledge of what the role of doctor entailed. They also felt they had good self directed learning and research skills. They did feel their basic science knowledge level was weaker than traditional graduates and perceived they had to work harder to pass postgraduate exams. Whilst many had enjoyed the curriculum and in particular the clinical skills resource centre and the clinical exposure of the final year including the "shadowing" and A & E attachment they would have liked more "structure" alongside the PBL when learning the basic sciences. Conclusion According to the graduates themselves many of the aims of curriculum reform have been met by the reformed curriculum and they were well prepared clinically to work as doctors. However, further reforms may be needed to give confidence to science knowledge acquisition.

  14. Graduates from a reformed undergraduate medical curriculum based on Tomorrow's Doctors evaluate the effectiveness of their curriculum 6 years after graduation through interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmough, Simon D; O'Sullivan, Helen; Taylor, David C M

    2010-09-29

    In 1996 Liverpool reformed its medical curriculum from a traditional lecture based course to a curriculum based on the recommendations in Tomorrow's Doctors. A project has been underway since 2000 to evaluate this change. This paper focuses on the views of graduates from that reformed curriculum 6 years after they had graduated. Between 2007 and 2009 45 interviews took place with doctors from the first two cohorts to graduate from the reformed curriculum. The interviewees felt like they had been clinically well prepared to work as doctors and in particular had graduated with good clinical and communication skills and had a good knowledge of what the role of doctor entailed. They also felt they had good self directed learning and research skills. They did feel their basic science knowledge level was weaker than traditional graduates and perceived they had to work harder to pass postgraduate exams. Whilst many had enjoyed the curriculum and in particular the clinical skills resource centre and the clinical exposure of the final year including the "shadowing" and A & E attachment they would have liked more "structure" alongside the PBL when learning the basic sciences. According to the graduates themselves many of the aims of curriculum reform have been met by the reformed curriculum and they were well prepared clinically to work as doctors. However, further reforms may be needed to give confidence to science knowledge acquisition.

  15. Beyond the didactic classroom: educational models to encourage active student involvement in learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreeve, Michael W

    2008-01-01

    In a chiropractic college that utilizes a hybrid curriculum model composed of adult-based learning strategies along with traditional lecture-based course delivery, a literature search for educational delivery methods that would integrate the affective domain and the cognitive domain of learning provided some insights into the use of problem-based learning (PBL), experiential learning theory (ELT), and the emerging use of appreciative inquiry (AI) to enhance the learning experience. The purpose of this literature review is to provide a brief overview of key components of PBL, ELT, and AI in educational methodology and to discuss how these might be used within the chiropractic curriculum to supplement traditional didactic lecture courses. A growing body of literature describes the use of PBL and ELT in educational settings across many disciplines, both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The use of appreciative inquiry as an instructional methodology presents a new area for exploration and study in the academic environment. Educational research in the chiropractic classroom incorporating ELT and appreciative inquiry might provide some valuable insights for future curriculum development.

  16. A blended learning framework for curriculum design and professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Mirriahi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The need for flexibility in learning and the affordances of technology provided the impetus for the rise of blended learning (BL globally across higher education institutions. However, the adoption of BL practices continues at a low pace due to academics’ low digital fluency, various views and BL definitions, and limited standards-based tools to guide academic practice. To address these issues, this paper introduces a BL framework, based on one definition and with criteria and standards of practice to support the evaluation and advancement of BL in higher education. The framework is theoretically underpinned by the extant literature and supported by focus group discussions. The evidence supporting the criteria and standards are discussed with suggestions for how they can be used to guide course design, academic practice, and professional development.

  17. 3D printing in social education: Eki-Fab and student PBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Masato; Saito, Azusa; Kodama, Mai; Takamatsu, Kyuuichiro; Tamate, Hideaki; Sakai, Kazuyuki; Wada, Masato; Khosla, Ajit; Kawakami, Masaru; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2017-04-01

    Additive manufacturing or 3D printer is one of the most innovative material processing methods. We are considering that human resources for 3D printing would be needed in the future. To educate the abilities of the digital fabrication, we have the public digital fabrication space "Eki-Fab" for junior and high school students and Project Based Learning (PBL) class for undergraduate students. Eki-Fab is held on every Saturday at the Yonezawa train station. In the "Eki-Fab", anybody can study the utilizing of 3D printer and modeling technics under the instruction of staff in Yamagata University. In the PBL class, we have the class every Thursday. The students get the techniques of the digital fabrication through the PBL.

  18. [Postgraduate training for specialists in psychiatry and psychotherapy. Problem-based learning - evaluation of a pilot project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufer, M; Schnyder, U; Schirlo, C; Wengle, H; Gerke, W

    2011-05-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) emphasizes the student's individual needs, their ability to solve complex clinical problems, and a professional attitude that facilitates communication among colleagues. Thus, PBL appears to provide a perfectly suitable didactic format for postgraduate training of medical specialties. To date, it is only rarely used in this area though. In a pilot project, we implemented PBL into the curriculum of postgraduate training in psychiatry and psychotherapy, and evaluated the program over a period of 12 months, using structured questionnaires. A total of 41 PBL courses were held, with 447 residents participating. Participants as well as tutors assessed 19 of 21 aspects as good or very good (5-point Likert scale, mean value >4). Overall, PBL was rated as highly suitable for advanced training (participants: 4.5±0.8; tutors: 5.0±0.2). The results of this pilot project suggest that PBL might be a useful element of multifaceted advanced training programs, strengthening their practical component and the applicability of knowledge in the daily clinical routine.

  19. Micrometeorological and PBL experiments in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, J. R.; Hicks, B. B.

    1990-03-01

    A brief summary is given of five main field experiments (or sets of expeditions) carried out in Australia in the last thirty years. The main objectives and results of each are described, and an indication is given of their impact on progress in our understanding of the planetary boundary layer (PBL).

  20. Bootstrapped Learning Analysis and Curriculum Development Environment (BLADE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    crutches ” removed, and with only a short time for additional preparation by the learning team is highly promising.   4.2.3 Conclusions Natural...of our findings. Our published papers [16, 17, 18] and BAE Systems technical reports [19, 20, 21, 22] provide details of the protocols and results...perry/work/ papers /090123-MB-blexp1.pdf 17. Grant, R., DeAngelis, D., Luu, D., Perry, D., Ryall, K., 2011, “Designing Human Benchmark Experiments for

  1. Optimizing biomedical science learning in a veterinary curriculum: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Amy L; Donnon, Tyrone

    2013-01-01

    As veterinary medical curricula evolve, the time dedicated to biomedical science teaching, as well as the role of biomedical science knowledge in veterinary education, has been scrutinized. Aside from being mandated by accrediting bodies, biomedical science knowledge plays an important role in developing clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic reasoning skills in the application of clinical skills, in supporting evidence-based veterinary practice and life-long learning, and in advancing biomedical knowledge and comparative medicine. With an increasing volume and fast pace of change in biomedical knowledge, as well as increased demands on curricular time, there has been pressure to make biomedical science education efficient and relevant for veterinary medicine. This has lead to a shift in biomedical education from fact-based, teacher-centered and discipline-based teaching to applicable, student-centered, integrated teaching. This movement is supported by adult learning theories and is thought to enhance students' transference of biomedical science into their clinical practice. The importance of biomedical science in veterinary education and the theories of biomedical science learning will be discussed in this article. In addition, we will explore current advances in biomedical teaching methodologies that are aimed to maximize knowledge retention and application for clinical veterinary training and practice.

  2. Superficial and deep learning approaches among medical students in an interdisciplinary integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirghani, Hisham M; Ezimokhai, Mutairu; Shaban, Sami; van Berkel, Henk J M

    2014-01-01

    Students' learning approaches have a significant impact on the success of the educational experience, and a mismatch between instructional methods and the learning approach is very likely to create an obstacle to learning. Educational institutes' understanding of students' learning approaches allows those institutes to introduce changes in their curriculum content, instructional format, and assessment methods that will allow students to adopt deep learning techniques and critical thinking. The objective of this study was to determine and compare learning approaches among medical students following an interdisciplinary integrated curriculum. This was a cross-sectional study in which an electronic questionnaire using the Biggs two-factor Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ) with 20 questions was administered. Of a total of 402 students at the medical school, 214 (53.2%) completed the questionnaire. There was a significant difference in the mean score of superficial approach, motive and strategy between students in the six medical school years. However, no significant difference was observed in the mean score of deep approach, motive and strategy. The mean score for years 1 and 2 showed a significantly higher surface approach, surface motive and surface strategy when compared with students in years 4-6 in medical school. The superficial approach to learning was mostly preferred among first and second year medical students, and the least preferred among students in the final clinical years. These results may be useful in creating future teaching, learning and assessment strategies aiming to enhance a deep learning approach among medical students. Future studies are needed to investigate the reason for the preferred superficial approach among medical students in their early years of study.

  3. Science-Based Thematic Cultural Art Learning in Primary School (2013 Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warih Handayaningrum

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at discussing the development result of thematic cultural art subject’s learning material based on science for primary school (2013 curriculum. This study is expected to inspire teacher to develop learning material that may explore artworks exist in our living environment (based on the context of children’s environment. This study applies steps in developmental research collaboration by Borg & Gall (1989 and Puslitjaknov (2008 to create the product. The development stages comprise observation in several primary schools in Surabaya, Gresik, and Sidoarjo that has implemented 2013 curriculum that is followed up by stages of development. Furthermore, prototype of cultural and art thematic learning material development results are verified by learning material experts, material expert, primary school teacher, and revised afterwards. The result of this research development is a set of teacher and student books. Science-based cultural art here means cultural art learning as the main medium to introduce local culture products (music, drawing, dance, and drama by integrating mathematics, sciences, Bahasa Indonesia, and local language subjects. Cultural art products in the form of dance, music, drawing, dramas will help children to understand a simple mathematical concept, such as: two-dimensional figure, geometry, comparing or estimating longer-shorter, smaller-bigger, or more-less.

  4. eABLE: Embedding Social Media in Academic Curriculum as a Learning and Assessment Strategy to Enhance Students Learning and E-Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megele, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines the redesign of an MSc module to enhance students' engagement and learning through embedding social media technologies into the academic curriculum as a learning and assessment strategy, and in a complementary manner that facilitated and enhanced the achievement of the module's learning outcomes. This paper describes the…

  5. Blending work-integrated learning with distance education in an Australian radiation therapy advanced practice curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Kristie; Wright, Caroline; Osborne, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Advanced practice for radiation therapists has been a part of the international landscape for several years; however formal implementation into the Australian health care system is yet to happen. Despite this, three short course radiation therapy advanced practitioner programs have been established by an Australian tertiary institution in response to clinical service needs at several organisations. This paper describes the rationale for curriculum design and development of the program materials, the small-scale implementation of the programs at pilot sites, and the evolution of the curriculum to be available to registered radiation therapists nationally. Each program has been designed around a specific clinical role, where flexibility of delivery to busy practitioners was central to the decision to offer them via distance education. The curriculum comprises theoretical units of study which run in parallel to and underpin clinical practice units, where advanced competence in the specific area of practice is overseen by an experienced radiation oncologist mentor. Given the nature of the disparate clinical services requiring an advanced radiation therapy practitioner, the workplace learning component of the course is individually negotiated at a local level. Outcomes suggest that the flexible clinically based training underpinned by a distance education academic curriculum is able to support the development of advanced radiation therapy practitioners responsive to local service need, and ultimately may improve the patient experience

  6. The strategic impact of a changing curriculum and learning environment on medical students' academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Pamela C; Epps, Anna Cherrie; McCammon, Sametria

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the administration of Meharry Medical College, School of Medicine (SOM), Nashville, Tennessee, recognized the need to modify the curriculum to help improve student academic performance especially on the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) US Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) steps 1 and 2. Thus, a number of changes occurred with respect to the traditional curriculum in the SOM, resulting in an integrated organ system-based curriculum design. The change in the learning environment was studied to determine the impact on performance after the introduction of the integrated organ system-based curriculum as compared to that of the traditional curriculum. With the utilization of a cadre of variables, it was believed that the strategic impact anticipated would provide a predictive validity profile to assist in the identification of students "at risk" of failure so that proactive intervention methodology could be made available to facilitate the students' successful progression during matriculation in the SOM. The purpose of this study was to analyze whether students trained with the integrated organ systems curriculum perform better than students trained with the traditional medical school curriculum on the medical education preclinical subject board examinations, and the NBME USMLE steps 1 and 2 examinations. From the 584 students studied in the control group (graduation classes for years 2005, 2006, and 2007) and the intervention group (graduation classes for years 2008, 2009, and 2010), significant improvement in performance on the NBME USMLE steps 1 and 2 examinations was noted following the introduction of the integrated organ system-based curriculum particularly among "at-risk" students. Data access availability from the School of Medicine of Meharry Medical College automatically gave reason for a preferential comparative relationship and study of the resulting strategic impact on cohorts graduating in years 2005-2010. Thus, this

  7. Outlines of the PBL Working programme 2012; Hoofdlijnen PBL Werkprogramma 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-01-15

    In this note, the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL) sketches the outlines of its working programme for 2012. With the intended research in this working programme, PBL aims to contribute to scientific substantiation and evaluation of the Dutch cabinet's policy in a wide range of areas: environment, mobility, space, living, energy, water, food provision, nature, international collaboration, declining population, administrative reforms and international competitive position. The PBL study is aligned to three (of the six) governmental strategic knowledge themes that have been selected for this administrative period, i.e. Dealing with scarcity of resources and space; (2) the competitive position of the Netherlands; (3) Towards a new division of responsibilities among the state and society and a new balance between rights and obligations [Dutch] Het Planbureau voor de Leefomgeving (PBL) schetst in deze notitie de hoofdlijnen van zijn werkprogramma voor 2012. Met het voorgenomen onderzoek in dit werkprogramma wil het PBL bijdragen aan wetenschappelijke onderbouwing en evaluatie van het kabinetsbeleid op een breed scala aan terreinen: milieu, mobiliteit, ruimte, wonen, energie, water, voedselvoorziening, natuur, internationale samenwerking, bevolkingskrimp, decentralisatie, bestuurlijke vernieuwing en internationale concurrentiepositie. PBL-onderzoek sluit aan bij drie (van de zes) rijksbrede strategische kennisthema's die zijn gekozen voor deze kabinetsperiode, te weten: (1) Omgaan met schaarste aan ruimte en grondstoffen; (2) Het concurrentievermogen van Nederland; (3) Naar een nieuwe verantwoordelijkheidsverdeling tussen staat en samenleving en een nieuwe balans tussen rechten en plichten.

  8. The Effect of Teacher Performance in Implementation of The 2013 Curriculum Toward Chemistry Learning Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, L. P.; Djohar, A.

    2018-04-01

    This research is a study about implementation of the 2013 Curriculum on Chemistry subject. This study aims to determine the effect of teacher performance toward chemistry learning achievement. The research design involves the independent variable, namely the performance of Chemistry teacher, and the dependent variable that is Chemistry learning achievement which includes the achievement in knowledge and skill domain. The subject of this research are Chemistry teachers and High School students in Bandung City. The research data is obtained from questionnaire about teacher performance assessed by student and Chemistry learning achievement from the students’ report. Data were analyzed by using MANOVA test. The result of multivariate significance test shows that there is a significant effect of teacher performance toward Chemistry learning achievement in knowledge and skill domain with medium effect size.

  9. Multi-Modal Curriculum Learning for Semi-Supervised Image Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Tao, Dacheng; Maybank, Stephen J; Liu, Wei; Kang, Guoliang; Yang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Semi-supervised image classification aims to classify a large quantity of unlabeled images by typically harnessing scarce labeled images. Existing semi-supervised methods often suffer from inadequate classification accuracy when encountering difficult yet critical images, such as outliers, because they treat all unlabeled images equally and conduct classifications in an imperfectly ordered sequence. In this paper, we employ the curriculum learning methodology by investigating the difficulty of classifying every unlabeled image. The reliability and the discriminability of these unlabeled images are particularly investigated for evaluating their difficulty. As a result, an optimized image sequence is generated during the iterative propagations, and the unlabeled images are logically classified from simple to difficult. Furthermore, since images are usually characterized by multiple visual feature descriptors, we associate each kind of features with a teacher, and design a multi-modal curriculum learning (MMCL) strategy to integrate the information from different feature modalities. In each propagation, each teacher analyzes the difficulties of the currently unlabeled images from its own modality viewpoint. A consensus is subsequently reached among all the teachers, determining the currently simplest images (i.e., a curriculum), which are to be reliably classified by the multi-modal learner. This well-organized propagation process leveraging multiple teachers and one learner enables our MMCL to outperform five state-of-the-art methods on eight popular image data sets.

  10. Embedding responsible conduct in learning and research into an Australian undergraduate curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Lynette B

    2017-01-02

    Responsible conduct in learning and research (RCLR) was progressively introduced into the pharmacology curriculum for undergraduate science students at The University of Western Australia. In the second year of this undergraduate curriculum, a lecture introduces students to issues such as the use of animals in teaching and responsible conduct of research. Third year student groups deliver presentations on topics including scientific integrity and the use of human subjects in research. Academic and research staff attending these presentations provide feedback and participate in discussions. Students enrolled in an optional capstone Honours year complete an online course on the responsible conduct of research and participate in an interactive movie. Once RCLR became established in the curriculum, a survey of Likert-scaled and open-ended questions examined student and staff perceptions. Data were expressed as Approval (% of responses represented by Strongly Agree and Agree). RCLR was found to be relevant to the study of pharmacology (69-100% Approval), important for one's future career (62-100% Approval), and stimulated further interest in this area (32-75% Approval). Free entry comments demonstrated the value of RCLR and constructive suggestions for improvement have now been incorporated. RCLR modules were found to be a valuable addition to the pharmacology undergraduate curriculum. This approach may be used to incorporate ethics into any science undergraduate curriculum, with the use of discipline-specific topics. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(1):53-59, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Assessment of incidental learning of medical terminology in a veterinary curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, A Jerald; Hardin, Laura; Robertson, Stanley

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether students in a veterinary curriculum at Mississippi State University would gain an understanding of medical terminology, as they matriculate through their courses, comparable to that obtained during a focused medical terminology unit of study. Evaluation of students' incidental learning related to medical terminology during the 2004/2005 and 2005/2006 academic years indicated that 88.7% and 81.9% of students, respectively, scored above 70% on a medical terminology exam by the end of the first year of the curriculum. For the 2004/2005 academic, 67.6% increased their percentage of correct answers above 70% from the first medical terminology exam to the third. For the 2005/2006 academic year, 61.1% of students increased their score above 70% from the first to the third exam. Our data indicate that students can achieve comprehension of medical terminology in the absence of a formal terminology course.

  12. Educational Technologies in Problem-Based Learning in Health Sciences Education: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background As a modern pedagogical philosophy, problem-based learning (PBL) is increasingly being recognized as a major research area in student learning and pedagogical innovation in health sciences education. A new area of research interest has been the role of emerging educational technologies in PBL. Although this field is growing, no systematic reviews of studies of the usage and effects of educational technologies in PBL in health sciences education have been conducted to date. Objective The aim of this paper is to review new and emerging educational technologies in problem-based curricula, with a specific focus on 3 cognate clinical disciplines: medicine, dentistry, and speech and hearing sciences. Analysis of the studies reviewed focused on the effects of educational technologies in PBL contexts while addressing the particular issue of scaffolding of student learning. Methods A comprehensive computerized database search of full-text articles published in English from 1996 to 2014 was carried out using 3 databases: ProQuest, Scopus, and EBSCOhost. Eligibility criteria for selection of studies for review were also determined in light of the population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) guidelines. The population was limited to postsecondary education, specifically in dentistry, medicine, and speech and hearing sciences, in which PBL was the key educational pedagogy and curriculum design. Three types of educational technologies were identified as interventions used to support student inquiry: learning software and digital learning objects; interactive whiteboards (IWBs) and plasma screens; and learning management systems (LMSs). Results Of 470 studies, 28 were selected for analysis. Most studies examined the effects of learning software and digital learning objects (n=20) with integration of IWB (n=5) and LMS (n=3) for PBL receiving relatively less attention. The educational technologies examined in these studies were seen as potentially fit for

  13. Educational technologies in problem-based learning in health sciences education: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Bridges, Susan M

    2014-12-10

    As a modern pedagogical philosophy, problem-based learning (PBL) is increasingly being recognized as a major research area in student learning and pedagogical innovation in health sciences education. A new area of research interest has been the role of emerging educational technologies in PBL. Although this field is growing, no systematic reviews of studies of the usage and effects of educational technologies in PBL in health sciences education have been conducted to date. The aim of this paper is to review new and emerging educational technologies in problem-based curricula, with a specific focus on 3 cognate clinical disciplines: medicine, dentistry, and speech and hearing sciences. Analysis of the studies reviewed focused on the effects of educational technologies in PBL contexts while addressing the particular issue of scaffolding of student learning. A comprehensive computerized database search of full-text articles published in English from 1996 to 2014 was carried out using 3 databases: ProQuest, Scopus, and EBSCOhost. Eligibility criteria for selection of studies for review were also determined in light of the population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) guidelines. The population was limited to postsecondary education, specifically in dentistry, medicine, and speech and hearing sciences, in which PBL was the key educational pedagogy and curriculum design. Three types of educational technologies were identified as interventions used to support student inquiry: learning software and digital learning objects; interactive whiteboards (IWBs) and plasma screens; and learning management systems (LMSs). Of 470 studies, 28 were selected for analysis. Most studies examined the effects of learning software and digital learning objects (n=20) with integration of IWB (n=5) and LMS (n=3) for PBL receiving relatively less attention. The educational technologies examined in these studies were seen as potentially fit for problem-based health sciences education

  14. Instituting systems-based practice and practice-based learning and improvement: a curriculum of inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Wilper

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background : The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME requires that training programs integrate system-based practice (SBP and practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI into internal medicine residency curricula. Context and setting : We instituted a seminar series and year-long-mentored curriculum designed to engage internal medicine residents in these competencies. Methods : Residents participate in a seminar series that includes assigned reading and structured discussion with faculty who assist in the development of quality improvement or research projects. Residents pursue projects over the remainder of the year. Monthly works in progress meetings, protected time for inquiry, and continued faculty mentorship guide the residents in their project development. Trainees present their work at hospital-wide grand rounds at the end of the academic year. We performed a survey of residents to assess their self-reported knowledge, attitudes and skills in SBP and PBLI. In addition, blinded faculty scored projects for appropriateness, impact, and feasibility. Outcomes : We measured resident self-reported knowledge, attitudes, and skills at the end of the academic year. We found evidence that participants improved their understanding of the context in which they were practicing, and that their ability to engage in quality improvement projects increased. Blinded faculty reviewers favorably ranked the projects’ feasibility, impact, and appropriateness. The ‘Curriculum of Inquiry’ generated 11 quality improvement and research projects during the study period. Barriers to the ongoing work include a limited supply of mentors and delays due to Institutional Review Board approval. Hospital leadership recognizes the importance of the curriculum, and our accreditation manager now cites our ongoing work. Conclusions : A structured residency-based curriculum facilitates resident demonstration of SBP and practice-based learning and

  15. Phenomenon-Based Teaching and Learning through the Pedagogical Lenses of Phenomenology: The Recent Curriculum Reform in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Symeonidis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to explore the phenomenon-based approach in teaching and learning, through the pedagogical lenses of phenomenology, the philosophy of phenomena. The phenomenon-based approach has informed the new core curriculum for basic education in Finland, which has officially introduced multidisciplinary learning modules as periods of phenomenon-based project studies. In this paper, we discuss how the specific approach is integrated into the curriculum, its theoretical grounding and its connections to constructivism. We also explore its implications for teaching and learning from a phenomenological perspective. The paper concludes that the responsive relation between teaching and learning is essential when our purpose is educational. Students are part of the learning process, but they do not necessarily initiate it; similarly, teachers cannot fully instruct it. Thus, we need to make meaning of the space between teaching and learning, in an effort to reclaim learning for pedagogy.

  16. Curriculum Integration in Distance Learning at Primary and Secondary Educational Levels on the Example of eTwinning Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Elzbieta

    2018-01-01

    Curriculum integration is one of the concepts which has been discussed for years. Telecollaborative projects, which employ elements of distance learning, provide opportunities for putting the idea into practice. Analysis of eTwinning projects undertaken in Polish schools aims at demonstrating the integrative role of distance learning approaches…

  17. Collaborative Learning in the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence: The Challenges of Assessment and Potential of Multi-Touch Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechan, Sandra; Ellis, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Scottish educational policy advocates the benefits of collaborative learning as a way of developing critical life skills, across the primary curriculum. In this paper, the rationale for collaborative learning, and specifically the Critical Skills (CS) approach, is considered along with an account of the perspectives of primary teachers…

  18. Integration of Work and Learning. Proceedings of the Workshop on Curriculum Innovation (2nd, Bled, Slovenia, September 1997).

    Science.gov (United States)

    European Training Foundation, Turin (Italy).

    This proceedings consists of 13 papers and 3 working group presentations from a 3-day workshop on issues of work-linked learning relevant for curriculum development. "Welcome" (Slavko Gaber, Peter de Rooij) is followed by two introductory papers: "Integration of Work and Learning: A Challenge for Both Schools and Companies"…

  19. The Robust Learning Model with a Spiral Curriculum: Implications for the Educational Effectiveness of Online Master Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Yoram; Neumann, Edith; Lewis, Shelia

    2017-01-01

    This study integrated the Spiral Curriculum approach into the Robust Learning Model as part of a continuous improvement process that was designed to improve educational effectiveness and then assessed the differences between the initial and integrated models as well as the predictability of the first course in the integrated learning model on a…

  20. Improving Students' Transfer of Learning among Subject Areas through the Use of an Integrated Curriculum and Alternative Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boidy, Tish; Moran, Michelle

    An intervention program sought to improve third- and fifth- grade students' ability to transfer learning among subject areas and to apply their learning to everyday occurrences. Surveys and interviews revealed the lack of student transference of knowledge among subject areas; teacher surveys and an interview with the curriculum director provided…

  1. PBL structure: the Sangamon Experiment of 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, G.D.; Hicks, B.B.

    1975-01-01

    The environmental impact of a number of fossil-fuel power plants in Illinois was investigated using numerical models of air pollution effects for a regional analysis. As a part of this study a field study (the Sangamon Experiment) was conducted during 1975 to examine physical mechanisms in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). This experiment was coordinated with the Midwest Interstate Sulfur Transformation and Transport (MISTT) project to investigate the effects of the urban plume emanating from St. Louis at distances of up to 100 km. Results are reported from studies on the evolution of the PBL capping inversion between the hours of 0400 and 1200; micrometeorological studies over maize and soybean crops growing in the area; measurements of wind speed, turbulence, and temperature in the lowest 100 m of the atmosphere; and measurements of the concentration of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and hydrocarbons in air samples from a kytoon system

  2. Introducing the ICF: the development of an online resource to support learning, teaching and curriculum design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lester E

    2011-03-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was adopted as one of the key models to support early health professional learning across a suite of new preregistration health science courses. It was decided that an online resource should be developed to enable students, course designers and teaching staff, across all disciplines, to have access to the same definitions, government policies and other supporting information on disability. As part of the comprehensive curriculum review, enquiry-based learning was adopted as the educational approach. Enquiry-based learning promotes deeper learning by encouraging students to engage in authentic challenges. As such, it was important that the online resource was not merely a site for accessing content, but enabled students to make decisions about where else to explore for credible information about the ICF. The selection of a host location that all students and staff could access meant that the resource could not be located in the existing online learning management system. Construction using software being trialled by the library at La Trobe University allowed for the required access, as well as alignment with an enquiry-based learning approach. Consultation for the content of the online resource included formal and informal working groups on curriculum review. The published version included resources from the World Health Organization, examples of research completed within different disciplines, a test of knowledge and a preformatted search page. The format of the online resource allows for updating of information, and feedback on the utilisation of the software has been used to enhance the student experience. The key issues for the development of this online resource were accessibility for students and staff, alignment with the adopted educational approach, consultation with all disciplines, and ease of modification of information and format once published. Copyright © 2010 Chartered

  3. PBL scaling using surface flux information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, G.D.; Hicks, B.B.

    1975-01-01

    The role of the atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL) in the transport and dispersion of air pollutants is discussed. It is pointed out that because the physical processes controlling the structure in the lowest one to two km of the atmosphere can be complex, interpretation of observational data is often ambiguous. The value of similarity theory for interpreting experimental data and for designing field experiments is discussed

  4. An analysis of teacher’s preparation in implementing 2013 revision edition curriculum on mathematics specialization learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, T.; Suryawan, A.

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to determine the pedagogical competence of teachers, the readiness of planning and implementation of learning related to the implementation 2013 revised edition curriculum on mathematics specialization learning for senior high schools Wonogiri. Informants in this study there are 6 high school mathematics teachers X and XI class who teach in the school district Wonogiri. Data were collected using questionnaire method, interview, observation and documentation. Qualitative data analysis is done interactively through 4 paths: data collection, data reduction, data display, drawing conclusion. The results showed that high school mathematics teacher class X and XI in school district of Wonogiri City. The results show that most high school mathematics teachers in grade X and XI are ready to implement the 2013 revised edition curriculum and a few have not been able to implement due to internal or external factors. High school math teachers at Wonogiri district who are ready to face the 2013 revised edition curriculum have applied 10 teacher pedagogic competency indicators according to Regulation of the national education ministry Number 16 Year 2007 in learning. The readiness and implementation of mathematics learning is in line with the demands of the 2013 revised edition curriculum. Based on the teachers who are not ready, data on issues that arise in the implementation of the 2013 revised edition curriculum. Especially the problems in learning, namely mismatch of Core Competence (KI) and Basic Competence (KD) in teacher manual, material disregard in student handbook and lack of examples of problems that exist in teacher manual.

  5. Peer-assisted learning--beyond teaching: How can medical students contribute to the undergraduate curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmedge, Daniel S; Iwata, Kazuya; Gill, Deborah

    2014-09-01

    Peer-assisted learning (PAL) has become increasingly popular over recent years with many medical schools now formally incorporating peer-teaching programs into the curriculum. PAL has a sound evidence base with benefit to both peer-teacher and peer-learner. Aside from in teaching delivery, empowering students to develop education in its broadest sense has been much less extensively documented. Five case studies with supportive evaluation evidence illustrate the success of a broad range of peer-led projects in the undergraduate medical curriculum, particularly where these have been embedded into formal teaching practices. These case studies identify five domains of teaching and support of learning where PAL works well: teaching and learning, resource development, peer-assessment, education research and evaluation and mentoring and support. Each case offers ways of engaging students in each domain. Medical students can contribute significantly to the design and delivery of the undergraduate medical program above and beyond the simple delivery of peer-assisted "teaching". In particular, they are in a prime position to develop resources and conduct research and evaluation within the program. Their participation in all stages enables them to feel involved in course development and education of their peers and ultimately leads to an increase in student satisfaction.

  6. Job requirements compared to dental school education: impact of a case-based learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeve, Philip L; Gerhards, Ute; Arnold, Wolfgang A; Zimmer, Stefan; Zöllner, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Case-based learning (CBL) is suggested as a key educational method of knowledge acquisition to improve dental education. The purpose of this study was to assess graduates from a patient-oriented, case-based learning (CBL)-based curriculum as regards to key competencies required at their professional activity. 407 graduates from a patient-oriented, case-based learning (CBL) dental curriculum who graduated between 1990 and 2006 were eligible for this study. 404 graduates were contacted between 2007 and 2008 to self-assess nine competencies as required at their day-to-day work and as taught in dental school on a 6-point Likert scale. Baseline demographics and clinical characteristics were presented as mean ± standard deviation (SD) for continuous variables. To determine whether dental education sufficiently covers the job requirements of physicians, we calculated the mean difference ∆ between the ratings of competencies as required in day-to-day work and as taught in medical school by subtracting those from each other (negative mean difference ∆ indicates deficit; positive mean difference ∆ indicates surplus). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was calculated to reveal statistical significance (statistical significance plearning/working" (∆+0.08), whereas "Problem-solving skills" (∆-0.07), "Psycho-social competence" (∆-0.66) and "Business competence" (∆-2.86) needed improvement in the CBL-based curriculum. CBL demonstrated benefits with regard to competencies which were highly required in the job of dentists. Psycho-social and business competence deserve closer attention in future curricular development.

  7. [Application of PBL method and LBL method in the teaching of Acupuncutre and Moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Jin; Ruan, Zhizhong

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve teaching lever and explore teaching approach, the feasibility study on the combination of the problembased learning method CPBL) and the lecture-based learning method (LBL) was conducted in the teaching of Acupuncture and Moxibustion. The 2010 undergraduates in the major of clinical integrated Chinese and western medicine of five years were randomized into a PBL and LBL group and a LEL group. In the first semester, according to the basic teaching requirement, LBL was used to accomplish the teaching of basic theory. In the internship teaching section, the different teaching method was applied. In the PBL and LEL group, PEL was used, and in the LBL group, LBL was given. At the end of semester, the examination results of the theory learning and medical cases learning were evaluated. The questionnaire was summarized in the teachers and students. The final examination result of theory learning was not different significantly between the two groups (P >0. 05), but the result of medical cases learning in the PEL and LEL group was better than that in LEL group (84. 47±10. 72 vs 76. 00±9. 97, Pmethod was higher than that of LEL method (86. 27±8. 36 vs 56. 00±14. 59, Pmethod of PBL and LEL is feasible in teaching of Acupuncture and Moxibustion and the teaching outcome is superior to the simple LBL, which provides the new approach to the teaching reform.

  8. [The good PBL tutor--to be or not to be: instructional films for tutors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelin, Silvia; Huwendiek, Sören; Nikendei, Christoph; Dieter, Peter; Kirschfink, Michael; Bosse, Hans-Martin

    2008-01-01

    Many faculties worldwide apply the method of problem-based learning (PBL) in their curricula as a form of instruction by which students in small groups develop problem-solving strategies on the basis of a specific case. This approach fosters self-responsible and context-dependent learning, which aims at providing an improved anchoring of knowledge. For this reason, the previous decades have seen a distribution of the method to medical schools across the world. The role of the tutor assumes particular importance since, in contrast to the traditional university system, he or she serves as a facilitator who fosters and structures content-related and group-dynamic learning processes. In some cases, this requires an intervention by the tutor. The major challenge is to intervene at the right time and in an appropriate manner. This paper presents examples of difficult PBL situations using short film sequences to demonstrate and comments on potential approaches of the tutor in attempting to resolve the problem. Standard problem situations within a PBL tutorial were defined and produced in a film. A collection of seven frequent critical PBL situations are presented in short film sequences. Potential instruments of intervention are demonstrated in the videos and discussed. The film sequences may be downloaded in the supplementary of the electronic version of this article (www.sciencedirect.com). Within the framework of a tutor-training programme, the problematic situations and interventions presented in this article will help to sensitise tutors to potentially critical PBL tutorial situations and aid the development of individual resolution approaches.

  9. Course Design and Student Responses to an Online PBL Course in 3D Modelling for Mining Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Iain; Stothard, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    To enhance a course in 3D Virtual Reality (3D VR) modelling for mining engineers, and to create the potential for off campus students to fully engage with the course, a problem based learning (PBL) approach was applied to the course design and all materials and learning activities were provided online. This paper outlines some of the theoretical…

  10. Curriculum structure, content, learning and assessment in European undergraduate dental education - update 2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manogue, M

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents an updated statement on behalf of the Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE) in relation to proposals for undergraduate Curriculum Structure, Content, Learning, Assessment and Student \\/ Staff Exchange for dental education in Europe. A task force was constituted to consider these issues and the two previous, related publications produced by the Association (Plasschaert et al 2006 and 2007) were revised. The broad European dental community was circulated and contributed to the revisions. The paper was approved at the General Assembly of ADEE, held in Amsterdam in August 2010 and will be updated again in 2015.

  11. Code to Learn: Where Does It Belong in the K-12 Curriculum?

    OpenAIRE

    Jesús Moreno León; Gregorio Robles; Marcos Román-González

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of computer programming in K-12 has become mainstream in the last years, as countries around the world are making coding part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical studies that investigate how learning to program at an early age affects other school subjects. In this regard, this paper compares three quasi-experimental research designs conducted in three different schools (n=129 students from 2nd and 6th grade), in order to assess the impact of intro...

  12. Longitudinal Study of the Impacts of a Climate Change Curriculum on Undergraduate Student Learning: Initial Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin C. Burkholder

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study assesses the efficacy of a semester-long undergraduate sustainability curriculum designed from a systems approach. The three-course curriculum, which incorporated environmental science and ethics courses along with an integrative course using a community-based learning pedagogy, was intended to provide students with experience using knowledge and skills from distinct disciplines in a holistic way in order to address the complex problems of the human acceptance of and response to anthropogenic climate change. In the fall of 2013, 23 of the 24 sophomore general education students enrolled in the three courses were surveyed at the beginning and end of the semester; 17 of those same students completed the survey again in the spring of 2016, their senior year. Results, which focus on the 17 students who continued to participate through their senior year, were analyzed with quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The pre/post data from the surveys demonstrated significant improvement in climate literacy, certainty, concern and urgency over the course of the semester; the senior data indicated that those improvements were largely retained. The study also suggests that the nine-credit curriculum improved transferable skills such as interdisciplinary thinking, self-confidence and public speaking. A qualitative analysis of three student cases, informed by a focus group (n = 7 of seniors along with other sources of information, suggested retention of such transferable skills, and, in some cases, deeper involvement in climate and sustainability action.

  13. Moderating Influence of Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Assessment Practices on Learning Outcomes in Indonesian Secondary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Umami

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to examine the current situation and problems faced by Indonesian schools in curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment practices despite government’s several legal initiatives. A questionnaire comprising both open and closed-ended questions was sent to the teachers and public education officers of the Indonesian education department. Out of a total of 200 questionnaires distributed in three secondary schools of Papua and Bandung and the headquarters of Indonesian Education Department at Jakarta, only 170 respondents retuned the questionnaire. For the purpose of quantitative analysis, percentage, mean and standard deviation were calculated while content analysis method was utilized for qualitative data. The questions dealt with curriculum, pedagogy and assessment and their combined role in the achievement of learning outcomes of secondary education in Indonesia. Evidence collected from teacher’s questionnaire show that most participants held a good knowledge of curriculum, pedagogy and assessment practices gained through long experience in the education sector. The implications of this study have wide perspectives as its findings would be beneficial for policy making. Recommendations of the study focus on the implementation of good practices.

  14. Novel Emergency Medicine Curriculum Utilizing Self-Directed Learning and the Flipped Classroom Method: Gastrointestinal Emergencies Small Group Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew King

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience and type of curriculum: This curriculum created and implemented at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center was designed to educate our emergency medicine (EM residents, PGY-1 to PGY-3, as well as medical students and attending physicians. Introduction/Background: Gastrointestinal (GI emergencies comprise approximately 12% of emergency department (ED visits.1 Residents must be proficient in the differential diagnosis and management of the wide variety of GI emergencies. The flipped classroom curricular model emphasizes self-directed learning activities completed by learners, followed by small group discussions pertaining to the topic reviewed. The active learning fostered by this curriculum increases faculty and learner engagement and interaction time typically absent in traditional lecture-based formats.2-4 Studies have revealed that the application of knowledge through case studies, personal interaction with content experts, and integrated questions are effective learning strategies for emergency medicine residents.4-6 The Ohio State University EM Residency didactic curriculum recently transitioned to a “flipped classroom” approach.7-10 We created this innovative curriculum aimed to improve our residency education program and to share educational resources with other EM residency programs. This proposed curriculum utilizes an 18-month curricular cycle. The flipped classroom curriculum maximizes didactic time and resident engagement, fosters intellectual curiosity and active learning, and meets the needs of today’s learners. 3,6,11 Objectives: We aim to teach the presentation and management of GI emergencies through the creation of a flipped classroom design. This unique, innovative curriculum utilizes resources chosen by education faculty and resident learners, study questions, real-life experiences, and small group discussions in place of traditional lectures. In doing so, a goal of the curriculum is to encourage self

  15. An Educational Approach to Problem-based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Chieh Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the educational framework of problem-based learning (PBL. As known and used, PBL finds its root in the Structuralism and Pragmatism schools of philosophy. In this paper, the three main requirements of PBL, namely learning by doing, learning in context, and focusing on the student, are discussed within the context of these two schools of thought. Given these attributes, PBL also seems ideally suited for use in learning bioethics.

  16. The Epistemological Fog in Realising Learning to Learn in European Curriculum Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leat, David; Thomas, Ulrike; Reid, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The European Union is concerned about the economic prospects of its member states as they have to compete against newly emerging economies with lower wages and high ambitions. Part of the strategy to deal with this economic shadow is to create a knowledge economy, but in order to achieve this, a shift to a competence-based curriculum model is seen…

  17. Effects of implementation of problem-based learning tutorials on fifth-year pharmacy students and future issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsuko; Morone, Mieko; Azuma, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    At Tohoku Pharmaceutical University, problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials were incorporated into "prescription analysis" and "case analysis" for fifth-year students in 2010 with the following objectives: ① application and confirmation of acquired knowledge and skills, and acquisition of ② communication ability, ③ presentation ability, ④ cooperativeness through groupwork, and ⑤ information collecting ability. In the present study, we conducted a questionnaire survey on a total of 158 fifth-year students in order to investigate the educational benefits of PBL tutorials. The results showed that the above five objectives of PBL tutorials were being achieved, and confirmed the educational benefits expected of PBL tutorials. In contrast, it was found to be necessary to improve the contents of scenarios and lectures, time allocation regarding schedules, the learning environment, the role of tutors, and other matters. In order to maximize the educational benefits of PBL tutorials, it will be necessary in the future to continue to conduct surveys on students and make improvements to the curriculum based on survey results.

  18. The Impact of Curriculum Developed in Line with Authentic Learning on the Teacher Candidates' Success, Attitude and Self-Directed Learning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursen, Cigdem

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of the curriculum developed in line with authentic learning on the teacher candidates' success, attitudes towards courses and self-directed learning skills. The study, that is quantitative in nature, is carried out with 64 teacher candidates studying at Near East University and taking the course…

  19. Curriculum Integration in Distance Learning at Primary and Secondary Educational Levels on the Example of eTwinning Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Gajek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Curriculum integration is one of the concepts which has been discussed for years. Telecollaborative projects, which employ elements of distance learning, provide opportunities for putting the idea into practice. Analysis of eTwinning projects undertaken in Polish schools aims at demonstrating the integrative role of distance learning approaches and their contribution to integration of various themes in educational context. As the eTwinning framework is very flexible, allowing for teacher and students autonomy the projects may vary in the topics, age and number of participants, duration scope within curriculum etc. The study shows various levels and perspectives of curriculum integration which take place in eTwinning projects. It also discusses the role of distance learning at primary and secondary educational levels. The challenge is to transform international collaboration of selected schools an everyday practice for all learners and teachers.

  20. Problem-Based Learning in Formal and Informal Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimic, Goran; Jevremovic, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a student-centered instructional strategy in which students solve problems and reflect on their experiences. Different domains need different approaches in the design of PBL systems. Therefore, we present one case study in this article: A Java Programming PBL. The application is developed as an additional module for…

  1. 問題導向式行動學習的整合應用:以高等教育為例 The Integration of Problem-Based Learning (PBL and Action Learning in Higher Education of Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    閻自安 Tzu-An Yen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available 為提高大學生的學習效果,大學教師的教學型態已從「傳統講述」轉變為「問題導向、團體討論、行動實作、即時應用與批判思考為主軸」的教學。問題導向學習源於醫學教育,係以學生為中心,盼透過實際問題,幫助學生以小組合作方式解決難題;而行動學習則是強調做中學與主動建構的體驗課程,除善用團隊的批判思考與反省激盪外,也期望能解決真實問題。因此,結合問題導向與行動學習特色的新課程教學模式,頗值得大學院校推動「翻轉課程教學型態」時參考。本篇首先探討問題導向與行動學習的基本概念,其次探究問題導向行動學習的運作方式與應用,期望提出結論與建議供大學院校推動課程教與學的革新時參考。 “Flipped Classroom” was currently an important issue in higher education of Taiwan. In order to improve undergraduates’ transfer of learning, professors changed teaching style from traditional lecture into problem-based, group discussion, practice doing, immediate use and critical thinking. Problem-based learning originated in the medical education. This kind of learning helped students build a team in order to solve the actual problems. Action learning emphasized the importance of “learning by doing” and “active construction”. They solved the real problems through critical thinking and reflection of team members. Therefore, the integration of problem-based learning and action learning was the new teaching trend. This paper explored the integration of problem-based learning and action learning in higher education. First of all, the fundamental concepts of problem-based learning and action learning were described. Secondly, the process of problem-based action learning were elaborated. The study also found out how to practice the problem-based action learning. Finally, feasible suggestions giving insight into

  2. So You're Thinking of Trying Problem Based Learning?: Three Critical Success Factors for Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Tim O.

    2004-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) shifts the traditional teaching paradigm. Rather than being teacher centered, PBL is student centered. Rather than presenting content first, PBL presents the problem first. Rather than presenting the students with a well-structured problem with a clear answer, PBL presents the students with an ill-structured problem…

  3. Learning and Motivational Processes When Students Design Curriculum-Based Digital Learning Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2015-01-01

    This design-based research (DBR) project has developed an overall gamified learning design (big Game) to facilitate the learning process for adult students by inviting them to be their own learning designers through designing digital learning games (small games) in cross-disciplinary subject...... matters. The DBR project has investigated and experimented with which elements, methods, and processes are important when aiming at creating a cognitive complex (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001) and motivating learning process within a reusable game-based learning design. This project took place in a co......, or programming provide a rich context for learning, since the construction of artefacts, in this case learning games, enables reflection and new ways of thinking. The students learned from reflection and interaction with the tools alone as well as in collaboration with peers. After analysing the students...

  4. Learning about gender on campus: an analysis of the hidden curriculum for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ling-Fang; Yang, Hsing-Chen

    2015-03-01

    Gender sensitivity is a crucial factor in the provision of quality health care. This paper explores acquired gendered values and attitudes among medical students through an analysis of the hidden curriculum that exists within formal medical classes and informal learning. Discourse analysis was adopted as the research method. Data were collected from the Bulletin Board System (BBS), which represented an essential communication platform among students in Taiwan before the era of Facebook. The study examined 197 gender-related postings on the BBS boards of nine of 11 universities with a medical department in Taiwan, over a period of 10 years from 2000 to 2010. The five distinctive characteristics of the hidden curriculum were as follows: (i) gendered stereotypes of physiological knowledge; (ii) biased treatment of women; (iii) stereotyped gender-based division of labour; (iv) sexual harassment and a hostile environment, and (v) ridiculing of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people. Both teachers and students co-produced a heterosexual masculine culture and sexism, including 'benevolent sexism' and 'hostile sexism'. As a result, the self-esteem and learning opportunities of female and LGBT students have been eroded. The paper explores gender dynamics in the context of a hidden curriculum in which heterosexual masculinity and stereotyped sexism are prevalent as norms. Both teachers and students, whether through formal medical classes or informal extracurricular interactive activities, are noted to contribute to the consolidation of such norms. The study tentatively suggests three strategies for integrating gender into medical education: (i) by separating physiological knowledge from gender stereotyping in teaching; (ii) by highlighting the importance of gender sensitivity in the language used within and outside the classroom by teachers and students, and (iii) by broadening the horizons of both teachers and students by recounting examples of the lived

  5. Implementation of computer learning cases into the curriculum of internal medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer-based interactive clinical cases were introduced in 1999 to improve problem-solving abilities in undergraduate education in internal medicine at the University of Munich; the content of online cases was matched with the main lecture. Course credits were given for the successful processing of four cases; an additional eight cases were offered to the students for voluntary use. Only the required cases were used substantially (between 89% and 95% of all students whereas a minority of students (between 5% and 11% used the cases voluntarily. In spite of this predominantly extrinsic motivation, most students expressed a high level of intrinsic motivation and rated their self-reported learning success as high. The difficulty of cases was rated as appropriate. This was supported by quantitative data on the correctness of students' answers. In summary, the integration of computer-based cases into a face-to-face learning curriculum should be coupled with the course assessment framework.

  6. An active learning curriculum improves fellows' knowledge and faculty teaching skills: a medical student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mubariz Ahmad, Nourah AlHennawi, Maaham AhmedManchester Medical School, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UKWe read with great interest the article by Inra et al1 which discusses the benefits of using an active learning curriculum to improve faculty teaching skills and help fellows retain more knowledge compared to traditional teaching methods. As current medical students, we can vouch for the effectiveness of this approach in improving the way material can be taught, hence would like to offer our perspective on this.  Authors’ replyJennifer A Inra,1,2 Stephen Pelletier,2 Navin L Kumar,1,2 Edward L Barnes,3,4 Helen M Shields1,21Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endoscopy, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 2Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 4University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USAWe appreciate the thoughtful comments received from Ahmed et al regarding our article “An active learning curriculum improves fellows’ knowledge and faculty teaching”.1 The educational literature supports the recommendation that the optimal timing for a lecture is 10-15 minutes, as a student’s attention may wander or wane after that time.2 This ideal time limit stems from a paperby Hartley in 1978, which recommends this optimal time frame.3View the original paper by Inra and colleagues  

  7. Using standardized patients versus video cases for representing clinical problems in problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Bo Young; Choi, Ikseon; Choi, Seokjin; Kim, Tae-Hee; Roh, Hyerin; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Lee, Jong-Tae

    2016-06-01

    The quality of problem representation is critical for developing students' problem-solving abilities in problem-based learning (PBL). This study investigates preclinical students' experience with standardized patients (SPs) as a problem representation method compared to using video cases in PBL. A cohort of 99 second-year preclinical students from Inje University College of Medicine (IUCM) responded to a Likert scale questionnaire on their learning experiences after they had experienced both video cases and SPs in PBL. The questionnaire consisted of 14 items with eight subcategories: problem identification, hypothesis generation, motivation, collaborative learning, reflective thinking, authenticity, patient-doctor communication, and attitude toward patients. The results reveal that using SPs led to the preclinical students having significantly positive experiences in boosting patient-doctor communication skills; the perceived authenticity of their clinical situations; development of proper attitudes toward patients; and motivation, reflective thinking, and collaborative learning when compared to using video cases. The SPs also provided more challenges than the video cases during problem identification and hypotheses generation. SPs are more effective than video cases in delivering higher levels of authenticity in clinical problems for PBL. The interaction with SPs engages preclinical students in deeper thinking and discussion; growth of communication skills; development of proper attitudes toward patients; and motivation. Considering the higher cost of SPs compared with video cases, SPs could be used most advantageously during the preclinical period in the IUCM curriculum.

  8. Investigating the impact of a LEGO(TM)-based, engineering-oriented curriculum compared to an inquiry-based curriculum on fifth graders' content learning of simple machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marulcu, Ismail

    This mixed method study examined the impact of a LEGO-based, engineering-oriented curriculum compared to an inquiry-based curriculum on fifth graders' content learning of simple machines. This study takes a social constructivist theoretical stance that science learning involves learning scientific concepts and their relations to each other. From this perspective, students are active participants, and they construct their conceptual understanding through the guidance of their teacher. With the goal of better understanding the use of engineering education materials in classrooms the National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council in the book "Engineering in K-12 Education" conducted an in-depth review of the potential benefits of including engineering in K--12 schools as (a) improved learning and achievement in science and mathematics, (b) increased awareness of engineering and the work of engineers, (c) understanding of and the ability to engage in engineering design, (d) interest in pursuing engineering as a career, and (e) increased technological literacy (Katehi, Pearson, & Feder, 2009). However, they also noted a lack of reliable data and rigorous research to support these assertions. Data sources included identical written tests and interviews, classroom observations and videos, teacher interviews, and classroom artifacts. To investigate the impact of the design-based simple machines curriculum compared to the scientific inquiry-based simple machines curriculum on student learning outcomes, I compared the control and the experimental groups' scores on the tests and interviews by using ANCOVA. To analyze and characterize the classroom observation videotapes, I used Jordan and Henderson's (1995) method and divide them into episodes. My analyses revealed that the design-based Design a People Mover: Simple Machines unit was, if not better, as successful as the inquiry-based FOSS Levers and Pulleys unit in terms of students' content learning. I also

  9. MODELAGEM DE UM SISTEMA MULTIAGENTE DE APOIO À PBL UTILIZANDO A METODOLOGIA MAS-COMMONKADS+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laysa Mabel de Oliveira Fontes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A aprendizagem baseada em problema (Problem-Based Learning - PBL é um método no qual os estudantes aprendem através da resolução de um problema que, em geral, não possui uma solução trivial e uma única solução correta. A PBL destaca o trabalho em equipe como um dos principais requisitos para o sucesso do processo de aprendizagem, ou seja, a colaboração é essencial. No entanto, a implantação de um método de ensino com base na PBL não é uma tarefa trivial. Em Ambientes Virtuais de Aprendizagem (AVAs, a complexidade de implantação deste método é ainda maior, pois o facilitador nem sempre pode detectar possíveis problemas na colaboração, nem possui todas as informações necessárias para aplicar as técnicas de aprendizagem deste método. Desta forma, este artigo apresenta o processo de modelagem de um Sistema Multiagente (SMA de apoio à PBL. O SMA proposto foi modelado utilizando a metodologia MAS-CommonKADS+, que consiste em uma extensão da metodologia MAS-CommonKADS.

  10. Conceptions of how a learning or teaching curriculum, workplace culture and agency of individuals shape medical student learning and supervisory practices in the clinical workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Pia; Edgren, Gudrun; Borna, Petter; Lindgren, Stefan; Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte; Stalmeijer, Renée E

    2015-05-01

    The role of workplace supervisors in the clinical education of medical students is currently under debate. However, few studies have addressed how supervisors conceptualize workplace learning and how conceptions relate to current sociocultural workplace learning theory. We explored physician conceptions of: (a) medical student learning in the clinical workplace and (b) how they contribute to student learning. The methodology included a combination of a qualitative, inductive (conventional) and deductive (directed) content analysis approach. The study triangulated two types of interview data from 4 focus group interviews and 34 individual interviews. A total of 55 physicians participated. Three overarching themes emerged from the data: learning as membership, learning as partnership and learning as ownership. The themes described how physician conceptions of learning and supervision were guided by the notions of learning-as-participation and learning-as-acquisition. The clinical workplace was either conceptualized as a context in which student learning is based on a learning curriculum, continuity of participation and partnerships with supervisors, or as a temporary source of knowledge within a teaching curriculum. The process of learning was shaped through the reciprocity between different factors in the workplace context and the agency of students and supervising physicians. A systems-thinking approach merged with the "co-participation" conceptual framework advocated by Billet proved to be useful for analyzing variations in conceptions. The findings suggest that mapping workplace supervisor conceptions of learning can be a valuable starting point for medical schools and educational developers working with changes in clinical educational and faculty development practices.

  11. [Application of PBL combined with SP method in during-course practice of endodontics for undergraduate dental students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Li-Na; Qiu, Li-Hong; Zhan, Fu-Liang; Xue, Ming

    2016-10-01

    To apply problem-based learning (PBL) combined with standardized patients(SP) in during-course practice of endodontics for undergraduate dental students, in order to improve the teaching quality. One hundred and four undergraduate dental students of China Medical University School of Stomatology were randomly divided into 2 groups, 52 students in each group. One group were taught with PBL combined with SP while the other group with lecture-based learning (LBL) alone. The teaching effect was measured with examination and questionnaire survey. The data were analyzed by Student's t test using SPSS 11.5 software package. Students in PBL combined with SP group was better than LBL group in case analysis, didactic tests, practical tests and total scores, and there was significant difference between the two groups (Pendodontics to undergraduate dental students.

  12. What can we learn from problem-based learning tutors at a graduate entry medical school? A mixed method approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O Doherty, Diane; Mc Keague, Helena; Harney, Sarah; Browne, Gerard; McGrath, Deirdre

    2018-05-04

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been adopted by many medical schools as an innovative method to deliver an integrated medical curriculum since its inception at McMaster University (Dornan et al., Med Educ 39(2):163-170, 2005; Finucane et al., Med Educ 35(1):56-61, 2001; Barrows, Tutorials in problem-based learning: A new direction in teaching the health professions, 1984). The student experience in PBL has been explored in detail (Merriam, New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education 89: 3-13, 2001; Azer, Kaohsiung J Med Sci 25(5): 240-249, 2009; Boelens et al., BMC Med Ed 15(1): 84, 2015; Dolmans et al., Med Teach 24(2):173-180, 2002; Lee et al., Med Teach 35(2): e935-e942, 2013) but the tutors who facilitate PBL have valuable insight into how PBL functions and this aspect has not been extensively researched. The integrated curriculum for years 1 and 2 at the Graduate Entry Medical School at the University of Limerick is delivered though problem-based learning (PBL). This programme requires collaborative teamwork between students and the tutors who facilitate small-group tutorial sessions. All PBL tutors at GEMS are medically qualified, with the majority (68%) currently working in clinical practice. A mixed-methods approach was adopted, utilising two surveys and follow-up focus groups to fully understand the tutor experience. Thirty-three tutors took part in two online surveys with a response rate of 89%. Thirteen tutors participated in two focus groups. Descriptive analysis was completed on survey data and thematic analysis on focus group discussions which highlighted five main themes. Tutors reported challenges with managing group dynamics, development of confidence in tutoring with experience and a willingness to learn from peers to improve practice. Findings are in keeping with previously published work. Results also identified several less commonly discussed issues impacting student engagement in PBL including the use of mobile device technology

  13. Hidden realities inside PBL design processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Ole Verner

    2015-01-01

    Design Process, but is a group-based architecture and design education better than that which is individually based? How does PBL affect space, form, and creative processes? Hans Kiib, professor and one of the founders of the Department of Architecture and Design in Aalborg, describes his intentions...... are passing from a complex world into one based on super complexity? Could Gaston Bachelard (1958), who writes in his book The Poetic of Space "that poets and artists are born phenomenologists," help architecture and design students in their journey to find his/her own professional expression? This paper...

  14. Learning and Motivational Processes When Students Design Curriculum-Based Digital Learning Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2015-01-01

    , or programming provide a rich context for learning, since the construction of artefacts, in this case learning games, enables reflection and new ways of thinking. The students learned from reflection and interaction with the tools alone as well as in collaboration with peers. After analysing the students...... another. The study found that the students benefitted from this way of learning as a valid variation to more conventional teaching approaches, and teachers found that the students learned at least the same amount or more compared to traditional teaching processes. The students were able to think outside...

  15. Novel Emergency Medicine Curriculum Utilizing Self-Directed Learning and the Flipped Classroom Method: Genitourinary Emergencies Small Group Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew King

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This curriculum, created and implemented at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, was designed to educate our emergency medicine (EM residents, PGY-1 to PGY-3, as well as medical students. Introduction: In 2013, there were over 6 million Emergency Department visits in the United States which resulted in a primary diagnosis of the genitourinary system. This represents 5.2% of all Emergency Department visits.1 Residents must be proficient in the differential diagnosis and management of the wide variety of genitourinary emergencies. This flipped classroom curricular model emphasizes self-directed learning activities completed by learners, followed by small group discussions pertaining to the topic reviewed. The active learning fostered by this curriculum increases faculty and learner engagement and interaction time typically absent in traditional lecture-based formats.2-4 Studies have revealed that the application of knowledge through case studies, personal interaction with content experts, and integrated questions are effective learning strategies for emergency medicine residents.4-6 The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center EM Residency didactic curriculum recently transitioned to a “flipped classroom” approach.7-10 We created this innovative curriculum aimed to improve our residency education program and to share educational resources with other EM residency programs. Our curriculum utilizes an 18-month curricular cycle to cover the defined emergency medicine content. The flipped classroom curriculum maximizes didactic time and resident engagement, fosters intellectual curiosity and active learning, and meets the needs of today’s learners. 3,6,11 Objectives: We aim to teach the presentation and management of genitourinary emergencies through the creation of a flipped classroom design. This unique, innovative curriculum utilizes resources chosen by education faculty and resident learners, study questions, real

  16. Novel Emergency Medicine Curriculum Utilizing Self-Directed Learning and the Flipped Classroom Method: Psychiatric Emergencies Small Group Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew King

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This curriculum created and implemented at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center was designed to educate our emergency medicine (EM residents, PGY-1 to PGY-3, as well as medical students and attending physicians. Introduction: In 2007, there were 12 million adult Emergency Department visits for mental health and substance abuse complaints. This represents 12.5% of all adult emergency department visits.1 Residents must be proficient in the differential diagnosis and management of the wide variety of psychiatric emergencies. The flipped classroom curricular model emphasizes self-directed learning activities completed by learners, followed by small group discussions pertaining to the topic reviewed. The active learning fostered by this curriculum increases faculty and learner engagement and interaction time typically absent in traditional lecture-based formats.2-4 Studies have revealed that the application of knowledge through case studies, personal interaction with content experts, and integrated questions are effective learning strategies for emergency medicine residents.4-6 The Ohio State University EM Residency didactic curriculum recently transitioned to a “flipped classroom” approach.7-10 We created this innovative curriculum aimed to improve our residency education program and to share educational resources with other EM residency programs. Our curriculum utilizes an 18-month curricular cycle to cover the defined emergency medicine content. The flipped classroom curriculum maximizes didactic time and resident engagement, fosters intellectual curiosity and active learning, and meets the needs of today’s learners. 3,6,11 Objectives: We aim to teach the presentation and management of psychiatric emergencies through the creation of a flipped classroom design. This unique, innovative curriculum utilizes resources chosen by education faculty and resident learners, study questions, real-life experiences, and small group

  17. Assessing learning outcomes and cost effectiveness of an online sleep curriculum for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandla, Hari; Franco, Rose A; Simpson, Deborah; Brennan, Kimberly; McKanry, Jennifer; Bragg, Dawn

    2012-08-15

    Sleep disorders are highly prevalent across all age groups but often remain undiagnosed and untreated, resulting in significant health consequences. To overcome an inadequacy of available curricula and learner and instructor time constraints, this study sought to determine if an online sleep medicine curriculum would achieve equivalent learner outcomes when compared with traditional, classroom-based, face-to-face instruction at equivalent costs. Medical students rotating on a required clinical clerkship received instruction in 4 core clinical sleep-medicine competency domains in 1 of 2 delivery formats: a single 2.5-hour face-to-face workshop or 4 asynchronous e-learning modules. Immediate learning outcomes were assessed in a subsequent clerkship using a multiple-choice examination and standardized patient station, with long-term outcomes assessed through analysis of students' patient write-ups for inclusion of sleep complaints and diagnoses before and after the intervention. Instructional costs by delivery format were tracked. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses compared learning outcomes and costs by instructional delivery method (face-to-face versus e-learning). Face-to-face learners, compared with online learners, were more satisfied with instruction. Learning outcomes (i.e., multiple-choice examination, standardized patient encounter, patient write-up), as measured by short-term and long-term assessments, were roughly equivalent. Design, delivery, and learner-assessment costs by format were equivalent at the end of 1 year, due to higher ongoing teaching costs associated with face-to-face learning offsetting online development and delivery costs. Because short-term and long-term learner performance outcomes were roughly equivalent, based on delivery method, the cost effectiveness of online learning is an economically and educationally viable instruction platform for clinical clerkships.

  18. The effectiveness of clinical problem-based learning model of medico-jurisprudence education on general law knowledge for Obstetrics/Gynecological interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui-Chin; Wang, Ning-Yen; Ko, Wen-Ru; Yu, You-Tsz; Lin, Long-Yau; Tsai, Hui-Fang

    2017-06-01

    The effective education method of medico-jurisprudence for medical students is unclear. The study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of problem-based learning (PBL) model teaching medico-jurisprudence in clinical setting on General Law Knowledge (GLK) for medical students. Senior medical students attending either campus-based law curriculum or Obstetrics/Gynecology (Ob/Gyn) clinical setting morning meeting from February to July in 2015 were enrolled. A validated questionnaire comprising 45 questions were completed before and after the law education. The interns attending clinical setting small group improvisation medico-jurisprudence problem-based learning education had significantly better GLK scores than the GLK of students attending campus-based medical law education course after the period studied. PBL teaching model of medico-jurisprudence is an ideal alternative pedagogy model in medical law education curriculum. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. A Curriculum-Based Approach to Teaching Biosafety Through eLearning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndolo, Dennis O; Wach, Michael; Rüdelsheim, Patrick; Craig, Wendy

    2018-01-01

    Anyone working in biosafety capacity enhancement faces the challenge of ensuring that the impact of a capacity enhancing activity continues and becomes sustainable beyond the depletion of funding. Many training efforts face the limitation of one-off events: they only reach those people present at the time. It becomes incumbent upon the trainees to pass on the training to colleagues as best they can, whilst the demand for the training never appears to diminish. However, beyond the initial effort to establish the basic content, repeating capacity enhancement events in different locations is usually not economically feasible. Also, the lack of infrastructure and other resources needed to support a robust training programme hinder operationalizing a "train-the-trainer" approach to biosafety training. One way to address these challenges is through the use of eLearning modules that can be delivered online, globally, continuously, at low cost, and on an as-needed basis to multiple audiences. Once the modules are developed and peer-reviewed, they can be maintained on a remote server and made available to various audiences through a password-protected portal that delivers the programme content, administers preliminary and final exams, and provides the administrative infrastructure to register users and track their progress through the modules. Crucial to the implementation of such an eLearning programme is an approach in which the modules are intentionally developed together as a cohesive curriculum. Once developed, such a curriculum can be released as a stand-alone programme for the training of governmental risk assessors and regulators or used as accredited components in post-graduate degree programmes in biosafety, at minimal cost to the government or university. Examples from the portfolio of eLearning modules developed by the International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB) are provided to demonstrate these key features.

  20. Pros and cons of vertical integration between clinical medicine and basic science within a problem-based undergraduate medical curriculum: examples and experiences from Linköping, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahle, L O; Brynhildsen, J; Behrbohm Fallsberg, M; Rundquist, I; Hammar, M

    2002-05-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL), combined with early patient contact, multiprofessional education and emphasis on development of communications skills, has become the basis for the medical curriculum at the Faculty of Health Sciences in Linköping (FHS), Sweden, which was started in 1986. Important elements in the curriculum are vertical integration, i.e. integration between the clinical and basic science parts of the curriculum and horizontal integration between different subject areas. This article discusses the importance of vertical integration in an undergraduate medical curriculum, according to experiences from the Faculty of Health Sciences in Linköping, and also give examples on how it has been implemented during the latest 15 years. Results and views put forward in published articles concerning vertical integration within undergraduate medical education are discussed in relation to the experiences in Linköping. Vertical integration between basic sciences and clinical medicine in a PBL setting has been found to stimulate profound rather than superficial learning, and thereby stimulates better understanding of important biomedical principles. Integration probably leads to better retention of knowledge and the ability to apply basic science principles in the appropriate clinical context. Integration throughout the whole curriculum entails a lot of time and work in respect of planning, organization and execution. The teachers have to be deeply involved and enthusiastic and have to cooperate over departmental borders, which may produce positive spin-off effects in teaching and research but also conflicts that have to be resolved. The authors believe vertical integration supports PBL and stimulates deep and lifelong learning.

  1. Reaching Consensus on Essential Biomedical Science Learning Objectives in a Dental Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Leandra; Walton, Joanne N; Walker, Judith; von Bergmann, HsingChi

    2016-04-01

    This article describes how the University of British Columbia Faculty of Dentistry reached consensus on essential basic biomedical science objectives for DMD students and applied the information to the renewal of its DMD curriculum. The Delphi Method was used to build consensus among dental faculty members and students regarding the relevance of over 1,500 existing biomedical science objectives. Volunteer panels of at least three faculty members (a basic scientist, a general dentist, and a dental specialist) and a fourth-year dental student were formed for each of 13 biomedical courses in the first two years of the program. Panel members worked independently and anonymously, rating each course objective as "need to know," "nice to know," "irrelevant," or "don't know." Panel members were advised after each round which objectives had not yet achieved a 75% consensus and were asked to reconsider their ratings. After a maximum of three rounds to reach consensus, a second group of faculty experts reviewed and refined the results to establish the biomedical science objectives for the renewed curriculum. There was consensus on 46% of the learning objectives after round one, 80% after round two, and 95% after round three. The second expert group addressed any remaining objectives as part of its review process. Only 47% of previous biomedical science course objectives were judged to be essential or "need to know" for the general dentist. The consensus reached by participants in the Delphi Method panels and a second group of faculty experts led to a streamlined, better integrated DMD curriculum to prepare graduates for future practice.

  2. Teaching Problem Based Learning as Blended Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Nortvig, Anne-Mette

    2018-01-01

    Problem-based and project organized learning (PBL) was originally developed for collaboration between physically present students, but political decisions at many universities require that collaboration, dialogues, and other PBL activities take place online as well. With a theoretical point...... of departure in Dewey and a methodological point of departure in netnography, this study focuses on an online module at Aalborg University where teaching is based on PBL. With the research question ‘How can teachers design for PBL online,’ this study explores the teacher’s role in a six weeks’ blended learning...... program, and we present suggestions for designs for blended learning PBL based on case studies from two PBL courses...

  3. Opinions of Turkish Language and Literature Teachers on the Curriculum of Turkish Literature Course Based on the Constructivist Learning Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epcacan, Cahit

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to collect the opinions of Turkish Language and Literature teachers at secondary schools about the Curriculum of the Turkish Literature Course based on the constructivist learning theory. To this end, the descriptive method was employed to collect teacher opinions. Structured interview was used as a data…

  4. Developing "Reflective" Development Practitioners through an Action-Learning Curriculum: Problems and Challenges in a South African Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckett, S.; Luckett, K.

    1999-01-01

    A South African university's community development program attempted to integrate Checkland's soft-systems method into Kolb's learning-cycle theory. Evaluation revealed shortcomings in the curriculum design, including the assumption of learner autonomy, necessity of assessing students individually, and difficulty of allowing learners to construct…

  5. Curriculum Issues in the Relationship between Language, Culture and Learning: The Case of Food and Beverage Management Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, John; Tse, Peter S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Hotel management students in Hong Kong (n=65) reported that foundation courses were essential to their careers, but 61% had problems understanding the curriculum. Causes were cultural differences in food styles and/or the fact that most Cantonese-speaking students were learning in their second language (English) and most of the multicultural…

  6. Commentary on "Lessons Learned from Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum in an Elementary School"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This commentary responds to "Lessons Learned From Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum in an Elementary School," E. L. Sportsman, J. S. Carlson, and K. M. Guthrie's (2010/this issue) account of an anger control intervention's implementation and effectiveness in an elementary school setting. The accompanying article…

  7. Evaluating Executive Strategies (Management Strategies and Teaching-Learning Strategies) of Graduate Curriculum: Case Study in Isfahan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanpour, Muhammad; Ahmadi, Mojtaba; Hatami, Mostafa; Mirzaee, Hamzeh

    2017-01-01

    The present study seeks to evaluate executive strategies in graduate Curriculum of Isfahan University from the point of view of management and teaching-learning strategies. This study is an applied survey. The population comprised BA students and faculty members of the University of Isfahan. In order to do so, 141 professors and 278 students were…

  8. Definition and Analysis of a System for the Automated Comparison of Curriculum Sequencing Algorithms in Adaptive Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongelli, Carla; Sciarrone, Filippo; Temperini, Marco; Vaste, Giulia

    2011-01-01

    LS-Lab provides automatic support to comparison/evaluation of the Learning Object Sequences produced by different Curriculum Sequencing Algorithms. Through this framework a teacher can verify the correspondence between the behaviour of different sequencing algorithms and her pedagogical preferences. In fact the teacher can compare algorithms…

  9. Mathematical Communication Ability by Grade VII Students Using a Themed Problem Based Learning with Scaffolding on Rectangle Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didik Adi Saputro

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of research to test students' mathematical communication used themed of PBL with scaffolding, themed of PBL and PBL achieve mastery learning;to test students' mathematical communication that used the themed of PBL with scaffolding, themed of PBL and PBL; and to test students' mathematical communication for the low, medium group, and a high-group themed of PBL with scaffolding, themed of PBL and PBL. This type of research is quantitative research. The Population is seventh grade students of SMPN 22 Semarang and the sample class VII E, F and VII VII G. Used normality test, homogenity test, equality test on average, the proportion of one-party test, one way anova test, and scheffe test. The results showed that (1 Student’s mathematical communication ability using themed of PBLwith Scaffolding strategy,themed of PBL, and PBL achieve the completeness of learning, (2 there is a difference in the classroom using the themed of PBL with scaffolding, themed of PBL, as well as PBL, (3 For the low, medium, high and there is a difference in the classroom using the themed of PBL with scaffolding, themed of PBL and PBL.

  10. Application of Ausubel's Theory of Meaningful Verbal Learning to Curriculum, Teaching and Learning of Deaf Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biser, Eileen

    Implications of D. Ausubel's Theory of Meaningful Verbal Learning and its derivative, the Advance Organizer Model of Teaching, for deaf students are examined. Ausubel believes that complex intellectual processes (thinking, language, problem-solving, concept formation) are the major aspects of learning, and that primary emphasis should be placed on…

  11. Enhancing Higher Order Thinking Skills In A Marine Biology Class Through Problem-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Magsino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to examine students' perspectives of their learning in marine biology in the collaborative group context of Problem-based Learning (PBL. Students’ higher order thinking skills (HOTS using PBL involves the development of their logical thinking and reasoning abilities which stimulates their curiosity and associative thinking. This study aimed to investigate how critical thinking skills, particularly analysis, synthesis and evaluation were enhanced in a marine biology class through PBL. Qualitative research approach was used to examine student responses in a questionnaire involving 10 open-ended questions that target students’ HOTS on a problem presented in a marine biology class for BS Biology students. Using axial coding as a qualitative data analysis technique by which grounded theory can be performed, the study was able to determine how students manifest their higher reasoning abilities when confronted with a marine biology situation. Results show student responses yielding affirmative remarks on the 10 questions intended to know their level of analysis (e.g., analyzing, classifying, inferring, discriminating and relating or connecting, synthesis (e.g., synthesizing and collaborating, and evaluation (e.g., comparing, criticizing, and convincing of information from the presented marine biology problem. Consequently, students were able to effectively design experiments to address the presented issue through problem-based learning. Results of the study show that PBL is an efficient instructional strategy embedded within a conventional curriculum used to develop or enhance critical thinking in marine biology.

  12. Integrating neuroscience in the training of psychiatrists: a patient-centered didactic curriculum based on adult learning principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David A; Rohrbaugh, Robert

    2014-04-01

    The authors describe the development and implementation of a new adult psychiatry residency didactic curriculum based on adult learning principles and an integrative, patient-centered approach that includes a progressive 4-year neuroscience curriculum. The authors describe the process of conducting a needs assessment, engaging stakeholders and developing guiding principles for the new curriculum. The curriculum was evaluated using qualitative measures, a resident survey, course evaluations, and a pilot version of a specialized assessment tool. Feedback from the resident survey and from course evaluations was positive, and residents indicated interest in receiving additional training in neuroscience. Residents self-reported not incorporating neuroscience into formulation and treatment planning as often as other perspectives. They also reported that neuroscience was reinforced less by clinical faculty than other perspectives. Performance on the curriculum assessment corroborated that clinical application of neuroscience may benefit from additional reinforcement. Residents responded well to the design and content of the new didactic curriculum. The neuroscience component appears to have achieved its primary objective of enhancing attitudes to the field. Continued work including enhancing the culture of neuroscience at the clinical sites may be required to achieve broader behavioral goals.

  13. Online learning in a dermatology clerkship: piloting the new American Academy of Dermatology Medical Student Core Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Sarah D; Dybbro, Eric; Boscardin, Christy K; Shinkai, Kanade; Berger, Timothy G

    2013-08-01

    Multiple studies have shown that both current and future primary care providers have insufficient education and training in dermatology. To address the limitations and wide variability in medical student dermatology instruction, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) created a standardized, online curriculum for both dermatology learners and educators. We sought to determine the impact of the integration of the AAD online curriculum into a 2-week introductory dermatology clerkship for fourth-year medical students. In addition to their clinical duties, we assigned 18 online modules at a rate of 1 to 3 per day. We evaluated knowledge acquisition using a 50-item, multiple-choice pretest and posttest. Postmodule and end-of-course questionnaires contained both closed and open-ended items soliciting students' perceptions about usability and satisfaction. All 51 participants significantly improved in their dermatology knowledge (P dermatology clerkship. Without a control group who did not experience the online curriculum, we are unable to isolate the specific impact of the online modules on students' learning. This study demonstrates the successful integration of this educational resource into a 2-week, university-based dermatology clerkship. Students' perceptions regarding usability and satisfaction were overwhelmingly positive, suggesting that the online curriculum is highly acceptable to learners. Widespread use of this curriculum may be a significant advancement in standardized dermatology learning for medical students. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Teaching and Learning in Chemical Product Engineering - an Evolving par of the Chemical Engineering Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigild, Martin Etchells; Kiil, Søren; Wesselingh, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decade Chemical Product Engineering has evolved as part of the Chemical Engineering Curriculum at several universities in Europe and America. At the DTU Chemical Product Engineering was introduced in 2000. This presentation will report on the experiences gained from teaching classes...... and preparing a text book on the subject. [1] Chemical Product Engineering is solidly based on chemical technical and engineering knowledge. Furthermore, the subject naturally calls for a holistic approach to teaching and learning and introduces elements which target transferable and professional engineering...... skills. Such skills are important in Chemical Product Engineering when dealing with open-ended problems, creative problem solutions, operating in a team working environment and exercising project management. In our course we emphasise team activites, formative feed back to the students as well as helping...

  15. Promoting active learning of graduate student by deep reading in biochemistry and microbiology pharmacy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ren

    2017-07-08

    To promote graduate students' active learning, deep reading of high quality papers was done by graduate students enrolled in biochemistry and microbiology pharmacy curriculum offered by college of life science, Jiangxi Normal University from 2013 to 2015. The number of graduate students, who participated in the course in 2013, 2014, and 2015 were eleven, thirteen and fifteen, respectively. Through deep reading of papers, presentation, and group discussion in the lecture, these graduate students have improved their academic performances effectively, such as literature search, PPT document production, presentation management, specialty document reading, academic inquiry, and analytical and comprehensive ability. The graduate students also have increased their understanding level of frontier research, scientific research methods, and experimental methods. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(4):305-312, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  16. Code to Learn: Where Does It Belong in the K-12 Curriculum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Moreno León

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of computer programming in K-12 has become mainstream in the last years, as countries around the world are making coding part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical studies that investigate how learning to program at an early age affects other school subjects. In this regard, this paper compares three quasi-experimental research designs conducted in three different schools (n=129 students from 2nd and 6th grade, in order to assess the impact of introducing programming with Scratch at different stages and in several subjects. While both 6th grade experimental groups working with coding activities showed a statistically significant improvement in terms of academic performance, this was not the case in the 2nd grade classroom. Notable disparity was also found regarding the subject in which the programming activities were included, as in social studies the effect size was double that in mathematics.

  17. Ethical violations in the clinical setting: the hidden curriculum learning experience of Pakistani nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafree, Sara Rizvi; Zakar, Rubeena; Fischer, Florian; Zakar, Muhammad Zakria

    2015-03-19

    The importance of the hidden curriculum is recognised as a practical training ground for the absorption of medical ethics by healthcare professionals. Pakistan's healthcare sector is hampered by the exclusion of ethics from medical and nursing education curricula and the absence of monitoring of ethical violations in the clinical setting. Nurses have significant knowledge of the hidden curriculum taught during clinical practice, due to long working hours in the clinic and front-line interaction with patients and other practitioners. The means of inquiry for this study was qualitative, with 20 interviews and four focus group discussions used to identify nurses' clinical experiences of ethical violations. Content analysis was used to discover sub-categories of ethical violations, as perceived by nurses, within four pre-defined categories of nursing codes of ethics: 1) professional guidelines and integrity, 2) patient informed consent, 3) patient rights, and 4) co-worker coordination for competency, learning and patient safety. Ten sub-categories of ethical violations were found: nursing students being used as adjunct staff, nurses having to face frequent violence in the hospital setting, patient reluctance to receive treatment from nurses, the near-absence of consent taken from patients for most non-surgical medical procedures, the absence of patient consent taking for receiving treatment from student nurses, the practice of patient discrimination on the basis of a patient's socio-demographic status, nurses withdrawing treatment out of fear for their safety, a non-learning culture and, finally, blame-shifting and non-reportage of errors. Immediate and urgent attention is required to reduce ethical violations in the healthcare sector in Pakistan through collaborative efforts by the government, the healthcare sector, and ethics regulatory bodies. Also, changes in socio-cultural values in hospital organisation, public awareness of how to conveniently report ethical

  18. A Comparison between the Effectiveness of PBL and LBL on Improving Problem-Solving Abilities of Medical Students Using Questioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yunfeng; Du, Xiangyun; Toft, Egon; Zhang, Xingli; Qu, Bo; Shi, Jiannong; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Hui

    2018-01-01

    In daily patient-history taking and diagnosis practice, doctors ask questions to gather information from patients and narrow down diagnostic hypotheses. Training medical students to be efficient problem solvers through the use of questioning is therefore important. In this study, the effectiveness of problem-based learning (PBL) and lecture-based…

  19. Personal skills and abilities in curriculum development planning for Project Oriented and Problem-Based Learning (POPBL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby, Egon

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author is giving examples on an approach to include the personal competences in the initial phase of the planning process for a change towards project organized and problem-based learning ? POPBL. A model is presented on how to have trainees recognize the necessity to include...... professional competences as well as personal competences in a new POPBL based curriculum. The article continues by giving an example of a possible method to be used in the developing of a curriculum where the personal skills and abilities are an active and equally valued as the development of the students...

  20. An analysis of the implementation of problem-based learning at the Department of Energy Technology – Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da

    2016-01-01

    increases students’ motivation and improves their performance resulting in better grades when comparing with traditional teaching methods. Engineering curriculums at AAU are organised in projects (i.e. problem-based) and courses (i.e. lecture-based). However, there are no systematic studies evaluating how...... well students do in projects and courses, and their perceptions on the respective assessments. This paper evaluates the AAU PBL model, based on a statistical analysis of the grades obtained by students from the department of Energy Technology, together with answers given by these students in an online....... A possible area for curriculum improvement, consisting in changing the project content at the first years of bachelor, is also evaluated. The results show that the projects have consistently higher grades than courses and a lower failure rate. The students agree that PBL improves the learning of technical...

  1. Learning of social studies in elementary school as a medium to strengthen multicultural education in the curriculum era 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Yulfia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The writing of this article aims to describe the learning of social studies in elementary schools as a medium to strengthen multicultural education in the era of the curriculum 2013. Writing methods used are qualitative descriptions and literature studies. Social studiesis one of the subjects found in the basic education curriculum.Social studies essentially examines human relationships with the environment. The environment in question here is one of the ethnic, religious, racial, ethnic and linguistic diversity in Indonesian. Become, the context of social studies learning is multicultural education.Multicultural education is a process of developing human potential that values heterogeneity as a consequence of diversity based on the principle of equality, mutual respect, and mutual acceptance and understanding of the moral commitment to bring about social justice. But in fact, social studies learning has not been applied as a medium of multicultural education.Therefore, through the implementation of curriculum 2013 Social studies subjects as a medium to strengthen multicultural education.This is because the implementation of the 2013 curriculum is oriented towards the formation and development of learners' character in diversity.

  2. Appreciation of a constructivist curriculum for learning theoretical knowledge by social work students with different kinds and levels of learning motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bommel, Marijke; Boshuizen, Els; Kwakman, Kitty

    2018-01-01

    Social work students differ largely in their appreciation of a constructivist curriculum that leaves ample room for student's self-directed learning and allows them to place their own emphasises. This study showed that students' motivational differences and need for cognition affected students'

  3. Primary exploration of the application of case based learning method in clinical probation teaching of the integrated curriculum of hematology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-zhen XU; Ye-fei WANG; Yan WANG; Shu CHENG; Yi-qun HU; Lei DING

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the application and the effect of the case based learning(CBL)method in clinical probation teaching of the integrated curriculum of hematology among eight-year-program medical students.Methods The CBL method was applied to the experimental group,and the traditional approach for the control group.After the lecture,a questionnaire survey was conducted to evaluate the teaching effect in the two groups.Results The CBL method efficiently increased the students’interest in learning and autonomous learning ability,enhanced their ability to solve clinical problems with basic theoretic knowledge and cultivated their clinical thinking ability.Conclusion The CBL method can improve the quality of clinical probation teaching of the integrated curriculum of hematology among eight-year-program medical students.

  4. Using Problem-Based Learning in Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the process of writing a problem-based learning (PBL) problem and shows how a typical end-of-chapter accounting problem can be converted to a PBL problem. PBL uses complex, real-world problems to motivate students to identify and research the concepts and principles they need to know to solve these problems.…

  5. A Curriculum Development Route Map for a Technology Enhanced Learning Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Linda; Prendes, Paz

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we are trying to present a model of analysis that includes a comprehensive perspective of the state of the art in the specialized literature about curriculum development. From this theoretical approach, we get a complete curriculum overview. Including insights into: what are the curriculum principal elements, what we already know…

  6. Impact of an engineering design-based curriculum compared to an inquiry-based curriculum on fifth graders' content learning of simple machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marulcu, Ismail; Barnett, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elementary Science Education is struggling with multiple challenges. National and State test results confirm the need for deeper understanding in elementary science education. Moreover, national policy statements and researchers call for increased exposure to engineering and technology in elementary science education. The basic motivation of this study is to suggest a solution to both improving elementary science education and increasing exposure to engineering and technology in it. Purpose/Hypothesis: This mixed-method study examined the impact of an engineering design-based curriculum compared to an inquiry-based curriculum on fifth graders' content learning of simple machines. We hypothesize that the LEGO-engineering design unit is as successful as the inquiry-based unit in terms of students' science content learning of simple machines. Design/Method: We used a mixed-methods approach to investigate our research questions; we compared the control and the experimental groups' scores from the tests and interviews by using Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) and compared each group's pre- and post-scores by using paired t-tests. Results: Our findings from the paired t-tests show that both the experimental and comparison groups significantly improved their scores from the pre-test to post-test on the multiple-choice, open-ended, and interview items. Moreover, ANCOVA results show that students in the experimental group, who learned simple machines with the design-based unit, performed significantly better on the interview questions. Conclusions: Our analyses revealed that the design-based Design a people mover: Simple machines unit was, if not better, as successful as the inquiry-based FOSS Levers and pulleys unit in terms of students' science content learning.

  7. Inquiry in early years science teaching and learning: Curriculum design and the scientific story

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Barbara Alexander

    2001-07-01

    Inquiry in school science, as conceived by the authors of the Common Framework of Science Learning Outcomes K--12, is dependent upon four areas of skills. These are the skills of initiating and planning, performing and recording, analysing and interpreting, and communication and teamwork that map onto what Hodson calls the five phases of scientific inquiry in school science: initiation, design and planning, performance, interpretation, and reporting and communicating. This study looked at initiation in a multiage (Grades 1--3) classroom, and the curriculum, design tools, and inquiry acts believed to be necessary precursors of design and planning phases whether the inquiry in which young children engage is archival or laboratory investigation. The curriculum was designed to build upon children's everyday biological knowledge and through a series of carefully organized lessons to help them to begin to build scientifically valid conceptual models in the area of animal life cycles. The lessons began with what is called benchmark-invention after the historical work of Robert Karplus and the contemporary work of Earl Hunt and Jim Minstrell. The introduction of a biological concept was followed by a series of exploration activities in which children were encouraged to apply the concept invented in the benchmark lesson. Enlargement followed. This was the instructional phase in which children were helped to establish scientifically valid relationships between the invented concept and other biological concepts. The pre-instruction and post-instruction interview data suggest that the enacted curriculum and sequence in which the biological knowledge was presented helped the nineteen children in the study to recognize the connections and regularities within the life cycles of the major groupings of animals, and to begin to build scientific biological conceptual models. It is, however, argued that everyday biology, in the form of the person analogy, acts as an obstacle to

  8. Learning through debate during problem-based learning: an active learning strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, Sadaf; Latif, Rabia

    2017-09-01

    We explored medical student's views and perceptions of a series of debates conducted during problem-based learning (PBL) practiced as a part of the Spiral curriculum at the Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Saudi Arabia. A series of debates were employed during PBL sessions for second-year female medical students, over the period 2014-2016. Each cohort of students was randomly split into 10 small PBL groups and exposed to weekly PBL activity. Within each group, the students were divided into a proposition half and an opposition half. Students were given 1 wk for debate preparation. The students' responses were recorded on a formulated questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze quantitative data, and results are presented as percentages. The usefulness of debate in alleviating potential difficulties in communicating with patients was agreed to by 69% ( n = 126) of participants. That these sessions evoked critical thinking among students was reported by 78% ( n = 142). This series of debates helped 61% ( n = 111) of students to learn effectively about controversial issues. Seventy-one percent ( n = 130) considered that debate promoted argument generation and interpretation skills. Enhanced ability to analyze and research evidence was reported by 59% ( n = 108) of students. One hundred and thirteen students (62%) agreed that debate helped them to improve clinical decision-making, and 75% of students agreed that debates encouraged tolerance toward diverse viewpoints/convincing strategies. The majority of our medical students found debating enhanced analytic decision-making, communication, and critical thinking skills. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Jumping In: Redefining Teaching and Learning in Physical Education through Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Jaime; Hollas, Tori; Potter, Jalene P.

    2016-01-01

    Project-based learning (PBL) is an inquiry-based instructional approach that allows students to gain knowledge and skills by investigating and respond to engaging, complex problems or challenges. For some, PBL may seem like an unnatural fit in PE classrooms. However, this article describes how, with careful and creative planning, PBL can easily…

  10. The role of the curriculum and other factors in determining the medium- to long-term attitude of the practicing dentist towards life-long learning.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Polyzois, I

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the significance of the undergraduate dental curriculum on the medium- to long-term attitudes of the clinician to life-long learning, and to identify demographical and professional characteristics which may influence this attitude.

  11. Teaching and learning curriculum programs: recommendations for postgraduate pharmacy experiences in education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Eric A; Brown, Bonnie; Gettig, Jacob; Martello, Jay L; McClendon, Katie S; Smith, Kelly M; Teeters, Janet; Ulbrich, Timothy R; Wegrzyn, Nicole; Bradley-Baker, Lynette R

    2014-08-01

    Recommendations for the development and support of teaching and learning curriculum (TLC) experiences within postgraduate pharmacy training programs are discussed. Recent attention has turned toward meeting teaching- and learning-related educational outcomes through a programmatic process during the first or second year of postgraduate education. These programs are usually coordinated by schools and colleges of pharmacy and often referred to as "teaching certificate programs," though no national standards or regulation of these programs currently exists. In an effort to describe the landscape of these programs and to develop a framework for their basic design and content, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Pharmacy Practice Section's Task Force on Student Engagement and Involvement, with input from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, reviewed evidence from the literature and conference proceedings and considered author experience and expertise over a two-year period. The members of the task force created and reached consensus on a policy statement and 12 recommendations to guide the development of best practices of TLC programs. The recommendations address topics such as the value of TLC programs, program content, teaching and learning experiences, feedback for participants, the development of a teaching portfolio, the provision of adequate resources for TLC programs, programmatic assessment and improvement, program transparency, and accreditation. TLC programs provide postgraduate participants with valuable knowledge and skills in teaching applicable to the practitioner and academician. Postgraduate programs should be transparent to candidates and seek to ensure the best experiences for participants through systematic program implementation and assessments. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Developing an evidence-based curriculum designed to help psychiatric nurses learn to use computers and the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta; Jakobsson, Tiina; Pitkänen, Anneli

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the systematic process in which an evidence-based approach was used to develop a curriculum designed to support the computer and Internet skills of nurses in psychiatric hospitals in Finland. The pressure on organizations to have skilled and motivated nurses who use modern information and communication technology in health care organizations has increased due to rapid technology development at the international and national levels. However, less frequently has the development of those computer education curricula been based on evidence-based knowledge. First, we identified psychiatric nurses' learning experiences and barriers to computer use by examining written essays. Second, nurses' computer skills were surveyed. Last, evidence from the literature was scrutinized to find effective methods that can be used to teach and learn computer use in health care. This information was integrated and used for the development process of an education curriculum designed to support nurses' computer and Internet skills.

  13. A Model of Small-Group Problem-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education: Teaching in the Clinical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumsikiew, Jeerisuda; Donsamak, Sisira; Saeteaw, Manit

    2015-01-01

    Problem-based Learning (PBL) is an alternate method of instruction that incorporates basic elements of cognitive learning theory. Colleges of pharmacy use PBL to aid anticipated learning outcomes and practice competencies for pharmacy student. The purpose of this study were to implement and evaluate a model of small group PBL for 5th year pharmacy…

  14. Problem-Based Learning: An Overview of its Process and Impact on Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine H.J. Yew

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we provide an overview of the process of problem-based learning (PBL and the studies examining the effectiveness of PBL. We also discuss a number of naturalistic and empirical studies that have examined the process of PBL and how its various components impact students’ learning. We conclude that the studies comparing the relative effectiveness of PBL are generally consistent in demonstrating its superior efficacy for longer-term knowledge retention and in the application of knowledge. Studies on the process of PBL, however, are still inconclusive as to which component(s of PBL most significantly impact students’ learning, although causal studies have demonstrated that all the phases of PBL are necessary in influencing students’ learning outcomes.

  15. LAND-MAN: a new curriculum based on open distance learning for Asian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadagno, F. M.; Dhital, M. R.; Petley, D.

    2003-04-01

    Land-Man is a one-year Asian-European partnership project (Asia-Link EU programme), aiming to implement both a new curriculum and a new distance learning model in the field of landslides management which deals with situations that occur prior to, during, and after the landslide. The emphasis in Land-Man is placed on establishing methodologies, guidelines, and tools to develop Open and Distance Learning (ODL) for the future improvement and harmonisation of education in Landslides Management. Decision-makers, postgraduate students in environmental, earth and engineering disciplines, as well as professionals may benefit from the project. During the implementation of activities, the clear intention is to use internet-based tools in order to strengthen the co-operation between partners and thus lay a stable, cross-cultural, internet-oriented foundation for the future ODL-based educational model. At the end of the project, an ODL-based model for Asian-European Landslides Management Education will be designed and based on specially assembled, multimedia products. In particular, the project aims to provide tutors/professors with training by supplying them with appropriate materials and support to enable them to change to the new teaching model and by focusing on assessment of training, self-esteem, comfort level, commitment, and enthusiasm for tutors. The project also aims to nurture positive attitudes towards distance learning by changing the techniques whereby students learn landslides management, using the latest educational strategies and technology. Although the management of territory is the responsibility of national and local authorities, personnel in these departments can have limited training and experience in natural hazard and, particularly, in landslides management plans. This project will not only hypothesise, through a new curriculum, how management planning can be undertaken, but will also consider how to bring together practitioners and decision makers

  16. A Vertically Integrated Online Radiology Curriculum Developed as a Cognitive Apprenticeship: Impact on Student Performance and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim-Dunham, Jennifer E; Ensminger, David C; McNulty, John A; Hoyt, Amy E; Chandrasekhar, Arcot J

    2016-02-01

    The principles of Collins' cognitive apprenticeship model were used to design a radiology curriculum in which medical students practice radiological skills using online case-based modules. The modules are embedded within clinical third-year clerkships, and students are provided with personalized feedback from the instructors. We describe the development of the vertical online radiology curriculum and evaluate its impact on student achievement and learning process using a mixed method approach. The curriculum was developed over a 2-year period. Student participation was voluntary in the first year and mandatory in the second year. For quantitative curriculum evaluation, student metrics for voluntary versus mandatory groups were assessed using independent sample t tests and variable entry method regression analysis. For qualitative analysis, responses from a survey of students about the value of the curriculum were organized into defined themes using consensus coding. Mandatory participation significantly improved (p = .001) the mean radiology examination score (82 %) compared to the voluntary group (73%), suggesting that mandatory participation had a beneficial effect on student performance. Potential preexisting differences in underlying general academic performance were accounted for by including mean basic science grades as the first variable in the regression model. The significant increase in R(2) from .16 to .28 when number of radiology cases completed was added to the original model, and the greater value of the standardized beta for this variable, suggest that the curriculum made a significant contribution to students' radiology examination scores beyond their baseline academic performance. Five dominant themes about curricular characteristics that enhanced student learning and beneficial outcomes emerged from consensus coding. These themes were (1) self-paced design, (2) receiving feedback from faculty, (3) clinical relevance of cases, (4) gaining

  17. A Curriculum Development for the Enhancement of Learning Management Performances Emphasizing Higher Order Thinking Skills for Lower Secondary Science Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saksit Seeluangpetch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at 1 investigating the problems and needs for the enhancement of learning management performances emphasizing the higher order thinking skills for lower secondary Science teachers, 2 developing an effective curriculum to enhance the learning management performances which emphasized the higher order thinking skills for lower secondary Science teachers, and 3 studying the effects of using the curriculum developed for the enhancement of learning management performances emphasizing the higher order thinking skills for lower secondary Science teachers. The research was conducted in 4 phases. Phase 1 of the research was the study of fundamental information regarding problems and needs for the enhancement of learning management performances emphasizing the higher order thinking skills for lower secondary Science teachers. It was carried out by studying the related literature and exploring the needs. The instrument used in Phase 1 study was the needs assessment. The statistics used for data analysis were mean ( , percentage (%, and standard deviation (S.D.. The result of the study revealed that the Science teachers’ prior knowledge was at low level and the need to enhance their performances was at high level. The development of the curriculum was carried out in Phase 2 of the study. The curriculum was constructed and developed in order to enhance the learning management performances which emphasized the higher order thinking skills. The instrument used was the appropriateness the assessment of the curriculum framework. Mean ( , percentage (%, and standard deviation (S.D. were used to analyze the data. The result of the assessment showed that the overall appropriateness of the curriculum was at high level. The main components of the curriculum comprised of curriculum’s problem and necessity, rationale, objective, structure, training activity, training media, training duration, and evaluation and assessment. The curriculum trial was

  18. If PBL is the answer, then what is the problem?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huttel, Hans; Gnaur, Dorina

    2017-01-01

    of project work in the undergraduate degree programme in computer science at Aalborg University. Danish PBL-based higher education institutions espouse the qualities of problembased projects but actual practice shows a different picture. The predominant use of project catalogues and the formal requirements...... ways of structuring problem-based project work in different settings. We identify the need for a further discussion of the conflict between the espoused ideals of PBL and the actual practice at PBL-based higher education. In particular, much greater attention should be devoted to the practice...... of semester coordination. This paper gives a critical analysis of the practice in PBL-based higher education and should be of value to practitioners and decision makers in these settings....

  19. Pharmacotherapeutic education through problem based learning and its impact on cognitive and motivational attitude of Indian students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, D; Sharma, S; Sethi, G; Dkhar, S

    1996-01-01

    The cognitive and motivational attitudes to problem based learning (i.e., simple didactic problem stated in written form and Programmed Patient) has been compared with those to didactic lectures (DL), the traditional teaching method. The change in recall performance measured in MCQ tests was considered as a change in the cognitive domain. The first test was conducted one week after completion of the topic and second test was taken 3 months later, without prior information. The motivational change was recorded by open-ended questions about the learning method. Three groups of students at second MBBS professional year level consisting of 55, 57 and 59 people, were assigned a simple didactic problem stated in written form (SDP), programmed patients (PP), and didactic lecture (DL), respectively. The average scores obtained by the learners in problem based learning (PBL) groups were similar to the students in the DL group in both the tests. Most of the students in PBL groups appreciated the exercise and suggested including more such exercises in the curriculum. These exercises helped them to better understand patient problems and prescribing behaviour as well as in development of communication skills. However, these exercises were time consuming and were not examination oriented. Pharmacotherapeutic teaching through PBL could be used within a traditional curriculum to develop relevant and rational use of drugs, provided the evaluation method was also modified.

  20. Homelessness in the Medical Curriculum: An Analysis of Case-Based Learning Content From One Canadian Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Matthew J; MacLeod, Anna; Hwang, Stephen W

    2016-01-01

    PHENOMENON: Homelessness is a major public health concern. Given that homeless individuals have high rates of mortality and morbidity, are more likely to be users of the healthcare system, and often report unmet health needs, it is important to examine how homelessness is addressed in medical education. We wanted to examine content and framing of issues related to homelessness in the case-based learning (CBL) curriculum and provide insights about whether medical students are being adequately trained to meet the health needs of homeless individuals through CBL. CBL content at a Canadian medical school that featured content related to homelessness was analyzed. Data were extracted from cases for the following variables: curriculum unit (e.g., professionalism/ethics curriculum or biomedical/clinical curriculum), patient characteristics (e.g., age, sex), and medical and social conditions. A thematic analysis was performed on cases related to homelessness. Discrepancies in analysis were resolved by consensus. Homelessness was mentioned in five (2.6%) of 191 CBL cases in the medical curriculum. Homelessness was significantly more likely to be featured in professionalism/ethics cases than in biomedical/clinical cases (p = .03). Homeless patients were portrayed as socially disadvantaged individuals, and medical learners were prompted to discuss ethical issues related to homeless patients in cases. However, homeless individuals were largely voiceless in cases. Homelessness was associated with serious physical and mental health concerns, but students were rarely prompted to address these concerns. Insights: The health and social needs of homeless individuals are often overlooked in CBL cases in the medical curriculum. Moreover, stereotypes of homelessness may be reinforced through medical training. There are opportunities for growth in addressing the needs of homeless individuals through medical education.