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Sample records for learning environment enhanced

  1. Enhancing the Learning Environment by Learning all the Students' Names

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms

    the method to learn all the students' names enhances the learning environment substantially.  ReferencesCranton, Patricia (2001) Becoming an authentic teacher in higher education. Malabar, Florida: Krieger Pub. Co.Wiberg, Merete (2011): Personal email communication June 22, 2011.Woodhead, M. M. and Baddeley......Short abstract This paper describes how the teaching environment can be enhanced significantly by a simple method: learning the names of all the students. The method is time-efficient: In a course with 33 students I used 65 minutes in total. My own view of the effect was confirmed in a small study......: The students felt more valued, secure and respected. They also made an effort to learn each other's names. Long abstract In high school teachers know the students' names very soon - anything else is unthinkable (Wiberg, 2011). Not so in universities where knowing the names of all the students is the exception...

  2. Peer Learning in Social Media Enhanced Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Maritta Tervakari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available TUT Circle, a dedicated social media service for students at Tampere University of Technology (TUT, was used as a learning environment for the purpose of enhancing students‘ collaboration, communication and networking skills required in business and working life and for promoting peer learning in small groups. Unfortunately, active conversation was limited. The students intensively read content created by other students, but they did not actively present their opinions, arguments or comments. Another reason for the lack of real conversation was procrastination. The students seemed to need more encouragement to comment on or question the ideas of others, more support to promote intergroup interaction and more assistance with time management.

  3. Enhancing Learning within the 3-D Virtual Learning Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Shirin Shafieiyoun; Akbar Moazen Safaei

    2013-01-01

    Today’s using of virtual learning environments becomes more remarkable in education. The potential of virtual learning environments has frequently been related to the expansion of sense of social presence which is obtained from students and educators. This study investigated the effectiveness of social presence within virtual learning environments and analysed the impact of social presence on increasing learning satisfaction within virtual learning environments. Second Life, as an example of ...

  4. Distributed Scaffolding: Synergy in Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustunel, Hale H.; Tokel, Saniye Tugba

    2018-01-01

    When technology is employed challenges increase in learning environments. Kim et al. ("Sci Educ" 91(6):1010-1030, 2007) presented a pedagogical framework that provides a valid technology-enhanced learning environment. The purpose of the present design-based study was to investigate the micro context dimension of this framework and to…

  5. TELMA: Technology-enhanced learning environment for minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-González, Patricia; Burgos, Daniel; Oropesa, Ignacio; Romero, Vicente; Albacete, Antonio; Sánchez-Peralta, Luisa F; Noguera, José F; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M; Gómez, Enrique J

    2013-06-01

    Cognitive skills training for minimally invasive surgery has traditionally relied upon diverse tools, such as seminars or lectures. Web technologies for e-learning have been adopted to provide ubiquitous training and serve as structured repositories for the vast amount of laparoscopic video sources available. However, these technologies fail to offer such features as formative and summative evaluation, guided learning, or collaborative interaction between users. The "TELMA" environment is presented as a new technology-enhanced learning platform that increases the user's experience using a four-pillared architecture: (1) an authoring tool for the creation of didactic contents; (2) a learning content and knowledge management system that incorporates a modular and scalable system to capture, catalogue, search, and retrieve multimedia content; (3) an evaluation module that provides learning feedback to users; and (4) a professional network for collaborative learning between users. Face validation of the environment and the authoring tool are presented. Face validation of TELMA reveals the positive perception of surgeons regarding the implementation of TELMA and their willingness to use it as a cognitive skills training tool. Preliminary validation data also reflect the importance of providing an easy-to-use, functional authoring tool to create didactic content. The TELMA environment is currently installed and used at the Jesús Usón Minimally Invasive Surgery Centre and several other Spanish hospitals. Face validation results ascertain the acceptance and usefulness of this new minimally invasive surgery training environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Guiding Curriculum Development: Student Perceptions for the Second Language Learning in Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürleyik, Sinan; Akdemir, Elif

    2018-01-01

    Developing curriculum to enhance student learning is the primer purpose of all curricular activities. Availability of recent tools supporting to teach various skills including reading, listening, speaking and writing has opened a new avenue for curricular activities in technology-enhanced learning environments. Understanding the perceptions of…

  7. Memory Transformation Enhances Reinforcement Learning in Dynamic Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Adam; Frankland, Paul W; Richards, Blake A

    2016-11-30

    Over the course of systems consolidation, there is a switch from a reliance on detailed episodic memories to generalized schematic memories. This switch is sometimes referred to as "memory transformation." Here we demonstrate a previously unappreciated benefit of memory transformation, namely, its ability to enhance reinforcement learning in a dynamic environment. We developed a neural network that is trained to find rewards in a foraging task where reward locations are continuously changing. The network can use memories for specific locations (episodic memories) and statistical patterns of locations (schematic memories) to guide its search. We find that switching from an episodic to a schematic strategy over time leads to enhanced performance due to the tendency for the reward location to be highly correlated with itself in the short-term, but regress to a stable distribution in the long-term. We also show that the statistics of the environment determine the optimal utilization of both types of memory. Our work recasts the theoretical question of why memory transformation occurs, shifting the focus from the avoidance of memory interference toward the enhancement of reinforcement learning across multiple timescales. As time passes, memories transform from a highly detailed state to a more gist-like state, in a process called "memory transformation." Theories of memory transformation speak to its advantages in terms of reducing memory interference, increasing memory robustness, and building models of the environment. However, the role of memory transformation from the perspective of an agent that continuously acts and receives reward in its environment is not well explored. In this work, we demonstrate a view of memory transformation that defines it as a way of optimizing behavior across multiple timescales. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/3612228-15$15.00/0.

  8. Assuring Best Practice in Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppell, Mike; Suddaby, Gordon; Hard, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    This paper documents the development and findings of the Good Practice Report on Technology-Enhanced Learning and Teaching funded by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC). Developing the Good Practice Report required a meta-analysis of 33 ALTC learning and teaching projects relating to technology funded between 2006 and 2010. This…

  9. Theoretical Foundations for Enhancing Social Connectedness in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagter van Tryon, Patricia J.; Bishop, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Group social structure provides a comfortable and predictable context for interaction in learning environments. Students in face-to-face learning environments process social information about others in order to assess traits, predict behaviors, and determine qualifications for assuming particular responsibilities within a group. In online learning…

  10. Animated Pedagogical Agents Effects on Enhancing Student Motivation and Learning in a Science Inquiry Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, Hans; van der Meij, Jan; Harmsen, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the design and testing of a motivational animated pedagogical agent (APA) in an inquiry learning environment on kinematics. The aim of including the APA was to enhance students' perceptions of task relevance and self-efficacy. Given the under-representation of girls in science classrooms, special attention was given to…

  11. Animated pedagogical agents effects on enhancing student motivation and learning in a science inquiry learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meij, Hans; van der Meij, Jan; Harmsen, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the design and testing of a motivational animated pedagogical agent (APA) in an inquiry learning environment on kinematics. The aim of including the APA was to enhance students’ perceptions of task relevance and self-efficacy. Given the under-representation of girls in science

  12. Animated pedagogical agents effects on enhancing student motivation and learning in a science inquiry learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meij, Hans; van der Meij, Jan; Harmsen, Ruth

    This study focuses on the design and testing of a motivational animated pedagogical agent (APA) in an inquiry learning environment on kinematics. The aim of including the APA was to enhance students’ perceptions of task relevance and selfefficacy. Given the under-representation of girls in science

  13. Improvement of Inquiry in a Complex Technology-Enhanced Learning Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedaste, Margus; Kori, Külli; Maeots, Mario; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Riopel, Martin; Smyrnaiou, Zacharoula

    2016-01-01

    Inquiry learning is an effective approach in science education. Complex technology-enhanced learning environments are needed to apply inquiry worldwide to support knowledge gain and improvement of inquiry skills. In our study, we applied an ecology mission in the SCY-Lab learning environment and

  14. Creating Dynamic Learning Environment to Enhance Students’ Engagement in Learning Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyasa

    2017-04-01

    Learning geometry gives many benefits to students. It strengthens the development of deductive thinking and reasoning; it also provides an opportunity to improve visualisation and spatial ability. Some studies, however, have pointed out the difficulties that students encountered when learning geometry. A preliminary study by the author in Bali revealed that one of the main problems was teachers’ difficulties in delivering geometry instruction. It was partly due to the lack of appropriate instructional media. Coupling with dynamic geometry software, dynamic learning environments is a promising solution to this problem. Employing GeoGebra software supported by the well-designed instructional process may result in more meaningful learning, and consequently, students are motivated to engage in the learning process more deeply and actively. In this paper, we provide some examples of GeoGebra-aided learning activities that allow students to interactively explore and investigate geometry concepts and the properties of geometry objects. Thus, it is expected that such learning environment will enhance students’ internalisation process of geometry concepts.

  15. Classroom acoustics and intervention strategies to enhance the learning environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Christal

    The classroom environment can be an acoustically difficult atmosphere for students to learn effectively, sometimes due in part to poor acoustical properties. Noise and reverberation have a substantial influence on room acoustics and subsequently intelligibility of speech. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA, 1995) developed minimal standards for noise and reverberation in a classroom for the purpose of providing an adequate listening environment. A lack of adherence to these standards may have undesirable consequences, which may lead to poor academic performance. The purpose of this capstone project is to develop a protocol to measure the acoustical properties of reverberation time and noise levels in elementary classrooms and present the educators with strategies to improve the learning environment. Noise level and reverberation will be measured and recorded in seven, unoccupied third grade classrooms in Lincoln Parish in North Louisiana. The recordings will occur at six specific distances in the classroom to simulate teacher and student positions. The recordings will be compared to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association standards for noise and reverberation. If discrepancies are observed, the primary investigator will serve as an auditory consultant for the school and educators to recommend remediation and intervention strategies to improve these acoustical properties. The hypothesis of the study is that the classroom acoustical properties of noise and reverberation will exceed the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association standards; therefore, the auditory consultant will provide strategies to improve those acoustical properties.

  16. The role of professional objects in technology-enhanced learning environments in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zitter, I.I.; Bruijn, E. de; Simons, P.R.J.; Cate, Th.J. ten

    2010-01-01

    We study project-based, technology-enhanced learning environments in higher education, which should produce, by means of specific mechanisms, learning outcomes in terms of transferable knowledge and learning-, thinking-, collaboration- and regulation-skills. Our focus is on the role of objects from

  17. Social Web Content Enhancement in a Distance Learning Environment: Intelligent Metadata Generation for Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Floriano, Andrés; Ferreira-Santiago, Angel; Yáñez-Márquez, Cornelio; Camacho-Nieto, Oscar; Aldape-Pérez, Mario; Villuendas-Rey, Yenny

    2017-01-01

    Social networking potentially offers improved distance learning environments by enabling the exchange of resources between learners. The existence of properly classified content results in an enhanced distance learning experience in which appropriate materials can be retrieved efficiently; however, for this to happen, metadata needs to be present.…

  18. Enhancing Student Self-Worth in the Primary School Learning Environment: Teachers' Views and Students' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Penni; Cowan, Jackie

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a study of teachers and students' views regarding self-worth in the primary school learning environment. The revised New Zealand curriculum recognises the importance of self-worth in students' motivation and ability to learn. While the need to enhance self-worth in the classroom has been well established in the…

  19. Community and Social Network Sites as Technology Enhanced Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Christiansen, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the affordance of the Danish social networking site Mingler.dk for peer-to-peer learning and development. With inspiration from different theoretical frameworks, the authors argue how learning and development in such social online systems can be conceptualised and analysed....... Theoretically the paper defines development in accordance with Vygotsky's concept of the zone of proximal development, and learning in accordance with Wenger's concept of communities of practice. The authors suggest analysing the learning and development taking place on Mingler.dk by using these concepts...... supplemented by the notion of horizontal learning adopted from Engestrm and Wenger. Their analysis shows how horizontal learning happens by crossing boundaries between several sites of engagement, and how the actors' multiple membership enables the community members to draw on a vast amount of resources from...

  20. An Enhanced Personal Learning Environment Using Social Semantic Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, Khaled; Seridi-Bouchelaghem, Hassina; Faron-Zucker, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Compared with learning in classrooms, classical e-learning systems are less adaptive and once a system that supports a particular strategy has been designed and implemented, it is less likely to change according to student's interactions and preferences. Remote educational systems should be developed to ensure as much as necessary the…

  1. Supporting the Strengths and Activity of Children with Autism in a Technology-Enhanced Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellonen, Virpi; Kärnä, Eija; Virnes, Marjo

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces four principles for the establishment of a technology-enhanced learning environment with and for children with autism spectrum disorders and presents results on how the principles were actualized in relation to children's actions in the environment. The study was conducted as action research premised on the children's active…

  2. An evaluation of UK foundation trainee doctors' learning behaviours in a technology-enhanced learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Hannah L; Pontefract, Sarah K; Hodson, James; Blackwell, Nicholas; Hughes, Elizabeth; Marriott, John F; Coleman, Jamie J

    2016-05-03

    Technology-Enhanced Learning (TEL) can be used to educate Foundation Programme trainee (F1 and F2) doctors. Despite the advantages of TEL, learning behaviours may be exhibited that are not desired by system developers or educators. The aim of this evaluation was to investigate how learner behaviours (e.g. time spent on task) were affected by temporal (e.g. time of year), module (e.g. word count), and individual (e.g. knowledge) factors for 16 mandatory TEL modules related to prescribing and therapeutics. Data were extracted from the SCRIPT e-Learning platform for first year Foundation trainee (F1) doctors in the Health Education England's West Midland region from 1(st) August 2013 to 5(th) August 2014. Generalised Estimating Equation models were used to examine the relationship between time taken to complete modules, date modules were completed, pre- and post-test scores, and module factors. Over the time period examined, 688 F1 doctors interacted with the 16 compulsory modules 10,255 times. The geometric mean time taken to complete a module was 28.9 min (95% Confidence Interval: 28.4-29.5) and 1,075 (10.5%) modules were completed in less than 10 min. In February and June (prior to F1 progression reviews) peaks occurred in the number of modules completed and troughs in the time taken. Most modules were completed, and the greatest amount of time was spent on the learning on a Sunday. More time was taken by those doctors with greater pre-test scores and those with larger improvements in test scores. Foundation trainees are exhibiting unintended learning behaviours in this TEL environment, which may be attributed to several factors. These findings can help guide future developments of this TEL programme and the integration of other TEL programmes into curricula by raising awareness of potential behavioural issues that may arise.

  3. Enhancing Student Adaption to a Case Based Learning Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter

    2010-01-01

    these at the end of the semester, showing the development of the student in terms of adapting to the learning model. The idea will be explained more closely in the final paper. RESEARCH METHOD The research part of the experiment was carried out as action research, as the teacher of the course in the same time......INTRODUCTION Since Aalborg University (AAU) was started it has been using an educational model, where Problem Based Learning is the turning point. Each semester the students on the Engineering Educations form groups of 3-6 persons, which uses half of the study time within the semester to solve......) in groups. It appeared to be difficult for the students to adapt to two different PBL approaches at the same time, and with the project being the most popular the learning outcome of the case studies was not satisfactory after the first semester, but improved on the following semesters. In 2009...

  4. Training Dismounted Soldiers in Virtual Environments: Enhancing Configuration Learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Witmer, Bob

    2000-01-01

    ...) has conducted research in using virtual environments (VE) to train dismounted soldiers. While showing that some dismounted soldiers skills can be trained in VE, the research has also identified problems in using VE for soldier training...

  5. Teachers as Participatory Designers: Two Case Studies with Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cober, Rebecca; Tan, Esther; Slotta, Jim; So, Hyo-Jeong; Könings, Karen D.

    2015-01-01

    Teachers are not typically involved as participatory designers in the design of technology-enhanced learning environments. As they have unique and valuable perspectives on the role of technology in education, it is of utmost importance to engage them in a participatory design process. Adopting a case study methodology, we aim to reveal in what…

  6. Feasibility of Using an Augmented Immersive Virtual Reality Learning Environment to Enhance Music Conducting Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orman, Evelyn K.; Price, Harry E.; Russell, Christine R.

    2017-01-01

    Acquiring nonverbal skills necessary to appropriately communicate and educate members of performing ensembles is essential for wind band conductors. Virtual reality learning environments (VRLEs) provide a unique setting for developing these proficiencies. For this feasibility study, we used an augmented immersive VRLE to enhance eye contact, torso…

  7. Enhancing the strategic management of practice learning through the introduction of the role of Learning Environment Manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Graham; Baker, Tracey; Cheesman, Amanda

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes a process evaluation project designed to enhance the strategic management of practice learning within a large Hospital in the North of England. The aim of the project was to introduce the role of the Learning Environment Manager with dedicated responsibility for practice learning of undergraduate student nurses within the Hospital's 49 practice-settings. Whilst aspects of this role were already evident in several of these settings, the project sought to locate and standardise responsibilities related to the organisation and management of learning and teaching in practice explicitly within the existing staffing structure of each practice-setting. Focus group interviews were used to explore significant aspects of the project with key stakeholder groups comprising Learning Environment Managers, the Hospital Clinical Educator, Hospital Department Managers, Ward Managers, Mentors, University Link Lecturers and undergraduate Student Nurses. Interview data were analysed using thematic content analysis. The findings of the project suggest that the Learning Environment Manager role affords providers of practice learning with a robust approach to establish organisation-wide benchmarks that standardise the strategic management of practice learning in collaboration with partner Universities. The role incorporated many operational activities previously undertaken by the Hospital Clinical Educator, thus enabling the Hospital Clinical Educator to make a more strategic contribution to the on-going quality monitoring and enhancement of practice learning across the Hospital. The Learning Environment Manager role was found to provide mentors with high levels of support which in turn helped to promote consistent, positive and holistic practice learning experiences for undergraduate student nurses across the Hospital. Importantly, the role offers a potent catalyst for nurses in practice to regain responsibility for practice learning and re-establish the value of

  8. ENERGY-NET (Energy, Environment and Society Learning Network): Best Practices to Enhance Informal Geoscience Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, R.; Elliott, E. M.; Bain, D.; Crowley, K. J.; Steiner, M. A.; Divers, M. T.; Hopkins, K. G.; Giarratani, L.; Gilmore, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    While energy links all living and non-living systems, the integration of energy, the environment, and society is often not clearly represented in 9 - 12 classrooms and informal learning venues. However, objective public learning that integrates these components is essential for improving public environmental literacy. ENERGY-NET (Energy, Environment and Society Learning Network) is a National Science Foundation funded initiative that uses an Earth Systems Science framework to guide experimental learning for high school students and to improve public learning opportunities regarding the energy-environment-society nexus in a Museum setting. One of the primary objectives of the ENERGY-NET project is to develop a rich set of experimental learning activities that are presented as exhibits at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (USA). Here we detail the evolution of the ENERGY-NET exhibit building process and the subsequent evolution of exhibit content over the past three years. While preliminary plans included the development of five "exploration stations" (i.e., traveling activity carts) per calendar year, the opportunity arose to create a single, larger topical exhibit per semester, which was assumed to have a greater impact on museum visitors. Evaluative assessments conducted to date reveal important practices to be incorporated into ongoing exhibit development: 1) Undergraduate mentors and teen exhibit developers should receive additional content training to allow richer exhibit materials. 2) The development process should be distributed over as long a time period as possible and emphasize iteration. This project can serve as a model for other collaborations between geoscience departments and museums. In particular, these practices may streamline development of public presentations and increase the effectiveness of experimental learning activities.

  9. A Data-enhanced On-line Learning Environment for Undergraduate Earth System Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    di, L.; Deng, M.

    2004-12-01

    Earth system science (ESS) research often requires integrating, analyzing, and modeling with large amount of multi-disciplinary, multi-source geospatial data. Satellite remote sensing is one of the major sources of such data. Currently, NASA EOSDIS has archived more than three petabytes of Earth remote sensing data. Those data are essential for conducting ESS research. Therefore, training students on how to effectively use large amount of remote sensing data in ESS research is the essential part of their ESS education. However, currently most of undergraduate students have never been trained to handle the huge volume of available data because of lack of resources and suitable teaching technology at ESS colleges. In order to reduce this problem, we are developing a web-based geospatial information system, called GeoBrain, for providing a data-enhanced on-line learning and research environment for ESS education and research. The system makes petabytes of NASA EOS data and information easily accessible to higher-education users. The system allows users to dynamically and collaboratively develop interoperable, web-executable geospatial process and analysis modules and models, and run them on-line against any part of the peta-byte archives for getting back the customized information products rather than raw data. The system makes a data-enhanced ESS learning and research environment, backed by petabytes of NASA EOS data and unavailable to students and professors before, available to them at their desktops. In order to integrate this new learning environment into the undergraduate ESS teaching and research, a NASA EOS Higher Education Alliance (NEHEA), consisting of the GeoBrain development team led by GMU and a group of Earth science educators selected from an open RFP process, has been formed. NEHEA members are incorporating the data enhanced learning environment into their teaching and on-going research and will develop new courses for taking advantages of the

  10. Enhancing Writing Achievement through a Digital Learning Environment: Case Studies of Three Struggling Adolescent Male Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruden, Manning; Kerkhoff, Shea N.; Spires, Hiller A.; Lester, James

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how "Narrative Theatre," a narrative-centered digital learning environment, supported the writing processes of 3 struggling adolescent male writers. We utilized a multicase study approach to capture 3 sixth-grade participants' experiences with the digital learning environment before, during, and after…

  11. The Effects of Enhancing Prospective EFL Teachers' Knowledge Management Strategies in Virtual Learning Environments on Their Ideational Flexibility and Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Abdullah Mahmoud Ismail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The last few years have witnessed an increased interest in moving away from traditional language instruction settings towards more hybrid and virtual learning environments. Face-to-face interaction, guided practice, and uniformity of knowledge sources and skills are all replaced by settings where multiplicity of views from different learning communities, interconnectedness, self-directedness, and self-management of knowledge and learning are increasingly emphasized. This shift from walled-classroom instruction with its limited scope and resources to hybrid and virtual learning environments with their limitless provisions requires that learners be equipped with requisite skills and strategies to manage knowledge and handle language learning in ways commensurate with the nature and limitless possibilities of these new environments. The current study aimed at enhancing knowledge management strategies of EFL teachers in virtual learning environments and examine the impact on their ideational flexibility and engagement in language learning settings. A knowledge management model was proposed and field-test on a cohort of prospective EFL teachers in the Emirati context. Participants were prospective EFL teachers enrolled in the Methods of Teaching Courses and doing their practicum in the Emirati EFL context. Participants' ideational flexibility was tapped via a bi-methodical approach including a contextualized task and a decontextualized one. Their engagement in virtual language learning settings was tapped via an engagement scale. Results of the study indicated that enhancing prospective EFL teachers' knowledge management strategies in virtual learning environments had a significant impact on their ideational flexibility and engagement in foreign language learning settings. Details of the instructional intervention, instruments for tapping students’ ideational flexibility and engagement, and results of the study are discussed. Implications for

  12. Enhancing Beginners' Second Language Learning through an Informal Online Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakowa, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools are used increasingly to support second language learning, but there have been limited studies involving beginner learners, multiple technologies, and informal settings. This current study addresses this gap and investigates the factors affecting students' interest in a nongraded online learning environment and what kinds of tools,…

  13. Enhancing a Multi-body Mechanism with Learning-Aided Cues in an Augmented Reality Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhu, Manjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a potential area of research for education, covering issues such as tracking and calibration, and realistic rendering of virtual objects. The ability to augment real world with virtual information has opened the possibility of using AR technology in areas such as education and training as well. In the domain of Computer Aided Learning (CAL), researchers have long been looking into enhancing the effectiveness of the teaching and learning process by providing cues that could assist learners to better comprehend the materials presented. Although a number of works were done looking into the effectiveness of learning-aided cues, but none has really addressed this issue for AR-based learning solutions. This paper discusses the design and model of an AR based software that uses visual cues to enhance the learning process and the outcome perception results of the cues.

  14. Enhancing a Multi-body Mechanism with Learning-Aided Cues in an Augmented Reality Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Sidhu, Manjit

    2013-06-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a potential area of research for education, covering issues such as tracking and calibration, and realistic rendering of virtual objects. The ability to augment real world with virtual information has opened the possibility of using AR technology in areas such as education and training as well. In the domain of Computer Aided Learning (CAL), researchers have long been looking into enhancing the effectiveness of the teaching and learning process by providing cues that could assist learners to better comprehend the materials presented. Although a number of works were done looking into the effectiveness of learning-aided cues, but none has really addressed this issue for AR-based learning solutions. This paper discusses the design and model of an AR based software that uses visual cues to enhance the learning process and the outcome perception results of the cues.

  15. Using a Synchronous Online Learning Environment to Promote and Enhance Transactional Engagement beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wdowik, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to create a synchronous online learning community through the use of "Blackboard Collaborate!" to promote and enhance transactional engagement outside the classroom. Design/methodology/approach: This paper employs a quantitative and qualitative approach where data were sourced from a third year…

  16. Framing and Enhancing Distributed Leadership in the Quality Management of Online Learning Environments in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Dale; Palmer, Stuart; Gosper, Maree; Sankey, Michael; Allan, Garry

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of senior leadership interviews in a nationally funded project on distributed leadership in the quality management of online learning environments (OLEs) in higher education. Questions were framed around the development of an OLE quality management framework and the situation of the characteristics of…

  17. Enhancing University Teachers' Information and Communication Technology Usage by Using a Virtual Learning Environment Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageel, Mohammed; Woollard, John

    2012-01-01

    The research project is a case study focussing on the use of a virtual learning environment (VLE) implemented to increase the use of information and communication technology (ICT) by university teachers in Jazan University, Saudi Arabia. The study aims to investigate the effect of the VLE as the vehicle for a training course in ICT designed to…

  18. Utilizing Twitter and #Hashtags toward Enhancing Student Learning in an Online Course Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, T. Scott; Harmeyer, Dave; Wu, Shuang Frances

    2014-01-01

    The authors offer an answer to the research question, To what extent and in what ways is Twitter helpful to student learning when group hashtags are created and used in collaborative educational environments? Sixty-two students in a spring 2012 graduate online Research Methodology course worked individually and in groups to create discussions on…

  19. Development of Web-Based Learning Environment Model to Enhance Cognitive Skills for Undergraduate Students in the Field of Electrical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakonpol, Thongmee; Ruangsuwan, Chaiyot; Terdtoon, Pradit

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to develop a web-based learning environment model for enhancing cognitive skills of undergraduate students in the field of electrical engineering. The research is divided into 4 phases: 1) investigating the current status and requirements of web-based learning environment models. 2) developing a web-based learning environment…

  20. Engaging Environments Enhance Motor Skill Learning in a Computer Gaming Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Keith R; Boyd, Lara A; Hodges, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    Engagement during practice can motivate a learner to practice more, hence having indirect effects on learning through increased practice. However, it is not known whether engagement can also have a direct effect on learning when the amount of practice is held constant. To address this question, 40 participants played a video game that contained an embedded repeated sequence component, under either highly engaging conditions (the game group) or mechanically identical but less engaging conditions (the sterile group). The game environment facilitated retention over a 1-week interval. Specifically, the game group improved in both speed and accuracy for random and repeated trials, suggesting a general motor-related improvement, rather than a specific influence of engagement on implicit sequence learning. These data provide initial evidence that increased engagement during practice has a direct effect on generalized learning, improving retention and transfer of a complex motor skill.

  1. Does Narrative Feedback Enhance Children's Motor Learning in a Virtual Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Danielle E; Lu, Amy S

    2018-04-30

    Augmented feedback has motivational and informational functions in motor learning, and is a key feature of practice in a virtual environment (VE). This study evaluated the impact of narrative (story-based) feedback as compared to standard feedback during practice of a novel task in a VE on typically developing children's motor learning, motivation and engagement. Thirty-eight children practiced navigating through a virtual path, receiving narrative or non-narrative feedback following each trial. All participants improved their performance on retention but not transfer, with no significant differences between groups. Self-reported engagement was associated with acquisition, retention and transfer for both groups. A narrative approach to feedback delivery did not offer an additive benefit; additional affective advantages of augmented feedback for motor learning in VEs should be explored.

  2. A Learning Model for Enhancing the Student's Control in Educational Process Using Web 2.0 Personal Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Ebrahim; van den Berg, Jan; Veen, Wim

    2015-01-01

    In recent educational literature, it has been observed that improving student's control has the potential of increasing his or her feeling of ownership, personal agency and activeness as means to maximize his or her educational achievement. While the main conceived goal for personal learning environments (PLEs) is to increase student's control by…

  3. Authoring a Web-enhanced interface for a new language-learning environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Hémard

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer-based applications in second language teaching have now been used for a protracted period of time, evolving from a deductive approach relying on grammatical progression to inductive methods and, more recently, exploratory interaction better suited to the constructivist mode. However, despite the initial adoption of a traditional learning environment, the first, albeit influential, generation of software design was poorly recognized, or worse, even met with scepticism by academics inasmuch as it did not seem to represent or, indeed, symbolize good teaching practices (Laurillard, 1991. As a result, original CALL programmes, such as gap-filling or substituting exercises, were often only considered appropriate as supplementary teaching material and, as such, referred to or introduced within courses as convenient adjuncts providing students with greater practical experience. Equally, students as users were never consulted on the use of CALL or, indeed, implicated beyond the designed interaction. Indeed, it was generally assumed that, since computer-based learning was a new concept, it would be, by itself, attractive and generate increased enthusiasm within the language-learning context. This situation was made even worse by a developmental process, dominated by self-taught, in-house authoring, which was too often amateurish, task-based in approach and empirical. Unfortunately, despite recent development in multimedia and hypermedia, this CALL legacy has been affecting CALL in design, practice and projected use.

  4. Anticipation of Personal Genomics Data Enhances Interest and Learning Environment in Genomics and Molecular Biology Undergraduate Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, K Scott; Jensen, Jamie L; Johnson, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    An important discussion at colleges is centered on determining more effective models for teaching undergraduates. As personalized genomics has become more common, we hypothesized it could be a valuable tool to make science education more hands on, personal, and engaging for college undergraduates. We hypothesized that providing students with personal genome testing kits would enhance the learning experience of students in two undergraduate courses at Brigham Young University: Advanced Molecular Biology and Genomics. These courses have an emphasis on personal genomics the last two weeks of the semester. Students taking these courses were given the option to receive personal genomics kits in 2014, whereas in 2015 they were not. Students sent their personal genomics samples in on their own and received the data after the course ended. We surveyed students in these courses before and after the two-week emphasis on personal genomics to collect data on whether anticipation of obtaining their own personal genomic data impacted undergraduate student learning. We also tested to see if specific personal genomic assignments improved the learning experience by analyzing the data from the undergraduate students who completed both the pre- and post-course surveys. Anticipation of personal genomic data significantly enhanced student interest and the learning environment based on the time students spent researching personal genomic material and their self-reported attitudes compared to those who did not anticipate getting their own data. Personal genomics homework assignments significantly enhanced the undergraduate student interest and learning based on the same criteria and a personal genomics quiz. We found that for the undergraduate students in both molecular biology and genomics courses, incorporation of personal genomic testing can be an effective educational tool in undergraduate science education.

  5. Learning Networks Distributed Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Harrie; Vogten, Hubert; Koper, Rob; Tattersall, Colin; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Sloep, Peter; Van Bruggen, Jan; Spoelstra, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Learning Networks Distributed Environment is a prototype of an architecture that allows the sharing and modification of learning materials through a number of transport protocols. The prototype implements a p2p protcol using JXTA.

  6. Pervasive Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøl, Jesper; Helms, Niels Henrik

    2006-01-01

    The potentials of pervasive communication in learning within industry and education are right now being explored through different R&D projects. This paper outlines the background for and the possible learning potentials in what we describe as pervasive learning environments (PLE). PLE?s differ...... from virtual learning environments (VLE) primarily because in PLE?s the learning content is very much related to the actual context in which the learner finds himself. Two local (Denmark) cases illustrate various aspects of pervasive learning. One is the eBag, a pervasive digital portfolio used...

  7. Transforming the Learning Environment of Undergraduate Physics Laboratories to Enhance Physics Inquiry Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory P. Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Concerns persist regarding the lack of promotion of students’ scientific inquiry processes in undergraduate physics laboratories. The consensus in the literature is that, especially in the early years of undergraduate physics programs, students’ laboratory work is characterized by recipe type, step-by-step instructions for activities where the aim is often confirmation of an already well-established physics principle or concept. In response to evidence reflecting these concerns at their university, the authors successfully secured funding for this study. A mixed-method design was employed. In the 2011/2012 academic year baseline data were collected. A quantitative survey, the Undergraduate Physics Laboratory Learning Environment Scale (UPLLES was developed, validated, and used to explore students’ perceptions of their physics laboratory environments. Analysis of data from the UPLLES and from interviews confirmed the concerns evident in the literature and in a previous evaluation of laboratories undertaken in 2002. To address these concerns the activities that students were to perform in the laboratory section of the course/s were re/designed to engage students in more inquiry oriented thinking and activity. In Fall 2012, the newly developed laboratory activities and tutorials, were implemented for the first time in PHYS124; a first year course. These changes were accompanied by structured training of teaching assistants and changes to the structure of the evaluation of students’ laboratory performance. At the end of that term the UPLLES was administered (n = 266 and interviews with students conducted (n = 16 to explore their perceptions of their laboratory environments. Statistically significant differences (p<.001 between the students in the PHYS 124 classes of 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 across all dimensions were found. Effect sizes of 0.82 to 1.3, between the views of students in the first semester physics classes of 2011/2012 and 2012

  8. Technology Enhanced Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Klemke, R., & Specht, M. (2013, 26-27 September). Technology Enhanced Learning. Presentation at the fourth international conference on eLearning (eLearning 2013), Belgrade, Serbia. http://econference.metropolitan.ac.rs/

  9. Improving the Use of Technology Enhanced Learning Environments in Higher Education in the UK: A Qualitative Visualization of Students' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Mark; Dunn, Thomas J.

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, the use of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) has risen exponentially throughout higher education in the UK. Whilst TEL is an umbrella term for a range of technologies, evidence suggests that in the UK, TEL is usually delivered via the medium of Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) for the provision of lecture materials and…

  10. Designing Creative Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Cochrane

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing creative learning environments involves not only facilitating student creativity, but also modeling creative pedagogical practice. In this paper we explore the implementation of a framework for designing creative learning environments using mobile social media as a catalyst for redefining both lecturer pedagogical practice, as well as redesigning the curriculum around student generated m-portfolios.

  11. Pervasive Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøl, Jesper; Helms, Niels Henrik

    in schools. The other is moreover related to work based learning in that it foresees a community of practitioners accessing, sharing and adding to knowledge and learning objects held within a pervasive business intelligence system. Limitations and needed developments of these and other systems are discussed......Abstract: The potentials of pervasive communication in learning within industry and education are right know being explored through different R&D projects. This paper outlines the background for and the possible learning potentials in what we describe as pervasive learning environments (PLE). PLE......'s differ from virtual learning environments (VLE) primarily because in PLE's the learning content is very much related to the actual context in which the learner finds himself. Two local (Denmark) cases illustrate various aspects of pervasive learning. One is the eBag, a pervasive digital portfolio used...

  12. Pervasive Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik; Hundebøl, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    The potentials of pervasive communication in learning within industry and education are right know being explored through different R&D projects. This paper outlines the background for and the possible learning potentials in what we describe as pervasive learning environments (PLE). PLE's differ...... from virtual learning environments (VLE) primarily because in PLE's the learning content is very much related to the actual context in which the learner finds himself. Two local (Denmark) cases illustrate various aspects of pervasive learning. One is the eBag, a pervasive digital portfolio used...... in schools. The other is moreover related to work based learning in that it foresees a community of practitioners accessing, sharing and adding to knowledge and learning objects held within a pervasive business intelligence system. Limitations and needed developments of these and other systems are discussed...

  13. Pedagogical Models for Enhancing the Cross-Cultural Online Public Health Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Srikanta; Firtell, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Background: Online distance learning (e-learning) is an established method for providing higher education on a global scale due to its potential to reduce inequalities particularly in the area of public health education. Simultaneously, multicultural education is a key component of health education and can be achieved by fostering cultural…

  14. Beliefs that manifest through newspaper items in relation to peoples’ life challenges and their potential to enhance a sustainable learning environment in school science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thapelo L. Mamiala

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper documents beliefs that manifest themselves through newspaper items and elaborates on their potential to enhance a sustainable learning environment in a school science lesson. “Learning environment” is depicted from different angles and includes virtual and real learning environments, school environments and classroom environments. Descriptive and item analyses were conducted on sixty-eight newspaper items that were identified. The nature of problems and prescriptions/solutions was categorised for each item and the paper further provides elaboration on the types of problems and recommended solutions. The results show that the “believed” structure contents in their newspaper items to catch the attention of the “believer”. Lessons on the power of belief must be learnt by school science teachers if they are to succeed in creating a sustainable learning environment with improved performance in school science.

  15. Technology Enhanced Agricultural Education Learning Environments: An Assessment of Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Antoine J.; English, Chastity Warren

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive research study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Web-enhanced agricultural education pedagogy as perceived by students in a collegiate agricultural education program. Overall, respondents agreed there were many benefits to Web-enhanced courses and perceived all Web site components under study to be very useful.…

  16. The VREST learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, E E; Geelkerken, R H; Sanders, A J B

    2005-01-01

    The VREST learning environment is an integrated architecture to improve the education of health care professionals. It is a combination of a learning, content and assessment management system based on virtual reality. The generic architecture is now being build and tested around the Lichtenstein protocol for hernia inguinalis repair.

  17. How Can Mobile SMS Communication Support and Enhance a First Year Undergraduate Learning Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Geraldine; Edwards, Gabriele; Reid, Alan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a case study investigating how the academic and personal development of first year students on an undergraduate sports education degree can be supported and enhanced with mobile SMS (Short Message Service) communication. SMS-based technologies were introduced in response to students' particular needs (in transition to…

  18. Enhancing learning with technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus; Klemke, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Specht, M., & Klemke, R. (2013, 26-27 September). Enhancing Learning with Technology. In D. Milosevic (Ed.), Proceedings of the fourth international conference on eLearning (eLearning 2013) (pp. 37-45). Belgrade Metropolitan University, Belgrade, Serbia. http://econference.metropolitan.ac.rs/

  19. Students’ digital learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Francesco; Dalsgaard, Christian; Davidsen, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to examine the nature of students’ digital learning environments to understand the interplay of institutional systems and tools that are managed by the students themselves. The paper is based on a study of 128 students’ digital learning environments. The objectives...... used tools in the students’ digital learning environments are Facebook, Google Drive, tools for taking notes, and institutional systems. Additionally, the study shows that the tools meet some very basic demands of the students in relation to collaboration, communication, and feedback. Finally...... of the study are 1) to provide an overview of tools for students’ study activities, 2) to identify the most used and most important tools for students and 3) to discover which activities the tools are used for. The empirical study reveals that the students have a varied use of digital media. Some of the most...

  20. Towards a social sustainability in higher education: Enhancing students’ solidarity and togetherness through collaborative projects in racially diverse learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet Ramohai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One key goal in the mission and vision statement of the University of the Free State is to recruit the best and most diverse students who work in solidarity and togetherness across social and historical divides. This goal is further echoed in the academic divisions’ own mission and vision statements which endeavour to ensure that the broader institutional goals are met. The Faculty of Education in this institution for instance, in accordance with the institution’s vision, has included in their vision statement issues of diversity and social transformation which foreground the Faculty’s commitment to produce teachers who show solidarity in their dealings with others. A question that is worth considering though is how these mission and vision statements can be implemented in practice by lecturers in their classes. In this paper I report on an action research project towards the realisation of the vision of togetherness and solidarity of the University of the Free State and the Faculty of Education, in which spaces are created for collaborative work for Honours classes. The results from this classroom practice indicate that students’ solidarity and togetherness in racially diverse learning environments can be enhanced through collaborative students’ work designed by lecturers.

  1. Designing Virtual Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veirum, Niels Einar

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this working paper is to present a conceptual model for media integrated communication in virtual learning environments. The model for media integrated communication is very simple and identifies the necessary building blocks for virtual place making in a synthesis of methods...

  2. Students’ digital learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Francesco; Dalsgaard, Christian; Davidsen, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    used tools in the students’ digital learning environments are Facebook, Google Drive, tools for taking notes, and institutional systems. Additionally, the study shows that the tools meet some very basic demands of the students in relation to collaboration, communication, and feedback. Finally...

  3. Effective e-learning in surgical education: the core values underpinning effective e-learning environments and how these may be enhanced for future surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, R; Coulston, J

    2016-01-01

    e-learning is a valuable tool that has a number of advantages for Surgical Oncology training and education. The rapidly evolving nature of, and limited clinical exposure to oncological practice creates challenges for surgical trainees to stay up to date and engaged. Online learning can be accessed anywhere at any time and allows trainees to develop, apply and be assessed on their learning. To be effective, it must be educationally sound and embrace technology to enhance learners' experience.

  4. Students’ digital learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Francesco; Dalsgaard, Christian; Davidsen, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    of the study are 1) to provide an overview of tools for students’ study activities, 2) to identify the most used and most important tools for students and 3) to discover which activities the tools are used for. The empirical study reveals that the students have a varied use of digital media. Some of the most......, the study shows that most of the important tools are not related to the systems provided by the educational institutions. Based on the study, the paper concludes with a discussion of how institutional systems connect to the other tools in the students’ practices, and how we can qualify students’ digital......The objective of the paper is to examine the nature of students’ digital learning environments to understand the interplay of institutional systems and tools that are managed by the students themselves. The paper is based on a study of 128 students’ digital learning environments. The objectives...

  5. Collaborations in Open Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard

    2015-01-01

    This thesis researches automated services for professionals aiming at starting collaborative learning projects in open learning environments, such as MOOCs. It investigates the theoretical backgrounds of team formation for collaborative learning. Based on the outcomes, a model is developed

  6. Architecture for Collaborative Learning Activities in Hybrid Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez, María Blanca; Maroto, David; García Rueda, José Jesús; Leony, Derick; Delgado Kloos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    3D virtual worlds are recognized as collaborative learning environments. However, the underlying technology is not sufficiently mature and the virtual worlds look cartoonish, unlinked to reality. Thus, it is important to enrich them with elements from the real world to enhance student engagement in learning activities. Our approach is to build learning environments where participants can either be in the real world or in its mirror world while sharing the same hybrid space in a collaborative ...

  7. Ubiquitous Learning Environments in Higher Education: A Scoping Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Mari Aulikki; Haavisto, Elina; Liikanen, Eeva; Kääriäinen, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitous learning and the use of ubiquitous learning environments heralds a new era in higher education. Ubiquitous learning environments enhance context-aware and seamless learning experiences available from any location at any time. They support smooth interaction between authentic and digital learning resources and provide personalized…

  8. The Integration of Personal Learning Environments & Open Network Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chih-Hsiung; Sujo-Montes, Laura; Yen, Cherng-Jyh; Chan, Junn-Yih; Blocher, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Learning management systems traditionally provide structures to guide online learners to achieve their learning goals. Web 2.0 technology empowers learners to create, share, and organize their personal learning environments in open network environments; and allows learners to engage in social networking and collaborating activities. Advanced…

  9. Enhancing Students' Language Skills through Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banditvilai, Choosri

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of using blended learning to enhance students' language skills and learner autonomy in an Asian university environment. Blended learning represents an educational environment for much of the world where computers and the Internet are readily available. It combines self-study with valuable face-to-face interaction…

  10. Enhancing Students' Learning: Instant Feedback Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrweis, Lawrence C.; Shinham, Kathe M.

    2015-01-01

    This study illustrates an active learning approach using instant feedback cards in the first course in accounting. The objectives of this study are to (1) describe instant feedback cards and (2) show how this tool, when used in an active learning environment, can enhance learning. We examined whether students exposed to immediate feedback…

  11. Judgments of Learning in Collaborative Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helsdingen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Helsdingen, A. S. (2010, March). Judgments of Learning in Collaborative Learning Environments. Poster presented at the 1st International Air Transport and Operations Symposium (ATOS 2010), Delft, The Netherlands: Delft University of Technology.

  12. Creating a flexible learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, B A; Jones, S; Winters, P

    1990-01-01

    Lack of classroom space is a common problem for many hospital-based nurse educators. This article describes how nursing educators in one institution redesigned fixed classroom space into a flexible learning center that accommodates their various programs. Using the nursing process, the educators assessed their needs, planned the learning environment, implemented changes in the interior design, and evaluated the outcome of the project. The result was a learning environment conducive to teaching and learning.

  13. Blended Learning in Personalized Assistive Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinagi, Catherine; Skourlas, Christos

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the special needs/requirements of disabled students and cost-benefits for applying blended learning in Personalized Educational Learning Environments (PELE) in Higher Education are studied. The authors describe how blended learning can form an attractive and helpful framework for assisting Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing (D-HH) students to…

  14. Using Interactive Animations to Enhance Teaching, Learning, and Retention of Respiration Pathway Concepts in Face-to-Face and Online High School, Undergraduate, and Continuing Education Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sederick C. Rice

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One major tool set teachers/instructors can use is online interactive animations, which presents content in a way that helps pique students' interest and differentiates instructional content.  The Virtual Cell Animation Collections (VCAC, developed from the Molecular and Cellular Biology Learning Center, has developed a series of online interactive animations that provide teacher/instructors and students with immersive learning tools for studying and understanding respiration processes.  These virtual tools work as powerful instructional devices to help explain and reinforce concepts of metabolic pathways that would normally be taught traditionally using static textbook pages or by neumonic flashcards. High school, undergraduate, and continuing education students of today learn and retain knowledge differently than their predecessors.  Now teachers face new challenges and must engage and assess students, within a small window during classroom instruction, but also have the skills to provide useful content in distance learning environments.  Educators have to keep up with changing trends in education as a result of technological advances, higher student/teacher ratios, and the influence of social media on education. It is critical for teachers/instructors to be able to present content that not only keeps students interested but also helps bridge learning gaps. VCAC provides high school, undergraduate, and continuing education biology or life science teachers/instructors with classroom strategies and tools for introducing respiration content through free open source online resources. VCAC content supports the development of more inquiry-based classroom and distance-learning environments that can be facilitated by teachers/instructors, which helps improve retention of important respiration subject content and problem-based learning skills for students.

  15. The development of a rich multimedia training environment for crisis management: using emotional affect to enhance learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Bacon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PANDORA is an EU FP7-funded project developing a novel training and learning environment for Gold Commanders, individualswho carry executive responsibility for the services and facilities identified as strategically critical e.g. Police, Fire, in crisis management strategic planning situations. A key part of the work for this project is considering the emotional and behavioural state of the trainees, and the creation of more realistic, and thereby stressful, representations of multimedia information to impact on the decision-making of those trainees. Existing training models are predominantly paper-based, table-top exercises, which require an exercise of imagination on the part of the trainees to consider not only the various aspects of a crisis situation but also the impacts of interventions, and remediating actions in the event of the failure of an intervention. However, existing computing models and tools are focused on supporting tactical and operational activities in crisis management, not strategic. Therefore, the PANDORA system will provide a rich multimedia information environment, to provide trainees with the detailed information they require to develop strategic plans to deal with a crisis scenario, and will then provide information on the impacts of the implementation of those plans and provide the opportunity for the trainees to revise and remediate those plans. Since this activity is invariably multi-agency, the training environment must support group-based strategic planning activities and trainees will occupy specific roles within the crisis scenario. The system will also provide a range of non-playing characters (NPC representing domain experts, high-level controllers (e.g. politicians, ministers, low-level controllers (tactical and operational commanders, and missing trainee roles, to ensure a fully populated scenario can be realised in each instantiation. Within the environment, the emotional and behavioural state of the

  16. Designing Learning Resources in Synchronous Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rene B

    2015-01-01

    Computer-mediated Communication (CMC) and synchronous learning environments offer new solutions for teachers and students that transcend the singular one-way transmission of content knowledge from teacher to student. CMC makes it possible not only to teach computer mediated but also to design...... and create new learning resources targeted to a specific group of learners. This paper addresses the possibilities of designing learning resources within synchronous learning environments. The empirical basis is a cross-country study involving students and teachers in primary schools in three Nordic...... Countries (Denmark, Sweden and Norway). On the basis of these empirical studies a set of design examples is drawn with the purpose of showing how the design fulfills the dual purpose of functioning as a remote, synchronous learning environment and - using the learning materials used and recordings...

  17. Learning Environment and Student Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopland, Arnt O.; Nyhus, Ole Henning

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between satisfaction with learning environment and student effort, both in class and with homework assignments. Design/methodology/approach: The authors use data from a nationwide and compulsory survey to analyze the relationship between learning environment and student effort. The…

  18. Context-aware Cloud Computing for Personal Learning Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Feng; Al-Bayatti, Ali Hilal; Siewe, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Virtual learning means to learn from social interactions in a virtual platform that enables people to study anywhere and at any time. Current Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) are a range of integrated web based applications to support and enhance the education. Normally, VLEs are institution centric; are owned by the institutions and are designed to support formal learning, which do not support lifelong learning. These limitations led to the research of Personal Learning Environments (PLE...

  19. Enhancing Critical Thinking in a PBL Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida; Holgaard, Jette Egelund

    2016-01-01

    Engineering education accreditation bodies emphasize the need for competencies beyond technical expertise. Critical thinking is one of these competencies, which is also considered as a precursor for the development of other competencies such as multidisciplinary collaboration, problem......-solving skills and lifelong learning. There is an urgent need to enhance engineering students’ critical thinking and one way to do this is to make use of active, student-centred learning approaches such as Problem Based Learning (PBL). This study aims to provide a model for understanding and enhancing critical...... thinking in a PBL environment. The development of the model takes its point of departure from a conceptual model for critical thinking that is concretized in a PBL context by including theoretical as well as empirical perspectives. The empirical study was conducted at the Faculty of Engineering and Science...

  20. Georgia - Improved Learning Environment

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The school rehabilitation activity seeks to decrease student and teacher absenteeism, increase students’ time on task, and, ultimately, improve learning and labor...

  1. Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Börner, D. (2009). Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments. Presented at the Doctoral Consortium of the Fourth European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL 2009). September, 29-October, 2, 2009, Nice, France.

  2. Constructivist learning theories and complex learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R-J. Simons; Dr. S. Bolhuis

    2004-01-01

    Learning theories broadly characterised as constructivist, agree on the importance to learning of the environment, but differ on what exactly it is that constitutes this importance. Accordingly, they also differ on the educational consequences to be drawn from the theoretical perspective. Cognitive

  3. Metacognitive components in smart learning environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumadyo, M.; Santoso, H. B.; Sensuse, D. I.

    2018-03-01

    Metacognitive ability in digital-based learning process helps students in achieving learning goals. So that digital-based learning environment should make the metacognitive component as a facility that must be equipped. Smart Learning Environment is the concept of a learning environment that certainly has more advanced components than just a digital learning environment. This study examines the metacognitive component of the smart learning environment to support the learning process. A review of the metacognitive literature was conducted to examine the components involved in metacognitive learning strategies. Review is also conducted on the results of study smart learning environment, ranging from design to context in building smart learning. Metacognitive learning strategies certainly require the support of adaptable, responsive and personalize learning environments in accordance with the principles of smart learning. The current study proposed the role of metacognitive component in smart learning environment, which is useful as the basis of research in building environment in smart learning.

  4. Mapping Students Use of Technologies in Problem Based Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn; Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Ryberg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to understand how students use technology to enhance their learning in problem-based learning environments. The research methodology is based on both qualitative and quantitative studies. The results are based on students’ interviews, a survey and students’ reflections in course......-related blog posts; they show that students have positive perceptions toward using technologies in problem-based learning environments....

  5. The Internet: A Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreal, Rory

    1997-01-01

    The Internet environment is suitable for many types of learning activities and teaching and learning styles. Every World Wide Web-based course should provide: home page; introduction; course overview; course requirements, vital information; roles and responsibilities; assignments; schedule; resources; sample tests; teacher biography; course…

  6. Computational intelligence for technology enhanced learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xhafa, Fatos [Polytechnic Univ. of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Languages and Informatics Systems; Caballe, Santi; Daradoumis, Thanasis [Open Univ. of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Computer Sciences Multimedia and Telecommunications; Abraham, Ajith [Machine Intelligence Research Labs (MIR Labs), Auburn, WA (United States). Scientific Network for Innovation and Research Excellence; Juan Perez, Angel Alejandro (eds.) [Open Univ. of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Information Sciences

    2010-07-01

    E-Learning has become one of the most wide spread ways of distance teaching and learning. Technologies such as Web, Grid, and Mobile and Wireless networks are pushing teaching and learning communities to find new and intelligent ways of using these technologies to enhance teaching and learning activities. Indeed, these new technologies can play an important role in increasing the support to teachers and learners, to shorten the time to learning and teaching; yet, it is necessary to use intelligent techniques to take advantage of these new technologies to achieve the desired support to teachers and learners and enhance learners' performance in distributed learning environments. The chapters of this volume bring advances in using intelligent techniques for technology enhanced learning as well as development of e-Learning applications based on such techniques and supported by technology. Such intelligent techniques include clustering and classification for personalization of learning, intelligent context-aware techniques, adaptive learning, data mining techniques and ontologies in e-Learning systems, among others. Academics, scientists, software developers, teachers and tutors and students interested in e-Learning will find this book useful for their academic, research and practice activity. (orig.)

  7. Learning Environments in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Vanshelle E.

    2017-01-01

    Learning mathematics is problematic for most primary school age children because mathematics is rote and the memorization of steps rather than an approach to seeing relationships that builds inquiry and understanding. Therefore, the traditional "algorithmic" way of teaching mathematics has not fully prepared students to be critical…

  8. Towards a Framework of Using Knowledge Tools for Teaching by Solving Problems in Technology-Enhanced Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostousov, Sergei; Kudryavtsev, Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Problem solving is a critical competency for modern world and also an effective way of learning. Education should not only transfer domain-specific knowledge to students, but also prepare them to solve real-life problems--to apply knowledge from one or several domains within specific situation. Problem solving as teaching tool is known for a long…

  9. A Study of the Use of Web-Based Conferencing Software To Enhance Learning Environments in Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosin, Adrienne

    This action research study of electronic conferencing highlights the online portions of teacher education courses at Pace University, New York. The study explores the infusion of technology into teaching and investigates the utility of a particular type of discussion software for learning. Data sources include texts of electronic conversations,…

  10. Learning environment, learning styles and conceptual understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Lourdes M.

    1990-01-01

    In recent years there have been many studies on learners developing conceptions of natural phenomena. However, so far there have been few attempts to investigate how the characteristics of the learners and their environment influence such conceptions. This study began with an attempt to use an instrument developed by McCarthy (1981) to describe learners in Malaysian primary schools. This proved inappropriate as Asian primary classrooms do not provide the same kind of environment as US classrooms. It was decided to develop a learning style checklist to suit the local context and which could be used to describe differences between learners which teachers could appreciate and use. The checklist included four dimensions — perceptual, process, self-confidence and motivation. The validated instrument was used to determine the learning style preferences of primary four pupils in Penang, Malaysia. Later, an analysis was made regarding the influence of learning environment and learning styles on conceptual understanding in the topics of food, respiration and excretion. This study was replicated in the Philippines with the purpose of investigating the relationship between learning styles and achievement in science, where the topics of food, respiration and excretion have been taken up. A number of significant relationships were observed in these two studies.

  11. Self-organized Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Christian; Mathiasen, Helle

    2007-01-01

    system actively. The two groups used the system in their own way to support their specific activities and ways of working. The paper concludes that self-organized learning environments can strengthen the development of students’ academic as well as social qualifications. Further, the paper identifies......The purpose of the paper is to discuss the potentials of using a conference system in support of a project based university course. We use the concept of a self-organized learning environment to describe the shape of the course. In the paper we argue that educational technology, such as conference...... systems, has a potential to support students’ development of self-organized learning environments and facilitate self-governed activities in higher education. The paper is based on an empirical study of two project groups’ use of a conference system. The study showed that the students used the conference...

  12. Engaging Students' Learning Through a Blended Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Stuart

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Within the furniture manufacturing industry a high proportion of occupational accidents are as a result of non-compliance to machining regulations and incorrect work practices. Safety training plays an important role in reducing accidents and promoting a safety culture within this sector. This article details an action research study undertaken during the first year of a new Degree in Timber Product Technology, which set out to evaluate the impact a blended learning environment and reusable learning objects (RLOs could have on promoting safe work practices and a safety culture amongst students. A constructivist approach was taken and the module design was underpinned by Kolb’s model of experiential learning, placing more responsibility on the learners for their own learning and encouraging them to reflect upon their experiences. The findings of this study suggest that students with prior industry machining experience required a change in their attitude to machining which was achieved within the practical labs, while students with no machining experiences were intimidated by the learning environment in the practical labs but whose learning experience was enhanced through the use of RLOs and other eLearning resources. In order to reduce occupational accidents in the furniture manufacturing industry the promotion of continuing professional development (CPD training courses is required in order to change workers’ behaviour to machine safety and encourage lifelong learning so as to promote a safety culture within the furniture manufacturing industry.

  13. Learning Environment And Pupils Academic Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Learning Environment And Pupils Academic Performance: Implications For Counselling. ... facilities as well as learning materials to make teaching and learning easy. In addition, teachers should provide conducive classroom environment to ...

  14. Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, June G.

    2002-01-01

    The feature story in this issue, "Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment," focuses on the growing emphasis on teamwork in the workplace. It discusses how the concept of empowering employees in the workplace is evolving and the benefits--faster decision making, lower costs and absenteeism, higher productivity and quality, and…

  15. School Colors Enhance Learning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern Schools, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The dramatic use of bold colors in the interior design of the Greenhill Middle School in Dallas, Texas, is an example of how a learning environment can stimulate student interest and enthusiasm. (Author/MLF)

  16. Technologically Enhanced Language Learning in Primary Schools in England, France and Spain: Developing Linguistic Competence in a Technologically Enhanced Classroom Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrory, Gee; Chretien, Lucette; Ortega-Martin, Jose Luis

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on an EU-funded project (Ref: 134244-2007-UK-COMENIUS-CMP) that explored the impact of technology, notably video-conferencing, on primary school children's language learning in England, France and Spain. Data were gathered from the children in the project, their teachers and also from trainee teachers placed in the schools. The…

  17. Using Interactive Animations to Enhance Teaching, Learning, and Retention of Respiration Pathway Concepts in Face-to-Face and Online High School, Undergraduate, and Continuing Education Learning Environments ?

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Sederick C.

    2013-01-01

    One major tool set teachers/instructors can use is online interactive animations, which presents content in a way that helps pique students' interest and differentiates instructional content.  The Virtual Cell Animation Collections (VCAC), developed from the Molecular and Cellular Biology Learning Center, has developed a series of online interactive animations that provide teacher/instructors and students with immersive learning tools for studying and understanding respiration processes.  The...

  18. Neuro-Holistic Learning©: An Integrated Kinesthetic Approach to Cognitive Learning© Using Collaborative Interactive Thought Exchange© in a Blended Environment to Enhance the Learning of Young African American Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osler, James Edward, II; Wright, Mark Anthony

    2016-01-01

    This paper is part two of the article entitled, "Dynamic Neuroscientific Systemology: Using Tri-Squared Meta-Analysis and Innovative Instructional Design to Develop a Novel Distance Education Model for the Systemic Creation of Engaging Online Learning Environments" published in the July-September 2015 issue of i-manager's "Journal…

  19. Personal Learning Environments for Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Panagiotidis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The advent of web 2.0 and the developments it has introduced both in everyday practice and in education have generated discussion and reflection concerning the technologies which higher education should rely on in order to provide the appropriate e-learning services to future students. In this context, the Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs, which are widely used in universities around the world to provide online courses to every specific knowledge area and of course in foreign languages, have started to appear rather outdated. Extensive research is under progress, concerning the ways in which educational practice will follow the philosophy of web 2.0 by adopting the more learner-centred and collaborative approach of e-learning 2.0 applications, without abandoning the existing investment of the academic institutions in VLEs, which belong to the e-learning 1.0 generation, and, thus, serve a teacher- or coursecentred approach. Towards this direction, a notably promising solution seems to be the exploitation of web 2.0 tools in order to form Personal Learning Environments (PLEs. These are systems specifically designed or created by the combined use of various external applications or tools that can be used independently or act as a supplement to existing VLE platforms, creating a personalized learning environment. In a PLE, students have the opportunity to form their own personal way of working, using the tools they feel are most appropriate to achieve their purpose. Regarding the subject of foreign language, in particular, the creation of such personalized and adaptable learning environments that extend the traditional approach of a course seems to promise a more holistic response to students’ needs, who, functioning in the PLE, could combine learning with their daily practice, communicating and collaborating with others, thus increasing the possibilities of access to multiple sources, informal communication and practice and eventually

  20. Personal Learning Environments for Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Panagiotidis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The advent of web 2.0 and the developments it has introduced both in everyday practice and in education have generated discussion and reflection concerning the technologies which higher education should rely on in order to provide the appropriate e-learning services to future students.In this context, the Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs, which are widely used in universities around the world to provide online courses to every specific knowledge area and of course in foreign languages, have started to appear rather outdated. Extensive research is under progress, concerning the ways in which educational practice will follow the philosophy of web 2.0 by adopting the more learner-centred and collaborative approach of e-learning 2.0 applications, without abandoning the existing investment of the academic institutions in VLEs, which belong to the e-learning 1.0 generation, and, thus, serve a teacher- or coursecentred approach.Towards this direction, a notably promising solution seems to be the exploitation of web 2.0 tools in order to form Personal Learning Environments (PLEs. These are systems specifically designed or created by the combined use of various external applications or tools that can be used independently or act as a supplement to existing VLE platforms, creating a personalized learning environment. In a PLE, students have the opportunity to form their own personal way of working, using the tools they feel are most appropriate to achieve their purpose.Regarding the subject of foreign language, in particular, the creation of such personalized and adaptable learning environments that extend the traditional approach of a course seems to promise a more holistic response to students’ needs, who, functioning in the PLE, could combine learning with their daily practice, communicating and collaborating with others, thus increasing the possibilities of access to multiple sources, informal communication and practice and eventually acquiring

  1. Effective Learning Environments in Relation to Different Learning Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Guney, Ali; Al, Selda

    2012-01-01

    There are diverse learning theories which explain learning processes which are discussed within this paper, through cognitive structure of learning process. Learning environments are usually described in terms of pedagogical philosophy, curriculum design and social climate. There have been only just a few studies about how physical environment is related to learning process. Many researchers generally consider teaching and learning issues as if independent from physical environment, whereas p...

  2. The learning environment and learning styles: a guide for mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinales, James Jude

    The learning environment provides crucial exposure for the pre-registration nursing student. It is during this time that the student nurse develops his or her repertoire of skills, knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in order to meet competencies and gain registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council. The role of the mentor is vital within the learning environment for aspiring nurses. The learning environment is a fundamental platform for student learning, with mentors key to identifying what is conducive to learning. This article will consider the learning environment and learning styles, and how these two essential elements guide the mentor in making sure they are conducive to learning.

  3. Music Enhances Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campabello, Nicolette; De Carlo, Mary Jane; O'Neil, Jean; Vacek, Mary Jill

    An action research project implemented musical strategies to affect and enhance student recall and memory. The target population was three suburban elementary schools near a major midwestern city: (1) a kindergarten classroom contained 32-38 students; (2) a second grade classroom contained 23 students and five Individualized Education Program…

  4. Group Modeling in Social Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankov, Slavomir; Glavinic, Vlado; Krpan, Divna

    2012-01-01

    Students' collaboration while learning could provide better learning environments. Collaboration assumes social interactions which occur in student groups. Social theories emphasize positive influence of such interactions on learning. In order to create an appropriate learning environment that enables social interactions, it is important to…

  5. The Game Enhanced Learning Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reng, Lars; Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    will describe the levels of the model, which is based on our experience in teaching professional game development at university level. Furthermore, we have been using the model to inspire numerous educators to improve their students’ motivation and skills. The model presents various game-based learning...... activities, and depicts their required planning and expected outcome through eight levels. At its lower levels, the model contains the possibilities of using stand-alone analogue and digital games as teachers, utilizing games as a facilitator of learning activities, exploiting gamification and motivating......In this paper, we will introduce the Game Enhanced learning Model (GEM), which describes a range of gameoriented learning activities. The model is intended to give an overview of the possibilities of game-based learning in general and all the way up to purposive game productions. In the paper, we...

  6. Blogs: Enhancing the Learning Experience for Technology Students

    OpenAIRE

    Birney, Rosanne

    2006-01-01

    Weblogs can be used to enhance the learning experience for technology students, by providing them with several features that are often absent in Learning Management Systems (LMSs). This research aims to demonstrate that weblogs can improve the learning experience by allowing students to reflect on their learning, and by allowing them to easily collaborate with their tutors and with one another. The incorporation of weblogs into the existing learning environment can provide several enhancemen...

  7. The clinical learning environment in nursing education: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flott, Elizabeth A; Linden, Lois

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to report an analysis of the clinical learning environment concept. Nursing students are evaluated in clinical learning environments where skills and knowledge are applied to patient care. These environments affect achievement of learning outcomes, and have an impact on preparation for practice and student satisfaction with the nursing profession. Providing clarity of this concept for nursing education will assist in identifying antecedents, attributes and consequences affecting student transition to practice. The clinical learning environment was investigated using Walker and Avant's concept analysis method. A literature search was conducted using WorldCat, MEDLINE and CINAHL databases using the keywords clinical learning environment, clinical environment and clinical education. Articles reviewed were written in English and published in peer-reviewed journals between 1995-2014. All data were analysed for recurring themes and terms to determine possible antecedents, attributes and consequences of this concept. The clinical learning environment contains four attribute characteristics affecting student learning experiences. These include: (1) the physical space; (2) psychosocial and interaction factors; (3) the organizational culture and (4) teaching and learning components. These attributes often determine achievement of learning outcomes and student self-confidence. With better understanding of attributes comprising the clinical learning environment, nursing education programmes and healthcare agencies can collaborate to create meaningful clinical experiences and enhance student preparation for the professional nurse role. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Validating a Technology Enhanced Student-Centered Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myunghee; Hahn, Jungsun; Chung, Warren

    2015-01-01

    The Technology Enhanced Student Centered Learning (TESCL) Model in this study presents the core factors that ensure the quality of learning in a technology-supported environment. Although the model was conceptually constructed using a student-centered learning framework and drawing upon previous studies, it should be validated through real-world…

  9. Engage, Enhance, and Extend Learning!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren-Kolb, Liz

    2013-01-01

    Educators often say that technology is more than a gimmick or add-on, and that it should engage, enhance, or extend learning in ways that traditional tools do not. Yet they seldom stop to define these terms, and they can be confusing, especially for teachers and preservice teachers. Recently, while collaborating on an English language arts and…

  10. Enhancing Engineering Students’ Learning in an Environmental Microbiology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhou

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While environmental engineering students have gained some knowledge of biogeochemical cycles and sewage treatment, most of them haven’t learned microbiology previously and usually have difficulty in learning environmental microbiology because microbiology deals with invisible living microorganisms instead of visible built environment. Many teaching techniques can be used to enhance students’ learning in microbiology courses, such as lectures, animations, videos, small-group discussions, and active learning techniques. All of these techniques have been applied in the engineering class, but the results indicate that these techniques are often inadequate for students. Learning difficulties have to be identified to enhance students’ learning.

  11. Gestures Enhance Foreign Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Macedonia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Language and gesture are highly interdependent systems that reciprocally influence each other. For example, performing a gesture when learning a word or a phrase enhances its retrieval compared to pure verbal learning. Although the enhancing effects of co-speech gestures on memory are known to be robust, the underlying neural mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we summarize the results of behavioral and neuroscientific studies. They indicate that the neural representation of words consists of complex multimodal networks connecting perception and motor acts that occur during learning. In this context, gestures can reinforce the sensorimotor representation of a word or a phrase, making it resistant to decay. Also, gestures can favor embodiment of abstract words by creating it from scratch. Thus, we propose the use of gesture as a facilitating educational tool that integrates body and mind.

  12. Enhanced living environments from models to technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Dobre, Ciprian; Ganchev, Ivan; Garcia, Nuno; Goleva, Rossitza Ivanova

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced living environments employ information and communications technologies to support true ambient assisted living for people with disabilities. This book provides an overview of today's architectures, techniques, protocols, components, and cloud-based solutions related to ambient assisted living and enhanced living environments.

  13. Enhancing students’ vocabulary knowledge using the Facebook environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kamarul Kabilan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effectiveness of using Facebook in enhancing vocabulary knowledge among Community College students. Thirty-three (33 Community College students are exposed to the use of Facebook as an environment of learning and enhancing their English vocabulary. They are given a pre-test and a post-test and the findings indicate that students perform significantly better in the post-test compared to the pre-test. It appears that Facebook could be considered as a supplementary learning environment or learning platform or a learning tool; with meaningful and engaging activities that require students to collaborate, network and functions as a community of practice, particularly for introverted students with low proficiency levels and have low self-esteem.

  14. Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Börner, D., & Specht, M. (2009). Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments. Proceedings of the Doctoral Consortium of the Fourth European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL 2009). September, 29-October, 2, 2009, Nice, France. [unpublished

  15. Enhancing E-Learning with VRML Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Sangeetha Senthilkumar; E. Kirubakaran

    2011-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a computer-generated three-dimensional space that is multi-sensorial, interactive and engaging. Virtual reality is an artificial environment that is created with software and presented to the user in such a way that the user suspends belief and accepts it as a real environment. On a computer, virtual reality is primarily experienced through two of the five senses: sight and sound. This research paper is focused on enhancing E-Learning using the three dimensional Web Te...

  16. Influences of Formal Learning, Personal Learning Orientation, and Supportive Learning Environment on Informal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woojae; Jacobs, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    While workplace learning includes formal and informal learning, the relationship between the two has been overlooked, because they have been viewed as separate entities. This study investigated the effects of formal learning, personal learning orientation, and supportive learning environment on informal learning among 203 middle managers in Korean…

  17. School and workplace as learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    In vocational education and training the school and the workplace are two different learning environments. But how should we conceive of a learning environment, and what characterizes the school and the workplace respectively as learning environments? And how can the two environ-ments be linked......? These questions are treated in this paper. School and workplace are assessed us-ing the same analytical approach. Thereby it is pointed out how different forms of learning are en-couraged in each of them and how different forms of knowledge are valued. On this basis sugges-tions are made about how to understand...

  18. Creating a supportive learning environment for students with learning difficulties

    OpenAIRE

    Grah, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Co-building of supporting learning environment for the learners with learning difficulties is one of the 21st century inclusive school’s elements. Since the physical presence of learners with learning difficulties in the classroom does not self-evidently lead to an effective co-operation and implementation of 21st century inclusive school, I have dedicated my doctor thesis to the establishment of supporting learning environment for the learners with learning difficulties in primary school wit...

  19. Students’ Motivation for Learning in Virtual Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Beluce, Andrea Carvalho; Oliveira, Katya Luciane de

    2015-01-01

    The specific characteristics of online education require of the student engagement and autonomy, factors which are related to motivation for learning. This study investigated students’ motivation in virtual learning environments (VLEs). For this, it used the Teaching and Learning Strategy and Motivation to Learn Scale in Virtual Learning Environments (TLSM-VLE). The scale presented 32 items and six dimensions, three of which aimed to measure the variables of autonomous motivation, controlled ...

  20. NERVE: New Enhanced Reverse Vaccinology Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippini Francesco

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since a milestone work on Neisseria meningitidis B, Reverse Vaccinology has strongly enhanced the identification of vaccine candidates by replacing several experimental tasks using in silico prediction steps. These steps have allowed scientists to face the selection of antigens from the predicted proteome of pathogens, for which cell culture is difficult or impossible, saving time and money. However, this good example of bioinformatics-driven immunology can be further developed by improving in silico steps and implementing biologist-friendly tools. Results We introduce NERVE (New Enhanced Reverse Vaccinology Environment, an user-friendly software environment for the in silico identification of the best vaccine candidates from whole proteomes of bacterial pathogens. The software integrates multiple robust and well-known algorithms for protein analysis and comparison. Vaccine candidates are ranked and presented in a html table showing relevant information and links to corresponding primary data. Information concerning all proteins of the analyzed proteome is not deleted along selection steps but rather flows into an SQL database for further mining and analyses. Conclusion After learning from recent years' works in this field and analysing a large dataset, NERVE has been implemented and tuned as the first available tool able to rank a restricted pool (~8–9% of the whole proteome of vaccine candidates and to show high recall (~75–80% of known protective antigens. These vaccine candidates are required to be "safe" (taking into account autoimmunity risk and "easy" for further experimental, high-throughput screening (avoiding possibly not soluble antigens. NERVE is expected to help save time and money in vaccine design and is available as an additional file with this manuscript; updated versions will be available at http://www.bio.unipd.it/molbinfo.

  1. Student Motivation in Constructivist Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin-Dindar, Ayla

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between constructivist learning environment and students'motivation to learn science by testing whether students' self-efficacy in learning science, intrinsically and extrinsically motivated science learning increase and students' anxiety about science assessment decreases when more…

  2. Enhancing students’ vocabulary knowledge using the Facebook environment

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Kamarul Kabilan; Tuti Zalina Mohamed Ernes Zahar

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of using Facebook in enhancing vocabulary knowledge among Community College students. Thirty-three (33) Community College students are exposed to the use of Facebook as an environment of learning and enhancing their English vocabulary. They are given a pre-test and a post-test and the findings indicate that students perform significantly better in the post-test compared to the pre-test. It appears that Facebook could be considered as a supplementary l...

  3. Predicting Virtual Learning Environment Adoption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penjor, Sonam; Zander, Pär-Ola Mikael

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the significance of Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovations (DOI) theory with regard to the use of a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) at the Royal University of Bhutan (RUB). The focus is on different adoption types and characteristics of users. Rogers’ DOI theory is applied...... to investigate the influence of five predictors (relative advantage, complexity, compatibility, trialability and observability) and their significance in the perception of academic staff at the RUB in relation to the probability of VLE adoption. These predictors are attributes of the VLE that determine the rate...... of adoption by various adopter group memberships (Innovators, Early Adopters, Early Majority, Late Majority, Laggards). Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were deployed to analyse adopter group memberships and predictor significance in VLE adoption and use. The results revealed varying attitudes...

  4. Personal Learning Environments in Black and White

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Kalz, M. (2010, 22 January). Personal Learning Environments in Black and White. Presentation provided during the workshop "Informal Learning and the use of social software in veterinary medicine" of the Noviceproject (http://www.noviceproject.eu), Utrecht, The Netherlands.

  5. Exploring Collaborative Learning Effect in Blended Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Z.; Liu, R.; Luo, L.; Wu, M.; Shi, C.

    2017-01-01

    The use of new technology encouraged exploration of the effectiveness and difference of collaborative learning in blended learning environments. This study investigated the social interactive network of students, level of knowledge building and perception level on usefulness in online and mobile collaborative learning environments in higher…

  6. Effective Use of Pause Procedure to Enhance Student Engagement and Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Bachhel, Rachna; Thaman, Richa Ghay

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Active learning strategies have been documented to enhance learning. We created an active learning environment in neuromuscular physiology lectures for first year medical students by using ‘Pause Procedure’.

  7. The better you feel the better you learn: do warm colours and rounded shapes enhance learning outcome in multimedia learning?

    OpenAIRE

    Münchow, Hannes; Mengelkamp, Christoph; Bannert, Maria

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether fostering positive activating affect during multimedia learning enhances learning outcome. University students were randomly assigned to either a multimedia learning environment designed to induce positive activating affect through the use of “warm” colours and rounded shapes (n=61) or an affectively neutral environment that used achromatic colours and sharp edges (n=50). Participants learned about the topic of functional neuroanatomy for 20...

  8. Mobile Affordances and Learning Theories in Supporting and Enhancing Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Kathryn; Day, Stephanie; Skelton, David; Verhaart, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Mobile technology promises to enhance and better support students' learning. The exploration and adoption of appropriate pedagogies that enhance learning is crucial for the wider adoption of mobile learning. An increasing number of studies have started to address how existing learning theory can be used to underpin and better frame mobile learning…

  9. Effective Learning Environments in Relation to Different Learning Theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guney, A.; Al, S.

    2012-01-01

    There are diverse learning theories which explain learning processes which are discussed within this paper, through cognitive structure of learning process. Learning environments are usually described in terms of pedagogical philosophy, curriculum design and social climate. There have been only just

  10. Infrared image enhancement with learned features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zunlin; Bi, Duyan; Ding, Wenshan

    2017-11-01

    Due to the variation of imaging environment and limitations of infrared imaging sensors, infrared images usually have some drawbacks: low contrast, few details and indistinct edges. Hence, to promote the applications of infrared imaging technology, it is essential to improve the qualities of infrared images. To enhance image details and edges adaptively, we propose an infrared image enhancement method under the proposed image enhancement scheme. On the one hand, on the assumption of high-quality image taking more evident structure singularities than low-quality images, we propose an image enhancement scheme that depends on the extractions of structure features. On the other hand, different from the current image enhancement algorithms based on deep learning networks that try to train and build the end-to-end mappings on improving image quality, we analyze the significance of first layer in Stacked Sparse Denoising Auto-encoder and propose a novel feature extraction for the proposed image enhancement scheme. Experiment results prove that the novel feature extraction is free from some artifacts on the edges such as blocking artifacts, ;gradient reversal;, and pseudo contours. Compared with other enhancement methods, the proposed method achieves the best performance in infrared image enhancement.

  11. E-Learning Systems, Environments and Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Isaias, P.; Spector, J.M.; Ifenthaler, D.; Sampson, D.G.

    2015-01-01

    The volume consists of twenty-five chapters selected from among peer-reviewed papers presented at the CELDA (Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age) 2013 Conference held in Fort Worth, Texas, USA, in October 2013 and also from world class scholars in e-learning systems, environments and approaches. The following sub-topics are included: Exploratory Learning Technologies (Part I), e-Learning social web design (Part II), Learner communities through e-Learning implementations (Par...

  12. Perceived Benefits of Technology Enhanced Learning by Learners in Uganda: Three Band Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Kafuko M. Maria; Namisango Fatuma; Byomire Gorretti

    2016-01-01

    Mobile learning (m-learning) is steadily growing and has undoubtedly derived benefits to learners and tutors in different learning environments. This paper investigates the variation in benefits derived from enhanced classroom learning through use of m-learning platforms in the context of a developing country owing to the fact that it is still in its initial stages. The study focused on how basic technology-enhanced pedagogic innovation like cell phone-based learning is enhancing classroom le...

  13. Technology Enhanced Learning in Programming Courses--International Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Mirjana; Xinogalos, Stelios; Pitner, Tomáš; Savic, Miloš

    2017-01-01

    Technology enhanced learning (TEL) is increasingly influencing university education, mainly in overcoming disadvantages of direct instruction teaching approaches, and encouraging creativity, problem solving and critical thinking in student-centered, interactive learning environments. In this paper, experiences from object-oriented programming…

  14. Soft Systems Methodology for Personalized Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Uday

    2015-01-01

    There are two sides to a coin when it comes to implementing technology at universities; on one side, there is the university using technologies via the virtual learning environment that seems to be outdated with the digital needs of the students, and on the other side, while implementing technology at the university learning environment the focus…

  15. Theoretical Foundations of Learning Environments. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonassen, David, Ed.; Land, Susan, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Theoretical Foundations of Learning Environments" provides students, faculty, and instructional designers with a clear, concise introduction to the major pedagogical and psychological theories and their implications for the design of new learning environments for schools, universities, or corporations. Leading experts describe the most…

  16. A Design Framework for Personal Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimi, E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our research was to develop a PLE (personal learning environment) design framework for workplace settings. By doing such, the research has answered this research question, how should a technology-based personal learning environment be designed, aiming at supporting learners to gain

  17. Preparing Teachers for Emerging Blended Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Kevin M.; Stallings, Dallas T.

    2014-01-01

    Blended learning environments that merge learning strategies, resources, and modes have been implemented in higher education settings for nearly two decades, and research has identified many positive effects. More recently, K-12 traditional and charter schools have begun to experiment with blended learning, but to date, research on the effects of…

  18. A Collaborative Model for Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Jorge; Barbosa, Debora; Rabello, Solon

    2016-01-01

    Use of mobile devices and widespread adoption of wireless networks have enabled the emergence of Ubiquitous Computing. Application of this technology to improving education strategies gave rise to Ubiquitous e-Learning, also known as Ubiquitous Learning. There are several approaches to organizing ubiquitous learning environments, but most of them…

  19. Teachers' experiences of teaching in a blended learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Pirkko; Mikkonen, Irma

    2013-11-01

    This paper considers teachers' experiences of teaching undergraduate nursing students in a blended learning environment. The basic idea of the study programme was to support students to reflect on theory and practice, and provide with access to expert and professional knowledge in real-life problem-solving and decision making. Learning was organised to support learning in and about work: students worked full-time and this provided excellent opportunities for learning both in practice, online and face-to-face sessions. The aim of the study was to describe teachers' experiences of planning and implementing teaching and learning in a blended-learning-based adult nursing programme. The research method was qualitative, and the data were collected by three focus group interviews, each with four to six participants. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results show that the blended learning environment constructed by the combination of face-to-face learning and learning in practice with technology-mediated learning creates challenges that must be taken into consideration when planning and implementing blended teaching and learning. However, it provides good opportunities to enhance students' learning in and about work. This is because such programmes support student motivation through the presence of "real-life" and their relevance to the students' own places of work. Nevertheless, teachers require knowledge of different pedagogical approaches; they need professional development support in redesigning teaching and learning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Interactive learning environments in augmented reality technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Wojciechowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of creation of learning environments based on augmented reality (AR is considered. The concept of AR is presented as a tool for safe and cheap experimental learning. In AR learning environments students may acquire knowledge by personally carrying out experiments on virtual objects by manipulating real objects located in real environments. In the paper, a new approach to creation of interactive educational scenarios, called Augmented Reality Interactive Scenario Modeling (ARISM, is mentioned. In this approach, the process of building learning environments is divided into three stages, each of them performed by users with different technical and domain knowledge. The ARISM approach enables teachers who are not computer science experts to create AR learning environments adapted to the needs of their students.

  1. Learning in Virtual Forest: A Forest Ecosystem in the Web-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jussila, Terttu; Virtanen, Viivi

    2014-01-01

    Virtual Forest is a web-based, open-access learning environment about forests designed for primary-school pupils between the ages of 10 and 13 years. It is pedagogically designed to develop an understanding of ecology, to enhance conceptual development and to give a holistic view of forest ecosystems. Various learning tools, such as concept maps,…

  2. Towards an intelligent environment for distance learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Morales

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Mainstream distance learning nowadays is heavily influenced by traditional educational approaches that produceshomogenised learning scenarios for all learners through learning management systems. Any differentiation betweenlearners and personalisation of their learning scenarios is left to the teacher, who gets minimum support from the system inthis respect. This way, the truly digital native, the computer, is left out of the move, unable to better support the teachinglearning processes because it is not provided with the means to transform into knowledge all the information that it storesand manages. I believe learning management systems should care for supporting adaptation and personalisation of bothindividual learning and the formation of communities of learning. Open learner modelling and intelligent collaborativelearning environments are proposed as a means to care. The proposal is complemented with a general architecture for anintelligent environment for distance learning and an educational model based on the principles of self-management,creativity, significance and participation.

  3. Learning Object Metadata in a Web-Based Learning Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avgeriou, Paris; Koutoumanos, Anastasios; Retalis, Symeon; Papaspyrou, Nikolaos

    2000-01-01

    The plethora and variance of learning resources embedded in modern web-based learning environments require a mechanism to enable their structured administration. This goal can be achieved by defining metadata on them and constructing a system that manages the metadata in the context of the learning

  4. The Effects of Integrating Social Learning Environment with Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspopovic, Miroslava; Cvetanovic, Svetlana; Medan, Ivana; Ljubojevic, Danijela

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the learning and teaching styles using the Social Learning Environment (SLE), which was developed based on the computer supported collaborative learning approach. To avoid burdening learners with multiple platforms and tools, SLE was designed and developed in order to integrate existing systems, institutional…

  5. Technically Speaking: Transforming Language Learning through Virtual Learning Environments (MOOs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Emde, Silke; Schneider, Jeffrey; Kotter, Markus

    2001-01-01

    Draws on experiences from a 7-week exchange between students learning German at an American college and advanced students of English at a German university. Maps out the benefits to using a MOO (multiple user domains object-oriented) for language learning: a student-centered learning environment structured by such objectives as peer teaching,…

  6. Clinical learning environment at Shiraz Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Rita; Ebrahimi, Sedigheh

    2013-01-01

    Clinical learning occurs in the context of a dynamic environment. Learning environment found to be one of the most important factors in determining the success of an effective teaching program. To investigate, from the attending and resident's perspective, factors that may affect student leaning in the educational hospital setting at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS). This study combined qualitative and quantitative methods to determine factors affecting effective learning in clinical setting. Residents evaluated the perceived effectiveness of the university hospital learning environment. Fifty two faculty members and 132 residents participated in this study. Key determinants that contribute to an effective clinical teaching were autonomy, supervision, social support, workload, role clarity, learning opportunity, work diversity and physical facilities. In a good clinical setting, residents should be appreciated and given appropriate opportunities to study in order to meet their objectives. They require a supportive environment to consolidate their knowledge, skills and judgment. © 2013 Tehran University of Medical Sciences. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical Learning Environment at Shiraz Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Ebrahimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical learning occurs in the context of a dynamic environment. Learning environment found to be one of the most important factors in determining the success of an effective teaching program. To investigate, from the attending and resident's perspective, factors that may affect student leaning in the educational hospital setting at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS. This study combined qualitative and quantitative methods to determine factors affecting effective learning in clinical setting. Residents evaluated the perceived effectiveness of the university hospital learning environment. Fifty two faculty members and 132 residents participated in this study. Key determinants that contribute to an effective clinical teaching were autonomy, supervision, social support, workload, role clarity, learning opportunity, work diversity and physical facilities. In a good clinical setting, residents should be appreciated and given appropriate opportunities to study in order to meet their objectives. They require a supportive environment to consolidate their knowledge, skills and judgment.

  8. Mapping Students’ Informal Learning Using Personal Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Anđelković Labrović

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Personal learning environments are a widely spared ways of learning, especially for the informal learning process. The aim of this research is to identify the elements of studens’ personal learning environment and to identify the extent to which students use modern technology for learning as part of their non-formal learning. A mapping system was used for gathering data and an analysis of percentages and frequency counts was used for data analysis in the SPSS. The results show that students’ personal learning environment includes the following elements: Wikipedia, Google, YouTube and Facebook in 75% of all cases, and an interesting fact is that all of them belong to a group of Web 2.0 tools and applications.

  9. Learning in a technology enhanced world

    OpenAIRE

    Specht, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Specht, M. (2009). Learning in a technology enhanced world. Invited talk given at the World Conference on E-learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare & Higher Education. October, 27, 2009, Vancouver, Canada.

  10. Create a good learning environment and motivate active learning enthusiasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Weihong; Fu, Guangwei; Fu, Xinghu; Zhang, Baojun; Liu, Qiang; Jin, Wa

    2017-08-01

    In view of the current poor learning initiative of undergraduates, the idea of creating a good learning environment and motivating active learning enthusiasm is proposed. In practice, the professional tutor is allocated and professional introduction course is opened for college freshman. It can promote communication between the professional teachers and students as early as possible, and guide students to know and devote the professional knowledge by the preconceived form. Practice results show that these solutions can improve the students interest in learning initiative, so that the active learning and self-learning has become a habit in the classroom.

  11. SCAFFOLDING IN CONNECTIVIST MOBILE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem OZAN

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Social networks and mobile technologies are transforming learning ecology. In this changing learning environment, we find a variety of new learner needs. The aim of this study is to investigate how to provide scaffolding to the learners in connectivist mobile learning environment: Ø to learn in a networked environment, Ø to manage their networked learning process, Ø to interact in a networked society, and Ø to use the tools belonging to the network society. The researcher described how Vygotsky's “scaffolding” concept, Berge’s “learner support” strategies, and Siemens’ “connectivism” approach can be used together to satisfy mobile learners’ needs. A connectivist mobile learning environment was designed for the research, and the research was executed as a mixed-method study. Data collection tools were Facebook wall entries, personal messages, chat records; Twitter, Diigo, blog entries; emails, mobile learning management system statistics, perceived learning survey and demographic information survey. Results showed that there were four major aspects of scaffolding in connectivist mobile learning environment as type of it, provider of it, and timing of it and strategies of it. Participants preferred mostly social scaffolding, and then preferred respectively, managerial, instructional and technical scaffolding. Social scaffolding was mostly provided by peers, and managerial scaffolding was mostly provided by instructor. Use of mobile devices increased the learner motivation and interest. Some participants stated that learning was more permanent by using mobile technologies. Social networks and mobile technologies made it easier to manage the learning process and expressed a positive impact on perceived learning.

  12. The Use of Virtual Learning Environment in Chinese Higher Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢苑苑

    2014-01-01

    The paper analyzes the current condition of the use of virtual learning environment (VLE) in Zhejiang University of Chinese Medicine. It is indicated that students show a positive attitude toward this technology, but the use of it fails to meet stu-dents’perception. In light of this, recommendations are made with a view to enhance the use of VLE.

  13. Conditions for Productive Learning in Network Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponti, M.; Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone; Lindström, B.

    2004-01-01

    are designed without a deep understanding of the pedagogical, communicative and collaborative conditions embedded in networked learning. Despite the existence of good theoretical views pointing to a social understanding of learning, rather than a traditional individualistic and information processing approach......The Kaleidoscope1 Jointly Executed Integrating Research Project (JEIRP) on Conditions for Productive Networked Learning Environments is developing and elaborating conceptual understandings of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) emphasizing the use of cross-cultural comparative......: Pedagogical design and the dialectics of the digital artefacts, the concept of collaboration, ethics/trust, identity and the role of scaffolding of networked learning environments.   The JEIRP is motivated by the fact that many networked learning environments in various European educational settings...

  14. Reconfiguring Course Design in Virtual Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael; Zupancic, Tadeja

    2007-01-01

    for architectural students offers some innovative insights into experientially oriented educational interfaces. A comparative analysis of VIPA courses and project results are presented in the paper. Special attention in the discussion is devoted to the improvements of e-learning solutions in architecture......Although many administrators and educators are familiar with e-learning programs, learning management systems and portals, fewer may have experience with virtual distributed learning environments and their academic relevance. The blended learning experience of the VIPA e-learning project....... The criterion of the relation between the actual applicability of selected e-learning solutions and elements of collaborative educational interfaces with VR are taken into account. A system of e-learning applicability levels in program and course development and implementation of architectural tectonics...

  15. USING WIKIS AS A SUPPORT AND ASSESSMENT TOOL IN COLLABORATIVE DIGITAL GAME-BASED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz SAMUR

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL environments, there are many researches done on collaborative learning activities; however, in game-based learning environments, more research and literature on collaborative learning activities are required. Actually, both game-based learning environments and wikis enable us to use new chances for learning, especially in collaborative learning activities. Therefore, in this paper, related literature on wikis and how game & instructional designers can leverage from wikis in game-based learning settings for enhancing students’ collaborative learning activities are examined. Based on the reviewed literature, two main suggestions are given in this paper with their underlying reasons. First, using wikis as a support tool for enhancing collaboration in digital game-based learning (DGBL environments, and second using wikis as an assessment tool in DGBL are suggested.

  16. Learning Environment as Correlates of Chemistry Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gold

    2012-07-26

    Jul 26, 2012 ... The study aimed at assessing how 13 learning environment variables taken ... chemistry education programmes for optimum achievement of students in ... The contribution of chemistry and chemists to social, industrial and.

  17. Information literacy experiencies inside virtual learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Hernández Salazar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Suggest the use of virtual learning environments as an Information Literacy (IL alternative. Method. Analysis of the main elements of web sites. To achieve this purpose the article includes the relationship between IL and the learning virtual environment (by defining both phrases; phases to create virtual IL programs; processes to elaborate didactic media; the applications that may support this plan; and the description of eleven examples of learning virtual environments IL experiences from four countries (Mexico, United States of America, Spain and United Kingdom these examples fulfill the conditions expressed. Results. We obtained four comparative tables examining five elements of each experience: objectives; target community; institution; country; and platform used. Conclusions. Any IL proposal should have a clear definition; IL experiences have to follow a didactic systematic process; described experiences are based on IL definition; the experiences analyzed are similar; virtual learning environments can be used as alternatives of IL.

  18. Relationship between learning environment characteristics and academic engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Minnaert, Alexander

    The relationship between learning environment characteristics and academic engagement of 777 Grade 6 children located in 41 learning environments was explored. Questionnaires were used to tap learning environment perceptions of children, their academic engagement, and their ethnic-cultural

  19. University Libraries and Digital Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    University libraries around the world have embraced the possibilities of the digital learning environment, facilitating its use and proactively seeking to develop the provision of electronic resources and services. The digital environment offers opportunities and challenges for librarians in all aspects of their work – in information literacy, virtual reference, institutional repositories, e-learning, managing digital resources and social media. The authors in this timely book are leading exp...

  20. Advanced Training Technologies and Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Training Technologies and Learning Environments held at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, March 9-10, 1999. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees were from NASA, other government agencies, industry, and universities. The objective of the workshop was to assess the status and effectiveness of different advanced training technologies and learning environments.

  1. Gendered learning environments in managerial work

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavsson, Maria; Fogelberg Eriksson, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The aim is to investigate female and male managers’ learning environments with particular focus on their opportunities for and barriers to learning and career development in the managerial work of a male-dominated industrial company. In the case study 42 managers, 15 women and 27 men in the company were interviewed. The findings demonstrate that the male managers were provided with significantly richer opportunities to participate in activities conducive to learning and career development tha...

  2. Playing SNES in the Retro Learning Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Bhonker, Nadav; Rozenberg, Shai; Hubara, Itay

    2016-01-01

    Mastering a video game requires skill, tactics and strategy. While these attributes may be acquired naturally by human players, teaching them to a computer program is a far more challenging task. In recent years, extensive research was carried out in the field of reinforcement learning and numerous algorithms were introduced, aiming to learn how to perform human tasks such as playing video games. As a result, the Arcade Learning Environment (ALE) (Bellemare et al., 2013) has become a commonly...

  3. Gendered Learning Environments in Managerial Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Maria; Eriksson, Anna Fogelberg

    2010-01-01

    The aim is to investigate female and male managers' learning environments with particular focus on their opportunities for and barriers to learning and career development in the managerial work of a male-dominated industrial company. In the case study 42 managers, 15 women and 27 men in the company were interviewed. The findings demonstrate that…

  4. Creating sustainable empowering learning environments through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... as these impede optimal learning especially among rural and immigrant communities in South Africa, Canada and the world over. The primary focus of all papers herein therefore is on the creation of sustainable empowering learning environments through engaged scholarship spearheaded by the university.

  5. The new learning environment is personal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, P.

    2013-01-01

    In a traditional sense the learning environment is qualified as the institutional setting for the teaching and learning to take place. This comprises the students, the teachers, management, the services and all the buildings, the classrooms, the equipment, the tools and laboratories that constitute

  6. Communicating the Library as a Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitecki, Danuta A.; Simpson, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Lack of commonly used vocabulary for informal learning environments hinders precise communication concerning what is observed, assessed, and understood about the relationship between space and learning. This study empirically extends taxonomies of terms and phrases that describe such relationships through content analysis of descriptions of…

  7. Invited Reaction: Influences of Formal Learning, Personal Learning Orientation, and Supportive Learning Environment on Informal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cseh, Maria; Manikoth, Nisha N.

    2011-01-01

    As the authors of the preceding article (Choi and Jacobs, 2011) have noted, the workplace learning literature shows evidence of the complementary and integrated nature of formal and informal learning in the development of employee competencies. The importance of supportive learning environments in the workplace and of employees' personal learning…

  8. Technology enhanced peer learning and peer assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Christian Bugge; Bregnhøj, Henrik; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the application of learning designs featuring formalised and structured technology enhanced peer learning. These include student produced learning elements, peer review discussions and peer assessment in the BSc/MSc level summer course Restoration of European Ecosystems and Fr...... be a huge benefit from developing learning design patterns that facilitate informal peer learning and reinforce knowledge sharing practices.......This paper explores the application of learning designs featuring formalised and structured technology enhanced peer learning. These include student produced learning elements, peer review discussions and peer assessment in the BSc/MSc level summer course Restoration of European Ecosystems...... and Freshwaters (REEF), the Master thesis preparation seminars for the Master of Public Health (MPH) and the MOOC course Global Environmental Management (GEM). The application of student produced learning elements and peer review discussions is investigated by analyzing quotes from course evaluations...

  9. Recommender Systems in Technology Enhanced Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manouselis, Nikos; Drachsler, Hendrik; Verbert, Katrien; Santos, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Manouselis, N., Drachsler, H., Verbert, K., & Santos, C. S. (Eds.) (2010). Recommender System in Technology Enhanced Learning. Elsevier Procedia Computer Science: Volume 1, Issue 2. Proceedings of the 1st Workshop on Recommender Systems for Technology Enhanced Learning (RecSysTEL). September, 29-30,

  10. Learner Ownership of Technology-Enhanced Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommett, Eleanor J.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the different ways in which learners may have ownership over technology-enhanced learning by reflecting on technical, legal and psychological ownership. Design/methodology/approach: The paper uses a variety of examples of technology-enhanced learning ranging from open-source software to cloud storage to discuss…

  11. Personalized learning Ecologies in Problem and Project Based Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn; Ryberg, Thomas; Zander, Pär-Ola

    2012-01-01

    is in contrast to an artificial learning setting often found in traditional education. As many other higher education institutions, Aalborg University aims at providing learning environments that support the underlying pedagogical approach employed, and which can lead to different online and offline learning.......g. coordination, communication, negotiation, document sharing, calendars, meetings and version control. Furthermore, the pedagogical fabric of LMSs/VLEs have recently been called into question and critiqued by proponents of Personal Learning Environments (PLEs)(Ryberg, Buus, & Georgsen, 2011) . In sum....... making it important to understand and conceptualise students’ use of technology. Ecology is the study of relationship between organisms in an environment which is the set of circumstances surrounding that organism. Learning ecologies are the study of the relationship of a learner or a group of learners...

  12. The Effectiveness of Blended Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryilmaz, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    The object of this experimental study is to measure the effectiveness of a blended learning environment which is laid out on the basis of features for face to face and online environments. The study was applied to 110 students who attend to Atilim University, Ankara, Turkey and take Introduction to Computers Course. During the application,…

  13. Teachers as designers of technology enhanced learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kali, Yael; McKenney, Susan; Sagy, Ornit; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Design of (technology-enhanced) learning activities and materials is one fruitful process through which teachers learn and become professionals. To facilitate this process, research is needed to understand how teachers learn through design, how this process may be supported, and how teacher

  14. Enhancing Student Success in Online Learning Experiences through the Use of Self-Regulation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Laurie A.; Sharp, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    Online learning experiences have greatly changed the landscape of instruction. Many courses in postsecondary environments incorporate some type of technological enhancement, which holds benefits for both postsecondary institutions and learners. However, online learning experiences require different pedagogical characteristics than traditional…

  15. Digital Learning Environments: New possibilities and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Peters

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the general problem whether and, if so, how far the impact of the digitised learning environment on our traditional distance education will change the way in which teachers teach and learners learn. Are the dramatic innovations a menace to established ways of learning and teaching or are they the panacea to overcome some of the difficulties of our system of higher learning and to solve some of our educational problems caused by the big and far-reaching educational paradigm shift? This paper will not deal with technical or technological achievements in the field of information and communication which are, of course, revolutionary and to be acknowledged and admired. Rather, the digital learning environment will be analysed from a pedagogical point of view in order to find out what exactly are the didactic possibilities and opportunities and what are its foreseeable disadvantages.

  16. Personal Learning Environment – a Conceptual Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Mühlburger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of digital technologies as well as the World Wide Web on education rises dramatically. In former years Learning Management Systems (LMS were introduced on educational institutes to address the needs both their institutions and their lecturers. Nowadays a shift from an institution-centered approach to a learner-centered one becomes necessary to allow individuality through the learning process and to think about learning strategies in general. In this paper a first approach of a Personal Learning Environment (PLE is described. The technological concept is pointed out as well as a study about the graphical user-interface done at Graz University of Technology (TU Graz. It can be concluded that PLEs are the next generation environments, which help to improve the learning and teaching behavior

  17. How People Learn in an Asynchronous Online Learning Environment: The Relationships between Graduate Students' Learning Strategies and Learning Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Beomkyu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between learners' learning strategies and learning satisfaction in an asynchronous online learning environment. In an attempt to shed some light on how people learn in an online learning environment, one hundred and sixteen graduate students who were taking online learning courses…

  18. Concept Mapping Using Cmap Tools to Enhance Meaningful Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, Alberto J.; Novak, Joseph D.

    Concept maps are graphical tools that have been used in all facets of education and training for organizing and representing knowledge. When learners build concept maps, meaningful learning is facilitated. Computer-based concept mapping software such as CmapTools have further extended the use of concept mapping and greatly enhanced the potential of the tool, facilitating the implementation of a concept map-centered learning environment. In this chapter, we briefly present concept mapping and its theoretical foundation, and illustrate how it can lead to an improved learning environment when it is combined with CmapTools and the Internet. We present the nationwide “Proyecto Conéctate al Conocimiento” in Panama as an example of how concept mapping, together with technology, can be adopted by hundreds of schools as a means to enhance meaningful learning.

  19. Enhancing Community Service Learning Via Practical Learning Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Ronen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of learning communities focused on analyzing social issues and educational repercussions in the field are presented in this study. The research examines the contribution of a learning community to enhancing student teachers' responsibility and their social involvement. The assumption was that participating in learning community would further implement student teachers' community social involvement while enhancing responsibility in their field of action. A questionnaire aimed to present the student teachers' attitudes involving all aspects of studying in the learning community and their social activity in the community was conducted. The findings pinpointed that there were positive contributions of the learning communities from a personal aspect such as developing self-learning, and learning about “me”, as well as broaden their teaching skills, through methodology for teacher training, and developing reflective thought. These insights can also be implemented in various educational frameworks and during service learning as part of teacher training.

  20. Clinical learning environments: place, artefacts and rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Dale; Jowsey, Tanisha; Parwaiz, Mariam; Birch, Mark; Seaton, Philippa; Shaw, Susan; Duggan, Alison; Wilkinson, Tim

    2017-10-01

    Health care practitioners learn through experience in clinical environments in which supervision is a key component, but how that learning occurs outside the supervision relationship remains largely unknown. This study explores the environmental factors that inform and support workplace learning within a clinical environment. An observational study drawing on ethnographic methods was undertaken in a general medicine ward. Observers paid attention to interactions among staff members that involved potential teaching and learning moments that occurred and were visible in the course of routine work. General purpose thematic analysis of field notes was undertaken. A total of 376 observations were undertaken and documented. The findings suggest that place (location of interaction), rhythm (regularity of activities occurring in the ward) and artefacts (objects and equipment) were strong influences on the interactions and exchanges that occurred. Each of these themes had inherent tensions that could promote or inhibit engagement and therefore learning opportunities. Although many learning opportunities were available, not all were taken up or recognised by the participants. We describe and make explicit how the natural environment of a medical ward and flow of work through patient care contribute to the learning architecture, and how this creates or inhibits opportunities for learning. Awareness of learning opportunities was often tacit and not explicit for either supervisor or learner. We identify strategies through which tensions inherent within space, artefacts and the rhythms of work can be resolved and learning opportunities maximised. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  1. Students’ Motivation for Learning in Virtual Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Carvalho Beluce

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The specific characteristics of online education require of the student engagement and autonomy, factors which are related to motivation for learning. This study investigated students’ motivation in virtual learning environments (VLEs. For this, it used the Teaching and Learning Strategy and Motivation to Learn Scale in Virtual Learning Environments (TLSM-VLE. The scale presented 32 items and six dimensions, three of which aimed to measure the variables of autonomous motivation, controlled motivation, and demotivation. The participants were 572 students from the Brazilian state of Paraná, enrolled on higher education courses on a continuous education course. The results revealed significant rates for autonomous motivational behavior. It is considered that the results obtained may provide contributions for the educators and psychologists who work with VLEs, leading to further studies of the area providing information referent to the issue investigated in this study.

  2. The Development of a Learning Dashboard for Lecturers: A Case Study on a Student-Centered E-Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, Harry B.; Batuparan, Alivia Khaira; Isal, R. Yugo K.; Goodridge, Wade H.

    2018-01-01

    Student Centered e-Learning Environment (SCELE) is a Moodle-based learning management system (LMS) that has been modified to enhance learning within a computer science department curriculum offered by the Faculty of Computer Science of large public university in Indonesia. This Moodle provided a mechanism to record students' activities when…

  3. Grand Challenge Problem 3: Empowering Science Teachers Using Technology-Enhanced Scaffolding to Improve Inquiry Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedaste, Margus; Lazonder, Adrianus W.; Raes, Annelies; Wajeman, Claire; Moore, Emily; Girault, Isabelle; Eberle, Julia; Lund, Kristine; Tchounikine, Pierre; Fischer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Inquiry learning in technology-enhanced learning (TEL) environments has potential to support science learning. The “symbiosis” between teachers and TEL environments is needed and, therefore, virtual assistants should be “taught” based on pedagogical theories. These assistants should be dynamically

  4. Learning Environment Facilitating Educational Achievements of Teenagers

    OpenAIRE

    Šūmane, Ilze

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT. The doctoral thesis of Ilze Šūmane in pedagogy science, school pedagogy sub-discipline ”Learning environment facilitating educational achievements of teenagers” was worked out in the Department of Pedagogy, Faculty of Pedagogy, Psychology and Arts, University of Latvia, under the supervision of Dr.paed., professor Rudīte Andersone from2001 till 2011. The topicality of the research determined by the necessity to improve quality learning and education. During an effective study ...

  5. The sociability of computer-supported collaborative learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreijns, C.J.; Kirschner, P.A.; Jochems, W.M.G.

    2002-01-01

    There is much positive research on computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments in asynchronous distributed learning groups (DLGs). There is also research that shows that contemporary CSCL environments do not completely fulfil expectations on supporting interactive group learning,

  6. Designing Ubiquitous Computing to Enhance Children's Learning in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, T.; Bannon, L.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, novel paradigms of computing have emerged, which enable computational power to be embedded in artefacts and in environments in novel ways. These developments may create new possibilities for using computing to enhance learning. This paper presents the results of a design process that set out to explore interactive techniques,…

  7. Estimating Students’ Satisfaction with Web Based Learning System in Blended Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Bauk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning became the most popular educational model that universities apply for teaching and learning. This model combines online and face-to-face learning environments, in order to enhance learning with implementation of new web technologies and tools in learning process. In this paper principles of DeLone and Mclean success model for information system are applied to Kano two-dimensional model, for categorizing quality attributes related to satisfaction of students with web based learning system used in blended learning model. Survey results are obtained among the students at “Mediterranean” University in Montenegro. The (dysfunctional dimensions of Kano model, including Kano basic matrix for assessment of the degree of students’ satisfaction level, have been considered in some more detail through corresponding numerical, graphical, and statistical analysis.

  8. Ethnography in the Danish Veterinary Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Kirketerp Nielsen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this project is research-based development, implementation and evaluation of a game-based learning concept to be used in the veterinary education. Herd visits and animal contact are essential for the development of veterinary competences and skills during education. Yet veterinary students have little occasion to reach/attain a proper level of confidence in their own skills/abilities, as they have limited “training-facilities” (Kneebone & Baillie, 2008. One possible solution mightbe to provide a safe, virtual environment (game-based where students could practise interdisciplinary clinical skills in an easily-accessible, interactive setting. A playable demo using Classical Swine Fever in a pig herd as an example has been produced for this purpose. In order totailor the game concept to the specific veterinary learning environment and to ensure compliance with both learning objectives and the actual learning processes/procedures of the veterinary students, the project contains both a developmental aspect (game development and an exploration of the academic (scholastic and profession (practice oriented learning context. The initial phase of the project was a preliminary exploration of the actual learning context, providing an important starting point for the upcoming phase in which I will concentrate on research-based development, implementation and evaluation of a game-based virtual environment in this course context. In the academic (scholastic and profession (practice oriented learning context of a veterinary course in Herd Health Management (Pig module,ethnographic studies have been conducted by using multiple data collection methods; participant observation, spontaneous dialogues and interviews (Borgnakke, 1996; Hammersley & Atkinson, 2007. All courserelated activities in the different learning spaces (commercial pig herds, auditoriums, post-mortem examinations, independent group work were followed.This paper will

  9. Creating a Learning Environment for Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Peter

    2004-01-01

    Until recently discussions about improvement of educational quality have focussed on the teacher – it was as-sumed that by training the teacher you could increase the students’ learning outcome. Realising that other changes than better teaching were necessary to give the students more useful......? And the introduction of IT has highlighted the importance of the learning environment, but the focus has narrowly been on the physical environment. However, the mental frame-work is also very important. To assure educational quality it is necessary to take all these elements into account and consider the total...

  10. The Relationship among Self-Regulated Learning, Procrastination, and Learning Behaviors in Blended Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masanori; Goda, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroshi; Miyagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to investigate the relationship among the awareness of self-regulated learning (SRL), procrastination, and learning behaviors in blended learning environment. One hundred seventy nine freshmen participated in this research, conducted in the blended learning style class using learning management system. Data collection was…

  11. Replicating enterprise environment using Office 365 to enhance graduates’ employability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carutasu Nicoleta Luminita

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The need of faster insertion of graduates into labor market and enhancing professional and soft skills of graduates required by employees, conduct to new learning method necessity. Starting from stated foreseen of Europe 2020 strategy, creativity, entrepreneurship and intensive use of ICT should be enhanced soon to all academic levels. Also, the entrepreneurs require that graduates to have strong organizational knowledge, to quickly integrate into company’ business processes. The traditional assessment of students implies an individual form, team assessment being avoided to be sure of each individual contribution. Also, the future Industry 4.0 implementations will ask for interdisciplinary skills regarding ICT use and specific digital workflows. The proposed enterprise environment replication uses ERP as backbone of IT infrastructure and Office 365 as business workflow tool management. The experience in using ERP as laboratory IT infrastructure for multiple subjects of academic curriculum of the same academic program showed that graduates could focus on internal business process and documents flow rather than learning how to use the software. The Office 365 is used to experience internal workflow of companies, implemented on existent tenants. To enhance the entrepreneurship and innovation, the learning method is completed with simulated enterprise specific activities.

  12. Learning Anatomy Enhances Spatial Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Klaassen, Tim P. F. M.; Donders, A. R. T.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability is an important factor in learning anatomy. Students with high scores on a mental rotation test (MRT) systematically score higher on anatomy examinations. This study aims to investigate if learning anatomy also oppositely improves the MRT-score. Five hundred first year students of medicine ("n" = 242, intervention) and…

  13. Recommender Systems in Technology Enhanced Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manouselis, Nikos; Drachsler, Hendrik; Vuorikari, Riina; Hummel, Hans; Koper, Rob

    2010-01-01

    Manouselis, N., Drachsler, H., Vuorikari, R., Hummel, H. G. K., & Koper, R. (2011). Recommender Systems in Technology Enhanced Learning. In P. B. Kantor, F. Ricci, L. Rokach, & B. Shapira (Eds.), Recommender Systems Handbook (pp. 387-415). Berlin: Springer.

  14. Teacher Design Knowledge for Technology Enhanced Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This presentation shares a framework for investigating the knowledge teachers need to be able to design technology-enhanced learning. Specific activities are undertaken to consider elements within the framework

  15. Generation and Application of Virtual Dynamic Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Zaretsky

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The generation of virtual dynamic learning environments by mental imagery improved physical education of student teachers. Up-to-date studies showed that training computerized simulations improved spatial abilities, especially visualization of the body's movements in space, and enhanced academic achievements. The main program of the research concentrated on creating teaching units focusing on a variety of physical skills through computerized dynamic presentations. The findings showed that as the student teachers practiced the creation of simulations through the PowerPoint Software, it became clear to them how the computer is related to physical activities. Consequently their presentations became highly animated, and applied to the natural environment. The student teachers applied their presentations in their practical classroom and reported about their pupils' progress in physical skills. Moreover the motivation of the student teachers and pupils to both modes of learning, manipulating virtually and physically, was enhanced.

  16. Learning environments matter: Identifying influences on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the light of the poor academic achievement in science by secondary school students in South Africa, students' motivation for science learning should be enhanced. It is argued that this can only be achieved with insight into which motivational factors to target, with due consideration of the diversity in schools. The study ...

  17. The use of serious gaming for open learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Lunn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The extensive growth of Open Learning has been facilitated through technological innovation and continuous examination of the global Open Education development. With the introduction of compulsory computing subjects being incorporated into the UK school system in September 2014, the challenge of harnessing and integrating technological advances to aid children's learning is becoming increasingly important, referring to £1.1 million being invested to offer training programs for teachers to become knowledgeable and experienced in computing. From the age of 5, children will be taught detailed computing knowledge and skills such as; algorithms, how to store digital content, to write and test simple programs. Simultaneously, as the Internet and technology are improving, parents and teachers are looking at the incorporation of game based learning to aid children’s learning processes in more exciting and engaging ways. The purpose of game-based learning is to provide a better engagement, and in turn, an anticipated improvement in learning ability. This paper presents a research based on the investigation of properly combining the advantages of serious games and Open Learning to enhance the learning abilities of primary school children. The case study and the adequate evaluation address a learning environment in support of a history subject matter.

  18. Smile: Student Modification in Learning Environments. Establishing Congruence between Actual and Preferred Classroom Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrow, Allan; Millwater, Jan

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated whether classroom psychosocial environment, as perceived by student teachers, could be improved to their preferred level. Students completed the College and University Classroom Environment Inventory, discussed interventions, then completed it again. Significant deficiencies surfaced in the learning environment early in the…

  19. Utilization of virtual learning environments in the allied health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butina, Michelle; Brooks, Donna; Dominguez, Paul J; Mahon, Gwendolyn M

    2013-01-01

    Multiple technology based tools have been used to enhance skill development in allied health education, which now includes virtual learning environments. The purpose of this study was to explore whether, and how, this latest instructional technology is being adapted in allied health education. An online survey was circulated to all Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) member institutions and focused on three broad areas of virtual learning environments: the uses of, the perceived pros and cons of, and the outcomes of utilizing them. Results show 40% (17 of 42) of the respondent use some form of the technology. The use of virtual learning technology in other healthcare professions (e.g., medicine) demonstrates the potential benefits to allied health education.

  20. Teachers as Designers of Technology Enhanced Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kali, Yael; McKenney, Susan; Sagy, Ornit

    2015-01-01

    While the benefits of teacher involvement in designing technology enhanced learning are acknowledged in the literature, far less is known about shaping that involvement to yield those benefits. Research is needed to understand how teachers learn through design; how teacher design activities may be

  1. Total Recall: Using Film to Enhance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Douglas N.

    2012-01-01

    Several scholars (e.g. Bumpus, 2005; Champoux, 1999; Mayer, 2005) and practitioners (Gallos 2007; English & Steffy, 1995; Hackley, 2007) of workplace learning have put forward the claim that the use of film (and other forms of multimedia) enhances learning. If this is the case, particularly given the increasing pressure to do more with less,…

  2. Teachers as Designers of Technology Enhanced Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kali, Yael; McKenney, Susan; Sagy, Ornit

    2015-01-01

    While the benefits of teacher involvement in designing technology enhanced learning are acknowledged in the literature, far less is known about shaping that involvement to yield those benefits. Research is needed to understand how teachers learn through design; how teacher design activities may be supported; and how teacher involvement in design…

  3. Teachers as Designers of Technology Enhanced Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kali, Yael; McKenney, Susan; Sagy, Ornit

    2016-01-01

    While the benefits of teacher involvement in designing technology enhanced learning are acknowledged in the literature, far less is known about shaping that involvement to yield those benefits. Research is needed to understand how teachers learn through design; how teacher design activities may be

  4. Timepiece: Extending and Enhancing Learning Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lorin W., Ed.; Walberg, Herbert J., Ed.

    This publication offers suggestions for making more productive use of time, a scarce and valued educational resource. The chapter authors, authorities on the use of educational time, write about how to extend and enhance learning time within and outside schools. In "Productive Use of Time," Herbert Walberg describes how learning time can be…

  5. Utilising learning environment assessments to improve teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined the viability of using feedback from a learning environment instrument to guide improvements in the teaching practices of in-service teachers undertaking a distance-education programme. The 31 teachers involved administered a primary school version of the What Is Happening In this Class?

  6. Educational Ethnography in Blended Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadou, Victoria; Dooly, Melinda

    2017-01-01

    This chapter aims to answer some of the questions that emerge when carrying out educational ethnography in a blended learning environment. The authors first outline how Virtual Ethnography (VE) has been developed and applied by other researchers. Then, to better illustrate the approach, they describe a doctoral research project that implemented…

  7. Alternative Learning Environments in the Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eugene D.

    This paper outlines a program utilized in the Countryside School which offers alternative learning environments in the elementary school. The program includes (1) semi-departmentalization; (2) team teaching; and (3) an open-alternatives program. Each of these areas is outlined and fully discussed in terms of student and parent needs. (YRJ)

  8. Measuring the clinical learning environment in anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, N A; Castanelli, D J

    2015-03-01

    The learning environment describes the way that trainees perceive the culture of their workplace. We audited the learning environment for trainees throughout Australia and New Zealand in the early stages of curriculum reform. A questionnaire was developed and sent electronically to a large random sample of Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists trainees, with a 26% final response rate. This new instrument demonstrated good psychometric properties, with Cronbach's α ranging from 0.81 to 0.91 for each domain. The median score was equivalent to 78%, with the majority of trainees giving scores in the medium range. Introductory respondents scored their learning environment more highly than all other levels of respondents (P=0.001 for almost all comparisons). We present a simple questionnaire instrument that can be used to determine characteristics of the anaesthesia learning environment. The instrument can be used to help assess curricular change over time, alignment of the formal and informal curricula and strengths and weaknesses of individual departments.

  9. The Classroom Environment Study: Teaching for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lorin W.

    1987-01-01

    The IEA's Classroom Environment Study, implemented in grades 5-9 in 9 countries, examined effects on student outcomes of home, community, school, teacher, and student characteristics and classroom practices. Across countries, course content varied widely, but teachers relied on relatively few classroom behaviors. Student learning was affected by…

  10. Hipatia: a hypermedia learning environment in mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Cueli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature revealed the benefits of different instruments for the development of mathematical competence, problem solving, self-regulated learning, affective-motivational aspects and intervention in students with specific difficulties in mathematics. However, no one tool combined all these variables. The aim of this study is to present and describe the design and development of a hypermedia tool, Hipatia. Hypermedia environments are, by definición, adaptive learning systems, which are usually a web-based application program that provide a personalized learning environment. This paper describes the principles on which Hipatia is based as well as a review of available technologies developed in different academic subjects. Hipatia was created to boost self-regulated learning, develop specific math skills, and promote effective problem solving. It was targeted toward fifth and sixth grade students with and without learning difficulties in mathematics. After the development of the tool, we concluded that it aligned well with the logic underlying the principles of self-regulated learning. Future research is needed to test the efficacy of Hipatia with an empirical methodology.

  11. Cooperative Learning Principles Enhance Online Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, George; Seow, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes eight principles that can be used to promote cooperative interactions among students working in online environments. The principles derive from a well-established approach to education, known variously as cooperative learning and collaborative learning. Each principle is explained as to what it means, why it is important and…

  12. AR-based Technoself Enhanced Learning Approach to Improving Student Engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, L.; Huang, W.; Wen, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The emerging technologies have expanded a new dimension of self – ‘technoself’ driven by socio-technical innovations and taken an important step forward in pervasive learning. Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) research has increasingly focused on emergent technologies such as Augmented Reality (AR) for augmented learning, mobile learning, and game-based learning in order to improve self-motivation and self-engagement of the learners in enriched multimodal learning environments. These researc...

  13. Learning under uncertainty in smart home environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; McClean, Sally; Scotney, Bryan; Nugent, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Technologies and services for the home environment can provide levels of independence for elderly people to support 'ageing in place'. Learning inhabitants' patterns of carrying out daily activities is a crucial component of these technological solutions with sensor technologies being at the core of such smart environments. Nevertheless, identifying high-level activities from low-level sensor events can be a challenge, as information may be unreliable resulting in incomplete data. Our work addresses the issues of learning in the presence of incomplete data along with the identification and the prediction of inhabitants and their activities under such uncertainty. We show via the evaluation results that our approach also offers the ability to assess the impact of various sensors in the activity recognition process. The benefit of this work is that future predictions can be utilised in a proposed intervention mechanism in a real smart home environment.

  14. Enhancing fieldwork learning using blended learning, GIS and remote supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Wouter A.; Alberti, Koko; Karssenberg, Derek

    2015-04-01

    Fieldwork is an important part of education in geosciences and essential to put theoretical knowledge into an authentic context. Fieldwork as teaching tool can take place in various forms, such as field-tutorial, excursion, or supervised research. Current challenges with fieldwork in education are to incorporate state-of-the art methods for digital data collection, on-site GIS-analysis and providing high-quality feedback to large groups of students in the field. We present a case on first-year earth-sciences fieldwork with approximately 80 students in the French Alps focused on geological and geomorphological mapping. Here, students work in couples and each couple maps their own fieldwork area to reconstruct the formative history. We present several major improvements for this fieldwork using a blended-learning approach, relying on open source software only. An important enhancement to the French Alps fieldwork is improving students' preparation. In a GIS environment, students explore their fieldwork areas using existing remote sensing data, a digital elevation model and derivatives to formulate testable hypotheses before the actual fieldwork. The advantage of this is that the students already know their area when arriving in the field, have started to apply the empirical cycle prior to their field visit, and are therefore eager to investigate their own research questions. During the fieldwork, students store and analyze their field observations in the same GIS environment. This enables them to get a better overview of their own collected data, and to integrate existing data sources also used in the preparation phase. This results in a quicker and enhanced understanding by the students. To enable remote access to observational data collected by students, the students synchronize their data daily with a webserver running a web map application. Supervisors can review students' progress remotely, examine and evaluate their observations in a GIS, and provide

  15. The Social Semantic Web in Intelligent Learning Environments: State of the Art and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Jelena; Gasevic, Dragan; Torniai, Carlo; Bateman, Scott; Hatala, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Today's technology-enhanced learning practices cater to students and teachers who use many different learning tools and environments and are used to a paradigm of interaction derived from open, ubiquitous, and socially oriented services. In this context, a crucial issue for education systems in general, and for Intelligent Learning Environments…

  16. Can a Hypermedia Cooperative e-Learning Environment Stimulate Constructive Collaboration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pragnell, Mary Victoria; Roselli, Teresa; Rossano, Veronica

    2006-01-01

    The growing use of the Internet in learning environments has led to new models being created addressing specific learning domains, as well as more general educational goals. In particular, in recent years considerable attention has been paid to collaborative learning supported by technology, because this mode can enhance peer interaction and group…

  17. The Predicaments of Language Learners in Traditional Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafie, Latisha Asmaak; Mansor, Mahani

    2009-01-01

    Some public universities in developing countries have traditional language learning environments such as classrooms with only blackboards and furniture which do not provide conducive learning environments. These traditional environments are unable to cater for digital learners who need to learn with learning technologies. In order to create…

  18. A Well Designed School Environment Facilitates Brain Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tak Cheung; Petrie, Garth

    2000-01-01

    Examines how school design facilitates learning by complementing how the brain learns. How the brain learns is discussed and how an artistic environment, spaciousness in the learning areas, color and lighting, and optimal thermal and acoustical environments aid student learning. School design suggestions conclude the article. (GR)

  19. Personal Learning Environments: A Solution for Self-Directed Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I discuss "personal learning environments" and their diverse benefits, uses, and implications for life-long learning. Personal Learning Environments (PLEs) are Web 2.0 and social media technologies that enable individual learners the ability to manage their own learning. Self-directed learning is explored as a foundation…

  20. Construction of a Digital Learning Environment Based on Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jihong; Xiong, Caiping; Liu, Huazhong

    2015-01-01

    Constructing the digital learning environment for ubiquitous learning and asynchronous distributed learning has opened up immense amounts of concrete research. However, current digital learning environments do not fully fulfill the expectations on supporting interactive group learning, shared understanding and social construction of knowledge.…

  1. Students’ Preferred Characteristics of Learning Environments in Vocational Secondary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Ingeborg Placklé; Karen D. Könings; Wolfgang Jacquet; Katrien Struyven; Arno Libotton; Jeroen J. G. van Merriënboer; Nadine Engels

    2014-01-01

    If teachers and teacher educators are willing to support the learning of students, it is important for them to learn what motivates students to engage in learning. Students have their own preferences on design characteristics of powerful learning environments in vocational education. We developed an instrument – the Inventory Powerful Learning Environments in Vocational Education - to measure students’ preferences on characteristics of powerful learning environments in vocational education. W...

  2. Students Preferred Characteristics of Learning Environments in Vocational Secondary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Placklé, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    If teachers and teacher educators are willing to support the learning of students, it is important for them to learn what motivates students to engage in learning. Students have their own preferences on design characteristics of powerful learning environments in vocational education. We developed an instrument - the Inventory Powerful Learning Environments in Vocational Education - to measure studentsâ preferences on characteristics of powerful learning environments in voca-tional education. ...

  3. Prototyping Feedback for Technology Enhanced Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cojocaru, Dorian; Spikol, Daniel; Friesel, Anna

    2016-01-01

    secondary-level high school STEM learning environments to post-secondary level engineering classes and design studios. Given this experience and framework, the present paper provides a perspective on the importance of using such research experience and iterative prototyping in real learning environments......The development of new educational technologies, in the area of practical activities is the main aim of the FP7 PELARS project. As part of the constructivist learning scenarios, according to the project proposal, the development and evaluation of technology designs are envisaged, for analytic data...... generation for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects, such as: technology solutions, infrastructure, activities, assessment, curricula, and classroom furniture and environment designs. Inside four EU national settings, three separate learning contexts are being dealt with – from...

  4. Enhanced learning through design problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Högberg, Stig; Jensen, Frida av Fløtum

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a teaching method used in an electrical machines course, where the students learn about electrical machines by designing them. The aim of the course is not to teach design, albeit this is a side product, but rather to teach the fundamentals and the function of electrical...... machines through design. The teaching method is evaluated by a student questionnaire, designed to measure the quality and effectiveness of the teaching method. The results of the questionnaire conclusively show that this method labelled ‘learning through design’ is a very effective way of teaching...

  5. The Videoconferencing Learning Environment: Technology, Interaction and Learning Intersect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, K. G.; Majid, Omar; Ghani, N. Abdul; Atan, H.; Idrus, R. M.; Rahman, Z. A.; Tan, K. E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a study on the interaction patterns of distance learners enrolled in the Mathematics and Physics programmes of Universiti Sains Malaysia in the videoconferencing learning environment (VCLE). Interaction patterns are analysed in six randomly chosen videoconferencing sessions within one academic year. The findings show there are more…

  6. Investigation of the Relationship between Learning Process and Learning Outcomes in E-Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurdugül, Halil; Menzi Çetin, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: Learners can access and participate in online learning environments regardless of time and geographical barriers. This brings up the umbrella concept of learner autonomy that contains self-directed learning, self-regulated learning and the studying process. Motivation and learning strategies are also part of this umbrella…

  7. Sociocultural Perspective of Science in Online Learning Environments. Communities of Practice in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Niyazi

    2016-01-01

    Present study reviews empirical research studies related to learning science in online learning environments as a community. Studies published between 1995 and 2015 were searched by using ERIC and EBSCOhost databases. As a result, fifteen studies were selected for review. Identified studies were analyzed with a qualitative content analysis method…

  8. Linkages between motivation, self-efficacy, self-regulated learning and preferences for traditional learning environments or those with an online component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Auld

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed 96 law school students’ preferences for online, hybrid, or traditional learning environments, and their reasons for these preferences, learning strategies, and motivational orientations. A discriminant analysis revealed that non-traditional learning environment familiarity, self-efficacy, and employment status were the strongest predictors of preferences for non-traditional learning environments. Preferences for traditional environments were attributed to students’ familiarity and ability to engage in and foster personal interaction. Preferences for hybrid and online environments were attributed to opportunities for enhanced learning given the convenience and flexible manner in which students with time and familial constraints could access these environments.

  9. Physical experience enhances science learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontra, Carly; Lyons, Daniel J; Fischer, Susan M; Beilock, Sian L

    2015-06-01

    Three laboratory experiments involving students' behavior and brain imaging and one randomized field experiment in a college physics class explored the importance of physical experience in science learning. We reasoned that students' understanding of science concepts such as torque and angular momentum is aided by activation of sensorimotor brain systems that add kinetic detail and meaning to students' thinking. We tested whether physical experience with angular momentum increases involvement of sensorimotor brain systems during students' subsequent reasoning and whether this involvement aids their understanding. The physical experience, a brief exposure to forces associated with angular momentum, significantly improved quiz scores. Moreover, improved performance was explained by activation of sensorimotor brain regions when students later reasoned about angular momentum. This finding specifies a mechanism underlying the value of physical experience in science education and leads the way for classroom practices in which experience with the physical world is an integral part of learning. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Reading a Story: Different Degrees of Learning in Different Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Giannini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The learning environment in which material is acquired may produce differences in delayed recall and in the elements that individuals focus on. These differences may appear even during development. In the present study, we compared three different learning environments in 450 normally developing 7-year-old children subdivided into three groups according to the type of learning environment. Specifically, children were asked to learn the same material shown in three different learning environments: reading illustrated books (TB; interacting with the same text displayed on a PC monitor and enriched with interactive activities (PC-IA; reading the same text on a PC monitor but not enriched with interactive narratives (PC-NoIA. Our results demonstrated that TB and PC-NoIA elicited better verbal memory recall. In contrast, PC-IA and PC-NoIA produced higher scores for visuo-spatial memory, enhancing memory for spatial relations, positions and colors with respect to TB. Interestingly, only TB seemed to produce a deeper comprehension of the story’s moral. Our results indicated that PC-IA offered a different type of learning that favored visual details. In this sense, interactive activities demonstrate certain limitations, probably due to information overabundance, emotional mobilization, emphasis on images and effort exerted in interactive activities. Thus, interactive activities, although entertaining, act as disruptive elements which interfere with verbal memory and deep moral comprehension.

  11. Reading a Story: Different Degrees of Learning in Different Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Anna Maria; Cordellieri, Pierluigi; Piccardi, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The learning environment in which material is acquired may produce differences in delayed recall and in the elements that individuals focus on. These differences may appear even during development. In the present study, we compared three different learning environments in 450 normally developing 7-year-old children subdivided into three groups according to the type of learning environment. Specifically, children were asked to learn the same material shown in three different learning environments: reading illustrated books (TB); interacting with the same text displayed on a PC monitor and enriched with interactive activities (PC-IA); reading the same text on a PC monitor but not enriched with interactive narratives (PC-NoIA). Our results demonstrated that TB and PC-NoIA elicited better verbal memory recall. In contrast, PC-IA and PC-NoIA produced higher scores for visuo-spatial memory, enhancing memory for spatial relations, positions and colors with respect to TB. Interestingly, only TB seemed to produce a deeper comprehension of the story's moral. Our results indicated that PC-IA offered a different type of learning that favored visual details. In this sense, interactive activities demonstrate certain limitations, probably due to information overabundance, emotional mobilization, emphasis on images and effort exerted in interactive activities. Thus, interactive activities, although entertaining, act as disruptive elements which interfere with verbal memory and deep moral comprehension.

  12. Foreign language learning in immersive virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Benjamin; Sheldon, Lee; Si, Mei; Hand, Anton

    2012-03-01

    Virtual reality has long been used for training simulations in fields from medicine to welding to vehicular operation, but simulations involving more complex cognitive skills present new design challenges. Foreign language learning, for example, is increasingly vital in the global economy, but computer-assisted education is still in its early stages. Immersive virtual reality is a promising avenue for language learning as a way of dynamically creating believable scenes for conversational training and role-play simulation. Visual immersion alone, however, only provides a starting point. We suggest that the addition of social interactions and motivated engagement through narrative gameplay can lead to truly effective language learning in virtual environments. In this paper, we describe the development of a novel application for teaching Mandarin using CAVE-like VR, physical props, human actors and intelligent virtual agents, all within a semester-long multiplayer mystery game. Students travel (virtually) to China on a class field trip, which soon becomes complicated with intrigue and mystery surrounding the lost manuscript of an early Chinese literary classic. Virtual reality environments such as the Forbidden City and a Beijing teahouse provide the setting for learning language, cultural traditions, and social customs, as well as the discovery of clues through conversation in Mandarin with characters in the game.

  13. Designing a Secure Exam Management System (SEMS) for M-Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiiali, Mustafa; Ozkaya, Armagan; Altun, Halis; Haddad, Hatem; Alier, Marc

    2016-01-01

    M-learning has enhanced the e-learning by making the learning process learner-centered. However, enforcing exam security in open environments where each student has his/her own mobile/tablet device connected to a Wi-Fi network through which it is further connected to the Internet can be one of the most challenging tasks. In such environments,…

  14. When does fading enhance perceptual category learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashler, Harold; Mozer, Michael C

    2013-07-01

    Training that uses exaggerated versions of a stimulus discrimination (fading) has sometimes been found to enhance category learning, mostly in studies involving animals and impaired populations. However, little is known about whether and when fading facilitates learning for typical individuals. This issue was explored in 7 experiments. In Experiments 1 and 2, observers discriminated stimuli based on a single sensory continuum (time duration and line length, respectively). Adaptive fading dramatically improved performance in training (unsurprisingly) but did not enhance learning as assessed in a final test. The same was true for nonadaptive linear fading (Experiment 3). However, when variation in length (predicting category membership) was embedded among other (category-irrelevant) variation, fading dramatically enhanced not only performance in training but also learning as assessed in a final test (Experiments 4 and 5). Fading also helped learners to acquire a color saturation discrimination amid category-irrelevant variation in hue and brightness, although this learning proved transitory after feedback was withdrawn (Experiment 7). Theoretical implications are discussed, and we argue that fading should have practical utility in naturalistic category learning tasks, which involve extremely high dimensional stimuli and many irrelevant dimensions. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Learning Environments Designed According to Learning Styles and Its Effects on Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özerem, Aysen; Akkoyunlu, Buket

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: While designing a learning environment it is vital to think about learner characteristics (learning styles, approaches, motivation, interests… etc.) in order to promote effective learning. The learning environment and learning process should be designed not to enable students to learn in the same manner and at the same level,…

  16. Extending human potential in a technical learning environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielden, Kay A.

    This thesis is a report of a participatory inquiry process looking at enhancing the learning process in a technical academic field in high education by utilising tools and techniques which go beyond the rational/logical, intellectual domain in a functional, objective world. By empathising with, nurturing and sustaining the whole person, and taking account of past patterning as well as future visions including technological advances to augment human awareness, the scene is set for depth learning. Depth learning in a tertiary environment can only happen as a result of the dynamic that exists between the dominant, logical/rational, intellectual paradigm and the experiential extension of the boundaries surrounding this domain. Any experiences which suppress the full, holistic expression of our being alienate us from the fullness of the expression and hence from depth learning. Depth learning is indicated by intrinsic motivation, which is more likely to occur in a trusting and supporting environment. The research took place within a systemic intellectual framework, where emergence is the prime characteristic used to evaluate results.

  17. Enhanced democratic learning within the Aalborg Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Palle

    2010-01-01

    The Aalborg PBL Model [Kjersdam & Enemark, 1997; Kolmos et al., 2004] is an example of a democratic learning system [Qvist, 2008]. Writing one project each semester in teams is an important element in the model. Medicine with Industrial Specialisation - a study at the Faculties of Engineering......, Science and Medicine at Aalborg University - has combined the Aalborg Model with solving cases as used by other models. A questionnaire survey related to democratic learning indicates that the democratic learning has been enhanced. This paper presents the results....

  18. Technology enhanced peer learning and peer assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Christian Bugge; Bregnhøj, Henrik; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the application of learning designs featuring formalised and structured technology enhanced peer learning. These include student produced learning elements, peer review discussions and peer assessment in the BSc/MSc level summer course Restoration of European Ecosystems...... and Freshwaters (REEF), the Master thesis preparation seminars for the Master of Public Health (MPH) and the MOOC course Global Environmental Management (GEM). The application of student produced learning elements and peer review discussions is investigated by analyzing quotes from course evaluations...... and performing focus group interviews. The application of peer assessment is investigated by analyzing the agreement of peer assessment between students assessing the same assignment. Our analyses confirm previous research on the value of peer learning and peer assessment and we argue that there could also...

  19. Virtual Learning Environment for Interactive Engagement with Advanced Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mads Kock; Skyum, Birk; Heck, Robert; Müller, Romain; Bason, Mark; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-01-01

    A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment "StudentResearcher," which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum…

  20. Practical Applications and Experiences in K-20 Blended Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyei-Blankson, Lydia, Ed.; Ntuli, Esther, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Learning environments continue to change considerably and is no longer confined to the face-to-face classroom setting. As learning options have evolved, educators must adopt a variety of pedagogical strategies and innovative technologies to enable learning. "Practical Applications and Experiences in K-20 Blended Learning Environments"…

  1. Active Learning Environment with Lenses in Geometric Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tural, Güner

    2015-01-01

    Geometric optics is one of the difficult topics for students within physics discipline. Students learn better via student-centered active learning environments than the teacher-centered learning environments. So this study aimed to present a guide for middle school teachers to teach lenses in geometric optics via active learning environment…

  2. CLEW: A Cooperative Learning Environment for the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Marcelo Blois; Noya, Ricardo Choren; Fuks, Hugo

    This paper outlines CLEW (collaborative learning environment for the Web). The project combines MUD (Multi-User Dimension), workflow, VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and educational concepts like constructivism in a learning environment where students actively participate in the learning process. The MUD shapes the environment structure.…

  3. Using Facebook as an informal learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Policastri, Anne

    2011-12-15

    To create, implement, and assess the effectiveness of an optional Facebook activity intended to expose students to contemporary business issues not covered in the core content of a pharmacy management and leadership course and to perspectives of experts and thought leaders external to their university. An informal learning strategy was used to create a Facebook group page and guest experts were identified and invited to submit posts pertaining to business-related topics. Students were given instructions for joining the Facebook group but informed that participation was optional. A mixed-methods approach using a student questionnaire, results on examination questions, and a student focus group was used to assess this activity. The informal design with no posting guidelines and no participation requirement was well received by students, who appreciated the unique learning environment and exposure to external experts. Facebook provides an informal learning environment for presenting contemporary topics and the thoughts of guest experts not affiliated with a college or school, thereby exposing students to relevant "real world" issues.

  4. Toward Project-based Learning and Team Formation in Open Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Sloep, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Open Learning Environments, MOOCs, as well as Social Learning Networks, embody a new approach to learning. Although both emphasise interactive participation, somewhat surprisingly, they do not readily support bond creating and motivating collaborative learning opportunities. Providing project-based

  5. Enhancing social skills through cooperative learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M J Booysen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The National Curriculum Statement of South Africa envisages qualified and competent teachers to deal with the diversity of learners and their needs in the classroom. One of the needs refers to all learners (Gr R-12 who need to acquire the necessary social skills to enable them to work effectively with others as members of a team, group, organization and community. These skills refer inter alia to: learning to work with others, listening to others, giving attention, asking clarifying questions, learning how to evaluate, and to praise others, handling conflict, reflecting on group work and allowing all group members to participate. The most obvious place to deal purposefully with the development of social skills is the classroom. This implies that alternative ways and methods of teaching must be introduced to develop the necessary social skills. This article reports on the findings obtained from a combined quantitative and qualitative study that set out to determine the levels of social competence achieved by a group of Grade 2 learners, and the possible association of a cooperative teaching and learning intervention programme for enhancing the social skills of these learners. The results revealed the latent potential of cooperative learning to enhance the social skills of Grade 2 learners. The significance of this research lies in the contribution it makes to establish the social competence of a group of Grade 2 learners and to determine the possibilities for enhancing their social skills through cooperative learning.

  6. Blended synchronous learning environment: Student perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conklina Sheri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Distance education environments can take many forms, from asynchronous to blended synchronous environments. Blended synchronous learning environment (BSLE can be defined as an innovative setting in which students can decide to attend classes either face-to-face or via a synchronous virtual connection. Many educators are unfamiliar teaching in BSLE because of lack of experience or exposure to this delivery method. Thus, it is important to understand the optimal organisational structures and the effective management of BSLE courses to facilitate student learning and interaction. Seeking to understand this teaching method, an exploratory mixed-method study was conducted to examine graduate students’ perceptions of the BSLE. Quantitative and qualitative data was collected from a questionnaire and analysed. The findings revealed that students were satisfied with the BSLE, interactions, and the instructor. However, findings showed that the instructor divided attention between face-to-face and online synchronous students, which can cause cognitive overload and compromise the quality of instruction. Additionally, this study suggests that technical difficulties can affect students’ satisfaction with BSLE courses. Implications for further research and limitations are discussed.

  7. Does Tracing Worked Examples Enhance Geometry Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fang-Tzu; Ginns, Paul; Bobis, Janette

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive load theory seeks to generate novel instructional designs through a focus on human cognitive architecture including a limited working memory; however, the potential for enhancing learning through non-visual or non-auditory working memory channels is yet to be evaluated. This exploratory experiment tested whether explicit instructions to…

  8. Didactic Experiments Suggest Enhanced Learning Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pals Svendsen, Lisbet

    2011-01-01

    and presenting material in the language studied, just as they were encouraged to systematically use evaluation processes to enhance learning outcomes. Eventually, increased grade point averages suggested that the experiment was successful. The article also mentions subsequent revisions to the original format...

  9. Designing Nordic Technology-Enhanced Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa; Jarvela, Sanna M.; Milrad, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The latest developments of information and communication technologies (ICT) and its large penetration in different sectors of our society pose new challenges and demands in the field of education. This special issue entitled "Designing Nordic technology-enhanced learning (TEL)", presents and discusses how researchers in the Nordic…

  10. Transactional distance in a blended learning environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Dron

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study that describes and discusses the problems encountered during the design and implementation of a blended learning course, largely taught online through a web-based learning environment. Based on Moore's theory of transactional distance, the course was explicitly designed to have dialogue at its heart. However, the reality of systemic behaviours caused by delivering such a course within a group of conventional further and higher educational institutions has led to an entirely unanticipated reversion to structure, with unpleasant consequences for both quality and quantity of dialogue. The paper looks at some of the reasons for this drift, and suggests that some of the disappointing results (in particular in terms of the quality of the students' experience and associated poor retention can be attributed to the lack of dialogue, and consequent increase in transactional distance. It concludes with a description and evaluation of steps currently being taken to correct this behaviour.

  11. Students’ Preferred Characteristics of Learning Environments in Vocational Secondary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingeborg Placklé

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available If teachers and teacher educators are willing to support the learning of students, it is important for them to learn what motivates students to engage in learning. Students have their own preferences on design characteristics of powerful learning environments in vocational education. We developed an instrument - the Inventory Powerful Learning Environments in Vocational Education - to measure students’ preferences on characteristics of powerful learning environments in vocational education. We investigated whether student preferences on the design of their learning environments are in line with what is described in the literature as beneficial for learning. Data of 544 students show that the preferences of students support most characteristics of PLEs in vocational education. Looking through the eyes of students, teachers have to challenge their students and encourage them to take their learning in their own hands. Adaptive learning support is needed. Remarkable, students do not prefer having reflective dialogues with teachers or peers.

  12. Learning styles: individualizing computer-based learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Musson

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available While the need to adapt teaching to the needs of a student is generally acknowledged (see Corno and Snow, 1986, for a wide review of the literature, little is known about the impact of individual learner-differences on the quality of learning attained within computer-based learning environments (CBLEs. What evidence there is appears to support the notion that individual differences have implications for the degree of success or failure experienced by students (Ford and Ford, 1992 and by trainee end-users of software packages (Bostrom et al, 1990. The problem is to identify the way in which specific individual characteristics of a student interact with particular features of a CBLE, and how the interaction affects the quality of the resultant learning. Teaching in a CBLE is likely to require a subset of teaching strategies different from that subset appropriate to more traditional environments, and the use of a machine may elicit different behaviours from those normally arising in a classroom context.

  13. Integrated Spreadsheets as Learning Environments for Young Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Abramovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This classroom note shares experience of using spreadsheets with a group of 2nd grade students. The main feature of the learning environments that made effective the integration of technology and grade appropriate mathematics is the use of images of modern tools such as the Nintendo DC, the Play Station Portable, and the iPhone. The idea is illustrated by presenting a number of worksheets of so modified spreadsheets called integrated spreadsheets. The authors suggest using spreadsheets in that way offers an attractive interface for young students and enhances significantly their on-task behavior.

  14. EDUCATION REFORMS TOWARDS 21ST CENTURY SKILLS: TRANSFORMING STUDENTS' LEARNING EXPERIENCES THROUGH EFFECTIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Harriet Wambui Njui

    2018-01-01

    This paper reviews literature on learning environments with a view to making recommendations on how teachers could create effective and high-quality learning environments that provide learners with transformative learning experiences as they go through the process of education. An effective learning environment is critical because quality education, which is essential to real learning and human development, is influenced by factors both inside and outside the classroom. Learning institutions ...

  15. Machine learning enhanced optical distance sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M. Junaid; Riza, N. A.

    2018-01-01

    Presented for the first time is a machine learning enhanced optical distance sensor. The distance sensor is based on our previously demonstrated distance measurement technique that uses an Electronically Controlled Variable Focus Lens (ECVFL) with a laser source to illuminate a target plane with a controlled optical beam spot. This spot with varying spot sizes is viewed by an off-axis camera and the spot size data is processed to compute the distance. In particular, proposed and demonstrated in this paper is the use of a regularized polynomial regression based supervised machine learning algorithm to enhance the accuracy of the operational sensor. The algorithm uses the acquired features and corresponding labels that are the actual target distance values to train a machine learning model. The optimized training model is trained over a 1000 mm (or 1 m) experimental target distance range. Using the machine learning algorithm produces a training set and testing set distance measurement errors of learning. Applications for the proposed sensor include industrial scenario distance sensing where target material specific training models can be generated to realize low <1% measurement error distance measurements.

  16. Using a Virtual Learning Environment to Manage Group Projects: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Yvonne; Marcus-Quinn, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) are increasingly used by Higher Education Institutions to manage and enhance teaching and learning, and research. Discussion, chat, scheduling, and other collaboration tools make VLEs especially useful systems for designing and managing complex group projects. In the spring semester of 2006, students at the…

  17. Turkish secondary education students' perceptions of their classroom learning environment and their attitude towards Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telli, S.; Cakiroglu, J.; den Brok, P.

    2006-01-01

    The domain of learning environments research has produced many promising findings, leading to an enhancement of the teaching and learning process in many countries. However, there have been a limited number of studies in this field in Turkey. For that reason, the purpose of the present study was to

  18. The Webinar Integration Tool: A Framework for Promoting Active Learning in Blended Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieser, Ping; Taf, Steven D.; Murphy-Hagan, Anne

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a three-stage process of developing a webinar integration tool to enhance the interaction of teaching and learning in blended environments. In the context of medical education, we emphasize three factors of effective webinar integration in blended learning: fostering better solutions for faculty and students to interact…

  19. Collaborative Embodied Learning in Mixed Reality Motion-Capture Environments: Two Science Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Glenberg, Mina C.; Birchfield, David A.; Tolentino, Lisa; Koziupa, Tatyana

    2014-01-01

    These 2 studies investigate the extent to which an Embodied Mixed Reality Learning Environment (EMRELE) can enhance science learning compared to regular classroom instruction. Mixed reality means that physical tangible and digital components were present. The content for the EMRELE required that students map abstract concepts and relations onto…

  20. An Approach to Folksonomy-Based Ontology Maintenance for Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasevic, D.; Zouaq, Amal; Torniai, Carlo; Jovanovic, J.; Hatala, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Recent research in learning technologies has demonstrated many promising contributions from the use of ontologies and semantic web technologies for the development of advanced learning environments. In spite of those benefits, ontology development and maintenance remain the key research challenges to be solved before ontology-enhanced learning…

  1. Turkish secondary education students' perceptions of their classroom learning environment and their attitude towards biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telli, S.; Cakiroglu, J.; Brok, den P.J.; Fisher, D. L.; Khine, M. S.

    2006-01-01

    The domain of learning environments research has produced many promising findings, leading to an enhancement of the teaching and learning process in many countries. However, there have been a limited number of studies in this field in Turkey. For that reason, the purpose of the present study was to

  2. Facilitative and obstructive factors in the clinical learning environment: Experiences of pupil enrolled nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eucebious Lekalakala-Mokgele

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical learning environment is a complex social entity that influences student learning outcomes in the clinical setting. Students can experience the clinical learning environment as being both facilitative and obstructive to their learning. The clinical environment may be a source of stress, creating feelings of fear and anxiety which in turn affect the students’ responses to learning. Equally, the environment can enhance learning if experienced positively. Objectives: This study described pupil enrolled nurses’ experiences of facilitative and obstructive factors in military and public health clinical learning settings. Method: Using a qualitative, contextual, exploratory descriptive design, three focus group interviews were conducted until data saturation was reached amongst pupil enrolled nurses in a military School of Nursing. Results: Data analysed provided evidence that acceptance by clinical staff and affordance of self-directed learning facilitated learning. Students felt safe to practise when they were supported by the clinical staff. They felt a sense of belonging when the staff showed an interest in and welcomed them. Learning was obstructed when students were met with condescending comments. Wearing of a military uniform in the public hospital and horizontal violence obstructed learning in the clinical learning environment. Conclusion: Students cannot have effective clinical preparation if the environment is not conducive to and supportive of clinical learning, The study shows that military nursing students experience unique challenges as they are trained in two professions that are hierarchical in nature. The students experienced both facilitating and obstructing factors to their learning during their clinical practice. Clinical staff should be made aware of factors which can impact on students’ learning. Policies need to be developed for supporting students in the clinical learning

  3. Facilitative and obstructive factors in the clinical learning environment: Experiences of pupil enrolled nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekalakala-Mokgele, Eucebious; Caka, Ernestine M

    2015-03-31

    The clinical learning environment is a complex social entity that influences student learning outcomes in the clinical setting. Students can experience the clinical learning environment as being both facilitative and obstructive to their learning. The clinical environment may be a source of stress, creating feelings of fear and anxiety which in turn affect the students' responses to learning. Equally, the environment can enhance learning if experienced positively. This study described pupil enrolled nurses' experiences of facilitative and obstructive factors in military and public health clinical learning settings. Using a qualitative, contextual, exploratory descriptive design, three focus group interviews were conducted until data saturation was reached amongst pupil enrolled nurses in a military School of Nursing. Data analysed provided evidence that acceptance by clinical staff and affordance of self-directed learning facilitated learning. Students felt safe to practise when they were supported by the clinical staff. They felt a sense of belonging when the staff showed an interest in and welcomed them. Learning was obstructed when students were met with condescending comments. Wearing of a military uniform in the public hospital and horizontal violence obstructed learning in the clinical learning environment. Students cannot have effective clinical preparation if the environment is not conducive to and supportive of clinical learning, The study shows that military nursing students experience unique challenges as they are trained in two professions that are hierarchical in nature. The students experienced both facilitating and obstructing factors to their learning during their clinical practice. Clinical staff should be made aware of factors which can impact on students' learning. Policies need to be developed for supporting students in the clinical learning environment.

  4. Creating Effective Collaborative Learning Groups in an Online Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E. Brindley

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative learning in an online classroom can take the form of discussion among the whole class or within smaller groups. This paper addresses the latter, examining first whether assessment makes a difference to the level of learner participation and then considering other factors involved in creating effective collaborative learning groups. Data collected over a three year period (15 cohorts from the Foundations course in the Master of Distance Education (MDE program offered jointly by University of Maryland University College (UMUC and the University of Oldenburg does not support the authors’ original hypothesis that assessment makes a significant difference to learner participation levels in small group learning projects and leads them to question how much emphasis should be placed on grading work completed in study groups to the exclusion of other strategies. Drawing on observations of two MDE courses, including the Foundations course, their extensive online teaching experience, and a review of the literature, the authors identify factors other than grading that contribute positively to the effectiveness of small collaborative learning groups in the online environment. In particular, the paper focuses on specific instructional strategies that facilitate learner participation in small group projects, which result in an enhanced sense of community, increased skill acquisition, and better learning outcomes.

  5. U-CrAc Flexible Interior Doctrine, Agile Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Søren Bolvig; Rosenstand, Claus Andreas Foss

    2012-01-01

    The research domain of this article is flexible learning environment for immediate use. The research question is: How can the learning environment support an agile learning process? The research contribution of this article is a flexible interior doctrine. The research method is action research...

  6. The Impact of Multitasking Learning Environments in the Middle Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwine, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    This research study considers the status of middle school students in the 21st century in terms of their tendency to multitask in their daily lives and the overall influence this multitasking has on teaching and learning environments. Student engagement in the learning environment and students' various learning styles are discussed as primary…

  7. Student-Teacher Interaction in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robert D., Ed.

    2015-01-01

    As face-to-face interaction between student and instructor is not present in online learning environments, it is increasingly important to understand how to establish and maintain social presence in online learning. "Student-Teacher Interaction in Online Learning Environments" provides successful strategies and procedures for developing…

  8. Enhancing agent safety through autonomous environment adaptation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rosman, Benjamin S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available limit their ability to interact with and explore their environments. In this work we address this risk through the incorporation of a caregiver robot, and present a model allowing it to autonomously adapt its environment to minimize danger for other...

  9. AN IT CONTEST ENVIRONMENT FOR ACTIVE LEARNING THROUGH COMPETITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin Wan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of constantly evolving developments in computing, students often feel that they need to study a great deal of materials passively. One way of developing a natural interest in computing is to organize group-based competitions. This paper describes the design and implementation of an online system for a “Millionaire”-type competition that was adopted for a computer literacy course. The students competed with each other in groups to win the game. Each group was required to discuss the answers, contributing to better learning. The project provided students with an environment of mutual respect and open communication. Students consequently evaluated the competition regarding enhancement of knowledge and learning through team efforts, providing positive feedback.

  10. Factors Influencing Learning Environments in an Integrated Experiential Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koci, Peter

    The research conducted for this dissertation examined the learning environment of a specific high school program that delivered the explicit curriculum through an integrated experiential manner, which utilized field and outdoor experiences. The program ran over one semester (five months) and it integrated the grade 10 British Columbian curriculum in five subjects. A mixed methods approach was employed to identify the students' perceptions and provide richer descriptions of their experiences related to their unique learning environment. Quantitative instruments were used to assess changes in students' perspectives of their learning environment, as well as other supporting factors including students' mindfulness, and behaviours towards the environment. Qualitative data collection included observations, open-ended questions, and impromptu interviews with the teacher. The qualitative data describe the factors and processes that influenced the learning environment and give a richer, deeper interpretation which complements the quantitative findings. The research results showed positive scores on all the quantitative measures conducted, and the qualitative data provided further insight into descriptions of learning environment constructs that the students perceived as most important. A major finding was that the group cohesion measure was perceived by students as the most important attribute of their preferred learning environment. A flow chart was developed to help the researcher conceptualize how the learning environment, learning process, and outcomes relate to one another in the studied program. This research attempts to explain through the consideration of this case study: how learning environments can influence behavioural change and how an interconnectedness among several factors in the learning process is influenced by the type of learning environment facilitated. Considerably more research is needed in this area to understand fully the complexity learning

  11. Distributed learning enhances relational memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litman, Leib; Davachi, Lila

    2008-09-01

    It has long been known that distributed learning (DL) provides a mnemonic advantage over massed learning (ML). However, the underlying mechanisms that drive this robust mnemonic effect remain largely unknown. In two experiments, we show that DL across a 24 hr interval does not enhance immediate memory performance but instead slows the rate of forgetting relative to ML. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this savings in forgetting is specific to relational, but not item, memory. In the context of extant theories and knowledge of memory consolidation, these results suggest that an important mechanism underlying the mnemonic benefit of DL is enhanced memory consolidation. We speculate that synaptic strengthening mechanisms supporting long-term memory consolidation may be differentially mediated by the spacing of memory reactivation. These findings have broad implications for the scientific study of episodic memory consolidation and, more generally, for educational curriculum development and policy.

  12. Effects of Collaborative Learning Styles on Performance of Students in a Ubiquitous Collaborative Mobile Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakomogbon, Michael Ayodele; Bolaji, Hameed Olalekan

    2017-01-01

    Collaborative learning is an approach employed by instructors to facilitate learning and improve learner's performance. Mobile learning can accommodate a variety of learning approaches. This study, therefore, investigated the effects of collaborative learning styles on performance of students in a mobile learning environment. The specific purposes…

  13. The Better You Feel the Better You Learn: Do Warm Colours and Rounded Shapes Enhance Learning Outcome in Multimedia Learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Münchow

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine whether fostering positive activating affect during multimedia learning enhances learning outcome. University students were randomly assigned to either a multimedia learning environment designed to induce positive activating affect through the use of “warm” colours and rounded shapes (n=61 or an affectively neutral environment that used achromatic colours and sharp edges (n=50. Participants learned about the topic of functional neuroanatomy for 20 minutes and had to answer several questions for comprehension and transfer afterwards. Affective states as well as achievement goal orientations were investigated before and after the learning phase using questionnaires. The results show that participants in the affectively positive environment were superior in comprehension as well as transfer when initial affect was strong. Preexperimental positive affect was therefore a predictor of comprehension and a moderator for transfer. Goal orientations did not influence these effects. The findings support the idea that positive affect, induced through the design of the particular multimedia learning environment, can facilitate performance if initial affective states are taken into account.

  14. Students' Preferred Characteristics of Learning Environments in Vocational Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placklé, Ingeborg; Könings, Karen D.; Jacquet, Wolfgang; Struyven, Katrien; Libotton, Arno; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J. G.; Engels, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    If teachers and teacher educators are willing to support the learning of students, it is important for them to learn what motivates students to engage in learning. Students have their own preferences on design characteristics of powerful learning environments in vocational education. We developed an instrument--the Inventory Powerful Learning…

  15. COOPERATIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT WITH THE WEB 2.0 TOOL E-PORTFOLIOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soh OR KAN

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the development of information and communication technology (ICT in the world and Malaysia namely has created a significant impact on the methods of communicating information and knowledge to the learners and consequently, innovative teaching techniques have evolved to change the ways teachers teach and the ways students learn. This study main focuses are directed on developing a cooperative learning environment to promote an active learning environment of smart schools in Malaysia. Within this learning process, multimedia technology and Web 2.0 tools, namely, MyPortfolio were integrated to provide the students to learn on their own as well as to document their progress and experience within this cooperative learning environment. The core purpose of this study is to establish the impact on student learning, their perceptions and learning experiences of the cooperative learning environment using web 2.0 tools among the smart secondary schools students in Malaysia. Surveys were conducted to students to ascertain their reaction towards these learning environment activities. The results of this project were encouraging as the students managed to cope with each other to reach their common goal. The usage of blogs acts as an important tool to enhance team cooperation and to foster a learning community within the class.

  16. School and workplace as learning environments in VET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    as limitations for learning, and thus frame the opportunities for learning. The second, the socio-cultural learning environment is constituted by the social and cultural relations and communities in the workplace and in school. I distinguish between three different types of social relations in the workplace......The aim of this paper is to present an analytical model to study school and workplace as different learning environments and discuss some findings from the application of the model on a case study. First the paper tries to answer the question: what is a learning environment? In most other studies...... schools and workplaces are not only considered to be different learning environment, but are also analysed using different approaches. In this paper I will propose a common model to analyse and compare the two learning environments, drawing on sociology of work (Kern & Schumann 1984; Braverman 1976...

  17. Designing an Interactive Multimedia Environment for Learning and Aiding Troubleshooting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolodner, Janet

    1997-01-01

    .... However troubleshooting is a complex process both to learn and perform. This report examines the prospects for designing an interactive learning environment that helps users acquire and engage in effective troubleshooting...

  18. Intellectual Property and Copyright Issues in Online Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szanto, Edit

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of intellectual property and copyright issues as they relate to online learning environments. Includes a historical perspective; laws and regulations; liability; Web-related issues; higher education; distance learning; compliance strategies; and policy recommendations. (Author/LRW)

  19. Moodle & Co. auf dem Weg zur Personal Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Hafer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the typical IT infrastructure for e-learning in higher education and the contemporary research on Personal Learning Environments (PLEs the paper shows how existing tools and services can be brought together to meet the needs of modern, technology enhanced classroom-based teaching. For this interdisciplinary development process both traditional software, development methods and existing PLE models offer only little guidance. The paper describes the approach and the interim results of a campus-wide project at the University of Potsdam. Therefore first typical teaching and communication scenarios are identified from which afterwards the requirements for a supporting platform are derived. This leads to a comprehensive collection of considerable services and functions, which have to be integrated according to their specific use in an educational technology system. Based on this fundamental approaches for integration and technical details of this mash up are considered in an overview of all relevant services and gets transferred into an integrated system architecture. The paper describes the exemplary realization using the Liferay portal technology in which the above-defined scenarios are implemented. Additional adjustments with regard to personalized and adaptive learning (and working environments are supported too and described briefly

  20. Nursing students' perceptions of learning in practice environments: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amanda; Cooke, Marie; Creedy, Debra K; Walker, Rachel

    2012-04-01

    Effective clinical learning requires integration of nursing students into ward activities, staff engagement to address individual student learning needs, and innovative teaching approaches. Assessing characteristics of practice environments can provide useful insights for development. This study identified predominant features of clinical learning environments from nursing students' perspectives across studies using the same measure in different countries over the last decade. Six studies, from three different countries, using the Clinical Leaning Environment Inventory (CLEI) were reviewed. Studies explored consistent trends about learning environment. Students rated sense of task accomplishment high. Affiliation also rated highly though was influenced by models of care. Feedback measuring whether students' individual needs and views were accommodated consistently rated lower. Across different countries students report similar perceptions about learning environments. Clinical learning environments are most effective in promoting safe practice and are inclusive of student learners, but not readily open to innovation and challenges to routine practices. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Early results of experiments with responsive open learning environments

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich, M.; Wolpers, M.; Shen, R.; Ullrich, C.; Klamma, R.; Renzel, D.; Richert, A.; Heiden, B. von der

    2011-01-01

    Responsive open learning environments (ROLEs) are the next generation of personal learning environments (PLEs). While PLEs rely on the simple aggregation of existing content and services mainly using Web 2.0 technologies, ROLEs are transforming lifelong learning by introducing a new infrastructure on a global scale while dealing with existing learning management systems, institutions, and technologies. The requirements engineering process in highly populated test-beds is as important as the t...

  2. Mobile Learning Environment System (MLES): The Case of Android-based Learning Application on Undergraduates' Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Hanafi, Hafizul Fahri; Samsudin, Khairulanuar

    2012-01-01

    Of late, mobile technology has introduced new, novel environment that can be capitalized to further enrich the teaching and learning process in classrooms. Taking cognizance of this promising setting, a study was undertaken to investigate the impact of such an environment enabled by android platform on the learning process among undergraduates of Sultan Idris Education University, Malaysia; in particular, this paper discusses critical aspects of the design and implementation of the android le...

  3. Language Learning in Outdoor Environments: Perspectives of preschool staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Norling

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Language environment is highlighted as an important area in the early childhood education sector. The term language environment refers to language-promoting aspects of education, such as preschool staff’s use of verbal language in interacting with the children. There is a lack of research about language learning in outdoor environments; thus children’s language learning is mostly based on the indoor physical environment. The aim of this study is therefore to explore, analyse, and describe how preschool staff perceive language learning in outdoor environments. The data consists of focus-group interviews with 165 preschool staff members, conducted in three cities in Sweden. The study is meaningful, thus results contribute knowledge regarding preschool staffs’ understandings of language learning in outdoor environments and develop insights to help preschool staff stimulate children’s language learning in outdoor environments.

  4. Learning by Doing Approach in the Internet Environment to Improve the Teaching Efficiency of Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.-S.; Xie, Hua

    This paper presents a learning-by-doing method in the Internet environment to enhance the results of information technology education by experimental work in the classroom of colleges. In this research, an practical approach to apply the "learning by doing" paradigm in Internet-based learning, both for higher educational environments and life-long training systems, taking into account available computer and network resources, such as blogging, podcasting, social networks, wiki etc. We first introduce the different phases in the learning process, which aimed at showing to the readers that the importance of the learning by doing paradigm, which is not implemented in many Internet-based educational environments. Secondly, we give the concept of learning by doing in the different perfective. Then, we identify the most important trends in this field, and give a real practical case for the application of this approach. The results show that the attempt methods are much better than traditional teaching methods.

  5. Quality of Learning Facilities and Learning Environment: Challenges for Teaching and Learning in Kenya's Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndirangu, Mwangi; Udoto, Maurice O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to report findings on the perceptions of quality of educational facilities in Kenyan public universities, and the implications for teaching/learning, and the learning environment. Design/methodology/approach: The study adopted an exploratory descriptive design. A total of 332 and 107 undergraduate students…

  6. DynaLearn-An Intelligent Learning Environment for Learning Conceptual Knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredeweg, Bert; Liem, Jochem; Beek, Wouter; Linnebank, Floris; Gracia, Jorge; Lozano, Esther; Wißner, Michael; Bühling, René; Salles, Paulo; Noble, Richard; Zitek, Andreas; Borisova, Petya; Mioduser, David

    2013-01-01

    Articulating thought in computerbased media is a powerful means for humans to develop their understanding of phenomena. We have created DynaLearn, an intelligent learning environment that allows learners to acquire conceptual knowledge by constructing and simulating qualitative models of how systems

  7. Learning environments matter: Identifying influences on the motivation to learn science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomé Schulze

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the light of the poor academic achievement in science by secondary school students in South Africa, students' motivation for science learning should be enhanced. It is argued that this can only be achieved with insight into which motivational factors to target, with due consideration of the diversity in schools. The study therefore explored the impact of six motivational factors for science learning in a sample of 380 Grade Nine boys and girls from three racial groups, in both public and independent schools. The students completed the Student Motivation for Science Learning questionnaire. Significant differences were identified between different groups and school types. The study is important for identifying the key role of achievement goals, science learning values and science self-efficacies. The main finding emphasises the significant role played by science teachers in motivating students for science in terms of the learning environments that they create. This has important implications for future research, aimed at a better understanding of these environments. Such insights are needed to promote scientific literacy among the school students, and so contribute to the improvement of science achievement in South Africa.

  8. Effects of prior knowledge on learning from different compositions of representations in a mobile learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.-C. Liu (Tzu-Chien); Y.-C. Lin (Yi-Chun); G.W.C. Paas (Fred)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractTwo experiments examined the effects of prior knowledge on learning from different compositions of multiple representations in a mobile learning environment on plant leaf morphology for primary school students. Experiment 1 compared the learning effects of a mobile learning environment

  9. Students' Conception of Learning Environment and Their Approach to Learning and Its Implication on Quality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaineh, Matheas Shemelis

    2017-01-01

    Quality of education in higher institutions can be affected by different factors. It partly rests on the learning environment created by teachers and the learning approach students are employing during their learning. The main purpose of this study is to examine the learning environment at Mizan Tepi University from students' perspective and their…

  10. Experiential Learning and Learning Environments: The Case of Active Listening Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Wong, Juan Enrique; Schoech, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Social work education research frequently has suggested an interaction between teaching techniques and learning environments. However, this interaction has never been tested. This study compared virtual and face-to-face learning environments and included active listening concepts to test whether the effectiveness of learning environments depends…

  11. Does academic performance or personal growth share a stronger association with learning environment perception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Sean; Wright, Scott M.; Shochet, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to characterize the relative strength of associations of learning environment perception with academic performance and with personal growth. Methods In 2012-2014 second and third year students at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine completed a learning environment survey and personal growth scale. Hierarchical linear regression analysis was employed to determine if the proportion of variance in learning environment scores accounted for by personal growth was significantly larger than the proportion accounted for by academic performance (course/clerkship grades). Results The proportion of variance in learning environment scores accounted for by personal growth was larger than the proportion accounted for by academic performance in year 2 [R2Δ of 0.09, F(1,175) = 14.99,  p environment scores shared a small amount of variance with academic performance in years 2 and 3.  The amount of variance between learning environment scores and personal growth was small in year 2 and large in year 3. Conclusions Since supportive learning environments are essential for medical education, future work must determine if enhancing personal growth prior to and during the clerkship year will increase learning environment perception. PMID:27570912

  12. INTUITEL and the Hypercube Model - Developing Adaptive Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fuchs

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce an approach for the creation of adaptive learning environments that give human-like recommendations to a learner in the form of a virtual tutor. We use ontologies defining pedagogical, didactic and learner-specific data describing a learner's progress, learning history, capabilities and the learner's current state within the learning environment. Learning recommendations are based on a reasoning process on these ontologies and can be provided in real-time. The ontologies may describe learning content from any domain of knowledge. Furthermore, we describe an approach to store learning histories as spatio-temporal trajectories and to correlate them with influencing didactic factors. We show how such analysis of spatiotemporal data can be used for learning analytics to improve future adaptive learning environments.

  13. An Analysis of University Students' Attitudes towards Personalized Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Muhittin; Kisla, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to analyze university students' attitudes towards personalized learning environments with respect to the independent variables of gender, age, university, year of study, knowledge about the environment, participation in the environment and being willing to participate in the environment. The correlative survey model is…

  14. Situational Awareness Support to Enhance Teamwork in Collaborative Working Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulyk, Olga Anatoliyivna; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; van der Vet, P.E.; Nijholt, Antinus; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Whitworth, B.; de Moor, A.

    This chapter addresses awareness support to enhance teamwork in co-located collaborative environments. In particular, we focus on the concept of situational awareness which is essential for successful team collaboration. Mutual situational awareness leads to informal social interactions, development

  15. A Study on Students’ Views On Blended Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem YILMAZ SOYLU

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century, information and communication technologies (ICT have developed rapidly and influenced most of the fields and education as well. Then, ICT have offered a favorable environment for the development and use of various methods and tools. With the developments in technology, blended learning has gained considerable popularity in recent years. Together with the developments it brought along the description of particular forms of teaching with technology. Blended learning is defined simply as a learning environment that combines technology with face-to-face learning. In other words blended learning means using a variety of delivery methods to best meet the course objectives by combining face-to-face teaching in a traditional classroom with teaching online. This article examines students’ views on blended learning environment. The study was conducted on 64 students from Department of Computer Education and Instructional Technologies in 2005–2006 fall semester in Instructional Design and Authoring Languages in PC Environment at Hacettepe University. The results showed that the students enjoyed taking part in the blended learning environment. Students’ achievement levels and their frequency of participation to forum affected their views about blended learning environment. Face-to-face interaction in blended learning application had the highest score. This result demonstrated the importance of interaction and communication for the success of on-line learning.

  16. Effects of Sharing Clickers in an Active Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Todd; Tivener, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Scientific research into learning enhancement gained by the use of clickers in active classrooms has largely focused on the use of individual clickers. In this study, we compared the learning experiences of participants in active learning groups in which an entire small group shared a single clicker to groups in which each member of the group had…

  17. A Framework for Mobile Learning for Enhancing Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreh, Kadar Abdillahi; Abas, Zoraini Wati

    2015-01-01

    As mobile learning becomes increasingly pervasive, many higher education institutions have initiated a number of mobile learning initiatives to support their traditional learning modes. This study proposes a framework for mobile learning for enhancing learning in higher education. This framework for mobile learning is based on research conducted…

  18. Web-Based Learning Environment Based on Students’ Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, N.; Ariffin, A.; Hamid, H.

    2017-08-01

    Traditional learning needs to be improved since it does not involve active learning among students. Therefore, in the twenty-first century, the development of internet technology in the learning environment has become the main needs of each student. One of the learning environments to meet the needs of the teaching and learning process is a web-based learning environment. This study aims to identify the characteristics of a web-based learning environment that supports students’ learning needs. The study involved 542 students from fifteen faculties in a public higher education institution in Malaysia. A quantitative method was used to collect the data via a questionnaire survey by randomly. The findings indicate that the characteristics of a web-based learning environment that support students’ needs in the process of learning are online discussion forum, lecture notes, assignments, portfolio, and chat. In conclusion, the students overwhelmingly agreed that online discussion forum is the highest requirement because the tool can provide a space for students and teachers to share knowledge and experiences related to teaching and learning.

  19. Enhancing synergies in a collaborative environment

    CERN Document Server

    Maeso-González, Elvira; Escudero-Santana, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains a selection of the best papers presented at the 8th International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Industrial Management, Engineering International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Operations Management, and International IIE Conference 2014,  hosted by ADINGOR, ABEPRO and the IIE, whose mission is to promote links between researchers and practitioners from different branches, to enhance an interdisciplinary perspective of industrial engineering and management.  The conference topics covered: operations research, modelling and simulation, computer and information systems, operations research, scheduling and sequencing, logistics, production and information systems, supply chain and logistics, transportation, lean management, production planning and control, production system design, reliability and maintenance, quality management, sustainability and eco-efficiency, marketing and consumer behavior, business administration and strategic management, economic and financial m...

  20. Emotions as Learning Enhancers of Foreign Language Learning Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Méndez López Mariza G.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present article reports on a study that explores the effects of the emotional experiences of Mexican language learners on their motivation to learn English. In this qualitative research we present how emotions impact the motivation of university language learners in south Mexico. Results suggest that emotions, both negative and positive, contribute to enhancing and diminishing motivation. Althoughnegative emotions may be considered detrimental to foreign language learning, the findings of this study show that negative emotions serve as learning enhancers. Results also evidence that Mexican language learners perceive negative emotions as positive for their language learning process.En este artículo se presenta una investigación en la que se exploran los efectos que causan las experiencias emocionales en la motivación de estudiantes mexicanos al aprender inglés. Con base en un estudio cualitativo se presenta cómo las emociones inciden en la motivación de estudiantes universitarios en el sur de México. Los resultados sugieren que las emociones, tanto positivas como negativas, contribuyen a potenciar y disminuir su motivación. Se encontró que a pesar de que las emociones negativas pueden afectar el aprendizaje de una lengua extranjera, estas actúan incluso como potenciadoras del aprendizaje. Los resultados también indican que los estudiantes mexicanos perciben las emociones negativas como positivas en su proceso de aprendizaje.

  1. Miscellany of Students' Satisfaction in an Asynchronous Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbi-Siaw, Otu; Owusu-Agyeman, Yaw

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the determinants of students' satisfaction in an asynchronous learning environment using seven key considerations: the e-learning environment, student-content interaction, student and student interaction, student-teacher interaction, group cohesion and timely participation, knowledge of Internet usage, and satisfaction. The…

  2. The Influence of Virtual Learning Environments in Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Paulo; Miranda, Luísa; Morais, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses mainly on the relation between the use of a virtual learning environment (VLE) and students' performance. Therefore, virtual learning environments are characterised and a study is presented emphasising the frequency of access to a VLE and its relation with the students' performance from a public higher education institution…

  3. Optimising the Blended Learning Environment: The Arab Open University Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Tahrir; Abu Qudais, Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    This paper will offer some insights into possible ways to optimise the blended learning environment based on experience with this modality of teaching at Arab Open University/Jordan branch and also by reflecting upon the results of several meta-analytical studies, which have shown blended learning environments to be more effective than their face…

  4. Postgraduate trainees' perceptions of the learning environment in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increased performance in both areas requires routine assessment of the learning environment to identify components that need attention. Objective. To evaluate the perception of junior doctors undergoing specialist training regarding the learning environment in a teaching hospital. Methods. This was a single-centre, ...

  5. From Personal to Social: Learning Environments that Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Mar; Guilana, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    VLE (Virtual Learning Environments) are rapidly falling short to meet the demands of a networked society. Web 2.0 and social networks are proving to offer a more personalized, open environment for students to learn formally as they are already doing informally. With the irruption of social media into society, and therefore, education, many voices…

  6. Evaluation of Hybrid and Distance Education Learning Environments in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Cascales, Rosario; Walker, Scott L.; Reig-Ferrer, Abilio; Fernandez-Pascual, Maria Dolores; Albaladejo-Blazquez, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the adaptation and validation of the "Distance Education Learning Environments Survey" (DELES) for use in investigating the qualities found in distance and hybrid education psycho-social learning environments in Spain. As Europe moves toward post-secondary student mobility, equanimity in access to higher education,…

  7. Mobile e-Learning for Next Generation Communication Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tin-Yu; Chao, Han-Chieh

    2008-01-01

    This article develops an environment for mobile e-learning that includes an interactive course, virtual online labs, an interactive online test, and lab-exercise training platform on the fourth generation mobile communication system. The Next Generation Learning Environment (NeGL) promotes the term "knowledge economy." Inter-networking…

  8. Digital Communication Applications in the Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambeth, Krista Jill

    2011-01-01

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was for the researcher to obtain a better understanding of the online learning environment, to explore the various ways online class instructors have incorporated digital communication applications to try and provide learner-centered online learning environments, and to examine students'…

  9. The fluidities of digital learning environments and resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansbøl, Mikala

    2012-01-01

    The research project “Educational cultures and serious games on a global market place” (2009-2011) dealt with the challenge of the digital learning environment and hence it’s educational development space always existing outside the present space and hence scope of activities. With a reference...... and establishments of the virtual universe called Mingoville.com, the research shows a need to include in researchers’ conceptualizations of digital learning environments and resources, their shifting materialities and platformations and hence emerging (often unpredictable) agencies and educational development...... spaces. Keywords: Fluidity, digital learning environment, digital learning resource, educational development space...

  10. Towards Entrepreneurial Learning Competencies: The Perspective of Built Environment Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, Kissi; Matthew, Somiah K.; Samuel, Ansah K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper sought to discuss entrepreneurial learning competencies by determining the outcome of entrepreneurial learning on the views of built environment students in the university setting. In this study, three relevant competencies were identified for entrepreneurial learning through literature, namely: entrepreneurial attitude, entrepreneurial…

  11. Knowledge Sharing Practice in a Play-Like Learning Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Nana

    2007-01-01

    The topic of this paper is play-like learning as it occurs when technology based learning environments is invited into the classroom. Observations of 5th grade classes playing with Lego Robolab, is used to illustrate that different ways of learning becomes visible when digital technology...

  12. Language Learning in Virtual Reality Environments: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsun-Ju; Lan, Yu-Ju

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the research trends in language learning in a virtual reality environment by conducting a content analysis of findings published in the literature from 2004 to 2013 in four top ranked computer-assisted language learning journals: "Language Learning & Technology," "CALICO Journal," "Computer…

  13. Creating a Total Quality Environment (TQE) for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Jann E.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a model for creating a total quality environment (TQE) for learning in which everyone is considered a learner. The model consists of 11 interrelated characteristics derived from the literature in the areas of continuous improvement, leadership, learning, learning organizations, and spirituality. The characteristics in the…

  14. ADILE: Architecture of a database-supported learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddink, G.W.

    2001-01-01

    This article proposes an architecture for distributed learning environments that use databases to store learning material. As the layout of learning material can inhibit reuse, the ar-chitecture implements the notion of "separation of layout and structure" using XML technology. Also, the

  15. Using Scaffolding to Improve Student Learning in Legal Environment Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Students taking the initial legal environment course in a business school generally have little background in the law. Most of these students are learning new terms and are exposed to the workings of the legal system and statutes and cases for the first time. Some students have characterized learning the law as like "learning a new…

  16. An Interactive Learning Environment for Information and Communication Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Mohamed; Hassan, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Interactive learning tools are emerging as effective educational materials in the area of computer science and engineering. It is a research domain that is rapidly expanding because of its positive impacts on motivating and improving students' performance during the learning process. This paper introduces an interactive learning environment for…

  17. Learning from data for aquatic and geothenical environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhattacharya, B.

    2005-01-01

    The book presents machine learning as an approach to build models that learn from data, and that can be used to complement the existing modelling practice in aquatic and geotechnical environments. It provides concepts of learning from data, and identifies segmentation (clustering), classification,

  18. Reponsive and Open Learning Environments (ROLE: Requirements, Evaluation and Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effie Lai-Chong Law

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Coordinating requirements engineering (RE and evaluation studies across heterogeneous technology-enhanced learning (TEL environments is deemed challenging, because each of them is situated in a specific organizational, technical and socio-cultural context. We have dealt with such challenges in the project of ROLE (http://www.role-project.eu/ in which five test-beds are involved in deploying and evaluating Personal Learning Environments (PLEs. They include Higher Education Institutions (HEIs and global enterprises in and beyond Europe, representing a range of values and assumptions. While the diversity provides fertile grounds for validating our research ideas, it poses many challenges for conducting comparison studies. In the paper, we first provide an overview of the ROLE project, focusing on its missions and aims. Next we present a Web2.0-inspired RE approach called Social Requirements Engineering (SRE. Then we depict our initial attempts to evaluate the ROLE framework and report some preliminary findings. One major outcome is that the technology adoption process must work on the basis of existing LMS, extending them with the ROLE functionality rather than embracing LMS functionality in ROLE.

  19. Rubrics and the enhancement of student learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malini Y Reddy

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Empirical research on the effectiveness of rubrics has primarily concentrated on its contribution towards improvement in academic performance, as reflected in attainment of higher grades. Its role in assessing the other dimensions of SL such as attitudes, behaviors and perceptions that affect students’ inclination and ability to learn has been largely unexplored. There is also a paucity of literature on how the tool can be used for informing course delivery and course design. The objectives of the study are derived from these gaps in literature. The proposed study seeks to explore the usefulness of rubrics from the perspective of students, drawing motivation from two recent studies – the study by Andrade & Du (2005, which examined the usage of rubrics by students to support their own learning and academic performance and the study by Petkov & Petkova(2006, which explored the possibility of developing curriculum wide rubrics at post-graduate level. This study intends to investigate the contribution of rubrics referenced feedback towards enhancement of motivation, development of self- regulation characteristics and improvement in academic performance. It seeks to achieve this by assessing student-learning outcomes in a multiple courses of general Masters in Business Administration (MBA program in two or more business schools in Hyderabad including, ICFAI Business School, Hyderabad.

  20. Concept mapping enhances learning of biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapaneni, Krishna M; Tekian, Ara

    2013-03-05

    Teaching basic science courses is challenging in undergraduate medical education because of the ubiquitous use of didactic lectures and reward for recall of factual information during examinations. The purpose of this study is to introduce concept maps with clinical cases (the innovative program) to improve learning of biochemistry course content. Participants were first year medical students (n=150) from Saveetha Medical College and Hospital (India); they were randomly divided into two groups of 75, one group attending the traditional program, the other the innovative program. Student performance was measured using three written knowledge tests (each with a maximum score of 20). The students also evaluated the relevance of the learning process using a 12-item questionnaire. Students in the innovative program using concept mapping outperformed those in the traditional didactic program (means of 7.13-8.28 vs. 12.33-13.93, pbiochemistry to clinical practice, and to enhance their reasoning and learning skills, as well as their deeper understanding for biochemistry.

  1. Concept mapping enhances learning of biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapaneni, KrishnaM; Tekian, Ara

    2013-01-01

    Teaching basic science courses is challenging in undergraduate medical education because of the ubiquitous use of didactic lectures and reward for recall of factual information during examinations. The purpose of this study is to introduce concept maps with clinical cases (the innovative program) to improve learning of biochemistry course content. Participants were first year medical students (n=150) from Saveetha Medical College and Hospital (India); they were randomly divided into two groups of 75, one group attending the traditional program, the other the innovative program. Student performance was measured using three written knowledge tests (each with a maximum score of 20). The students also evaluated the relevance of the learning process using a 12-item questionnaire. Students in the innovative program using concept mapping outperformed those in the traditional didactic program (means of 7.13-8.28 vs. 12.33-13.93, pbiochemistry to clinical practice, and to enhance their reasoning and learning skills, as well as their deeper understanding for biochemistry.

  2. Factors enhancing learning possibilities in digital workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kobbernagel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a study of processes supporting student learning possibilities in digital workshops planned and held at art museums in Denmark. The investigation aims to provide insights into factors enhancing learning possibilities, including the educator’s dialogic performance, experiences of art, and perceived qualities of digital content creation processes in art museum education workshops. To address the research question of what conditional and processual factors can be said to support learning possibilities, a model was developed on the basis of fieldwork and theories of media education, art pedagogy and motivation. The model was then analyzed using structural equation modelling (SEM on data collected (N= 502 after workshops in two museums. The results suggest that the dialogic performance of museum educators, a positive art experience and positive perceptions of working with digital media are factors that strongly support student participation and reflection – although to various degrees. The findings also show that, in cases in which students are disinterested and see little value in participating during the workshop, this amotivation is likely to be lower when their art experiences and their perceptions of the media production process are positive. 

  3. Factors enhancing learning possibilities in digital workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kobbernagel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a study of processes supporting student learning possibilities in digital workshops planned and held at art museums in Denmark. The investigation aims to provide insights into factors enhancing learning possibilities, including the educator’s dialogic performance, experiences of art, and perceived qualities of digital content creation processes in art museum education workshops. To address the research question of what conditional and processual factors can be said to support learning possibilities, a model was developed on the basis of fieldwork and theories of media education, art pedagogy and motivation. The model was then analyzed using structural equation modelling (SEM on data collected (N= 502 after workshops in two museums. The results suggest that the dialogic performance of museum educators, a positive art experience and positive perceptions of working with digital media are factors that strongly support student participation and reflection – although to various degrees. The findings also show that, in cases in which students are disinterested and see little value in participating during the workshop, this amotivation is likely to be lower when their art experiences and their perceptions of the media production process are positive.

  4. Technological enhancement of natural radionuclides in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, P.; Baxter, M.S.; Scott, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    This review summarizes aspects of technologically enhanced radioactivity in the UK marine environment, considers briefly related investigations in western Europe and then discusses some models for the kinetics of series decay and ingrowth which can be applied to technological inputs of series members to the marine environment and to their differential elemental biogeochemistries. (author)

  5. Privacy enhanced group communication in clinical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyan; Narayanan, Sreeram; Poovendran, Radha

    2005-04-01

    Privacy protection of medical records has always been an important issue and is mandated by the recent Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) standards. In this paper, we propose security architectures for a tele-referring system that allows electronic group communication among professionals for better quality treatments, while protecting patient privacy against unauthorized access. Although DICOM defines the much-needed guidelines for confidentiality of medical data during transmission, there is no provision in the existing medical security systems to guarantee patient privacy once the data has been received. In our design, we address this issue by enabling tracing back to the recipient whose received data is disclosed to outsiders, using watermarking technique. We present security architecture design of a tele-referring system using a distributed approach and a centralized web-based approach. The resulting tele-referring system (i) provides confidentiality during the transmission and ensures integrity and authenticity of the received data, (ii) allows tracing of the recipient who has either distributed the data to outsiders or whose system has been compromised, (iii) provides proof of receipt or origin, and (iv) can be easy to use and low-cost to employ in clinical environment.

  6. The Learning Impact of a 4-Dimensional Digital Construction Learning Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Landorf; Stephen Ward

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses a virtual environment approach to work integrated learning for students in construction-related disciplines. The virtual approach provides a safe and pedagogically rigorous environment where students can apply theoretical knowledge in a simulated real-world context. The paper describes the development of a 4-dimensional digital construction environment and associated learning activities funded by the Australian Office for Learning and Teaching. The environment was trialle...

  7. Seamless learning: Technology-enhanced learning from practical experiences across contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusman, Ellen

    2018-01-01

    Rusman, E. (2018, 8th of June). Seamless learning: Technology-enhanced learning from practical experiences across contexts. Keynote presentation at the Seamless learning conference, Maastricht, The Netherlands. http://www.ou.nl/slc

  8. The Effects of Students' Learning Anxiety and Motivation on the Learning Achievement in the Activity Theory Based Gamified Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chung-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The advancement of mobile game-based learning has encouraged many related studies, which has enabled students to learn more and faster. To enhance the clinical path of cardiac catheterization learning, this paper has developed a mobile 3D-CCGBLS (3D Cardiac Catheterization Game-Based Learning System) with a learning assessment for cardiac…

  9. Mobile Technologies Enhance the E-Learning Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Keh-Wen

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the mobile technologies that enhance the E-Learning opportunity, examine the educational benefits and implementation issues in mobile learning, discuss the guidelines for implementing effective mobile learning, identify the current application and operation of mobile learning, and discuss the future of…

  10. Education for Knowledge Society: Learning and Scientific Innovation Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander O. Karpov

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive-active learning research-type environment is the fundamental component of the education system for the knowledge society. The purpose of the research is the development of conceptual bases and a constructional model of a cognitively active learning environment that stimulates the creation of new knowledge and its socio-economic application. Research methods include epistemic-didactic analysis of empirical material collected as a result of the study of research environments at school...

  11. Perceived Satisfaction, Perceived Usefulness and Interactive Learning Environments as Predictors to Self-Regulation in e-Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The research purpose is to investigate learner self-regulation in e-learning environments. In order to better understand learner attitudes toward e-learning, 196 university students answer a questionnaire survey after use an e-learning system few months. The statistical results showed that perceived satisfaction, perceived usefulness, and…

  12. Technology-Enhanced Learning @ CELSTEC: Ausgangslage, Entwicklung und Trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Klemke, R. (2011). Technology-Enhanced Learning @ CELSTEC: Ausgangslage, Entwicklung und Trends. Presentation given to visitors from Currenta GmbH in the Learning Media Lab. February, 15, 2011, Heerlen, Netherlands. ICoper-project.

  13. Enhancing learning in tertiary institutions through multimedia based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhancing learning in tertiary institutions through multimedia based ... convenient and cost-effective courseware reengineering methodology of our age. ... Also discussed are the reasons for converting classroom courses to e-learning format.

  14. Student-Centred Learning Environments: An Investigation into Student Teachers' Instructional Preferences and Approaches to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Marlies; Dochy, Filip; Struyven, Katrien; Parmentier, Emmeline; Vanderbruggen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The use of student-centred learning environments in education has increased. This study investigated student teachers' instructional preferences for these learning environments and how these preferences are related to their approaches to learning. Participants were professional Bachelor students in teacher education. Instructional preferences and…

  15. Interactive learning environments to support independent learning: the impact of discernability of embedded support devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Rob; Valcke, Martin; Portier, Stanley

    2017-01-01

    In this article the effectivity of prototypes of interactive learning environments (ILE) is investigated. These computer-based environments are used for independent learning. In the learning materials, represented in the prototypes, a clear distinction is made between the basic content and embedded

  16. Recommender systems for technology enhanced learning research trends and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Manouselis, Nikos; Verbert, Katrien

    2014-01-01

    Presents cutting edge research from leading experts in the growing field of Recommender Systems for Technology Enhanced Learning (RecSys TEL) International contributions are included to demonstrate the merging of various efforts and communities Topics include: Linked Data and the Social Web as Facilitators for TEL Recommender Systems in Research and Practice, Personalised Learning-Plan Recommendations in Game-Based Learning and Recommendations from Heterogeneous Sources in a Technology Enhanced Learning Ecosystem

  17. Social Contact in Virtual Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilesen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    A common question is whether technology will replace social contact. In this article it is argued that it will not, provided that we learn to use the characteristics of new media constructively in designing for learning. The term “social”, in this context is taken to mean “purposeful communication......” and not “recreational socializing” (even if socializing may indeed facilitate learning)...

  18. Once upon a time.... Storytelling to enhance teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordly, Daphne

    2007-01-01

    The impact of storytelling in the classroom was examined, as was what motivates individuals to engage in storytelling. A storytelling methodology was introduced in an undergraduate nutrition course as an opportunity to enhance the teaching and learning environment. A 28-item, multi-part, self-administered survey was then distributed to the class (n=17). Survey responses (n=15, 88% response) indicate that educators' and students' storytelling can positively influence the learning environment. This occurs through the creation of a greater focus on personalized information, glimpses of real-life experience, a connection with a topic as participants recognize similarities in their own personal experience and knowledge, and connections between different topics and through the emphasis on key concepts. Stories initiate useful conversations about unexplored struggles within practice, such as the emotional dimension(s) of an issue or what it means to be professional. Students are motivated to participate in storytelling through an external focus on others (i.e., helping others to learn) and an internal focus on self (i.e., seeking a connection with others to promote social dialogue). Several challenges related to the use of storytelling in the classroom emerged. Storytelling develops ways of knowing and dialoguing about issues, which has the potential to influence how students will approach their professional practice.

  19. Virtual Learning Environments and Learning Forms -experiments in ICT-based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2004-01-01

    This paper report the main results of a three year experiment in ICT-based distance learning. The results are based on a full scale experiment in the education, Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII) and is one of many projects deeply rooted in the project Virtual Learning Environments...... didactic model has until now been a positive experience........ The main problem is that we do not find the same self regulatoring learning effect in the group work among the off-campus students as is the case for on-campus students. Based on feedback from evaluation questionnaires and discussions with the students didactic adjustments have been made. The revised...

  20. Virtual Learning Environments and Learning Forms -experiments in ICT-based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2004-01-01

    This paper report the main results of a three year experiment in ICT-based distance learning. The results are based on a full scale experiment in the education, Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII) and is one of many projects deeply rooted in the project Virtual Learning Environments...... and Learning forms (ViLL). The experiment was to transfer a well functioning on-campus engineering program based on project organized collaborative learning to a technology supported distance education program. After three years the experiments indicate that adjustments are required in this transformation....... The main problem is that we do not find the same self regulatoring learning effect in the group work among the off-campus students as is the case for on-campus students. Based on feedback from evaluation questionnaires and discussions with the students didactic adjustments have been made. The revised...

  1. Virtual learning environment for interactive engagement with advanced quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads Kock Pedersen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment StudentResearcher, which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum mechanics at the advanced university level. StudentResearcher is built upon the experiences gathered from workshops with the citizen science game Quantum Moves at the high-school and university level, where the games were used extensively to illustrate the basic concepts of quantum mechanics. The first test of this new virtual learning environment was a 2014 course in advanced quantum mechanics at Aarhus University with 47 enrolled students. We found increased learning for the students who were more active on the platform independent of their previous performances.

  2. Virtual Learning Environment for Interactive Engagement with Advanced Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mads Kock; Skyum, Birk; Heck, Robert; Müller, Romain; Bason, Mark; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-06-01

    A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment StudentResearcher, which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum mechanics at the advanced university level. StudentResearcher is built upon the experiences gathered from workshops with the citizen science game Quantum Moves at the high-school and university level, where the games were used extensively to illustrate the basic concepts of quantum mechanics. The first test of this new virtual learning environment was a 2014 course in advanced quantum mechanics at Aarhus University with 47 enrolled students. We found increased learning for the students who were more active on the platform independent of their previous performances.

  3. Interaction Forms in Successful Collaborative Learning in Virtual Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuopala, Essi; Hyvönen, Pirkko; Järvelä, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Despite the numerous studies on social interaction in collaborative learning, little is known about interaction forms in successful computer-supported collaborative learning situations. The purpose of this study was to explore and understand student interaction in successful collaborative learning during a university course which was mediated by…

  4. Learning Tools for Knowledge Nomads: Using Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) in Web-based Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Christian Sebastian

    2001-01-01

    Examines how mobile computers, or personal digital assistants (PDAs), can be used in a Web-based learning environment. Topics include wireless networks on college campuses; online learning; Web-based learning technologies; synchronous and asynchronous communication via the Web; content resources; Web connections; and collaborative learning. (LRW)

  5. An Ontology to Support the Classification of Learning Material in an Organizational Learning Environment: An Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaski, Joselaine; Reinehr, Sheila; Malucelli, Andreia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to evaluate whether ontology integrated in an organizational learning environment may support the automatic learning material classification in a specific knowledge area. Design/methodology/approach: An ontology for recommending learning material was integrated in the organizational learning environment…

  6. Virtual language learning environments: the standardization of evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Romero Forteza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays there are many approaches aimed at helping learners acquire knowledge through the Internet. Virtual Learning Environments (VLE facilitate the acquisition and practice of skills, but some of these learning platforms are not evaluated or do not follow a standard that guarantees the quality of the tasks involved. In this paper, we set out a proposal for the standardization of the evaluation of VLEs available on the World Wide Web. Thus, the main objective of this study is to establish an evaluation template with which to test whether a VLE is appropriate for computer-assisted language learning (CALL. In the methodology section, a learning platform is analysed and tested to establish the characteristics learning platforms must have. Having established the design of the template for language learning environments, we concluded that a VLE must be versatile enough for application with different language learning and teaching approaches.

  7. Multi-modal Virtual Scenario Enhances Neurofeedback Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avihay Cohen

    2016-08-01

    produced a higher effect size. In addition, neurofeedback via the animated scenario showed better sustainability, as indicated by a no-feedback trial conducted in session 2 and better transferability to a new unfamiliar interface. Lastly, participants reported that the animated scenario was more engaging and more motivating than the thermometer. Together, these results demonstrate the promising potential of integrating realistic virtual environments in neurofeedback to enhance learning and improve user's experience.

  8. Students experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning environments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewiyanti, Silvia; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Jochems, Wim; Broers, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Dewiyanti, S., Brand-Gruwel, S., Jochems, W., & Broers, N. (2007). Students experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning environments. Computers in Human Behavior, 23, 496-514.

  9. Mining Learning Social Networks for Cooperative Learning with Appropriate Learning Partners in a Problem-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ming; Chang, Chia-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have identified web-based cooperative learning as an increasingly popular educational paradigm with potential to increase learner satisfaction and interactions. However, peer-to-peer interaction often suffers barriers owing to a failure to explore useful social interaction information in web-based cooperative learning environments.…

  10. Kinespell: Kinesthetic Learning Activity and Assessment in a Digital Game-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariaga, Ada Angeli; Salvador, Jay Andrae; Solamo, Ma. Rowena; Feria, Rommel

    Various approaches in learning are commonly classified into visual, auditory and kinesthetic (VAK) learning styles. One way of addressing the VAK learning styles is through game-based learning which motivates learners pursue knowledge holistically. The paper presents Kinespell, an unconventional method of learning through digital game-based learning. Kinespell is geared towards enhancing not only the learner’s spelling abilities but also the motor skills through utilizing wireless controllers. It monitors player’s performance through integrated assessment scheme. Results show that Kinespell may accommodate the VAK learning styles and is a promising alternative to established methods in learning and assessing students’ performance in Spelling.

  11. Incremental learning of concept drift in nonstationary environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwell, Ryan; Polikar, Robi

    2011-10-01

    We introduce an ensemble of classifiers-based approach for incremental learning of concept drift, characterized by nonstationary environments (NSEs), where the underlying data distributions change over time. The proposed algorithm, named Learn(++). NSE, learns from consecutive batches of data without making any assumptions on the nature or rate of drift; it can learn from such environments that experience constant or variable rate of drift, addition or deletion of concept classes, as well as cyclical drift. The algorithm learns incrementally, as other members of the Learn(++) family of algorithms, that is, without requiring access to previously seen data. Learn(++). NSE trains one new classifier for each batch of data it receives, and combines these classifiers using a dynamically weighted majority voting. The novelty of the approach is in determining the voting weights, based on each classifier's time-adjusted accuracy on current and past environments. This approach allows the algorithm to recognize, and act accordingly, to the changes in underlying data distributions, as well as to a possible reoccurrence of an earlier distribution. We evaluate the algorithm on several synthetic datasets designed to simulate a variety of nonstationary environments, as well as a real-world weather prediction dataset. Comparisons with several other approaches are also included. Results indicate that Learn(++). NSE can track the changing environments very closely, regardless of the type of concept drift. To allow future use, comparison and benchmarking by interested researchers, we also release our data used in this paper. © 2011 IEEE

  12. Theoretical framework on selected core issues on conditions for productive learning in networked learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone; Svendsen, Brian Møller; Ponti, Marisa

    The report documents and summarises the elements and dimensions that have been identified to describe and analyse the case studies collected in the Kaleidoscope Jointly Executed Integrating Research Project (JEIRP) on Conditions for productive learning in network learning environments.......The report documents and summarises the elements and dimensions that have been identified to describe and analyse the case studies collected in the Kaleidoscope Jointly Executed Integrating Research Project (JEIRP) on Conditions for productive learning in network learning environments....

  13. Mind tools contributing to an ICT-rich learning environment for technology education en primary schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou A.M.P. Slangen; Peter B. Sloep

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines how the learning environment in primary education can be enhanced by stimulating the use of innovative ICT applications. In particular, this discussion focuses on mind tools as a means of leveraging ICT for the development of cognitive skills. The stimulating effect of mind tools

  14. Learning Environment, Attitudes and Conceptual Development Associated with Innovative Strategies in Middle-School Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuehi, Philip I.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2007-01-01

    This study of middle-school students in California focused on the effectiveness of using innovative teaching strategies for enhancing the classroom environment, students' attitudes and conceptual development. A sample of 661 students from 22 classrooms in four inner city schools completed modified forms of the Constructivist Learning Environment…

  15. Developing a Virtual Book - Material for Virtual Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Karin Larsen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the process of, and considerations taken when Virtual Learning Materials were developed for an international study in Comparative Social Work arranged by the VIRCLASS project. The steps taken and the elements included in the Virtual Book – A Guide to Social Work in Europe are presented in details to inform others who are planning to make virtual learning materials. Students from 11 countries in Europe participated, and their reception of this material and learning outcomes from using it are analysed and presented. Furthermore; the article discuss how the learning material contributes to students’ learning, how a common understanding of practice enhances knowledge-building and in what way audio-visual learning material can contribute to good learning in e-learning courses. The results are discussed in relation to theories about composite texts and community of inquiry, and outlines some challenges for e-teachers’ competences.

  16. A model for hypermedia learning environments based on electronic books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Aedo

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Current hypermedia learning environments do not have a common development basis. Their designers have often used ad-hoc solutions to solve the learning problems they have encountered. However, hypermedia technology can take advantage of employing a theoretical scheme - a model - which takes into account various kinds of learning activities, and solves some of the problems associated with its use in the learning process. The model can provide designers with the tools for creating a hypermedia learning system, by allowing the elements and functions involved in the definition of a specific application to be formally represented.

  17. Design of a virtual PBL learning environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Qvist, Palle; Du, Xiangyun

    2006-01-01

    The technological development has created a need for engineers who are oriented towards a global market, have the ability to be involved in interdisciplinary professional and intercultural teams, and who possess lifelong learning competencies. This entails a demand for new educational programmes...... that are more student-centred. In order to support that development, a new master programme (60 European Credit Transfer System) the Master of Problem Based Learning (MPBL) has been established with the aim to improve engineering education. The master programme addresses staff and is an international distance...... programme capable of recruiting participants from all over the world. In terms of contents, it is organized exemplary according to the problem-based and project-based learning method and the participants have to experiment and develop their own teaching and curriculum. On the virtual learning side...

  18. Learning environments matter: Identifying influences on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    The students completed the Student Motivation for Science Learning questionnaire. ... (1999), which gave the South African education system the opportunity to benchmark mathematics and .... petition and rewards (Ramnarain, 2013; Vedder-.

  19. Design of Feedback in Interactive Multimedia Language Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vehbi Türel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In interactive multimedia environments, different digital elements (i. e. video, audio, visuals, text, animations, graphics and glossary can be combined and delivered on the same digital computer screen (TDM 1997: 151, CCED 1987, Brett 1998: 81, Stenton 1998: 11, Mangiafico 1996: 46. This also enables effectively provision and presentation of feedback in pedagogically more efficient ways, which meets not only the requirement of different teaching and learning theories, but also the needs of language learners who vary in their learning-style preferences (Robinson 1991: 156, Peter 1994: 157f.. This study aims to bring out the pedagogical and design principles that might help us to more effectively design and customise feedback in interactive multimedia language learning environments. While so doing, some examples of thought out and customized computerised feedback from an interactive multimedia language learning environment, which were designed and created by the author of this study and were also used for language learning purposes, will be shown.

  20. Technology-supported environments for learning through cognitive conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne McDougall

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines ways in which the idea of cognitive conflict is used to facilitate learning, looking at the design and use of learning environments for this purpose. Drawing on previous work in science education and educational computing, three approaches to the design of learning environments utilizing cognitive conflict are introduced. These approaches are described as confrontational, guiding and explanatory, based on the level of the designer's concern with learners' pre-existing understanding, the extent of modification to the learner's conceptual structures intended by the designer, and the directness of steering the learner to the desired understanding. The examples used to illustrate the three approaches are taken from science education, specifically software for learning about Newtonian physics; it is contended however that the argument of the paper applies more broadly, to learning environments for many curriculum areas for school levels and in higher education.

  1. Quantum Coherent Dynamics Enhanced by Synchronization with Nonequilibrium Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Akira; Okada, Ryo; Uchiyama, Kazuharu; Hori, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi

    2018-05-01

    We report the discovery of the anomalous enhancement of quantum coherent dynamics (CD) due to a non-Markovian mechanism originating from not thermal-equilibrium phonon baths but nonequilibrium coherent phonons. CD is an elementary process for quantum phenomena in nanosystems, such as excitation transfer (ET) in semiconductor nanostructures and light-harvesting systems. CD occurs in homogeneous nanosystems because system inhomogeneity typically destroys coherence. In real systems, however, nanosystems behave as open systems surrounded by environments such as phonon systems. Typically, CD in inhomogeneous nanosystems is enhanced by the absorption and emission of thermal-equilibrium phonons, and the enhancement is described by the conventional master equation. On the other hand, CD is also enhanced by synchronization between population dynamics in nanosystems and coherent phonons; namely, coherent phonons, which are self-consistently induced by phase matching with Rabi oscillation, are fed back to enhance CD. This anomalous enhancement of CD essentially originates from the nonequilibrium and dynamical non-Markovian nature of coherent phonon environments, and the enhancement is firstly predicted by applying time-dependent projection operators to nonequilibrium and dynamical environments. Moreover, CD is discussed by considering ET from a donor to an acceptor. It is found that the enhancement of ET by synchronization with coherent phonons depends on the competition between the output time from a system to an acceptor and the formation time of coherent phonons. These findings in this study will stimulate the design and manipulation of CD via structured environments from the viewpoint of application to nano-photoelectronic devices.

  2. Test-enhanced learning: the potential for testing to promote greater learning in undergraduate science courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brame, Cynthia J; Biel, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Testing within the science classroom is commonly used for both formative and summative assessment purposes to let the student and the instructor gauge progress toward learning goals. Research within cognitive science suggests, however, that testing can also be a learning event. We present summaries of studies that suggest that repeated retrieval can enhance long-term learning in a laboratory setting; various testing formats can promote learning; feedback enhances the benefits of testing; testing can potentiate further study; and benefits of testing are not limited to rote memory. Most of these studies were performed in a laboratory environment, so we also present summaries of experiments suggesting that the benefits of testing can extend to the classroom. Finally, we suggest opportunities that these observations raise for the classroom and for further research. © 2015 C. J. Brame and R. Biel. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Multilingual Writing and Pedagogical Cooperation in Virtual Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe; Vandepitte, Sonia; Arnó Macà, Elisabet

    Multilingual Writing and Pedagogical Cooperation in Virtual Learning Environments is a critical scholarly resource that examines experiences with virtual networks and their advantages for universities and students in the domains of writing, translation, and usability testing. Featuring coverage o...

  4. Evaluation of the Learning and Teaching Environment of the Faculty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... perceptions of atmosphere, and social self-perceptions. Results: The ... to Bloom, the learning environment is a network of physical, social, as well as ..... Medical Licensure Examination in Japan. BMC Med Educ. 2010;10:35.

  5. Creating sustainable learning environments in schools by means of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Creating sustainable learning environments in schools by means of strategic ... be addressed by means of proper strategic planning of the education system as such ... The authors who are academics at a university and who are specializing in ...

  6. Implementing the virtual reality learning environment: Second Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Bonnie; Stewart, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Today, faculty members are challenged to find meaningful learning activities that enhance online nursing education. Second Life is an innovative Internet-based strategy that may be used to engage students in active learning. The authors discuss how this technology was implemented into an accelerated online nursing program.

  7. The Value of Interactive Assignments in the Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florenthal, Bela

    2016-01-01

    The offerings of Web-based supplemental material for textbooks have been increasingly growing. When deciding to adopt a textbook, instructors examine the added value of the associated supplements, also called "e-learning tools," to enhance students' learning of course concepts. In this study, one such supplement, interactive assignments,…

  8. Towards a smart learning environment for smart city governance

    OpenAIRE

    Hammad, R.; Ludlow, D.; Computer Science and Creative Technology; Centre for Sustainable Planning

    2016-01-01

    Educational services provided to various stakeholders need to be actively developed to accommodate the diversity of learning models and to get the advantages of available resources (e.g. data) in smart cities governance. Despite the substantial literature on smart cities, for Technology-Enhanced Learning (TEL) and its related domains such as learning analytics and big data, little effort has been given to the creation of connectivity to smart cities governance to meet stakeholders’ demands, e...

  9. Learning in Non-Stationary Environments Methods and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lughofer, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Recent decades have seen rapid advances in automatization processes, supported by modern machines and computers. The result is significant increases in system complexity and state changes, information sources, the need for faster data handling and the integration of environmental influences. Intelligent systems, equipped with a taxonomy of data-driven system identification and machine learning algorithms, can handle these problems partially. Conventional learning algorithms in a batch off-line setting fail whenever dynamic changes of the process appear due to non-stationary environments and external influences.   Learning in Non-Stationary Environments: Methods and Applications offers a wide-ranging, comprehensive review of recent developments and important methodologies in the field. The coverage focuses on dynamic learning in unsupervised problems, dynamic learning in supervised classification and dynamic learning in supervised regression problems. A later section is dedicated to applications in which dyna...

  10. Scrum-Based Learning Environment: Fostering Self-Regulated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Tanya

    2018-01-01

    Academics teaching software development courses are experimenting with teaching methods aiming to improve students' learning experience and learning outcomes. Since Agile software development is gaining popularity in industry due to positive effects on managing projects, academics implement similar Agile approaches in student-centered learning…

  11. Student Activity and Learning Outcomes in a Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Kalle; Nevgi, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between degree of participation and learning outcomes in an e-learning course on medical informatics. Overall activity in using course materials and degree of participation in the discussion forums of an online course were studied among 39 medical students. Students were able to utilise the…

  12. Learning to Cook: Production Learning Environment in Kitchens

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Learning in workplaces is neither ad hoc nor informal. Such labels are a misnomer and do not do justice to the highly-structured nature and complexity of many workplaces where learning takes place. This article discusses the organisational and structural framework developed from a three-year doctoral study into how apprentice chefs construct their…

  13. How Nurses Experience Their Work as a Learning Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Skår, Randi

    2010-01-01

    This article explores and illuminates the meaning of nurses’ experiences with their work as a learning environment. A qualitative hermeneutic approach guided the research process and the analysis and interpretation of the transcribed interview-texts of eleven graduate nurses. Three core themes emerged from these informants’ descriptions of their work as a learning environment: ‘participation in the work community’, ‘to engage in interpersonal relations’ and ‘accessing important...

  14. Evaluation of hybrid and distance education learning environments in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer-Cascales, Rosario; Walker, Scott L.; Reig-Ferrer, Abilio; Fernández-Pascual, M. Dolores; Albaladejo-Blázquez, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the adaptation and validation of the Distance Education Learning Environments Survey (DELES) for use in investigating the qualities found in distance and hybrid education psycho-social learning environments in Spain. As Europe moves toward post-secondary student mobility, equanimity in access to higher education, and more standardised degree programs across the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) the need for a high quality method for continually assessing the excelle...

  15. Learning Design for a Successful Blended E-learning Environment: Cultural Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Huwail, N.; Gulf Univ. for Science & Technology; Al-Sharhan, S.; Gulf Univ. for Science & Technology; Al-Hunaiyyan, A.; Gulf Univ. for Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Blended e-learning is becoming an educational issue especially with the new development of e-learning technology and globalization. This paper presents a new framework for delivery environment in blended e-learning. In addition, new concepts related to the learning strategies and multimedia design in blended e-learning are introduced. The work focuses on the critical cultural factors that affect a blended elearning system. Since it is common that good systems may fail due to cultural issues, ...

  16. Open Integrated Personal Learning Environment: Towards a New Conception of the ICT-Based Learning Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Miguel Ángel; García-Peñalvo, Francisco José; Casany, Marià José; Alier Forment, Marc

    Learning processes are changing related to technological and sociological evolution, taking this in to account, a new learning strategy must be considered. Specifically what is needed is to give an effective step towards the eLearning 2.0 environments consolidation. This must imply the fusion of the advantages of the traditional LMS (Learning Management System) - more formative program control and planning oriented - with the social learning and the flexibility of the web 2.0 educative applications.

  17. Recommender Systems for Technology Enhanced Learning: Research Trends & Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manouselis, Nikos; Verbert, Katrien; Drachsler, Hendrik; Santos, Olga

    2014-01-01

    As an area, Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) aims to design, develop and test socio-technical innovations that will support and enhance learning practices of individuals and organizations. Information retrieval is a pivotal activity in TEL and the deployment of recommender systems has attracted

  18. Do we need teachers as designers of technology enhanced learning?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    In this special issue, five teams of researchers discuss different aspects of the teacher as designer of technology enhanced learning situations. This final contribution critically discusses if and how teachers as designers of technology enhanced learning might (not) be feasible or even desirable.

  19. Nigerian Physiotherapy Clinical Students' Perception of Their Learning Environment Measured by the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odole, Adesola C.; Oyewole, Olufemi O.; Ogunmola, Oluwasolape T.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of the learning environment and the understanding of how students learn will help teacher to facilitate learning and plan a curriculum to achieve the learning outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate undergraduate physiotherapy clinical students' perception of University of Ibadan's learning environment. Using the…

  20. FUNDAMENTALIZATION OF ICT LEARNING IN MODERN HIGH TECH ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Shyshkina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the features of the process of fundamentalization of ICT learning, educational background to ensure it in high school. The concept of fundamental knowledge and its role in training of a specialist is described. The problems of access to qualitative education, particularly to electronic learning resources in modern high-tech environment are revealed. The role of computer mathematics as a tool of ICT learning fundamentalization is emphasized.

  1. Implementation of Collaborative Learning in Higher Education Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Soetam Rizky Wicaksono

    2013-01-01

    The need of improvement in learning process, especially in higher education environment, has already begun a dilemma for many lecturers. Many experts has already agreed that one of the success factor in learning process improvement is creating collaboration among students. This pre-eliminary action research tried to implement collaborative learning from small groups using simple task and escalating into large group with more complicated collaborative framework. Although there is no quantific...

  2. The Design of Immersive English Learning Environment Using Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Cheng-Ting; Cheng, Shein-Yung; Tsai, Chung-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The study uses augmented reality (AR) technology to integrate virtual objects into the real learning environment for language learning. The English AR classroom is constructed using the system prototyping method and evaluated by semi-structured in-depth interviews. According to the flow theory by Csikszenmihalyi in 1975 along with the immersive…

  3. Students' Opinions on Facebook Supported Blended Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Mukaddes; Kibar, Pinar Nuhoglu

    2014-01-01

    The first purpose of this study was to determine students' opinions on blended learning and its implementation. The other purpose was to explore the students' opinions on Facebook integration into blended learning environment. The participants of this study were 40 undergraduate students in their fourth semester of the program.…

  4. Stimulating Collaboration and Discussion in Online Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the advantages of online learning environments (OLEs) for distance education focuses on the importance of collaboration and discussion to make the students feel more central to the learning process. Presents methods to stimulate collaboration and discussion in OLEs. (Author/LRW)

  5. Integrating Dynamic Mathematics Software into Cooperative Learning Environments in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Yilmaz; Tatar, Enver

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the implementation of the cooperative learning model supported with dynamic mathematics software (DMS), that is a reflection of constructivist learning theory in the classroom environment, in the teaching of mathematics. For this purpose, a workshop was conducted with the volunteer teachers on the…

  6. Managing Learning Experiences in an AACSB Environment: Beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruell, James; Hawkins, Al; Vicknair, David

    2009-01-01

    The study explores the development and management of a rich learning environment that extends the traditional classroom to include significant co-curricular programs. Learning enrichment is guided by the individual mission of the business school, accreditation agency (AACSB), and in our case, the Jesuit mission. That central framework provides a…

  7. Hybrid E-Textbooks as Comprehensive Interactive Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaem Sigarchian, Hajar; Logghe, Sara; Verborgh, Ruben; de Neve, Wesley; Salliau, Frank; Mannens, Erik; Van de Walle, Rik; Schuurman, Dimitri

    2018-01-01

    An e-TextBook can serve as an interactive learning environment (ILE), facilitating more effective teaching and learning processes. In this paper, we propose the novel concept of an EPUB 3-based Hybrid e-TextBook, which allows for interaction between the digital and the physical world. In that regard, we first investigated the gap between the…

  8. Constant Change: The Ever-Evolving Personal Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Kompen, Ricardo; Monguet, Josep Ma.; Brigos, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    There are several definitions for the term "personal learning environment" (PLE); in this article, PLE refers to a group of web technologies, with various degrees of integration and interaction, that helps users and learners manage the flow of information that relates to the learning process, the creation of knowledge, and the…

  9. Designing for Learning: Online Social Networks as a Classroom Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Gail; Evans, Terry

    2011-01-01

    This paper deploys notions of emergence, connections, and designs for learning to conceptualize high school students' interactions when using online social media as a learning environment. It makes links to chaos and complexity theories and to fractal patterns as it reports on a part of the first author's action research study, conducted while she…

  10. Interaction in a Blended Environment for English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Archila, Yuranny Marcela

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the types of interaction that emerged not only in a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) but also in face-to-face settings. The study also assessed the impact of the different kinds of interactions in terms of language learning. This is a qualitative case study that took place in a private Colombian…

  11. Designing a Virtual-Reality-Based, Gamelike Math Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinhao; Ke, Fengfeng

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the design issues related to a virtual-reality-based, gamelike learning environment (VRGLE) developed via OpenSimulator, an open-source virtual reality server. The researchers collected qualitative data to examine the VRGLE's usability, playability, and content integration for math learning. They found it important…

  12. Creative Learning Environments in Education--A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Dan; Jindal-Snape, Divya; Collier, Chris; Digby, Rebecca; Hay, Penny; Howe, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a systematic review of 210 pieces of educational research, policy and professional literature relating to creative environments for learning in schools, commissioned by Learning and Teaching Scotland (LTS). Despite the volume of academic literature in this field, the team of six reviewers found comparatively few empirical…

  13. Procrastination, Participation, and Performance in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michinov, Nicolas; Brunot, Sophie; Le Bohec, Olivier; Juhel, Jacques; Delaval, Marine

    2011-01-01

    The present study focuses on a specific learner characteristic in the management of time--procrastination--, and its role in an online learning environment. More specifically, it was expected that procrastination would influence the successfulness of online learning and that this could be explained by the level of participation of learners in…

  14. Hyperbaric Oxygen Environment Can Enhance Brain Activity and Multitasking Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dor Vadas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Brain uses 20% of the total oxygen supply consumed by the entire body. Even though, <10% of the brain is active at any given time, it utilizes almost all the oxygen delivered. In order to perform complex tasks or more than one task (multitasking, the oxygen supply is shifted from one brain region to another, via blood perfusion modulation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether a hyperbaric oxygen (HBO environment, with increased oxygen supply to the brain, will enhance the performance of complex and/or multiple activities.Methods: A prospective, double-blind randomized control, crossover trial including 22 healthy volunteers. Participants were asked to perform a cognitive task, a motor task and a simultaneous cognitive-motor task (multitasking. Participants were randomized to perform the tasks in two environments: (a normobaric air (1 ATA 21% oxygen (b HBO (2 ATA 100% oxygen. Two weeks later participants were crossed to the alternative environment. Blinding of the normobaric environment was achieved in the same chamber with masks on while hyperbaric sensation was simulated by increasing pressure in the first minute and gradually decreasing to normobaric environment prior to tasks performance.Results: Compared to the performance at normobaric conditions, both cognitive and motor single tasks scores were significantly enhanced by HBO environment (p < 0.001 for both. Multitasking performance was also significantly enhanced in HBO environment (p = 0.006 for the cognitive part and p = 0.02 for the motor part.Conclusions: The improvement in performance of both single and multi-tasking while in an HBO environment supports the hypothesis which according to, oxygen is indeed a rate limiting factor for brain activity. Hyperbaric oxygenation can serve as an environment for brain performance. Further studies are needed to evaluate the optimal oxygen levels for maximal brain performance.

  15. Hyperbaric Oxygen Environment Can Enhance Brain Activity and Multitasking Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadas, Dor; Kalichman, Leonid; Hadanny, Amir; Efrati, Shai

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Brain uses 20% of the total oxygen supply consumed by the entire body. Even though, multitasking), the oxygen supply is shifted from one brain region to another, via blood perfusion modulation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether a hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) environment, with increased oxygen supply to the brain, will enhance the performance of complex and/or multiple activities. Methods: A prospective, double-blind randomized control, crossover trial including 22 healthy volunteers. Participants were asked to perform a cognitive task, a motor task and a simultaneous cognitive-motor task (multitasking). Participants were randomized to perform the tasks in two environments: (a) normobaric air (1 ATA 21% oxygen) (b) HBO (2 ATA 100% oxygen). Two weeks later participants were crossed to the alternative environment. Blinding of the normobaric environment was achieved in the same chamber with masks on while hyperbaric sensation was simulated by increasing pressure in the first minute and gradually decreasing to normobaric environment prior to tasks performance. Results: Compared to the performance at normobaric conditions, both cognitive and motor single tasks scores were significantly enhanced by HBO environment ( p Multitasking performance was also significantly enhanced in HBO environment ( p = 0.006 for the cognitive part and p = 0.02 for the motor part). Conclusions: The improvement in performance of both single and multi-tasking while in an HBO environment supports the hypothesis which according to, oxygen is indeed a rate limiting factor for brain activity. Hyperbaric oxygenation can serve as an environment for brain performance. Further studies are needed to evaluate the optimal oxygen levels for maximal brain performance.

  16. Creative and Playful Learning: Learning through Game Co-Creation and Games in a Playful Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Marjaana

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a pilot study in which children aged 7-12 (N = 68) had an opportunity to study in a novel formal and informal learning setting. The learning activities were extended from the classroom to the playful learning environment (PLE), an innovative playground enriched by technological tools. Curriculum-based learning was intertwined…

  17. Enhancing Simulation Learning with Team Mental Model Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltz, Sonia M.

    2017-01-01

    Simulations have been developed for many business courses because of enhanced student engagement and learning. A challenge for instructors using simulations is how to take this learning to the next level since student reflection and learning can vary. This article describes how to use a conceptual mapping game at the beginning and end of a…

  18. Enhancing Formal E-Learning with Edutainment on Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labus, A.; Despotovic-Zrakic, M.; Radenkovic, B.; Bogdanovic, Z.; Radenkovic, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the investigation of the possibilities of enhancing the formal e-learning process by harnessing the potential of informal game-based learning on social networks. The goal of the research is to improve the outcomes of the formal learning process through the design and implementation of an educational game on a social network…

  19. Qualitative development of eLearning environments through a learner relationship management methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fattaneh Taghiyareh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to paramount importance of knowledge, life-long learning, globalization, and mobility; eLearning as an information technology application has faced rapid growth in recent years. Disseminated war for talent enforces providers of eLearning products to identify technological gaps of learning and provide personalized services for customers of this industry. As we may know, designing customer-centered environments and managing end-user relations are the most effective elements in the market gain, due to the importance of customer satisfaction. The special features of eLearning systems with respect to their centers and users make them appropriate realms for applying a Customer Relationship Management (CRM methodology. Learner Relationship Management (LRM, which is more specialized than CRM in eLearning context, plays a significant role in improving quality of services, enhancing learners’ satisfaction and retention, keeping them, and recruitment new users. LRM provides an integrated infrastructure for eLearning systems and helps them to analyse learners’ capabilities and find the best match to overcome the turbulent environment and tight competition. Also, by improving the service quality and enhancing teaching and learning flows, LRM offers personalized instructions to learners.

  20. OPUS One: An Intelligent Adaptive Learning Environment Using Artificial Intelligence Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzoli, Attilio

    2010-06-01

    AI based Tutoring and Learning Path Adaptation are well known concepts in e-Learning scenarios today and increasingly applied in modern learning environments. In order to gain more flexibility and to enhance existing e-learning platforms, the OPUS One LMS Extension package will enable a generic Intelligent Tutored Adaptive Learning Environment, based on a holistic Multidimensional Instructional Design Model (PENTHA ID Model), allowing AI based tutoring and adaptation functionality to existing Web-based e-learning systems. Relying on "real time" adapted profiles, it allows content- / course authors to apply a dynamic course design, supporting tutored, collaborative sessions and activities, as suggested by modern pedagogy. The concept presented combines a personalized level of surveillance, learning activity- and learning path adaptation suggestions to ensure the students learning motivation and learning success. The OPUS One concept allows to implement an advanced tutoring approach combining "expert based" e-tutoring with the more "personal" human tutoring function. It supplies the "Human Tutor" with precise, extended course activity data and "adaptation" suggestions based on predefined subject matter rules. The concept architecture is modular allowing a personalized platform configuration.

  1. Visual error augmentation enhances learning in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Ian; Huang, Felix; Patton, James

    2011-09-02

    Because recent preliminary evidence points to the use of Error augmentation (EA) for motor learning enhancements, we visually enhanced deviations from a straight line path while subjects practiced a sensorimotor reversal task, similar to laparoscopic surgery. Our study asked 10 healthy subjects in two groups to perform targeted reaching in a simulated virtual reality environment, where the transformation of the hand position matrix was a complete reversal--rotated 180 degrees about an arbitrary axis (hence 2 of the 3 coordinates are reversed). Our data showed that after 500 practice trials, error-augmented-trained subjects reached the desired targets more quickly and with lower error (differences of 0.4 seconds and 0.5 cm Maximum Perpendicular Trajectory deviation) when compared to the control group. Furthermore, the manner in which subjects practiced was influenced by the error augmentation, resulting in more continuous motions for this group and smaller errors. Even with the extreme sensory discordance of a reversal, these data further support that distorted reality can promote more complete adaptation/learning when compared to regular training. Lastly, upon removing the flip all subjects quickly returned to baseline rapidly within 6 trials.

  2. Visual error augmentation enhances learning in three dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Felix

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Because recent preliminary evidence points to the use of Error augmentation (EA for motor learning enhancements, we visually enhanced deviations from a straight line path while subjects practiced a sensorimotor reversal task, similar to laparoscopic surgery. Our study asked 10 healthy subjects in two groups to perform targeted reaching in a simulated virtual reality environment, where the transformation of the hand position matrix was a complete reversal--rotated 180 degrees about an arbitrary axis (hence 2 of the 3 coordinates are reversed. Our data showed that after 500 practice trials, error-augmented-trained subjects reached the desired targets more quickly and with lower error (differences of 0.4 seconds and 0.5 cm Maximum Perpendicular Trajectory deviation when compared to the control group. Furthermore, the manner in which subjects practiced was influenced by the error augmentation, resulting in more continuous motions for this group and smaller errors. Even with the extreme sensory discordance of a reversal, these data further support that distorted reality can promote more complete adaptation/learning when compared to regular training. Lastly, upon removing the flip all subjects quickly returned to baseline rapidly within 6 trials.

  3. Applying a Hybrid Model: Can It Enhance Student Learning Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    There has been a marked increase in the use of online learning over the past decade. There remains conflict in the current body of research on the efficacy of online versus face to face learning in these environments. One resolution of these issues is the hybrid learning option which is a combination of face-to-face classroom instruction with…

  4. Learning Analytics: Potential for Enhancing School Library Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulden, Danielle Cadieux

    2015-01-01

    Learning analytics has been defined as the measurement, collection, analysis, and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimizing learning and the environments in which it occurs. The potential use of data and learning analytics in educational contexts has caught the attention of educators and…

  5. Role Management in a Privacy-Enhanced Collaborative Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Anja; Borcea-Pfitzmann, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Facing the dilemma between collaboration and privacy is a continual challenge for users. In this setting, the purpose of this paper is to discuss issues of a highly flexible role management integrated in a privacy-enhanced collaborative environment (PECE). Design/methodology/approach: The general framework was provided by former findings…

  6. The Challenges of Nursing Students in the Clinical Learning Environment: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Nahid; Molazem, Zahra; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Torabizadeh, Camellia; Najafi Kalyani, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Clinical learning is a main part of nursing education. Students' exposure to clinical learning environment is one of the most important factors affecting the teaching-learning process in clinical settings. Identifying challenges of nursing students in the clinical learning environment could improve training and enhance the quality of its planning and promotion of the students. We aimed to explore Iranian nursing students' challenges in the clinical learning environment. Materials and Methods. This is a qualitative study using the content analysis approach. The participants consisted of seventeen nursing students and three nursing instructors. The participants were selected through purposive sampling method and attended semistructured interviews and focus groups. Results. Three themes emerged after data analysis, including ineffective communications, inadequate readiness, and emotional reactions. Conclusion. Nursing students in Iran are faced with many challenges in the clinical learning environment. All challenges identified in this study affected the students' learning in clinical setting. Therefore, we recommend that the instructors prepare students with a specific focus on their communication and psychological needs.

  7. Cultural Communication Learning Environment in Science Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhindsa, Harkirat S.; Abdul-Latif, Salwana

    2012-01-01

    Classroom communication often involves interactions between students and teachers from dissimilar cultures, which influence classroom learning because of their dissimilar communication styles influenced by their cultures. It is therefore important to study the influence of culture on classroom communication that influences the classroom verbal and…

  8. Virtual Reality: A New Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrington, Gary; Loge, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    Discusses virtual reality (VR) technology and its possible uses in military training, medical education, industrial design and development, the media industry, and education. Three primary applications of VR in the learning process--visualization, simulation, and construction of virtual worlds--are described, and pedagogical and moral issues are…

  9. learning environments and the learning proces of interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, learning in working life has been launched as an important approach in relation to the urgent need for competence-development in our modern knowledge society. But what does it mean in practice? What can and what cannot be learned on the job; what is learned better at courses......, and their results, findings and recommendations are summed up in this book. The book ranges from the background for this development, over general mapping of the area from social, learning and political angles, the development of an overview model and analysis of a wide variety of practical approaches...... to the concluding perspectives on a practical, a theoretical and a political level. On the practical level, the door is opened for close interaction between workplaces and educational organisers, and politically for broad cooperation between the state, the partners in the labour market, and educational institutions...

  10. Case-based learning in an electronic learning environment

    OpenAIRE

    John Graham

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of e-learning have been widely established. These benefits include reduced costs, time savings, flexibility, accessible learning, and convenience. Due to such benefits, it has attracted business, industry, the professions, and of course educational institutes to begin using this platform either to supplement traditional teaching strategies or offer it as a complete substitute for them. The benefits of teaching with case studies are also well-recognized. Working with real world si...

  11. Healthcare students' evaluation of the clinical learning environment and supervision - a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Salla; Kääriäinen, Maria; Oikarainen, Ashlee; Tuomikoski, Anna-Maria; Elo, Satu; Ruotsalainen, Heidi; Saarikoski, Mikko; Kärsämänoja, Taina; Mikkonen, Kristina

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of clinical placements and supervision is to promote the development of healthcare students´ professional skills. High-quality clinical learning environments and supervision were shown to have significant influence on healthcare students´ professional development. This study aimed to describe healthcare students` evaluation of the clinical learning environment and supervision, and to identify the factors that affect these. The study was performed as a cross-sectional study. The data (n = 1973) were gathered through an online survey using the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher scale during the academic year 2015-2016 from all healthcare students (N = 2500) who completed their clinical placement at a certain university hospital in Finland. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression analysis. More than half of the healthcare students had a named supervisor and supervision was completed as planned. The students evaluated the clinical learning environment and supervision as 'good'. The students´ readiness to recommend the unit to other students and the frequency of separate private unscheduled sessions with the supervisor were the main factors that affect healthcare students` evaluation of the clinical learning environment and supervision. Individualized and goal-oriented supervision in which the student had a named supervisor and where supervision was completed as planned in a positive environment that supported learning had a significant impact on student's learning. The clinical learning environment and supervision support the development of future healthcare professionals' clinical competence. The supervisory relationship was shown to have a significant effect on the outcomes of students' experiences. We recommend the planning of educational programmes for supervisors of healthcare students for the enhancement of supervisors' pedagogical competencies in supervising students in

  12. Evaluation of the learning and teaching environment of the Faculty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The study aimed at evaluating the learning and teaching environment of undergraduate students of the Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Nigeria. Methods: The study was a descriptive, cross‑sectional survey. The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaire was ...

  13. Impact of the learning environment on career intentions of paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    training on career intentions, specifically in terms of paediatrics, in a ... SA paediatric interns work in an environment with a high ... already challenging learning environment (LE) for interns. ... doctors during internship may influence career trajectories in a direction that is discordant with .... Cronbach's alpha for the teaching,.

  14. Personal Efficacy and Factors of Effective Learning Environment in Higher Education: Croatian and American Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Vidaček - Hainš

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Successful learning in higher education incorporates various factors related to knowledge, skills, habits, and motivation. Additionally, students’ personalities and self-efficacy may contribute to their adjustment, planning of activities, and achieving success. The objective of this paper is to analyze students’ needs for support services, which enhance the effectiveness of their learning environment at higher education institutions. Answers received from a sample of undergraduate freshmen at one American University and one Croatian University were analyzed and compared. The students from both countries agree that there is a need for developing self-reliance and personal responsibility in using support services, as well as for the timely and accurate information on availability of these services. Students’ suggestions and their desire to enhance effectiveness of their learning environment may be used in creating and improving support services in higher education institutions as well as training their staff.

  15. Associative visual learning by tethered bees in a controlled visual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buatois, Alexis; Pichot, Cécile; Schultheiss, Patrick; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Lazzari, Claudio R; Chittka, Lars; Avarguès-Weber, Aurore; Giurfa, Martin

    2017-10-10

    Free-flying honeybees exhibit remarkable cognitive capacities but the neural underpinnings of these capacities cannot be studied in flying insects. Conversely, immobilized bees are accessible to neurobiological investigation but display poor visual learning. To overcome this limitation, we aimed at establishing a controlled visual environment in which tethered bees walking on a spherical treadmill learn to discriminate visual stimuli video projected in front of them. Freely flying bees trained to walk into a miniature Y-maze displaying these stimuli in a dark environment learned the visual discrimination efficiently when one of them (CS+) was paired with sucrose and the other with quinine solution (CS-). Adapting this discrimination to the treadmill paradigm with a tethered, walking bee was successful as bees exhibited robust discrimination and preferred the CS+ to the CS- after training. As learning was better in the maze, movement freedom, active vision and behavioral context might be important for visual learning. The nature of the punishment associated with the CS- also affects learning as quinine and distilled water enhanced the proportion of learners. Thus, visual learning is amenable to a controlled environment in which tethered bees learn visual stimuli, a result that is important for future neurobiological studies in virtual reality.

  16. How A Flipped Learning Environment Affects Learning In A Course On Theoretical Computer Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnaur, Dorina; Hüttel, Hans

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports initial experiences with flipping the classroom in an undergraduate computer science course as part of an overall attempt to enhance the pedagogical support for student learning. Our findings indicate that, just as the flipped classroom implies, a shift of focus in the learning...... context influences the way students engage with the course and their learning strategies....

  17. Teaching strategies in web technologies for virtual learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilber Dario Saza-Garzón

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The virtual learning environments (AVAs have been a subject of discussion and questions mainly on finding the best teaching practices, which tools you can use them and how to achieve optimum utilization have better results in virtual education, for Therefore in this paper some elements about the characteristics, history, teaching, studies have virtual environments and web applications as tools to support teaching and learning, are set for a virtual tutor note the when planning, designing, creating and implementing online courses. Thus the reader will find concepts, explanations and different evolutionary processes that wins ICT and how are you have been involved in the educational context, spotting potential applications from mediation of teaching, plus some suggestions of how to carry out exposed use thereof in virtual learning environments to strengthen the different processes of teaching and learning.

  18. Non-formal Learning through Ludic Engagement within Interactive Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson, Eva

    Adaptive responsive environments that encourage interaction for children with severe disabilities offer a distinct potential for play and learning in rehabilitation. Physical training and therapy for these children is often enduring, tedious, and boring through repetition – and this is often...... the case for both the child and the facilitator/therapist. Despite this, little is yet known about how the utilization of empowering technology influences the users’ communication and learning. The aim of this thesis is twofold: to contribute to the understanding of the role of action and interaction...... in the learning involved when people with different abilities are using interactive environments, and to make a contribution to the research field by concluding at tentative generalizations on design for non-formal learning in interactive environments.      The thesis consists of seven studies which analyze...

  19. Learning How to Design a Technology Supported Inquiry-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakverdi-Can, Meral; Sonmez, Duygu

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a study focusing on pre-service teachers' experience of learning how to design a technology supported inquiry-based learning environment using the Internet. As part of their elective course, pre-service science teachers were asked to develop a WebQuest environment targeting middle school students. A WebQuest is an…

  20. The Effects of Different Learning Environments on Students' Motivation for Learning and Their Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Marlies; Dochy, Filip; Struyven, Katrien

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research in higher education on the effects of student-centred versus lecture-based learning environments generally does not take into account the psychological need support provided in these learning environments. From a self-determination theory perspective, need support is important to study because it has been associated with…

  1. Personalised Peer-Supported Learning: The Peer-to-Peer Learning Environment (P2PLE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneli, Joseph; Mikroyannidis, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The Peer-to-Peer Learning Environment (P2PLE) is a proposed approach to helping learners co-construct their learning environment using recommendations about people, content, and tools. The work draws on current research on PLEs, and participant observation at the Peer-to-Peer University (P2PU). We are particularly interested in ways of eliciting…

  2. Novel environments enhance the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Cyndy D; Jones, Floretta L; Derrick, Brian E

    2004-07-21

    The induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal formation can be modulated by different behavioral states. However, few studies have addressed modulation of LTP during behavioral states in which the animal is likely acquiring new information. Here, we demonstrate that both the induction and the longevity of LTP in the dentate gyrus are enhanced when LTP is induced during the initial exploration of a novel environment. These effects are independent from locomotor activity, changes in brain temperature, and theta rhythm. Previous exposure to the novel environment attenuated this enhancement, suggesting that the effects of novelty habituate with familiarity. LTP longevity also was enhanced when induced in familiar environments containing novel objects. Together, these data indicate that both LTP induction and maintenance are enhanced when LTP is induced while rats investigate novel stimuli. We suggest that novelty initiates a transition of the hippocampal formation to a mode that is particularly conducive to synaptic plasticity, a process that could allow for new learning while preserving the stability of previously stored information. In addition, LTP induced in novel environments elicited a sustained late LTP. This suggests that a single synaptic population can display distinct profiles of LTP maintenance and that this depends on the animal's behavioral state during its induction. Furthermore, the duration of LTP enhanced by novelty parallels the time period during which the hippocampal formation is thought necessary for memory, consistent with the view that dentate LTP is of a duration sufficient to sustain memory in the hippocampal formation.

  3. A saturation hypothesis to explain both enhanced and impaired learning with enhanced plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Vu, TD Barbara; Zhao, Grace Q; Lahiri, Subhaneil; Kimpo, Rhea R; Lee, Hanmi; Ganguli, Surya; Shatz, Carla J; Raymond, Jennifer L

    2017-01-01

    Across many studies, animals with enhanced synaptic plasticity exhibit either enhanced or impaired learning, raising a conceptual puzzle: how enhanced plasticity can yield opposite learning outcomes? Here, we show that the recent history of experience can determine whether mice with enhanced plasticity exhibit enhanced or impaired learning in response to the same training. Mice with enhanced cerebellar LTD, due to double knockout (DKO) of MHCI H2-Kb/H2-Db (KbDb−/−), exhibited oculomotor learning deficits. However, the same mice exhibited enhanced learning after appropriate pre-training. Theoretical analysis revealed that synapses with history-dependent learning rules could recapitulate the data, and suggested that saturation may be a key factor limiting the ability of enhanced plasticity to enhance learning. Optogenetic stimulation designed to saturate LTD produced the same impairment in WT as observed in DKO mice. Overall, our results suggest that the recent history of activity and the threshold for synaptic plasticity conspire to effect divergent learning outcomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20147.001 PMID:28234229

  4. A Semi-Open Learning Environment for Mobile Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Sucar

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a semi-open learning environment for mobile robotics, to learn through free exploration, but with specific performance criteria that guides the learning process. The environment includes virtual and remote robotics laboratories, and an intelligent virtual assistant the guides the students using the labs. A series of experiments in the virtual and remote labs are designed to gradually learn the basics of mobile robotics. Each experiment considers exploration and performance aspects, which are evaluated by the virtual assistant, giving feedback to the user. The virtual laboratory has been incorporated to a course in mobile robotics and used by a group of students. A preliminary evaluation shows that the intelligent tutor combined with the virtual laboratory can improve the learning process.

  5. Learning Enhancement in Tertiary Institutions Using Mobile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-01

    Dec 1, 2012 ... model that is still by far the dominant mode of education and learning in tertiary institutions. In addition to identifying ... education has there been a technology that ..... Determinant of Mobile Learning Acceptance: An Empirical.

  6. Personal Learning Environments (PLEs) in a Distance Learning Course on Mathematics Applied to Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidarra, Jose; Araujo, Joao

    2013-01-01

    This paper argues that the dominant form of distance learning that is common in most e-learning systems rests on a set of learning devices and environments that may be outdated from the student's perspective, namely because it is not supportive of learner empowerment and does not facilitate the efforts of self-directed learners. For this study we…

  7. Students’ goal orientations and learning strategies in a powerful learning environment : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, M.; Bakx, A.W.E.A.; Beijaard, D.

    2014-01-01

    In Dutch secondary education, experiments with powerful social constructivist learning environments are conducted that aim to appeal to students’ intrinsic goal orientations, use of deep cognitive learning strategies, and self-direction of meta-cognitive learning strategies. The aim of this study is

  8. Study Circles in Online Learning Environment in the Spirit of Learning-Centered Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simándi Szilvia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the era of information society and knowledge economy, learning in non-formal environments gets a highlighted role: it can supplement, replace or raise the knowledge and skills gained in the school system to a higher level (Forray & Juhász, 2008, as the so-called “valid” knowledge significantly changes due to the acceleration of development. With the appearance of information technology means and their booming development, the possibilities of gaining information have widened and, according to the forecasts, the role of learning communities will grow. Purpose: Our starting point is that today, with the involvement of community sites (e.g. Google+, Facebook etc. there is a new possibility for inspiring learning communities: by utilizing the power of community and the possibilities of network-based learning (Ollé & Lévai, 2013. Methods: We intend to make a synthesis based on former research and literature focusing on the learning-centered approach, online learning environment, learning communities and study circles (Noesgaard & Ørngreen, 2015; Biggs & Tang, 2007; Kindström, 2010 Conclusions: The online learning environment can be well utilized for community learning. In the online learning environment, the process of learning is built on activity-oriented work for which active participation, and an intensive, initiative communication are necessary and cooperative and collaborative learning get an important role.

  9. A Working Model for Intercultural Learning and Engagement in Collaborative Online Language Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    Given the emerging focus on the intercultural dimension in language teaching and learning, language educators have been exploring the use of information and communications technology ICT-mediated language learning environments to link learners in intercultural language learning communities around the globe. Despite the potential promise of…

  10. Understanding and Predicting Student Self-Regulated Learning Strategies in Game-Based Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, Jennifer L.; Shores, Lucy R.; Mott, Bradford W.; Lester, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Self-regulated learning behaviors such as goal setting and monitoring have been found to be crucial to students' success in computer-based learning environments. Consequently, understanding students' self-regulated learning behavior has been the subject of increasing attention. Unfortunately, monitoring these behaviors in real-time has…

  11. promoting self directed learning in simulation based discovery learning environments through intelligent support.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veermans, K.H.; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; van Joolingen, Wouter

    2000-01-01

    Providing learners with computer-generated feedback on their learning process in simulationbased discovery environments cannot be based on a detailed model of the learning process due to the “open” character of discovery learning. This paper describes a method for generating adaptive feedback for

  12. Employing the TPACK Framework for Researcher-Teacher Co-Design of a Mobile-Assisted Seamless Language Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lung-Hsiang; Chai, Ching Sing; Zhang, Xujuan; King, Ronnel B.

    2015-01-01

    Integrating technologies into teaching and learning poses a significant challenge for many teachers who lack socio-techno-pedagogical know-how and time to design interventions. A possible solution is to design sound technology-enhanced learning (TEL) environments with relevant content and pedagogical tools to reduce teachers' design efforts.…

  13. Using Machine Learning in Adversarial Environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Warren Leon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Intrusion/anomaly detection systems are among the first lines of cyber defense. Commonly, they either use signatures or machine learning (ML) to identify threats, but fail to account for sophisticated attackers trying to circumvent them. We propose to embed machine learning within a game theoretic framework that performs adversarial modeling, develops methods for optimizing operational response based on ML, and integrates the resulting optimization codebase into the existing ML infrastructure developed by the Hybrid LDRD. Our approach addresses three key shortcomings of ML in adversarial settings: 1) resulting classifiers are typically deterministic and, therefore, easy to reverse engineer; 2) ML approaches only address the prediction problem, but do not prescribe how one should operationalize predictions, nor account for operational costs and constraints; and 3) ML approaches do not model attackers’ response and can be circumvented by sophisticated adversaries. The principal novelty of our approach is to construct an optimization framework that blends ML, operational considerations, and a model predicting attackers reaction, with the goal of computing optimal moving target defense. One important challenge is to construct a realistic model of an adversary that is tractable, yet realistic. We aim to advance the science of attacker modeling by considering game-theoretic methods, and by engaging experimental subjects with red teaming experience in trying to actively circumvent an intrusion detection system, and learning a predictive model of such circumvention activities. In addition, we will generate metrics to test that a particular model of an adversary is consistent with available data.

  14. A SIMULTANEOUS MOBILE E-LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan KARAL

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to design a mobile learning environment that enables the use of a teleconference application used in simultaneous e-learning with mobile devices and to evaluate this mobile learning environment based on students’ views. With the mobile learning environment developed in the study, the students are able to follow a teleconference application realized by using appropriate mobile devices. The study was carried out with 8 post-graduate students enrolled in Karadeniz Technical University (KTU, Department of Computer Education and Instructional Technologies (CEIT, Graduate School of Natural and Applied Science. The students utilized this teleconference application using mobile devices supporting internet access and Adobe Flash technology. Of the 8 students, 4 accessed the system using EDGE technology and 4 used wireless internet technology. At the end of the application, the audio and display were delayed by 4-5 seconds with EDGE technology, and were delayed by 7-8 seconds with wireless internet technology. Based on the students’ views, it was concluded that the environment had some deficiencies in terms of quality, especially in terms of the screen resolution. Despite this, the students reported that this environment could provide more flexibility in terms of space and time when compared to other simultaneous distance education applications. Although the environment enables interaction, in particular, the problem of resolution caused by screen size is a disadvantage for the system. When this mobile learning application is compared to conventional education environments, it was found that mobile learning does have a role in helping the students overcome the problems of participating in learning activities caused by time and space constraints.

  15. Development and Study the Usage of Blended Learning Environment Model Using Engineering Design Concept Learning Activities to Computer Programming Courses for Undergraduate Students of Rajabhat Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasame Tritrakan

    2017-06-01

    were the desired characteristics of students for learning programming. All components were passed the suitable assessment by the experts at high level. In addition, the model’s efficiency tilled the criteria at 69.17/68.20. 3 The developed learning environment and courseware was able to significantly enhance at .05 level on the programming conceptual understanding, computer program analytical skills, and problem-solving by using programming skills. Comparing between control and experiment group, the programming conceptual average scores of the experiment and control group were not significantly different. However, the program analytical skills and problem-solving by programming skills average scores of the experiment group were significantly higher than the control group at .05 level. In addition, the experiment students group also had good attitude in learning computer programming. 4 The students were satisfied with the developed learning environment at highest level.

  16. Nursing Students' Clinical Learning Environment in Norwegian Nursing Homes: Lack of Innovative Teaching and Learning Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Berntsen, Karin; Bjørk, Ida Torunn; Brynildsen, Grethe

    2017-01-01

    Background: Nursing students hesitate to choose aged care as a career, and the aged care sectors are on an edge regarding nursing positions. Clinical learning environments may influence nursing students’ career choices. Few studies have explored learning environments in nursing homes, although students increasingly have placements there. Objectives: The aim was to produce information for developing nursing students’ learning opportunities in nursing homes. Design: A cross-sectional survey des...

  17. Learning about “wicked” problems in the Global South. Creating a film-based learning environment with “Visual Problem Appraisal”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loes Witteveen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The current complexity of sustainable development in the Global South calls for the design of learning strategies that can deal with this complexity. One such innovative learning strategy, called Visual Problem Appraisal (VPA, is highlighted in this article. The strategy is termed visual as it creates a learning environment that is film-based. VPA enhances the analysis of complex issues, and facilitates stakeholder dialogue and action planning. The strategy is used in workshops dealing with problem analysis and policy design, and involves the participants “meeting” stakeholders through filmed narratives. The article demonstrates the value of using film in multi stakeholder learning environments addressing issues concerning sustainable development.

  18. Profiling medical school learning environments in Malaysia: a validation study of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Tackett

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: While a strong learning environment is critical to medical student education, the assessment of medical school learning environments has confounded researchers. Our goal was to assess the validity and utility of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale (JHLES for preclinical students at three Malaysian medical schools with distinct educational and institutional models. Two schools were new international partnerships, and the third was school leaver program established without international partnership. Methods: First- and second-year students responded anonymously to surveys at the end of the academic year. The surveys included the JHLES, a 28-item survey using five-point Likert scale response options, the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM, the most widely used method to assess learning environments internationally, a personal growth scale, and single-item global learning environment assessment variables. Results: The overall response rate was 369/429 (86%. After adjusting for the medical school year, gender, and ethnicity of the respondents, the JHLES detected differences across institutions in four out of seven domains (57%, with each school having a unique domain profile. The DREEM detected differences in one out of five categories (20%. The JHLES was more strongly correlated than the DREEM to two thirds of the single-item variables and the personal growth scale. The JHLES showed high internal reliability for the total score (α=0.92 and the seven domains (α, 0.56-0.85. Conclusion: The JHLES detected variation between learning environment domains across three educational settings, thereby creating unique learning environment profiles. Interpretation of these profiles may allow schools to understand how they are currently supporting trainees and identify areas needing attention.

  19. STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION ABOUT CLINICAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT IN THE PRIMARY, SECONDARY AND TERTIARY MEDICAL FACILITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Dewi, Dian Puspita; Rahayu, Gandes Retno; Kristina, Tri Nur

    2018-01-01

    Background: Learning environment is an important factor in learning process and can affect students' competence and work-readiness. Learning environment is not only about physical facilities but also social and psychological condition. The complexity of clinical learning environments pose challenges and problems that may affect students learning process so it is necessary to monitoring and evaluating students learning environments. This study aims to assess students' perception of their learn...

  20. The influence of an online virtual situated environment on a Chinese learning community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-En Chang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study used an online virtual environment to create and develop a Chinese learning community. The purposes of research were (1 to enhance the Chinese learners’ oral Chinese communication skills and (2 to change the community members’ Chinese speaking and teaching behavior. This is an action research. The research tried to create a community in a virtual environment. The research results showed that (1 a virtual community can enhance learner’s Chinese competence, and (2 future Chinese teachers’ instructional and leading skills can be developed in a virtual community situation.

  1. Enhancing the Accounting Major with Online Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hershey Friedman Ph.D

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Accounting majors who wish to be successful in life must learn to acquire knowledge using all kinds of platforms. The belief that the only way people can learn is by classroom instruction is not supported by research. The authors show how online learning is an important tool for achieving the various goals of accounting education that should include creativity, collaboration, communication, critical thinking and problem solving. The authors conclude that the optimal method to teach accounting is by combining face-to-face learning with on-line learning.

  2. academic dimension of classroom learning environment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... most of them are not interested in their school work, and at the end fail to do .... criminal or lazy, it is the environment that makes him so. Certain environmental ... pregnant women have cause a numbers of deformation in babies, some also ...

  3. Social Networks as Learning Environments for Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.Cortés

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Learning is considered as a social activity, a student does not learn only of the teacher and the textbook or only in the classroom, learn also from many other agents related to the media, peers and society in general. And since the explosion of the Internet, the information is within the reach of everyone, is there where the main area of opportunity in new technologies applied to education, as well as taking advantage of recent socialization trends that can be leveraged to improve not only informing of their daily practices, but rather as a tool that explore different branches of education research. One can foresee the future of higher education as a social learning environment, open and collaborative, where people construct knowledge in interaction with others, in a comprehensive manner. The mobility and ubiquity that provide mobile devices enable the connection from anywhere and at any time. In modern educational environments can be expected to facilitate mobile devices in the classroom expansion in digital environments, so that students and teachers can build the teaching-learning process collectively, this partial derivative results in the development of draft research approved by the CONADI in “Universidad Cooperativa de Colombia”, "Social Networks: A teaching strategy in learning environments in higher education."

  4. Career learning and career learning environment in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, Frans; Kuijpers, Marinka

    2018-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on the effects of career development and guidance among students (age 17-23) enrolled in higher education in The Netherlands. First the paper explores whether the development of career competencies contribute to career identity, learning motivation,

  5. Career learning and career learning environment in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinka Kuijpers; dr. Frans Meijers

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to focus on the effects of career development and guidance among students (age 17-23) enrolled in higher education in The Netherlands. First the paper explores whether the development of career competencies contribute to career identity, learning motivation,

  6. Creating Participatory Online Learning Environments: A Social Learning Approach Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Quincy; Lutz, Heather S.; Padgitt, Amanda J.

    2017-01-01

    Online learning has never been more popular than it is today. Due to the rapid growth of online instruction at colleges and universities, questions about the effectiveness of online courses have been raised. In this paper, we suggest guidelines for the selection and application of social media tools. In addition to describing the potential…

  7. A Constructionist Learning Environment for Teachers to Model Learning Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurillard, D.; Charlton, P.; Craft, B.; Dimakopoulos, D.; Ljubojevic, D.; Magoulas, G.; Masterman, E.; Pujadas, R.; Whitley, E.A.; Whittlestone, K.

    2013-01-01

    The use of digital technologies is now widespread and increasing, but is not always optimized for effective learning. Teachers in higher education have little time or support to work on innovation and improvement of their teaching, which often means they simply replicate their current practice in a digital medium. This paper makes the case for a…

  8. Problem-Based Learning in Formal and Informal Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimic, Goran; Jevremovic, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a student-centered instructional strategy in which students solve problems and reflect on their experiences. Different domains need different approaches in the design of PBL systems. Therefore, we present one case study in this article: A Java Programming PBL. The application is developed as an additional module for…

  9. Learning about “wicked” problems in the Global South. Creating a film-based learning environment with “Visual Problem Appraisal”

    OpenAIRE

    Loes Witteveen; Rico Lie

    2012-01-01

    The current complexity of sustainable development in the Global South calls for the design of learning strategies that can deal with this complexity. One such innovative learning strategy, called Visual Problem Appraisal (VPA), is highlighted in this article. The strategy is termed visual as it creates a learning environment that is film-based. VPA enhances the analysis of complex issues, and facilitates stakeholder dialogue and action planning. The strategy is used in workshops dealing with ...

  10. Learning Design Patterns for Hybrid Synchronous Video-Mediated Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2016-01-01

    This article describes an innovative learning environment where remote and face-to-face full-time general upper secondary adult students jointly participate in the same live classes at VUC Storstrøm, an adult learning centre in Denmark. The teachers developed new learning designs as a part of the...... activating and equal learning designs for the students. This article is written on the basis of a chapter in the PhD–thesis by the author....

  11. The Influence of Social Media on Collaborative Learning in a Cohort Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha James-Waldon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of the impact that social media has on the development of collaborative learning within a cohort environment in a doctoral program. The researchers surveyed doctoral students in an education program to determine how social media use has influenced the doctoral students. The study looked at the following areas: a the ability of social media use to develop a collaborative learning environment, b access to social media content which supports learning, and c whether social media use has contributed to the enhancement of the doctoral students’ academic achievement and learning progress. As social media use and on-line learning become more prevalent in education, it is important to continue to understand the impact that social media has on improving students’ ability to achieve their academic goals. This study provides insight on how doctoral students used social media and how social media use has influenced academic development in their cohort environment. In addition, this paper provides a discerning view into the role social media plays when developing a collaborative learning environment in a cohort.

  12. Learning new skills in Multimodal Enactive Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardy Benoît G.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A European consortium of researchers in movement and cognitive sciences, robotics, and interaction design developed multimodal technologies to accelerate and transfer the (relearning of complex skills from virtual to real environments. The decomposition of skill into functional elements — the subskills — and the enactment of informational variables used as accelerators are here described. One illustration of accelerator using virtual reality in team rowing is described.

  13. Role Playing in Online Education: A Teaching Tool to Enhance Student Engagement and Sustained Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Tisha

    2005-01-01

    As online education escalates, it is important for instructors to explore teaching techniques that engage students and enhance learning at a profound level. To achieve this goal, instructors must look at the primarily text-based environment of the online class not as a limitation, but as an opportunity. Attentive and highly personal teaching that…

  14. Use of Immersive Simulations to Enhance Graduate Student Learning: Implications for Educational Leadership Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Robert H.; Johnson, Christie W.; Gilbert, Kristen A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present how one university incorporates immersive simulations through platforms which employ avatars to enhance graduate student understanding and learning in educational leadership programs. While using simulations and immersive virtual environments continues to grow, the literature suggests limited evidence of…

  15. On bricolage and the creation of sustainable postgraduate learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sechaba MG Mahlomaholo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I show how bricolage as a theoretical framework is used to understand and enhance the learning of the postgraduate students and academics working as a team. Bricolage is described as a metaphor for a research approach which creates something out of nothing and uses that which is available to achieve new goals. It is about finding many and new ways to resolve real life problems using that which is present in the context. It is not linear research, but research that acknowledges and works with the contradictions and incongruences in order to weave a complex text of solutions to the problems. It uses multiple voices, different textual forms and different resources, blurring neat disciplinary boundaries. In short, it splinters the dogmatism of a single approach. This theoretical positioning provides the vocabulary to describe and understand processes and interactions among the research team of 28 PhD and 22 Masters’ students being supervised by 15 academics, across the two campuses of the University of the Free State. For example, while all the actors in this team come from diverse and sometimes contradictory theoretical origins and fields of specialisation they tend to coalesce around the theme of creating sustainable learning environments in their respective research sites. To this theme they ask different questions, hence diverse aims and objectives. They also read different literature informed by the diverse groups of participants in their respective studies. Rather than being the sole determinants of their respective research agendas, they treat the participants as co-researchers who direct and inform the direction of these studies. Their methodologies acknowledge the multiple voices of those who directly experience the problem under investigation and thus can assist in the resolution thereof. They listen to all, irrespective of their station in life and, like bricoleurs, they weave meaningful solutions out of fragments of data

  16. Blended learning in paediatric emergency medicine: preliminary analysis of a virtual learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spedding, Ruth; Jenner, Rachel; Potier, Katherine; Mackway-Jones, Kevin; Carley, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Paediatric emergency medicine (PEM) currently faces many competing educational challenges. Recent changes to the working patterns have made the delivery of effective teaching to trainees extremely difficult. We developed a virtual learning environment, on the basis of socioconstructivist principles, which allows learning to take place regardless of time or location. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a blended e-learning approach for PEM training. We evaluated the experiences of ST3 trainees in PEM using a multimodal approach. We classified and analysed message board discussions over a 6-month period to look for evidence of practice change and learning. We conducted semistructured qualitative interviews with trainees approximately 5 months after they completed the course. Trainees embraced the virtual learning environment and had positive experiences of the blended approach to learning. Socioconstructivist learning did take place through the use of message boards on the virtual learning environment. Despite their initial unfamiliarity with the online learning system, the participants found it easy to access and use. The participants found the learning relevant and there was an overlap between shop floor learning and the online content. Clinical discussion was often led by trainees on the forums and these were described as enjoyable and informative. A blended approach to e-learning in basic PEM is effective and enjoyable to trainees.

  17. Applying a Framework for Student Modeling in Exploratory Learning Environments: Comparing Data Representation Granularity to Handle Environment Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratamico, Lauren; Conati, Cristina; Kardan, Samad; Roll, Ido

    2017-01-01

    Interactive simulations can facilitate inquiry learning. However, similarly to other Exploratory Learning Environments, students may not always learn effectively in these unstructured environments. Thus, providing adaptive support has great potential to help improve student learning with these rich activities. Providing adaptive support requires a…

  18. The Role of the Constructivist Learning Theory and Collaborative Learning Environment on Wiki Classroom, and the Relationship between Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Ibraheem; Woollard, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to discover the relationship between both the social constructivist learning theory and the collaborative learning environment. This relationship can be identified by giving an example of the learning environment. Due to wiki characteristics, Wiki technology is one of the most famous learning environments that can show the…

  19. Using Wikis as a Support and Assessment Tool in Collaborative Digital Game-Based Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samur, Yavuz

    2011-01-01

    In computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments, there are many researches done on collaborative learning activities; however, in game-based learning environments, more research and literature on collaborative learning activities are required. Actually, both game-based learning environments and wikis enable us to use new chances…

  20. Remote Laboratory Experiments in a Virtual Immersive Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Berruti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Virtual Immersive Learning (VIL test bench implements a virtual collaborative immersive environment, capable of integrating natural contexts and typical gestures, which may occur during traditional lectures, enhanced with advanced experimental sessions. The system architecture is described, along with the motivations, and the most significant choices, both hardware and software, adopted for its implementation. The novelty of the approach essentially relies on its capability of embedding functionalities that stem from various research results (mainly carried out within the VICOM national project, and “putting the pieces together” in a well-integrated framework. These features, along with its high portability, good flexibility, and, above all, low cost, make this approach appropriate for educational and training purposes, mainly concerning measurements on telecommunication systems, at universities and research centers, as well as enterprises. Moreover, the methodology can be employed for remote access to and sharing of costly measurement equipment in many different activities. The immersive characteristics of the framework are illustrated, along with performance measurements related to a specific application.

  1. Analysis of Virtual Learning Environments from a Comprehensive Semiotic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria María Álvarez Cadavid

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a wide variety of perspectives and models for the study of online education, most of these focus on the analysis of the verbal aspects of such learning, while very few consider the relationship between speech and elements of a different nature, such as images and hypermediality. In a previous article we presented a proposal for a comprehensive semiotic analysis of virtual learning environments that more recently has been developed and tested for the study of different online training courses without instructional intervention. In this paper we use this same proposal to analyze online learning environments in the framework of courses with instructional intervention. One of the main observations in relation to this type of analyses is that the organizational aspects of the courses are found to be related to the way in which the input elements for the teaching and learning process are constructed.

  2. Blended learning approach improves teaching in a problem-based learning environment in orthopedics - a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background While e-learning is enjoying increasing popularity as adjunct in modern teaching, studies on this topic should shift from mere evaluation of students’ satisfaction towards assessing its benefits on enhancement of knowledge and skills. This pilot study aimed to detect the teaching effects of a blended learning program on students of orthopedics and traumatology in the context of a problem-based learning environment. Methods The project NESTOR (network for students in traumatology and orthopedics) was offered to students in a problem-based learning course. Participants completed written tests before and directly after the course, followed by a final written test and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) as well as an evaluation questionnaire at the end of the semester. Results were compared within the group of NESTOR users and non-users and between these two groups. Results Participants (n = 53) rated their experiences very positively. An enhancement in knowledge was found directly after the course and at the final written test for both groups (p blended learning approach on knowledge enhancement and satisfaction of participating students. However, it will be an aim for the future to further explore the chances of this approach and internet-based technologies for possibilities to improve also practical examination skills. PMID:24690365

  3. Personal Learning Environments, Social Media, and Self-Regulated Learning: A Natural Formula for Connecting Formal and Informal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbagh, Nada; Kitsantas, Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    A Personal Learning Environment or PLE is a potentially promising pedagogical approach for both integrating formal and informal learning using social media and supporting student self-regulated learning in higher education contexts. The purpose of this paper is to (a) review research that support this claim, (b) conceptualize the connection…

  4. Incremental Learning for Place Recognition in Dynamic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Jie; Pronobis, Andrzej; Caputo, Barbara; Jensfelt, Patric

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a discriminative approach to template-based Vision-based place recognition is a desirable feature for an autonomous mobile system. In order to work in realistic scenarios, visual recognition algorithms should be adaptive, i.e. should be able to learn from experience and adapt continuously to changes in the environment. This paper presents a discriminative incremental learning approach to place recognition. We use a recently introduced version of the incremental SVM, which ...

  5. ASPECTS OF USING CLOUD TECHNOLOGIES IN VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

    OpenAIRE

    ZHVANIA, Taliko; KAPANADZE, David; KIKNADZE, Mzia; TANDILASHVILI, George

    2016-01-01

    Thereare increased using the e-Learning technologies at the modern institutions ofhigher education, which favored to integrate the various instruments in thevirtual learning environment. Recently,the cloud technologies have become the most popular, which offer e-Learninginternet technologies based dynamical and actual new opportunities to theeducational institutions. The cloud technologies provide a high level of theservice and they impact on the design of the training courses, offered servic...

  6. Scoping the future: a model for integrating learning environments

    OpenAIRE

    Honeychurch, Sarah; Barr, Niall

    2013-01-01

    The Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) has become synonymous with online learning in HE.However, with the rise of Web 2.0 technologies, social networking tools and cloud computing thearchitecture of the current VLEs is increasingly anachronistic. This paper suggests an alternative tothe traditional VLE: one which allows for flexibility and adaptation to the needs of individual teachers,while remaining resilient and providing students with a seamless experience. We present a prototypeof our vi...

  7. Mechanisms underlying the social enhancement of vocal learning in songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yining; Matheson, Laura E; Sakata, Jon T

    2016-06-14

    Social processes profoundly influence speech and language acquisition. Despite the importance of social influences, little is known about how social interactions modulate vocal learning. Like humans, songbirds learn their vocalizations during development, and they provide an excellent opportunity to reveal mechanisms of social influences on vocal learning. Using yoked experimental designs, we demonstrate that social interactions with adult tutors for as little as 1 d significantly enhanced vocal learning. Social influences on attention to song seemed central to the social enhancement of learning because socially tutored birds were more attentive to the tutor's songs than passively tutored birds, and because variation in attentiveness and in the social modulation of attention significantly predicted variation in vocal learning. Attention to song was influenced by both the nature and amount of tutor song: Pupils paid more attention to songs that tutors directed at them and to tutors that produced fewer songs. Tutors altered their song structure when directing songs at pupils in a manner that resembled how humans alter their vocalizations when speaking to infants, that was distinct from how tutors changed their songs when singing to females, and that could influence attention and learning. Furthermore, social interactions that rapidly enhanced learning increased the activity of noradrenergic and dopaminergic midbrain neurons. These data highlight striking parallels between humans and songbirds in the social modulation of vocal learning and suggest that social influences on attention and midbrain circuitry could represent shared mechanisms underlying the social modulation of vocal learning.

  8. Engaging students in a community of learning: Renegotiating the learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Karen A; Windsor, Carol A; Forster, Elizabeth M

    2018-03-01

    Promoting student engagement in a student led environment can be challenging. This article reports on the process of design, implementation and evaluation of a student led learning approach in a small group tutorial environment in a three year Bachelor of Nursing program at an Australian university. The research employed three phases of data collection. The first phase explored student perceptions of learning and engagement in tutorials. The results informed the development of a web based learning resource. Phase two centred on implementation of a community of learning approach where students were supported to lead tutorial learning with peers. The final phase constituted an evaluation of the new approach. Findings suggest that students have the capacity to lead and engage in a community of learning and to assume greater ownership and responsibility where scaffolding is provided. Nonetheless, an ongoing whole of course approach to pedagogical change would better support this form of teaching and learning innovation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. JTEL Winter School for Advanced Technologically Enhanced Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glahn, Christian; Gruber, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Glahn, C., & Gruber, M. (2010). JTEL Winter School for Advanced Technologically Enhanced Learning. In ~mail. Das Magazin des Tiroler Bildungsinstituts, 01/10, März (p. 3-4). Innsbruck: Grillhof, Medienzentrum.

  10. History and Future of Technology-Enhanced Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westera, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Westera, W. (2009). History and Future of Technology-Enhanced Learning. Keynote Presentation at the First International Conference on Software, Services & Semantic Technologies (3ST). October, 28, 2009, Sofia, Bulgaria.

  11. Personal Profiles: Enhancing Social Interaction in Learning Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlanga, Adriana; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter; Fetter, Sibren

    2009-01-01

    Berlanga, A. J., Bitter-Rijpkema, M., Brouns, F., Sloep, P. B., & Fetter, S. (2011). Personal Profiles: Enhancing Social Interaction in Learning Networks. International Journal of Web Based Communities, 7(1), 66-82.

  12. Category Learning Research in the Interactive Online Environment Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jan; Livingston, Ken; Sturm, Joshua; Bliss, Daniel; Hawthorne, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The interactive online environment Second Life allows users to create novel three-dimensional stimuli that can be manipulated in a meaningful yet controlled environment. These features suggest Second Life's utility as a powerful tool for investigating how people learn concepts for unfamiliar objects. The first of two studies was designed to establish that cognitive processes elicited in this virtual world are comparable to those tapped in conventional settings by attempting to replicate the established finding that category learning systematically influences perceived similarity . From the perspective of an avatar, participants navigated a course of unfamiliar three-dimensional stimuli and were trained to classify them into two labeled categories based on two visual features. Participants then gave similarity ratings for pairs of stimuli and their responses were compared to those of control participants who did not learn the categories. Results indicated significant compression, whereby objects classified together were judged to be more similar by learning than control participants, thus supporting the validity of using Second Life as a laboratory for studying human cognition. A second study used Second Life to test the novel hypothesis that effects of learning on perceived similarity do not depend on the presence of verbal labels for categories. We presented the same stimuli but participants classified them by selecting between two complex visual patterns designed to be extremely difficult to label. While learning was more challenging in this condition , those who did learn without labels showed a compression effect identical to that found in the first study using verbal labels. Together these studies establish that at least some forms of human learning in Second Life parallel learning in the actual world and thus open the door to future studies that will make greater use of the enriched variety of objects and interactions possible in simulated environments

  13. The learning environment and medical student burnout: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrbye, Liselotte N; Thomas, Matthew R; Harper, William; Massie, F Stanford; Power, David V; Eacker, Anne; Szydlo, Daniel W; Novotny, Paul J; Sloan, Jeff A; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2009-03-01

    Little is known about specific personal and professional factors influencing student distress. The authors conducted a comprehensive assessment of how learning environment, clinical rotation factors, workload, demographics and personal life events relate to student burnout. All medical students (n = 3080) at five medical schools were surveyed in the spring of 2006 using a validated instrument to assess burnout. Students were also asked about the aforementioned factors. A total of 1701 medical students (response rate 55%) completed the survey. Learning climate factors were associated with student burnout on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR] 1.36-2.07; all P burnout (ORs 1.69 and 1.48, respectively; both P student burnout. Students who experienced a positive personal life event had a lower frequency of burnout (OR 0.70; P burnout than students who did not experience a negative personal life event. On multivariate analysis personal characteristics, learning environment and personal life events were all independently related to student burnout. Although a complex array of personal and professional factors influence student well-being, student satisfaction with specific characteristics of the learning environment appears to be a critical factor. Studies determining how to create a learning environment that cultivates student well-being are needed.

  14. Extended Immersive Learning Environment: A Hybrid Remote/Virtual Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lírio Shaeffer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a collaborative virtual learning environment, which includes technologies such as 3D virtual representations, learning and content management systems, remote experiments, and collaborative learning spaces, among others. It intends to facilitate the construction, management and sharing of knowledge among teachers and students, in a global perspective. The environment proposes the use of 3D social representations for accessing learning materials in a dynamic and interactive form, which is regarded to be closer to the physical reality experienced by teachers and students in a learning context. A first implementation of the proposed extended immersive learning environment, in the area of solid mechanics, is also described, including the access to theoretical contents and a remote experiment to determine the elastic modulus of a given object.These instructions give you basic guidelines for preparing camera-ready papers for conference proceedings. Use this document as a template if you are using Microsoft Word 6.0 or later. Otherwise, use this document as an instruction set. The electronic file of your paper will be formatted further. Define all symbols used in the abstract. Do not cite references in the abstract.

  15. The effects of different learning environments on students' motivation for learning and their achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Marlies; Dochy, Filip; Struyven, Katrien

    2013-09-01

    Research in higher education on the effects of student-centred versus lecture-based learning environments generally does not take into account the psychological need support provided in these learning environments. From a self-determination theory perspective, need support is important to study because it has been associated with benefits such as autonomous motivation and achievement. The purpose of the study is to investigate the effects of different learning environments on students' motivation for learning and achievement, while taking into account the perceived need support. First-year student teachers (N= 1,098) studying a child development course completed questionnaires assessing motivation and perceived need support. In addition, a prior knowledge test and case-based assessment were administered. A quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test design was set up consisting of four learning environments: (1) lectures, (2) case-based learning (CBL), (3) alternation of lectures and CBL, and (4) gradual implementation with lectures making way for CBL. Autonomous motivation and achievement were higher in the gradually implemented CBL environment, compared to the CBL environment. Concerning achievement, two additional effects were found; students in the lecture-based learning environment scored higher than students in the CBL environment, and students in the gradually implemented CBL environment scored higher than students in the alternated learning environment. Additionally, perceived need support was positively related to autonomous motivation, and negatively to controlled motivation. The study shows the importance of gradually introducing students to CBL, in terms of their autonomous motivation and achievement. Moreover, the study emphasizes the importance of perceived need support for students' motivation. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  16. A collaborative learning environment for Management Education based on Experiential Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidón, Iván; Rebollar, Rubén; Møller, Charles

    2011-01-01

    from a student learning perspective. This paper presents the design and the operating principles of a learning environment that has been formulated in a joint development by teachers and researchers of the universities of Zaragoza (Spain) and Aalborg (Denmark). In this paper we describe what...... the learning environment developed consists in, beginning by presenting the theoretical foundation considered for its design, to then describe it in detail and present it. Finally, we will discuss the implications of this environment for researching and teaching in this field, and gather the conclusions...

  17. A mixed-methods exploration of an environment for learning computer programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Mather

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A mixed-methods approach is evaluated for exploring collaborative behaviour, acceptance and progress surrounding an interactive technology for learning computer programming. A review of literature reveals a compelling case for using mixed-methods approaches when evaluating technology-enhanced-learning environments. Here, ethnographic approaches used for the requirements engineering of computing systems are combined with questionnaire-based feedback and skill tests. These are applied to the ‘Ceebot’ animated 3D learning environment. Video analysis with workplace observation allowed detailed inspection of problem solving and tacit behaviours. Questionnaires and knowledge tests provided broad sample coverage with insights into subject understanding and overall response to the learning environment. Although relatively low scores in programming tests seemingly contradicted the perception that Ceebot had enhanced understanding of programming, this perception was nevertheless found to be correlated with greater test performance. Video analysis corroborated findings that the learning environment and Ceebot animations were engaging and encouraged constructive collaborative behaviours. Ethnographic observations clearly captured Ceebot's value in providing visual cues for problem-solving discussions and for progress through sharing discoveries. Notably, performance in tests was most highly correlated with greater programming practice (p≤0.01. It was apparent that although students had appropriated technology for collaborative working and benefitted from visual and tacit cues provided by Ceebot, they had not necessarily deeply learned the lessons intended. The key value of the ‘mixed-methods’ approach was that ethnographic observations captured the authenticity of learning behaviours, and thereby strengthened confidence in the interpretation of questionnaire and test findings.

  18. P3: a practice focused learning environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Paul W.; Obsniuk, Michael J.; Caballero, Marcos D.

    2017-09-01

    There has been an increased focus on the integration of practices into physics curricula, with a particular emphasis on integrating computation into the undergraduate curriculum of scientists and engineers. In this paper, we present a university-level, introductory physics course for science and engineering majors at Michigan State University called P3 (projects and practices in physics) that is centred around providing introductory physics students with the opportunity to appropriate various science and engineering practices. The P3 design integrates computation with analytical problem solving and is built upon a curriculum foundation of problem-based learning, the principles of constructive alignment and the theoretical framework of community of practice. The design includes an innovative approach to computational physics instruction, instructional scaffolds, and a unique approach to assessment that enables instructors to guide students in the development of the practices of a physicist. We present the very positive student related outcomes of the design gathered via attitudinal and conceptual inventories and research interviews of students’ reflecting on their experiences in the P3 classroom.

  19. Follow-groups, Enhancing Learning Potential at Project Exams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollestrup, Christian H. T.

    2016-01-01

    In the Problem Based, Project Oriented Learning Program of Industrial Design Engineering at AAU students work and are examined/evaluated in groups. Following a period of a 6 years of ban on group-based exams by the government, the return of the group-based exam at Universities in 2014 has...... and the supervisor. Having the group based exam re-introduced sparked the interest for even further utilizing the exam situation for enhancing the learning outcome for each project and at the same time promote a more open atmosphere. Can the students learn even more and/or put their own project learning...... into perspective by seeing other project exams? So in order to investigate whether there was a possibility to further enhance the learning potential and understanding of the learning outcome the study board for the Architecture & Design program opened for a trial period for 2 semesters for voluntarily organizing...

  20. Methodologies and intelligent systems for technology enhanced learning

    CERN Document Server

    Gennari, Rosella; Vitorini, Pierpaolo; Vicari, Rosa; Prieta, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This volume presents recent research on Methodologies and Intelligent Systems for Technology Enhanced Learning. It contains the contributions of ebuTEL 2013 conference which took place in Trento, Italy, on September, 16th 2013 and of mis4TEL 2014 conference, which took take place in Salamanca, Spain, on September, 4th-6th 2014 This conference series are an open forum for discussing intelligent systems for Technology Enhanced Learning and empirical methodologies for its design or evaluation.

  1. Education for Knowledge Society: Learning and Scientific Innovation Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander O. Karpov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive-active learning research-type environment is the fundamental component of the education system for the knowledge society. The purpose of the research is the development of conceptual bases and a constructional model of a cognitively active learning environment that stimulates the creation of new knowledge and its socio-economic application. Research methods include epistemic-didactic analysis of empirical material collected as a result of the study of research environments at schools and universities; conceptualization and theoretical modeling of the cognitively active surrounding, which provides an infrastructure of the research-type cognitive process. The empirical material summarized in this work was collected in the research-cognitive space of the “Step into the Future” program, which is one of the most powerful systems of research education in present-day Russia. The article presents key points of the author's concept of generative learning environments and a model of learning and scientific innovation environment implemented at Russian schools and universities.

  2. Peer Evaluation in CMC Learning Environment and Writing Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mellati

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Peer evaluation and technology-based instruction as the various domains of language teaching perspectives might affect language development. Group work in a technology-based environment might be more successful when learners are involved in developing the assessment process particularly peer assessment. This study investigated the effectiveness of peer evaluation in technology-based language environment and its effects on English writing ability. To reach this goal, 70 Iranian learners were participated in English language writing context. They were divided into two groups, one group assigned to CMC (Computer-Mediated Communication language learning context and the other assigned to a traditional learning environment. Both groups were encouraged to evaluate their classmates’ writing tasks. In addition, interviews were conducted with two learners. Comparing these two groups provides comprehensive guidelines for teachers as well as curriculum designers to set adjusted writing language environment for more effective and creative language teaching and learning. E-collaboration classroom tasks have high intrinsic motivation as well as significant effects on learners’ outcomes. Cooperative tasks specifically in technology-based environment lead learners to group working and consequently group learning. Computer-Mediated Communication is meaningful, especially in contexts in which teachers stimulate group work activities.

  3. Resident burnout: evaluating the role of the learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vendeloo, Stefan N; Godderis, Lode; Brand, Paul L P; Verheyen, Kees C P M; Rowell, Suria A; Hoekstra, Harm

    2018-03-27

    Although burnout is viewed as a syndrome rooted in the working environment and organizational culture, the role of the learning environment in the development of resident burnout remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the association between burnout and the learning environment in a cohort of Belgian residents. We conducted a cross-sectional online survey among residents in a large university hospital in Belgium. We used the Dutch version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (UBOS-C) to assess burnout and the Dutch Residency Educational Climate Test (D-RECT) to assess the learning environment. A total of 236 residents (29 specialties) completed the survey (response rate 34.6%), of which 98 (41.5%) met standard criteria for burnout. After multivariate regression analysis adjusting for hours worked per week, quality of life and satisfaction with work-life balance, we found an inverse association between D-RECT scores and the risk of burnout (adjusted odds ratio; 0.47 for each point increase in D-RECT score; 95% CI, 0.23 - 0.95; p = 0.01). Resident burnout is highly prevalent in our cohort of Belgian residents. Our results suggest that the learning environment plays an important role in reducing the risk of burnout among residents.

  4. A Framework for Mobile Learning for the enhancement of Learning in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadar Abdillahi Barreh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As mobile learning becomes increasingly pervasive, many higher education institutions have embarked on a number of mobile learning initiatives to support their traditional learning modes. This study proposes a framework for mobile learning for the enhancement of learning in higher education. This framework for mobile learning is based on the research conducted on the second year course entitled “Internet Technology,” taught to second year students in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at the University of Djibouti. While the entire gamut of mobile technologies and academic applications needs to be considered, special emphasis and focus is provided to Short Message Services (SMS and popular social network sites such as Facebook, which is widely used for recreation. This paper highlights how mobile learning using SMS and Facebook can be designed to enhance student learning in order to help achieve learning outcomes.

  5. A Simulated Learning Environment for Teaching Medicine Dispensing Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Jenny; Styles, Kim; Sewell, Keith; Trinder, Peta; Marriott, Jennifer; Maher, Sheryl; Naidu, Som

    2016-02-25

    To develop an authentic simulation of the professional practice dispensary context for students to develop their dispensing skills in a risk-free environment. A development team used an Agile software development method to create MyDispense, a web-based simulation. Modeled on virtual learning environments elements, the software employed widely available standards-based technologies to create a virtual community pharmacy environment. Assessment. First-year pharmacy students who used the software in their tutorials, were, at the end of the second semester, surveyed on their prior dispensing experience and their perceptions of MyDispense as a tool to learn dispensing skills. The dispensary simulation is an effective tool for helping students develop dispensing competency and knowledge in a safe environment.

  6. Veterinary students' perceptions of their learning environment as measured by the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelzer, Jacquelyn M; Hodgson, Jennifer L; Werre, Stephen R

    2014-03-24

    The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) has been widely used to evaluate the learning environment within health sciences education, however, this tool has not been applied in veterinary medical education. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the DREEM tool in a veterinary medical program and to determine veterinary students' perceptions of their learning environment. The DREEM is a survey tool which quantitatively measures students' perceptions of their learning environment. The survey consists of 50 items, each scored 0-4 on a Likert Scale. The 50 items are subsequently analysed within five subscales related to students' perceptions of learning, faculty (teachers), academic atmosphere, and self-perceptions (academic and social). An overall score is obtained by summing the mean score for each subscale, with an overall possible score of 200. All students in the program were asked to complete the DREEM. Means and standard deviations were calculated for the 50 items, the five subscale scores and the overall score. Cronbach's alpha was determined for the five subscales and overall score to evaluate reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate construct validity. 224 responses (53%) were received. The Cronbach's alpha for the overall score was 0.93 and for the five subscales were; perceptions of learning 0.85, perceptions of faculty 0.79, perceptions of atmosphere 0.81, academic self-perceptions 0.68, and social self-perceptions 0.72. Construct validity was determined to be acceptable (p education programs. Four individual items of concern were identified by students. In this setting the DREEM was a reliable and valid tool to measure veterinary students' perceptions of their learning environment. The four items identified as concerning originated from four of the five subscales, but all related to workload. Negative perceptions regarding workload is a common concern of students in health education

  7. Evaluating Recommender Systems for Technology Enhanced Learning: A Quantitative Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdt, Mojisola; Fernandez, Alejandro; Rensing, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The increasing number of publications on recommender systems for Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) evidence a growing interest in their development and deployment. In order to support learning, recommender systems for TEL need to consider specific requirements, which differ from the requirements for recommender systems in other domains like…

  8. Adaptative Peer to Peer Data Sharing for Technology Enhanced Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelaccio, Michele; Buttarazzi, Berta

    Starting from the hypothesis that P2P Data Sharing in a direct teaching scenario (e.g.: a classroom lesson) may lead to relevant benefits, this paper explores the features of EduSHARE a Collaborative Learning System useful for Enhanced Learning Process.

  9. A Rotational Blended Learning Model: Enhancement and Quality Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoul, Said

    2013-01-01

    Research on blended learning theory and practice is growing nowadays with a focus on the development, evaluation, and quality assurance of case studies. However, the enhancement of blended learning existing models, the specification of their online parts, and the quality assurance related specifically to them have not received enough attention.…

  10. Innovative Assessment Paradigm to Enhance Student Learning in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Maaddawy, Tamer

    2017-01-01

    Incorporation of student self-assessment (SSA) in engineering education offers opportunities to support and encourage learner-led-learning. This paper presents an innovative assessment paradigm that integrates formative, summative, and SSA to enhance student learning. The assessment innovation was implemented in a senior-level civil engineering…

  11. Enhancing Children's Outdoor Learning Experiences with a Mobile Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikala, Jenni

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how a mobile learning application can enhance children's outdoor learning experiences. The study draws upon empirical evidence gathered in one case study conducted in a Finnish primary school setting in the fall of 2012. The data were collected with student and teacher surveys. The case study indicated that the mobile…

  12. Experiential Learning and Research Ethics: Enhancing Knowledge through Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira-Poit, Stephanie M.; Cameron, Abigail E.; Schulman, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    How can instructors use experiential learning strategies to enhance student understanding of research ethics and responsible research conduct? In this article, the authors review literature on using experiential learning to teach research ethics and responsible research conduct. They present a three-step exercise for teaching research ethics and…

  13. Interactive Videos Enhance Learning about Socio-Ecological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithwick, Erica; Baxter, Emily; Kim, Kyung; Edel-Malizia, Stephanie; Rocco, Stevie; Blackstock, Dean

    2018-01-01

    Two forms of interactive video were assessed in an online course focused on conservation. The hypothesis was that interactive video enhances student perceptions about learning and improves mental models of social-ecological systems. Results showed that students reported greater learning and attitudes toward the subject following interactive video.…

  14. A Learning Management System Enhanced with Internet of Things Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mershad, Khaleel; Wakim, Pilar

    2018-01-01

    A breakthrough in the development of online learning occurred with the utilization of Learning Management Systems (LMS) as a tool for creating, distributing, tracking, and managing various types of educational and training material. Since the appearance of the first LMS, major technological enhancements transformed this tool into a powerful…

  15. Constructive feedback as a learning tool to enhance students' self ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If feedback is provided in a way that can develop students' self-regulatory skills, it could enhance learning and, consequently, lead to improved performance. To improve teaching and learning in higher education (HE), this study sought to determine whether the feedback to first-year students affords them an opportunity to ...

  16. Three visual techniques to enhance interprofessional learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsell, G; Gibbs, T; Bligh, J

    1998-07-01

    Many changes in the delivery of healthcare in the UK have highlighted the need for healthcare professionals to learn to work together as teams for the benefit of patients. Whatever the profession or level, whether for postgraduate education and training, continuing professional development, or for undergraduates, learners should have an opportunity to learn about and with, other healthcare practitioners in a stimulating and exciting way. Learning to understand how people think, feel, and react, and the parts they play at work, both as professionals and individuals, can only be achieved through sensitive discussion and exchange of views. Teaching and learning methods must provide opportunities for this to happen. This paper describes three small-group teaching techniques which encourage a high level of learner collaboration and team-working. Learning content is focused on real-life health-care issues and strong visual images are used to stimulate lively discussion and debate. Each description includes the learning objectives of each exercise, basic equipment and resources, and learning outcomes.

  17. THE BLENDED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT ON THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEARNING PROCESS: A Balance for Motivation and Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar ISIGUZEL

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the effects on motivation and success within the application of blended learning environments in the foreign language class. The research sample is formed by third grade students studying in the tourism and hotel management programs of the faculty for tourism and the faculty of economics and administrative sciences at the Nevsehir Hacı Bektas Veli University (Turkey in fall semester of the 2012-2013 academic year. The research group consists of 62 students and there of 35 students belong to the experimental group and the other 27 persons belong to the control group. While the experimental group was subject to 14 hours online and 6 hours traditional face to face learning, the control group was subject to only 6 hours traditional face to face learning. The research has been completed after a 10 week application. The data on the research have been collected with German course achievement tests via the German Language Learning Motivation Scale. The results reveal that the experimental group of students attending the German classes in blended learning environments has more success and higher motivation compared to the control group attending German language classes in the traditional learning environment. Even if the learners achieve certain success and motivation findings in the classroom and face to face environments performed along with teaching-learning activities mainly in control of the instructor, the success and motivation effect of the blended learning environment could not be achieved.

  18. Learning environment, approaches to learning and learning preferences: medical students versus general education students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Raza

    2016-05-01

    The main objective of the study was to see whether medical students use more desirable approaches to studying than general education students. Survey method was used to collect data from both the medical students and the general education students. The survey of the medical students was carried out between January and March, 2012. The survey was administered to all the medical students present in lecture halls on day of data collection, while general education students were randomly selected from four subject areas at two universities. In total, 976 medical students and 912 general students participated in the study. Of the general students, 494(54%) were boys and 418(46%)were girls with an overall mean age of 20.53±1.77 years (range: 17-27 years). The medical students' perceptions of their learning environment and their learning preferences were broadly similar to that of general education students with the exception of workload. The medical students perceived the workload to be less appropriate (Mean = 2.06±0.72) than the students in general education (Mean = 2.84±0.90). The medical students were more likely to use the deep approach to studying (Mean = 3.66±0.59) than the students in general education (Mean = 3.16±0.91). The students in general education were slightly more likely to use the organized studying (Mean = 3.44±0.90) than the medical students (Mean =3.23±0.90). Both medical students and the students in general education tended to use the surface approaches along with other approaches to studying. There was not a great difference between the medical students and the students pursuing general education with regard to perceptions of the learning environment and approaches to learning.

  19. DREEM and beyond; studies of the educational environment as a means for its enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, S R; Whelan, B; Murdoch-Eaton, D G

    2007-05-01

    Educational environment makes an important contribution to student learning. The DREEM (Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure) questionnaire is a validated instrument for assessing educational environment, but used alone it has little value for identifying means of remediation of poor aspects of environment. This study used qualitative analysis, in association with the DREEM questionnaire, to evaluate the educational environment across all five years of a large undergraduate medical school, and identify areas for change to enhance student experience. The DREEM questionnaire was administered to 968 undergraduate students, together with an open question asking for suggested changes to current medical school practices. Items of concern highlighted by this study were further defined through qualitative analysis, using focus groups, email questionnaires and introduction of Stressful Incident reporting. Through responses to the open question, two items with low scores on the DREEM questionnaire were identified as requiring remediation. Focus groups and email questionnaires were used to define the underlying causes of poor scores, which varied by student year group. Stress resulting from experiences on clinical placement was highlighted by some students, but on closer investigation found to be rare. Remedial steps to improve student support are described. The qualitative data have substantially enhanced questionnaire interpretation, and allowed actions to address common causes for student dissatisfaction to be undertaken. This combined methodology is recommended to other institutions wishing to improve the educational environment, and thus the overall quality of educational provision.

  20. Learning Analytics to Understand Cultural Impacts on Technology Enhanced Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelmeier, Jenna; Tempelaar, Dirk; Rienties, Bart; Nguyen, Quan

    2016-01-01

    In this empirical study, we investigate the role of national cultural dimensions as distal antecedents of the use intensity of e-tutorials, which constitute the digital component within a blended learning course. Profiting from the context of a dispositional learning analytics application, we investigate cognitive processing strategies and…