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Sample records for learning american english

  1. International Students in American Pathway Programs: Learning English and Culture through Service-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Julie; Berkey, Becca; Griffin, Francis

    2015-01-01

    As the number of international students studying in the United States continues to grow, the body of literature about service-learning in English Language Learning (ELL) curricula is growing in tandem. The primary goal of this paper is to explore how service-learning impacts the development and transition of pathway program students in the United…

  2. Vietnamese American Experiences of English Language Learning: Ethnic Acceptance and Prejudice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey LaBelle

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the effects of ethnic acceptance and prejudice on English language learning among immigrant nonnative speakers. During 2004 and 2005, the author conducted participatory dialogues among six Vietnamese and Mexican adult immigrant English language learners. The researcher sought to answer five questions: (1 What are some nonnative English speakers’ experience regarding the way native speakers treat them? (2 How have nonnative English speakers’ experiences of ethnic acceptance or ethnic prejudice affected their learning of English? (3 What do nonnative English speakers think they need in order to lower their anxiety as they learn a new language? (4 What can native English speakers do to lower nonnative speakers’ anxiety? (5 What can nonnative English speakers do to lower their anxiety with native English speakers? Even though many of the adult immigrant participants experienced ethnic prejudice, they developed strategies to overcome anxiety, frustration, and fear. The dialogues generated themes of acceptance, prejudice, power, motivation, belonging, and perseverance, all factors essential to consider when developing English language learning programs for adult immigrants.

  3. Listening to Hyun-woo: What Can We Learn from a Korean American English Learner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Keonghee Tao; Scull, W. Reed

    2012-01-01

    English learners (ELs) from Confucian heritage culture (CHC) are often perceived to be reserved and conforming to the authority of the classroom. But a careful look at struggles between a CHC student and the mainstream teacher reveals that the teacher's views and pedagogical approaches shape academic and social hierarchy in the classroom.…

  4. Japanese College Students' Attitudes towards Japan English and American English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasayama, Shoko

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated contemporary Japanese college students' attitudes towards Japan English (JE) and American English (AE) through a verbal guise test (VGT) as well as a questionnaire. Forty-four Japanese college students listened to four Japanese and four North Americans reading a text in English, rated them in terms of solidarity-related…

  5. The Significance of Learning Nicknames of Public Figures in Modern English and American Language Models of the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garayeva, Almira K.; Akhmetzyanov, Ildar G.; Khismatullina, Lutsia G.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of the topic of this study is determined by several factors: increased interest of linguists to the problem of interaction between language and culture; the need to study the onomastic units as body language. The purpose of this article is to identify the types of motivational nick names of famous American and English public…

  6. Preparedness of Chinese Students for American Culture and Communicating in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Melody; Sue, Edna

    2013-01-01

    What Chinese students learn about American culture and the English language in the classrooms of China does not adequately prepare them for the reality of American culture and communication in English. In this study, the constructs of American culture and models of English language taught in Chinese classrooms are compared with the reality of…

  7. Argumentative Strategies in American and Japanese English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Taeko; Oi, Kyoko

    1998-01-01

    A study examined differences in argumentative strategies in Japanese and American English by analyzing English essays on capital punishment written by 22 American high school seniors and 30 Japanese college sophomores. Differences were found in the organizational patterns, content and use of rational appeals, preference for type of diction, and…

  8. Learning Theories In Instructional Multimedia For English Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Farani, Rizki

    2016-01-01

    Learning theory is the concept of human learning. This concept is one of the important components in instructional for learning, especially English learning. English subject becomes one of important subjects for students but learning English needs specific strategy since it is not our vernacular. Considering human learning process in English learning is expected to increase students' motivation to understand English better. Nowadays, the application of learning theories in English learning ha...

  9. An Evaluation of American English File Series

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    Behnam Ghasemi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Textbooks play a pivotal role in language learning classrooms. The problem is that among a wide range of textbooks in market which is appropriate for a specific classroom and a group of learners. In order to evaluate ELT textbooks theorists and writers have offered different kinds of evaluative frameworks based on a number of principles and criteria. This study evaluates a series of ELT textbook, namely, American English File by the use of Littlejohn’s (1998 evaluative framework to see what explicit features of the book are, what pedagogic values it has, whether it is in line with its claimed objectives, and what its merits and demerits are. Littlejohn believes that we should evaluate a textbook based on its own pedagogic values and we should see what is in it not what teacher and evaluators think must exist in it. Consequently his framework is claimed to be devoid of any impressionistic ideas and it is in-depth and objective rather than being subjective. Nine ELT experts and ten ELT teachers helped the researcher rate the evaluative checklists. The results of the study show that although a number of shortcomings and drawbacks were found in American English File, it stood up reasonably well to a detailed and in-depth analysis and that its pedagogic values and positive attributes far out-weighed its shortcomings. The internal consistency between ratings was computed via the statistical tool of Cronbach’s alpha that indicated a desirable inter-rater reliability.

  10. English in Economy World: an Overview of English Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Setyaningsih, Ani; Kurniasih, Siwi Karmadi

    2007-01-01

    English is not a language for the English-speaking countries anymore. English has spread worldwide to the countries in the five continents. One of the reasons is economy. People need to acquire English since it is one way to cope with the communication in economy trend. English is needed to process information, analyze, evaluate, experiment, negotiate and collaborate in economy. The awareness of English importance in the globalization era has made people learn this universal language consciou...

  11. Korea's "Model Minority": A Case Study of an American-Korean Bilingual Student's Challenges Learning English in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    In contemporary South Korean society, there is a strong emphasis on cultural homogeneity and, simultaneously, the development of English proficiency as a human resource. Since language is inextricably linked to identity, bilingual learners from English speaking countries may feel pressure to conform to Korean cultural and linguistic norms, leading…

  12. The Typical Different Features of Grammar of the British English (BrE and American English (AmE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Dirgeyasa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of varieties of English all over the world such as American, British, Australian, Indian, Singaporean, Philippine English, etc. However, there are only two varieties of English which are most widely and dominantly taught, learned, and used both spoken and printed around the world namely British English (BrE and American English (AmE. In real sense, the two are often confusing for the non-native learners because they have some differences and uniqueness in some aspects such as spelling, pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. Therefore, it is really important for students, teachers and speakers as well to be aware of the major differences between the two. This paper is trying to review some striking unique and different features of grammar of British English (BrE and American English (AmE.

  13. Social construction of American sign language--English interpreters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermid, Campbell

    2009-01-01

    Instructors in 5 American Sign Language--English Interpreter Programs and 4 Deaf Studies Programs in Canada were interviewed and asked to discuss their experiences as educators. Within a qualitative research paradigm, their comments were grouped into a number of categories tied to the social construction of American Sign Language--English interpreters, such as learners' age and education and the characteristics of good citizens within the Deaf community. According to the participants, younger students were adept at language acquisition, whereas older learners more readily understood the purpose of lessons. Children of deaf adults were seen as more culturally aware. The participants' beliefs echoed the theories of P. Freire (1970/1970) that educators consider the reality of each student and their praxis and were responsible for facilitating student self-awareness. Important characteristics in the social construction of students included independence, an appropriate attitude, an understanding of Deaf culture, ethical behavior, community involvement, and a willingness to pursue lifelong learning.

  14. Perception of "English" and Motivation in Learning English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mehmet; Seçer, Sule Y. E.; Erisen, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to present high school students' perception of "English" through the impressions and images and the effect of these perceptions on their motivation in learning English. This qualitative study is based on the data about students' metaphors and the focus group interview to determine their effect on the students' motivation.…

  15. ENDLESS OPTIONS OF INTERNET IN LEARNING ENGLISH

    OpenAIRE

    Skipalska, O.M.; Скіпальська, О.М.

    2013-01-01

    Proficient level of English will depend not only on talent and hard work of a learner but also on the ways of learning. Internet is a future of education and will enhance learning process. It facilitates learning, it can be used anywhere, it enables research and improved learning, it accelerates learning, it helps them grow.

  16. Mechanisms of Vowel Variation in African American English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Yolanda Feimster

    2018-02-15

    This research explored mechanisms of vowel variation in African American English by comparing 2 geographically distant groups of African American and White American English speakers for participation in the African American Shift and the Southern Vowel Shift. Thirty-two male (African American: n = 16, White American controls: n = 16) lifelong residents of cities in eastern and western North Carolina produced heed,hid,heyd,head,had,hod,hawed,whod,hood,hoed,hide,howed,hoyd, and heard 3 times each in random order. Formant frequency, duration, and acoustic analyses were completed for the vowels /i, ɪ, e, ɛ, æ, ɑ, ɔ, u, ʊ, o, aɪ, aʊ, oɪ, ɝ/ produced in the listed words. African American English speakers show vowel variation. In the west, the African American English speakers are participating in the Southern Vowel Shift and hod fronting of the African American Shift. In the east, neither the African American English speakers nor their White peers are participating in the Southern Vowel Shift. The African American English speakers show limited participation in the African American Shift. The results provide evidence of regional and socio-ethnic variation in African American English in North Carolina.

  17. On Principle of Rewards in English Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊莉芸

    2004-01-01

    There is no question that learning a foreign language like English is different from learning other subjects, mainly be cause it is new to us Chinese and there is no enough enviroment. But that doesn't mean we have no way to learn it and do it well .If asked to identify the most powerful influences on learning, motivation would probably be high on most teachers' and learners' lists. It seens only sensible to assume that English learning is most likely to occur when the learners want to learn. That is, when motivation such as interest, curiosity, or a desire achieves, the learners would be engaged in learning. However, how do we teachers motivate our students to like learning and learn well? Here, rewards both extrinsic and intrinsic are of great value and play a vital role in English learning.

  18. The Method of High School English Word Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴博涵

    2016-01-01

    Most Chinese students are not interested in English learning, especially English words. In this paper, I focus on English vocabulary learning, for example, the study of high school students English word learning method, and also introduce several ways to make vocabulary memory becomes more effective. The purpose is to make high school students grasp more English word learning skills.

  19. A Study of Autonomy English Learning on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yunsheng

    2008-01-01

    With the variety of environment and method of English learning, Autonomy English learning on the Internet is playing a more and more important role in modern English learning. It challenges the traditional learning approach, and also is forwardness. This paper points out that autonomy English learning on the Internet facilitates the improvement of…

  20. The Effect of Situated Learning on Students Vocational English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özüdogru, Melike; Özüdogru, Fatma

    2017-01-01

    The current study aimed to find out the effect of situated learning on students' Vocational English learning. This research employed a mixed method research design. In the quantitative part of the study, pre-tests and post-tests were implemented to investigate the differences in students' vocational English learning between the experimental and…

  1. Weblogs For English Language Learning: Students’ Perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    WAN, Juida

    2011-01-01

    The digital explosion of information on the Internet has resulted in a need for a new and up-to-date way for Digital Natives to learn English. Educators have reported numerous benefits of using weblogs in English language learning. This article presents a small scale study on the use of weblogs for English language learning at tertiary level in Malaysia. Twenty six students kept weblogs for a duration of a semester. This study investigated how students perceived the use of weblogs for Eng...

  2. WEBLOGS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNING: Students’ Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juida WAN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The digital explosion of information on the Internet has resulted in a need for a new and up-to-date way for Digital Natives to learn English. Educators have reported numerous benefits of using weblogs in English language learning. This article presents a small scale study on the use of weblogs for English language learning at tertiary level in Malaysia. Twenty six students kept weblogs for a duration of a semester. This study investigated how students perceived the use of weblogs for English language learning. A questionnaire which was made up of both close-ended and open-ended questions was administered at the end of the study. A mixture of quantitative and qualitative methods was used to analyse the students’ responses to the questionnaire. The study found that students were aware of their audience when they blogged and that they geared their writing towards their audience. In addition, they also interacted with others through the use of the comment feature on their weblogs. Furthermore, the majority of the students enjoyed blogging and found weblogs useful for English language learning. This study found that weblogs are promising interactive tools for English language learning.

  3. A Study of Effective Strategies to Stimulate College Non-English Majors' Motivation for Learning English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向玉

    2008-01-01

    As an English teacher for non-English majors in a college in Wuhan,I find that most of my students are not interested in learning English.Thus.I am concerned about how to stimulate my students' motivation in learning English.This paper discusses some effective strategies to stimulate college non-English majors' motivation for learning English.such as creating a comfortable atmosphere,buiIding students' confidence,promoting cooperative learning.and incorporating the multiple intelligences concept in the classroom.These strategies do have practical application in my classroom and have motivated my students' interest in English learning.

  4. Learning Strategies in Alleviating English Writing Anxiety for English Language Learners (ELLs) with Limited English Proficiency (LEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Pei; Lin, Huey-Ju

    2016-01-01

    This study utilized the Oxford Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) and an English writing anxiety scale to examine the relationship between learning strategies and English writing anxiety in 102 university-level English language learners (ELLs) with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) in a university in Taiwan. Kruskal Wallis Test…

  5. Personalised Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning System for Supporting Effective English Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ming; Li, Yi-Lun

    2010-01-01

    Because learning English is extremely popular in non-native English speaking countries, developing modern assisted-learning schemes that facilitate effective English learning is a critical issue in English-language education. Vocabulary learning is vital within English learning because vocabulary comprises the basic building blocks of English…

  6. English Lecturer’s Attitude Toward English Variety In English Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahma Yanti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates English lecturers’ attitude toward the variation of English in the process of English learning. The purpose of this study is to discuss the types of English variations uttered by English lecturers who are considered as respondents in this study and their attitudes toward the variations of language that appear to their own speech during the teaching-learning process. This research is descriptive by using qualitative approach. The data to be presented in this research is taken from several words of Indonesian lecturers at several universities in Padang West Sumatra by distributing some questionnaires and also interviews. The method of data analysis is divided into two types, first, methods which related to the correlation of external language objects with a non-linguistic element called correlation method or method of matching, and secondly, methods which related to surgical, processing or internal verbal tampering called the method of operation or distribution method.

  7. Motivation's Influence on English Learning and Strategies for Improving

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玢; 张亚铃

    2009-01-01

    The article mainly focuses on the relationship between motivation and English learning,the influence of motivation on English learning(That is,English learning motive may be simply viewed as the reason of learning English;different motives will lead to different learning methods;generally speaking,surface motive does not endure longer than deep motive.;strong motivation can lead to final Success.)and six strategies of improving English learning(That is,developing proper attitudes towards English learning and letting students know the pressure of it;goal and feedback;praise and criticism;contest and cooperation;expectation and appraisement;achievement motive.).

  8. Researches and Analysis on Middle School Students’ English Learning Motivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈虹; 韩小乐

    2008-01-01

    <正>This thesis discusses the relations among English learning motivations, learning strategies and study efficiency under China’s background through reviewing the Chinese and overseas English learning motivation research, analyzing its explanation, characteristics and the questionnaire results. Several suggestions on how to stimulate and foster the students’English learning motivation have been given through the analysis of existing problems in the English study of students. I expect these would be animating English teaching in school.

  9. English or Perish: How Contemporary South Korea Received, Accommodated, and Internalized English and American Modernity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JongHwa; Han, Min Wha; McKerrow, Raymie E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the positionality of English in South Korea as a form of symbolic capital that represents the discursive power of Americanism and East Asian Social Darwinism. By employing Bourdieu's and Foucault's theoretical orientations, this paper traces how South Korean linguistic policies to incorporate English loan words coincide with…

  10. Research on demand-oriented Business English learning method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Business English is integrated with visual-audio-oral English, which focuses on the application for English listening and speaking skills in common business occasions, and acquire business knowledge and improve skills through English. This paper analyzes the Business English Visual-audio-oral Course, and learning situation of higher vocational students’ learning objectives, interests, vocabulary, listening and speaking, and focuses on the research of effective methods to guide the higher vocational students to learn Business English Visual-audio-oral Course, master Business English knowledge, and improve communicative competence of Business English.

  11. English language proficiency and smoking prevalence among California's Asian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao; Shimizu, Robin; Chen, Moon S

    2005-12-15

    The authors documented California's tobacco control initiatives for Asian Americans and the current tobacco use status among Asian subgroups and provide a discussion of the challenges ahead. The California Tobacco Control Program has employed a comprehensive approach to decrease tobacco use in Asian Americans, including ethnic-specific media campaigns, culturally competent interventions, and technical assistance and training networks. Surveillance of tobacco use among Asian Americans and the interpretation of the results have always been a challenge. Data from the 2001 The California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) were analyzed to provide smoking prevalence estimates for all Asian Americans and Asian-American subgroups, including Korean, Filipino, Japanese, South Asian, Chinese, and Vietnamese. Current smoking prevalence was analyzed by gender and by English proficiency level. Cigarette smoking prevalence among Asian males in general was almost three times of that among Asian females. Korean and Vietnamese males had higher cigarette smoking prevalence rates than males in other subgroups. Although Asian females in general had low smoking prevalence rates, significant differences were found among Asian subgroups, from 1.1% (Vietnamese) to 12.7% (Japanese). Asian men who had high English proficiency were less likely to be smokers than men with lower English proficiency. Asian women with high English proficiency were more likely to be smokers than women with lower English proficiency. Smoking prevalence rates among Asian Americans in California differed significantly on the basis of ethnicity, gender, and English proficiency. English proficiency seemed to have the effect of reducing smoking prevalence rates among Asian males but had just the opposite effect among Asian females. Cancer 2005. (c) 2005 American Cancer Society.

  12. Business Spoken English Learning Strategies for Chinese Enterprise Staff

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Li

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses the issue of promoting effective Business Spoken English of Enterprise Staff in China.It aims to assess the assessment of spoken English learning methods and identify the difficulties of learning English oral expression concerned business area.It also provides strategies for enhancing Enterprise Staff’s level of Business Spoken English.

  13. TYPES OF LANGUAGE LEARNING STRATEGIES USED BY TERTIARY ENGLISH MAJORS

    OpenAIRE

    TAN KHYE CHUIN; SARJIT KAUR

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the types of language learning strategies used by 73 English majors from the School of Humanities in Universiti Sains Malaysia. Using questionnaires adopted from Oxford’s (1990) Strategy Inventory of Language Learning (SILL) and focus group interviews, the study also examined the English major students’ perceptions of using language learning strategies while learning English. The results revealed that the English majors were generally high users of all six types of lan...

  14. Motivating Senior High School Students in English Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章小焕

    2015-01-01

    Motivation is the key to students’ English learning. To know how to promote students’ motivation in learning English, we need to know e-nough about motivation itself. In fact, motivation is so important to successful English learning that we must find the ways to promote students’ motivation. This paper focuses on identifying students’ problems of motivation and activa-ting their motivation to learn English with some useful ways.

  15. American-English on Philippine Radio and Television

    OpenAIRE

    江中, 八郎; Hachiro, Enaka

    1998-01-01

    Both English and Filipino are official languages in the Philippines. However, if we take a walk in downtown Manila, we notice that Radio and Television broadcasting, newspapers and journals are in English, their expression and the accents of trained Filipino announcers are indeed very American. At present, radio signals are received in 95% of the whole archipelago, with more than 70% of the total Philippine households owning radios. On the other hand, only about 35% of all households own TV s...

  16. Learning English in Gabon: The Question of Cultural Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Mbodouma

    1999-01-01

    Gabonese students who speak French as a second language and are educated through French, learn English using textbooks designed for students in France. Article discusses pedagogical issues, goals that Gabonese students have in learning English, and the linguistic and sociolinguistic context in which learning of English takes place. Materials used…

  17. Cultivation and Stimulation of the English Learning Motivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马茹

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, more and more researches show that we should pay more attention to students to play a main role in English study, because students who get the final effect on English learning motivation play central role in numerous students' learning affected factors. Therefore, in the education teaching activities, many teachers regard learning motivation of English effect as important aspect and use it in teaching through different ways and methods to cultivate and motivate students to learn English motivation. According to the definition of learning motivation,combined with the modern middle school students’English study, such as, the current situation of teachers' teaching, the actual situation of the relationship between teach-ers and students to talk about encouraging and educating high school students in English learning motivation by means and methods, in order to culti-vate and stimulate students`English learning motivation and improve English teaching level.

  18. How to Learn English Grammar?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖琳燃

    2017-01-01

    Grammar is an aspect of language about which learners have different opinions. Some learners are very interested in ifnding out or learning grammar rules and doing lots of grammar exercises. Others hate grammar and think it is the most boring part of learning a new language. Whatever opinion you have, however, you cannot escape from grammar; it is in every sentence you read or write, speak or hear. Grammar is simply the word for the rules that people follow when they use a language. We need those rules in the same way as we need the rules in a game. If there are no rules, or if everybody follows their own rules, the game would soon break down. It's the same with language; without rules we would not be able to communicate with other people. So you cannot escape from grammar, but the key question here is: what is the best way to learn grammar? You can learn the rules of a game by simply playing the game. You will certainly make mistakes; you may even get hurt. Eventually, however, you will know how to play. Of course, the rules of a language are very much more complicated than the rules of any game, but in fact this is exactly how you learned your own language. Nobody taught you the rules of your mother tongue as you were growing up but now you never make a grammar mistake.

  19. English language learning materials a critical review

    CERN Document Server

    Tomlinson

    2010-01-01

    This research collection presents a critical review of the materials used for learning English around the world. The first section includes a discussion of materials for specific learners and purposes, such as young learners, self-study, academic writing and general proficiency. The second section presents a detailed study of the materials used in Europe, Asia, North America, South America, Africa and Australia, and critically evaluates their effectiveness in the teaching of English to speakers of other languages. Taking both the teacher's and the learner's needs into consideration, the book m

  20. Developing an English Mobile Learning Attitude Scale for Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tzu-Ying

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of mobile devices, mobile learning (m-learning) has becoming another popular topic. There is a strong need for both researchers and educators to be aware of adult learners' attitudes toward English mobile learning, yet relevant studies on mobile learning to promote English learning for adult learners are…

  1. Research on demand-oriented Business English learning method

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Business English is integrated with visual-audio-oral English, which focuses on the application for English listening and speaking skills in common business occasions, and acquire business knowledge and improve skills through English. This paper analyzes the Business English Visual-audio-oral Course, and learning situation of higher vocational students’ learning objectives, interests, vocabulary, listening and speaking, and focuses on the research of effective methods to guide the higher voca...

  2. Learning through English Language in Early Childhood Education: A Case of English Medium Schools in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwalongo, Leopard Jacob

    2016-01-01

    In China the English medium schools are now mushrooming and many parents send their children at very early age. These schools enroll children of pre-school to school age to learn through English as foreign language regardless of their proficiency in the first language. Therefore the study aims at examining the learning English language as a…

  3. Rolex learning center English guide

    CERN Document Server

    Della Casa, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The novel architectural form of this building, conceived of by the architects of SAANA (winners of the Pritzker Prize in 2010), compelled the building engineers to come up with unprecedented structural, technical and logistical solutions. And yet, once the Rolex Learning Center was complete, the ingenuity required for its construction had become practically invisible in the eyes of the uninitiated. This richly illustrated guide provides, in condensed form, an account of the extraordinary adventure of the realization of the Rolex Learning Center. It explains in detail the context of its construction and brings to light the spatial subtleties of its architecture. In addition, it provides the visitor of the building with all the needed technical information and many novel facts and figures.

  4. An Uncommon Language: The Multicultural Making of American English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Jim

    1994-01-01

    This article explains the use of the origins of American English and the dictionary to teach multiculturalism to elementary school students. It suggests classroom activities that help students explore the cultural roots behind words and appreciate the ways words have been created. Esperanto and the development of an international language are also…

  5. Research on the Relationship between English Majors’ Learning Motivation and Spoken English in Chinese Context

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆佳佳

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing importance attached to spoken English, it is of great significance to find how the motivation of English majors affects their oral English learning outcomes. Based on the research results and theoretical frameworks of the previous studies on this area, this paper carries out research in Zhujiang College of South China Agricultural University trying to find out the types of motivation and the correlation between motivation factors of English majors and their spoken English, and thus to guide spoken English learning and teaching.

  6. Dictionary Usage in English Language Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Rohmatillah, Rohmatillah

    2016-01-01

    This article examined about the important of using dictionary in English language learning. We cannot deny in learning a foreign language, we need to consult a dictionary. It is supported by Laufer in Koca believes that when word looks familiar but the sentence in which it is found or its wider context makes no sense at all, the learner should be encouraged to consult a dictionary. Sometimes the learners are reluctant to find out the other meaning of word from dictionary, as a result the mea...

  7. Linking English First Additional Language teaching and learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    English as the language of learning, the acquisition of English as second (or even third) language, as well as OBE has been researched before. This study is unique in the way that it addresses the direct influence of the OBE approach on the teaching and learning process in Grade 8 EFAL classrooms. Keywords: English ...

  8. Motivation of Students for Learning English in Rwandan Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tomoharu

    2018-01-01

    Since Rwanda decided that from 2009 English will be the sole medium of instruction from upper level primary school onwards, motivation for learning English has become an especially important issue. Therefore this study investigated motivation for Rwandan primary and secondary school students to learn English. The study was carried out in Nyagatare…

  9. English made easy volume one a new ESL approach learning English through pictures

    CERN Document Server

    Crichton, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This is a fun and user–friendly way to learn English English Made Easy is a breakthrough in English language learning—imaginatively exploiting how pictures and text can work together to create understanding and help learners learn more productively. It gives beginner English learners easy access to the vocabulary, grammar and functions of English as it is actually used in a comprehensive range of social situations. Self–guided students and classroom learners alike will be delighted by the way they are helped to progress easily from one unit to the next, using a combination of pictures and text

  10. 76 FR 3120 - Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students; Overview Information; Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program...

  11. On Stimulating English Learning Motivation of Junior Middle School Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱梦萱

    2016-01-01

    Learning motivation plays an important role in students’ English learning process. This thesis first introduces the definition and classification of motivation and then puts forward some measures and strategies that can foster and motivate junior middle school students’ learning motivation.

  12. Teaching Intercultural English Learning/Teaching in World Englishes: Some Classroom Activities in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-Young

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses what intercultural English learning/teaching (IELT) is in English as a world Englishes (WEes) and how IELT can contribute to the development of proficiency/competence among WEes and can be fitted into actual WEes classrooms. This is to claim that IELT be a pivotal contextual factor facilitating success in…

  13. Attitudes toward English & English Learning at an Iranian Military University: A Preliminary Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi Zafarghandi, Amir; Jodai, Hojat

    2012-01-01

    This study intends to represent attitudes toward English and English learning at an Iranian military university. Iranian military staff is required to study English in a social environment where there is little immediate need or opportunity to use the language for real communicative purposes.The subjects included 34 Iranian military personnel who…

  14. Study on Correlation of English Pronunciation Self-Concept to English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xin; Zhang, Shengqi; Li, Yucong; Zhao, Miqiang

    2013-01-01

    English pronunciation self-concept is formed in the process of pronunciation learning, which refers to the learners' self-conception and assessment of one's English pronunciation proficiency and pronunciation (Gimson, A. C. 1980). This paper reports an investigation on 237 non-English major college students into the relationship between English…

  15. Students' Evaluation of Their English Language Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizatulliza, M.; Kiely, R.

    2017-01-01

    In the field of English language teaching and learning, there is a long history of investigating students' performance while they are undergoing specific learning programmes. This research study, however, focused on students' evaluation of their English language learning experience after they have completed their programme. The data were gathered…

  16. English made easy, v.1 a new ESL approach learning English through pictures

    CERN Document Server

    Crichton, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This is a fun and userfriendly way to learn EnglishEnglish Made Easy is a breakthrough in English language learningimaginatively exploiting how pictures and text can work together to create understanding and help learners learn more productively. It gives beginner English learners easy access to the vocabulary, grammar and functions of English as it is actually used in a comprehensive range of social situations. Selfguided students and classroom learners alike will be delighted by the way they are helped to progress easily from one unit to the next, using a combina

  17. An Exploration of Foreign Language Anxiety and English Learning Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meihua Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Perceived to be two important affective variables, anxiety and motivation have been found to be highly correlated to second/foreign language acquisition. In order to examine the relationship between foreign language anxiety, English learning motivation, and performance in English, the present study investigated 980 undergraduate students from three universities in China who answered a 76-item survey. Analyses of the data revealed that (1 the respondents generally did not feel anxious in English and were moderately motivated to learn English, (2 foreign language anxiety and English learning motivation were significantly negatively correlated with each other, and (3 both foreign language anxiety and English learning motivation were significantly correlated with students' performance in English. Among the scales, foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCAS, intrinsic motivation (IntrinM, instrumental motivation (InstruM, fear of being negatively evaluated (FLCAS1, and interest in foreign languages and cultures (IFLC proved to be powerful predictors for the latter.

  18. Online English-English Learner Dictionaries Boost Word Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmukhamedov, Ulugbek

    2012-01-01

    Learners of English might be familiar with several online monolingual dictionaries that are not necessarily the best choices for the English as Second/Foreign Language (ESL/EFL) context. Although these monolingual online dictionaries contain definitions, pronunciation guides, and other elements normally found in general-use dictionaries, they are…

  19. Motivation of Students’ English Learning and Its Implications for English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚莉

    2016-01-01

    As is well-known, people’s behaviors come from certain motivation. The learning of English also related to this certain motivation. The stronger the motivation is, the better effects on English learning students will have. If English teachers have a comprehensive understanding of the types and effects of the motivation, it will be useful for them to adjust their teaching methods to stimulate and sustain the students’ motivation.

  20. When Learning English is Compulsory at School:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Azarnoosh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Research findings highlight the role of motivation in the long-term process of learning a second/foreign language. One’s motivation can change even in a short period of time under the influence of multifarious factors. To enrich our understanding of the attitudinal/motivational basis of foreign language learning this study attempts to investigate L2 motivational fluctuation, and the possibility of predicting EFL learners’ motivated learning behavior in light of Dörnyei’s (2005, 2009 theory of L2 motivational self system. To this end, 1670 junior high and high school students studying English as a compulsory subject in Iran filled out L2 motivational self system questionnaire. Independent samples t-test and regression analyses were applied; and the findings indicated a higher motivational disposition for junior high school students in comparison to high school students, except for their attitudes towards L2 community. For both groups, attitudes towards L2 learning was the best predictor of students motivated learning behavior.

  1. How to Motivate Students in Their English Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This essay mainly deals with the effectual ways to motivate students in their English learning, the motivation and teachers' role in motivating students. The author does hope, through this kind of studying, more and more English teachers come to realize the importance of motivation and do some research to improve students' English level.

  2. A Survey into the Motivations of Adult English Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛源

    2016-01-01

    #%Adult English learners have their own unique characteristics. This research adopts a questionnaire consisting of 9 di-mensions to explore their English learning motivations, which turn out to be mainly instrumental ones. And the author has postu-lated suggestions about adult English teaching.

  3. English Learners with Learning Disabilities: What Is the Current State?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Ashley; Rodríguez, Diane

    2017-01-01

    As the demographics across the United States continues to change, specifically with increases in school age English Learners who speak a home language other than English, it is imperative that schools meet the diverse needs of these children. This article summarizes studies about English Learners with learning disabilities. It reports on the…

  4. The Role of Gender in Foreign Language Learning Attitudes: Japanese Female Students' Attitudes towards English Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoko

    2002-01-01

    Analyzed data from research on Japanese high school students' attitudes toward learning English to investigate female students' more positive attitudes toward English learning. Girls' attitudes toward English were affected by a composite of Japanese social and educational elements (e.g., characterization of English as a woman-dominant choice at…

  5. Removing obstacles for African American English-speaking children through greater understanding of language difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Barbara Zurer; Conner, Tracy; Jackson, Janice E

    2013-01-01

    Language difference among speakers of African American English (AAE) has often been considered language deficit, based on a lack of understanding about the AAE variety. Following Labov (1972), Wolfram (1969), Green (2002, 2011), and others, we define AAE as a complex rule-governed linguistic system and briefly discuss language structures that it shares with general American English (GAE) and others that are unique to AAE. We suggest ways in which mistaken ideas about the language variety add to children's difficulties in learning the mainstream dialect and, in effect, deny them the benefits of their educational programs. We propose that a linguistically informed approach that highlights correspondences between AAE and the mainstream dialect and trains students and teachers to understand language varieties at a metalinguistic level creates environments that support the academic achievement of AAE-speaking students. Finally, we present 3 program types that are recommended for helping students achieve the skills they need to be successful in multiple linguistic environments.

  6. Networking for English Literature Class: Cooperative Learning in Chinese Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiyin

    2017-01-01

    This action research was conducted to investigate the efficacy of networking, an adjusted cooperative learning method employed in an English literature class for non-English majors in China. Questionnaire was administered online anonymously to college students after a 14-week cooperative learning in literature class in a Chinese university, aiming…

  7. Learning English: Experiences and Needs of Saudi Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruh, Susan; Obeidat, Fayiz

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative study, Saudi engineering students talk openly of their experiences learning English in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) and as university students in the United States (US). These students reported that they learned only the basics of vocabulary and grammar in KSA. Consequently, they came to the US with few English skills. In…

  8. Types of Language Learning Strategies Used by Tertiary English Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuin, Tan Khye; Kaur, Sarjit

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the types of language learning strategies used by 73 English majors from the School of Humanities in Universiti Sains Malaysia. Using questionnaires adopted from Oxford's (1990) Strategy Inventory of Language Learning (SILL) and focus group interviews, the study also examined the English major students' perceptions of using…

  9. Improving College Students English Learning with Dr. Eye Android Mid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ju Yin; Che, Pei-Chun

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates college students' English language learning through use of Dr. Eye Android handheld mobile Internet device (MID). Compared to related studies, students' English learning using MIDs has not been evaluated and fully understood in the field of higher education. Quantitatively, the researchers used TOEIC pretest and posttest to…

  10. Learning English in the Periphery: A View from Myanmar (Burma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin, Tan Bee

    2014-01-01

    Although researchers have called for the investigation of local vernacular learning and teaching practices in various ELT (English language teaching) contexts, studies conducted in the Periphery are fewer in number. This study attempts to understand English learning experiences of a group of students from the Periphery, who were studying English…

  11. A case study of an ESL Student learning English in an English Speaking Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Taufiq

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Different students who learn English as the second language has various problems and strategies to overcome. A case study on an international student who learns English as a second language in an English speaking country raised some problems he had and offered some strategies he used during the process of learning. The progress of learning from the first time coming and studying at a college in Australia was mainly the core data collected on this study. The data copes from his formal academic learning experience and also from informal situation that he met at his everyday life. This study applied qualitative research method and use interview and recording as the instruments. The data were analized through three stages: data reduction, data display, and conclusion drawing. The results of the study show that the learner experiences a range of English learning problems which happened after his coming to Australia and some strategies he used to overcome.

  12. Bringing American Popular Culture to the English Departments in Indonesia*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi N.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One outcome of the globalization process is the growing influence and dominance of American popular culture. The speed with which American music, films, and goods have flooded the markets worldwide is remarkably high, thanks to the advancement of telecommunication technologies and the Internet. Increased cultural transfer or, more precisely, internationalization of American culture has posed both fear and fascination to other cultures. How do people in the academia respond to this conundrum of cross-cultural contacts? What do we teach when we teach popular culture? What viable research in American popular culture is encouraged so as to result in impartially beneficial impacts for society at large? This paper is to argue that one can become an avid learner or critic of a certain culture when s/he finds meaningful connections between that culture and life itself. The teaching of American popular culture in the English Department, for instance, has to be locally contextualized, learner-participant oriented, and socially self-actualized. In this way, American Studies outside the U. S. may in turn become less centralized as the interchange of cross-cultural understanding takes place concurrently.

  13. Football versus football: effect of topic on /r/ realization in American and English sports fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jessica; Walker, Abby

    2013-12-01

    Can the topic of a conversation, when heavily associated with a particular dialect region, influence how a speaker realizes a linguistic variable? We interviewed fans of English Premier League soccer at a pub in Columbus, Ohio. Nine speakers of British English and eleven speakers of American English were interviewed about their favorite American football and English soccer teams. We present evidence that the soccer fans in this speech community produce variants more consistent with Standard American English when talking about American football than English soccer. Specifically, speakers were overall more /r/-ful (F3 values were lower in rhotic environments) when talking about their favorite American football team. Numeric trends in the data also suggest that exposure to both American and British English, being a fan of both sports, and task may mediate these effects.

  14. A Comparison of Motivation to Learn English between English Major and Non-English Major Students in a Vietnamese University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Huong; Spooner-Lane, Rebecca; Mergler, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Despite the plethora of literature examining higher education students' motivation to learn a second language, it is not known if students who choose to study English as their major differ from those who are required to study English as the minor component of their wider degree. Drawing on self-determination theory, this paper reports on the…

  15. Conflicting Voices: An analysis of Intralingual translation from British English to American English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda PILLIÈRE

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Cet article propose une étude de plusieurs éditions américaines et britanniques de romans du vingtième siècle sous l'angle de la traduction intralinguale. On analysera comment les éditions américaines rendent le texte plus compréhensible pour leurs lecteurs, choisissant soit d'enlever toute référence culturelle jugée trop difficile, soit d'ajouter des explications. Cette pratique modifie sensiblement la voix du narrateur et celles des personnages. On montrera que la traduction intralinguale de ces textes britanniques, où s'entremêlent divers registres, voix et dialectes, introduit d'autres voix qui sont souvent en conflit avec les voix d'origine.This article proposes a study of American English editions of British English novels published in the twentieth century from the point of view of intralingual translation. It demonstrates how the American English editions transform the text to make it more easily accessible for their readers either by removing any cultural references that are deemed to be too difficult, or by adding explanations to the text itself. Such a practice inevitably modifies the voice of the narrator and those of the characters. By comparing the two versions of the same text, it will be shown that translating texts where different voices, registers and dialects are present, inevitably introduces other voices which often conflict with those of the original text.

  16. Text-based Learning (Tbl) to Activate Adult Efl Learners in Learning English: a Narrative Inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Iftanti, Erna

    2017-01-01

    In response to the fact that college students complain on their unsuccessful story of their EFL learning experience such as the limited number of vocabulary, English Grammar confusion, low competence of English language skills, this article explores an alternative effective way of helping them to improve their English through Text-Based Learning (TBL) model. This article is then intended to narrate the implementation of TBL to teach English for college students of non English Department of Po...

  17. A Study of English Language Learning Beliefs, Strategies, and English Academic Achievement of the ESP Students of STIENAS Samarinda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Noor

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate; students' English academic achievement, beliefs about English language learning, English language learning strategies, and the relationship of them. Descriptive and correlational design, quantitative methods were applied in this research. The students' final English scores of the first year, BALLI, and SILL were…

  18. Research on English Language Teaching and Learning in Argentina (2007-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Melina; Montemayor-Borsinger, Ann; López-Barrios, Mario

    2016-01-01

    In this article we review research on English as a foreign language (EFL) teaching and learning published in Argentina between 2007 and 2013. This is the first review of a Latin American country in this series. Argentina has a century-long tradition of training EFL teachers but a comparatively shorter though fruitful history of foreign language…

  19. A Resource-Oriented Functional Approach to English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia

    2018-01-01

    This article reports on a case study that investigates the learning preferences and strategies of Chinese students learning English as a second language (ESL) in Canadian school settings. It focuses on the interaction between second language (L2) learning methods that the students have adopted from their previous learning experience in China and…

  20. Is Online Learning Suitable for All English Language Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuama, Settha; Intharaksa, Usa

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine online language learning strategies (OLLS) used and affection in online learning of successful and unsuccessful online language students and investigate the relationships between OLLS use, affection in online learning and online English learning outcomes. The participants included 346 university students completing a…

  1. The Effect of Cultural Background Knowledge on Learning English Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ibrahim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the effect of cultural background knowledge on learning English Language. It also aims to investigate if there are significant differences between subjects' performance in reading comprehension according to sex and general ability in English (GAE. The study aims at answering the following questions: 1 . To what extent is the effect of cultural background knowledge on subjects' performance in reading comprehension? 2 . What is the difference in performance in reading comprehension between male and female subjects who have cultural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge? 3. What is the differenc e between subjects' performance in reading comprehension texts which are loaded with American culture and their general ability in English. ? The population of th is study consisted of all first - year students majoring in English at Hebron University in th e first semester of the academic year 2011/2012. They were 600. The sample of the study consisted of 60 subjects, males and females divided into four groups, two experimental and two controlled. The researcher followed the experimental method. Means, stand ard deviations and Pearson Product Moment Correlation were calculated by using SPSS program. The study revealed the following results: 1. There are statistically significant differences in performance in reading comprehension between subjects who have cu ltural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge . 2 . There are no statistically significant differences in performance in reading comprehension between male and female subjects who have cultural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge. 3. Subjects' GAE revealed that there are significant differences in performance in reading comprehension between subjects who have cultural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge. In the light of the results of th e study, the researcher recommends the

  2. OBSERVATIONS ON ENGLISH LEARNING MOTIVATION IN PROFESSIONAL COLLEGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuoShixiang

    2004-01-01

    The study was carried out on 78 students majoring in tourism in a professional college based on their fourth-term final English achievements. A small scale questionnaire investigated students' English learning motivation. The study reveals that:1) Most of the professional college students English learning motivation is instrumental motivation or certificate motivation.2)Successful learners have intrinsic motivation.3)unsuccessfull earners have extrinsic motivation.4)Both successful learners and unsuccessful learners spend nearly the same time learning English. In the light of social constructivism,the thesis analyzes the students' English learning motivation in professional colleges on the basis of the result of the investigation. It also illustrates causes of formed motivation. Four education suggestions are put forward based on the study.

  3. The Influence of Classroom Layout on Children's English Learning Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林琬媚

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, more and more Children English Training organization developed, all the parents and teachers also want to improve the children's English. So the parents will find the organization where the teachers are better in teaching. They will motive a lot of imagine and acquire many information which you can not know. If we can care more about this point from the children, may be it also can help children to learn English well. This essay aims at how does classroom Layout influence the children to learn English well and let the children love this environment.

  4. Impacts of the Test of English Listening Comprehension on Students' English Learning Expectations in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Mu-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    In Taiwan, English language learning in senior high school has predominantly focused on reading, with a heavy emphasis on memorising vocabulary and grammar rules. English listening has been marginalised and is not officially taught until the first year of university. In 2012, the Joint Board of College Recruitment Commission in Taiwan passed…

  5. Agency Construction and Navigation in Oral Narratives of English Learning by Chinese College English Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiuming

    2017-01-01

    The current study aims to investigate the discursive construction and navigation of agency in oral narratives of English learning by Chinese college English majors. Based on the theoretical framework integrating Bamberg et. al.'s theory of identity dilemma and Hallidayan systemic functional linguistics, the study has addressed two research…

  6. The Religion of Learning English in "English": A Language Educator's Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuesong

    2011-01-01

    This essay is my reading of "English," a novel based on author Wang Gang's experiences in Urumqi, Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, Northwest China during the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). As a language educator, I was particularly interested in the way that Wang describes learning English in the novel. The essay focuses on three…

  7. Developing English Writing Proficiency in Limited English Proficient College Students through Cooperative Learning Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden-Jones, Epsey M.; Carrasquillo, Angela L.

    A study followed ten limited-English-proficient (LEP) community college students who were taught English largely using a cooperative learning approach. For four months, the students worked together using brainstorming techniques and collaborative reading and writing tasks. Task emphasis was on development of thinking skills through collaboration…

  8. Learning English as an L2 in the Global Context: Changing English, Changing Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Chit Cheung Matthew

    2013-01-01

    As the English language has become a global lingua franca today, it is not surprising that changes in attitudes and perceptions towards learning English in the international context have taken place at the same time. In this paper, I critically examine the notion of "integrative motivation" in the literature of second language (L2)…

  9. English for University Administrative Work: English Officialization Policy and Foreign Language Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongyeon; Choi, Jinsook

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how the English officialization policy of higher education in an EFL context interplays with administrative workers' motivational orientations towards English learning. The data consisted of questionnaire responses of 117 administrative members with undergraduate degrees and qualitative interviews with 9 who answered the…

  10. The online informal learning of English

    CERN Document Server

    Sockett, G

    2014-01-01

    Young people around the world are increasingly able to access English language media online for leisure purposes and interact with other users of English. This book examines the extent of these phenomena, their effect on language acquisition and their implications for the teaching of English in the 21st century.

  11. Ubiquitous English Learning System with Dynamic Personalized Guidance of Learning Portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting-Ting; Sung, Tien-Wen; Huang, Yueh-Min; Yang, Chu-Sing; Yang, Jin-Tan

    2011-01-01

    Situated learning has been recognized as an effective approach in enhancing learning impressions and experiences for students. Can we take advantage of situated learning in helping students who are not English native speakers to read English articles more effective? Can the effectiveness of situated learning be further promoted by individual…

  12. English for au pairs the au pair's guide to learning English

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    English for Au Pairs has interlinked stories about a group of au pairs new to England. Marta, an 18-year-old from Poland arrives in the UK to work as an au pair. Throughout her year-long stay she has many different experiences - some bad, some good - but with the support of her host family she finds new friends and improves her English. English for Au Pairs offers insight into the joys and difficulties of being an au pair while at the same time reinforcing English language learning through grammar explanations and exercises.

  13. A Fuzzy Logic-Based Personalized Learning System for Supporting Adaptive English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tung-Cheng; Wang, Tzone-I; Su, Chien-Yuan; Lee, Ming-Che

    2012-01-01

    As a nearly global language, English as a Foreign Language (EFL) programs are essential for people wishing to learn English. Researchers have noted that extensive reading is an effective way to improve a person's command of English. Choosing suitable articles in accordance with a learner's needs, interests and ability using an e-learning system…

  14. Challenges of Effective English Language Learning in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The factors that influence the students. effective learning of the English Language as second language learners, the attitude of students towards the study of the English language, the nature of teacher/student interaction, the methods of teaching and the availability of teaching aids in Nigeria secondary schools are looked ...

  15. Useful Expressions for Implementing Cooperative Learning in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Machiko; Kanamaru, Ayako; Plaza, Taron; Shiramizu, Chie

    2016-01-01

    With the Ministry of Education, Sports, Science and Technology calling for junior and senior high school English classes in Japan to be more communicative and taught in English, teachers need effective tools to help make their classrooms more interactive. Cooperative learning activities have the potential to increase interaction among students and…

  16. Crosscultural Differences in Learning Styles of Secondary English Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Clara C.

    2002-01-01

    Learning styles were investigated for 857 English-learners of Armenian, Hmong, Korean, Mexican, and Vietnamese origin in 20 California high schools. All ethnic groups indicated major or minor preferences for kinesthetic/tactile and visual learning styles. Groups differed in preferences for group versus individual learning. Some preferences were…

  17. College English Students’ Autonomous Learning Motivation and Cultivation Model Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳荣; 李娥

    2015-01-01

    Studying the autonomous learning motivation and excitation model can stimulate intrinsic motivation of foreign language learners,develop students self-management strategy evaluation are very necessary.The purpose of this paper is to give students the skills of listening and speaking for their autonomous learning.Then study the cultivation and motivation of college English students autonomous learning,hoping to make students to learn autonomous learning and stimulate their motivation fully.

  18. Challenges Associated with Teaching and Learning of English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Challenges Associated with Teaching and Learning of English Grammar in Nigerian Secondary Schools. ... Abstract. This paper discussed the challenges which are associated with the teaching and ... AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO ...

  19. CONCEPT ‘MONEY’ IN THE ENGLISH AMERICAN PROVERBS

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Anatolyevna Osheva

    2015-01-01

    The present paper explored the concept ‘money’ observed upon the data from the English American proverbs and sayings. The paper adduced the etymology of the lexical unit ‘money’, and observed the proverbs and sayings taken from the dictionary written by W. Mieder. The material has been sorted out into nine semantic groups: «money means value», «money means evil», «lack of money», «easy money», «money means motivation», «importance of money», «money is no object», «money means work», «money wh...

  20. Oxford Guide to British and American Culture for Learners of English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Jonathan, Ed.; Kavanagh, Kathryn, Ed.

    The guide to American and British culture, for upper secondary- and university-level students, is intended for use by learners of English as a second language. It is designed to explain specific aspects of British and American life and traditions not generally included in English language dictionaries. The guide has a dictionary format, with terms…

  1. The Cooperative Learning Effects on English Reading Comprehension and Learning Motivation of EFL Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ching-Ying; Wu, Hui-Yi

    2013-01-01

    This experimental study aims to investigate the effects of using cooperative learning to enhance the English reading comprehension and learning motivation of EFL freshmen by comparing the cooperative learning instruction and traditional lecture instruction. This experiment was implemented in a Freshman English Reading course, a two credit course,…

  2. TEXT-BASED LEARNING (TBL TO ACTIVATE ADULT EFL LEARNERS IN LEARNING ENGLISH: A NARRATIVE INQUIRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Iftanti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In response to the fact that college students complain on their unsuccessful story of their EFL learning experience such as the limited number of vocabulary, English Grammar confusion, low competence of English language skills, this article explores an alternative effective way of helping them to improve their English through Text-Based Learning (TBL model. This article is then intended to narrate the implementation of TBL to teach English for college students of non English Department of Post Graduate Program of State Islamic Institute of Tulungagung, Indonesia. The result of implementing this teaching model proves to be able to not only stimulate joyful learning atmosphere but to attract the students’ active participation during the EFL instructional process as well. This further brings about their better practical understanding on English language skills as their expectation. Therefore, for English lecturers, this model is pedagogically good to be implemented in their English instructional practices.

  3. Adults' motivation of learning English as a second language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴梦楠

    2005-01-01

    English learning is extensive among adults. Their motivations are classified into two types: the integrative one and the instrumental one.Obviously the integrative motivation makes the learners more active and joyful in learning process. Teachers find ways to cultivate and inspire the adult learners' motivation of learning L2, to design and deliver language instruction with care and sensitivity, and to assess rather than test the learners' learning for inducing a positive reaction.

  4. THE ROLE OF NON-NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKER TEACHERS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutfi Ashar Mauludin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Native-English Speaker Teachers (NESTs and Non-Native English Speaker Teachers (NNESTs have their own advantages and disadvantages. However, for English Language Learners (ELLs, NNESTs have more advantages in helping students to acquire English skills. At least there are three factors that can only be performed by NNESTs in English Language Learning. The factors are knowledge of the subject, effective communication, and understanding students‘ difficulties/needs. The NNESTs can effectively provide the clear explanation of knowledge of the language because they are supported by the same background and culture. NNESTs also can communicate with the students with all levels effectively. The use of L1 is effective to help students building their knowledge. Finally, NNESTs can provide the objectives and materials that are suitable with the needs of the students.

  5. A Learning Style-Based Grouping Collaborative Learning Approach to Improve EFL Students' Performance in English Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yu-Chen; Chu, Hui-Chun; Huang, Chi-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Learning English is an important and challenging task for English as Foreign Language (EFL) students. Educators had indicated that, without proper learning support, most EFL students might feel frustrated while learning English, which could significantly affect their learning performance. In the past research, learning usually utilized grouping,…

  6. Experiences of Chinese international students learning English at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to provide insight into the experiences of Chinese international students in some South African tertiary institutions. The study investigates their successes and failures in endeavouring to learn English and the culture shock and 'learning shock' they endure when registering to study in an African country with ...

  7. The Design of Immersive English Learning Environment Using Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Cheng-Ting; Cheng, Shein-Yung; Tsai, Chung-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The study uses augmented reality (AR) technology to integrate virtual objects into the real learning environment for language learning. The English AR classroom is constructed using the system prototyping method and evaluated by semi-structured in-depth interviews. According to the flow theory by Csikszenmihalyi in 1975 along with the immersive…

  8. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Computer Applications in Developing English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, James Todd

    2016-01-01

    I examined the effectiveness of self-directed learning and English learning with computer applications on college students in Bangkok, Thailand, in a control-group experimental-group pretest-posttest design. The hypothesis was tested using a t test: two-sample assuming unequal variances to establish the significance of mean scores between the two…

  9. Attitudes towards English Language Learning among EFL Learners at UMSKAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shameem

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the result of a survey on 238 undergraduate EFL students at a public university in Malaysia. The survey focused on their attitude towards English learning and causes that might have hindered their learning. For data collection, a 19 item questionnaire were designed and administered on 238 students. The objective of this study…

  10. Understanding the Quality of Out-of-Class English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun; Zhu, Weimin; Gong, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-class learning constitutes an important context for human development, and active engagement in out-of-class activities is associated with successful language development. However, not all out-of-class experiences are equally beneficial to learning, and it is of paramount importance to understand what quality out-of-class English language…

  11. Research on English Teaching and Learning: Taiwan (2004-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Suchiao; Tsai, Yachin

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes research in second/foreign language teaching and learning conducted in Taiwan over the period 2004-2009. Representative articles published in local refereed journals and conference proceedings--not readily accessible outside Taiwan--are reviewed to reflect current trends in English teaching and learning. The main themes…

  12. Afrikaans, American and British models for South African English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the treatment of racial labels in monolingual English dictionaries of South Africa. Considering past controversies regarding racist language in Afrikaans dictionaries and considering the changing role of English in democratic South Africa, we can expect that English dictionaries will be more carefully ...

  13. English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillipson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The article exemplifies and presents the characteristics of linguistic imperialism, linguistic capital accumulation following the same pattern as capitalist economic dominance. The text summarizes the way English was established in the colonial period. Many of the mechanisms of linguistic hierarchy...... have been maintained and intensified since then, as African and Indian scholarship demonstrates. Language plays a key role in education, the World Bank taking over where colonial regimes left off. Anglo-American efforts to maintain global English dominance have intensified since 1945 and are central...... to the present-day world ‘order’, as the postcolonial is subsumed under global empire, assisted by English linguistic neoimperialism. Some scholars who deny the existence of linguistic imperialism are reported on, and the complexity of language policy in European integration is demonstrated. The article...

  14. Studies on English Vocabulary Learning Strategies of Three-year Business English Majors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Fang-rong

    2008-01-01

    Vocabulary learning strategies have been studied by a lot of scholars and teachers to a different extent on language learner of different levels. Little research has been done on three-year .Business English majors. This study is intended to examine the vocabulary learning strategies applied by those students to their vocabulary learning during the course of English learning. This study is carried out in the form of doing a questionnaire among 117 three-year Business English majors. The collected data is analyzed in the computer by using the SPSS software. The result is that most of the students give up the concept and strategy of repetition and accept the concept of context and practicing. In addition, most of the students know how to make use of cognitive strategies to learn vocabulary. However, those students seldom employ metacognitive strategies and social/affective strategies to facilitate their vocabulary learning. In fight of these, some recommendations have given to those students to help them learn more vocabulary by appropriately using the vocabulary learning strategies.

  15. New frontiers in teaching and learning English

    CERN Document Server

    Vettorel, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The contributions to this volume explore several focal issues related to the global spread of English and their implications for English language teaching, providing both theoretical and empirical perspectives on recent research and implications in educational terms. The volume is divided into three thematic sections, namely ""Developments in ELF research and pedagogic implications"", ""Raising teachers' awareness of ELF"", and ""ELF and ELT practices"". The book provides up-to-date perspectives on the issues, implications and repercussions that findings in ELF research can have for ELT practi

  16. Stimulating and Developing High School Students’Motivation in Their English Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    笈文婷

    2014-01-01

    Stimulating learning motivation refers to transforming potential learning motivation to learning behavior.Motivation is the core of learning process,keeping right and long-lasting power is the premise of English learning.As for present English teaching,teachers often face students lacking learning interests and learning motivation,so how to stimulate and develop these students’learning motivation is a universal prob-lem for many teachers,of course it is a difficult problem.The essay aims at analyzing the classifications of English learning motivation,the influen-tial factors of learning motivation and how to improve English learning motivation from many ways.

  17. English Language Proficiency and Early School Attainment Among Children Learning English as an Additional Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Katie E; Gooch, Debbie; Norbury, Courtenay F

    2017-05-01

    Children learning English as an additional language (EAL) often experience lower academic attainment than monolingual peers. In this study, teachers provided ratings of English language proficiency and social, emotional, and behavioral functioning for 782 children with EAL and 6,485 monolingual children in reception year (ages 4-5). Academic attainment was assessed in reception and Year 2 (ages 6-7). Relative to monolingual peers with comparable English language proficiency, children with EAL displayed fewer social, emotional, and behavioral difficulties in reception, were equally likely to meet curriculum targets in reception, and were more likely to meet targets in Year 2. Academic attainment and social, emotional, and behavioral functioning in children with EAL are associated with English language proficiency at school entry. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Research in Child Development.

  18. Learning Strategy Training in English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulselvi, M. Evangelin

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental task of schools is to endow students with strategies, which enable them to elaborate, transform, contrast and critically rebuild knowledge, that develops strategic knowledge. Learning strategy is the specific action to make the students better in learning a second language. Learning Strategy Training is based on problems the…

  19. God and Apple pie: American missionaries teaching English in Siberia

    OpenAIRE

    Sartor, V.

    2015-01-01

    This article extends the debate concerning whether TESOL teachers should be encouraged to promote their religious beliefs in context with English language teaching. The controversy is ongoing and has generated a dialogue that addresses the perspective of the TESOL instructor, while neglecting to explore the actual responses of those English Language Learners who have come into contact with evangelical English language teachers. The question is explored in a remote area of the Russian Federati...

  20. Commentary: Motivation for Learning Languages Other than English in an English-Dominant World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    The majority of recent research on language learning motivation has reportedly focused on English as a target language, typically in relatively homogeneous, secondary and postsecondary "foreign language" settings. How applicable, then, are the theories and findings undergirding that research to our understanding of the contemporary…

  1. DESIGNING ENGLISH LEARNING MATERIALS TO FOSTER CHILDREN‟S CREATIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Murni Wahyanti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning materials form an important part of English teaching-learning processes in Elementary schools. In many cases, teachers and students rely on the learning materials available and the materials dictate teachers‘ strategies. Despite the availability of commercially produced materials, it is considered necessary for teachers to construct or adapt learning materials. Teachers know better about their students‘ ability, needs and interests. In addition, the materials can be more contextual. Good materials should foster children‘s creative thinking since creativity is one of the important skills children need to develop. Features of creativity involve using imagination, generating ideas and questions, experimenting with alternatives, being original and making judgment. This presentation will focus on how to develop learning materials that can foster children‘s creativity. It will discuss about why teachers need to design their own materials, principles for designing effective English learning materials, the concepts and components of creativity and the importance of creativity in language learning. Examples of how to apply features of creativity in the English learning materials for children will be provided.

  2. Development of e-learning for English class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Noni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the twenty first century, teachers are required to have a digital literacy skill. They must be able to integrate technology in learning process. It was already conducted by a teacher in one of public junior high schools in Jakarta. She searched the materials from the internet but she had a problem to adjust the learning materials to her students’ needs and characteristics. Therefore, this study was undertaken to explore deeply how to develop e-learning in English class based on her students’ needs and characteristics. This study employed research and development methodology. The participants were an English teacher and the first graders of junior high school. The result showed that this e-learning used PHP, Framework Bookstrap and MySQL. The e-learning also used Adobe Flash and Adobe Illustrator to make some animated videos. It consisted of listening, reading, and grammar which the topic focused on descriptive texts comprising some themes referring to 2013 curriculum. Those themes were people, animal, thing, place, and occupation. The development of e-learning deserved to be implemented after it was validated by the expert, evaluated by the teacher and tested to the students. It is expected to contribute as supplemental learning media in English learning process.

  3. Can Learning Motivation Predict Learning Achievement? A Case Study of a Mobile Game-Based English Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Hui; Cheng, Ching-Hsue; Yeh, Duen-Yian; Lin, Shih-Yun

    2017-01-01

    This study applied a quasi-experimental design to investigate the influence and predictive power of learner motivation for achievement, employing a mobile game-based English learning approach. A system called the Happy English Learning System, integrating learning material into a game-based context, was constructed and installed on mobile devices…

  4. Private English Tutoring and Adolescents' Motivation to Learn English as a Foreign Language: A Self System Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hung-Tzu

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated how self-related English learning motivation among Taiwanese adolescent learners differs between students who only receive English instruction in formal schooling and those who have additional private tutoring. A total of 1,698 teenage English learners in public secondary schools across Taiwan completed a…

  5. Content-Based Instruction Approach In Instructional Multimedia For English Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Farani, Rizki

    2016-01-01

    Content-based Instruction (CBI) is an approach in English learning that integrates certain topic and English learning objectives. This approach focuses on using English competencies as a “bridge” to comprehend certain topic or theme in English. Nowadays, this approach can be used in instructional multimedia to support English learning by using computer. Instructional multimedia with computer system refers to the sequential or simultaneous use of variety of media formats in a given presentatio...

  6. Comprehensive Evaluation Criteria for English Learning Websites Using Expert Validity Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Ting C.; Chan, Chia-Ying

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a set of evaluation criteria for English learning websites. These criteria can assist English teachers/web designers in designing effective websites for their English courses and can also guide English learners in screening for appropriate and reliable websites to use in increasing their English ability. To fulfill our…

  7. A Brief Discussion on Skillfully Learning English Knowledge in Senior High School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘孜斐

    2017-01-01

    English learning is a process of accumulation, which requires enough input and output. It is not an efficient way to study English by rote. Some skills and methods may help English learners. In this thesis, the author introduces some specific memory methods and processes and aims to help senior high school students to improve English learning strategies.

  8. Interactive Syllable-Based English Vocabulary Learning in a Context-Aware Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Yen; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2017-01-01

    English is one of the most important second languages in nonnative English-speaking countries, where learning English usually begins in primary school. To this end, vocabulary learning is regarded as the most fundamental and crucial stage in developing the student's English language capability. While some studies have explored strategies of…

  9. How Deaf American Sign Language/English Bilingual Children Become Proficient Readers: An Emic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounty, Judith L.; Pucci, Concetta T.; Harmon, Kristen C.

    2014-01-01

    A primary tenet underlying American Sign Language/English bilingual education for deaf students is that early access to a visual language, developed in conjunction with language planning principles, provides a foundation for literacy in English. The goal of this study is to obtain an emic perspective on bilingual deaf readers transitioning from…

  10. An approach to the prospects of business English learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra VASILESCU

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The future of English as a global language has widely been discussed for over 10 years, starting with David Graddol (1997, a language researcher and lecturer at the Open University in Britain, in his famous work ‘The Future of English’, to so many other language researchers, so much inspired by Graddol’s book. Whether English will keep its supremacy as THE tool of communication in the future world is still debatable, fact is that English is still the language of business and information technology and it shall stay so for quite a while, in spite of the challenges coming from Spanish, French, German, Russian and… Mandarin. Once we acknowledge that, the question is: how can the teaching/learning process be improved in the future for a better and faster acquisition of English as the language of choice in the business world?

  11. Comparing Local and International Chinese Students’ English Language Learning Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margreat Aloysious Anthony

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available According to Horwitz (1987 learners’ belief about language learning are influenced by previous language learning experiences as well as cultural background. This study examined the English Language Learning Strategies between local and international Chinese students who share the same cultural background but have been exposed to different learning experiences. Given the significant number of local and international Chinese students enrolled in educational institutions, there is a need to understand the differences and similarities in the learning strategies of these two groups. The sample for the study comprised of 60 local and 50 international Chinese students currently enrolled at a local private college. The Oxford Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL was administered as a measure of learning strategy preferences. The study reveals that language learning experiences as well as socioeconomic status impact the learning strategy adopted by both local and international Chinese students. The findings of this study point to the need to address the needs of these students in order to enhance their English language learning experience in Malaysia.

  12. English-learning infants' perception of word stress patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoruppa, Katrin; Cristià, Alejandrina; Peperkamp, Sharon; Seidl, Amanda

    2011-07-01

    Adult speakers of different free stress languages (e.g., English, Spanish) differ both in their sensitivity to lexical stress and in their processing of suprasegmental and vowel quality cues to stress. In a head-turn preference experiment with a familiarization phase, both 8-month-old and 12-month-old English-learning infants discriminated between initial stress and final stress among lists of Spanish-spoken disyllabic nonwords that were segmentally varied (e.g. ['nila, 'tuli] vs [lu'ta, pu'ki]). This is evidence that English-learning infants are sensitive to lexical stress patterns, instantiated primarily by suprasegmental cues, during the second half of the first year of life. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  13. Iranian EFL Learners' Attitudes toward Learning English through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The students learning English as a foreign language sometimes enjoy computer systems in their classes to do some class activities and tasks. The learners' attitudes toward enjoying computer systems can help the teachers to be aware that computers in EFL classrooms are necessary. The aim of the present study is to ...

  14. Learning the Structure of English by Means of Esperanto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. Kent

    The Esperanto language was consciously designed as a coherent system, in contrast to the 3000 conventional languages originated by people's cave-dwelling ancestors. The systematic nature of Esperanto makes it ideal as an instructional tool. The amorphous nature of English makes its serious use very difficult for students. Even though they learn to…

  15. Factors Affecting English Language Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hong Thi; Warren, Wendy; Fehring, Heather

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports part of a study that aims to explore factors affecting the efficacy of non-major English teaching and learning in Vietnamese higher education through an investigation of classroom practices. Eight non-participant class observations were conducted at HUTECH University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The study's findings show that…

  16. Writing Learning Outcomes for English Language Lessons in Multilingual Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sally Ann

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a pedagogic innovation in teacher education by articulating a method for writing learning outcomes for English language lessons in multilingual school contexts. The argument for this approach is founded on curriculum studies; however, the practice also draws specifically on applied psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic…

  17. Vygotskian methods of teaching and learning in the English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes an alternative approachto the teaching of concepts related to theEnglish curriculum, namely literature, writing summaries and grammar. It combines ashift in the theory of school learning development by a combination with a psychologicaltheory of development. The research was conducted over the ...

  18. Assessing Moroccan University Students’ English Learning Motivation: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otmane Omari

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to survey whether students are motivated to learn English or not and to evaluate the differences within and between three most known universities in Morocco, involving a private one, in terms of students’ English learning motivation. Moreover, factors that make a student more motivated to learn English were investigated. This study examines motivation of university students according to their institution, gender, and other variables. Assessment of university students’ motivation was by scores on items from the Academic Motivation Scale. The sample consisted of 329 undergraduate students from three different Moroccan universities. The most important finding was that participants in general are quite motivated to learn English with a score of (M = 3.80 with regard to the overall score using a 5-point Likert scale, and a higher level of introjected extrinsic motivation (M = 4.11, which means that they do such tasks because they are supposed or asked to do them. Moreover, factors such as how students consider university, their location during the academic year, and their decision behind choosing to go to university were found to affect students’ motivation.

  19. APPLYING PBL AND ZUVIO TO ENHANCE ENGLISH LEARNING MOTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOR-TYNG WANG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To inspire college students’ English learning motivation, this study proposed to combine Project-Based Learning (PBL with ZUVIO online teaching platform. The traditional teaching methods focus on teachers’ direct instruction in class, which mean that students only receive knowledge from teachers instead of formulating the answers on their own. This also decreases interaction in the classroom and prevents students from collaborating with other peers. However, implementing PBL and ZUVIO would allow students to apply knowledge in the social context and work with their classmates. In this study, two freshman English classes in a private university in central Taiwan were chosen as the sample. The students in both classes were low-level students (CEF A2 level. One class (N = 39 was chosen as the experimental group which had to complete the PBL tasks assigned by the teacher and use peer assessment function in ZUVIO for one academic year. The other class (N = 43 was chosen as the control group which was given the traditional teaching instructions. The results showed that the experimental group performed better on the midterm exam compared to the control group during both semesters (p = 0.001. Additionally, the results of the questionnaire showed that students’ motivation to learn English increased when using PBL and ZUVIO as teaching methods. To cite this document: Bor-Tyng Wang, "Applying PBL and ZUVIO to enhance English learning motivation", International Journal of Cyber Society and Education, Vol. 9, No. 1, pp. 1-16, 2016.

  20. Students' Motivation toward English Language Learning at Undergraduate Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mumtaz; Aftab, Maria; Yaqoob, Humaira

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this descriptive research is to explore the fact that why students are less motivated towards English language learning at undergraduate level. It also throws light upon the very facts of motivation with regard to the factors like student-teacher relationship, class room environment, self esteem or self respect, and willingness…

  1. Student Deep Learning in Bachelor English Programs within Pakistani Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Khazima

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contrast undergraduate students' descriptions about transformational teaching practices, and student deep learning in bachelor English programs in selected universities within Pakistan. This study utilized a survey to gather responses from five hundred and twenty three students. A paired sample t test was utilized…

  2. Opportunity to learn English and mathematics in Ghanaian primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Opportunity to learn English and mathematics in Ghanaian primary schools: implications for teacher education programmes. ... teachers' instructional practices and management of instructional time, and • teachers' preparedness to implement the content standards. These inefficiencies could be attributed to the fact that the ...

  3. Learning English Using Children's Stories in Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavus, Nadire; Ibrahim, Dogan

    2017-01-01

    The topic of this paper is to describe the development of an interactive application that can be used in teaching English as a second language using children's stories in mobile devices. The aim of this experimental study has been to find out the potential of using the developed interactive mobile application in improving the learning skills such…

  4. Proverbes anglo-americains (English/American Proverbs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giauque, Gerald S.

    A collection of the 550 best-known English-language proverbs provides an explanation of their meanings in French and gives French-language equivalents. A list of proverbs categorized by key words is appended. (MSE)

  5. Analysis of the Length of Braille Texts in English Braille American Edition, the Nemeth Code, and Computer Braille Code versus the Unified English Braille Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Marie; Wetzel, Robin

    2006-01-01

    This study compared the length of text in English Braille American Edition, the Nemeth code, and the computer braille code with the Unified English Braille Code (UEBC)--also known as Unified English Braille (UEB). The findings indicate that differences in the length of text are dependent on the type of material that is transcribed and the grade…

  6. The Survey on Barriers of Oral English Learning for College Students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuehong; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    With the development of society, oral English teaching and learning has been the top in English teaching and learning in china. This paper reports a survey conducted at North China Electric Power University on the barriers for learners of oral English learning in China. Questionnaires with both close-ended and open-ended questions were distributed…

  7. Assessing Moroccan University Students' English Learning Motivation: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omari, Otmane; Moubtassime, Mohammed; Ridouani, Driss

    2018-01-01

    This study seeks to survey whether students are motivated to learn English or not and to evaluate the differences within and between three most known universities in Morocco, involving a private one, in terms of students' English learning motivation. Moreover, factors that make a student more motivated to learn English were investigated. This…

  8. Pitfalls in Measuring the Health Status of Mexican Americans: Comparative Validity of the English and Spanish Sickness Impact Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyo, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    A test found responses to the Sickness Impact Profile highly reliable, whether administered in Spanish or English. However, construct validity of responses by Mexican Americans using the Spanish version, non-Hispanics using the English version, and Mexican Americans using the English version was weak. (CMG)

  9. Utilizing Mind Mapping to Summarize English Text with the Theme "American Culture"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivi Aulia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims at knowing and describing on the utilization of mind mapping strategy in summarizing English text under the theme American Culture. It is conducted to the third semester of English Department students at STKIP PGRI Banjarmasin batch 2016 who take Reading III course. The instruments used in this research are observation sheet and documentation of students’ mind map products. The observation sheet is analyzed qualitatively by describing the important result of observation process while the students’ mind maps are analyzed quantitatively using mind mapping scoring rubric. They create mind mapping in post-reading activity. After reading, they have to summarize the text written through mind map. The result from the observation sheet shows that during four meetings of learning to create mind maps, students carry out the steps of creating mind map well. Although they get difficulties in early activities of this process, however, they can accomplish it well in the last meeting with a different topic of the text. Moreover, there are 17 (51% of 33 students as the subject of this research who have a good score on their mind maps products. It indicates that utilizing mind map is good enough for helping them to summarize the text written.

  10. The Influence of Learning Style on English Learning Achievement Among Undergraduates in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fang; Hoi, Cathy Ka Weng; Teo, Timothy

    2018-03-26

    Learning style is one of the main factors that determines how students learn English and has a significant influence on students' learning strategy selection, which further affects their learning outcomes (Ehrman and Oxford in Mod Lang J 74(3):311-327, 1990; Oxford in Language learning styles and strategies: an overview, 2003. http://web.ntpu.edu.tw/~language/workshop/read2.pdf ). This study examines the learning style preferences of Chinese university students and whether those preferences influence their English achievements. Four hundred undergraduates from one university in eastern mainland China participated in this study. Data from 329 valid questionnaires were analysed. The results revealed that the Chinese university students preferred the visual learning style the most, followed by the auditory and kinaesthetic styles. However, no learning style preference was found to influence the students' English proficiency. Cultural reasons are discussed to explain the findings, which contradict those of previous studies of learning style theories and practices. This study recommends that Chinese scholars consider issues of English teaching and learning in China and to adopt appropriate teaching methods to effectively improve English teaching.

  11. Vocabulary Instruction and Mexican-American Bilingual Students: How Two High School Teachers Integrate Multiple Strategies to Build Word Consciousness in English Language Arts Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Lasisi

    2015-01-01

    Despite the significance of vocabulary knowledge to student learning, limited studies have examined English language arts (ELA) teachers' skills and practices that may be effective for building word consciousness in high school Mexican-American bilingual students. The research objective of the present study is to examine how two high school ELA…

  12. Reading books with young deaf children: strategies for mediating between American Sign Language and English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Research on shared reading has shown positive results on children's literacy development in general and for deaf children specifically; however, reading techniques might differ between these two populations. Families with deaf children, especially those with deaf parents, often capitalize on their children's visual attributes rather than primarily auditory cues. These techniques are believed to provide a foundation for their deaf children's literacy skills. This study examined 10 deaf mother/deaf child dyads with children between 3 and 5 years of age. Dyads were videotaped in their homes on at least two occasions reading books that were provided by the researcher. Descriptive analysis showed specifically how deaf mothers mediate between the two languages, American Sign Language (ASL) and English, while reading. These techniques can be replicated and taught to all parents of deaf children so that they can engage in more effective shared reading activities. Research has shown that shared reading, or the interaction of a parent and child with a book, is an effective way to promote language and literacy, vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and metalinguistic awareness (Snow, 1983), making it critical for educators to promote shared reading activities at home between parent and child. Not all parents read to their children in the same way. For example, parents of deaf children may present the information in the book differently due to the fact that signed languages are visual rather than spoken. In this vein, we can learn more about what specific connections deaf parents make to the English print. Exploring strategies deaf mothers may use to link the English print through the use of ASL will provide educators with additional tools when working with all parents of deaf children. This article will include a review of the literature on the benefits of shared reading activities for all children, the relationship between ASL and English skill development, and the techniques

  13. I Learn What I Need: Needs Analysis of English Learning in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Ju; Chang, Yung-Hao; Chang, Wei-Huan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the needs analysis of English learning from the viewpoints of students and the real needs of employers regarding English usage at the workplace. A questionnaire was administered to 60 participants comprising 30 senior students and 30 employers. After quantitative analysis, the results demonstrated that…

  14. Bangladeshi EFL Learners' Approach towards Learning English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathema, Fawzia

    2015-01-01

    Bangladesh is a poverty stricken country with a huge population "unemployed' in respect of the definition of Economics including both male and female. Government is striving hard to make the people well-equipped with necessary skills and learning in order that they can prove themselves fit for the upcoming challenges of the global economy and…

  15. Mobile-Assisted Language Learning: Student Attitudes to Using Smartphones to Learn English Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davie, Neil; Hilber, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    This project examines mobile-assisted language learning (MALL) and in particular the attitudes of undergraduate engineering students at the South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences towards the use of the smartphone app Quizlet to learn English vocabulary. Initial data on attitudes to learning languages and to the use of mobile devices to do…

  16. Learning Styles Of Introvert And Extrovert Students In The English Learning Process

    OpenAIRE

    DEWI, KHARISMA YUNITA DEANDRA

    2013-01-01

    Recently, English is the first foreign language taught as a compulsorysubject in Indonesia. We mostly deal with the challenge of learning and using aforeign language, whether at school, at work or in our day-to-day life. This mightbe difficult for Indonesian EFL students to learn. The learners will get thedifficulties when they do not have appropriate learning style in their learningprocess. Therefore, in order to handle the difficulty in their learning, thosestudents must have the learning s...

  17. Communication during Cultural Context need to be Learned During English Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王计

    2017-01-01

    The paper discusses the importance of cultural learning during English study. It is not only aim at some ways to en-hance cultural knowledge and also how the cultural context response influences the effective of communication.

  18. Shhh… I Need Quiet! Children's Understanding of American, British, and Japanese-accented English Speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Tessa; Holt, Rachael Frush

    2018-02-01

    Children's ability to understand speakers with a wide range of dialects and accents is essential for efficient language development and communication in a global society. Here, the impact of regional dialect and foreign-accent variability on children's speech understanding was evaluated in both quiet and noisy conditions. Five- to seven-year-old children ( n = 90) and adults ( n = 96) repeated sentences produced by three speakers with different accents-American English, British English, and Japanese-accented English-in quiet or noisy conditions. Adults had no difficulty understanding any speaker in quiet conditions. Their performance declined for the nonnative speaker with a moderate amount of noise; their performance only substantially declined for the British English speaker (i.e., below 93% correct) when their understanding of the American English speaker was also impeded. In contrast, although children showed accurate word recognition for the American and British English speakers in quiet conditions, they had difficulty understanding the nonnative speaker even under ideal listening conditions. With a moderate amount of noise, their perception of British English speech declined substantially and their ability to understand the nonnative speaker was particularly poor. These results suggest that although school-aged children can understand unfamiliar native dialects under ideal listening conditions, their ability to recognize words in these dialects may be highly susceptible to the influence of environmental degradation. Fully adult-like word identification for speakers with unfamiliar accents and dialects may exhibit a protracted developmental trajectory.

  19. Motivation and its importance in learning English

    OpenAIRE

    Нетесова, Мария Витальевна

    2015-01-01

    The principal objective of this paper is to pay our attention to such a significant problem as motivation in the process of learning a foreign language. The paper is devoted to the very important problem concerning educational process. For most purposes in today, motivation has different reasons why we act in a certain way. We may indeed be motivated by influences as basic as pain and pleasure. The key to understanding motivation is, to some, understanding why it is important to an individual...

  20. Mobility limitations and fear of falling in non-English speaking older Mexican-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Eric G; Conatser, Phillip; Karabulut, Murat; Leveille, Suzanne G; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Cote, Sarah; Tucker, Katherine L; Barton, Bruce; Bean, Jonathan F; Al Snih, Soham; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2017-10-01

    To determine whether older Mexican-Americans who cannot speak and/or understand spoken English have higher rates of mobility limitations or fear of falling than their English-speaking counterparts. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 1169 community-dwelling Mexican-Americans aged 72-96 years from the 2000-2001 wave of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly. Mobility limitations were defined as having a Short Physical Performance Battery score ≤9, and fear of falling by participant report of being somewhat, fairly, or very afraid of falling. We determined the rates and odds ratios, for having mobility limitations and fear of falling as a function of English ability in those who were 72-96, English 85.7% had mobility limitations and 61.6% were afraid of falling, compared to 77.6% and 57.5%, respectively, of English speakers. Before adjusting for covariates, participants who did not speak and/or understand spoken English were more likely to have mobility limitations (odds ratio: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.3-2.4) but not fear of falling, compared to English speakers. Among those aged ≥80 years, but not those English were more likely to have mobility limitations (odds ratio: 4.8; 95% CI:2.0-11.5) and fear of falling (odds ratio: 2.0; 95% CI:1.3-3.1). Older Mexican-Americans who do not speak or understand spoken English have a higher rate of mobility limitations and fear of falling than their English-speaking counterparts.

  1. Effects of the Differences between Native and Non-Native English-Speaking Teachers on Students' Attitudes and Motivation toward Learning English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pae, Tae-Il

    2017-01-01

    This study presents findings on three research agendas: (1) the difference between native English-speaking teachers (NESTs) and non-native English-speaking teachers (NNESTs) in students' attitudes toward and motivation for learning English, (2) the moderating effect of the type of class (i.e., English Conversation vs. Practical English) on the…

  2. Business English: An Individualised Learning Programme -- An Effective but Defective ESP Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Gui-min

    2008-01-01

    Business English is the core course for ESP (English for Specific Purposes) programs which empathizes the effectiveness and pragmatism. Feasibility is the crucial element for business English programs especially for in-services business people. Business English-An individualised learning programme is an effective and radical business English…

  3. Learning from Fables: Moral Values in Three Selected English Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrar, Mukhlash

    2016-01-01

    Fable is not just a fun story, but it certainly has the moral lesson(s) inside of the storyline. This research tries to portray ethical value(s) in three selected English fable stories as well as to let the readers know that they can learn something from the fables. With this study, the researcher also correlated the value(s) to real life and…

  4. Differentiated Learning. Teaching English to Mixed-Ability Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lăcrimioara Năsui

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article is dedicated to one of the most important aspects of teaching nowadays- differentiated teaching and instruction for English language learners. Differentiation means directing teaching towards the interests and capacities of all pupils in a class. It is not a simple expedient for keeping pupils busy – although that may prove important – it is a consideration for overcoming any latent barriers to learning.

  5. eLearning Mobile App for Android and Ios "English Grammar Learn & Test"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca-Georgiana FODOR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is aiming to present the architecture and few elements from the developing cycle of "English Grammar Learn & Test" app. This is an e-learning tool for people who want to improve their English Grammar and Vocabulary. The app was approved by Google Play and Apple Store and it is available for free on both platforms as following: Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.labsterzz.english_tests iOS: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/english-grammar-learn-test/id1126468980 The app already reached350.000 users, it is rated at 4.43out of maximum 5.0 in Google Play Store. Since mid-June 2016, we launched the app also in the Apple Store iOS devices.

  6. Utilizing Mind Mapping to Summarize English Text with the Theme "American Culture"

    OpenAIRE

    Vivi Aulia

    2017-01-01

    This research aims at knowing and describing on the utilization of mind mapping strategy in summarizing English text under the theme American Culture. It is conducted to the third semester of English Department students at STKIP PGRI Banjarmasin batch 2016 who take Reading III course. The instruments used in this research are observation sheet and documentation of students’ mind map products. The observation sheet is analyzed qualitatively by describing the important result of observation pro...

  7. Cultivate Mindfulness: A Case Study of Mindful Learning in an English as a Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    This case study investigated how the use of mindfulness affected college English as a foreign language (EFL) students' learning and how mindful learning strategies supported their learning of English. Mindful learning considers the students' abilities to be aware, perceive and conceive. Mindfulness results in an increase in competence, memory,…

  8. Informal Learning Activities for Learners of English and for Learners of Dutch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Marsenille, Anne

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the informal learning activities which French-speaking higher education students in Brussels engage in while learning English and Dutch. The informal learning of English was investigated in 2012, while the informal learning of Dutch was studied in 2015 and then compared to the informal…

  9. Experiencing Different Identity Prototypes in Learning and Teaching English: A Chinese Learner's Autoethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I narrate highlights of my long process of learning and teaching English as a foreign language in mainland China and Australia, presenting a picture of the practices of learning and teaching English in mainland China from the bottom up. Over the past 50 years, English learners in mainland China, as Gao Yihong has written, have…

  10. DIFFICULTIES THAT ARAB STUDENTS FACE IN LEARNING ENGLISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassem BAHEEJ

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Jordan English is not used in everyday situations. Arab students face problems of learning English, both in writing and in speech. They find it hard to learn English in their native country, where language is Arabic. The only way to learn English in Jordan is through formal training, ie inside the classroom foreign language teachers are native speakers of Arabic. There is little opportunity to learn English through natural interaction in the target language. This is possible only when students are faced with native speakers of English who come to the country as tourists, and this happens very rarely.DIFICULTĂŢI CU CARE SE CONFRUNTĂ STUDENŢII ARABI CARE ÎNVAŢĂ LIMBA ENGLEZĂ În Iordania, limba engleză nu este utilizată în situaţii cotidiene. Studenţii arabi se confruntă cu probleme de învăţare a limbii engleze, atât în scris, cât şi în vorbire. Lor le vine greu să înveţe limba engleză în ţara lor natală, dat fiind că limba maternă este araba. Singura modalitate de a învăţa limba engleză în Iordania este prin instruire formală, adică în sala de clasă în care profesorii de limbă străină sunt vorbitori nativi de limbă arabă. Există puţine şanse de a învăţa limba engleză prin interacţiune naturală în limba-ţintă. Acest lucru este posibil numai atunci când elevii conversează cu vorbitori nativi de limbă engleză, care vin în ţară în calitate de turişti, ceea ce se întâmplă foarte rar.

  11. Effects of gender and regional dialect on prosodic patterns in American English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopper, Cynthia G.; Smiljanic, Rajka

    2011-01-01

    While cross-dialect prosodic variation has been well established for many languages, most variationist research on regional dialects of American English has focused on the vowel system. The current study was designed to explore prosodic variation in read speech in two regional varieties of American English: Southern and Midland. Prosodic dialect variation was analyzed in two domains: speaking rate and the phonetic expression of pitch movements associated with accented and phrase-final syllables. The results revealed significant effects of regional dialect on the distributions of pauses, pitch accents, and phrasal-boundary tone combinations. Significant effects of talker gender were also observed on the distributions of pitch accents and phrasal-boundary tone combinations. The findings from this study demonstrate that regional and gender identity features are encoded in part through prosody, and provide further motivation for the close examination of prosodic patterns across regional and social varieties of American English. PMID:21686317

  12. The Influence of Parents' Backgrounds, Beliefs about English Learning, and a Dialogic Reading Program on Thai Kindergarteners' English Lexical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petchprasert, Anongnad

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated parents' backgrounds and their beliefs about English language learning, and compared the receptive English vocabulary development of three to six year-old-Thai children before and after participating in a parent-child reading program with the dialogic reading (DR) method. Fifty-four single parents of 54 children voluntarily…

  13. How to Stimulate College Students' English Learning Motivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭艳玲

    2008-01-01

    Motivation to language learning is a complex set of variables including effort, desire to achieve goals, as well as attitudes toward the learning of the language. Individuals' motivation to second-language learning also includes their motivation orientations, interest in the second language, attitudes toward the second-language group, attitudes toward the second-language learning situations and second-language anxiety. Based on the basic theories and approaches, teaching activities are part of motivation in English classes. The teacher of language should have a good influence on students and develop students' keen interest in study in order to strengthen their intrinsic motivation, and set up some new goals for students to pursue and give the feedback to reinforce their inner drive and confidence. Thus, students will become major conductors, make full use of their potentials and enhance their study results.

  14. Learning Outcomes and Affective Factors of Blended Learning of English for Library Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentao, Chen; Jinyu, Zhang; Zhonggen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    English for Library Science is an essential course for students to command comprehensive scope of library knowledge. This study aims to compare the learning outcomes, gender differences and affective factors in the environments of blended and traditional learning. Around one thousand participants from one university were randomly selected to…

  15. Verb Learning in 14- and 18-Month-Old English-Learning Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Angela Xiaoxue; Lidz, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates English-learning infants' early understanding of the link between the grammatical category "verb" and the conceptual category "event," and their ability to recruit morphosyntactic information online to learn novel verb meanings. We report two experiments using an infant-controlled…

  16. Impact of Interactive Online Units on Learning Science among Students with Learning Disabilities and English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas-Arellanes, Fatima E.; Gallard M., Alejandro J.; Strycker, Lisa A.; Walden, Emily D.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the design, classroom implementation, and effectiveness of interactive online units to enhance science learning over 3 years among students with learning disabilities, English learners, and general education students. Results of a randomised controlled trial with 2,303 middle school students and 71…

  17. Student Motivation And Instructional Strategies In English Learning In Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Mustapha Bin Danquah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Motivation has been referred to as the single most important ingredient of learning Wieman 2013. However it does not come by chance application of appropriate instructional strategies are necessary. The present study conducted in-depth inquiry into the relevance of student motivation and its relationship with higher achievement in L2 learning. Descriptive research design was adopted for the study. Using stratified sampling technique 60 students were sampled from three public schools in Kumasi Metropolis. Also by means of purposive sampling six English teachers were selected in the three schools as participants. Set of questionnaires were the instrument for the study and analysis involved simple frequencies percentages tables and Pearsons Correlation Coefficient r. The study revealed that students can be motivated by simplicity clarity practical and insightful analogies making lessons lively and interesting and most importantly generous use of TLMs. Positive relationship also existed between students motivation and the use of effective instructional strategies with the attendant proficiency in English. Unequivocally student motivation is pivotal to facilitating proficiency in English a key to riding the crest of globalization and technology.

  18. A Report on Non-Egnlish Majors' Motivation and Achievement of Learning English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王粉

    2009-01-01

    A large number of non-English majors seldom consider what strategies of learning English they are using to regulate their motivation and how their motivation is related to achievement. Data were collected from 4000 college non-English-majors at Guizhou University using a questionnaire. This paper contrasts students' motivation and strategies of learning English. Some teaching approaches are offered to motivate students to do their best in attaining higher achievement.

  19. Rich Language Learning Environment and Young Learners' Literacy Skills in English

    OpenAIRE

    Artini, Luh Putu

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed at developing rich language learning environment to help elementary school students develop their literacy skills in English. Shortage of professional English teachers in primary school, limited time allocation, as well as the lack of tools and facilities that support English language teaching and learning for young learners had resulted in students’low literacy skills in English. It was tried out in six primary schools across Bali involving 12 teachers and 520 students. T...

  20. Language Learning Styles Used By Students Of Basic English Course (Bec) Pare

    OpenAIRE

    HIDAYAH, ULFA NURUL

    2013-01-01

    Learning styles are the important factors to help students to learn a second or foreign language. A learning habit of every individual is needed to support the student's learning to be more effective, for example by taking an English course. Learning styles can be classified into: visual, auditory, kinesthetic, tactile, group, and individual. This study is conducted to examine the language learning styles applied by the students of Basic English Course (BEC) in Pare, Kediri. This study applie...

  1. Exploring ELT Students' Awareness of the Differences between the British and American Varieties of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to find out the extent to which students attending the English Language Teaching Programme (ELT) at Ondokuz Mayis University are aware of the major spelling, vocabulary, and pronunciation differences between American and British English which constitute the most commonly used varieties of English. To this end, 42 randomly selected…

  2. English Learners (ELs) Who Are American Indian and/or Alaska Native (AI/AN). Fast Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of English Language Acquisition, US Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA) has synthesized key data on English learners (ELs) into two-page PDF sheets, by topic, with graphics, plus key contacts. The topics for this report on English Learners (ELs) Who Are American Indian and/or Alaska Native (AI/AN) include: (1) States With the Highest Percentage of ELs Who Were AI/AN:…

  3. Unlearning to Learn: Investigating the Lived Experience of Learning English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    What is the journey of acquiring language? What is the journey of sharing it? These are the questions that compelled the hermeneutic phenomenological investigation (Gadamer, 1960/2004; van Manen, 1997) that led to this paper. Guided by the voice of Heidegger (1954/2008), I discovered the necessity of "un-learning to learn" in order to hear the…

  4. Investigation of Chinese University Students’ Attributions of English Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjin Lu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of developing students’ learning autonomy in Chinese schools similar to Western cultured schools, many concerns are raised regarding the influence and effectiveness that learner autonomy has on students’ academic achievements. The aim of this study was to identify the attribution patterns of Chinese university students for success and failure toward students who learnt through autonomy learning (student-centered approaches compared with students who learnt through teacher-centered approaches. Within this study, mixed research methods were adopted, and students used a reflective method to distinguish whether they were taught English through a traditional or student-centered method. The findings of the study reveal that there are no significant differences in attributional patterns between students who had learnt in high school through autonomous learning and those who learnt through teacher-centered approaches. The findings have implications for policy and practice in the Chinese Ministry of Education system and recommendations for future research.

  5. Afrikaans, American and British Models for South African English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tions in a national and international context, by comparing the traditions and the roles of the lan- ... The changing linguistic, social, and educational situations in South Africa ... abroad, by the British and American leXicographical traditions. ... interactional styles in the South African social psychology and cross-cultural.

  6. Dyslexia and English: Degree of Difficulties Faced by the Students with Dyslexia while Learning English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Kaperoni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to investigate the hypothesis that students diagnosed with dyslexia face a greater amount of difficulty when they attempt to learn a foreign language and especially English. On a survey carried out in the form of a questionnaire, two groups of students completed the same questionnaire regarding their difficulty to learn the basic skills such as reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The questions mostly focused on the difficulty they may face in spelling, reading, and listening which are the main aspects of the language dyslexic students’ score lower than students without dyslexia. The answers were evaluated with the use of the statistical method of t-test. The findings of the survey displayed a great difference on the score chosen by the two teams, which indicates the greater degree of difficulty the dyslexic students face confirming the original hypothesis.

  7. The relationship between students' perceptual learning style preferences, language learning strategies and English language vocabulary size

    OpenAIRE

    Gorevanova, Anna

    2000-01-01

    Ankara : The Institute of Economic and Social Sciences Bilkent Univ., 2000. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2000. Includes bibliographical references leaves 54-58 This study investigated the relationship between students’ perceptual learning style preferences, language learning strategies and English language vocabulary size. It is very important for teachers to be aware of students’ preferences in learning to help them be more successful and to avoid conflicts when...

  8. Learning English Tenses through Spanish Grammar : When Using the L1 Benefits ESL Learning

    OpenAIRE

    López Garrido, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The current teaching trend of ESL is focused on maximizing the use of the L2 so that the student learns the language through linguistic immersion. This approach leaves the L1 out of the game, even though research has shown it can also be beneficial for the learner. My research intends to demonstrate that translation of English grammar tenses into Spanish can be a helpful way of assimilating English grammar more easily and faster, especially for those students with a poor command of English. ...

  9. Orbiting by Bharati Mukherjee: A Contemporary American Short Story in the English Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Konopka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article puts forward arguments why American short stories should be used to teach English as a foreign language. It also describes the method which might help to teach literature in secondary schools. Additionally, it presents the results of the research conducted among students in Lomza, Poland, which aimed at examining the pedagogical potential of applying ethnic American short stories in teaching English as a foreign language. This was done by comparing the literary critical analysis of Orbiting – a short story written by Bharati Mukherjee with its intuitive interpretations by young Polish adults. Finally, the article is supplemented with the passage from the said text as well as lexical and reading comprehension exercises based on its contents, which can be used in the English classroom.

  10. Accentedness and intelligibility of Mandarin-accented English for Chinese, Koreans and Americans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardman, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    English is used as a lingua franca not only throughout Asia, but also in Inner Circle countries for academic purposes. Due to wide variation in L2 English speech, however, mutual intelligibility is an increasing concern. Since accentedness does not necessarily correlate with intelligibility...... and results have been mixed as to the benefit of interlanguage match, a study focused on the academic context investigated the extent to which Mandarin-accented English was intelligible to L1 Mandarin listeners, as compared to Koreans and Americans, and whether intelligibility varied by talker segmental...... revealed that listener L1 and word familiarity were significant predictors of intelligibility, but that talker segmental production accuracy was not. A clear benefit for interlanguage match was found for the Mandarin L1 listeners with Mandarin-accented English as compared to the Korean listeners, however...

  11. The Construction of New Political Identities through the Internationally Distributed English Learning Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzande, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Today, English education is very important but language learning has long been challenged since learning a second language is not only the mastery of its forms but also a process of identity construction and self-positioning in the second language. A review of recent studies shows that the cultural effects of learning English in the…

  12. English Learning Strategies of Various Nations: A Study in Military Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Ekrem

    2014-01-01

    How successful learners learn English has been one of the primary interest of scientists and researchers in recent years. Therefore, this study aimed to determine what language learning strategies the military personnel from different nations used while learning English. 56 subjects from 14 different nations deployed in three different military…

  13. Investigation the Relationship among Language Learning Strategies, English Self-Efficacy, and Explicit Strategy Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pei-Ling; Wang, Ai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the relationship among EFL college learners' language learning strategies, English self-efficacy, and explicit strategy instruction from the perspectives of Social Cognitive Theory. Three constructs, namely language learning strategies, English learning self-efficacy, and explicit strategy instruction, were…

  14. The Challenge of English Language Collocation Learning in an ES/FL Environment: PRC Students in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to seek an in-depth understanding about English collocation learning and the development of learner autonomy through investigating a group of English as a Second Language (ESL) learners' perspectives and practices in their learning of English collocations using an AWARE approach. A group of 20 PRC students learning English in…

  15. Acoustic characteristics of the vowel systems of six regional varieties of American English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopper, Cynthia G.; Pisoni, David B.; de Jong, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Previous research by speech scientists on the acoustic characteristics of American English vowel systems has typically focused on a single regional variety, despite decades of sociolinguistic research demonstrating the extent of regional phonological variation in the United States. In the present study, acoustic measures of duration and first and second formant frequencies were obtained from five repetitions of 11 different vowels produced by 48 talkers representing both genders and six regional varieties of American English. Results revealed consistent variation due to region of origin, particularly with respect to the production of low vowels and high back vowels. The Northern talkers produced shifted low vowels consistent with the Northern Cities Chain Shift, the Southern talkers produced fronted back vowels consistent with the Southern Vowel Shift, and the New England, Midland, and Western talkers produced the low back vowel merger. These findings indicate that the vowel systems of American English are better characterized in terms of the region of origin of the talkers than in terms of a single set of idealized acoustic-phonetic baselines of “General” American English and provide benchmark data for six regional varieties. PMID:16240825

  16. American or British? L2 Speakers' Recognition and Evaluations of Accent Features in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrie, Erin; McKenzie, Robert M.

    2018-01-01

    Recent language attitude research has attended to the processes involved in identifying and evaluating spoken language varieties. This article investigates the ability of second-language learners of English in Spain (N = 71) to identify Received Pronunciation (RP) and General American (GenAm) speech and their perceptions of linguistic variation…

  17. Morphophonological Practice: An Ethnographic Study of Grammar and Discourse in Four American English Stuttering Speech Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Nathaniel William

    2010-01-01

    Using the Practice Theory Approach to Language, this dissertation examines how social actors use communicative practices within activities to constitute a communicative context that I call the American English Stuttering Speech Community (AESSC). Building on previous linguistic research on stuttering and sociological research on collectives of…

  18. BE, DO, and Modal Auxiliaries of 3-Year-Old African American English Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newkirk-Turner, Brandi L.; Oetting, Janna B.; Stockman, Ida J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined African American English--speaking children's use of BE, DO, and modal auxiliaries. Method: The data were based on language samples obtained from 48 three-year-olds. Analyses examined rates of marking by auxiliary type, auxiliary surface form, succeeding element, and syntactic construction and by a number of child…

  19. Auxiliary BE Production by African American English-Speaking Children with and without Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, April W.; Oetting, Janna B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine 3 forms ("am," "is," "are") of auxiliary BE production by African American English (AAE)-speaking children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Method: Thirty AAE speakers participated: 10 six-year-olds with SLI, 10 age-matched controls, and 10 language-matched controls. BE production was examined through…

  20. Subtitling African American English into French can we do the right thing?

    CERN Document Server

    Mével, Pierre-Alexis

    2017-01-01

    Like Mookie in Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing, translators are at the nexus between cultures, making difficult decisions with sometimes dramatic consequences. Drawing on the fields of translation studies, sociolinguistics and film studies, this book analyses the French subtitling of African American English in films from the USA.

  1. American PARCC and SBAC and Their Implications on the Construction of English Assessment System in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Kang, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) and Smarter Balanced Assessment Systems (SBAC) started in the 2014-2015 academic year and has been regarded by many in the field as a radical effort to improve the American English Language Art (ELA) educational standards. These two consortia, being aligned with Common…

  2. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Rating Scale for Countertransference (RSCT to American English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Mondrzak

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The Rating Scale for Countertransference (RSCT - originally, Escala para Avaliação de Contratransferência (EACT - is a self-administered instrument comprising questions that assess 23 feelings (divided into three blocs, closeness, distance, and indifference that access conscious countertransferential emotions and sentiments. This paper describes the process of translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the RSCT into American English. Methods: This study employed the guidelines proposed by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR Task Force for Translation and Cultural Adaptation which define 10 steps for translation and cross-cultural adaptation of self-report instruments. Additionally, semantic equivalence tools were employed to select the final versions of terms used. The author of the RSCT gave permission for translation and took part in the process. The instrument is available for use free of charge. Results: Analysis of the back-translation showed that just seven of the 23 terms needed to be adjusted to arrive at the final version in American English. Conclusions: This study applied rigorous standards to construct a version of the RSCT in American English. This version of the RSCT translated and adapted into American English should be of great use for accessing and researching countertransferential feelings that are part of psychodynamic treatment.

  3. Penggunaan Media e-Learning Berbasis Edmodo Dalam Pembelajaran English for Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmawati .

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of edmodo in learning English for Business was aimed to described the use of edmodo in teaching learning English for Business. The subject of this research was the second semester of Information System students in STT Harapan Medan. This research was research and development and the method was qualitative research and the data used was observation among English lecturer and students. The result of this research was classroom interaction among English lecture and students in edmodo application, teaching learning English for Business become interesting and students were active to use their English because the lecturer push them to use English in writing comments, message and also when they had presentation infront of the class. However, there were some students’ mistakes when they wrote comments, and also when they had English presentation.

  4. INTEGRATING ICT IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING AND LEARNING IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuti Hidayati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian ELT is complex for numerous reasons, and the level of students‟ outcome has been regarded unsatisfactory by a number of researchers and academics. This paper considers ICT as one of possible alternatives to deal with the complexity of Indonesian ELT and to improve its outcomes. It widely explores ICT integration in English LTL, especially on how ICT has been used in this field. It further investigates the benefits and challenges of integrating ICT in LTL. The paper argues that the integration of ICT is promising for changing and improving the effectiveness of the current Indonesian ELT condition when it is carried out in line with the effective LTL principles. The integration of ICT will enable teachers to vary teaching and learning activities, to gradually change the teaching style to be more student-centred, to train students to have more active role in learning, and to access a huge range of authentic learning materials. The paper also acknowledges the contraints that will emerge in an effort of integrating ICT in Indonesian English LTL. Hence, some recommedations for action are proposed at the end.

  5. Project for Teaching and Learning of English Based on Blended Learning in the Accounting Career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique del Valle–Reus

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper gathers some aspects related to the improvement on teaching-learning process of English to students who specialize in Accounting through blended learning. Its objective is to integrate the use of the foreign language with the contents of the area in the solution of professional problems. The project is methodologically based on the contradiction between the professional needs of using the foreign language and its limited application in the teaching-learning process. It shows the activities to be carried out during the first two years of the major. The integration of the contents of English with those of Accounting is mainly focused in oral and written communication without neglecting the development of reading and listening comprehension. In this way, the syllabuses of English are enriched. 

  6. African American English-speaking students: an examination of the relationship between dialect shifting and reading outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Holly K; Zhang, Lingling; Hensel, Stephanie L; Quinn, Erin J

    2009-08-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated the contribution made by dialect shifting to reading achievement test scores of African American English (AAE)-speaking students when controlling for the effects of socioeconomic status (SES), general oral language abilities, and writing skills. Participants were 165 typically developing African American 1st through 5th graders. Half were male and half were female, one third were from low-SES homes, and two-thirds were from middle-SES homes. Dialect shifting away from AAE toward Standard American English (SAE) was determined by comparing AAE production rates during oral and written narratives. Structural equation modeling evaluated the relative contributions of AAE rates, SES, and general oral language and writing skills on standardized reading achievement scores. AAE production rates were inversely related to reading achievement scores and decreased significantly between the oral and written narratives. Lower rates in writing predicted a substantial amount of the variance in reading scores, showing a significant direct effect and a significant indirect effect mediated by measures of oral language comprehension. The findings support a dialect shifting-reading achievement hypothesis, which proposes that AAE-speaking students who learn to use SAE in literacy tasks will outperform their peers who do not make this linguistic adaptation.

  7. Learner Open Modeling in Adaptive Mobile Learning System for Supporting Student to Learn English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Cong Pham

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents a personalized context-aware mobile learning architecture for supporting student to learn English as foreign language in order to prepare for TOEFL test. We consider how to apply open learner modeling techniques to adapt contents for different learners based on context, which includes location, amount of time to learn, the manner as well as learner's knowledge in learning progress. Through negotiation with system, the editable learner model will be updated to support adaptive engine to select adaptive contents meeting learner's demands. Empirical testing results for students who used application prototype indicate that interaction user modeling is helpful in supporting learner to learn adaptive materials.

  8. Negative Transfer of L1 on English Grammar Learning in SLA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马秀琳

    2015-01-01

    At present,many scholars pay more attention to the positive transfer of native language on the English learning,while ignoring the negative transfer of L1 on English grammar learning.Therefore native transfer of L1 often appears on English grammar learning.This paper aims to point out that the negative transfer of L1 has a profound and vast influence on the English grammar learning,to find out the countermeasures to reduce the influence of negative transfer of L1 and finally to bring the benefits to the following relative studies.

  9. Free classification of regional dialects of American English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopper, Cynthia G.; Pisoni, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have found that naïve listeners perform poorly in forced-choice dialect categorization tasks. However, the listeners' error patterns in these tasks reveal systematic confusions between phonologically similar dialects. In the present study, a free classification procedure was used to measure the perceptual similarity structure of regional dialect variation in the United States. In two experiments, participants listened to a set of short English sentences produced by male talkers only (Experiment 1) and by male and female talkers (Experiment 2). The listeners were instructed to group the talkers by regional dialect into as many groups as they wanted with as many talkers in each group as they wished. Multidimensional scaling analyses of the data revealed three primary dimensions of perceptual similarity (linguistic markedness, geography, and gender). In addition, a comparison of the results obtained from the free classification task to previous results using the same stimulus materials in six-alternative forced-choice categorization tasks revealed that response biases in the six-alternative task were reduced or eliminated in the free classification task. Thus, the results obtained with the free classification task in the current study provided further evidence that the underlying structure of perceptual dialect category representations reflects important linguistic and sociolinguistic factors. PMID:21423862

  10. Free classification of regional dialects of American English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopper, Cynthia G; Pisoni, David B

    2007-07-01

    Recent studies have found that naïve listeners perform poorly in forced-choice dialect categorization tasks. However, the listeners' error patterns in these tasks reveal systematic confusions between phonologically similar dialects. In the present study, a free classification procedure was used to measure the perceptual similarity structure of regional dialect variation in the United States. In two experiments, participants listened to a set of short English sentences produced by male talkers only (Experiment 1) and by male and female talkers (Experiment 2). The listeners were instructed to group the talkers by regional dialect into as many groups as they wanted with as many talkers in each group as they wished. Multidimensional scaling analyses of the data revealed three primary dimensions of perceptual similarity (linguistic markedness, geography, and gender). In addition, a comparison of the results obtained from the free classification task to previous results using the same stimulus materials in six-alternative forced-choice categorization tasks revealed that response biases in the six-alternative task were reduced or eliminated in the free classification task. Thus, the results obtained with the free classification task in the current study provided further evidence that the underlying structure of perceptual dialect category representations reflects important linguistic and sociolinguistic factors.

  11. E-Learning Tutoring System for Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) English

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Yusof Munirah; Lee Wah Ng; Mohamed Rozlini; Othman Muhaini

    2018-01-01

    An E-Learning tutoring system for English (SPM) is an e-learning platform for Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia English subject. E-learning is a web based application that supports the delivery of learning, skills and knowledge related to the English subject in SPM. E-learning use the technology to enable people to learn anytime and anywhere. Besides, it is developed with the purpose to evaluate student’s performance through an online quiz. Nowadays, tuition center have a lot of students, hence insuff...

  12. Latin American Investigative Journalism Education: Learning Practices, Learning Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz Weiss, Amy; de Macedo Higgins Joyce, Vanessa; Saldaña, Magdalena; Alves, Rosental Calmon

    2017-01-01

    This study seeks to examine the state of investigative journalism practices used in higher education in Latin America. Using a meta-theoretical framework called the Community of Practice (CoP), this study seeks to identify whether a particular learning practice exists in this region. Based on an online survey conducted on Latin American educators…

  13. South Korean University Students' Perceptions of Different English Varieties and Their Contribution to the Learning of English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, So-Yeon; Kang, Hyun-Sook

    2017-01-01

    This study explored South Korean university students' perceptions of different English varieties and their speakers, student attitudes towards the learning of English and its varieties, and the role of these attitudinal variables in the learning of English as a foreign language. One-hundred-one students who were enrolled in four sections of a…

  14. PROJECT-BASED LEARNING IN ENGLISH FOR MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Antić

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Project-based learning facilitates hands-on learning in student-driven investigations, resulting in high-quality, challenging activities. Students participate actively in projects that revolve around their interests, questions or needs. PBL also develops the 21st century skills including critical thinking, collaboration and communication. The essence of PBL is problem-solving, a key critical thinking skill. Since problem-solving is an integral part of medicine, projects represent a significant method of instruction in English for Medical Purposes. Depending on their individual interests and abilities, each student contributes to the whole group work and the final outcome. The approach also requires students to work in teams and to communicate their findings. Using real-life problems to motivate students, challenging them to think deeply about meaningful content, and enabling them to work collaboratively are practices that yield benefits for all students and their future careers.

  15. Blended Learning Using Video-Based Blogs: Public Speaking for English as a Second Language Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ru-Chu

    2010-01-01

    With globalisation and the advent of information technology, the English language has become more important for second language (L2) learners. This study aimed to establish a blended teaching and learning model combining online and face to face instructional blogging for an English for specific purposes (ESP) course named "English Public…

  16. Development and Use of a Corpus Tailored for Legal English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skier, Jason; Vibulphol, Jutarat

    2016-01-01

    While corpus linguistics has been applied towards many specific academic purposes, reports are few regarding its use to facilitate learning of legal English by non-native English speakers. Specialized corpora are required because legal English often differs significantly from ordinary usage, with words such as bar, motion, and hearing having…

  17. Interdisciplinary Connections and Academic Performance in Psychology-English Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose-Fifer, Jillian; Helmer, Kimberly A.; Zottoli, Tina M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether students in psychology-based learning communities (LCs; i.e., cohorts who took introductory psychology and English together) performed better on psychology tests than those in standard classes. There were two types of LC; in one (connected LC), we created links between English and psychology by using English class readings…

  18. Learning English through Automotive Electronics (Project LETAE), Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    Learning Through Automotive Electronics (Project LETAE) was a federally funded program serving 77 limited-English-proficient (LEP) students and 5 English-proficient students in an automotive computer electronics course in 1992-93, its third year of operation. The program provided instruction in English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL), native language…

  19. Improving English Listening Proficiency: The Application of ARCS Learning-Motivational Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Language learning motivation is one of vital factors which strongly correlates to the success in second language acquisition. Listening proficiency, as one of the basic language abilities, is paid much attention in English instruction, but presently the college English listening teaching is a weak link in English language teaching in China, which…

  20. Language Learning Motivation, Global English and Study Modes: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanvers, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Exploring the popular explanation that the global spread of English may demotivate students with English as their first language to learn other languages, this study investigates relations between student motivation and perception of Global English and tests for differences between traditional "campus" and distance university students…

  1. English Speech Acquisition in 3- to 5-Year-Old Children Learning Russian and English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildersleeve-Neumann, Christina E.; Wright, Kira L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: English speech acquisition in Russian-English (RE) bilingual children was investigated, exploring the effects of Russian phonetic and phonological properties on English single-word productions. Russian has more complex consonants and clusters and a smaller vowel inventory than English. Method: One hundred thirty-seven single-word samples…

  2. MOLT: A Mobile Learning Tool That Makes Learning New Technical English Language Words Enjoyable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogan - Ibrahim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available There is an increase use of wireless technologies in education all over the world. In fact, wireless technologies such as laptop computers, palmtop computers, and mobile phones are revolutionizing education and transforming the traditional classroom based learning and teaching into anytime and anywhere education. This paper investigates the use of wireless technologies in education with particular reference to the potential of learning new technical English Language words using SMS text messaging. The system, developed by the authors, called Mobile Learning Tool (MOLT, has been tested with 45 first-year undergraduate students. Students’ opinions have been collected after the experiment. Our results show that students enjoyed and be happy used mobile phones to learn new technical English word. We believe that if we add the improvements or modifications students wish to see in the MOLT system, then using the MOLT system as an educational tool will contribute to motivation and success of students.

  3. An Investigation into Saudi Students' Knowledge of and Attitudes towards E-Resources on BBC Learning English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Khalid Saleh

    2017-01-01

    The BBC Learning English website has become an important method of learning and studying English as a second language, a resource that enhances the importance of e-learning. The aim of the current research is to find Saudi students' knowledge of and attitude towards e-resources on BBC Learning English. The sample size was 28 participants (17 male…

  4. Integrating Video-Capture Virtual Reality Technology into a Physically Interactive Learning Environment for English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie Chi; Chen, Chih Hung; Jeng, Ming Chang

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to design and develop a Physically Interactive Learning Environment, the PILE system, by integrating video-capture virtual reality technology into a classroom. The system is designed for elementary school level English classes where students can interact with the system through physical movements. The system is designed to…

  5. Modeling the learning of the English past tense with memory-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noord, Rik; Spenader, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the acquisition and final state of English past tense inflection has been an ongoing challenge since the mid-eighties. A number of rule-based and connectionist models have been proposed over the years, but the former usually have no explanation of how the rules are learned and the latter

  6. Autonomous Pluralistic Learning Strategies among Mexican Indigenous and Minority University Students Learning English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despagne, Colette

    2015-01-01

    This critical ethnographic case study draws on Indigenous and minority students' process of learning English as a Foreign Language (EFL) in Mexico. The study specifically focuses on students who enrolled in a program called "A Wager with the Future." The aim of the study is to identify and understand contributing factors in these…

  7. The Effects of Intercultural Learning on English Learning Motivation among Students Studying Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yau

    2012-01-01

    Background: While English is becoming as a tool of communication and interaction with people from different countries in the global society of the twenty-first century due to the trend toward globalization and internationalization, those who study abroad and immerse themselves in the host culture may experience intercultural learning naturally…

  8. China English and ELT for English Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingjuan

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a general study of one of varieties of English--China English and its influence on English Language Teaching (ELT) for English majors. The status of English as an International language breaks the situation in which British English or American English is the sole standard. English becomes World Englishes, taking on a plural form,…

  9. Impacts of the Problem-Based Learning Pedagogy on English Learners' Reading Comprehension, Strategy Use, and Active Learning Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lu-Fang

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether an English reading course integrated with the problem-based learning approach could foster foreign language learners' reading comprehension ability, strategy use, and their active learning attitudes. The pedagogy was featured with the small group scaffolding. Two intact English classes in a Taiwanese university were…

  10. Flipped Learning in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom: Outcomes and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Given; Wallace, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    Although many educators have recently discussed the positive effects of flipped learning, there is little empirical evidence about whether this approach can actually promote students' English learning. This study was undertaken in four sections of the same College English 1 (E1) course over two consecutive semesters at a South Korean university. A…

  11. Foundation Year Students' Perceptions of Using Social Network Sites for Learning English in the Saudi Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShoaibi, Rana; Shukri, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The major aim of this study is to better understand the university students' perceptions and attitudes towards using social network sites for learning English as well as to identify if there is a difference between male and female university students in terms of using social networking sites for learning English inside and outside the classroom.…

  12. Differences in Perceived Approaches to Learning and Teaching English in Hong Kong Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Barley; Chik, Pakey

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates differences in approaches to learning and teaching English as a second language (ESL) as reported by 324 mixed-ability Grade 7 Hong Kong ESL students and 37 ESL secondary school teachers with different backgrounds. Information about participants' perceived approaches to learning/teaching English were collected through a…

  13. Enhancing the Pronunciation of English Suprasegmental Features through Reflective Learning Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwartono

    2014-01-01

    Suprasegmental features are of paramount importance in spoken English. Yet, these pronunciation features are marginalised in EFL/ESL teaching-learning. This article reported a study that was aimed at improving the students' mastery of English suprasegmental features through the use of reflective learning method. The study adopted Kemmis and…

  14. Developing Multi-Dimensional Evaluation Criteria for English Learning Websites with University Students and Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gi-Zen; Liu, Zih-Hui; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Many English learning websites have been developed worldwide, but little research has been conducted concerning the development of comprehensive evaluation criteria. The main purpose of this study is thus to construct a multi-dimensional set of criteria to help learners and teachers evaluate the quality of English learning websites. These…

  15. Pedagogical Challenges of Spoken English Learning in the Second Life Virtual World: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haisen

    2013-01-01

    As one of the emerging technologies, the Second Life virtual world provides learners of English as a Foreign Language with a unique opportunity of learning authentic language with native and non-native speakers of English in a virtual environment. It enables them to learn the target language in a real-life-like social communication environment. To…

  16. Elderly Korean Learners' Participation in English Learning through Lifelong Education: Focusing on Motivation and Demotivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Young; Kim, Yoon-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    This study explores motivational and demotivational factors in English learning among elderly learners attending a lifelong education institute located in Seoul, South Korea. A total of 420 elderly learners with limited English learning experience responded to a questionnaire with 47 five-point Likert-type items. In order to investigate what…

  17. Do Peer Tutors Help Teach ESL Students to Learn English as a Second Language More Successfully?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttle, LeighAnne

    2011-01-01

    This research study tries to understand the information processing model and social learning theory in regards to teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) to Spanish speakers by using peer teaching methods. This study will examine each theory's concepts and frameworks to better comprehend what teaching methods support English language learning.…

  18. Language Learning Strategies and English Proficiency: Interpretations from Information-Processing Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zhenhui

    2016-01-01

    The research reported here investigated the relationship between students' use of language learning strategies and their English proficiency, and then interpreted the data from two models in information-processing theory. Results showed that the students' English proficiency significantly affected their use of learning strategies, with high-level…

  19. Which Methodology Works Better? English Language Teachers' Awareness of the Innovative Language Learning Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated whether English language teachers were aware of the innovative language learning methodologies in language learning, how they made use of these methodologies and the learners' reactions to them. The descriptive survey method was employed to disclose the frequencies and percentages of 175 English language teachers'…

  20. User-Centred Design for Chinese-Oriented Spoken English Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Pan, Yingxin; Li, Chen; Zhang, Zengxiu; Shi, Qin; Chu, Wenpei; Liu, Mingzhuo; Zhu, Zhiting

    2016-01-01

    Oral production is an important part in English learning. Lack of a language environment with efficient instruction and feedback is a big issue for non-native speakers' English spoken skill improvement. A computer-assisted language learning system can provide many potential benefits to language learners. It allows adequate instructions and instant…

  1. Investigating the ICT Use and Needs of "Digital Natives" in Learning English at a Taiwanese University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chao-Jung; Thang, Siew Ming; Ou, Shu-chen

    2014-01-01

    This article reports key findings of a study which investigated the use of technology by 569 "digital natives" students for English Language learning and recreational purposes. Their views on the applicability of technological tools such as Facebook, blogging and Skype for English Language teaching and learning were also investigated.…

  2. Using Personal Portable Devices as Learning Tools in the English Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Díaz, Luz Edith; Cruz Ramos, María de los Milagros; Sandoval Sánchez, Mario Alberto

    2014-01-01

    A group of university students used a variety of personal portable devices (cellphones, tablets, laptops, and netbooks) which distracted them in English class. This qualitative action research aimed to implement activities entailing the use of such devices and to learn their impact on students' learning and the use of English in class. Thus, a…

  3. "If I speak English, what am I? I am full man, me": Emotional impact and barriers for refugees and asylum seekers learning English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Tania; de C Williams, Amanda C

    2017-01-01

    Lack of proficiency in the language of the host country predicts distress among refugees, but many refugees and asylum seekers in the United Kingdom have less than functional English. This study examined how learning English affected refugees' and asylum seekers' lives, particularly their emotional wellbeing, to explore what factors, particularly psychological ones, facilitated or impeded their learning English. We recruited 16 refugees and asylum seekers from an inner-city National Health Service trauma service and from a charity providing one-to-one English classes. All participants were interviewed in English. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis from a critical realist perspective. Interviewees provided consistent accounts of their efforts to learn English, integrated into often unsettled and difficult lives. The analysis generated six themes in two domains. The impact of learning English was mainly positive, associated with autonomy, sense of achievement, and aspirations. Barriers to learning English consisted of other problems affecting refugees' capacity to learn, limited opportunities to speak English, and a sense of shame associated with perceived lack of English language competence. Findings highlight the need to provide adequate psychological support for refugees and asylum seekers learning English, recognising its importance in promoting both their integration in the UK and their individual psychological well-being.

  4. The place of morphology in learning to read in English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastle, Kathleen

    2018-02-24

    Morphology is a major organising principle of English and other alphabetic languages, but has been largely neglected in theories of reading acquisition. In this article, I develop the view that learning to appreciate morphological relationships may be a vital part of acquiring a direct mapping between printed words and their meanings, represented in the ventral brain pathway of the reading network. I show that morphology provides an important degree of regularity across this mapping in English, and suggest that this regularity is directly associated with irregularity in the mapping between spelling and sound. I further show that while children in primary school display explicit knowledge of morphological relationships, there is scant evidence they show the rapid morphological analysis of printed words that skilled readers exhibit. These findings suggest that the acquisition of long-term morphological knowledge may be associated with the ongoing development of reading expertise. Implications for reading instruction are discussed. Copyright © 2018 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of interactive online units on learning science among students with learning disabilities and English learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas-Arellanes, Fatima E.; Gallard M., Alejandro J.; Strycker, Lisa A.; Walden, Emily D.

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the design, classroom implementation, and effectiveness of interactive online units to enhance science learning over 3 years among students with learning disabilities, English learners, and general education students. Results of a randomised controlled trial with 2,303 middle school students and 71 teachers across 13 schools in two states indicated that online units effectively deepened science knowledge across all three student groups. Comparing all treatment and control students on pretest-to-posttest improvement on standards-based content-specific assessments, there were statistically significant mean differences (17% improvement treatment vs. 6% control; p English learner status, indicating that these two groups performed similarly to their peers; students with learning disabilities had significantly lower assessment scores overall. Teachers and students were moderately satisfied with the units.

  6. Learning difficulties or learning English difficulties? Additional language acquisition: an update for paediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Vanessa; Rhodes, Anthea; Paxton, Georgia

    2014-03-01

    Australia is a diverse society: 26% of the population were born overseas, a further 20% have at least one parent born overseas and 19% speak a language other than English at home. Paediatricians are frequently involved in the assessment and management of non-English-speaking-background children with developmental delay, disability or learning issues. Despite the diversity of our patient population, information on how children learn additional or later languages is remarkably absent in paediatric training. An understanding of second language acquisition is essential to provide appropriate advice to this patient group. It takes a long time (5 years or more) for any student to develop academic competency in a second language, even a student who has received adequate prior schooling in their first language. Refugee students are doubly disadvantaged as they frequently have limited or interrupted prior schooling, and many are unable to read and write in their first language. We review the evidence on second language acquisition during childhood, describe support for English language learners within the Australian education system, consider refugee-background students as a special risk group and address common misconceptions about how children learn English as an additional language. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  7. STUDENTS OF ECONOMICS’ ANXIETY TOWARDS ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulnara Faritovna Kalganova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explores language anxiety which has shown a substantially negative impact on performance. This paper reveals four related levels of language anxiety such as communication apprehension, test anxiety, fear of negative evaluation, level of language performance, and their correlations with macro and micro social variables like age, gender, bilingual environment.A total 103 male and female English-language learners of the Economic faculty, Federal Kazan University, completed two questionnaires: a background questionnaire and the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale.The results showed that girls experience greater psychological discomfort in the process of foreign language learning; the greatest concern of students is language anxiety in test situations; first-year students as a whole are more susceptible to language anxiety.The task of a teacher is to create a favorable psychological climate in the classroom of a foreign language in order to removing barriers to development and a better perception of the subject matter.

  8. Self-regulatory Behaviors and Approaches to Learning of Arts Students: A Comparison Between Professional Training and English Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Min-Chen; Chen, Chia-Cheng

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the self-regulatory behaviors of arts students, namely memory strategy, goal-setting, self-evaluation, seeking assistance, environmental structuring, learning responsibility, and planning and organizing. We also explored approaches to learning, including deep approach (DA) and surface approach (SA), in a comparison between students' professional training and English learning. The participants consisted of 344 arts majors. The Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire and the Revised Learning Process Questionnaire were adopted to examine students' self-regulatory behaviors and their approaches to learning. The results show that a positive and significant correlation was found in students' self-regulatory behaviors between professional training and English learning. The results indicated that increases in using self-regulatory behaviors in professional training were associated with increases in applying self-regulatory behaviors in learning English. Seeking assistance, self-evaluation, and planning and organizing were significant predictors for learning English. In addition, arts students used the deep approach more often than the surface approach in both their professional training and English learning. A positive correlation was found in DA, whereas a negative correlation was shown in SA between students' self-regulatory behaviors and their approaches to learning. Students with high self-regulation adopted a deep approach, and they applied the surface approach less in professional training and English learning. In addition, a SEM model confirmed that DA had a positive influence; however, SA had a negative influence on self-regulatory behaviors.

  9. Pre-service mathematics teachers' attitudes towards learning English: A case study in Yogyakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyaningrum, Wahyu

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated attitudes of pre-service mathematics teachers towards English as one of the subject at the university. It is a qualitative study in which questionnaire and face-to-face interview were employed to collect the data. The participants of this study were sixty students of mathematics education department at one of the university in Yogyakarta. The main research question was concern with how pre-service mathematics teachers perceive the importance of learning English. This study found that most of the participants perceive English as an important language that should be acquired by mathematics teachers. Their beliefs about the importance of English were mostly due to instrumental orientation rather than integrative orientation, such as getting a good job, getting a scholarship and understanding learning sources that are written in English. The data also revealed some obstacles faced by pre-service mathematics teachers in learning English as an additional language for them. The main obstacles were related to the differences between English for mathematics and English in daily life including its vocabulary and structure. Most of the participants argued that several mathematics vocabularies had precise meaning and different from daily English. In addition, they found difficult to understand some sentences used in the paper journal due to its structure. This study therefore, provided an insight into the pre-service mathematics teachers' perception and obstacles when learning English that could be use in improving pre-service teachers' education.

  10. The Prevalence of English Monolingualism and Its Association with Generational Status among Hmong Americans, 2005-2009

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Sao Xiong; Nao Xiong

    2011-01-01

    Using the American Community Survey's multi-year (2005-2009) Public Use Microdata Sample, we estimate the prevalence of English monolingualism and statistically analyze the association between English monolingualism and generational status within the U.S. Hmong population. Our findings show that the odds of speaking only English among the second generation is almost three times more compared to the first generation. Data from the 2009 ACS PUMS further indicate that there is a linear an...

  11. Examining the Guidance and Counselling Students' Perceptions about English Language Learning Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymakamoglu, Sibel Ersel

    2017-01-01

    Since contemporary views of learning and teaching place learners in the center of learning process, most of the researchers and practitioners have directed their attention to understanding what goes on in the mind of the learners during the process of learning and teaching. In the area of English language learning and teaching this perspective…

  12. The Relationship of Vocabulary Learning Strategies and Self-Efficacy with Medical English and Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Huei; Kao, Pan-Fu; Liao, Hung-Chang

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between the use of vocabulary learning strategies and self-efficacy in medical English learning, and whether after an initial six-week course to master the basics of medical terminology, those with higher use of vocabulary learning strategies and those with a higher degree of self-efficacy would have significant score improvements in the medical English proficiency. Second-year medical students (N = 115; M age = 19.6, SD = 0.5; 82 men, 33 women) participated in the study. A one-group pretest-posttest design was used. Measures included medical English tests, the English Vocabulary Learning Strategies Survey (EVLSS), and the English Learning Self-Efficacy Scale (ELSES). Results showed that there was no significant correlation between vocabulary learning strategies and English learning self-efficacy. In addition, as a whole, vocabulary learning strategies and self-efficacy significantly predicted students' score improvements in medical English proficiency. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. An Analysis of Technical Students' English Learning Motivation——A Case Study in Hainan Technician College%An Analysis of Technical Students'English Learning Motivation——A Case Study in Hainan Technician College

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩燕

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, because of the large-scale colleges' enrollment, the number of students is increasing while the quality of their English learning level is lower than before. So the gap between students' achievement in English is becoming larger and larger. The author aims to reveal problems of learning motivation in the English learning process. By the ways of handing out questionnaires, interviewing subjects and attending some classes, she find reasons of the problems and give suggestions to the English teachers and technical students. Base on this, teachers could find out how to stir students' English learning motivation. Through analysis of 117 questionnaires, it finds that students of Hainan Technician College (HTC) have different motivations, and some English learning problems. In the college English learning process, teachers should first of all make an acquaintance with students' English learning motivation and fully understand the link between academic result and motivation. Then according to their different situations, teachers should use different teaching methods and skills so as to stir and keep students learning motivation, especially in the process of college students' classroom learning. Only if teachers keep students' interest and stir their inner motivation, students can make good teaching achievement in teaching round. At the same time students should actively cooperate with teachers, have a clear attitude and goal in English learning, change the original bias to English, raise English learning motivation, and work hard for English in order to meet the needs of times.

  14. The Attitudes of Freshman Undergraduates in Learning English as a Second Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Jain

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the attitudes of tertiary students towards the learning of English language with regard to their gender, discipline and language proficiency. This descriptive study involved a total of 200 undergraduates from the Faculty of Education in Shah Alam, Selangor. The study employed two methods of data collection: questionnaire and semi- structured interviews. The findings revealed that there was a moderately positive attitude towards the learning of English language. However, the findings showed that the female respondents were more positive towards the learning of English language compared to their male counterparts while the Non Science major students had positive attitude towards learning English language compared to the Science major students. The study also showed that low proficiency students had better attitude towards English language compared to high proficiency students.

  15. Pilot Study An Investigating Proficiency Learners Attitudes Towards English Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ozge Razy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to investigate foreign students feeling and behaviour towards learning English and different other languages. The study found out that there is any significant difference in the students aspects attitudes positive and negative towards learning English language inside and outside the school based on their response to 25 items. A total of participants were 18 took a questionnaire as an instrument to qualify their attitudes. The participants showed positive attitudes in the high level towards foreign languages such as English. The study presented recommendation to improve other languages in the future as English.

  16. E-Learning Tutoring System for Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Yusof Munirah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An E-Learning tutoring system for English (SPM is an e-learning platform for Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia English subject. E-learning is a web based application that supports the delivery of learning, skills and knowledge related to the English subject in SPM. E-learning use the technology to enable people to learn anytime and anywhere. Besides, it is developed with the purpose to evaluate student’s performance through an online quiz. Nowadays, tuition center have a lot of students, hence insufficient time to analyze the individual performance in learning English. In addition, e-learning is able to reduce the printing cost and administrative cost at the same time reducing usage of paper and printed materials associate in learning. The system developed by using Javascript and PHP language based on system prototyping methodology. The result will produce student’s performance in monthly quiz and teacher are able to monitor the performance of each students. Although the development or this e-learning is based on requirement gathered via tuition center, however it can be proposed to be by any learning center or to self-study. It is hoped that this e-learning will be able to improve student knowledge in English language and subsequently help student to obtain the best result in SPM by providing more guided references and practices.

  17. Teaching and learning English through digital game projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan deHaan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Digital games are receiving increasing attention by researchers and practitioners in education; however, most of the theory and pedagogy focus on general education or language and literacy development of native speakers. There are very few investigations of game play or game culture and second language development. Language teachers and institutions must know more about games to use the media effectively. Two completed extracurricular projects, based on constructionist learning and media literacy theories and practices, are described in this paper: game design and game magazine creation. The action research projects aimed to guide students towards a better understanding of games’ formal features and technologies through their active creation of games and game-related media, and to improve their spoken and written English language skills. In general, students learned and practised a variety of language and technology skills with the design projects. The projects motivated the students, challenged the students, and provided many opportunities for authentic discussions in the foreign language. Various suggestions, based on the teacher and student experiences of these projects, are made for other language teachers interested in conducting creative game-based projects with their students.

  18. A History of Learning Communities within American Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, John E.; Inkelas, Karen Kurotsuchi

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the historical development of learning communities within American higher education. We examine the forces both internal and external to higher education that contributed to and stalled the emergence of learning communities in their contemporary form.

  19. Focus on Australian English: A Critical Learning Portfolio Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on critical pedagogy, this study challenges the hegemony of Standard English (SE) to promote inclusive approaches which recognise and tolerate the variation of World Englishes to prepare students for intercultural encounters with interlocutors speaking different varieties of English. To enhance students' ethno-sensitivity and receptive…

  20. ENGLISH LANGUAGE FOR SUCCESSFUL INTEGRATION: LEARNING FROM THE BOLOGNA PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernandez - Carrion Jose Rodolfo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Bologna Process aims to provide tools to connect the European national educational systems. The purpose of this paper is to analyze what we have learned and what challenges remain today. Since the beginning all participating countries had to agree on a comparable three cycle degree system for undergraduates (Bachelor degrees or Grades and graduates (Master and PhD degrees in order to create compatibility and comparability for achieving international competitiveness and a worldwide degree of attractiveness in higher education. The Bologna Declaration, originally signed by 29 countries, has now reached 47 countries, engaged in the process of creating a European Higher Education Area (EHEA, searching to be competitive to launch the European Academia of the 21st Century. The European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS has turned out to be the perfect tool to design, describe, and deliver programs and award higher education qualifications. Markets and European universities are going to be able to compete overseas in the future if the new regulations let them to create profitable business in the education area. As expected, European Universities have responded promptly and actively to the call. In the case of small countries like Spain, it is an opportunity to internationalize Spanish universities; moreover, there is the opportunity for the expansion and consolidation of the Spanish language as the second most important foreign language. The 2009 Report highlights that early teaching of a foreign language is advancing in Europe. In lower secondary education, earlier teaching of English is becoming widespread; and the three Nordic countries, Germany, and the UK are the highest innovation performers. The result is a system of higher education more competitive and more attractive for Europeans and non-Europeans students and scholars. Reform is needed today if Europe wants to match the performance of the best performing higher education

  1. Medical English M-Learning: Positioning a New Paradigm in E-Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Asgari Arani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT- This study uses Depth Interview as a research instrument to study users' perceptions and acceptance of the potential use of mobile phones in a prospective design for learning Medical English, a mandatory course in medicine. Almost all the respondents (93% across graduates and students were unanimous about the need to learn English through M-Learning. When respondents were asked to suggest ideas on how medical English can be taught through mobiles (unaided question, 49% suggested SMS and 27% suggested SMS & Live Calls. The survey indicates that there is a unanimous demand to learn English amongst students and graduates of medicine in a new e-education setting called M-learning. Constraints imposed by one’s occupation and available resources expose the limitations of traditional learning and opens up a huge opportunity for M-English learning. Irrespective of differences, potential learners accepted the credibility of M-learning and displayed willingness to be an active user of an M-learning module. Diversity of responses on potential frequency of usage for SMSs, preferences regarding listening to IVR, speaking to Live Callers, traditional classroom learning, M-learning and testing options will establish at a primary level that the means of ‘engagement’, ‘presence’ and ‘flexibility’ can be significantly different ‘between’ and ‘within’ different educational groups.

  2. Senales de Trafico. Ingles-Espanol = Traffic Signs. English-Spanish [and] English-Spanish Road Signs for American Tourists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Philip

    Two English/Spanish bilingual glossaries define words and phrases found on traffic signs. The first is an extensive alphabetical checklist of sign messages, listed in English with translations in Spanish. Some basic traffic and speed limit rules are included. The second volume, in Spanish-to-English form, is a pocket version designed for American…

  3. The Coloniality of Neoliberal English: The Enduring Structures of American Colonial English Instruction in the Philippines and Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Funie

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights two relationships in regards to neoliberalism and second language. First, it examines the connection between English and neoliberalism. It focuses on the idea of English as a global language and the linguistic instrumentalism (Kubota, 2011; Wee, 2003) of English as a necessary tool for economic viability in the globalized…

  4. Different mechanisms in learning different second languages: Evidence from English speakers learning Chinese and Spanish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fan; Sussman, Bethany L; Rios, Valeria; Yan, Xin; Wang, Zhao; Spray, Gregory J; Mack, Ryan M

    2017-03-01

    Word reading has been found to be associated with different neural networks in different languages, with greater involvement of the lexical pathway for opaque languages and greater invovlement of the sub-lexical pathway for transparent langauges. However, we do not know whether this language divergence can be demonstrated in second langauge learners, how learner's metalinguistic ability would modulate the langauge divergence, or whether learning method would interact with the language divergence. In this study, we attempted to answer these questions by comparing brain activations of Chinese and Spanish word reading in native English-speaking adults who learned Chinese and Spanish over a 2 week period under three learning conditions: phonological, handwriting, and passive viewing. We found that mapping orthography to phonology in Chinese had greater activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and left inferior temporal gyrus (ITG) than in Spanish, suggesting greater invovlement of the lexical pathway in opaque langauges. In contrast, Spanish words evoked greater activation in the left superior temporal gyrus (STG) than English, suggesting greater invovlement of the sublexical pathway for transparant languages. Furthermore, brain-behavior correlation analyses found that higher phonological awareness and rapid naming were associated with greater activation in the bilateral IFG for Chinese and in the bilateral STG for Spanish, suggesting greater language divergence in participants with higher meta-linguistic awareness. Finally, a significant interaction between the language and learning condition was found in the left STG and middle frontal gyrus (MFG), with greater activation in handwriting learning than viewing learning in the left STG only for Spanish, and greater activation in handwriting learning than phonological learning in the left MFG only for Chinese. These findings suggest that handwriting facilitates assembled phonology in Spanish and addressed

  5. A Comparative Study of the Use of Collocation in Iranian High School Textbooks and American English File Books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Shahrokhi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the extent to which lexical and grammatical collocations are used in Iranian high school English textbooks, compared with the American English File books. To achieve the purposes of this study, this study had to be carried out in two phases. In the first phase, the content of the instructional textbooks, that is, American English File book series, Book 2 and Iranian high school English Book 3, were analyzed to find the frequencies and proportions of the collocations used in the textbooks. Since the instructional textbooks used in the two teaching environments (i.e., Iranian high schools and language institutes were not equal with regard to the density of texts, from each textbook just the first 6000 words, content words as well as function words, were considered. Then, the frequencies of the collocations among the first 6000 words in high school English Book 3 and American English File Book 2 were determined.The results of the statistical analyses revealed that the two text book series differ marginally in terms of frequency and type of collocations. Major difference existed between them when it came to lexical collocations in American English File book 2.

  6. Accentedness and intelligibility: Mandarin-accented English for Korean and American listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardman, Jocelyn

    .S. who were certified to teach at the university level, and the key words were highly familiar to native speakers of English, those words which matched exactly were scored as accurate, while those which did not were marked as inaccurate. In addition, the listeners rated their familiarity with known key...... words on an increasing 5-point Likert scale, while unknown words were entered as ‘0.’. A series of mixed effects models with logistic regression analyzed the effect of speaker segmental production accuracy and listener word familiarity on intelligibility. Individual speaker and listener variation......, as well as key word variation, were crossed as random effects. For the Koreans, Mandarin-accented English was significantly less intelligible than for the Americans and the differences in the segments that most frequently caused problems for each L1 listener group lend evidence to the strong role played...

  7. Reflections of College English Majors' Cultural Perceptions on Learning English in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Mei

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted with the participation of nine English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students and two EFL teachers of the Department of Applied English at an institute of technology in central Taiwan. Based on in-depth interviews with the students and teachers, the findings suggest that the participating students' perspectives of culture…

  8. English speech acquisition in 3- to 5-year-old children learning Russian and English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildersleeve-Neumann, Christina E; Wright, Kira L

    2010-10-01

    English speech acquisition in Russian-English (RE) bilingual children was investigated, exploring the effects of Russian phonetic and phonological properties on English single-word productions. Russian has more complex consonants and clusters and a smaller vowel inventory than English. One hundred thirty-seven single-word samples were phonetically transcribed from 14 RE and 28 English-only (E) children, ages 3;3 (years;months) to 5;7. Language and age differences were compared descriptively for phonetic inventories. Multivariate analyses compared phoneme accuracy and error rates between the two language groups. RE children produced Russian-influenced phones in English, including palatalized consonants and trills, and demonstrated significantly higher rates of trill substitution, final devoicing, and vowel errors than E children, suggesting Russian language effects on English. RE and E children did not differ in their overall production complexity, with similar final consonant deletion and cluster reduction error rates, similar phonetic inventories by age, and similar levels of phonetic complexity. Both older language groups were more accurate than the younger language groups. We observed effects of Russian on English speech acquisition; however, there were similarities between the RE and E children that have not been reported in previous studies of speech acquisition in bilingual children. These findings underscore the importance of knowing the phonological properties of both languages of a bilingual child in assessment.

  9. Becoming Global Citizens through Bilingualism: English Learning in the Lives of University Students in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangguang Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing globalisation has led to a tremendous expansion of the English language. With China striving to become part of the world economy since the late 1970's, there has been a great emphasis placed on the education of young people to become a world citizen with fluent English. “Being a global citizen” is having strong interests in global issues, cultivating the understanding and appreciation of diverse values, and enhancing country's competitiveness. All this however needs to be realized through communication in English, the world language. Improving communicative competence among Chinese learners of English depends on how English is learnt in the FL classroom and how it gets practiced outside the classroom. Data drawn from English corners, English clubs and English church all show that those informal learning settings have a complentary role to play especially when the formal English classroom is found having various deficits. Data also confirm that informal settings offer the opportunity to close the gap between L1 and L2 learning processes, and nurtutre learners' communicative competence through social intercourse and intercultural exchanges. Moreover, EFL learning is inherently intercultural, which facilitate cross cultural perspectives through bilingualism and bridges over the indigenous cultural traditions and the western democratic values.

  10. Bridges to Swaziland: Using Task-Based Learning and Computer-Mediated Instruction to Improve English Language Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Susan Jacques

    2015-01-01

    One way to provide high quality instruction for underserved English Language Learners around the world is to combine Task-Based English Language Learning with Computer- Assisted Instruction. As part of an ongoing project, "Bridges to Swaziland," these approaches have been implemented in a determined effort to improve the ESL program for…

  11. Teachers and Students' Stereotypes about the Teaching and Learning of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto Flórez, Eliana Edith; Arias Rodríguez, Gladis Leonor

    2016-01-01

    This article is the result of a research study that examined teachers and undergraduate students' stereotypes about English teaching and learning processes at a private university in Tunja, Colombia. The research was carried out with six English teachers and twenty undergraduate students from first and second semesters. The instruments used to…

  12. Learners' Listening Comprehension Difficulties in English Language Learning: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilakjani, Abbas Pourhosein; Sabouri, Narjes Banou

    2016-01-01

    Listening is one of the most important skills in English language learning. When students listen to English language, they face a lot of listening difficulties. Students have critical difficulties in listening comprehension because universities and schools pay more attention to writing, reading, and vocabulary. Listening is not an important part…

  13. The Relationship between Gender, Motivation and Achievement in Learning English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becirovic, Senad

    2017-01-01

    This study deals with the research into the relationship between gender, motivation and achievement in learning English as a foreign language. A good command of English is of paramount importance for an individual to be successful in numerous aspects of life such as professional, personal and educational. The aim of this research was to determine…

  14. Mobile English learning: an evidence-based study with fifth graders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandberg, J.; Maris, M.; de Geus, K.

    2011-01-01

    Three groups participated in a study on the added value of mobile technology for learning English as a second language for primary school students. The first group had classroom lessons in English about zoo animals and their characteristics. The second group took classroom lessons and worked with a

  15. Teaching and Learning English in Thailand and the Integration of Conversation Analysis (CA) into the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Bunthan; Sinwongsuwat, Kemtong

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of English language teaching and learning, specifically as it pertains to teaching English conversational skills in Thailand. The paper examines the shortcomings of the Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) approach, the current dominant pedagogical approach in the nation, and explores how the integration of…

  16. An Investigation of Game-Embedded Handheld Devices to Enhance English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hui-Chun; Young, Shelley Shwu-Ching

    2015-01-01

    This study proposed and implemented a system combining the advantages of both educational games and wireless handheld technology to promote the interactive English learning in the classroom setting. An interactive English vocabulary acquisition board game was designed with the system being implemented on handheld devices. Thirty sixth-grade…

  17. Understanding the Online Informal Learning of English as a Complex Dynamic System: An Emic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockett, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Research into the online informal learning of English has already shown it to be a widespread phenomenon involving a range of comprehension and production activities such as viewing original version television series, listening to music on demand and social networking with other English users. Dynamic systems theory provides a suitable framework…

  18. English Language Learning Difficulty of Korean Students in a Philippine Multidisciplinary University

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Albela, Emmanuel Jeric A.; Nieto, Deborah Rosalind D.; Ferrer, John Bernard F.; Santos, Rior N.

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative study analyzed the English language learning difficulties of 13 purposively chosen Korean students relative to their sociolinguistic competence, motivation in using the English language, and cultural factors. Interview responses were transcribed, categorized and thematised according to saliency, meaning and homogeneity. The…

  19. Auditory Processing, Linguistic Prosody Awareness, and Word Reading in Mandarin-Speaking Children Learning English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wei-Lun; Jarmulowicz, Linda; Bidelman, Gavin M.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined language-specific links among auditory processing, linguistic prosody awareness, and Mandarin (L1) and English (L2) word reading in 61 Mandarin-speaking, English-learning children. Three auditory discrimination abilities were measured: pitch contour, pitch interval, and rise time (rate of intensity change at tone onset).…

  20. Language Learning Strategies of English for Specific Purposes Students at a Public University in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mohamed Ismail Ahamad; Ismail, Yusof; Esa, Zaleha; Muhamad, Ainon Jariah

    2013-01-01

    Studies on strategy research have shown the usefulness and importance of language learning strategies (LLS) for ESL and EFL learners. However, research on content-based learners in relation to English for Academic Purposes (EAP) and English for Occupational Purposes (EOP) has yet to be undertaken. This study, therefore, investigated the learning…

  1. The Effect of Educational Computerized Games on Learning English Spelling among Iranian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrpour, Saeed; Ghayour, Maaedeh

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of educational computerized games on learning English spelling among Iranian children. In doing so, 66 young Iranian English learners with the average age of 9.5, attending the children's branch of Iran Language Institute (ILI), the most well-established state-run language teaching institute in Iran,…

  2. English as a Second Language and World War II: Possibilities for Language and Historical Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mary Amanda; Walker, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Although, traditionally, the purpose of the social studies class in secondary schools is to teach content knowledge, this article argues that historical learning can be a powerful vehicle for English language development for late-arrival English learners (ELs) in middle and high schools. ELs bring a wealth of life experiences, diverse…

  3. Exploring Students' Perceptions about English Learning in a Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Patricia Kim

    2018-01-01

    This manuscript reports the final findings of an exploratory, descriptive case study that aimed at exploring the perceptions of a group of English as a foreign language students in a public university regarding their English learning and the commitment level through the process. A questionnaire, a survey, and the teacher's diary were the…

  4. Do Chinese Dyslexic Children Have Difficulties Learning English as a Second Language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Connie Suk-Han; Fong, Kin-Man

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether Chinese dyslexic children had difficulties learning English as a second language given the distinctive characteristics of the two scripts. Twenty-five Chinese primary school children with developmental dyslexia and 25 normally achieving children were tested on a number of English vocabulary,…

  5. Attitude and Self-Efficacy Change: English Language Learning in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dongping; Young, Michael F.; Brewer, Robert A.; Wagner, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    This study explored affective factors in learning English as a foreign language in a 3D game-like virtual world, Quest Atlantis (QA). Through the use of communication tools (e.g., chat, bulletin board, telegrams, and email), 3D avatars, and 2D webpage navigation tools in virtual space, nonnative English speakers (NNES) co-solved online…

  6. English Business Communication Needs of Mexican Executives in a Distance-Learning Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Christine Uber

    2004-01-01

    Many firms within and outside the United States operate in multilingual environments that require executives to do business in English as well as in other languages. Executives for whom English is a second language often face special challenges communicating in such settings. This study examines how 115 executives in a distance-learning business…

  7. Learning about the Literacy Development of English Language Learners in Asynchronous Online Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Luciana C.; Olesova, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    This study examined asynchronous online discussions in the online course "English Language Development" to identify themes related to participants' learning about the language and literacy development of English Language Learners when they facilitated online discussions to determine whether the participants developed sufficient…

  8. Use of Language Learning Strategies by Spanish Adults for Mastering Business English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Jeffrey Wallace

    2010-01-01

    Research of language learning strategy (LLS) has provided insight for language learners from many international cultures since this branch of research began in the 1970s. Despite the urgent need for competence in the use of business English in Western Europe, LLS studies have not been conducted on Spanish adults who use English for business. The…

  9. Parental Factors in Children's Motivation for Learning English: A Case in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Yuko Goto

    2015-01-01

    Schools in China and elsewhere are starting to teach English as a second language or foreign language (FL) to students at increasingly earlier ages. Although young learners (YLs), due to their developmental stage, are likely to be particularly susceptible to the influence of parents, parents' roles in YLs' motivation to learn English as an FL is…

  10. Investigation of Turkish EFL Learners' Attributions on Success and Failure in Learning English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Aysun; Höl, Devrim

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the attributions of Turkish EFL learners on success and failure in learning English as a foreign language with different variables such as gender and level of English proficiency. To investigate the attributions of the participants and gather the relevant data, a questionnaire including 38 items and…

  11. Graduate Students' Perceptions of the Impact of the Alternative National English Course on the Improvement of Their English Language Learning and Their Learning Challenges at the University of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhawaldeh, Ahmad Mokbel

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study addressed the English language learning needs and challenges expressed by a sample of 22 postgraduate students from diversified faculties in the University of Jordan. These students were required to take the Alternative National English course. They wrote a self-report reflecting on their English language learning needs and…

  12. An Inquiry into the NEST Program in Relation to English Teaching and Learning in Taiwanese Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to explore the Native English-Speaking Teacher (NEST) Program in relation to teachers' instruction and students' learning of English in primary schools in Taiwan. Inviting native English-speakers to teach English in the school system is not an unusual practice in the Asia-Pacific region. As the practice of including NESTs in the…

  13. Performance, Cognitive Load, and Behaviour of Technology-Assisted English Listening Learning: From CALL to MALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Warden, Clyde A.; Liang, Chaoyun; Chou, Pao-Nan

    2018-01-01

    This study examines differences in English listening comprehension, cognitive load, and learning behaviour between outdoor ubiquitous learning and indoor computer-assisted learning. An experimental design, employing a pretest-posttest control group is employed. Randomly assigned foreign language university majors joined either the experimental…

  14. Application-Driven Educational Game to Assist Young Children in Learning English Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Hong; Lee, Shu-Yu

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an educational game, named My-Pet-Shop, to enhance young children's learning of English vocabulary. The educational game is underpinned by an application-driven model, which consists of three components: application scenario, subject learning, and learning regulation. An empirical study is further conducted…

  15. Strategies of Learning Speaking Skill by Indonesian Learners of English and Their Contribution to Speaking Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistar, Junaidi; Umamah, Atik

    2014-01-01

    This paper was a subset report of a research project on skill-based English learning strategies by Indonesian EFL learners. It focusses on the attempts to reveal: (1) the differences in the use of strategies of learning speaking skill by male and female learners, and (2) the contribution of strategies of learning speaking skill on the learners'…

  16. Students' Attitudes and Motivation for Learning English at Dokuz Eylul University School of Foreign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Kadim

    2014-01-01

    Attitudes and motivation are two of the key factors in second language learning since positive attitudes and high levels of motivation are considered as the predictors of a successful learning process. This study aims to reveal the relation between university preparatory students' attitudes towards learning English and their language learning…

  17. Game-Enhanced Simulation as an Approach to Experiential Learning in Business English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punyalert, Sansanee

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation aims to integrate various learning approaches, i.e., multiple literacies, experiential learning, game-enhanced learning, and global simulation, into an extracurricular module, in which it remodels traditional ways of teaching input, specifically, the lexical- and grammatical-only approaches of business English at a private…

  18. Exploring Prospective EFL Teachers' Perceived Self-Efficacy and Beliefs on English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genç, Gülten; Kulusakli, Emine; Aydin, Savas

    2016-01-01

    Learners' perceived self-efficacy and beliefs on English language learning are important in education. Taking into consideration the important impact of individual variables on language learning, this study seeks to highlight the relationship between Turkish EFL learners' beliefs about language learning and their sense of self-efficacy. The…

  19. Key Learning Styles of Teaching English to Students from the Asian-Pacific Region

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    Kovalenko Natalia A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines key styles of learning English as the second language, particularly for students from Asian-Pacific countries. It deals with the methods of improving their learning skills and abilities. The most traditional and popular ways of learning styles are pointed out. The authors also discuss teaching approaches for matching and interaction of learning styles in different cultures. The authors also discuss teaching approaches to matching and interaction of learning styles in different cultures.

  20. The interrelatedness of lexis and morphology in English language learning

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    Danilović-Jeremić Jelena P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The past few decades have seen a sparked interest in the development of vocabulary knowledge in both L1 and L2 learners, resulting in an ever increasing body of research which supports the view that vocabulary and morphology are closely related. Morphological awareness, encompassing the knowledge of derivational and inflectional forms, is nowadays thought to be a critical element of vocabulary growth, contributing to a rapid expansion in children's lexicon from the fourth grade to high school (Nagy & Herman, 1987. There are indications of a similar but much slower and more challenging process taking place in the EFL teaching/learning context. Nevertheless, the relationships between various aspects of morphological awareness and vocabulary knowledge have not been investigated in depth, and even less so in Serbian EFL learners. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to explore the aforementioned issue in upper-intermediate Serbian EFL learners, first-year students majoring in English at the Faculty of Philology and Arts in Kragujevac. Their performance on the word segmentation and suffix elicitation task, as measures of receptive and productive morphological awareness (Hayashi & Murphy, 2011, was statistically analyzed and examined in relation to their vocabulary size (Nation, 1990; 2001. The results obtained contribute to our growing understanding of L2 lexical knowledge in EFL learners and have pedagogical implications.

  1. Student motivation and achievement in learning English as a second language using Second Life

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    Tosti H. C. Chiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the impact of a 3D virtual learning environment based on Second Life on student motivation and achievement in learning English as a second language. Twenty-one university students participate in this study, with the support of an English instructor. The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ was used to evaluate students’ intrinsic and extrinsic goal orientation and self-efficacy in Second Life. The pre-test and post-test were used to assess students’ learning achievement. The results showed that students’ intrinsic and extrinsic goal orientations in English learning in Second Life had a positive influence on their self-efficacy. In addition, students’ self-efficacy of English learning in Second Life was found to positively relate to their learning achievement. Moreover, students’ intrinsic and extrinsic goal orientations were found to significantly influence their learning achievement via self-efficacy. In other words, instructors can utilize Second Life to enhance student motivation and achievement in English learning.

  2. An Annotated Bibliography of Research on Reading and Adults Learning English as a Second Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Miriam, Comp.; Florez, MaryAnn, Comp.; Terrill, Lynda, Comp.; Van Duzer, Carol, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography contains 27 references regarding research on reading and adults learning English as a Second Language (ESL). None of the resources are more than 10 years old. (Adjunct ERIC Clearinghouse for ESL Literacy Education) (KFT)

  3. EXPLORING MOTIVATION OF LEARNING ENGLISH (A STUDY OF A JAPANESE TEACHER

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    Indriyati Hadiningrum

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Motivation, in general, can be described as a reason for doing something; and in language learning this refers to learners‘ need to master a second or foreign language. It is one of causal factors (e.g. age, environment in a language learning, especially in learning the English language. Students or individuals who learn English in a non-English speaking country must have high motivation to be able to speak using the English language. This study is aimed at describing motivation of a native Japanese who is able to speak English. Basically, she speaks Japanese most of the time with her colleagues and students since she teaches Japanese. The result shows that she is eager to learn Englishbecause she wants to have a relationship with many people around the world especially when she has to teach Japanese in some English-speaking countries. She has positive attitudes towards the English language although she realises that her pronunciation is sometimes difficult to understand because she cannot utter /l/ (she utters /r/ instead.

  4. Perceptions and Attitudes Towards Blended Learning for English Courses: A Case Study of Students at University of Bisha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ja'ashan, Mohammed Mohammed Nasser Hassan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of students' perceptions and attitudes towards Blended Learning course in English at University of Bisha. The statement of problem that blended learning of English course annoys students at University of Bisha. Most of the students do not understand well the objectives of e learning through blended learning courses…

  5. Promoting autonomous learning in English through the implementation of Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL in science and maths subjects

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    Andriani Putu Fika

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous learning is a concept in which the learner has the ability to take charge of their own learning. It becomes a notable aspect that should be perceived by students. The aim of this research is for finding out the strategies used by grade two teachers in Bali Kiddy Primary School to promote autonomous learning in English through the implementation of Content and Language Integrated Learning in science and maths subjects. This study was designed in the form of descriptive qualitative study. The data were collected through observation, interview, and document study. The result of the study shows that there are some strategies of promoting autonomous learning in English through the implementation of CLIL in Science and Maths subjects. Those strategies are table of content training, questioning & presenting, journal writing, choosing activities, and using online activity. Those strategies can be adopted or even adapted as the way to promote autonomous learning in English subject.

  6. The Influence of Teacher’s Competence towards the Motivation of Students in Learning English

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    Bustami Usman; Tengku Maya Silviyanti; Marzatillah Marzatillah

    2016-01-01

    This study is intended to find out the influence of the teacher’s competence towards the motivation of students in learning English. A questionnaire was given to 24 students at a sports school in Banda Aceh, Indonesia. The five (5) closed and open questions were adapted from Zhao (2012). The results from this study show that the competences of the teacher including cognitive, affective, and psychomotor competence (Syah, 2013) enhance the motivation of students to learn English. The teacher’s ...

  7. Learning autonomy in writing class: Implementation of project-based learning in english for spesific purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayu Sukerti, G. N.; Yuliantini, Ny

    2018-01-01

    This research was aimed to analyze students’ attitude on learning autonomy through the implementation of project-based learning (PBL). Writing has been considered one of the most difficult competencies to master as it incorporates several integrated language skills. Thus, teaching writing in English for Specific Class posts a huge challenge as students often feel discouraged by the complex series of processes involved in producing a well-structured piece of writing. This research implemented PBL as the learning model to boost students’ learning outcomes and construct self-directed learning. Participants were 25 second semester students enrolled in a three-year undergraduate program in Informatics Management. The implementation of PBL in writing class contributed real advantages since it allowed students to collaboratively arrange outline in order to produce individual drafts and final essays. The study revealed that students were able to be involved in a more deep and autonomous learning as they helped each other during group discussion. The students autonomously engaged in the completion of the project in a more positive attitude. They also acquired more knowledge in the aspect of grammar and learned how to use language in proper context based on the feedbacks they got during revising their writing.

  8. An investigation on normal school students’ learning burnout – A case study of English normal students

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    Linjing Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Learning burnout is a phenomenon in which students hold a negative attitude to curriculum learning, which manifests in aspects of physiology, psychology, behavior and interpersonal communication. China attaches great importance to higher education, colleges and universities shoulder the important task of training national modernization personnel. The problem of university students’ learning burnout has become a social phenomenon that cannot be ignored. Normal university students are one of the important groups of college students, and this phenomenon of learning burnout may also occur among them. English majors are the backbone of English teachers in primary and secondary schools in the future. The learning status of these groups affects the overall quality of teaching in normal colleges and universities and, more importantly, the quality of teachers in primary and secondary schools in the future. This paper first reviews the definition of learning burnout and the research methods of measurement. Subsequently, it investigates the learning burnout of English matriculation students by taking the first-year English majors of Jiangxi Normal University as an example. In this way, this research is hoped to promote the study on learning burnout not only among English normal students but also other normal students.

  9. Incorporating E-learning in teaching English language to medical students: exploring its potential contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navidinia, Hossein; Zare Bidaki, Majid; Hekmati, Nargess

    2016-01-01

    Background: The spread of technology has influenced different aspects of human life, and teaching and learning are not exceptions. This study aimed to examine the potential contribution of the use of technology in teaching English language to medical students. Methods: This qualitative-action research study was conducted in Birjand University of Medical Sciences (BUMS), with 60 medical students taking a general English course in the Fall Semester of 2015. The class favored different tools and multimedia facilities such as a tube channel, e-dictionaries, educational films, and etextbooks to enhance students’ learning. In addition, the class had a weblog in which students could upload assignments and receive feedback from peers and the instructors. Results: The results revealed that e-learning could enhance students’ language proficiency and facilitate the teaching process. Learners preferred to use more e-dictionaries to learn the meaning of the new words, watch English medical films to boost their speaking and listening skills, and use the electronic version of their textbook as they could carry it wherever they wanted. Conclusion: The students preferred this method of learning English as they became more independent by using the electronic facilities. They found that learning English did not have a fixed institutionalized method, and e-learning activities could provide them with authentic input for language learning even outside of the classroom. PMID:28491837

  10. Incorporating E-learning in teaching English language to medical students: exploring its potential contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navidinia, Hossein; Zare Bidaki, Majid; Hekmati, Nargess

    2016-01-01

    Background: The spread of technology has influenced different aspects of human life, and teaching and learning are not exceptions. This study aimed to examine the potential contribution of the use of technology in teaching English language to medical students. Methods: This qualitative-action research study was conducted in Birjand University of Medical Sciences (BUMS), with 60 medical students taking a general English course in the Fall Semester of 2015. The class favored different tools and multimedia facilities such as a tube channel, e-dictionaries, educational films, and etextbooks to enhance students' learning. In addition, the class had a weblog in which students could upload assignments and receive feedback from peers and the instructors. Results: The results revealed that e-learning could enhance students' language proficiency and facilitate the teaching process. Learners preferred to use more e-dictionaries to learn the meaning of the new words, watch English medical films to boost their speaking and listening skills, and use the electronic version of their textbook as they could carry it wherever they wanted. Conclusion: The students preferred this method of learning English as they became more independent by using the electronic facilities. They found that learning English did not have a fixed institutionalized method, and e-learning activities could provide them with authentic input for language learning even outside of the classroom.

  11. Evaluation of simulation learning materials use to fill the gap in Japanese dental English education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Naoko; Moross, Janelle; Sunaga, Masayo; Hobo, Koki; Miyoshi, Tomoe; Nitta, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Morio, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    Even though English is most frequently the common language when the patient's native language differs from that of a dentist, the opportunities for Japanese undergraduate dental students to learn dental English are now quite limited. The purposes of our study were to investigate: the effectiveness and feasibility of the computer-assisted simulation materials as one solution strategy for dental English education in Japan, and the needs and demands for dental English from the learners' side. Interactive simulation materials for medical interviews in English and clinical cases which were translated to English, were delivered via Learning Management System (LMS) to nineteen trainee residents of dentistry (residents). Evaluation for the materials, learners' knowledge and interests in the contents, and ease of operation were obtained by post-questionnaire (response rates were 100% and 95%, respectively). Both questionnaire-surveys received positive feedback toward the materials, yet 47% answered that they lacked the level of knowledge about contents of the medical interview in English. Results were sufficient to suggest that the residents would like to have the opportunity to study or practice medical interview in English, or English related to dentistry, and that the simulation materials could be one of the solution strategies for opportunity provision.

  12. Application of Effective Techniques in Teaching/Learning English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Shweta; Joshi, Kavita A.; Koshy, Sonymol; Tewari, Deeksha

    2017-01-01

    English being a global language has become a vital element in all walks of life. The feelers of this language have left no sphere unmarked with its significance. Despite such a colossal tide for gaining command over the language it was found that the conventional pattern of teaching English language could not reap desired results. A comprehensive…

  13. English Proficiency and Participation in Online Discussion for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Does English proficiency affect participation in online discussion? This study polled 14 students from a postgraduate online course that require online discussion. The students are divided into groups according to their home language spoken and self-assessed English proficiency, and measure against their participation level in the required…

  14. English Learning in an Intercultural Perspective: Russia and Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjøru, Anne-Mette

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a cross-border collaboration between a Russian and a Norwegian University in the English Language field, and how it is made possible by the universities' support--both in terms of strategic plans and funding. The paper shows the goals of the collaboration; to give the students an insight into how English is taught in…

  15. A Learning Experience of the Gender Perspective in English Teaching Contexts

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    Claudia Patricia Mojica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen Colombian English teachers participated in a course with an emphasis on gender and foreign language teaching in a Master’s program in Bogotá. This text describes the design, implementation, and the learning in this educational experience. The analysis of the course was based on a view of learning as a process of participation rooted in the praxis of English teachers’ classrooms. This experience reveals that gender is a relevant category in the frame of English language teacher education as it provides teachers with tools from a broader social and educational perspective. This reflection also leads to implications for teachers’ practices with a gender perspective.

  16. Learning for life, a structured and motivational process of knowledge construction in the acquisition/learning of English as a foreign language in native Spanish speakers

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    Fernando Miño-Garcés

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available As language learning theory has shifted from a highly guided to a more open learning process, this paper presents the teaching/learning philosophy called Learning for Life (L for L as a great way to motivate native Spanish speaker students learning English as a foreign language, and to help them be the constructors of their own knowledge. The Learning for Life philosophy was created by Patricia López de Jaramillo, M.A. and Fernando Miño-Garcés, Ph.D. at the Andean Center for Latin American Studies (ACLAS in Quito – Ecuador. In the Learning for Life philosophy, the learner is the center of the process and becomes the creator of his/her own knowledge. To get to this new dimension in learning, acquisition is emphasized, and the principles of this philosophy are applied in the EFL classroom. The definition of the philosophy and its principles are presented, and explained in detail as to how they can be applied in the teaching of a foreign language. This paper also explains the difference between acquisition versus learning, and what process should be applied in the classroom to emphasize on acquisition, and not so much on learning.

  17. Cultural Adaptation, Parenting and Child Mental Health Among English Speaking Asian American Immigrant Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Keng-Yen; Calzada, Esther; Cheng, Sabrina; Barajas-Gonzalez, R Gabriela; Brotman, Laurie Miller

    2017-08-01

    Contrary to the "model minority" myth, Asian American children, especially those from low-income immigrant families, are at risk for both behavioral and emotional problems early in life. Little is known, however, about the underlying developmental mechanisms placing Asian American children at risk, including the role of cultural adaptation and parenting. This study examined cultural adaptation, parenting practices and culture related parenting values and child mental health in a sample of 157 English speaking Asian American immigrant families of children enrolled in early childhood education programs in low-income, urban neighborhoods. Overall, cultural adaptation and parenting cultural values and behaviors were related to aspects of child mental health in meaningful ways. Parents' cultural value of independence appears to be especially salient (e.g., negatively related to behavior problems and positively related to adaptive behavior) and significantly mediates the link between cultural adaptation and adaptive behavior. Study findings have implications for supporting Asian American immigrant families to promote their young children's mental health.

  18. Learning experience of Chinese nursing students in an online clinical English course: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Anson C Y; Wong, Nick; Wong, Thomas K S

    2015-02-01

    The low English proficiency of Chinese nurse/nursing students affects their performance when they work in English-speaking countries. However, limited resources are available to help them improve their workplace English, i.e. English used in a clinical setting. To this end, it is essential to look for an appropriate and effective means to assist them in improving their clinical English. The objective of this study is to evaluate the learning experience of Chinese nursing students after they have completed an online clinical English course. Focus group interview was used to explore their learning experience. 100 students in nursing programs at Tung Wah College were recruited. The inclusion criteria were: (1) currently enrolled in a nursing program; and (2) having clinical experience. Eligible participants self-registered for the online English course, and were required to complete the course within 3 months. After that, semi-structured interviews were conducted on students whom completed the whole and less than half of the course. One of the researchers joined each of the interviews as a facilitator and an observer. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Finally, 7 themes emerged from the interviews: technical issues, adequacy of support, time requirement, motivation, clarity of course instruction, course design, and relevancy of the course. Participants had varied opinions on the 2 themes: motivation and relevancy of the course. Overall, results of this study suggest that the online English course helped students improve their English. Factors which support their learning are interactive course design, no time constraint, and relevancy to their work/study. Factors which detracted from their learning are poor accessibility, poor technical and learning support and no peer support throughout the course. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Effects of Noise on English Listening Comprehension among Chinese College Students with Different Learning Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohu; Jiang, Meng; Zhao, Yong

    2017-01-01

    This study was intended to determine whether the effects of noise on English listening comprehension would vary among Chinese college students with different learning styles. A total of 89 participants with different learning styles measured using Kolb's (1985) Learning Style Inventory finished English listening comprehension tests in quiet and in white noise, Chinese two-talker babble, and English two-talker babble respectively. The results showed that the participants in general had significantly poorer performance in the two babble conditions than in quiet and white noise. However, the participants with assimilative and divergent learning styles performed relatively better in Chinese babble, and exhibited stable performance across the three noisy conditions, while the participants with convergent and accommodative learning styles had more impaired performance in both Chinese babble and English babble than in white noise. Moreover, of Kolb's four learning modes, reflective observation had a facilitative effect on listening performance in Chinese babble and English babble. These findings suggest that differences in learning style might lead to differential performance in foreign language listening comprehension in noise.

  20. Effects of Noise on English Listening Comprehension among Chinese College Students with Different Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohu; Jiang, Meng; Zhao, Yong

    2017-01-01

    This study was intended to determine whether the effects of noise on English listening comprehension would vary among Chinese college students with different learning styles. A total of 89 participants with different learning styles measured using Kolb’s (1985) Learning Style Inventory finished English listening comprehension tests in quiet and in white noise, Chinese two-talker babble, and English two-talker babble respectively. The results showed that the participants in general had significantly poorer performance in the two babble conditions than in quiet and white noise. However, the participants with assimilative and divergent learning styles performed relatively better in Chinese babble, and exhibited stable performance across the three noisy conditions, while the participants with convergent and accommodative learning styles had more impaired performance in both Chinese babble and English babble than in white noise. Moreover, of Kolb’s four learning modes, reflective observation had a facilitative effect on listening performance in Chinese babble and English babble. These findings suggest that differences in learning style might lead to differential performance in foreign language listening comprehension in noise. PMID:29085317

  1. STUDENTS’ MOTIVATION IN LEARNING ENGLISH LANGUAGE (A CASE STUDY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT STUDENTS

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    Anna Riana Suryanti Tambunan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The real challenges for teachers and learners lie in finding ways of sustaining the motivation through the long and often arduous process of learning a language. The aim of this study was to describe the students’ instrumental and integrative motivation in English language learning. A case study was used in this study by distributing the motivation questionnaire to the 36 second-year students of English Department at Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa university in Serang, Banten. Then, the data from the returned questionnaire were analyzed by describing the types of motivation the students use. Findings from this study indicated that the second year students were instrumentally motivated and their integration was sufficient, too. The instrumental motivation was found to have more impact on students than integrative one. Three interrelated instrumental motivations in studying English were identified: future study, scores and career. In addition the students mentioned that good marks in English were required for their future studies and a good qualification for their careers. In conclusion, motivation has a contribution towards the students’ English language learning. The findings could be useful for researchers and teachers in improving students’ English language learning by conducting effective teaching and learning strategies to develop the students’ motivation.

  2. Islamic Senior High School Students’ Language Learning Strategies and their English Achievement

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    ISTI QOMARIAH

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the correlation between language learning strategies and English achievement, and explored the influence of language learning strategies on English achievement of eleventh grade students’ of MAN 3 Palembang. A total of 141 eleventh grade students participated in this study. The questionnaire and test were used to collect the data. For this purpose, the language learning strategies (SILL questionnaire developed by Oxford (1989 measured language learning strategies and TOEFL junior (2015 was used to know students’ English achievement. There were three levels from high to low based on the results of SILL questionnaire and five categories English achievement test. Descriptive stastistic, pearson product moment correlation and regression anlaysis were employed to analyze the data. Based on the data analysis, it was found that r (.665 > rtable (.165 with significant level which was lower than 0.05. Thus, it indicated that there was significant correlation between language learning strategies and English achievement. It was implied that good language learners caused good in English achievement.

  3. Rich Language Learning Environment and Young Learners’ Literacy Skills in English

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    Luh Putu Artini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed at developing rich language learning environment to help elementary school students develop their literacy skills in English. Shortage of professional English teachers in primary school, limited time allocation, as well as the lack of tools and facilities that support English language teaching and learning for young learners had resulted in students’low literacy skills in English. It was tried out in six primary schools across Bali involving 12 teachers and 520 students. The data were collected through questionnaires, observation, interview, English literacy tests, and students’ literacy journals. Research finds that young learners should have the opportunity to learn by doing without too much intervention so that anatural process of learning could occur. The product comprises multiple literacy experiences in the form of five different texts. The findings revealed that the readability of the material was in the category of high. The systematic exposures of these materials to beginner learners of English have been proven to have the significant impact on their literacy skills. Thehighest improvement is found in word level (87,1%, followed by sentence level (56,2%, and discourse level (46,8%. The improvements are all confirmed at the significance level of 0,05. The research also finds that RLLE has the positive impact on the development of self-directed learning skills.

  4. Effectiveness of E-learning for the Teaching of English: A Study of Comparative Strategies

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    Intakhab Alam Khan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Teaching of English in Saudi Arabia (KSA is on top priority these days. Linguists, researchers, pedagogues and teachers have different perceptions and views regarding the approaches/methods/techniques of teaching of English in EFL/ESL classrooms. In today’s modern learning scenario, it is believed that appropriate utilization of sophisticated tools of e-learning has generally been recommended in order to yield best possible results in a given situation. It is found that many students are found indifferent towards learning the target language (English. Different reasons are attributed to this situation. However, in order to overcome learning difficulties and motivate the concerned learners it is suggested that the students should be well involved in the teaching/learning activities. Online resources in particular can catch the attention of even a passive learner. While ascertaining the effectiveness of e-learning in general, the following aspects were also taken into account: relevance of e-learning, utilization of e-resource, e-training for the teachers etc. The effectiveness has been measured on account of the observation, responses of the questionnaires, experiment on the sample. The findings of the study are hopefully going to be effective and useful in the current practice of teaching English. Keywords: Teaching, E-learning, online learning, pedagogues, linguists, resource utilization, e-training

  5. What explains the American disadvantage in health compared with the English? The case of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, James; Kumari, Meena; Smith, James P; Zaninotto, Paola

    2012-03-01

    Middle-aged and older American men and women have almost twice the rate of diabetes of men and women in England. This differential was not explained by conventional risk factors including age, smoking, social position and body mass index (BMI). This study used large and representative samples of non-minority adults aged 52-85 years taken from the 1999-2006 American National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the 2004 English Longitudinal Study of Aging. The surveys contain self-reported and objective biological disease markers of diabetes as well as indicators of major risk factors for diabetes including anthropometric measures of BMI, height and waist circumference. The older American population has much higher rates of diabetes than the English population-a differential not yet explained, but this population also has higher waist circumference at each level of BMI than does the equivalent group in England. By controlling for such waist circumference differences and allowing for different effects of waist on diabetes in each country, approximately three-quarters of the country differences for women and 38% among men can be explained. Higher rates of diabetes in the US old-age population than in England were largely accounted for by raised waist circumference and not BMI differences, especially among women. In addition, elevated diabetes risk associated with higher waist circumference in the USA as opposed to England could arise as a result of a number of different mechanisms. Investigation of the relative importance of such mechanisms is an important topic for further study.

  6. A Development English Language Learning Management Strategies Model to Enhance Communicative Competence for High School Students

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    Thitiya Ruennakarn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives for this research are to 1 build a development English language learning management strategies model to enhance communicative competence for high school students 2 study the results of using the model. A target group is seven English teachers in Pibulwittayalai School and the sample for studying the results of model to students are ten English club students in Pibulwittayalai School.The research tools are focus group discussion forms, communication plans, English skills evaluation forms, communicative competence test, communicative competence evaluation forms and 21st century skills evaluation forms. This model is examined by connoisseurship.The statistics for analyzing data are frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation and Wilcoxon test. The results of the research were as follows: 1. The development English language learning management strategies model to enhance communicative competence for high school students had4components ; 1 SWOT–Analysis, 2 strategy development, 3 strategy assessment and 4 strategy adjustment.This model had 6 strategies such as 1 genius academic strategy 2 English through AEC 3 English through World Class 4 enhancing for genius academic in communication with foreigners 5 enhancing English through world class standard and 6 enhancing for potential in English skills learning through world class standard. These were merged as only one strategy as “ Development of students’ potential for communication”. 2. The results of using the model comprised of 2.1 The results to teachers were teachers could analyze SWOT- analysis for determining strength, weakness,opportunity and threat about English language learning management, received guideline and could appropriately and efficiently construct strategies of English language learning management to enhance communicative competence. 2.2 The results to students: The students had 4 English skills, such as listening,speaking, reading and writing. It was

  7. A Model of Communicative Teaching and Learning of English Vocabulary Through Interactive Actin vities

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    Sahraini Sahraini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Teaching English vocabulary is very important, and it is more than just presenting and introducing new vocabulary to the students. Knowing words is not only memorizing them, but the students need to understand the meaning of the word in context and how the words are used. This can be achieved through correct vocabulary instruction which should involve vocabulary selection, word knowledge, and techniques. The needs of prospective teachers in mastering English both spoken and written, and the ability to teach using English as the language of instruction in the teaching and learning process in the classroom is very important. They also need the skills to teach English effectively and enjoyable to make the students have confident to use English communicatively. Deciding an interesting method for students is also an English teachers’ job to do. In this paper the writer tries to design a model of teaching and learning of English vocabulary through interactive activities. By using a lot of interactive activities, hopefully the students are able to practice to communicate by using English in oral and written.

  8. Integrating self-regulated learning and discovery learning into English lesson plan

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    Sayukti Ni Kadek Heny

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion of learner-centeredness has been embedded in the National Curriculum of Indonesia, 2013 Curriculum. However, most of the teachers seem to be hardly acquainted with the concept of Self-Regulated Learning (SRL and discovery learning in the lesson planning. Considering the phenomenon, this study intends to explore the concept of Self-Regulated Learning in the lesson plan of English subject for a tenth-grade level by employing a qualitative design with data obtained from a teacher-made lesson plan and a semi-structured interview. The researcher used content analysis to analyze the lesson plan. Meanwhile, the qualitative data from interview result were preceded through a coding sheet and transcribed modified figure. The findings revealed an integration of SRL cyclical phase and discovery learning in the teacher-made lesson plan. Based on the discussion, the results need to be applied in a considerably large context, in order to see thoroughly dynamic integration between Self-Regulated Learning model, lesson planning and the concept of learner autonomy.

  9. The Effect of Scaffolded Think-Group-Share Learning on Indonesian Elementary Schooler Satisfaction and Learning Achievement in English Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantik, Octavia; Choi, Hee Jun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether or not "Scaffolded Think-Group-Share" learning can have a positive effect on student satisfaction and learning achievement in English classes of an Indonesian elementary school. To achieve this purpose, this study compared the findings from the two dependent variables (i.e., student…

  10. Foreign language learning as a complex dynamic process: A microgenetic case study of a Chinese child's English learning trajectory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, He; Steinkrauss, Rasmus; van der Steen, Steffie; Cox, Ralf; de Bot, Kees

    2016-01-01

    The current study focuses on one child's (male, 3 years old) learning behaviors in an English as a Foreign Language classroom, and explores the coordination and developmental patterns of his nonverbal (gestures and body language) and verbal (verbal repetition and verbal responses) learning behaviors

  11. Moving Bravely towards Mobile Learning: Iranian Students' Use of Mobile Devices for Learning English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtestani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, students have shown growing interest in mobile learning and the use of mobile devices for learning English as a foreign language (EFL). However, it appears that further research needs to be undertaken to identify students' use of mobile devices and their attitudes towards them, especially in developing countries. To achieve this…

  12. An Analysis of Social Network Websites for Language Learning: Implications for Teaching and Learning English as a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M.; Abe, K.; Cao, M. W.; Liu, S.; Ok, D. U.; Park, J.; Parrish, C.; Sardegna, V. G.

    2015-01-01

    Although educators are excited about the potential of social network sites for language learning (SNSLL), there is a lack of understanding of how SNSLL can be used to facilitate teaching and learning for English as Second language (ESL) instructors and students. The purpose of this study was to examine the affordances of four selected SNSLL…

  13. Learning English as a Second Language at the University Level in Jordan: Motivation, Self-Regulation and Learning Environment Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzubaidi, Eman; Aldridge, Jill M.; Khine, Myint Swe

    2016-01-01

    The overarching aim of this study was to investigate students' perceptions of the learning environment and whether these influenced their motivation and self-regulation in learning English as a second language at the university level in Jordan. Our sample involved 994 students, drawn from 13 schools, within three faculties (humanities, health…

  14. The Pedagogical, Linguistic, and Content Features of Popular English Language Learning Websites in China: A Framework for Analysis and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, Margaret; Yuan, Yifeng; Luke, Allan; Ewing, Robyn; Shen, Huizhong

    2012-01-01

    As increasing numbers of Chinese language learners choose to learn English online, there is a need to investigate popular websites and their language learning designs. This paper reports on the first stage of a study that analyzed the pedagogical, linguistic, and content features of 25 Chinese English Language Learning (ELL) websites ranked…

  15. Flipping the Classroom for English Language Learners to Foster Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hsiu-Ting

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a structured attempt to integrate flip teaching into language classrooms using a WebQuest active learning strategy. The purpose of this study is to examine the possible impacts of flipping the classroom on English language learners' academic performance, learning attitudes, and participation levels. Adopting a…

  16. A Blended Learning Model for Teaching Reading in English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkour, Islam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a blended learning model to be used in Egyptian schools when teaching reading classes in English as a foreign language. This paper is divided into three parts. The first part outlines the Egyptian context and describes the target learners. The second part describes the suggested blended learning model, which is…

  17. Effects of Semantic Ambiguity Detection Training on Reading Comprehension Achievement of English Learners with Learning Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozwik, Sara L.; Douglas, Karen H.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how explicit instruction in semantic ambiguity detection affected the reading comprehension and metalinguistic awareness of five English learners (ELs) with learning difficulties (e.g., attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, specific learning disability). A multiple probe across participants design (Gast & Ledford, 2010)…

  18. Chinese Students' Goal Orientation in English Learning: A Study Based on Autonomous Inquiry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Goal orientation is a kind of theory of learning motivation, which helps learners to develop their capability by emphasis on new techniques acquiring and environment adapting. In this study, based on the autonomous inquiry model, the construction of Chinese students' goal orientations in English learning are summarized according to the data…

  19. An Insight into Secondary School Students' Beliefs Regarding Learning English Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Fakhra; Quraishi, Uzma

    2017-01-01

    The present descriptive study aimed to get an insight into secondary school students' beliefs regarding English language learning. The survey method was employed for obtaining data from the secondary school students (N = 664). A modified version of "beliefs about language learning inventory" was used to collect data. Five out of nine…

  20. Self-Efficacy, Attitudes, and Choice of Strategies for English Pronunciation Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardegna, Veronica G.; Lee, Juhee; Kusey, Crystal

    2018-01-01

    This article proposes a structural model of English language learners' self-efficacy beliefs, attitudes toward learning pronunciation skills, and choice of pronunciation learning strategies. Participants' responses (N = 704) to two self-reported questionnaires--Strategies for Pronunciation Improvement (SPI) inventory and Learner Attitudes for…

  1. Using "Quipper" as an Online Platform for Teaching and Learning English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyono, Herri

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates the affordability of "Quipper" as an online platform for teaching and learning English as a foreign language (EFL). It focuses on the extent to which features available in "Quipper" may correspond to fundamental components of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) pedagogy, as suggested by Chapelle…

  2. A Learning Experience of the Gender Perspective in English Teaching Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Claudia Patricia; Castañeda-Peña, Harold

    2017-01-01

    Eighteen Colombian English teachers participated in a course with an emphasis on gender and foreign language teaching in a Master's program in Bogotá. This text describes the design, implementation, and the learning in this educational experience. The analysis of the course was based on a view of learning as a process of participation rooted in…

  3. Visual Learning: A Learner Centered Approach to Enhance English Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philominraj, Andrew; Jeyabalan, David; Vidal-Silva, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This article presents an empirical study carried out among the students of higher secondary schools to find out how English language learning occurs naturally in an environment where learners are encouraged by an appropriate method such as visual learning. The primary data was collected from 504 students with different pretested questionnaires. A…

  4. An Evaluative Study of Some Online Websites for Learning and Teaching English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Mahsoub Abdul-Sadeq

    2008-01-01

    Although there are many websites designed and published on the Internet for learning and teaching English, little use of them is done by both Egyptian EFL teachers and students. The textbook is usually their main concern and focus. That is why the present study draws more light on the importance of language teaching and learning websites and…

  5. Reflections of the Role of Motivation on Learning English for Successful College EFL Learners in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Mei; Cheng, Tsui-Ping

    2012-01-01

    While a number of studies have investigated the relationship between motivation and foreign or second language learning outcomes, the process of how such motivation transforms into successful learning outcomes is relatively unexplored. Interviewing a group of four participants, this study seeks to understand how college English as a Foreign…

  6. Perceived Convenience in an Extended Technology Acceptance Model: Mobile Technology and English Learning for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Yan, Chi-Fang; Tseng, Ju-Shih

    2012-01-01

    Since convenience is one of the features for mobile learning, does it affect attitude and intention of using mobile technology? The technology acceptance model (TAM), proposed by David (1989), was extended with perceived convenience in the present study. With regard to English language mobile learning, the variables in the extended TAM and its…

  7. Motivation Management of Project-Based Learning for Business English Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqin

    2016-01-01

    The paper finds out poor engagement in business English training program prevents adult learners at College of Continuing Education of Guangdong University of Foreign Studies from improving their communication skills. PBL (Project-Based Learning) is proposed to motivate adult learners to get involved with learning a lot. Based on the perspective…

  8. Students' Motivation and Learning and Teachers' Motivational Strategies in English Classrooms in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibulphol, Jutarat

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate second language learners' motivation and learning of English and the ways in which the teachers supported the students' motivation and learning in natural classroom settings. Based on Self-Determination Theory (SDT), questionnaires were developed and data were collected from students and their teachers in twelve…

  9. An Empirical Analysis of Chinese College Learners' Obstacles to MOOC Learning in an English Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liangxing

    2017-01-01

    This article reports a study applying an exploratory factor analysis to discovering the underlying factor structure of Chinese college students' obstacles to learning MOOC in an English context. Seven obstacle factors are identified: 1. academic and language skills; 2. internet skills; 3. course instruction/management; 4. learning motivations; 5.…

  10. Problems and advantages of applying the e-learning model to the teaching of English

    OpenAIRE

    Shaparenko, А.; Golikova, А.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we mention some potential and noted problems and advantages of applying the e-learning model to the teaching of English. In the area of foreign language teaching a lot has been done, but there are constant attempts for new solutions. Another option for e-learning is a hybrid course.

  11. COGNITIVE LEARNING STRATEGIES OF NON-ENGLISH DEPARTMENT STUDENTS ON NOUN STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shierly Novalita Yappy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Learning English for non-English department students is not as easy as it seems. Besides, as much as it is necessary to know how successful learners learn, not less important is to know how less successful learners learn. Using think aloud method, this study aims at finding out the cognitive strategies used by the engineering department students in answering incorrectly problems on TOEFL noun structure-the grammar point in which students made the most errors. Findings uncover the students' strategies and reasoning upon which pedagogical implications can be put forth so that more effective and fruitful instruction can be tailored.

  12. EIGHT KEYS BEFORE LEARNING TO SPEAK ENGLISH: (A Proposal for Motivating EFL Speaking Learners in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Wafi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Being able to speak English fluently is as measuring rod for someone who is said to be good at English. In Indonesian context, English is still as foreign language and this becomes problem for them who want to learn it. The problem could be caused by the difficulty of the English itself, the learners’ personality and the process in learning it. There are ample solutions to deal with those difficulties; however, the writer provides a solution as a proposal for motivating the learners; there are 8 keys to be possessed by the learners before they learn to speak English. They are (1 Listen up, (2 be good at imitating, (3 use the mouth, (4 check the voice, (5 have the motion, (6 smile, (7 thank God, and (8 love. The solution is as inner drive or  instrinsic motivation for the learners and it can also be used by the teachers, tutors and lecturers as reference for motivatingthe learners in learning or in mastering English speaking.

  13. Intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and learning English as a foreign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikholeslami, Razieh; Khayyer, Mohammad

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationships of amotivation, extrinsic motivation, and intrinsic motivation with learning the English language. The 230 Iranian students at Shiraz University were tested using the Language Learning Orientations Scales to measure Amotivation, Extrinsic Motivation, and Intrinsic Motivation as explanatory variables. Grade point average in English exams was selected as a measure of English learning Achievement. Multiple regression analysis revealed that learning Achievement scores were predicted by scores on the Amotivation subscale, Introjected Regulation subscale, Knowledge subscale, and Stimulation subscale, whereas, the External and Identified Regulation and Accomplishment subscales did not have a significant relationship with Achievement. The results are discussed in terms of differences in Iranian context and culture.

  14. Using Personal Portable Devices as Learning Tools in the English Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Edith Herrera Díaz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A group of university students used a variety of personal portable devices (cellphones, tablets, laptops, and netbooks which distracted them in English class. This qualitative action research aimed to implement activities entailing the use of such devices and to learn their impact on students’ learning and the use of English in class. Thus, a series of applications was used to promote the use of these devices for the benefit of the English as a Foreign Language class. These applications included a learning management system that resembled a social network, a live interaction application, and an online dictionary. It was found that students were able to productively use these devices as learning tools plus they expressed comfort and interest in using them.

  15. Informal learning in SME majors for African American female undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezella McPherson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates how eight undergraduate African American women in science, math, and engineering (SME majors accessed cultural capital and informal science learning opportunities from preschool to college. It uses the multiple case study methodological approach and cultural capital as the framework to better understand their opportunities to engage in free-choice science learning. The article demonstrates that African American women have access to cultural capital and informal science learning inside and outside of home and school environments in P-16 settings. In primary and secondary schools, African American girls acquire cultural capital and access to free-choice science learning in the home environment, museums, science fairs, student organizations and clubs. However, in high school African American female teenagers have fewer informal science learning opportunities like those such as those provided in primary school settings. In college, cultural capital is transmitted through informal science learning that consisted of involvement in student organizations, research projects, seminars, and conferences. These experiences contributed to their engagement and persistence in SME fields in K-16 settings. This research adds to cultural capital and informal science learning research by allowing scholars to better understand how African American women have opportunities to learn about the hidden curriculum of science through informal science settings throughout the educational pipeline.

  16. The effect of the integration of talking toys on preschoolers’ vocabulary learning in English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Güngör

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate conditions and suitable materials can inspire young children to learn a new language effortlessly. The present study attempted to investigate the effects of English talking toys as teaching materials on vocabulary learning of very young learners (VYL based on their gender. The study was conducted at one of the public preschools in Yenimahalle/Ankara with 48 five-year old children from two classes. The first group of students was the experimental group and they were instructed using English talking toys as a teaching material. On the other hand, the other class was the control group and was instructed using flashcards. The target vocabulary for this study, which was incorporated into a Vocabulary Checklist Test, was developed after a close scrutiny of the relevant literature (i.e. vocabulary learning in young learners and examination of the theme-related curriculum employed in the chosen preschool. To assess preschoolers' learning of target words in English, a new Vocabulary Checklist Test was developed by the researcher. The results of a series of t-tests showed that the class instructed with English talking toys performed better on both receptive and expressive/productive vocabulary. The results also indicated that there was not any significant difference between males and females in terms of the effect of English talking toys on preschool children's vocabulary learning. The findings suggest that English talking toys are not only used for entertainment and recreational purposes, they can also be used as teaching material particularly when it comes to teaching basic English vocabulary. The current study contributed to areas such as early childhood education, foreign/second language learning, foreign language testing and evaluation.

  17. Informal learning in SME majors for African American female undergraduates

    OpenAIRE

    Ezella McPherson

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates how eight undergraduate African American women in science, math, and engineering (SME) majors accessed cultural capital and informal science learning opportunities from preschool to college. It uses the multiple case study methodological approach and cultural capital as the framework to better understand their opportunities to engage in free-choice science learning. The article demonstrates that African American women have access to cultural capital and informal sci...

  18. Gaming as an English language learning resource among young children in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Signe Hannibal

    2017-01-01

    written English input are significantly related to vocabulary scores, in particular for boys. By investigating the EE-habits of YELLs and relations with second language (L2) English vocabulary learning, this study adds valuable new insights and knowledge about a topic that is becoming increasingly......This article presents a study of Danish young English language learners’ (YELLs’) contact with and use of Extramural English (EE) (N = 107, aged 8 [n = 49] and 10 [n = 58]). They have received little formal English instruction: two lessons per week for one year. Data on EE-habits were collected...... with a one-week language diary (self-report with parental guidance). Participants reported minutes spent each day on seven EE-activities: gaming, listening to music, reading, talking, watching television, writing, and other. Vocabulary proficiency scores were obtained using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary...

  19. English Orthographic Learning in Chinese-L1 Young EFL Beginners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Lin

    2017-12-01

    English orthographic learning, among Chinese-L1 children who were beginning to learn English as a foreign language, was documented when: (1) only visual memory was at their disposal, (2) visual memory and either some letter-sound knowledge or some semantic information was available, and (3) visual memory, some letter-sound knowledge and some semantic information were all available. When only visual memory was available, orthographic learning (measured via an orthographic choice test) was meagre. Orthographic learning was significant when either semantic information or letter-sound knowledge supplemented visual memory, with letter-sound knowledge generating greater significance. Although the results suggest that letter-sound knowledge plays a more important role than semantic information, letter-sound knowledge alone does not suffice to achieve perfect orthographic learning, as orthographic learning was greatest when letter-sound knowledge and semantic information were both available. The present findings are congruent with a view that the orthography of a foreign language drives its orthographic learning more than L1 orthographic learning experience, thus extending Share's (Cognition 55:151-218, 1995) self-teaching hypothesis to include non-alphabetic L1 children's orthographic learning of an alphabetic foreign language. The little letter-sound knowledge development observed in the experiment-I control group indicates that very little letter-sound knowledge develops in the absence of dedicated letter-sound training. Given the important role of letter-sound knowledge in English orthographic learning, dedicated letter-sound instruction is highly recommended.

  20. The Relationship between the Agreeableness Trait and Use of the English Language Learning Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Fazeli

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: The present study aims to find out the relationship between the Agreeableness trait and use of the English Language Learning Strategies (ELLSs for learners of English as a foreign language.Method: Four instruments were used, which were Persian adapted Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL, A Background Questionnaire, NEO-Five Factors Inventory (NEO-FFI, and Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL. Two hundred and thirteen Iranian female university level learners of English language as a university major in Iran, were volunteer to participate in this research work. The intact classes were chosen.Findings and Results: The results show that there is only a significant relationship between the Agreeableness trait and the use of one of six categories of ELLSs (i.e. Compensation Strategies.

  1. Learning Science and English: How School Reform Advances Scientific Learning for Limited English Proficient Middle School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Minicucci, Catherine

    1996-01-01

    This article presents findings from the School Reform and Student Diversity Study, a 4-year project to locate and analyze schools offering exemplary science and mathematics programs to middle school students with limited proficiency in English. In contrast to the vast majority of schools, the four schools described in this article give these students access to stimulating science and mathematics curricula by instructing them either in the students' primary language or in English using shelter...

  2. Saudi high school students' attitudes and barriers toward the use of computer technologies in learning English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabti, Ahmed Abdulateef; Chaichan, Rasha Sami

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the attitudes of Saudi Arabian high school students toward the use of computer technologies in learning English. The study also discusses the possible barriers that affect and limit the actual usage of computers. Quantitative approach is applied in this research, which involved 30 Saudi Arabia students of a high school in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The respondents comprised 15 males and 15 females with ages between 16 years and 18 years. Two instruments, namely, Scale of Attitude toward Computer Technologies (SACT) and Barriers affecting Students' Attitudes and Use (BSAU) were used to collect data. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) of Davis (1989) was utilized. The analysis of the study revealed gender differences in attitudes toward the use of computer technologies in learning English. Female students showed high and positive attitudes towards the use of computer technologies in learning English than males. Both male and female participants demonstrated high and positive perception of Usefulness and perceived Ease of Use of computer technologies in learning English. Three barriers that affected and limited the use of computer technologies in learning English were identified by the participants. These barriers are skill, equipment, and motivation. Among these barriers, skill had the highest effect, whereas motivation showed the least effect.

  3. Strategies for Better Learning of English Grammar: Chinese vs. Thais

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supakorn, Patnarin; Feng, Min; Limmun, Wanida

    2018-01-01

    The success of language learning significantly depends on multiple sets of complex factors; among these are language-learning strategies of which learners in different countries may show different preferences. Needed areas of language learning strategy research include, among others, the strategy of grammar learning and the context-based approach…

  4. Interrogating the Teaching and Learning of English in Nigeria: Still in Search of an Enabling Principle

    OpenAIRE

    Ugwuanyi, Kingsley; Chukwu, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    With the understanding that effective communication is the central goal in any second language situation, this paper examines how best to achieve this in the light of the current curriculum for the teaching of English in Nigeria. The way the English language is taught at all the levels of education in Nigeria leaves a lot to be desired, and therefore does not hold a promise of actualising the very end of language teaching and learning, which is the development of learners’ communicative compe...

  5. Learning English Idioms through Reading in an LMS: Etymological Notes versus Pictorial Support

    OpenAIRE

    Demiröz, Hakan; Çekiç, Ahmet; Bakla, Arif

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to compare the effectiveness of definition + etymological notes versus definition + pictorial support on the learning of English idioms through reading online texts with hyperlinks to definitions. 121 Turkish learners of English as a foreign language assigned to two different courses were given a vocabulary knowledge scale, revealing that the idioms were unfamiliar to the learners. Participants in both groups read 17 passages with definitions as hyperlink annotations for 18 id...

  6. Integrating ICT in English Language Learning: Students’ Perceptions of a State University in Jambi Province

    OpenAIRE

    Oktalia, Dwi; Ngadiso, Ngadiso; Supriyadi, Slamet

    2018-01-01

    This research was done in order to know students‘ perception toward integrating ICT in English Language Learning and also to find out problem that may faced by students during the ICT integration. This research used quantitative method in order to describe students‘ perception toward the use of ICT in ELL. This research involved English students from a state university in Jambi province as the respondents. The data were collected by using questionnaires adapted from Chutopama (2004). The ques...

  7. The Sounds of Picturebooks for English Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teresa Fleta Guillén

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Picturebooks have long been recognised to aid language development in both first and second language acquisition. This paper investigates the relevance of the acoustic elements of picturebooks to raise phonological awareness and to fine-tune listening. In order to enhance the learners’ aural and oral skills for English language development, the paper proposes that listening to stories from picturebooks plays a most important role for raising awareness of the sound system of English in child second-language learners. To provide practical advice for teachers of young learners, this article describes the ways that picturebooks promote listening and speaking and develops criteria to select picturebooks for English instruction focusing on the acoustic elements of language.

  8. SECOND LANGUAGE LEARNERS’ ATTITUDES AND STRATEGIES IN LEARNING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Istiyani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on comparison of learner’s attitude and strategies in learning En- glish between the high and low achievers. The qualitative descriptive analytic method is implemented in this study. The 10 ninth graders of MTs Darul Ulum Bandungharjo were chosen as the subject of the study and questionnaires are used as the research instru- ment. The study found that the high and low achievement students had positive atti- tudes towards community, people who speak English, and English in general. However, there was differences between high and low achiever’s attitudes towards English. The high-achievement students argued that they prefered English than other subjects. On the other hand, the low-achievement students disagreed with the statement. This condi- tion showed that attitude was personal. Morever, the strategies were differ from the high and low achievement student. The study found that the high-achievement students used cognitive and metacognitive strategies to improve their ability in English. How- ever, the low-achievement students used only some of cognitive strategies in learning English. As a summary, cognitive and metacognitive strategies accompanied by posi- tive attitude and motivation influenced the learners’ achievements of English skills.

  9. The Effect of Task-based Teaching on Incidental Vocabulary Learning in English for Specific Purposes

    OpenAIRE

    FALLAHRAFIE, Zahra; RAHMANY, Ramin; SADEGHI, Bahador

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Learning vocabulary is an essential part of language learning linking the four skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing together. This paper considers the incidental vocabulary teaching and learning within the framework of task-based activities in the hope of improving learners’ vocabulary acquiring in English for Specific Purposes courses (ESP), concentrating on Mechanical Engineering students at Islamic Azad University of Hashtgerd, Iran. A total number of 55 male and fe...

  10. An Investigation Into The Learning Styles, English Proficiency And Assessment Performance Of Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Toh Peng Yeow; Mark Kiak Min TAN; Li-Cher LOH; Julia BLITZ

    2010-01-01

    Appreciation of learning styles can be of use tohelp both educators and students to enhance theeffectiveness of an educational experience. It has beennoticed that some students at this College are not verygood at expressing themselves in either written orspoken English. Our study aimed to identify thestudent’s learning styles; assess whether there isany correlation between learning style, baselinedemographic data and self rated proficiency in Englishlanguage; and assess their associations wit...

  11. Creativity in the English Class: Activities to Promote EFL Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán A. Avila

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a pedagogical intervention that includes a set of creative activities designed to improve the oral and written production of students in the English classroom, especially those who have shown a lack of interest or attention. It was observed that participants initially seemed careless about studying the language. Eventually they responded to the proposed methods positively and were more willing and motivated to participate in chain games, creative writing, and screenwriting exercises. The activities helped develop the students’ fluency in both oral and written production and improved their understanding of English grammar and structure.

  12. Use of Computer-Based Learning Multimedia at English Departement of Universitas Sembilanbelas November Kolaka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadaruddin Kadaruddin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to help the students of the English Study Program in Universitas Sembilanbelas November improve their English proficiency, the researcher used computer-based learning multimedia. The objective of the treatment was to overcome the students’ low performance in English by creating an enjoyable atmosphere. To investigate how computer-based learning multimedia improve the students’ English students’performance at the English Study Program of Universitas Sembilanbelas November, the researcher adopted Plomp’s (1997 development method which consists of five steps; namely, preliminary investigation; planning; realization/construction; test, evaluation, and revision; and implementation. Based on the results of this research, it can be concluded that in order to improve the English ability of students, it will need to be presented in the form of activities that are more creative and innovative. One is through the use of computer-based learning multimedia. This has been done in order to provide a more attractive presentation of the material and relevant to the conditions and characteristics of the students.

  13. Developing Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning: The American Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Maurice J.; Moceri, Dominic C.

    2012-01-01

    Developments in American policy, research and professional development to promote social and emotional learning in schools have drawn on work carried out by the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), encouraged by the popular and political catalyst of Daniel Goleman's work on emotional intelligence. Based on CASEL's…

  14. Enhancing Integrative Motivation: The Japanese-American Collaborative Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Fumie

    2016-01-01

    The Collaborative Learning Project is a language exchange program in which American and Japanese university students have the opportunity to interact with native speakers over the course of a three-week period. This paper reports the outcomes of the Collaborative Learning Project in terms of its effectiveness in fulfilling student expectations and…

  15. Character Values and Their Internalization in Teaching and Learning English at Madrasah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Islami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Language is more than to express the ideas, believe, and thought or as intellectual based, it also expresses the norms, values, and even emotions. As the result, it is important to internalize the character values into the teaching and learning activity of English. Since the focus of this study was on the analysis of the internalization of character values without any experimental or manipulated settings involved, the design of this study was qualitative. The results showed that there were at least six character values performed by the students in learning English, they were independent, hardworking ethos, curiosity, democratic attitude, communicative manner, and reading interest. In addition, the character values were internalized by the English teacher into the process of teaching and learning even though she did not realize it.

  16. University Students’ Perceptions of Their Failures in Learning English as a Foreign Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen YILMAZ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate university students' perceived failure attributions in learning English as a foreign language at a preparatory school. The participants were 118 undergraduate students who failed at the end of a preparatory year and had to attend the repeat program. Each participant was asked to write about their perceived causes of failure in learning English. Students' responses were analyzed based on Weiner's (1983, 1985 Attribution Theory, and the emerging themes were linked to the locus of control, stability and controllability dimensions. The qualitative nature of the study provided in-depth information about the content of each dimension. The results suggest that students mostly attributed their academic failure in learning English to external and uncontrollable factors, which are in line with the findings of similar studies conducted in other university settings.

  17. Young Learners' Attitudes and Motivation to Learn English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmali, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    According to recent modifications in Turkish educational system, English language teaching starts in the second grade. Young learners studying in this grade were in the focus in this study. This paper reported on the findings of a mixed method study conducted in three different primary schools in the west of Turkey. The main aim was to represent…

  18. Vowel change across three age groups of speakers in three regional varieties of American English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, Ewa; Fox, Robert A.; Salmons, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This acoustic study examines sound (vowel) change in apparent time across three successive generations of 123 adult female speakers ranging in age from 20 to 65 years old, representing three regional varieties of American English, typical of western North Carolina, central Ohio and southeastern Wisconsin. A set of acoustic measures characterized the dynamic nature of formant trajectories, the amount of spectral change over the course of vowel duration and the position of the spectral centroid. The study found a set of systematic changes to /I, ε, æ/ including positional changes in the acoustic space (mostly lowering of the vowels) and significant variation in formant dynamics (increased monophthongization). This common sound change is evident in both emphatic (articulated clearly) and nonemphatic (casual) productions and occurs regardless of dialect-specific vowel dispersions in the vowel space. The cross-generational and cross-dialectal patterns of variation found here support an earlier report by Jacewicz, Fox, and Salmons (2011) which found this recent development in these three dialect regions in isolated citation-form words. While confirming the new North American Shift in different styles of production, the study underscores the importance of addressing the stress-related variation in vowel production in a careful and valid assessment of sound change. PMID:22125350

  19. Influences of Social and Style Variables on Adult Usage of African American English Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Holly K.; Grogger, Jeffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In this study, the authors examined the influences of selected social (gender, employment status, educational achievement level) and style variables (race of examiner, interview topic) on the production of African American English (AAE) by adults. Method Participants were 50 African American men and women, ages 20–30 years. The authors used Rapid and Anonymous Survey (RAS) methods to collect responses to questions on informal situational and formal message-oriented topics in a short interview with an unacquainted interlocutor. Results Results revealed strong systematic effects for academic achievement, but not gender or employment status. Most features were used less frequently by participants with higher educational levels, but sharp declines in the usage of 5 specific features distinguished the participants differing in educational achievement. Strong systematic style effects were found for the 2 types of questions, but not race of addressee. The features that were most commonly used across participants—copula absence, variable subject–verb agreement, and appositive pronouns—were also the features that showed the greatest style shifting. Conclusions The findings lay a foundation with mature speakers for rate-based and feature inventory methods recently shown to be informative for the study of child AAE and demonstrate the benefits of the RAS. PMID:22361105

  20. An acoustical study of English word stress produced by Americans and Koreans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Byunggon

    2002-05-01

    Acoustical correlates of stress can be divided into duration, intensity, and fundamental frequency. This study examined the acoustical difference in the first two syllables of stressed English words produced by ten American and Korean speakers. The Korean subjects scored very high in TOEFL. They read, at a normal speed, a fable from which the acoustical parameters of eight words were analyzed. In order to make the data comparison meaningful, each parameter was collected at 100 dynamic time points proportional to the total duration of the two syllables. Then, the ratio of the parameter sum of the first rime to that of the second rime was calculated to determine the relative prominence of the syllables. Results showed that the durations of the first two syllables were almost comparable between the Americans and Koreans. However, statistically significant differences showed up in the diphthong pronunciations and in the words with the second syllable stressed. Also, remarkably high r-squared values were found between pairs of the three acoustical parameters, which suggests that either one or a combination of two or more parameters may account for the prominence of a syllable within a word. [Work supported by Korea Science Foundation R01-1999-00229.

  1. Vowel change across three age groups of speakers in three regional varieties of American English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, Ewa; Fox, Robert A; Salmons, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    This acoustic study examines sound (vowel) change in apparent time across three successive generations of 123 adult female speakers ranging in age from 20 to 65 years old, representing three regional varieties of American English, typical of western North Carolina, central Ohio and southeastern Wisconsin. A set of acoustic measures characterized the dynamic nature of formant trajectories, the amount of spectral change over the course of vowel duration and the position of the spectral centroid. The study found a set of systematic changes to /I, ε, æ/ including positional changes in the acoustic space (mostly lowering of the vowels) and significant variation in formant dynamics (increased monophthongization). This common sound change is evident in both emphatic (articulated clearly) and nonemphatic (casual) productions and occurs regardless of dialect-specific vowel dispersions in the vowel space. The cross-generational and cross-dialectal patterns of variation found here support an earlier report by Jacewicz, Fox, and Salmons (2011) which found this recent development in these three dialect regions in isolated citation-form words. While confirming the new North American Shift in different styles of production, the study underscores the importance of addressing the stress-related variation in vowel production in a careful and valid assessment of sound change.

  2. mLearning Scaffolding Model for Undergraduate English Language Learning: Bridging Formal and Informal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Muhammad Ridhuan Tony Lim; Hussin, Zaharah; Asra; Zakaria, Abd Razak

    2013-01-01

    Learning using mobile devices also known as mLearning is the current buzz word in the present debates over the use of technology in education. Although mLearning has a high prospect for future education, it is yet to be

  3. THE IMPACT OF SMARTPHONE AND INTERNET USAGE ON ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNING

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    Rosina Fransisca J. Lekawael

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available English language skills here mean the development of the main parts or elements of the language which include speaking, listening, reading, and writing. English language subject has different educational tools that are likely suited with it. Smartphone and internet usage have actively influence daily life, even for children and adolescents. In learning activity, smartphone is a tool to help students connected to be online. A qualitative approach was pursued in this study. Then, the data collection technique used in this study is a survey by using questionnaires. As result, the research shows that most students spend much time to access the social network, some students access internet for dictionary and games, and only a few students access internet for education purposes. In short, the students rather to use smartphone for other thing than education. Therefore, English language learning should be focused on leading language teaching by using English resources from smartphone and internet, as media, which closed to students. By using smartphone and internet, it is expected that either teacher or students become more active and creative to explore their knowledge through media. Pedagogically, there is an urgent need for teachers to implement smartphone-based language learning in order to engage students to be critics with material and its content. So, it enables students to build and enhance a technology awareness of smartphone and internet usage on English language learning in classroom.

  4. The Influence of Pronunciation Learning Strategies on Mastering English Vowels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokoszewska, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the role of strategies in learning the pronunciation of the target language. First, an outline of various general classifications of language learning strategies is provided. Next, pronunciation learning strategies are defined and their various taxonomies are presented. This is followed by the description of the study…

  5. Malaysian Gifted Students' Use of English Language Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Melor Md; Sulaiman, Nur Ainil; Embi, Mohammed Amin

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have been done on language learning strategies employed by different type of learners and in various contexts. However, very little studies have been done on gifted students regarding language learning. Gifted students have unique characteristics and have different ways of thinking and learning. These characteristics affect how they…

  6. Learning English Vocabulary in a Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL Environment: A Sociocultural Study of Migrant Women

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    Kham Sila Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a case study of a group of six non-native English speaking migrant women’s experiences learning English vocabulary in a mobile assisted language learning (MALL environment at a small community centre in Western Australia. A sociocultural approach to learning vocabulary was adopted in designing the MALL lessons that the women undertook. The women provided demographic information, responded to questions in a pre-MALL semi-structured interview, attended the MALL lessons, and completed a post-MALL semi-structured interview. This study explores the sociocultural factors that affect migrant women’s language learning in general, and vocabulary in particular. The women’s responses to MALL lessons and using the tablet reveal a positive effect in their vocabulary learning.

  7. Affordances of telecollaboration tools for English for Specific Purposes online learning

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    Ana Sevilla-Pavón

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores students’ perceptions of the affordances of different telecollaboration tools used in an innovation project for English for Specific Purposes online learning carried out between the University of Valencia (Spain and Wofford College (South Carolina, United States during the school year 2015-2016. Different tools for synchronous and asynchronous communication were used. The asynchronous tools included a discussion forum, a wiki, social networking websites and Google forms; while the tools used for synchronous communication were text, voice and video chat, videoconferencing tools and Google Drive. All the tools were accessible through the online platform used in the project, Google+. By using these tools, students from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean carried out a number of activities and tasks through online telecollaborative methods, involving both synchronous and asynchronous communication. The tasks completed by students through the use of the different tools were aimed at fostering distance online collaboration among American and Spanish students for the development of their linguistic, intercultural and digital literacies.

  8. Cyberl@b: a platform for learning english in Costa Rican public high schools

    OpenAIRE

    Allen Quesada Pacheco

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: This paper covers the design and development of a noncommercial software for learning and practicing English called CyberL@b. It was developed at the School of Modern Languages at the University of Costa Rica. Its target population focuses on 7th, 8th and 9th graders at six public high schools in diverse urban and rural settings in Costa Rica.CyberL@b uses interactive media resources designed to engage student in learning English within authentic contexts.Cyberlab was designed to cr...

  9. DISTANCE LEARNING FOR DEVELOPING KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING

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    Natalia A. Kameneva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of using distance learning for developing knowledge, skills and competences in English Language teaching in contemporary educational process is justified in the article. In this connection the great attention is focused on radical changes in English Language teaching methodology. With the advent of online education the relationships between the lecturers or the tutors and the students alter and become more open and cooperating, because the students get more involved, interested and motivated in learning foreign languages. Apart from this, the main components of distance education are briefly considered.

  10. Effects of Cooperative Learning Method Type Stad, Language Aptitude, and Intelligence on the Achievement English Hotel at Medan Tourism Academy

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    Abdul Kadir Ritonga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available STAD cooperative learning method which is considered effective in achieving the goal of learning the English language, especially for students majoring in Tourism Academy who are required to master English for Specific Purposes (ESP in accordance with their needs. This study uses factorial design 2x3x3 version of the non-equivalent control group design with ANOVA 3 Ways. The subjects were students MDK III / 5 A and B courses MDK III.5 Rooms Division department Hospitality Academy Year 2015/2016. The samples are saturated samples. Data were collected through a pretest, posttest, and instrument of Language Aptitude and Intelligence parametric statistics analyzed by parametric statistics with significance level of 0.05%. The results showed that: (1 there are differences between method STAD cooperative learning and expository on Hospitality English achievement, (2 there are differences between the students who have high language aptitude and low language aptitude on English achievement, (3 there are differences between students who have high language aptitude and medium on Hospitality English achievement, (4 there are differences between students who have the medium language aptitude and low language aptitude on Hospitality English achievement, (5 there are differences between students who have high intelligence and low intelligence\\ on Hospitality English achievement, (6 there are no differences between who have high intelligence and medium intelligence on Hospitality English achievement, (7 there are differences between students who have the medium intelligence and low intelligence on Hospitality English achievement, (8 there is no interaction between the learning method and language aptitude on Hospitality English achievement, (9 there is an interaction between the learning method and the intelligence on Hospitality English achievement, (10 there is no interaction between intelligence and language aptitude on Hospitality English achievement. (11

  11. THE ENGLISH LEARNING MOTIVATION AND ATTITUDE TOWARD ENGLISH OF D3 NURSING SCIENCE STUDENTS IN PALEMBANG, SOUTH SUMATRA

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    Agus Wahyudi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Language proficiency is a person’s skill in using a language for a specific purpose (Richards, 1997. One of the tests used to measure the students’ English proficiency is TOEFL. The purpose of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL is to evaluate the English proficiency of people whose native language is not English. Over a period of three years from 2007 to 2009, one of the education Companies called Education First (EF ranked the English proficiency among a broad population in 44 countries and territories. The results showed that Asia’s performance was lower than expected, in light of the amount spent on private English training and Indonesia was in the 34th rank or in the very low proficiency level out of 44 countries and territories in the survey (EF : 2011 There are many factors that might cause the students’ low proficiency in English, two of which are students’ motivation and attitude toward English. ‘Motivation’ is the reason or reasons behind one’s actions or behavior, it is a powerful affective variable in second language acquisition, and it has a great influence on second language learning. In order to collect the data, the researcher uses a motivation questionnaire to measure students’ motivation which consists of 40 structured questions (items adapted from Ethel Ogane & Masako Sakamoto (1997. ‘Attitude’ is defined as a disposition or tendency to respond positively or negatively towards a certain thing (idea, object, person, or situation. In order to collect the data, the researcher uses an attitude questionnaire to measure students’ attitude. It consists of 33 structured questions (items adapted from R. Narayanan (2008 which is developed from the Attitude/Motivation Test Battery of Gardner and Lambert and the questionnaires are calculated through Likert Scale. The population of this study is the 1st, 3rd, and 5th semester students of D3

  12. Engineering students’ instrumental motivation and positive attitude towards learning English in a trilingual tertiary setting

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    Joseba González Ardeo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory small-scale study focuses on the attitude towards learning English and levels of motivation of 132 engineering students from the University of the Basque Country (Spain. The extent to which they consider themselves competent in three languages (Basque/Spanish/English is also evaluated. For assessing these variables, a 35-item questionnaire is used. The participants were taking an ESP (English for Specific Purposes course and were familiar with English as a vehicular language through CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning and/or EMI (English Medium Instruction courses. The results demonstrate that their attitude is positive, and it has improved since 2003, despite certain historical events concerning the minority language (Basque. With regard to motivation, the students show a high level of instrumental orientation but a low level of extrinsic-integrative motivation. Relatively high levels of intrinsic motivation are also observed, not far from extrinsic-instrumental motivation levels. The students’ mother tongue (Basque vs. Spanish vs. Basque/Spanish does not affect results significantly. Finally, high levels of self-perceived confidence with respect to their command of English are observed.

  13. The Effectiveness of Classroom Management in English Language Teaching and Learning for Tenth Graders of SMA Panjura Malang

    OpenAIRE

    ASTUTI, AGRIT DWI

    2015-01-01

    Keywords: effective classroom, classroom management, English language teaching, tenth graders students of Senior High School. English is International language that should be learnt by people in every country, included Indonesia. Effective English language teaching and learning process was needed for students in Indonesia. Whether classroom is effective to support teaching and learning process was influenced by many factors such as teaching strategy, managing classroom and students themselves...

  14. Teaching a Large Multi-Level Class Using Different Strategies and Activities to Motivate English Language Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Sevy

    2016-01-01

    Many challenges face English language teachers today, but two common problems in Ecuador specifically in universities are large class sizes and multi-level students. These problems can create boredom, anxiety, and over all lack of interest in English language learning. It is shown in this article how to combat these particular problems through various strategies utilized to teach to the students’ needs, help them work together and intrinsically motivate them to learn different English languag...

  15. Teaching English through Open Non-Formal Education (ONFE) in Bangladesh with an Effective Integration of ICT to Support Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Mizanoor; Panda, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    The program entitled "English in Action (EIA)", 9 year period DFID funded project in Bangladesh, was launched in 2008, for the desire to bring a change in the learning of English language. EIA works to reach a total of 25 million primary and secondary students and adult learners through communicative language learning techniques and the…

  16. Effects of a Computer-Assisted Concept Mapping Learning Strategy on EFL College Students' English Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Lin; Chen, Chiu-Jung; Chang, Yu-Ju

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of a computer-assisted concept mapping learning strategy on EFL college learners' English reading comprehension. The research questions were: (1) what was the influence of the computer-assisted concept mapping learning strategy on different learners' English reading comprehension? (2) did…

  17. The Impact of Utilising Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) on Vocabulary Acquisition among Migrant Women English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Kham Sila; Armarego, Jocelyn; Sudweeks, Fay

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: To develop a framework for utilizing Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) to assist non-native English migrant women to acquire English vocabulary in a non-formal learning setting. Background: The women in this study migrated to Australia with varied backgrounds including voluntary or forced migration, very low to high levels of…

  18. Media Presentation Mode, English Listening Comprehension and Cognitive Load in Ubiquitous Learning Environments: Modality Effect or Redundancy Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Lei, Hao; Tseng, Ju-Shih

    2011-01-01

    Although ubiquitous learning enhances students' access to learning materials, it is crucial to find out which media presentation modes produce the best results for English listening comprehension. The present study examined the effect of media presentation mode (sound and text versus sound) on English listening comprehension and cognitive load.…

  19. Do English Listening Outcome and Cognitive Load Change for Different Media Delivery Modes in U-Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Lei, Hao; Tseng, Ju-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Although ubiquitous learning enhances students' access to learning materials, it is crucial to find out which media delivery modes produce the best results for English listening comprehension. The present study examined the effect of media delivery mode (sound and text vs. sound) on English listening comprehension and cognitive load. Participants…

  20. The Development of English Language Teaching Skills for Graduate Students through the Process of Learning by Doing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likitrattanaporn, Wannakarn

    2017-01-01

    The purposes of this investigation were (1) to examine the findings of effectiveness of the process of learning-by-doing; (2) to develop students' skill of designing English teaching materials and teaching English language; and (3) to determine an efficient format of learning-by-doing used for training student-teachers in the skill of teaching…

  1. Self-Access Learning in Medical English (ME

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    Pop Anişoara

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Individual learning is a pre-requisite of formal ME credit allocation in higher education (HE, albeit this may be hard to document and quantify. Edmodo-enhanced self-access learning can be customized to accommodate different learning styles, form basic learning skills and field-specific subskills, extend and expand the students’ medical language use, while also meeting the desiderata of independent curriculum-stipulated learning that can thus be exploited and demonstrated. The paper will reflect on the design of ME multimedia assignments as well as the quantitative and qualitative results, motivation and attitude of a group of medical students working on Edmodo self-access ME learning as part of a class research project for two years.

  2. Internet Cognitive Failure and Fatigue Relevant to Learners' Self-Regulation and Learning Progress in English Vocabulary with a Calibration Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, J.-C.; Hwang, M.-Y.; Chang, H.-W.; Tai, K.-H.; Kuo, Y.-C.; Tsai, Y.-H.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the factors of learning effectiveness in English vocabulary learning when using a calibration scheme, this study developed a freshman English mobile device application (for iPhone 4) for students with low levels of English proficiency to practise vocabulary in the beginning of their Freshman English course. Data were collected and…

  3. Learning medical English: A prerequisite for successful academic and professional education

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    Milosavljević Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present specificities of the English language teaching necessary for successful education and professional training of medical students. In contemporary globalized world the English language has become the basic language of communication in all scientific fields including the field of medical science. It is well established that Medical English teaching should primarily focus on stable linguistic competence in English that is created by means of content and context based curriculum, thus preparing students for active use of English upon graduation. In order to achieve this it is very important that English language teaching be based on specific real situations in which the language is to be used. In addition, students should be encouraged to adapt practical skills applicable in specific future professional setting. Medical English teaching represents constant challenge for teachers because they need to be flexible, open to new approaches and methods, make decisions and adapt themselves to constant changes. In addition, long-term learning is at the core of higher education, and being equal partners, both students and teachers should be aware that education is a two-way process.

  4. The Effect of Focus Strategies on ADHD Students' English Vocabulary Learning in Junior High School

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    Masoud Khalili Sabet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available "Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is the most common neurobehavioral disorder of childhood. ADHD is also among the most prevalent chronic health conditions affecting school-aged children"(American Academy of Pediatrics, 2000. Too many young girls are not getting the help they need because of hidden symptoms and late diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of focus strategies on vocabulary learning of ADHD students at two junior high schools. To this end, eight female ADHD and eight normal students from two public schools were assigned to the both control group and the experimental one. The quantitative data was gathered from each student and was analyzed through 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA in a factorial arrangement with two repetitions. An orthogonal test was used to compare the strategies that were used in the control group (word list and the experimental group (key word method, concentration, making sentences and fold overs. The instrument of this study contained a questionnaire sent to the parents and English teachers, an interview with a psychologist, a pre-test and a post-test. The results indicated that the four focus strategies in the experimental group increased the vocabulary learning in ADHD students for the short term retention and this increase was significant in the first focus strategy (key word method and mostly the last one (fold overs in the normal and ADHD students. The mean scores of control group were lower than the treatment group both in the normal and ADHD students. The results of delayed post-test revealed that although focus strategies improved the scores of the normal students compared to the ADHD students, this difference was not significant.

  5. Differences of English and Spanish Grammars, and Their Bearing on American and Mexican Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Arturo Zárate

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I notice that English now is a dominant language and I highlight some features which actually make English language great. I also consider that these facts may lead a Spanish language user wrongly believe that applying English peculiar grammatical strengths to Spanish would make Spanish a better means of communication: he would…

  6. The psychometric properties of the generalized anxiety disorder-7 scale in Hispanic Americans with English or Spanish language preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Sarah D; Fox, Rina S; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Roesch, Scott C; Champagne, Brian R; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2014-07-01

    The Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scale (GAD-7) is a self-report questionnaire that is widely used to screen for anxiety. The GAD-7 has been translated into numerous languages, including Spanish. Previous studies evaluating the structural validity of the English and Spanish versions indicate a unidimensional factor structure in both languages. However, the psychometric properties of the Spanish language version have yet to be evaluated in samples outside of Spain, and the measure has not been tested for use among Hispanic Americans. This study evaluated the reliability, structural validity, and convergent validity of the English and Spanish language versions of the GAD-7 for Hispanic Americans in the United States. A community sample of 436 Hispanic Americans with an English (n = 210) or Spanish (n = 226) language preference completed the GAD-7. Multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine the goodness-of-fit of the unidimensional factor structure of the GAD-7 across language-preference groups. Results from the multiple-group CFA indicated a similar unidimensional factor structure with equivalent response patterns and item intercepts, but different variances, across language-preference groups. Internal consistency was good for both English and Spanish language-preference groups. The GAD-7 also evidenced good convergent validity as demonstrated by significant correlations in expected directions with the Perceived Stress Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and the Physical Health domain of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF assessment. The unidimensional GAD-7 is suitable for use among Hispanic Americans with an English or Spanish language preference.

  7. The Use of English in the Chinese Language Classroom: Perspectives from American College Students

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    Henrietta Yang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, whether learners' first language (L1 should be used in the foreign language classroom has been a controversial issue in the foreign language education field. The focus has been mostly on the use of L1 in the English language classroom (e.g.,Atkinson, 1987; Brooks-Lewis, 2009; Kieu, 2010; Krashen, 1981; Miles, 2004; Nazary, 2008; Prodromou, 2002; Schweers, 1999; Tang,2002. The debate centers on two diverse pedagogical approaches: the monolingual approach and the bilingual approach. The supporters of the monolingual approach contend that only the target language that learners are acquiring (i.e. English in most of the study should be allowed in the classroom, and Krashen (1981, 1985 was a pivotal supporter of this approach. However, other researchers and language teachers argue that the monolingual approach is not practical, particularly in lower-level classes (e.g., Atkinson, 1987; BrooksLewis, 2009; Schweers, 1999; Tang, 2002. They believe that using L1 in the classroom can be very effective when explaining difficult grammar points and linguistic elements that are language specific. The supporters of the bilingual approach do not deny the advantages of maximizing target language exposure and practice. However, they suggest that when learners' L1 is applied strategically, it can actually be a very important learning tool (e.g., Atkinson, 1987; Brooks-Lewis,2009; Schweers, 1999. Furthermore, both Schweers (1999 and Miles (2004 point out that the use of L1 provides students a more relaxed atmosphere and makes them less anxious and more confident in the classroom.

  8. Investigating the Efficacy of an Intensive English Program and the L2 Learners’ Learning Styles

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    Rebecca Lee Su Ping

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Past research has found that many pre-university L2 learners, having completed an Intensive English Program (IEP still have difficulty in undertaking various disciplines in English-speaking tertiary institutions and continue to exhibit numerous linguistic problems (Bialystok, 2001, Celce Murcia 2001. The purpose of this paper is to present the findings on the investigation of L2 learners’ English proficiency in reading, writing, grammar, listening and speaking upon their completion of an Intensive English (IE program using their IELTS (Academic, in-house exams and English Placement Tests (EPT scores, and the efficacy of IE program.  IELTS test is chosen for this study due to its increasing popularity in Malaysia and its internationally recognised value and quality.  The study was conducted in two parts. In Part One, all 72 Level 4 IE students were given an in-house EPT (English Placement Test pre-test on their entry and another EPT post-test on their exit, and then their pre-test and post-test results were compared.  In Part Two, 22 volunteers sat the IELTS test at the end of the program. The IELTS results of the 22 volunteers were compared with those who did not.  Data were analyzed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. This paper hopes to shed some light on (i whether or not L2 learners’ English language proficiency can be significantly enhanced and influenced by an intensive English program and (ii how leaners’ perception of their own learning strategies influence their learning progress.

  9. Tracking Multiple Statistics: Simultaneous Learning of Object Names and Categories in English and Mandarin Speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Hsin; Gershkoff-Stowe, Lisa; Wu, Chih-Yi; Cheung, Hintat; Yu, Chen

    2017-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine adult learners' ability to extract multiple statistics in simultaneously presented visual and auditory input. Experiment 1 used a cross-situational learning paradigm to test whether English speakers were able to use co-occurrences to learn word-to-object mappings and concurrently form object categories based on the commonalities across training stimuli. Experiment 2 replicated the first experiment and further examined whether speakers of Mandarin, a language in which final syllables of object names are more predictive of category membership than English, were able to learn words and form object categories when trained with the same type of structures. The results indicate that both groups of learners successfully extracted multiple levels of co-occurrence and used them to learn words and object categories simultaneously. However, marked individual differences in performance were also found, suggesting possible interference and competition in processing the two concurrent streams of regularities. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  10. THE RELEVANCE OF LEARNING APPLIED ENGLISH FOR ACADEMICS TO FOSTER PROFESSIONALISM

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    Lubna Algadrie

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Academics who are not competent in communication skills, particularly language skills, will develop less compared to those who are. Communication skills in general and language skills in particular will foster professionalism since professionals will spend less time doing and more time managing as experience grows. Professionalism grows from qualities that can be learned and developed as well as information learned and acquired. Negotiating skills will enable them to win deals more readily. Moreover, internet based realms of communications are mostly English speaking creations, which vary in terms of level of formality and choice of words. In this paper the writer shares her experience in materials preparations and a classroom-centered research done on a group of academics of non-English majors who came to ITS Language Centre to improve their English language competence for career development and further studies.

  11. ATTITUDES TOWARDS LEARNING ENGLISH: A STUDY OF MOTIVATION AND RESPONSIBILITY AS AIDS TO HUMAN RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica-Ariana Sim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a survey carried out at the Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Oradea, in order to identify attitudes, beliefs, motivation and self-responsibility among students when it comes to learning the English language. The main issue investigated was motivation set at the basis of the learning process together with students’ attitudes regarding the use of English in the Romanian social and educational context, as well as the use of the English language in general. A valid questionnaire was designed and tried to a convenient sample of students; the results of the study are discussed in terms of the principal components that were established including attitude towards motivation, self-responsibility, and language learning approaches. Research and experience show that English is of utmost importance in the academic and future professional lives of students majoring in economics. Therefore, this paper provides some theoretical aspects of motivation, beliefs and responsibility in the context of second language acquisition.Among the important achievements of the study we should mention the observations of students’ behaviour concerning responsibility. It appears that most students are not ready to take complete responsibility for learning. They are either afraid of the teacher, or feel embarrassed, and are ashamed to openly utter their ideas. Thus, teamwork and pair-work facilitate the effective learning of the foreign language and encourage students’ collaboration. The teacher is not the central actor, the controller anymore; s/he becomes the facilitator and source of knowledge. It is important for the teacher to know the basic needs of his/her students and cater for these according to level of their importance, to be aware of the reasons that propel students towards learning, improving or just surviving English as a foreign language.

  12. Using Tangible Companions for Enhancing Learning English Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi Hsuan; Young, Shelley S.-C.; Jang, Jyh-Shing Roger

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the researchers attempted to extend the concept of learning companions from the virtual world to the real physical environment and made a breakthrough in technique development of tangible learning robots. The aim of this study was to explore an innovative way by combining the speech recognition technology with educational robots in…

  13. Interaction in a Blended Environment for English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Archila, Yuranny Marcela

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the types of interaction that emerged not only in a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) but also in face-to-face settings. The study also assessed the impact of the different kinds of interactions in terms of language learning. This is a qualitative case study that took place in a private Colombian…

  14. Mobile English Vocabulary Learning Based on Concept-Mapping Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Numerous researchers in education recognize that vocabulary is essential in foreign language learning. However, students often encounter vocabulary that is difficult to remember. Providing effective vocabulary learning strategies is therefore more valuable than teaching students a large amount of vocabulary. The purpose of this study was to…

  15. Harmonious Learning: Yoga in the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at one way for teachers to make classrooms emotionally, mentally, and physically healthy places to learn--places where tensions and stresses are lessened and where teachers and students are concentrating, yet relaxed. "Harmonious language learning classroom" is the term the author coined to describe this kind of language…

  16. Designing an American Sign Language Avatar for Learning Computer Science Concepts for Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing Students and Deaf Interpreters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, Stefan; Osborne, Lawrence; Smith, Zanthia

    2013-01-01

    The current learning process of Deaf or Hard of Hearing (D/HH) students taking Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) courses needs, in general, a sign interpreter for the translation of English text into American Sign Language (ASL) signs. This method is at best impractical due to the lack of availability of a specialized sign…

  17. Learning for Life, a Structured and Motivational Process of Knowledge Construction in the Acquisition/Learning of English as a Foreign Language in Native Spanish Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino-Garces, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    As language learning theory has shifted from a highly guided to a more open learning process, this paper presents the teaching/learning philosophy called Learning for Life (L for L) as a great way to motivate native Spanish speaker students learning English as a foreign language, and to help them be the constructors of their own knowledge. The…

  18. LEARNING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND THE NEW MILLENNIALS' LITERACIES

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Osuna*, Carlos Zavala, Ma. Reynoso and Ileana Osuna

    2018-01-01

    Although Mexico has made efforts to teach English to students for more than seven decades, the results of its policies have not been as expected. However, young people who have reached successful levels of language proficiency could show us other factors they interact with that let them achieve those proficiency levels. These students, called millennials, learn differently from their predecessors and their learning scenarios are no longer found only at school. Internet, an environment where t...

  19. Empirical Studies on English Vocabulary Learning Strategies in Mainland China over the Past Two Decades

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongxin Dai; Yao Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Wen and Wang (2004) reviewed the empirical studies over the past two decades (from 1984 to 2003) on learning strategies that Chinese EFL learners used. This article, following their methodological framework, reviews about 45 empirical studies on Chinese EFL learners’ English vocabulary learning strategies, conducted by Mainland Chinese scholars over the past two decades. The review shows that more than half of the Chinese scholars are interested in questionnaire investigation of EFL learners’...

  20. Mandarin-English Bilinguals Process Lexical Tones in Newly Learned Words in Accordance with the Language Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quam, Carolyn; Creel, Sarah C

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has mainly considered the impact of tone-language experience on ability to discriminate linguistic pitch, but proficient bilingual listening requires differential processing of sound variation in each language context. Here, we ask whether Mandarin-English bilinguals, for whom pitch indicates word distinctions in one language but not the other, can process pitch differently in a Mandarin context vs. an English context. Across three eye-tracked word-learning experiments, results indicated that tone-intonation bilinguals process tone in accordance with the language context. In Experiment 1, 51 Mandarin-English bilinguals and 26 English speakers without tone experience were taught Mandarin-compatible novel words with tones. Mandarin-English bilinguals out-performed English speakers, and, for bilinguals, overall accuracy was correlated with Mandarin dominance. Experiment 2 taught 24 Mandarin-English bilinguals and 25 English speakers novel words with Mandarin-like tones, but English-like phonemes and phonotactics. The Mandarin-dominance advantages observed in Experiment 1 disappeared when words were English-like. Experiment 3 contrasted Mandarin-like vs. English-like words in a within-subjects design, providing even stronger evidence that bilinguals can process tone language-specifically. Bilinguals (N = 58), regardless of language dominance, attended more to tone than English speakers without Mandarin experience (N = 28), but only when words were Mandarin-like-not when they were English-like. Mandarin-English bilinguals thus tailor tone processing to the within-word language context.

  1. Mandarin-English Bilinguals Process Lexical Tones in Newly Learned Words in Accordance with the Language Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quam, Carolyn; Creel, Sarah C.

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has mainly considered the impact of tone-language experience on ability to discriminate linguistic pitch, but proficient bilingual listening requires differential processing of sound variation in each language context. Here, we ask whether Mandarin-English bilinguals, for whom pitch indicates word distinctions in one language but not the other, can process pitch differently in a Mandarin context vs. an English context. Across three eye-tracked word-learning experiments, results indicated that tone-intonation bilinguals process tone in accordance with the language context. In Experiment 1, 51 Mandarin-English bilinguals and 26 English speakers without tone experience were taught Mandarin-compatible novel words with tones. Mandarin-English bilinguals out-performed English speakers, and, for bilinguals, overall accuracy was correlated with Mandarin dominance. Experiment 2 taught 24 Mandarin-English bilinguals and 25 English speakers novel words with Mandarin-like tones, but English-like phonemes and phonotactics. The Mandarin-dominance advantages observed in Experiment 1 disappeared when words were English-like. Experiment 3 contrasted Mandarin-like vs. English-like words in a within-subjects design, providing even stronger evidence that bilinguals can process tone language-specifically. Bilinguals (N = 58), regardless of language dominance, attended more to tone than English speakers without Mandarin experience (N = 28), but only when words were Mandarin-like—not when they were English-like. Mandarin-English bilinguals thus tailor tone processing to the within-word language context. PMID:28076400

  2. REVITALIZATION OF ENGLISH TEACHER EDUCATION: AN EFFORT TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF STUDENTS‟ LEARNING IN ENGLISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Muth‘im

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly believed that the quality of teachers correlates with the quality of students‘ learning. This implies that if the quality of teachers is good the quality of students‘ learning will be good too. On the contrary, if the quality of teachers is bad the quality of students‘ learning will be bad too. The following data may justify this belief. First, the results of UKA (Uji Kompetensi Awal and UKG (Uji Kompetensi Guru held by the Ministry of Education and Culture in 2012 indicate that the mean score of the first was 42.25 whereas the mean score of the second was 45.82 – lower than the passing grade of UN (Ujian Nasional. When they are correlated with the results of study carried out by PISA on mathematics, natural sciences and language in 2009 and the study conducted by TIMSS on mathematics and natural sciences in 2007 and 2011 the belief may have its justification. PISA‘s study uncovered that Indonesian students were only in level 3 (out of 6 levels. Whereas, TIMSS‘ study revealed that around 95% of Indonesian junior high school students could only reach intermediate level (among five levels. Based on the above data, there must some efforts that must be done to improve the quality of teachers so that the quality of students‘ learning can be made better too. Revitalization of language teacher education is suggested to be one of the solutions.

  3. The Effectiveness of the Continuation Task on Second Language Learning of English Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to uncover how alignment in the continuation task affects second language (L2) learning of English articles. Two classes of 47 Chinese students participated in the study which employed a pretest-treatment-posttest research design and lasted for a period of 20 weeks. One class received the continuation task treatment, during which…

  4. The Instructed Learning of Form-Function Mappings in the English Article System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Helen; MacWhinney, Brian

    2018-01-01

    This article analyzes the instructed learning of the English article system by second language (L2) learners. The Competition Model (MacWhinney, 1987, 2012) was adopted as the theoretical framework for analyzing the cues to article usage and for designing effective computer-based article instruction. Study 1 found that article cues followed a…

  5. On the Learning Behaviours of English Additional-Language Speakers Entering Engineering Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollacott, L.; Simelane, Z.; Inglis, J.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the findings of an inductive study on the learning behaviours and language difficulties of a small group of English additional-language students entering a school of chemical and metallurgical engineering in South Africa. Students were interviewed in their home language. While they appeared to have had a reasonable grounding…

  6. Adaptations for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Families of English Language Learning Students with Autisim Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, grounded theory study was to describe adaptations for culturally and linguistically diverse families of English language learning students with autism spectrum disorders. Each family's parent was interviewed three separate times to gather information to understand the needs and experiences regarding their…

  7. Still on the Margins: Migration, English Language Learning, and Mental Health in Immigrant Psychiatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eamer, Allyson; Fernando, Shanti; King, Alyson E.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the reflexive relationships among mental illness, acculturation, and progress toward English proficiency in five adult immigrants being treated at a Canadian psychiatric hospital. The research explores the additional challenges faced by mentally ill individuals when learning a new language and the extent to which…

  8. Relationship between English Learning Motivation Types and Self-Identity Changes among Chinese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yihong, Gao; Yuan, Zhao; Ying, Cheng; Yan, Zhou

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between English learning motivation types and self-identity changes among university students in the People's Republic of China. The sample obtained from a stratified sampling consisted of 2,278 undergraduates from 30 universities in 29 regions. The instrument was a Likert-scale questionnaire which included…

  9. Google apps for virtual learning communities development: strengthening english language skills in an university environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Intriago

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This action research project aims to strengthen English language reading comprehension and speaking skills in college students through the use of Google Apps and Literature Circles (LCs in virtual communities for learning. Method: The study involved 70 students at a public university in Ecuador. The educational intervention lasted a semester, included the implementation of LCs virtually and in person with a phase of independent reading and another for the discussion. 14 learning communities were organized and students assumed specific roles in order to warranty equality participation. The “Google Apps” were chosen for their ease of access. To monitor the progress of learning English, a pretest and a posttest were applied using the Preliminary English Test (PET by Cambridge University, whose validity and reliability are amply recognized internationally. Results: It showed an improvement of the reading comprehension and speaking skills in English Language in the participants group, who went from A1 to B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL at the end of the process. Conclusion: it is confirmed that the use of “Google Apps” aided in the building of virtual learning communities to support the second language acquisition process (L2 in the university context.

  10. Designing Bilingual Scenarios to Promote English Language Learning at a Public School in Monteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Yanilis; Manjarres, Milton Pájaro

    2016-01-01

    This research study examines the assumptions of creating bilingual scenarios to promote English language learning for 384 students of ninth, tenth and eleventh grade of a public school in Monteria Colombia. An action research methodology was carried out in this study. The findings of this research suggested that the creation of bilingual scenarios…

  11. Technology Enhanced Instruction: An Example of English Language Learning in the Context of Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasi, Sabri; Chang, Maiga; Altinay-Aksal, Fahriye; Kayimbasioglu, Dervis; Dervis, Huseyin; Kinshuk; Altinay-Gazi, Zehra

    2017-01-01

    Early childhood quality education is a cornerstone in educational development. Many countries have started to develop their own preschool educational system in accordance with the European Union Standards, where learning English language and using technology are prerequisites. In this research, the peace context was used as a mediator for learning…

  12. Effective Utilization of ICT in English Language Learning--The Case of University of Botswana Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umunnakwe, Ngozi; Sello, Queen

    2016-01-01

    The study investigates the effective utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by first year undergraduates of the University of Botswana (UB) in their reading and writing skills. The first year students are not first language (L1) learners of English. They have not utilized computers for learning reading and writing in their…

  13. Japanese English Education and Learning: A History of Adapting Foreign Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    This essay is a history that relates the Japanese tradition of accepting and adapting aspects of foreign culture, especially as it applies to the learning of foreign languages. In particular, the essay describes the history of English education in Japan by investigating its developments after the Meiji era. The author addresses the issues from the…

  14. Measuring the Impact of Language-Learning Software on Test Performance of Chinese Learners of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholes, Justin

    2016-01-01

    This classroom quasi-experiment aimed to learn if and to what degree supplementing classroom instruction with Rosetta Stone (RS), Tell Me More (TMM), Memrise (MEM), or ESL WOW (WOW) impacted high-stakes English test performance in areas of university-level writing, reading, speaking, listening, and grammar. Seventy-eight (N = 78) Chinese learners…

  15. Using Collaborative Filtering to Support College Students' Use of Online Forum for English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Yu; Yang, Hui-Chun

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the impact of collaborative filtering (the so-called recommender) on college students' use of an online forum for English learning. The forum was created with an open-source software, Drupal, and its extended recommender module. This study was guided by three main questions: 1) Is there any difference in online behaviors…

  16. English Learning Achievement and EFL Learners' Cheating Attitudes and Cheating Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Mehrak; Goli, Atefeh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was investigating the role of achievement in learning English as a foreign language in EFL learners' cheating attitudes and cheating behaviors. Eight hundred junior high-school students were selected based on random cluster sampling and participated in the study. Their attitudes towards academic dishonesty and their…

  17. A Survey on Chinese Students' Online English Language Learning Experience through Synchronous Web Conferencing Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxi

    2016-01-01

    The online education industry has had a rapid economic development in China since 2013, but this area received little attention in research. This study investigates Chinese undergraduate students' online English learning experiences and online teacher-learner interaction in synchronous web conferencing classes. This article reports the findings…

  18. The Effect of English Language Learning on Creative Thinking Skills: A Mixed Methods Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehic, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this sequential explanatory mixed-methods case study was to investigate the effects of English language learning on creative thinking skills in the domains of fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration as measured with the Alternate Uses Test. Unlike the previous research studies that investigated the links between English…

  19. Language Assessment of Latino English Learning Children: A Records Abstraction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Robert; Fabiano-Smith, Leah

    2017-01-01

    The researchers examined how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in a small northern California school district assessed Spanish speaking English learning (EL) Latino children suspected of language impairments. Specifically we sought to (1) determine whether SLPs adhered to federal, state, and professional guidelines during initial assessments and…

  20. Teaching and Learning English in a Multicultural Classroom: Strategies and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerri, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the beliefs and experiences of a group of teachers endeavouring to enhance their students' learning of English while adapting to a multicultural classroom reality. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on the results of a case study involving a number of semi-structured interviews. Findings: The paper…

  1. Learning science through the medium of English: what do Grade 8 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The TIMSS-R (Third International Mathematics and Science Study1 report) results served to focus attention on the long-standing problem of teaching and learning though the medium of English when it is not the home language of learners or teachers and proficiency levels are too low for learners to engage with the ...

  2. Gaming as Extramural English L2 Learning and L2 Proficiency among Young Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylven, Liss Kerstin; Sundqvist, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Today, playing digital games is an important part of many young people's everyday lives. Claims have been made that certain games, in particular massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) provide L2 English learners with a linguistically rich and cognitively challenging virtual environment that may be conducive to L2 learning, as…

  3. A Robot-Partner for Preschool Children Learning English Using Socio-Cognitive Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Elvis; Benvenuti, Martina

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study in which a humanoid robot (MecWilly) acted as a partner to preschool children, helping them to learn English words. In order to use the Socio-Cognitive Conflict paradigm to induce the knowledge acquisition process, we designed a playful activity in which children worked in pairs with another child or with…

  4. Sabemos y Podemos: Learning for Social Action. Adult Education Curriculum. English Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rachel

    This adult education curriculum, part of the Aprender Es Poder (To Learn Is Power) program, explores the themes of school success for Latino children, expands the work options and improves the working conditions of Latino adults, and identifies community issues. It is meant to be a resource for English as a Second Language Literacy and adult basic…

  5. "Space on Earth:" A Learning Community Integrating English, Math, and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortna, Joanna; Sullivan, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Imagine a mathematics instructor and English instructor sharing an office; scribbled equations litter one desk, snatches of poetry the other. Our learning community, "Space on Earth," grew from conversations in just such an office where we bridged our own disciplinary gap and discovered a shared passion for helping students apply the concepts and…

  6. Podcasts for Learning English Pronunciation in Igboland: Students' Experiences and Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbah, Evelyn E.; Mbah, Boniface M.; Iloene, Modesta I.; Iloene, George O.

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies students' experiences and expectations on the use of podcasts in learning English pronunciation in Igboland. The Igboland is made up of five states in Southeastern Nigeria where Igbo is spoken as a mother tongue. The states are Abia, Anambra, Ebonyi, Enugu, and Imo. The study is a survey research where two universities were…

  7. The Impact of Motivation on English Language Learning in the Gulf States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Othman, Fadel H. M.; Shuqair, Khaled M.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that motivation is positively linked to success in learning the English language or any other second language. Generally, motivation and attitude work together to ensure learners' successful acquisition of a second language; hence, various motivational theories and models have been formulated to examine and explain this…

  8. Enhancing the Students' Positive Attitude in Learning Business English by Using Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustina, Lia

    2017-01-01

    Many research findings have stated that the use of technology in EFL classroom results invaluable achievements and develops positive attitudes. Technology may integrate sounds, pictures, motions, and colors that fi ure out a natural picture of real life. The aim of the study was to enhance the students' attitude toward learning English by using…

  9. Intrinsic Difficulties in Learning Common Greek-Originated English Words: The Case of Pluralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavakli, Nurdan

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the origin of a language helps us to determine the historical background of that language. As language itself is such a system of a society that is continuously evolving as that aforementioned society learns and technologically develops along with its roots or origins. Like many other languages, English is also a language that has roots or…

  10. A Survey Study of Autonomous Learning by Chinese Non-English Major Post-Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianping

    2009-01-01

    This thesis reports a survey study of the autonomous L2 learning by 100 first-year non-English-major Chinese post-graduates via the instruments of a questionnaire and semi-structured interview after the questionnaire. It attends to address the following research question: To what extent do Chinese postgraduate students conduct autonomous L2…

  11. Approaches to Learning and Hispanic Children's Math Scores: The Moderating Role of English Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumgarner, Erin; Martin, Anne; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that children's approaches to learning (ATL) at kindergarten entry predict their academic achievement years later. However, the gains associated with ATL may be diminished for Hispanic immigrant children, many of whom are English language learners (ELLs). We tested whether ATL predicted math scores in a sample of…

  12. Reading comprehension as part of the teaching learning process of English for specific purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaima Rosa Reyes Piñero

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents and characterizes a system of interdisciplinary tasks which contributes to reading comprehension as a basic objective of the teaching learning process of English in the first year students of Marxism-Leninism and History career of the University of Pedagogical Sciences in Pinar del Río.

  13. Learning to Teach English Language Arts in Urban Middle Schools: A Cultural and Interactional Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buescher, Eileen M.

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation explores the experiences of middle childhood pre-service teachers (PST) across two academic years as they learn to teach English language arts to diverse students from conflicting sociocultural contexts. To help PSTs navigate the tensions across contexts, this study introduced culturally relevant (Ladson-Billings, 1995; 2014) and…

  14. The effect of Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) on English performance and self-confidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansma, Marrit; Minnaert, Alexander; Klinkenberg, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, it was investigated whether third language teaching through Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) was more effective than teaching a third language as an isolated subject. By means of a cross-sectional study design, English vocabulary, speaking performance and

  15. The Potential for Mobile Learning in English as a Foreign Language and Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the application of mobile technologies to support learning in a specific field: nursing education for English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners, which is the context of the author's institution. Using a qualitative meta-synthesis methodology, factors from published literature that facilitates success in mobile learning…

  16. Trait Emotional Intelligence and Learning Styles: The Case of Iranian English for Academic Purposes Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbari, Mohammad; Abol-Nejadian, Rezvan

    2015-01-01

    Although a large body of research has been dedicated to examining emotional intelligence (EI) and learning styles in relation to different factors in academic setting, the relationship between these two variables still necessitates more exploration and deeper study, especially in the Iranian context. To this end, 60 English for Academic Purposes…

  17. Research On: Motivation to Learn English among College Students in Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humaida, Ibrahim Abdelrahim Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    This research was conducted to achieve the following objectives: to examine motivation to learn English language among students of faculty of arts, Islamic University-Sudan, to find out if there were significant statistical differences on motivation scores related to both student level and age. To pursue these objectives, the researcher used the…

  18. Exploring the Potential for Language Supportive Learning in English Medium Instruction: A Rwandan Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Lizzi O.; Clegg, John; Tikly, Leon

    2016-01-01

    This article puts forward the argument for language supportive learning for learners in English medium instruction (EMI) classrooms based on the findings from a mixed methods study in Rwanda. The article first reviews the relevant literature and research which looks at the concept of language support, focusing on textbooks and pedagogy in…

  19. Applying Cognitive Linguistics to Instructed L2 Learning: The English Modals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Andrea; Mueller, Charles M.; Ho, Vu

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a quasi-experimental effects-of-instruction study examining the efficacy of applying a Cognitive Linguistic (CL) approach to L2 learning of the semantics of English modals. In spite of their frequency in typical input, modal verbs present L2 learners with difficulties, party due to their inherent…

  20. Character Values and Their Internalization in Teaching and Learning English at Madrasah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami, Milad

    2016-01-01

    In addition to communicating intellectual-based concepts such as ideas, belief and thought, language is used to communicate norms, values and emotions. As the result, it is important to internalize the character values into the teaching and learning activity of English. The study describes the analysis of the internalization of character values.…

  1. Learning English Pragmatics in China: An Investigation into Chinese EFL Learners' Perceptions of Pragmatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yifeng; Tangen, Donna; Mills, Kathy A.; Lidstone, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study investigating Chinese English language learners' perceptions of pragmatics in the EFL learning context in China. A total of 237 Chinese EFL first--year university students participated in the study. A questionnaire and focus group interviews were used to collect data about learners' pragmatics insights…

  2. Thai EFL Learners' Attitudes and Motivation towards Learning English through Content-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai Yuanxing; Aksornjarung, Prachamon

    2018-01-01

    This study examined EFL learners' attitudes and motivation towards learning English through content-based instruction (CBI) at a university in Thailand. Seventy-one (71) university students, the majority sophomores, answered a 6-point Likert scale questionnaire on attitudes and motivation together with six open-ended questions regarding learning…

  3. Cross-Grade Analysis of Chinese Students' English Learning Motivation: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Mei; Kim, Tae-Young

    2013-01-01

    This mixed-methods study investigated the changes in Chinese students' motivation to learn English from elementary to high school and explored the reasons for these changes at different school levels. A motivational questionnaire was designed and administered to 3,777 elementary, junior high, and high school students, and follow-up interviews were…

  4. Education Context and English Teaching and Learning in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrashidi, Oqab; Phan, Huy

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the education context and English teaching and learning in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The paper is organised into five main sections. The first section offers a brief glance at the social, religious, economic, and political context in KSA. The second section provides an overview of the education system in KSA, which…

  5. Teachers' Beliefs in English Language Teaching and Learning: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilakjani, Abbas Pourhosein; Sabouri, Narjes Banou

    2017-01-01

    Beliefs form part of the process of understanding how teachers shape their work which is significant to the comprehending of their teaching methods and their decisions in the classroom. Teachers' beliefs have been an interesting topic for researchers due to the input they provide for the improvement of English language teaching and learning.…

  6. English for Business: Student Responses to Language Learning through Social Networking Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Laborda, Jesús; Litzler, Mary Frances

    2017-01-01

    This action research based case study addresses the situation of a first year class of Business English students at Universidad de Alcalá and their attitudes towards using Web 2.0 tools and social media for language learning. During the semester, the students were asked to collaborate in the creation and use of some tools such as blogs, video…

  7. The Impact of Blended e-Learning on Undergraduate Academic Essay Writing in English (L2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriman, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a quasi-experimental study into the impact of a blended e-learning environment on academic writing assignments in English (L2) at a Thai international college. An experimental group of 15 students used an on-line bulletin board, as well as face-to-face (F2F) communication in class, to share information for essay topics they…

  8. Computer-Assisted English Learning System Based on Free Conversation by Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Kwon; Kwon, Oh-Woog; Kim, Young-Kil

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to describe a computer-assisted English learning system using chatbots and dialogue systems, which allow free conversation outside the topic without limiting the learner's flow of conversation. The evaluation was conducted by 20 experimenters. The performance of the system based on a free conversation by topic was measured by the…

  9. Self-Regulation and Approaches to Learning in English Composition Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    It is hypothesized in the present study that when learners are tasked to write a composition in a second language (such as English language for Filipinos), they use specific approaches to learning and eventually undergo self-regulatory processes. The present study tested a model showing the shift from process to outcome in writing (Zimmerman &…

  10. Students' Attitudes to Classroom English Learning: A Cross-Cultural Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, William

    2001-01-01

    Examines learner attitudes toward classroom learning of English, with particular focus on collectivism versus individualism, attitudes towards authority, and types of achievement motivation. Data are collected from eight Asian and three European countries. Although many attitudinal differences occur between individual countries, striking…

  11. Enhancing Academic Instruction for Adolescent English Language Learners with or at Risk for Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haager, Diane; Osipova, Anna V.

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of children worldwide attend schools where the language of instruction does not match their native language, presenting significant challenges with learning the content and vocabulary of academic content areas (e.g., social studies, science). In the U.S., these students are designated as English language learners…

  12. The Effectiveness of Dialogic Reading in Increasing English Language Learning Preschool Children's Expressive Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Diana; Dauksas, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of dialogic reading in increasing the literacy interactions between English language learning parents (ELL) and their preschool aged children and children's expressive language development were studied. Twenty-one ELL parents of preschool aged children received dialogic reading training every other week for a ten-week period.…

  13. English Learning Styles of Students from East Asian Countries: A Focus on Reading Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jia-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Little research has been done to investigate the influence of cultural differences on students' second/foreign language learning styles, with a focus on comparing between East and West classroom cultures. This study investigates the differences that East Asian students may encounter when studying in the English-medium academic environment. By…

  14. AN ACTION RESEARCH IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING AND LEARNING FOR CHILDREN WITH USE OF DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Coelho Chimenti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article is based on a field research that aimed to provide educational subsidies for the use of digital technologies in teaching and learning process of English language, in two classes of the fifth grade from the elementary school, at the public school located in Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil. Based on the perspective of childhood pedagogy, which conceives the child as the protagonist and also (reproductive of knowledge, activities were carried with YouTube videos, online games, music, and many other learning objects. Likewise, observations, interviews and questionnaires were made with teachers and students involved in the research. Based on the action research, we analyzed aspects related to the contribution of some digital resources in teaching and learning of English at elementary school and we obtained many elements that allowed us to know the importance of learning a foreign language in the childhood nowadays, mainly English, and how new technologies can make learning more contextualized, meaningful, motivating children for language learning in a context in which they can be (criative.

  15. Variation in stop consonant voicing in two regional varieties of American English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, Ewa; Fox, Robert Allen; Lyle, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    This study is an acoustic investigation of the nature and extent of consonant voicing of the stop /b/ in two dialectal varieties of American English spoken in south-central Wisconsin and western North Carolina. The stop /b/ occurred at the juncture of two words such as small bids, in a position between two voiced sonorants, i.e. the liquid /l/ and a vowel. Twenty women participated, ten representing the Wisconsin and ten the North Carolina variety, respectively. Significant dialectal differences were found in the voicing patterns. The Wisconsin stop closures were usually not fully voiced and terminated in a complete silence followed by a closure release whereas North Carolina speakers produced mostly fully voiced closures. Further dialectal differences included the proportion of closure voicing as a function of word emphasis. For Wisconsin speakers, the proportion of closure voicing was smallest when the word was emphasized and it was greatest in non-emphatic positions. For North Carolina speakers, the degree of word emphasis did not have an effect on the proportion of closure voicing. The results suggest different mechanisms by which closure voicing is maintained in these two dialects, pointing to active articulatory maneuvers in North Carolina speakers and passive in Wisconsin speakers. PMID:20198112

  16. Cross-dialectal variation in formant dynamics of American English vowels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert Allen; Jacewicz, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to characterize the nature of the dynamic spectral change in vowels in three distinct regional varieties of American English spoken in the Western North Carolina, in Central Ohio, and in Southern Wisconsin. The vowels ∕ɪ, ε, e, æ, aɪ∕ were produced by 48 women for a total of 1920 utterances and were contained in words of the structure ∕bVts∕ and ∕bVdz∕ in sentences which elicited nonemphatic and emphatic vowels. Measurements made at the vowel target (i.e., the central 60% of the vowel) produced a set of acoustic parameters which included position and movement in the F1 by F2 space, vowel duration, amount of spectral change [measured as vector length (VL) and trajectory length (TL)], and spectral rate of change. Results revealed expected variation in formant dynamics as a function of phonetic factors (vowel emphasis and consonantal context). However, for each vowel and for each measure employed, dialect was a strong source of variation in vowel-inherent spectral change. In general, the dialect-specific nature and amount of spectral change can be characterized quite effectively by position and movement in the F1 by F2 space, vowel duration, TL (but not VL which underestimates formant movement), and spectral rate of change. PMID:19894839

  17. Doctrine of Frustration of Contract in English, American and Iranian Law (Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Daraei

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pacta sunt servanda” is one of the most fundamental principles in the common law and Iranian legal systems, which have been exposed to exceptions in the process of time. These exceptions are part of general doctrine of frustration. Iranians exceptions to this rule are named as “Ta`azzor” and “Ta`assor” rules. Doctrine of Frustration in Common law includes three subdivision theories: “impossibility of performance”, “frustration of purpose” and “impracticability” (hardship. All of these theories applied where a supervening event occurs. In English courts, only first two theories are accepted but third one is applicable in American courts. In imamieh Jurisprudence and Iranian law, “Ta`azzor” rule in most aspects is similar to Impossibility and “Ta`assor” rule is somehow like Impracticability. Some Iranian lawyers are said that we have no rule like “Frustration of Purpose” but I believe we can find traces of this theory in Imamieh jurisprudence and according which it is part of “Ta`azzor” rule.

  18. "Going to town": Large-scale norming and statistical analysis of 870 American English idioms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulkes, Nyssa Z; Tanner, Darren

    2017-04-01

    An idiom is classically defined as a formulaic sequence whose meaning is comprised of more than the sum of its parts. For this reason, idioms pose a unique problem for models of sentence processing, as researchers must take into account how idioms vary and along what dimensions, as these factors can modulate the ease with which an idiomatic interpretation can be activated. In order to help ensure external validity and comparability across studies, idiom research benefits from the availability of publicly available resources reporting ratings from a large number of native speakers. Resources such as the one outlined in the current paper facilitate opportunities for consensus across studies on idiom processing and help to further our goals as a research community. To this end, descriptive norms were obtained for 870 American English idioms from 2,100 participants along five dimensions: familiarity, meaningfulness, literal plausibility, global decomposability, and predictability. Idiom familiarity and meaningfulness strongly correlated with one another, whereas familiarity and meaningfulness were positively correlated with both global decomposability and predictability. Correlations with previous norming studies are also discussed.

  19. The relationship between English language learning strategies and proficiency of pre-university students: A study case of UMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiram, Johannah Jamalul; Sulaiman, Jumat; Swanto, Suyansah; Din, Wardatul Akmam

    2014-07-01

    This paper seeks to investigate the relationship between language learning strategies and proficiency in English. Fifty-six pre-university students (22 males, 34 females) of University Malaysia Sabah participated in this study. Oxford's Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) self-report questionnaire was adopted to identify the students' language learning strategies, whereas their proficiencies were judged based on their Malaysian University English Test (MUET) Results. Pearson's correlation coefficient, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and the t-test were utilized to make statistical interpretation about the relationship. The knowledge obtained from this study will be helpful for future studies on how to improve the quality of learning and proficiency in English.

  20. A Communicative Approach to College English Grammar Teaching and Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-xian

    2016-01-01

    In response to the misconception that Communicative Language Teaching means no teaching of grammar, it is argued that grammar is as important as traffic rules for safe and smooth traffic on the road. To achieve appropriate and effective commu-nication, a communicative approach to college grammar teaching and learning is proposed. Both teachers and learners should change their attitudes toward and conceptions about grammar teaching and learning;additionally, teaching grammar in the com-pany of reading and writing helps learners learn and acquire grammar in meaningful contexts.

  1. Cultivate Mindfulness: A Case Study of Mindful Learning in an English as a Foreign Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This case study investigated how the use of mindfulness affected college English as a foreign language (EFL students learning and how mindful learning strategies supported their learning of English. Mindful learning considers the students’ abilities to be aware, perceive and conceive. Mindfulness results in an increase in competence, memory, creativity, and positive affect based on the previous studies. In this study, 24 undergraduate freshmen participated at a Northeastern University in China. The data collection included those undergraduates’ pre-surveys, post-surveys, work samples, the instructor’s observation notes and the researcher’s reflective journal entries. This practice found that by engaging in mindful strategies, EFL students took ownership of their learning in the following ways: students built and became aware of a comfortable learning environment in their classroom through mindfulness; mindful writing helped students generate new thoughts and become aware of their thinking; mindfulness facilitated their learning process, cultivated creativity and intelligence; mindful cooperative learning provided students with an opportunity to discover their awareness, learn from others, reflect and think critically.

  2. The Psychometric Properties of English and Spanish Versions of the Life Orientation Test-Revised in Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tonya M; Mills, Sarah D; Fox, Rina S; Baik, Sharon H; Harry, Kadie M; Roesch, Scott C; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Malcarne, Vanessa L

    2017-12-01

    The Life Orientation Test-Revised (LOT-R) is a widely used measure of optimism and pessimism, with three positively worded and three negatively worded content items. This study examined the structural validity and invariance, internal consistency reliability, and convergent and divergent validity of the English and Spanish versions of the LOT-R among Hispanic Americans. A community sample of Hispanic Americans ( N = 422) completed self-report measures, including the LOT-R, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, in their preferred language of English or Spanish. Based on the literature, four structural models were tested: one-factor , oblique two-factor , orthogonal two-factor method effects with positive specific factor , and orthogonal two-factor method effects with negative specific factor . Baseline support for both of the English and Spanish versions was not achieved for any model; in all models, the negatively worded items in Spanish had non-significant factor loadings. Therefore, the positively worded three-item optimism subscale of the LOT-R was examined separately and fit the data, with factor loadings equivalent across language-preference groups. Coefficient alphas for the optimism subscale were consistent across both language-preference groups (αs = .61 [English] and .66 [Spanish]). In contrast, the six-item total score and three-item pessimism subscale demonstrated extremely low or inconsistent alphas. Convergent and divergent validity were established for the optimism subscale in both languages. In sum, the optimism subscale of the LOT-R demonstrated minimally acceptable to good psychometric properties across English and Spanish language-preference groups. However, neither the total score nor the pessimism subscale showed adequate psychometric properties for Spanish-speaking Hispanic Americans, likely due to translation and cultural adaptation issues, and thus are not supported for use with this population.

  3. University Students’ Perception of Demotivating Factors in Learning English as a Foreign Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Hosseinpour

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Demotivation is a relatively new topic in the field of second or foreign language acquisition which is in need of more rigorous research. In this regard, the present study was an attempt to investigate demotivating factors in learning English as a foreign language in an Iranian context. To this end, 382 Persian learners of English were selected through stratified clustering sampling procedure to participate in this mixed method study. The Data was collected through a 40-item Likert type questionnaire. The Factor analysis of the data extracted seven factors including a inadequate facilities, b reduced self-confidence, c class characteristics, d lack of purpose to study English, e teaching methods, f teachers and teaching styles, and g negative attitudes toward English and the culture of English-speaking countries as demotivators. The Students’ perceptions of these seven factors were compared based on their general English proficiency levels. The Results revealed that low proficient learners perceived reduced self-confidence and negative attitudes more demotivating than their counterparts at other levels of proficiency.

  4. Motivation Is more Powerful than Interest in Learning English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Songmei

    2017-01-01

    Many people say interest is the teacher in learning. In fact, interest is a very important factor in doing things. If one has interest in something, he/she will has the feeling that he/she wants to know or learn more about it. In other words, interest is related to one's preference. Therefore, in teaching practice, teachers usually stress the importance of arousing students' interest because students with interest will feel curious and know how to satisfy their curiosity and will attain objectives of their curiosity. On the contrary, motivation is the inner desire and drive to achieve something, which is related to the personal goals. Therefore, motivation can sustain throughout the whole process of learning activities. Interest and motivation are both worth putting into use in teaching, but I think motivation is more powerful than interest.

  5. Multimedia Scenario Based Learning Programme for Enhancing the English Language Efficiency among Primary School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navnath Tupe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This research was undertaken with a view to assess the deficiencies in English language among Primary School Children and to develop Multimedia Scenario Based Learning Programme (MSBLP for mastery of English language which required special attention and effective treatment. The experimental study with pretest, post-test control group design was employed to carry out the experiment of MSBLP in a sample school and to determine its efficacy for enhancing English Language skills among Primary School Students. In India, the Central and State Government has made great efforts to Education for All (EFA and initiated several programs to provide universal access to education, to reduce the drop-out rates and ensure achievement of minimum levels of learning. To our surprise the scenario had not much changed inside the classroom even implementing several programmes. However, it was still unclear how effective was the delivery of the course content in the classroom. An intensive training for teachers on a regular basis on a state-wide scale may not be feasible again and again. Hence, multimedia offers pragmatic solutions So that this research paper devoted to explore the issues of learning English and describes the creation of MSBLP as a solution in scientific manner.

  6. THE USE OF SOCIAL NETWORKS IN THE PROCESS OF LEARNING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halyna I. Sotska

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the recent decade many changes in the process of education took place because of the development of information and communication technologies. Online social groups tend to be used by teachers and students for formal (study and informal (personal communication purposes. An efficient teacher may turn social networks into an effective tool, encouraging students to communicate in the target language. With the help of social networks the teacher can activate students in the process of learning, create situations for better understanding and perceiving the material. The use of such approaches as blended learning, corporative learning and active learning helps make the classes more attractive and effective. Moreover, social networks can help in the development of students’ creativity, provision of feedback and cooperative learning. The article deals with the question of influence of Massive online open courses on effectiveness of the educational process for students who learn English as a second language.

  7. A Dual-Route Model that Learns to Pronounce English Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Roger W.; Miller, Craig S.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a model that learns to pronounce English words. Learning occurs in two modules: 1) a rule-based module that constructs pronunciations by phonetic analysis of the letter string, and 2) a whole-word module that learns to associate subsets of letters to the pronunciation, without phonetic analysis. In a simulation on a corpus of over 300 words the model produced pronunciation latencies consistent with the effects of word frequency and orthographic regularity observed in human data. Implications of the model for theories of visual word processing and reading instruction are discussed.

  8. Applying the Flipped Learning Model to an English-Medium Nursing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heeseung; Kim, Jeongeun; Bang, Kyung Sook; Park, Yeon Hwan; Lee, Nam Ju; Kim, Chanhee

    2015-12-01

    An emerging trend in Asian higher education is English-medium instruction (EMI), which uses English as the primary instructional language. EMI prepares domestic students for international leadership; however, students report difficulty in learning, and educators have raised questions concerning the effectiveness of EMI. The flipped learning model (FLM), in which lecture and homework activities for a course are reversed, was applied to an English-medium course offered by a college of nursing in Korea. The aims of this study were to: 1) revise an existing English-medium nursing course using the FLM; 2) explore students' learning experiences and their acceptance of the FLM; and 3) identify key factors in the success of FLM. We used a descriptive, cross-sectional, mixed-methods design and the participants were students at one nursing school in Korea. A series of course development meetings with faculties from the nursing school and the center for teaching and learning were used to develop the course format and content. We conducted course evaluations using the Flipped Course Evaluation Questionnaire with open-ended questions and focus group interviews. Students (N=75) in a 15-week nursing course responded to a survey after completing the course. Among them, seven students participated in one of two focus groups. Overall, students accepted and favored the flipped learning strategy, and indicated that the method enhanced lecture content and their understanding of it. Factors associated with effective instruction included structured monitoring systems and motivational environments. The FLM requires sufficient preparation to facilitate student motivation and maximize learning outcomes.

  9. Cultural Differences in Parents' Facilitation of Mathematics Learning: A Comparison of Euro-American and Chinese-American Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsinger, Carol S.; Jose, Paul E.

    A longitudinal study examined differences in Chinese-American and Euro-American parents' facilitation of their young children's mathematics learning. Participating in the Time 2 data collection were 36 second-generation Chinese-American and 40 Euro-American first and second graders from well-educated suburban Chicago families. Children were given…

  10. DESIGNING AND BUILDING EXERCISE MODEL OF TECHNICAL ENGLISH VOCABULARIES USING CALL (COMPUTER ASSISTED LANGUAGE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogi Widiawati

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed to assist and facilitate the students of Electrical and Electronics Department of Politeknik Negeri Jakarta (State Polytechnics of Jakarta, Indonesia, in learning technical English vocabulary. As technical students, they study ESP (English for Specific Purposes and they find some obstacles in memorizing technical vocabularies which are very important in order to read and understand manual books for laboratory and workshop. Some English technical vocabularies among others are “generate”, “pile”, “bench”, et cetera. The research outcome is software which will be beneficial for technical students, especially electrical and electronics students. This software can be used to practice their vocabulary skills, so they will be more skillful and knowledgeable. This software is designed by using the program of Rapid E-Learning Suite Version 5.2 and Flash CS3. The software practice contains some exercises on reading text and reading comprehension questions and presented with the multiple answers. This software is handy and flexible because students can bring it anywhere and be studied anytime. It is handy because this software is put and saved in CD (compact disc, so the students can take it with them anywhere and anytime they want to learn. In other words, they have flexibility to learn and practice English Technical Vocabularies. As a result, the students are found one of the ways to overcome their problems of memorizing vocabularies. The product is a kind of software which is easily used and portable so that the students can use the software anywhere and anytime. It consists of 3 (three sections of exercises. At the end of each exercise, the students are evaluated automatically by looking at the scoring system. These will encourage them to get good score by repeating it again and again. So the technical words are not problem for them. Furthermore, the students can practice technical English vocabulary both at home and

  11. Exploring Mobile Apps for English Language Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bin; Li, Jiaying

    2015-01-01

    Many recent studies have shown that mobile learning can provide potential possibilities for foreign language learners to practice language skills on their smart mobile phones and tablet PCs (e.g. Chang & Hsu, 2011; Egbert, Akasha, Huff, & Lee, 2011; Hoven & Palalas, 2011; Stockwell, 2010). A number of apps have been created and used…

  12. Teaching and learning English as a Home Language in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most important difference from the standpoint of Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) was in the learning content selection, with the EHL settings using more literary works, and so focusing less on the direct teaching of grammatical forms. However, a disturbing pattern was the inability of the learners in both sets of ...

  13. Studies and Suggestions on English Vocabulary Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shigao

    2012-01-01

    To improve vocabulary learning and teaching in ELT settings, two questionnaires are designed and directed to more than 100 students and teachers in one of China's key universities. The findings suggest that an enhanced awareness of cultural difference, metaphorical competence, and learners' autonomy in vocabulary acquisition will effectively…

  14. Learning English with Electronic Textbooks on Tablet PCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-cheng

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies on electronic textbooks were all survey studies of college students in the U.S.A. Their main findings revealed that using electronic textbooks and using print textbooks showed no statistical differences in learning achievements. As mobile devices became popular in classrooms, the present study was intended to confirm the…

  15. Brain Plasticity in Speech Training in Native English Speakers Learning Mandarin Tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzen, Christina Carolyn

    The current study employed behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures to investigate brain plasticity associated with second-language (L2) phonetic learning based on an adaptive computer training program. The program utilized the acoustic characteristics of Infant-Directed Speech (IDS) to train monolingual American English-speaking listeners to perceive Mandarin lexical tones. Behavioral identification and discrimination tasks were conducted using naturally recorded speech, carefully controlled synthetic speech, and non-speech control stimuli. The ERP experiments were conducted with selected synthetic speech stimuli in a passive listening oddball paradigm. Identical pre- and post- tests were administered on nine adult listeners, who completed two-to-three hours of perceptual training. The perceptual training sessions used pair-wise lexical tone identification, and progressed through seven levels of difficulty for each tone pair. The levels of difficulty included progression in speaker variability from one to four speakers and progression through four levels of acoustic exaggeration of duration, pitch range, and pitch contour. Behavioral results for the natural speech stimuli revealed significant training-induced improvement in identification of Tones 1, 3, and 4. Improvements in identification of Tone 4 generalized to novel stimuli as well. Additionally, comparison between discrimination of across-category and within-category stimulus pairs taken from a synthetic continuum revealed a training-induced shift toward more native-like categorical perception of the Mandarin lexical tones. Analysis of the Mismatch Negativity (MMN) responses in the ERP data revealed increased amplitude and decreased latency for pre-attentive processing of across-category discrimination as a result of training. There were also laterality changes in the MMN responses to the non-speech control stimuli, which could reflect reallocation of brain resources in processing pitch patterns

  16. Evidence and characterization of a glide-vowel distinction in American English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Scott Jaggers

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study tests whether native speakers of American English exhibit a glide-vowel distinction ([j]-[i] in a speech elicitation experiment. When reading sentences out loud, participants’ pronunciations of 4 near-minimal pairs of pre-existing lexical items (e.g., 'Eston'[iə] vs. 'pneumon'[jə] exhibit significant differences when acoustically measured, confirming the presence of a [j]-[i] distinction. This distinction is also found to be productively extended to the production of 20 near-minimal pairs of nonce words (e.g., 'Súmia '→ [sumiə] vs. 'Fímya '→ [fimjə], diversified and balanced along different phonologically relevant factors of the surrounding environment. Multiple acoustic measurements are compared to test what aspects most consistently convey the distinction: F2 (frontness, F1 (height, intensity, vocalic sequence duration, transition earliness, and transition speed. This serves the purpose of documenting the distinction’s acoustic phonetic realization. It also serves in the comparison of phonological representations. Multiple types of previously proposed phonological representations are considered along with the competing predictions they generate regarding the acoustic measurements performed. Results suggest that the primary and most consistent characteristic of the distinction is earliness of transition into the following vowel, with results also suggesting that the [j] glide has a greater degree of constriction. The [j] glide is found to have a significantly 'less 'anterior articulation, challenging the application of a representation based on place or articulator differences that would predict [j] to be 'more 'anterior.

  17. Skype™ Conference Calls: A Way to Promote Speaking Skills in the Teaching and Learning of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeferson Romaña Correa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a research project on the teaching and learning of English through the use of Skype™ conference calls. The research was carried out with a group of 12 English as a foreign language adult learners in the language institute of Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas, Bogotá, Colombia. The findings of this study suggest that Skype™ conference calls might be considered as an influential computer-mediated communication tool in order to promote English as a foreign language adult A1 learners’ speaking skill, especially for social interaction purposes and oral reinforcement of both language fluency and course contents outside of classroom settings.

  18. An Evaluation of Native-speaker Judgements of Foreign-accented British and American English

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doel, W.Z. van den

    2006-01-01

    This study is the first ever to employ a large-scale Internet survey to investigate priorities in English pronunciation training. Well over 500 native speakers from throughout the English-speaking world, including North America, the British Isles, Australia and New Zealand, were asked to detect and

  19. ELL Excel: Using Peer Mentoring to Help English Language Learners Excel in American Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Kristilynn M.

    2013-01-01

    This action research study describes implementation of a peer mentorship program to improve the performance of English language learners at the research site, a suburban high school in Ohio. With the rapidly increasing number of English language learners at the research site as well as schools across the country and the expectations of No Child…

  20. Experiential Learning Model in Enhancing Prospective English Teachers` Teaching Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heri Mudra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the effectiveness of Experiential Learning (EL model in improving prospective EFL teachers’ (PETs teaching competence. The method of this study was Classroom Action Research (CAR consisting of planning, observing, acting, and reflecting phases. There were two cycles needed in implementing EL to the twenty one EFL learners as the participants. The results revealed that each subcompetence in cycle I and cycle II was achieved in the following score: planning & preparation for learning (Mean in cycle I=2,8; Mean in cycle II=3,38, classroom management (Mean in cycle I=2,5; Mean in cycle II=2,95, delivery of instruction (Mean in cycle I=2,6; Mean in cycle II=2,90, and monitoring, assessment, and follow-up (Mean in cycle I=2,4; Mean in cycle II=2,95. It can be concluded that EL is effective in improving PETs’ teaching competence.