WorldWideScience

Sample records for ldr manchester system

  1. Comparative study of LDR (Manchester system) and HDR image-guided conformal brachytherapy of cervical cancer: patterns of failure, late complications, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Kailash; van Dyk, Sylvia; Bernshaw, David; Rajasooriyar, Chrishanthi; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas

    2009-08-01

    To compare patterns of failure, late toxicities, and survival in locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated by either low-dose-rate (LDR) or conformal high-dose-rate (HDRc) brachytherapy as a part of curative radiotherapy. A retrospective comparative study of 217 advanced cervix cancer patients was conducted; 90 of these patients received LDR and 127 received HDRc brachytherapy. All patients were staged using International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) rules, had pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and were treated with concurrent cisplatin chemoradiotherapy. Both groups matched for FIGO stage, MRI tumor volume, and uterine invasion status. Local and pelvic failures were similar 12-13% and 14% both in both groups. Abdominal and systemic failures in LDR group were 21% and 24%, whereas corresponding failures in HDRc group were 20% and 24%. Sixty-eight percent (87/127) of patients treated by HDRc remained asymptomatic, whereas 42% (38/90) of patients were asymptomatic from the bowel and bladder symptoms after treatment with LDR. The 5-year OS rate was 60% (SE = 4%). The 5-year failure-free survival rate was 55% (SE = 3%). There was no significant difference between the groups. Image-guided HDRc planning led to a large decrease in late radiation effects in patients treated by HDRc. Patterns of failure and survival were similar in patients treated either by LDR or HDRc.

  2. Comparative Study of LDR (Manchester System) and HDR Image-guided Conformal Brachytherapy of Cervical Cancer: Patterns of Failure, Late Complications, and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Kailash; Dyk, Sylvia van; Bernshaw, David; Rajasooriyar, Chrishanthi; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare patterns of failure, late toxicities, and survival in locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated by either low-dose-rate (LDR) or conformal high-dose-rate (HDRc) brachytherapy as a part of curative radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: A retrospective comparative study of 217 advanced cervix cancer patients was conducted; 90 of these patients received LDR and 127 received HDRc brachytherapy. All patients were staged using International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) rules, had pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and were treated with concurrent cisplatin chemoradiotherapy. Both groups matched for FIGO stage, MRI tumor volume, and uterine invasion status. Results: Local and pelvic failures were similar 12-13% and 14% both in both groups. Abdominal and systemic failures in LDR group were 21% and 24%, whereas corresponding failures in HDRc group were 20% and 24%. Sixty-eight percent (87/127) of patients treated by HDRc remained asymptomatic, whereas 42% (38/90) of patients were asymptomatic from the bowel and bladder symptoms after treatment with LDR. The 5-year OS rate was 60% (SE = 4%). The 5-year failure-free survival rate was 55% (SE = 3%). There was no significant difference between the groups. Conclusions: Image-guided HDRc planning led to a large decrease in late radiation effects in patients treated by HDRc. Patterns of failure and survival were similar in patients treated either by LDR or HDRc.

  3. A comparative study of Manchester system and ABS system in intracavitary brachytherapy dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surendran, N.; Uma Maheswari, P.; Meenakshi, P.S.; Mallika, A.; Gandhimathi, S.

    2008-01-01

    The success of brachytherapy in the treatment of cancer of cervix depends on the delivery of high radiation dose to the tumour in the cervix, sparing the critical organs rectum and bladder. Ideally, the dose should be prescribed to the individual patient's target volume. But almost all the institutions follow the dose prescription at a point instead of target volume, since tumour localization is not possible in radiograph. There are different systems of dose specifications for Ca. cervix treatment: -Manchester system and American Brachytherapy Society system. In Manchester system, Point A and Point B were defined. Point A was defined to be 2 cm superior to the external cervical os (or cervical end of the tandem) and 2 cm lateral to the cervical canal, which represents the location where the uterine vessels cross the ureter. Point B was defined 3 cm lateral to point A, which represents the lymph nodes. The American Board of Brachytherapy (ABs) recommends prescribing the dose to the new point called point H and pelvic wall points. Point H is based on the mid-dwell position of the vaginal ovoids. Finding Point H begins with drawing a line connecting the mid-dwell positions of the ovoids. From the intersection of this line with the tandem, move superiorly along the tandem 2 cm plus the radius of the ovoids, and then 2 cm perpendicular to the tandem in the lateral direction. In selectron LDR machine, instead of the mid-dwell position, the center of the ovoid source is taken. The pelvic wall points are located at the intersection of a horizontal tangent to superior aspect of the acetabulum on the AP radiograph

  4. Solar energy system performance evaluation: Seasonal report for Contemporary-Manchester, Manchester, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The operational and thermal performance of the solar energy system, Contemporary-Manchester, is described. The system was designed by Contemporary Systems Incorporated to provide space heating and domestic hot water preheating for a three story dwelling located on the New Hampshire Vocational Technical College campus, Manchester, New Hampshire. The net fossil energy savings for the period from March, 1979 to February, 1980 was 14.52 million Btu. However, the performance of the system must be degraded due to the fact that the building was unoccupied throughout the data assessment and analysis period. The unoccupied status prevented the normal adjustment of heating and ventilating controls for maintenance of comfort levels within the building. This lack of occupancy also prevented the typical family hot water usage, which would have allowed for more realistic evaluation of the hot water subsystem.

  5. LDR system concepts and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, B.

    1985-01-01

    The Large Deployable Reflector is a 20 meter diameter infrared/submillimeter telescope planned for the late 1990's. The Astronomy Survey Committee of the National Academy of Sciences (Field Committee) recommended LDR as one of the two space based observatories that should start development in the 80's. LDR's large aperture will give it unequaled resolution in the wavelength range from 30 to 1000 microns. To meet LDR performance goals will call for advances in several technology disciplines including: optics, controls, thermal control, detectors, cryogenic cooling, and large space structures.

  6. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) feasibility study update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alff, W. H.; Banderman, L. W.

    1983-01-01

    In 1982 a workshop was held to refine the science rationale for large deployable reflectors (LDR) and develop technology requirements that support the science rationale. At the end of the workshop, a set of LDR consensus systems requirements was established. The subject study was undertaken to update the initial LDR study using the new systems requirements. The study included mirror materials selection and configuration, thermal analysis, structural concept definition and analysis, dynamic control analysis and recommendations for further study. The primary emphasis was on the dynamic controls requirements and the sophistication of the controls system needed to meet LDR performance goals.

  7. LDR cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, T.

    1988-01-01

    A brief summary from the 1985 Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Asilomar 2 workshop of the requirements for LDR cryogenic cooling is presented. The heat rates are simply the sum of the individual heat rates from the instruments. Consideration of duty cycle will have a dramatic effect on cooling requirements. There are many possible combinations of cooling techniques for each of the three temperatures zones. It is clear that much further system study is needed to determine what type of cooling system is required (He-2, hybrid or mechanical) and what size and power is required. As the instruments, along with their duty cycles and heat rates, become better defined it will be possible to better determine the optimum cooling systems.

  8. The stepping source dosimetry system as an extension of the manchester system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rembowska, A.M.E.; Cook, M.; Hoskin, P.J.; Mahdevan, A.

    1996-01-01

    Brachytherapy based on absolute application of Manchester distribution rules has been used at Mount Vernon Hospital for single and two plane breast implants. Here dwell times are extracted from the required ratio of source activity in the periphery to that at the centre of the implant. Required dwell times can then be calculated directly from the original Manchester tables using a simple formula. Traditionally High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Dosimetry has used equal exposure times at each source dwell position as a starting point, an approach comparable to a Paris type implant. An optimisation system based on introducing constraints into the system can then be applied, however the number and type of constraints are limited, and there is little clinical evidence to justify this approach. The advantages of using Manchester distribution rules in planar implants, where the sources are contained in the target area or volume and also circumscribe it, but do not extend beyond it, together with the homogenous dose distribution achievable, are illustrated, with clinical examples. A proposed distribution, based on this approach for treating a spherical volume typical of planned prostate treatments at this centre is also described

  9. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Analysis of space station requirements for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Vinkey, Victor F.; Runge, Fritz C.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine how the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) might benefit from the use of the space station for assembly, checkout, deployment, servicing, refurbishment, and technology development. Requirements that must be met by the space station to supply benefits for a selected scenario are summarized. Quantitative and qualitative data are supplied. Space station requirements for LDR which may be utilized by other missions are identified. A technology development mission for LDR is outlined and requirements summarized. A preliminary experiment plan is included. Space Station Data Base SAA 0020 and TDM 2411 are updated.

  10. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Analysis of space station requirements for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Vinkey, Victor F.; Runge, Fritz C.

    1989-04-01

    A study was conducted to determine how the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) might benefit from the use of the space station for assembly, checkout, deployment, servicing, refurbishment, and technology development. Requirements that must be met by the space station to supply benefits for a selected scenario are summarized. Quantitative and qualitative data are supplied. Space station requirements for LDR which may be utilized by other missions are identified. A technology development mission for LDR is outlined and requirements summarized. A preliminary experiment plan is included. Space Station Data Base SAA 0020 and TDM 2411 are updated.

  11. Report of the Asilomar 3 LDR Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, M. J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The conclusions and recommendations of the workshop held to study technology development issues critical to the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) are summarized. LDR is to be a dedicated, orbiting, astronomical observatory, operating at wavelengths from 30 to 1000 microns, a spectral region where the Earth's atmosphere is almost completely opaque. Because it will have a large, segmented, passively cooled aperture, LDR addresses a wide range of technology areas. These include lightweight, low cost, structural composite reflector panels, primary support structures, wavefront sensing and adaptive optics, thermal background management, and integrated vibration and pointing control systems. The science objectives for LDR present instrument development challenges for coherent and direct arrayed detectors which can operate effectively at far infrared and submillimeter wavelengths, and for sub-Kelvin cryogenic systems.

  12. UOP LDR 300 All Assignments New

    OpenAIRE

    ADMIN

    2018-01-01

    UOP LDR 300 All Assignments New Check this A+ tutorial guideline at http://www.ldr300assignment.com/ldr-300-uop/ldr-300-all-assignments-latest For more classes visit http://www.ldr300assignment.com LDR 300 Week 1 Assignment Leadership Assessment (2 Papers) LDR 300 Week 2 Assignment Leadership Theories Matrix (2 Set) LDR 300 Week 2 Assignment Formulating Leadership Part I (2 Papers) LDR 300 Week 3 Assignment Interaction and Influence Amo...

  13. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 1: Executive summary, analyses and trades, and system concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative large deployable reflector (LDR) system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume includes the executive summary for the total study, a report of thirteen system analysis and trades tasks (optical configuration, aperture size, reflector material, segmented mirror, optical subsystem, thermal, pointing and control, transportation to orbit, structures, contamination control, orbital parameters, orbital environment, and spacecraft functions), and descriptions of three selected LDR system concepts. Supporting information is contained in appendices.

  14. Structural design of the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satter, Celeste M.; Lou, Michael C.

    1991-01-01

    An integrated Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) analysis model was developed to enable studies of system responses to the mechanical and thermal disturbances anticipated during on-orbit operations. Functional requirements of the major subsystems of the LDR are investigated, design trades are conducted, and design options are proposed. System mass and inertia properties are computed in order to estimate environmental disturbances, and in the sizing of control system hardware. Scaled system characteristics are derived for use in evaluating launch capabilities and achievable orbits. It is concluded that a completely passive 20-m primary appears feasible for the LDR from the standpoint of both mechanical vibration and thermal distortions.

  15. Structural design of the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satter, Celeste M.; Lou, Michael C.

    1991-09-01

    An integrated Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) analysis model was developed to enable studies of system responses to the mechanical and thermal disturbances anticipated during on-orbit operations. Functional requirements of the major subsystems of the LDR are investigated, design trades are conducted, and design options are proposed. System mass and inertia properties are computed in order to estimate environmental disturbances, and in the sizing of control system hardware. Scaled system characteristics are derived for use in evaluating launch capabilities and achievable orbits. It is concluded that a completely passive 20-m primary appears feasible for the LDR from the standpoint of both mechanical vibration and thermal distortions.

  16. MsLDR-creator: a web service to design msLDR assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, Felix; Dahl, Andreas; Sers, Christine

    2012-03-01

    MsLDR-creator is a free web service to design assays for the new DNA methylation detection method msLDR. The service provides the user with all necessary information about the oligonucleotides required for the measurement of a given CpG within a sequence of interest. The parameters are calculated by the nearest neighbour approach to achieve optimal behaviour during the experimental procedure. In addition, to guarantee a good start using msLDR, further information, like protocols and hints and tricks, are provided.

  17. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 2: Technology assessment and technology development plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative LDR system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume presents thirteen technology assessments and technology development plans, as well as an overview and summary of the LDR concepts. Twenty-two proposed augmentation projects are described (selected from more than 30 candidates). The five LDR technology areas most in need of supplementary support are: cryogenic cooling; astronaut assembly of the optically precise LDR in space; active segmented primary mirror; dynamic structural control; and primary mirror contamination control. Three broad, time-phased, five-year programs were synthesized from the 22 projects, scheduled, and funding requirements estimated.

  18. LDR structural technology activities at JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Ben

    1988-01-01

    The status of the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) technology requirements and the availability of that technology in the next few years are summarized. The research efforts at JPL related to these technology needs are also discussed. LDR requires that a large and relatively stiff truss-type backup structure have a surface accurate to 100 microns in space (initial position with thermal distortions) and the dynamic characteristics predictable and/or measurable by on-orbit system identification for micron level motion. This motion may result from the excitation of the lower modes or from wave-type motions. It is also assumed that the LDR structure can be ground tested to validate its ability to meet mission requirements. No program manager will commit a structural design based solely on analysis, unless the analysis is backed by a validation test program.

  19. Introduction to the report of the Asilomar 3 LDR workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) is a system concept for a dedicated, orbiting, submillimeter, far infrared, astronomical observatory. The purpose of the 3rd conference was to review the latest system concepts for LDR, update the science requirements, and assess the status of the technology development that was recommended at Asilomar 2. The technology development assessment included ongoing work within NASA, the DOD, and various universities. Problem areas and technologies not being adequately addressed were to be identified and prioritized. In particular, the CSTI program in Sensors and Precision Segmented Reflectors was reviewed for appropriateness and progress relative to LDR technology needs.

  20. Pointing control for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Y.; Briggs, C.

    1988-01-01

    One important aspect of the LDR control problem is the possible excitations of structural modes due to random disturbances, mirror chopping, and slewing maneuvers. An analysis was performed to yield a first order estimate of the effects of such dynamic excitations. The analysis involved a study of slewing jitters, chopping jitters, disturbance responses, and pointing errors, making use of a simplified planar LDR model which describes the LDR dynamics on a plane perpendicular to the primary reflector. Briefly, the results indicate that the command slewing profile plays an important role in minimizing the resultant jitter, even to a level acceptable without any control action. An optimal profile should therefore be studied.

  1. Land disposal restriction (LDR) waste management strategy at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, R.W.; Anderson, S.A.; Rising, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility which is a part of the nationwide DOE nuclear weapons production complex. Rocky Flats has accumulated (and will continue to generate) a substantial quantity of mixed waste subject to regulation under the land disposal restrictions (LDR) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). These waste streams include low level mixed waste and transuranic mixed waste which are LDR primarily due to solvent and heavy metal contamination. DOE and EPA have entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) which requires actions to be taken to ensure the accurate identification, safe storage and minimization of LDR mixed wastes prior to their ultimate treatment and/or disposal. As required by the FFCA, DOE has prepared a Comprehensive Treatment and Management Plant (CTMP) which describes the strategy and commitments for bringing LDR wastes at RFP into compliance with applicable regulations. This strategy includes waste characterization and reclassification, utilization of existing commercial and DOE treatment capacity, as well as, the development and implementation of treatment systems (and other management systems) for the purpose of achieving LDR regulatory compliance and ultimate waste disposal. This paper will give an overview of this strategy including a description of the major waste streams being addressed, the regulatory drivers, and plans and status of ongoing treatment systems technology development and implementation efforts

  2. Workshop on technology development issues for the large deployable reflector (LDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, K.

    1986-02-01

    The results of the 2nd Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Technology Review Workshop held at Asilomar, California, March 17 to 22, 1985, are summarized. The workshop was convened to update LDR Technology status and to revise as necessary the results for the first LDR Workshop held in June 1982. There were some 100 participants representing government agencies, industry, and universities. This Workshop's goal was to assess, identify, and set priorities for the LDR technology issues based on requirements identified in the first workshop. Four high-priority technology areas were identified: (1) mirror materials and construction; (2) sensing and controls; (3) system-simulation and modeling capability; and (4) submillimeter instruments. The results of the workshop were used to provide a list of technolgy issues for the development of a technology initiatives plan for the LDR by NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology

  3. Workshop on Technology Development Issues for the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Kenji (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The results of the 2nd Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Technology Review Workshop held at Asilomar, California, March 17 to 22, 1985, are summarized. The workshop was convened to update LDR Technology status and to revise as necessary the results for the first LDR Workshop held in June 1982. There were some 100 participants representing government agencies, industry, and universities. This Workshop's goal was to assess, identify, and set priorities for the LDR technology issues based on requirements identified in the first workshop. Four high-priority technology areas were identified: (1) mirror materials and construction; (2) sensing and controls; (3) system-simulation and modeling capability; and (4) submillimeter instruments. The results of the workshop were used to provide a list of technolgy issues for the development of a technology initiatives plan for the LDR by NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology.

  4. 3.375-Gb/s RGB-LED based WDM visible light communication system employing PAM-8 modulation with phase shifted Manchester coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Nan; Zhang, Mengjie; Zhou, Yingjun; Zhao, Jiaqi

    2016-09-19

    Optical background noise and second-order nonlinear distortions are two main challenges faced by indoor high-speed VLC system. In this paper, a novel phase shifted Manchester (PS-Manchester) coding based on PAM-8 is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to mitigate these noise and distortions. With the aid of PS-Manchester coding and WDM, a total data rate of 3.375-Gb/s can be successfully achieved in the RGB-LED based VLC system. The BER is under 7% HD-FEC limit of 3.8x10-3 after 1-m indoor free space transmission. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest data rate ever achieved in PAM VLC systems.

  5. Diffraction, chopping, and background subtraction for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Edward L.

    1988-01-01

    The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) will be an extremely sensitive infrared telescope if the noise due to the photons in the large thermal background is the only limiting factor. For observations with a 3 arcsec aperture in a broadband at 100 micrometers, a 20-meter LDR will emit 10(exp 12) per second, while the photon noise limited sensitivity in a deep survey observation will be 3,000 photons per second. Thus the background subtraction has to work at the 1 part per billion level. Very small amounts of scattered or diffracted energy can be significant if they are modulated by the chopper. The results are presented for 1-D and 2-D diffraction calculations for the lightweight, low-cost LDR concept that uses an active chopping quaternary to correct the wavefront errors introduced by the primary. Fourier transforms were used to evaluate the diffraction of 1 mm waves through this system. Unbalanced signals due to dust and thermal gradients were also studied.

  6. The effects of low dose radiation (LDR) on lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Liaoyuan; Du Zeji; Tian Hailin; Zhao Yujie; Zou Huawei; Zhou Jianhua; Kong Xiangrong; Zhang Jianhua; Shen Wei

    2001-01-01

    LDR could stimulate lymphocyte transformation for adults, children and infants. The effect of LDR on lymphocytes in malnourished children was lower, but higher on lymphocytes in cord blood. The effect of LDR on CD 4 + cells in adult persons was higher than that on CD + cells. NK cells were radioresistant. The stimulative effect of LDR on NK activity in tumor patients was lower than that in normal individuals. For the mice with tumors, LDR could increase the ratio of L 3 T 4 cells in blood, spleen and the number of cytotoxic T cells in the tumors. Extracellular fluid of the lymphocytes operated by LDR could also stimulate the lymphocyte transformation. The preliminary LDR could decrease the injuries to macromolecules, membrane antigens and chromosomes in lymphocytes which were induced by high dose radiation. The LDR- induced protein might be found from mouse spleen cells, and this protein could increase immune function in human and animals

  7. Changes of Space Debris Orbits After LDR Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnuk, E.; Golebiewska, J.; Jacquelard, C.; Haag, H.

    2013-09-01

    A lot of technical studies are currently developing concepts of active removal of space debris to protect space assets from on orbit collision. For small objects, such concepts include the use of ground-based lasers to remove or reduce the momentum of the objects thereby lowering their orbit in order to facilitate their decay by re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere. The concept of the Laser Debris Removal (LDR) system is the main subject of the CLEANSPACE project. One of the CLEANSPACE objectives is to define a global architecture (including surveillance, identification and tracking) for an innovative ground-based laser solution, which can remove hazardous medium debris around selected space assets. The CLEANSPACE project is realized by a European consortium in the frame of the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), Space topic. The use of sequence of laser operations to remove space debris, needs very precise predictions of future space debris orbital positions, on a level even better than 1 meter. Orbit determination, tracking (radar, optical and laser) and orbit prediction have to be performed with accuracy much better than so far. For that, the applied prediction tools have to take into account all perturbation factors that influence object orbit. The expected object's trajectory after the LDR operation is a lowering of its perigee. To prevent the debris with this new trajectory to collide with another object, a precise trajectory prediction after the LDR sequence is therefore the main task allowing also to estimate re-entry parameters. The LDR laser pulses change the debris object velocity v. The future orbit and re-entry parameters of the space debris after the LDR engagement can be calculated if the resulting ?v vector is known with the sufficient accuracy. The value of the ?v may be estimated from the parameters of the LDR station and from the characteristics of the orbital debris. However, usually due to the poor knowledge of the debris

  8. Experience with LDR and MDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Tomohiko; Okawa, Midori-Kita; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Karasawa, Kumiko; Fukuhara, Noboru

    1996-01-01

    As the brachytherapy dose-rate increases, it is necessary to reduce the total dose or to increase the fraction number with reducing the fraction dose in order not to increase the incidence of the late effect. With the introduction to the Tokyo Women's Medical College, Hospital of a remote afterloading system of Selectron - MDR, delivering dose-rate to point A became approximately twice of that with our classical cesium LDR manual afterloading technique. Material and Methods: Between 1987 to 1993 a total of, previously untreated 74 patients with cervical cancer received MDR brachytherapy using a Selection - MDR. This analysis is therefore of those patients series who underwent radical radioradiotherapy with MDR, 1987-1993, in comparison with the 347 cases who were treated with classical manual LDR afterloading machine, 1969-1986. The treatment was a brachytherapy during external radiotherapy and dos-rate at point A was 160-180 cGy/hour with MDR and 80-90 cGy/hour with LDR. The mean fraction dose was 800-1000 cGy by MDR and 1000-1200 cGy by LDR and fraction number was increased 1-2times in the MDR group with no change of a total dose at point A. Results: The mean age was 63.3 years in the MDR group and 60.2 in the LDR group. In the MDR group, 4 patients were at stage I, 16 stage II, 32 stage III, and 22 stage IV. In the LDR group, 32 were at stage I, 83 stage II, 183 stage III, and 49 stage IV. The medical rate was not significantly different between two groups. The tumor response by manual examination one month after radiotherapy showed no significant difference. The 5-year survival rate for the MDR and LDR groups were 100% : 78% at stage I, 61% : 71% at stage II and 52% : 53% at stage III, with no significant differences. Late complications by severity with grade II-III according to Kottureire's classification were not significantly different in the rectum or bladder. These results suggested that MDR brachytherapy was useful for the patients' QOL as it reduced the

  9. Cryogenics for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Three cryogenic questions of importance to Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) are discussed: the primary cooling requirement, the secondary cooling requirement, and the instrument changeout requirement.

  10. LDR structural experiment definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard A.; Gates, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to develop the definition of a structural flight experiment for a large precision segmented reflector that would utilize the Space Station. The objective of the study was to use the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) baseline configuration for focusing on experiment definition activity which would identify the Space Station accommodation requirements and interface constraints. Results of the study defined three Space Station based experiments to demonstrate the technologies needed for an LDR type structure. The basic experiment configurations are the same as the JPL baseline except that the primary mirror truss is 10 meters in diameter instead of 20. The primary objectives of the first experiment are to construct the primary mirror support truss and to determine its structural and thermal characteristics. Addition of the optical bench, thermal shield and primary mirror segments and alignment of the optical components occur on the second experiment. The structure will then be moved to the payload pointing system for pointing, optical control and scientific optical measurement for the third experiment.

  11. Observer agreement of the Manchester Triage System and the Emergency Severity Index: a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storm-Versloot, M. N.; Ubbink, D. T.; Chin a Choi, V.; Luitse, J. S. K.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To compare inter and intra-observer agreement of the Manchester Triage System (MTS) and the Emergency Severity Index (ESI). Methods: 50 representative emergency department (ED) scenarios derived from actual cases were presented to 18 ED nurses from three different hospitals. Eight of

  12. Företaget Manchester United : En kontraktsekonomisk studie

    OpenAIRE

    Ellermann, Daniel; Lönnefelt, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Denna kontraktsekonomiska studie behandlar fotbollsklubben och företaget Manchester United, en av världens största och framgångsrika klubbar alla kategorier. Syftet med uppsatsen är att dels kartlägga Manchester Uniteds kontraktsnät, dels att begripliggöra de kontraktsrelationer som särskiljer Manchester United från vanliga nuvärdesmaximerande företag utifrån kontraktsekonomisk teori. Den ekonomiska teori som ihuvudsak används i uppsatsen är kontraktsekonomisk teori som innefattar teorier om...

  13. Perancangan alat Pendeteksi Intensitas Cahaya Menggunakan LDR Berbasis Arduino uno

    OpenAIRE

    Karlina

    2017-01-01

    132411080 Telah dirancang dan dibuat alat ukur intensitas cahaya menggunakan LDR berbasis arduino uno. Alat ukur intensitas cahaya ini menggunakan LDR sebagai sensor intensitas cahaya,mikrokontroller,arduino uno berfungsi sebagai pengolah sinyal elektronik dari LDR dan sebagai pengolah data,sedangkan hasil pengolahan data akan ditampilkan pada LCD Dari hasil pengujian alat ini dihasilkan persentase kesalahan relatif rata-rata sekitar % Kata kunci :Arduino Uno,Lcd,LDR.

  14. Manchester medical society (imaging section) presidential address 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakeley, C. [University of Salford (United Kingdom); Manchester Royal Infirmary (CMFT) (United Kingdom)], E-mail: c.blakeley@salford.ac.uk; Hogg, P. [University of Salford (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    This article is based partly upon the Presidential Address of the Manchester Medical Society (Imaging Section) in 2008. It reviews the development of radiology services in the Manchester (UK) area from their inception in 1896 to the installation of the first EMI body CT scanner in Europe. It considers some of the innovative people in the Manchester area and some milestone events that occurred in that area to help establish the role and value of X-ray in diagnostic imaging. In this article the first recorded case of when X-ray imaging was used in a forensic domiciliary case is also outlined; this occurred approximately 35 miles north of Manchester on 23rd April 1896. The article also explains some interesting background information on the development of the first EMI CT scanner, drawing particularly on the revenue stream generated by the music section of EMI through the success of The Beatles - a band which emanated 35 miles from Manchester in Liverpool.

  15. Manchester medical society (imaging section) presidential address 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakeley, C.; Hogg, P.

    2009-01-01

    This article is based partly upon the Presidential Address of the Manchester Medical Society (Imaging Section) in 2008. It reviews the development of radiology services in the Manchester (UK) area from their inception in 1896 to the installation of the first EMI body CT scanner in Europe. It considers some of the innovative people in the Manchester area and some milestone events that occurred in that area to help establish the role and value of X-ray in diagnostic imaging. In this article the first recorded case of when X-ray imaging was used in a forensic domiciliary case is also outlined; this occurred approximately 35 miles north of Manchester on 23rd April 1896. The article also explains some interesting background information on the development of the first EMI CT scanner, drawing particularly on the revenue stream generated by the music section of EMI through the success of The Beatles - a band which emanated 35 miles from Manchester in Liverpool.

  16. Relationship between pedographic analysis and the Manchester scale in hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliou, Kalliopi; Paraskevas, George; Kanavaros, Panagiotis; Gekas, Christos; Barbouti, Alexandra; Kitsoulis, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the Manchester scale and foot pressure distribution in patients with hallux valgus deformity. The study included 152 feet of 87 patients with hallux valgus and a control group of 391 feet of 241 individuals without hallux valgus deformity. The severity of hallux valgus was determined using the Manchester scale grading system. Plantar loading patterns in 10 foot areas were determined for all participants. According to the Manchester scale, 72% of the participants had no, 12.9% mild, 10.7% moderate and 4.4% severe deformity. The Manchester scale grade was highly correlated with both hallux valgus angle and first intermetatarsal angle (p=0.00). Significant differences between the four grades were present for mean pressure under the hallux and the first and second metatarsal heads only (p=0.00). The load distribution under these areas was higher as the hallux valgus progressed from mild to more severe. In all groups, the highest pressure was observed under the second metatarsal head. The Manchester scale was strongly associated with both the hallux valgus angle and the first intermetatarsal angle. The progression from mild to moderate and severe deformation is associated with peak pressure raise at the hallux, first and second metatarsal heads. The Manchester scale appears to be a useful tool to provide information for the degree of deformity and the pressure under painful foot areas.

  17. MANCHESTER TRIAGE SYSTEM IN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE: AMBIGUITIES AND CHALLENGES RELATED TO ACCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Danielle de Araújo Moreira; Hanna Beatriz Bacelar Tibães; Renata Cristina Rocha Batista; Cecília Maria Lima Cardoso; Maria José Menezes Brito

    2017-01-01

    Objetivo: comprender ambigüedades y desafíos relacionados con el acceso, después de la implantación del Sistema de Triage de Manchester en la atención primaria en salud. Método: investigación cualitativa, que utilizó la entrevista semiestructurada con enfermeros, médicos y auxiliares de enfermería, totalizando 22 profesionales. Los datos fueron analizados por medio de análisis de contenido temático . Resultados: el Sistema de Triage de Manchester interfirió de forma antagónica en el acce...

  18. LDR: A submillimeter great observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert

    1990-12-01

    The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), a high Earth orbit free flying 10 to 20 m diameter deployable telescope, is described. The LDR is intended for use throughout the submillimeter band, using imaging receivers with unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution. Its mission is to produce pictures of line emission regions in the solar neighborhood, in nearby galaxies and in objects at the edge of the known galaxy distribution. It is predicted to be an ideal instrument for exploring the first galaxies and protogalaxies as the submillimeter cooling lines should light up as soon as metals form.

  19. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) - A concept for an orbiting submillimeter-infrared telescope for the 1990s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, P. N.; Gulkis, S.; Kulper, T. B. H.; Kiya, M.

    1983-01-01

    The history and background of the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) are reviewed. The results of the June 1982 Asilomar (CA) workshop are incorporated into the LDR science objectives and telescope concept. The areas where the LDR may have the greatest scientific impact are in the study of star formation and planetary systems in the own and nearby galaxies and in cosmological studies of the structure and evolution of the early universe. The observational requirements for these and other scientific studies give rise to a set of telescope functional requirements. These, in turn, are satisfied by an LDR configuration which is a Cassegrain design with a 20 m diameter, actively controlled, segmented, primary reflector, diffraction limited at a wavelength of 30 to 50 microns. Technical challenges in the LDR development include construction of high tolerance mirror segments, surface figure measurement, figure control, vibration control, pointing, cryogenics, and coherent detectors. Project status and future plans for the LDR are discussed.

  20. PENGARUH CAR DAN LDR TERHADAP RETURN ON ASSETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deden Edwar Yokeu Bernardin

    2016-10-01

      Banking is one of the sectors that dominate perkonomian Indonesia. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the Capital Adequacy Ratio (CAR and the Loan to Deposit Ratio (LDR Of Return On Assets (ROA at Bank BJB listed on the Stock Exchange with the observation period 2009 - 2015. The method used by researchers is using dekskriptif and verification method with quantitative approach using multiple regression analysis. This study uses a support program SPSS 20. The results in this study stated that partially showed that the CAR significant effect on ROA, means to show the truth of the factual from the Bank BJB is possible with the increased quality of the CAR will be the effect on the profit shown by the increase in ROA and LDR no significant effect on ROA, that the increase in liquidity does not necessarily increase profits in the analysis using ROA and by no means influence. Additionally simultaneously both CAR and LDR significant effect on ROA, means that the ratio analysis done of the higher value of CAR and LDR will necessarily increase in the profits of the Bank BJB by using ROA.   Keywords: CAR, LDR and ROA

  1. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Requirements for Space Station Accommodations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, D. A.; Clayton, M. J.; Runge, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    Top level requirements for assembly and integration of the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Observatory at the Space Station are examined. Concepts are currently under study for LDR which will provide a sequel to the Infrared Astronomy Satellite and the Space Infrared Telescope Facility. LDR will provide a spectacular capability over a very broad spectral range. The Space Station will provide an essential facility for the initial assembly and check out of LDR, as well as a necessary base for refurbishment, repair and modification. By providing a manned platform, the Space Station will remove the time constraint on assembly associated with use of the Shuttle alone. Personnel safety during necessary EVA is enhanced by the presence of the manned facility.

  2. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) requirements for space station accommodations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, D. A.; Clayton, M. J.; Runge, F. C.

    1985-04-01

    Top level requirements for assembly and integration of the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Observatory at the Space Station are examined. Concepts are currently under study for LDR which will provide a sequel to the Infrared Astronomy Satellite and the Space Infrared Telescope Facility. LDR will provide a spectacular capability over a very broad spectral range. The Space Station will provide an essential facility for the initial assembly and check out of LDR, as well as a necessary base for refurbishment, repair and modification. By providing a manned platform, the Space Station will remove the time constraint on assembly associated with use of the Shuttle alone. Personnel safety during necessary EVA is enhanced by the presence of the manned facility.

  3. Report: Manchester Band of Pomo Indians Needs to Improve Its Financial Management System and Demonstrate Completion of Grant Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #16-P-0320, September 21, 2016. The Manchester Band of Pomo Indians' inadequate financial management system, and shortfalls in completing grant tasks, resulted in all costs claimed being questioned.

  4. Low-dose radiation (LDR) induces hematopoietic hormesis: LDR-induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells into peripheral blood circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Guanjun; Cui, Jiuwei; Xue, Lu; Cai, Lu

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the stimulating effect of low-dose radiation (LDR) on bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) proliferation and peripheral blood mobilization. Mice were exposed to 25- to 100-mGy x-rays. Bone marrow and peripheral blood HPCs (BFU-E, CFU-GM, and c-kit+ cells) were measured, and GM-CSF, G-CSF, and IL-3 protein and mRNA expression were detected using ELISA, slot blot hybridization, and Northern blot methods. To functionally evaluate LDR-stimulated and -mobilized HPCs, repopulation of peripheral blood cells in lethally irradiated recipients after transplantation of LDR-treated donor HPCs was examined by WBC counts, animal survival, and colony-forming units in the recipient spleens (CFUs-S). 75-mGy x-rays induced a maximal stimulation for bone marrow HPC proliferation (CFU-GM and BFU-E formation) 48 hours postirradiation, along with a significant increase in HPC mobilization into peripheral blood 48 to 72 hours postradiation, as shown by increases in CFU-GM formation and proportion of c-kit+ cells in the peripheral mononuclear cells. 75-mGy x-rays also maximally induced increases in G-CSF and GM-CSF mRNA expression in splenocytes and levels of serum GM-CSF. To define the critical role of these hematopoietic-stimulating factors in HPC peripheral mobilization, direct administration of G-CSF at a dose of 300 microg/kg/day or 150 microg/kg/day was applied and found to significantly stimulate GM-CFU formation and increase c-kit+ cells in the peripheral mononuclear cells. More importantly, 75-mGy x-rays plus 150 microg/kg/day G-CSF (LDR/150-G-CSF) produced a similar effect to that of 300 microg/kg/day G-CSF alone. Furthermore, the capability of LDR-mobilized donor HPCs to repopulate blood cells was confirmed in lethally irradiated recipient mice by counting peripheral WBC and CFUs-S. These results suggest that LDR induces hematopoietic hormesis, as demonstrated by HPC proliferation and peripheral mobilization, providing a

  5. Biological equivalence between LDR and PDR in cervical cancer: multifactor analysis using the linear-quadratic model

    OpenAIRE

    José Guilherme Couto; Isabel Bravo; Rui Pirraco

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was the biological comparison between Low Dose Rate (LDR) and Pulsed Dose Rate (PDR) in cervical cancer regarding the discontinuation of the afterloading system used for the LDR treatments at our Institution since December 2009. Material and methods In the first phase we studied the influence of the pulse dose and the pulse time in the biological equivalence between LDR and PDR treatments using the Linear Quadratic Model (LQM). In the second phase, the equival...

  6. The reliability of the Manchester Triage System (MTS): a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhaghi, Amir; Mazlom, Reza; Heydari, Abbas; Ebrahimi, Mohsen

    2017-05-01

    Although the Manchester Triage System (MTS) was first developed two decades ago, the reliability of the MTS has not been questioned through comparison with a moderating variable; therefore, the aim of this study is to determine the extent of the reliability of MTS using a meta-analytic review. Electronic databases were searched up to 1 March 2014. Studies were only included if they had reported sample sizes, reliability coefficients, and adequate description of the reliability assessment. The Guidelines for Reporting Reliability and Agreement Studies was used. Two reviewers independently examined abstracts and extracted data. The effect size was obtained by the z-transformation of reliability coefficients. Data were pooled with random-effects models, and meta-regression was performed based on the method-of-moments estimator. Seven studies were included. The pooled coefficient for the MTS was substantial at 0.751 (CI 95%: 0.677 to 0.810); the incidence of mistriage is greater than 50%. Agreement is higher for the latest version of MTS (for adults) among nurse-experts and in countries in closer proximity to the country of MTS origin (the UK, in Manchester) than for the oldest (pediatric) version, nurse-nurse raters, and countries at a greater distance from the UK. The MTS showed an acceptable level of overall reliability in the emergency department, but more development is required to attain almost perfect agreement. © 2016 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Additive protection by LDR and FGF21 treatment against diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Minglong; Yu, Lechu; Zhang, Fangfang; Lu, Xuemian; Li, Xiaokun; Cheng, Peng; Lin, Xiufei; He, Luqing; Jin, Shunzi; Tan, Yi; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Chi; Cai, Lu

    2015-07-01

    The onset of diabetic nephropathy (DN) is associated with both systemic and renal changes. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-21 prevents diabetic complications mainly by improving systemic metabolism. In addition, low-dose radiation (LDR) protects mice from DN directly by preventing renal oxidative stress and inflammation. In the present study, we tried to define whether the combination of FGF21 and LDR could further prevent DN by blocking its systemic and renal pathogeneses. To this end, type 2 diabetes was induced by feeding a high-fat diet for 12 wk followed by a single dose injection of streptozotocin. Diabetic mice were exposed to 50 mGy LDR every other day for 4 wk with and without 1.5 mg/kg FGF21 daily for 8 wk. The changes in systemic parameters, including blood glucose levels, lipid profiles, and insulin resistance, as well as renal pathology, were examined. Diabetic mice exhibited renal dysfunction and pathological abnormalities, all of which were prevented significantly by LDR and/or FGF21; the best effects were observed in the group that received the combination treatment. Our studies revealed that the additive renal protection conferred by the combined treatment against diabetes-induced renal fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative damage was associated with the systemic improvement of hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance. These results suggest that the combination treatment with LDR and FGF21 prevented DN more efficiently than did either treatment alone. The mechanism behind these protective effects could be attributed to the suppression of both systemic and renal pathways. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Manchester Coding Option for SpaceWire: Providing Choices for System Level Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Glenn; Kisin, Alex

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an optional coding scheme for SpaceWire in lieu of the current Data Strobe scheme for three reasons. First reason is to provide a straightforward method for electrical isolation of the interface; secondly to provide ability to reduce the mass and bend radius of the SpaceWire cable; and thirdly to provide a means for a common physical layer over which multiple spacecraft onboard data link protocols could operate for a wide range of data rates. The intent is to accomplish these goals without significant change to existing SpaceWire design investments. The ability to optionally use Manchester coding in place of the current Data Strobe coding provides the ability to DC balanced the signal transitions unlike the SpaceWire Data Strobe coding; and therefore the ability to isolate the electrical interface without concern. Additionally, because the Manchester code has the clock and data encoded on the same signal, the number of wires of the existing SpaceWire cable could be optionally reduced by 50. This reduction could be an important consideration for many users of SpaceWire as indicated by the already existing effort underway by the SpaceWire working group to reduce the cable mass and bend radius by elimination of shields. However, reducing the signal count by half would provide even greater gains. It is proposed to restrict the data rate for the optional Manchester coding to a fixed data rate of 10 Megabits per second (Mbps) in order to make the necessary changes simple and still able to run in current radiation tolerant Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Even with this constraint, 10 Mbps will meet many applications where SpaceWire is used. These include command and control applications and many instruments applications with have moderate data rate. For most NASA flight implementations, SpaceWire designs are in rad-tolerant FPGAs, and the desire to preserve the heritage design investment is important for cost and risk considerations. The

  9. Poet North Manchester Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    This update August 9, 2016 letter from EPA approves, with modifications, the petition from Poet Biorefining-North Manchester, LLC, regarding non-grandfathered ethanol produced through a dry mill process, qualifying under the Clean Air Act for renewable

  10. FAKTOR-FAKTOR YANG MEMPENGARUHI LOAN TO DEPOSIT RATIO (LDR BANK UMUM DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Novalina Ambaroita

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Loan to Deposit Ratio kredit belum menunjukan optimalisasi sesuai dengan peraturan Bank Indonesia yaitu berkisar 85%-110%. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendiskripsikan DPK, CAR, dan NPL, dan menganalisis bagaimana pengaruh CAR, DPK, NPL, terhadap LDR dalam jangka pendek dan jangka panjang bank umum di Indonesia. Data yang digunakan adalah time series berdasarkan bulanan tahun 2009-2013 yang diperoleh dari Bank Indonesia dan Otoritas jasa keuangan (OJK. Metode analisis yang digunakan adalah Error Corection Model (ECM dan menggunakan uji asumsi klasik. Hasil dalam jangka panjang CAR tidak berpengaruh terhadap LDR, dalam jangka pendek CAR berpengaruh positif terhadap LDR bank umum di Indonesia, dalam jangka panjang DPK berpengaruh positif terhadap LDR dan dalam jangka pendek DPK tidak berpengaruh terhadap LDR bank umum di Indonesia, dalam jangka panjang NPL berpengaruh negatif terhadap LDR dan dalam jangka pendek NPL berpengaruh positif terhadap LDR. Saran untuk DPK diusahakan semaksimal mungkin. Berbagai inovasi terus dimunculkan dan berbagai strategi dimunculkan agar DPK yang efektif dan agar dalam jangka pendek dan jangka panjang dapat lebih maksimal sehingga tidak ada hambatan.  Loan to deposit ratio not show that the optimization of credit in accordance with the bank indonesia but range 85 % -110 % . This study attempts to mendiskripsikan dpk , car , and non-performing loans of the , and analyze how the influence of car , dpk , non-performing loans of the , against ldr in the short term and longer term commercial banks in indonesia . The data used was based on time series monthly koni year obtained from bank indonesia and the authority of financial services ( ojk . In the long run this results not affect the ldr, on this positive effect on short-term ldr commercial banks in indonesia; the positive effect on long-term deposits ldr in short-term deposits do not affect the ldr commercial banks in indonesia; in its negative effects towards long

  11. Biological equivalence between LDR and PDR in cervical cancer: multifactor analysis using the linear-quadratic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guilherme Couto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this work was the biological comparison between Low Dose Rate (LDR and Pulsed DoseRate (PDR in cervical cancer regarding the discontinuation of the afterloading system used for the LDR treatments atour Institution since December 2009. Material and methods: In the first phase we studied the influence of the pulse dose and the pulse time in the biologicalequivalence between LDR and PDR treatments using the Linear Quadratic Model (LQM. In the second phase,the equivalent dose in 2 Gy/fraction (EQD2 for the tumor, rectum and bladder in treatments performed with both techniqueswas evaluated and statistically compared. All evaluated patients had stage IIB cervical cancer and were treatedwith External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT plus two Brachytherapy (BT applications. Data were collected from 48 patients(26 patients treated with LDR and 22 patients with PDR. Results: In the analyses of the influence of PDR parameters in the biological equivalence between LDR and PDRtreatments (Phase 1, it was calculated that if the pulse dose in PDR was kept equal to the LDR dose rate, a small therapeuticloss was expected. If the pulse dose was decreased, the therapeutic window became larger, but a correction inthe prescribed dose was necessary. In PDR schemes with 1 hour interval between pulses, the pulse time did not influencesignificantly the equivalent dose. In the comparison between the groups treated with LDR and PDR (Phase 2 weconcluded that they were not equivalent, because in the PDR group the total EQD2 for the tumor, rectum and bladderwas smaller than in the LDR group; the LQM estimated that a correction in the prescribed dose of 6% to 10% was ne -cessary to avoid therapeutic loss. Conclusions: A correction in the prescribed dose was necessary; this correction should be achieved by calculatingthe PDR dose equivalent to the desired LDR total dose.

  12. Biological equivalence between LDR and PDR in cervical cancer: multifactor analysis using the linear-quadratic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, José Guilherme; Bravo, Isabel; Pirraco, Rui

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this work was the biological comparison between Low Dose Rate (LDR) and Pulsed Dose Rate (PDR) in cervical cancer regarding the discontinuation of the afterloading system used for the LDR treatments at our Institution since December 2009. In the first phase we studied the influence of the pulse dose and the pulse time in the biological equivalence between LDR and PDR treatments using the Linear Quadratic Model (LQM). In the second phase, the equivalent dose in 2 Gy/fraction (EQD(2)) for the tumor, rectum and bladder in treatments performed with both techniques was evaluated and statistically compared. All evaluated patients had stage IIB cervical cancer and were treated with External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) plus two Brachytherapy (BT) applications. Data were collected from 48 patients (26 patients treated with LDR and 22 patients with PDR). In the analyses of the influence of PDR parameters in the biological equivalence between LDR and PDR treatments (Phase 1), it was calculated that if the pulse dose in PDR was kept equal to the LDR dose rate, a small the-rapeutic loss was expected. If the pulse dose was decreased, the therapeutic window became larger, but a correction in the prescribed dose was necessary. In PDR schemes with 1 hour interval between pulses, the pulse time did not influence significantly the equivalent dose. In the comparison between the groups treated with LDR and PDR (Phase 2) we concluded that they were not equivalent, because in the PDR group the total EQD(2) for the tumor, rectum and bladder was smaller than in the LDR group; the LQM estimated that a correction in the prescribed dose of 6% to 10% was ne-cessary to avoid therapeutic loss. A correction in the prescribed dose was necessary; this correction should be achieved by calculating the PDR dose equivalent to the desired LDR total dose.

  13. System concept for a moderate cost Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, P. N.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Diner, A.; Freeland, R. E.; Irace, W. R.; Mcelroy, P. M.; Meinel, A. B.; Tolivar, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    A study was carried out at JPL during the first quarter of 1985 to develop a system concept for NASA's LDR. Major features of the concept are a four-mirror, two-stage optical system; a lightweight structural composite segmented primary reflector; and a deployable truss backup structure with integral thermal shield. The two-stage optics uses active figure control at the quaternary reflector located at the primary reflector exit pupil, allowing the large primary to be passive. The lightweight composite reflector panels limit the short-wavelength operation to approximately 30 microns but reduce the total primary reflector weight by a factor of 3 to 4 over competing technologies. On-orbit thermal analysis indicates a primary reflector equilibrium temperature of less than 200 K with a maximum gradient of about 5 C across the 20-m aperture. Weight and volume estimates are consistent with a single Shuttle launch, and are based on Space Station assembly and checkout.

  14. Coexistence Mechanism for Colocated HDR/LDR WPANs Air Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Ramjee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the issues of interference management among Low Data Rate (LDR and High Data Rate (HDR WPAN air interfaces that are located in close-proximity (up to 10 cm and eventually on the same multimode device. After showing the noticeable performance degradation in terms of Bit Error Rate (BER and goodput due to the out-of-band interference of an HDR air interface over an LDR air interface, the paper presents a novel coexistence mechanism, named Alternating Wireless Activity (AWA, which is shown to greatly improve the performance in terms of goodput of the most interference vulnerable air interface (i.e., the LDR air interface. The main difference of the proposed mechanism with respect to other collaborative mechanisms based on time-scheduling is that it synchronizes the transmission of the LDR and HDR WPANs at the superframe level instead of packet level. Advantages and limitations of this choice are presented in the paper. Furthermore the functionalities of the AWA mechanism are positioned in a common protocol layer over the Medium Access Control (MAC sublayers of the HDR and LDR devices and it can be used with any standard whose MAC is based on a superframe structure.

  15. The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) report of the Science Coordination Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) is a telescope designed to carry out high-angular resolution, high-sensitivity observations at far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. The scientific rationale for the LDR is discussed in light of the recent Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) and Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) results and the several new ground-based observatories planned for the late 1980s. The importance of high sensitivity and high angular resolution observations from space in the submillimeter region is stressed. The scientific and technical problems of using the LDR in a light bucket mode at approx. less than 5 microns and in designing the LDR as an unfilled aperture with subarcsecond resolution are also discussed. The need for an aperture as large as 20 m is established, along with the requirements of beam-shape stability, spatial chopping, thermal control, and surface figure stability. The instrument complement required to cover the wavelength-spectral resolution region of interest to the LDR is defined.

  16. A Brief History of Manchester Astronomical Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, K. J.

    Manchester Astronomical Society celebrated its centenary in September 2003. But that centenary was of a hundred years as the MAS: the history of the society goes back much further, and can be traced directly to that great era of.public awareness of astronomy and amateur interest in Victorian England in the last half of the nineteenth century. Allan Chapman has discussed this period in detail, so the present paper concentrates on the MAS's particular influence on Manchester astronomers and recent work on the history of the society.

  17. Divergently overlapping cis-encoded antisense RNA regulating toxin-antitoxin systems from E. coli: hok/sok, ldr/rdl, symE/symR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Mitsuoki

    2012-12-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are categorized into three classes based on the type of antitoxin. In type I TA systems, the antitoxin is a small antisense RNA that inhibits translation of small toxic proteins by binding to the corresponding mRNAs. Those type I TA systems were originally identified as plasmid stabilization modules rendering a post-segregational killing (PSK) effect on the host cells. The type I TA loci also exist on the Escherichia coli chromosome but their biological functions are less clear. Genetic organization and regulatory elements of hok/sok and ldr/rdl families are very similar and the toxins are predicted to contain a transmembrane domain, but otherwise share no detectable sequence similarity. This review will give an overview of the type I TA modules of E. coli K-12, especially hok/sok, ldr/rdl and SOS-inducible symE/symR systems, which are regulated by divergently overlapping cis-encoded antisense RNAs.

  18. Wavefront error sensing for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, Eldred F.; Glavich, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    Wavefront sensing is a significant aspect of the LDR control problem and requires attention at an early stage of the control system definition and design. A combination of a Hartmann test for wavefront slope measurement and an interference test for piston errors of the segments was examined and is presented as a point of departure for further discussion. The assumption is made that the wavefront sensor will be used for initial alignment and periodic alignment checks but that it will not be used during scientific observations. The Hartmann test and the interferometric test are briefly examined.

  19. Optimal conditions of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Li, Fengsheng; Cui, Jiuwei; Guo, Weiying; Li, Cai; Li, Wei; Wang, Guixia; Xing, Xiao; Gao, Ying; Ge, Yuanyuan; Wang, Guanjun; Cai, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Aims We reported the attenuation of diabetes-induced renal dysfunction by exposure to multiple low-dose radiation (LDR) at 25 mGy every other day via suppressing renal oxidative damage. We here explored the optimal conditions of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes. Main methods Type 1 diabetic mice were induced with multiple injections of low-dose streptozotocin in male C57BL/6J mice. Diabetic mice received whole body X-irradiation at dose of 12.5, 25 or 50 mGy every other day for either 4 or 8 weeks. Age-matched normal mice were similarly irradiated at the dose of 25 mGy for 4 or 8 weeks. The renal function and histopathological changes were examined at the 4th and 8th week of the study. Key findings Diabetes induced renal dysfunction, shown by the decreased creatinine and increased microalbumin in urinary. Renal oxidative damage, detected by protein nitration and lipid oxidation, and remodeling, reflected by increased expression of connective tissue growth factor, collagen IV and fibronectin, were significantly increased in diabetic mice. All these renal pathological and function changes in diabetic mice were significantly attenuated by exposure to LDR at all regimens, among which, however, exposure to LDR at 12.5 mGy for 8 weeks provided the best preventive effect on the kidney of diabetic mice. Significance Our results suggest that whole-body LDR at 12.5 mGy every other day for 8 weeks is the optimal condition of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes. PMID:24631139

  20. Dose rate considerations in brachytherapy: biological equivalence of LDR and HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, C.G.

    1994-01-01

    The linear-quadratic model for cell survival and bioeffect doses is discussed and equations for low dose rate (LDR), high dose rate (HDR) and intermediate situations are presented. The model, when used to define LDR and single fractions of HDR, shows, that these correspond to irradiations lasting longer than about 14 hours or shorter than about 0.7 hours, respectively. It is shown that, for HDR to be as safe and effective as LDR, the dose-rate effect of LDR has to be replaced by the fractionation-effect of HDR. This is necessary in order to take advantage of the differential repair characteristics between late-reacting normal tissue and tumor cells at low doses and low dose rates. Using the linear-quadratic model to simulate repair mathematically, it is shown that the number of fractions required is highly dependent upon what parameters are assumed for normal tissues and tumor, as well as whether or not there is any physical advantage gained by conversion from LDR to HDR. (author). 20 refs., 7 figs

  1. Permanent LDR implants in treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowronek, J.; Kanikowski, M.; Chichel, A.; Zwierzchowski, G.

    2009-01-01

    Low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) is a radiation method known for several years in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. The main idea of this method is to implant small radioactive seeds directly into the prostate gland. LDR brachytherapy is applied as a monotherapy and also used along with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a boost. In most cases it is used as a sole radical treatment modality, but not as a palliative treatment. The application of permanent seed implants is a curative treatment alternative in patients with organ- confined cancer, without extracapsular extension of the tumour. This technique is particularly popular in the United States. In Europe, however, high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) is more popular in early-stage prostate cancer treatment (as a boost). The aim of this publication is to describe methods, indications, complications and selected results of prostate cancer LDR brachytherapy. (authors)

  2. Intervening to promote early initiation of breastfeeding in the LDR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komara, Carol; Simpson, Diana; Teasdale, Carla; Whalen, Gaye; Bell, Shay; Giovanetto, Laurie

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an interventional protocol for the early initiation of breastfeeding that would remove barriers in the labor, delivery, recovery (LDR) unit. Descriptive design using 100 postpartum mothers who were interviewed before discharge at a large university hospital in the south-central United States. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis. The protocol was effective for initiating breastfeeding, and breastfeeding increased from 53% to 66%. When barriers to breastfeeding are reduced in the LDR setting, women will breastfeed. It is possible that reducing hospital barriers to breastfeeding in the LDR can also set the stage for sustained breastfeeding during hospitalization and for less supplementation with formula.

  3. LDR vs. HDR brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer: the view from radiobiological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Christopher R

    2002-01-01

    Permanent LDR brachytherapy and temporary HDR brachytherapy are competitive techniques for clinically localized prostate radiotherapy. Although a randomized trial will likely never be conducted comparing these two forms of brachytherapy, a comparative radiobiological modeling analysis proves useful in understanding some of their intrinsic differences, several of which could be exploited to improve outcomes. Radiobiological models based upon the linear quadratic equations are presented for fractionated external beam, fractionated (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy, and (125)I and (103)Pd LDR brachytherapy. These models incorporate the dose heterogeneities present in brachytherapy based upon patient-derived dose volume histograms (DVH) as well as tumor doubling times and repair kinetics. Radiobiological parameters are normalized to correspond to three accepted clinical risk factors based upon T-stage, PSA, and Gleason score to compare models with clinical series. Tumor control probabilities (TCP) for LDR and HDR brachytherapy (as monotherapy or combined with external beam) are compared with clinical bNED survival rates. Predictions are made for dose escalation with HDR brachytherapy regimens. Model predictions for dose escalation with external beam agree with clinical data and validate the models and their underlying assumptions. Both LDR and HDR brachytherapy achieve superior tumor control when compared with external beam at conventional doses (LDR brachytherapy as boost achieves superior tumor control than when used as monotherapy. Stage for stage, both LDR and current HDR regimens achieve similar tumor control rates, in agreement with current clinical data. HDR monotherapy with large-dose fraction sizes might achieve superior tumor control compared with LDR, especially if prostate cancer possesses a high sensitivity to dose fractionation (i.e., if the alpha/beta ratio is low). Radiobiological models support the current clinical evidence for equivalent outcomes in localized

  4. The economics of a professional sports club Manchester United

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlov, Vitalij

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of the economic situation of Manchester United, recognition of reasons and sources of its indebtedness and evaluation of its necessity. In my thesis I will analyse club revenues and costs, financial contributions of competitions Manchester United takes part in. I will find weaknesses of the club that contribute to financial losses and suggest solutions.

  5. Effect of low dose radiation (LDR) on biological activity of NK cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Liyun; Lin Meixiong; Luo Min; Ran Min; Liang Xuefei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the in vitro and in vivo effect of LDR on the proliferation and killing activity of mouse NK cells with exploitation of the related mechanism of signal transduction. The effect of infused NK cells on inhibiton of oncogenesis and tumor burden regression was also studied. Methods: Mononuclear cells extracted from mouse spleen were treated with immunomagnetic bead for the isolation of CD3 - /CD16 + , CD56 + cells. After verified with flowcytometry, these NK cells were cultured with mice splenic cells (irradiated with 20Gy 60 Co gamma ray) as feeder cells and rhIL-2 as induction factor for 3 rounds (5 days each round). Specimens of cultured NK cells were treated with different doses of radiation (25mGy, 75mGy, 200mGy, 500mGy), the proliferation index (PI) with tumoreidal activity on K562 cells (with 3 H-TdR) incorporation was examined at 4h, 24h, 48h, 72h after irradiation respectively. The role of P38MAPK signal pathway in the LDR effect was examined with adding either inhibitor (SB203580) or activator (P79350) of P38MAPK into the culture and measuring the PI, Killing activity (as expression of the related factors IFN-gamma, FasL, perforin) of NK cells thereafter. The in vivo test involved exposing mice to whole body 25mGy irradiation, harvesting splenic NK cells at 4h, 24h, 48h, 72h later respectively and performing the above-described in vitro procedures. Inhibition of oncogenesis was examined in vivo with infusion of cultured NK cells (LDR treated vs LDR non-treated) 10 days after infusion of K562 cells into mice and examination of hepatic/splenic CD 13+ , S-stage cells and peripheral blood tumor cells in the sacrificed animal another 10 days later. Also, K562 cells were innoculated subcutaneously into mice. After tumor nodule formation (2.0 x 2.0 mm), NK cells (LDR treated vs non-treated) were infused and regression of the tumor nodule with the weight of hepatic tumor mass was noticed in sacrificed animals on d 8 and the survival rate on d 40

  6. Impact of small variations in LDR for late-reacting tissue in gyn brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourel, Victor J.; Torre, Marcela de la; Rodriguez, Isabel

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: The linear-quadratic model shows that while a slight variation in the LDR Brachytherapy dose rate affects just a little the tumoral tissue ERD (Extrapolated Response Dose), the effect can be very strong in the late reacting tissues. The LDR Brachytherapy in cervix cancer is done with a dose rate in point A that range between 0.5 Gy/h and 0.7 Gy/h. This small range is a very heavy variable to find equivalent schemes. Material and Methods: Whith the LC10 program (based in the linear-quadratic model developed in our centre) a radiobiological analysis of the GYN Brachytherapy considering the dosimetric distribution of the most usual applicators is done. Different studies show that the critical rectal and bladder point doses in reference to point A ranges between 60% and 80%. Bearing this in mind, and the typical variables (tissue parameters, number of fractions, dose per fraction, total dose, etc.) the effect of the LDR dose rate variation in particularly analysed while calculating the equivalent HDR scheme. Result and discussion: When equivalent schemes are calculated in practise it is found that the HDR number of fractions depends highly on the LDR dose rate, that's why for one specific LDR scheme is necessary even to duplicate the HDR number of fractions to find the unique equivalent scheme when varying the dose rate from 0.5 Gy/h to 0.7 Gy/h. This also shows that the same LDR scheme using 0.5 Gy/h or 0.7 Gy/h is radiobiologically different (up to 20% in the late reacting tissue ERD). Conclusion: It is very important to report with great detail the LDR dose rate with which the gynaecological treatments have been performed because this variable is decisive to compare the results with other LDR or HDR schemes

  7. 40 CFR 268.49 - Alternative LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternative LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil. 268.49 Section 268.49 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Treatment Standards § 268.49 Alternative LDR treatment standards for contaminated...

  8. Urethral toxicity after LDR brachytherapy: experience in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2015-01-01

    Urinary toxicity is common after low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy, and the resolution of urinary toxicity is a concern. In particular, urinary frequency is the most common adverse event among the urinary toxicities. We have previously reported that approximately 70% of patients experience urinary frequency during the first 6 months after seed implantation. Most urinary adverse events were classified as Grade 1, and Grade 2 or higher adverse events were rare. The incidence of urinary retention was approximately 2-4%. A high International Prostate Symptom Score before seed implantation was an independent predictor of acute urinary toxicity of Grade 2 or higher. Several previous reports from the United States also supported this trend. In Japan, LDR brachytherapy was legally approved in 2003. A nationwide prospective cohort study entitled Japanese Prostate Cancer Outcome Study of Permanent Iodine-125 Seed Implantation was initiated in July 2005. It is an important issue to limit urinary toxicities in patients who undergo LDR brachytherapy. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative Analysis between LDR and HDR Images for Automatic Fruit Recognition and Counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana M. Pinho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Precision agriculture is gaining an increasing interest in the current farming paradigm. This new production concept relies on the use of information technology (IT to provide a control and supervising structure that can lead to better management policies. In this framework, imaging techniques that provide visual information over the farming area play an important role in production status monitoring. As such, accurate representation of the gathered production images is a major concern, especially if those images are used in detection and classification tasks. Real scenes, observed in natural environment, present high dynamic ranges that cannot be represented by the common LDR (Low Dynamic Range devices. However, this issue can be handled by High Dynamic Range (HDR images since they have the ability to store luminance information similarly to the human visual system. In order to prove their advantage in image processing, a comparative analysis between LDR and HDR images, for fruits detection and counting, was carried out. The obtained results show that the use of HDR images improves the detection performance to more than 30% when compared to LDR.

  10. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 268 - LDR Effective Dates of Injected Prohibited Hazardous Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false LDR Effective Dates of Injected Prohibited Hazardous Wastes VIII Appendix VIII to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... to Part 268—LDR Effective Dates of Injected Prohibited Hazardous Wastes National Capacity LDR...

  11. A rectum shield for the circular applicator system of a selectron unit (HDR and LDR afterloading)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetzel, H.; McCoy, M.; Kamleitner, H.; Frommhold, H.

    1987-01-01

    In order to decrease the morbidity rate after combined radiotherapy of the cervix carcinoma, a tungsten shield 3 and 5 mm thick for the rectum has been developed by the authors which is applied with the ring and pin applicator of the selectron unit (LDR and HDR afterloading). The isodose curves were measured in a plexiglas phantom, and the radiation dose at the reference points was determined by means of a ionization dosemeter. The phantom measurements were performed with the same arrangement of sources as applied in radiotherapy. The measurements showed a dose reduction at point Rmax of 33% (HDR) and 44% (LDR) with the tungsten shield 5 mm thick. (orig.) [de

  12. Mathematical simulation of biologically equivalent doses for LDR-HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slosarek, K.; Zajusz, A.

    1996-01-01

    Based on the LQ model examples of biologically equivalent doses LDR, HDR and external beams were calculated. The biologically equivalent doses for LDR were calculated by appending to the LQ model the corrector for the time of repair of radiation sublethal damages. For radiation continuously delivered at a low dose rate the influence of sublethal damage repair time changes on biologically equivalent doses were analysed. For fractionated treatment with high dose rate the biologically equivalent doses were calculated by adding to the LQ model the formula of accelerated repopulation. For total biologically equivalent dose calculation for combine LDR-HDR-Tele irradiation examples are presented with the use of different parameters of the time of repair of sublethal damages and accelerated repopulation. The calculations performed show, that the same biologically equivalent doses can be obtained for different parameters of cell kinetics changes during radiation treatment. It also shows, that during biologically equivalent dose calculations for different radiotherapy schedules, ignorance of cell kinetics parameters can lead to relevant errors

  13. Tingkat Intensitas Cahaya Di Dalam Ruangan Dengan Menggunakan Sensor Ldr Berbasis Arduino Uno R-3

    OpenAIRE

    Siahaan, Haslena A.

    2017-01-01

    Has designed a measure of light intensity levels using LDR sensor. The working principle of a series of light sensors on sebenarya very simple. Voltage division between VR1 and LDR is at the core of the light above the sensor circuit. The increase in the voltage at VR1 will reduce the voltage falls on LDR, vice versa rise in LDR voltage will reduce the voltage drop on the VR1. Voltage division in accordance with the formula that applies a voltage divider in a series circuit, the voltage suppl...

  14. New laryngeal allophony in Manchester English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejná, Michaela; Scanlon, Jane

    2015-01-01

    The study focuses on the relationship between pre-aspiration and glottalisation in Manchester English. Analyses of five speakers aged 20-22 years indicate there is a prosodically conditioned complementary distribution: pre-aspiration is found word-medially ("batter"), while glottalisation occurs...

  15. Translation and cultural adaptation of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) into Persian language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Alireza; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Birjandinejad, Ali; Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Kachooei, Amir Reza

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to translate and test the validity and reliablity of the Persian version of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire in foot and ankle patients. We translated the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire to Persian language according to the accepted guidelines, then assessed the psychometric properties including the validity and reliability on 308 patients with long-standing foot and ankle problems. To test the reliability, we calculated the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) for test-retest reliability and measured Cronbach's alpha to test the internal consistency. To test the construct validity of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire we also administered the Short-Form 36 to patients. Construct validity was supported by significant correlation with SF36 subscales except for pain subscale of the persian MOXFQ with mental health of the SF36 (r=0.207). Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.79 for the total MOXFQ and ranged from 0.83 to 0.89 for the three subscales. Cronbach's alpha for pain, walking/standing, and social interaction was 0.86, 0.88, and 0.89, respectively, and was 0.79 for the total MOXFQ showing good internal consistency in each domain. The Persian Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire health scoring system is a valid and reliable patient-reported instrument for foot and ankle problems. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. "Mandela, Manchester": A Response to Establishment Pessimism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Chris

    2009-01-01

    This article includes some of the remarkable poems to be included in "Mandela, Manchester", an anthology of school students' work dedicated to the inspirational life of Nelson Mandela. (Contains 3 notes.)

  17. The use of nomograms in LDR-HDR prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujades, Ma Carmen; Camacho, Cristina; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Richart, José; Gimeno, Jose; Lliso, Françoise; Carmona, Vicente; Ballester, Facundo; Crispín, Vicente; Rodríguez, Silvia; Tormo, Alejandro

    2011-09-01

    The common use of nomograms in Low Dose Rate (LDR) permanent prostate brachytherapy (BT) allows to estimate the number of seeds required for an implant. Independent dosimetry verification is recommended for each clinical dosimetry in BT. Also, nomograms can be useful for dose calculation quality assurance and they could be adapted to High Dose Rate (HDR). This work sets nomograms for LDR and HDR prostate-BT implants, which are applied to three different institutions that use different implant techniques. Patients treated throughout 2010 till April 2011 were considered for this study. This example was chosen to be the representative of the latest implant techniques and to ensure consistency in the planning. A sufficient number of cases for both BT modalities, prescription dose and different work methodology (depending on the institution) were taken into account. The specific nomograms were built using the correlation between the prostate volume and some characteristic parameters of each BT modality, such as the source Air Kerma Strength, number of implanted seeds in LDR or total radiation time in HDR. For each institution and BT modality, nomograms normalized to the prescribed dose were obtained and fitted to a linear function. The parameters of the adjustment show a good agreement between data and the fitting. It should be noted that for each institution these linear function parameters are different, indicating that each centre should construct its own nomograms. Nomograms for LDR and HDR prostate brachytherapy are simple quality assurance tools, specific for each institution. Nevertheless, their use should be complementary to the necessary independent verification.

  18. The use of nomograms in LDR-HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Carmen Pujades

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The common use of nomograms in Low Dose Rate (LDR permanent prostate brachytherapy (BT allowsto estimate the number of seeds required for an implant. Independent dosimetry verification is recommended for eachclinical dosimetry in BT. Also, nomograms can be useful for dose calculation quality assurance and they could be adaptedto High Dose Rate (HDR. This work sets nomograms for LDR and HDR prostate-BT implants, which are applied tothree different institutions that use different implant techniques. Material and methods: Patients treated throughout 2010 till April 2011 were considered for this study. This examplewas chosen to be the representative of the latest implant techniques and to ensure consistency in the planning. A sufficientnumber of cases for both BT modalities, prescription dose and different work methodology (depending on theinstitution were taken into account. The specific nomograms were built using the correlation between the prostatevo lume and some characteristic parameters of each BT modality, such as the source Air Kerma Strength, numberof implanted seeds in LDR or total radiation time in HDR. Results: For each institution and BT modality, nomograms normalized to the prescribed dose were obtained andfitted to a linear function. The parameters of the adjustment show a good agreement between data and the fitting.It should be noted that for each institution these linear function parameters are different, indicating that each centreshould construct its own nomograms. Conclusions: Nomograms for LDR and HDR prostate brachytherapy are simple quality assurance tools, specific foreach institution. Nevertheless, their use should be complementary to the necessary independent verification.

  19. The Manchester contribution to peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, Raymond T.

    2011-01-01

    Two names emerge when considering the contribution of Manchester in the development of peritoneal dialysis (PD). The first is Ram Gokal; the second is icodextrin. As there will be a separate article on icodextrin, this one will focus more on other aspects of the activities performed by the Renal

  20. Preliminary results of study comparing HDR with LDR brachytherapy for IIIb cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, N.; Pellizzon, A.C.A.; Novaes, P.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Fogaroli, R.; Maia, M.A.C.; Baraldi, H.; Ferrigno, R.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1992 we have been using a Micro-Selectron HDR device, working with Iridium 192 to treat the cervical cancer and some others pathologies. With a minimum follow up of 24 months, 59 patients with cervical cancer were randomizated for one of the following schedule of treatment: EBRT - 45Gy - fx 1,8Gy plus Brachytherapy 1-HDR - 36 (61%) - 4 weekly insertions of 6,0Gy at point A 2-LDR - 29 (39%) - two insertions fifteen days apart of 17,5Gy at point A EBRT was performed with a Linac 4MV, in box arrangement and parametrial complementation of dose with AP-PA fields. For Brachytherapy Fletcher Colpostats are used in association with intrauterine tamdens, in both arms. Brachyterapy starts in HDR group after ten days of the beginning of the treatment. The total time of treatment is shortened here in two weeks. LDR brachytherapy starts only after the end of EBRT. Results - local control was 61% in 12 months and 50% in 24 months for HDR group, versus 52,6% and 47,8% for LDR group. Local failures of 39% and 50% in 12 and 24 months for HDR and 47,8% and 52,8% for LDR groups respectively. Complications were restricted to rectites and cistites - 8,3% for HDR and 13% for LDR. Conclusions - HDR brachytherapy has an equivalent local control when compared to LDR, can treat a larger number of patients in a shorter period, has possibilities of dose optimizations and decrease the radiation exposure to the staff

  1. Rectourethral fistula following LDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, Holger; Pinkawa, Michael; Donner, Andreas; Wolter, Timm P; Pallua, Norbert; Eble, Michael J; Jakse, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Modern LDR brachytherapy has drastically reduced rectal toxicity and decreased the occurrence of rectourethral fistulas to <0.5% of patients. Therefore, symptoms of late-onset sequelae are often ignored initially. These fistulas cause severe patient morbidity and require interdisciplinary treatment. We report on the occurrence and management of a rectourethral fistula which occurred 4 years after (125)I seed implantation. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Using LDR as Sensing Element for an External Fuzzy Controller Applied in Photovoltaic Pumping Systems with Variable-Speed Drives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Geraldo Neves De A; Brito, Alaan Ubaiara; Leal, Anderson Marques; Fonseca, Jéssica Kelly Silva; Macêdo, Wilson Negrão

    2015-09-22

    In the present paper, a fuzzy controller applied to a Variable-Speed Drive (VSD) for use in Photovoltaic Pumping Systems (PVPS) is proposed. The fuzzy logic system (FLS) used is embedded in a microcontroller and corresponds to a proportional-derivative controller. A Light-Dependent Resistor (LDR) is used to measure, approximately, the irradiance incident on the PV array. Experimental tests are executed using an Arduino board. The experimental results show that the fuzzy controller is capable of operating the system continuously throughout the day and controlling the direct current (DC) voltage level in the VSD with a good performance.

  3. Using LDR as Sensing Element for an External Fuzzy Controller Applied in Photovoltaic Pumping Systems with Variable-Speed Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Neves De A. Maranhão

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a fuzzy controller applied to a Variable-Speed Drive (VSD for use in Photovoltaic Pumping Systems (PVPS is proposed. The fuzzy logic system (FLS used is embedded in a microcontroller and corresponds to a proportional-derivative controller. A Light-Dependent Resistor (LDR is used to measure, approximately, the irradiance incident on the PV array. Experimental tests are executed using an Arduino board. The experimental results show that the fuzzy controller is capable of operating the system continuously throughout the day and controlling the direct current (DC voltage level in the VSD with a good performance.

  4. BrachyView: Combining LDR seed positions with transrectal ultrasound imaging in a prostate gel phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnaghy, S; Cutajar, D L; Bucci, J A; Enari, K; Safavi-Naeini, M; Favoino, M; Tartaglia, M; Carriero, F; Jakubek, J; Pospisil, S; Lerch, M; Rosenfeld, A B; Petasecca, M

    2017-02-01

    BrachyView is a novel in-body imaging system which aims to provide LDR brachytherapy seeds position reconstruction within the prostate in real-time. The first prototype is presented in this study: the probe consists of a gamma camera featuring three single cone pinhole collimators embedded in a tungsten tube, above three, high resolution pixelated detectors (Timepix). The prostate was imaged with a TRUS system using a sagittal crystal with a 2.5mm slice thickness. Eleven needles containing a total of thirty 0.508U 125 I seeds were implanted under ultrasound guidance. A CT scan was used to localise the seed positions, as well as provide a reference when performing the image co-registration between the BrachyView coordinate system and the TRUS coordinate system. An in-house visualisation software interface was developed to provide a quantitative 3D reconstructed prostate based on the TRUS images and co-registered with the LDR seeds in situ. A rigid body image registration was performed between the BrachyView and TRUS systems, with the BrachyView and CT-derived source locations compared. The reconstructed seed positions determined by the BrachyView probe showed a maximum discrepancy of 1.78mm, with 75% of the seeds reconstructed within 1mm of their nominal location. An accurate co-registration between the BrachyView and TRUS coordinate system was established. The BrachyView system has shown its ability to reconstruct all implanted LDR seeds within a tissue equivalent prostate gel phantom, providing both anatomical and seed position information in a single interface. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Kissing Bonds using Local Defect Resonance (LDR) Spectroscopy: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrue, S.; Tabatabaeipour, M.; Hettler, J.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    With the growing demand from industry to optimize and further develop existing Non-Destructive Testing & Evaluation (NDT&E) techniques or new methods to detect and characterize incipient damage with high sensitivity and increased quality, ample efforts have been devoted to better understand the typical behavior of kissing bonds, such as delaminations and cracks. Recently, it has been shown experimentally that the nonlinear ultrasonic response of kissing bonds could be enhanced by using Local Defect Resonance (LDR) spectroscopy. LDR spectroscopy is an efficient NDT technique that takes advantage of the characteristic fre- quencies of the defect (defect resonances) in order to provide maximum acoustic wave-defect interaction. In fact, for nonlinear methodologies, the ultrasonic excitation of the sample should occur at either multiples or integer ratios of the characteristic defect resonance frequencies, in order to obtain the highest signal-to-noise response in the nonlinear LDR spectroscopy. In this paper, the potential of using LDR spectroscopy for the detection, localization and characterization of kissing bonds is illustrated using a 3D simulation code for elastic wave propagation in materials containing closed but dynamically active cracks or delaminations. Using the model, we are able to define an appropriate method, based on the Scaling Subtraction Method (SSM), to determine the local defect resonance frequencies of a delamination in a composite plate and to illustrate an increase in defect nonlinearity due to LDR. The simulation results will help us to obtain a better understanding of the concept of LDR and to assist in the further design and testing of LDR spectroscopy for the detection, localization and characterization of kissing bonds.

  6. Interventional effect of multiple LDR on splenocyte apoptosis and immunity on twelve-week diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanbo; Wang Zhicheng; Li Pengwu; Guo Wei; Zhao Hongguang; Liu Yang; Gong Shouliang; Guo Caixia

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore the effect of multiple low dose irradiation (LDR) on the apoptosis of splenocytes, immune factors and lymphocyte subgroups in twelve-week diabetes mellitus (DM), the experiment was carried out with control, DM and DM+LDR groups. The irradiation dose every time was 25, 50 and 75 mGy respectively, and the irradiated times were 15. At the eighth weekend after the DM rats were irradiated, the percentages of CD4 + , CD8 + T lymphocytes and TCR α β were detected by flowcytometry (FCM). The content of IL-2 in both serum and supernatant of cultured splenocytes were detected by ELISA. And the apoptotic rate of splenocytes was detected by FCM and TUNEL respectively. The result shows that as compared with that in the control, the body weight (BW) decreases both in the DM and the DM + LDR groups, particularly in the DM group. The blood glucose (BG) level in the DM+LDR groups is higher than that in the control, but lower than that in the DM group. As compared with those in the control, the percentages of TCR α β and CD4 + T cells, the content of IL-2 in serum and supernatant of cultured splenocytes, and the apoptotic rate of splenocytes in DM + LDR groups increase significantly. However, as compared with those in the DM group, the percentages of TCR α β, CD4 + and CD8 + T cells and the splenocyte apoptotic rates in the DM+LDR groups decrease while the content of IL-2 and the ratio of CD4 + /CD8 + T cells increase. It is obvious that the multiple LDR could regulate and weaken the loss of BW and increase of BG caused by DM, correct the imbalance of lymphocyte subgroups and immune factors, decrease the increment of splenocyte apoptosis resulted from DM. Multiple LDR could result in body protection. (authors)

  7. Unit Monitors Manchester-Format Data Buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Jose J.

    1994-01-01

    Circuit card converts data signals into convenient hexadecimal form for troubleshooting. Bus-monitoring unit converts data signals from Manchester II format used on data bus into hexadecimal format. Monitoring circuit causes hexadecimal words to display on video terminal, where test engineer compares them with hexadecimal records for troubleshooting. Circuit monitors one bus or two buses simultaneously.

  8. Manchester's Magiscope: An Interesting Optics Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancor, Rachael; Lancor, Brian

    2017-01-01

    The Magiscope was an attraction at Manchester's department store in Madison, WI, in 1939 that allowed children to peek into Santa's workshop (as shown in Fig. 1). The "magiscope" was a telescope-like device that gave children the illusion they were looking at a distant Santa, when in fact they were looking at a fabricated workshop on an…

  9. Survival of tumor bearing mice by sequencing of low dose rate (LDR) neutron and photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onomura, C.I.; Feola, J.M.; Maruyama, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Cf-252 neutron radiation (NT) has been shown to be effective therapy for bulky, hypoxic human tumor and to produce consistent rapid clearance and 5 year cures. NT has been found to be more or less effective depending upon the schedule in which it is used and upon mixing with photon radiation. In an effort to study this scheduling and photon effect, LSA tumor was irradiated in vivo in a hypoxic, advanced state, in different schedules in combination of NT with Co-60 photons. The LSA lymphoma of C57BL/ym mice represents an accurate system to assess dose-response of tumor cells in vivo. Mean survival time was used as endpoint. A high RBE for LDR Cf-252 NT was observed with a RBE(n) of -- 5.0. The effect was not greatly sensitive to sequence in which photons were used. Comparison studies were also tested relative to LDR Cs-137 photon radiation. The results support the high efficacy of LDR NT for destruction of hypoxic tumor in vivo

  10. Paso elevado, en Manchester – Inglaterra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes, J.

    1970-09-01

    Full Text Available This is an urban main traffic connection, running south of the civic centre of Manchester, and facilitates communications in the East West directions. It also links the main motor roads entering the city from the South. It involves a viaduct with two traffic directions, with a total length of 975 m, which runs over several highways and pedestrian footpaths. The article describes the structure of this viaduct and its special features, such as an improved type of prestressed concrete dowels and certain construction problems.Se trata de un paso de enlace urbano, situado al sur del centro cívico de Manchester, que descongestiona el tránsito este-oeste actuando como un distribuidor entre las carreteras principales de entrada desde el sur. Incluye un viaducto de dos calzadas, de unos 975,36 m, que pasa por encima de un conjunto de carreteras al nivel del suelo y de pasos de peatones. El artículo describe la estructura elevada con unas notas sobre los aspectos notables del proyecto, como son: las mejoras introducidas en las dovelas de hormigón pretensado y los problemas que se presentaron durante la construcción.

  11. LDR structural experiment definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    A system study to develop the definition of a structural flight experiment for a large precision segmented reflector on the Space Station was accomplished by the Boeing Aerospace Company for NASA's Langley Research Center. The objective of the study was to use a Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) baseline configuration as the basis for focusing an experiment definition, so that the resulting accommodation requirements and interface constraints could be used as part of the mission requirements data base for Space Station. The primary objectives of the first experiment are to construct the primary mirror support truss and to determine its structural and thermal characteristics. Addition of an optical bench, thermal shield and primary mirror segments, and alignment of the optical components, would occur on a second experiment. The structure would then be moved to the payload point system for pointing, optical control, and scientific optical measurement for a third experiment. Experiment 1 will deploy the primary support truss while it is attached to the instrument module structure. The ability to adjust the mirror attachment points and to attach several dummy primary mirror segments with a robotic system will also be demonstrated. Experiment 2 will be achieved by adding new components and equipment to experiment one. Experiment 3 will demonstrate advanced control strategies, active adjustment of the primary mirror alignment, and technologies associated with optical sensing.

  12. The effect of lysate of spleen cells after low dose radiation (LDR) on NK activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Duicai; Su Liaoyuan

    2003-01-01

    To find effect of lysate of spleen cells after LDR on NK activity of CD 57 cells or non-CD 57 cells, lysate of spleen cells after LDR were extracted. McAb (anti CD 57 cells) was used to separate CD 57 cells from human peripheral blood by Panning direct method. The CD 57 cells and non-CD 57 cells were used as effective cells. K 562 cells labelled by 3 H-TdR were used as target cells. The ratio of effect cells to target cells was 10:1. NK activity of CD 57 cells or non-CD 5 -7 cells with the lysate of spleen cells after LDR was reflected by the efficiency of anti tumor cells. The 3 H-TdR incorporation in K 562 cells cultured with non-CD 57 cells was significantly lower than that with CD 57 cells. After use of the lysate of spleen cells after LDR, NK activities of CD 57 cells and non-CD 57 cells were 1.24 and 1.58 respectively. They were both increased obviously compared with control groups. The effect of anti K 562 cells of non-CD 57 cells is even greater than that of CD 57 cells. The lysate of spleen cells after LDR can enhance the effect of both non-CD 57 cells and CD 57 cells

  13. MANCHESTER UNITED’S IPO (2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TEODOR DIMA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A practice quite rarely used in the competition industry, the Initial Public Offering (IPO of a sporting entity can have as a goal the procurement of financial resources in order to invest in productive assets or to adjust the economic image of the club. The listing on the Stock Exchange in 2012 of one of the most valuable football clubs in the world, Manchester United, was an atypical one within the sporting area, both in terms of the motivation behind it and of the technical considerations. This analysis aims to provide a general perspective on the stock exchange index in this niche area and its relevance, focusing on the details of the English club’s listing and analyzing a set of indicators relevant to the dynamics of its economic evolution and popularity. After more than two years from the club’s listing on the Stock Exchange, the stocks have a value close to the initial one, the stock price following an oscillating trend, marked by a couple of stages of significant growth too. The research emphasizes the opposing effects of certain indicators: the brand value experiences a negative growth, while the income from current activities, especially the one from commercial activities follows a rising trend. So, it is still premature to deem the listing of Manchester United on the Stock Exchange a success or a failure, but the scientific debate is worth continuing.

  14. Multiple scattering effects on the Linear Depolarization Ratio (LDR) measured during CaPE by a Ka-band air-borne radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Toshio; Meneghini, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Air-borne radar measurements of thunderstorms were made as part of the CaPE (Convection and Precipitation/Electrification) experiment in Florida in July 1991. The radar has two channels, X-band (10 GHz) and Ka-band (34.5 GHz), and is capable of measuring cross-polarized returns as well as co-polarized returns. In stratiform rain, the cross-polarized components can be observed only at the bright band region and from the surface reflection. The linear depolarization ratios (LDR's) measured at X-band and Ka-band at the bright band are nearly equal. In convective rain, however, the LDR in Ka-band often exceeds the X-band LDR by several dB, and sometimes by more than 10 dB, reaching LDR values of up to -5 dB over heavy convective rain. For randomly oriented hydrometeors, such high LDR values cannot be explained by single scattering from non-spherical scattering particles alone. Because the LDR by single backscatter depends weakly on the wavelength, the difference between the Ka-band and X-band LDR's suggests that multiple scattering effects prevail in the Ka-band LDR. In order to test this inference, the magnitude of the cross-polarized component created by double scattering was calculated using the parameters of the airborne radar, which for both frequencies has beamwidths of 5.1 degrees and pulse widths of 0.5 microsecond. Uniform rain beyond the range of 3 km is assumed.

  15. Emesis as a Screening Diagnostic for Low Dose Rate (LDR) Total Body Radiation Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarata, Andrew S; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Demidenko, Eugene; Flood, Ann B; Swartz, Harold M; Ali, Arif N

    2016-04-01

    Current radiation disaster manuals list the time-to-emesis (TE) as the key triage indicator of radiation dose. The data used to support TE recommendations were derived primarily from nearly instantaneous, high dose-rate exposures as part of variable condition accident databases. To date, there has not been a systematic differentiation between triage dose estimates associated with high and low dose rate (LDR) exposures, even though it is likely that after a nuclear detonation or radiologic disaster, many surviving casualties would have received a significant portion of their total exposure from fallout (LDR exposure) rather than from the initial nuclear detonation or criticality event (high dose rate exposure). This commentary discusses the issues surrounding the use of emesis as a screening diagnostic for radiation dose after LDR exposure. As part of this discussion, previously published clinical data on emesis after LDR total body irradiation (TBI) is statistically re-analyzed as an illustration of the complexity of the issue and confounding factors. This previously published data includes 107 patients who underwent TBI up to 10.5 Gy in a single fraction delivered over several hours at 0.02 to 0.04 Gy min. Estimates based on these data for the sensitivity of emesis as a screening diagnostic for the low dose rate radiation exposure range from 57.1% to 76.6%, and the estimates for specificity range from 87.5% to 99.4%. Though the original data contain multiple confounding factors, the evidence regarding sensitivity suggests that emesis appears to be quite poor as a medical screening diagnostic for LDR exposures.

  16. Characterization of Ze and LDR of nonspherical and inhomogeneous ice particles for 95-GHz cloud radar: Its implication to microphysical retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kaori; Okamoto, Hajime

    2006-11-01

    Effect of density, shape, and orientation on radar reflectivity factor (Ze) and linear depolarization ratio (LDR) at 95 GHz are investigated by using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) for ice cloud studies. We consider hexagonal plate, hollow hexagonal column, and hollow bullet rosette in horizontal (2-D) or three-dimensional (3-D) random orientation. We first validate a widely used method to take into account the density and shape effects by the combinational use of Mie theory with the Maxwell-Garnett mixing rule (the MG-Mie method). It is found that the MG-Mie method underestimates Ze and its applicability is limited to sizes smaller than 40 μm. On the basis of the DDA, it is possible to separately treat density, aspect ratio, orientation, and shape. Effect of density turns out to be minor. Orientation and shape are the major controlling factors for Ze especially at effective radius reff > 100 μm and LDR except for very large sizes where the effect of orientation in LDR diminishes. Comparison between the DDA results and the analytical solution for 3-D Rayleigh spheroids show that LDR in the small size range is characterized by the target boundary and aspect ratio. In the large size range, LDR reveals features of a single target element; for example, LDR of bullet rosette is similar to that of a single branch of the particle. Combinational use of Ze and LDR is effective in microphysics retrieval for LDR LDR > -23 dB, additional information such as Doppler velocity is required.

  17. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 268 - LDR Effective Dates of Surface Disposed Prohibited Hazardous Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false LDR Effective Dates of Surface Disposed Prohibited Hazardous Wastes VII Appendix VII to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... VII to Part 268—LDR Effective Dates of Surface Disposed Prohibited Hazardous Wastes Table 1—Effective...

  18. Manchester nuclear physics report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the experimental research of the Manchester University Nuclear Physics Group for the period August 1987 - December 1988. The experiments have been performed at the Daresbury Nuclear Structure Facility, mostly using the gamma-ray arrays and the Recoil Separator. However, experiments using the Daresbury Isotope Separator, the Oxford Folded Tandem and the new charged particle detector array are also reported. Studies of gamma decaying states in 21 Ne and 23 Na are reported. The spectroscopy of medium mass nuclei includes the investigation of the Gamow-Tellar decay of 98 Cd. Fourteen studies of the spectroscopy of nuclei with A ≥ 100 are reported. Fission studies and instrumentation and computer developments are also included. (U.K.)

  19. PENGARUH CAR, BOPO, DAN LDR TERHADAP ROA PADA BANK UMUM SWASTA NASIONAL DI INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    ABIDIN, MUH. HAD

    2015-01-01

    2015 Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melihat sejauh mana pengaruh CAR, BOPO, dan LDR dalam memengaruhi ROA. Dengan menggunakan metode regresi linear berganda, untuk melihat apakah CAR, BOPO, dan LDR memiliki pengaruh secara simultan dan parsial terhadap ROA. Ruang lingkup untuk penelitian ini adalah Bank Umum Swasta Nasional Devisa dengan aset terbesar dalam lima tahun terakhir, yakni pada tahun 2009 hingga 2013. Secara parsial variabel independen dalam penelitian berpeng...

  20. ldr: An R Software Package for Likelihood-Based Su?cient Dimension Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kofi Placid Adragni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In regression settings, a su?cient dimension reduction (SDR method seeks the core information in a p-vector predictor that completely captures its relationship with a response. The reduced predictor may reside in a lower dimension d < p, improving ability to visualize data and predict future observations, and mitigating dimensionality issues when carrying out further analysis. We introduce ldr, a new R software package that implements three recently proposed likelihood-based methods for SDR: covariance reduction, likelihood acquired directions, and principal fitted components. All three methods reduce the dimensionality of the data by pro jection into lower dimensional subspaces. The package also implements a variable screening method built upon principal ?tted components which makes use of ?exible basis functions to capture the dependencies between the predictors and the response. Examples are given to demonstrate likelihood-based SDR analyses using ldr, including estimation of the dimension of reduction subspaces and selection of basis functions. The ldr package provides a framework that we hope to grow into a comprehensive library of likelihood-based SDR methodologies.

  1. Development of a PCR/LDR/flow-through hybridization assay using a capillary tube, probe DNA-immobilized magnetic beads and chemiluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommatsu, Manami; Okahashi, Hisamitsu; Ohta, Keisuke; Tamai, Yusuke; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/ligase detection reaction (LDR)/flow-through hybridization assay using chemiluminescence (CL) detection was developed for analyzing point mutations in gene fragments with high diagnostic value for colorectal cancers. A flow-through hybridization format using a capillary tube, in which probe DNA-immobilized magnetic beads were packed, provided accelerated hybridization kinetics of target DNA (i.e. LDR product) to the probe DNA. Simple fluid manipulations enabled both allele-specific hybridization and the removal of non-specifically bound DNA in the wash step. Furthermore, the use of CL detection greatly simplified the detection scheme, since CL does not require a light source for excitation of the fluorescent dye tags on the LDR products. Preliminary results demonstrated that this analytical system could detect both homozygous and heterozygous mutations, without the expensive instrumentation and cumbersome procedures required by conventional DNA microarray-based methods.

  2. Transition from LDR to HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Evaluation of tumor control, survival, and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, K D; Pugh, K J; Trifiletti, D M; Libby, B; Showalter, T N

    In 2012, our institution transitioned from low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy to high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. We report clinical outcomes after brachytherapy for cervical cancer at our institution over a continuous 10-year period. From 2004 to 2014, 258 women (184 LDR and 74 HDR) were treated with tandem and ovoid brachytherapy in the multidisciplinary management of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stages IA-IVB cervical cancer. Clinical and treatment-related prognostic factors including age, stage, smoking status, relevant doses, and toxicity data were recorded. Median followup for the LDR and HDR groups was 46 months and 12 months, respectively. The majority of patients (92%) received external beam radiotherapy as well as concurrent chemotherapy (83%) before the start of brachytherapy. For all stages, the 1-year local control and overall survival (OS) rates were comparable between the LDR and HDR groups (87% vs. 81%, p = 0.12; and 75% vs. 85%, p = 0.16), respectively. Factors associated with OS on multivariate analysis include age, stage, and nodal involvement. On multivariate analysis, severe toxicity (acute or chronic) was higher with HDR than LDR (24% vs. 10%, p = 0.04). Additional prognostic factors associated with increased severe toxicity include former/current smokers and total dose to lymph nodes. This comparative retrospective analysis of a large cohort of women treated with brachytherapy demonstrates no significant difference in OS or local control between the LDR and HDR. Acute and chronic toxicity increased shortly after the implementation of HDR, highlighting the importance of continued refinement of HDR methods, including integrating advanced imaging. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The relative efficacy of HDR and LDR interstitial brachytherapy in squamous cell carcinoma of vagina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demanes, D. J.; Hsu, I-C.; Lin, S.; Ewing, T.; Rodriguez, R.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: Beginning in 1982 we performed low dose rate (LDR) interstitial template brachytherapy (ISTB) for carcinoma of the vagina. High dose rate (HDR) remote afterloading has been used exclusively since 1991. We compare the results LDR and HDR brachytherapy. Material and Methods: Between 1982 and 1994, 30 patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of vagina received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy. The AJCC stage distribution was 3 stage I, 25 stage II, and 2 stage III. The average central pelvic EBRT dose was 35 Gy. Pelvic side wall EBRT doses ranged from 45 to 50.4 Gy. Nineteen patients had LDR treatment; 3 intracavitary brachytherapy (ICB) and 16 ISTB. Eleven patients had HDR treatment; 2 ICB and 9 ISB. The average dose delivered by LDR was 41.2 Gy usually in 2 fractions, and by HDR 32.5 Gy in 6 fractions of 500-550 cGy. Local failures were confirmed pathologically. The absolute survival (AS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method and compared with logrank statistics. Results: The mean follow-up was 77 months for LDR and 23 months for HDR. Local and regional control was achieved in 90% (27/30) of the patients. Three year AS was 84% and RFS was 87%. There was no significant difference between LDR and HDR in AS, RFS or local-regional control, (log rank p=0.85, p=0.12 and p=0.35 respectively). The single HDR local failure presented in a patient with extensive stage II disease who declined ISTB. There were fewer complications following HDR. The 1 case of extensive vaginal necrosis and the 3 cases of rectovaginal fistula that required surgery occurred only with LDR brachytherapy. Discussion: Excellent local and regional control of carcinoma of the vagina can be achieved by administering limited doses of external radiation and brachytherapy. Interstitial template implants are the best means of encompassing paravaginal disease while sparing the adjacent uninvolved normal tissues from high doses of

  4. Radiation monitoring. Quarterly report for the Greater Manchester Fire and Civil Defence Authority and the Manchester Area Pollution Advisory Council. Manchester Area Gamma Radiation Air Monitoring System (MANAGRAMS), report covering period of 3 months 01/04/1997 to 30/06/1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Gamma radiation monitoring data from ten outstations in the Manchester area are presented. For each station there is a summary table, a background radiation graph showing 6 hour mean levels and a windrose graph showing the direction of the wind as a percentage of the total. A line graph comparison between stations is provided for the background 6 hour mean levels and a bar chart comparison of total dose. Graphs of temperature and barometric pressure taken from extra sensors at the Trafford station are presented. (Author)

  5. Manchester University: report: nuclear physics, January 1992-December 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the experimental research of the Manchester Nuclear Physics Group for the period January 1992 to January 1993. The chief areas are radioactive beams, improved techniques for analysis of multifold γ-coincidence data, and the development of improved heavy-ion detection systems. We are designing and building systems for measuring the radioactive beams and have been making measurements of the backgrounds to be encountered with and without beam at the measuring sites. Construction of the heavy-ion spectrometer HIPS is nearly complete, and it is intended to use it in conjunction with the TESSA array to observe γ rays in coincidence with deep-inelastic reaction products from the Jvaskyla cyclotron. Work is also proceeding on novel ways to use Ge detectors as γ-ray polarimeters and as position-sensitive devices. (author)

  6. Time to PSA rise differentiates the PSA bounce after HDR and LDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchardt, Wojciech; Skowronek, Janusz

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the differences in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce (PB) after high-dose-rate (HDR-BT) or low-dose-rate (LDR-BT) brachytherapy alone in prostate cancer patients. Ninety-four patients with localized prostate cancer (T1-T2cN0), age ranged 50-81 years, were treated with brachytherapy alone between 2008 and 2010. Patients were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, Gleason score ≤ 7. The LDR-BT total dose was 144-145 Gy, in HDR-BT - 3 fractions of 10.5 or 15 Gy. The initial PSA level (iPSA) was assessed before treatment, then PSA was rated every 3 months over the first 2 years, and every 6 months during the next 3 years. Median follow-up was 3.0 years. Mean iPSA was 7.8 ng/ml. In 58 cases, PSA decreased gradually without PB or biochemical failure (BF). In 24% of patients, PB was observed. In 23 cases (24%), PB was observed using 0.2 ng/ml definition; in 10 cases (11%), BF was diagnosed using nadir + 2 ng/ml definition. The HDR-BT and LDR-BT techniques were not associated with higher level of PB (26 vs. 22%, p = 0.497). Time to the first PSA rise finished with PB was significantly shorter after HDR-BT then after LDR-BT (median, 10.5 vs. 18.0 months) during follow-up. Predictors for PB were observed only after HDR-BT. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and higher Gleason score decreased the risk of PB (HR = 0.11, p = 0.03; HR = 0.51, p = 0.01). The higher PSA nadir and longer time to PSA nadir increased the risk of PB (HR 3.46, p = 0.02; HR 1.04, p = 0.04). There was no predictors for PB after LDR-BT. HDR-BT and LDR-BT for low and intermediate risk prostate cancer had similar PB rate. The PB occurred earlier after HDR-BT than after LDR-BT. ADT and higher Gleason score decreased, and higher PSA nadir and longer time to PSA nadir increased the risk of PB after HDR-BT.

  7. Effect of Whole Body Low Dose Radiation (WB-LDR) on diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of type II diabetic mice to LDR has been shown to significantly up regulate pancreatic antioxidants along with reduction of glucose levels. Present study was aimed to evaluate the effects of WB-LDR on type II diabetic rats. Sprague-Dawley male rats (n=18) were pre-treated with Alloxan Monohydrate (150 mg/kg body weight, IP) to induce hyperglycemia. Elevated level of blood glucose was monitored for consecutive 10 days by Glucometer (Accu-Chek, Active) before irradiation. Two group of rats (n=12) were exposed to single dose of 0.25 Gy and 0.5 Gy of gamma radiation at the rate of 1.02 Gy/minute. Blood glucose level, feed, water intake and body weight was monitored for 10 days post irradiation. Results revealed weight loss, polydipsia, polyphagia and elevated blood glucose level up to 10th day in diabetic control, whereas; reverse trend was observed from 7th day post irradiation in two treated groups. However, no significant difference was found between two treated groups. The results indicate that treatment with WB-LDR reduces the blood-glucose level and so its complications in diabetic rats. (author)

  8. Rancang Bangun Solar Tracker Berbasis Mikrokontroler Atmega8535 Dengan Sensor Ldr Dan Penampil Lcd

    OpenAIRE

    Syafrialdi, Roni; -, Wildian

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to design a solar tracker using a four-quadrant LDR that used for sensing the position of the sun. Solar tracker is the tools used to follow the direction of motion of the sun. The electronic circuits consisting of a power supply circuit, microcontroller ATmega8535 and LCD circuit, stepper motor driver circuit and LDR sensor circuit. The mechanical design using dual axis with stepper motor as an actuator to position the solar cell tilted appropriately to face the sun direct...

  9. The effects of low dose radiation (LDR) on mice of immune function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Li; Deng Daping

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To find out the Effects of Low Dose Radiation(LDR) on mice of immune function. Methods: Through flow cytometry to observe and analyse the effects of the leukomonocyte. Through immunohistochemistry to study IL-2, TNF-α. Results: At dose of 100mGy the stimulative effect on CD 4 + cells, CD 8 + cells and NK activity was higher than that at other doses. At dose of 500mGy leukomonocyte activity was lower. At dose of 100mGy, the colorations about IL-2, TNF-α deepen. Conclusion: LDR could stimulate immune function, especially at dose of 100mGy. while at dose of 500mGy, radiation could restrain the leukomonocyte activity. (authors)

  10. Realization of manchester encoding and decoding and fast-speed communication for digital power supply based on FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huanguang; Xu Ruinian; Shen Tianjian; Li Deming

    2008-01-01

    A design and simulation to realize the process of Manchester encoding and decoding, to realize the process of SPI communication between FPGA and DSP, using Altera company's Quartus II IDE on FPGA is presented in this paper. And the application on the digital power supply controller with Manchester communication by optical fiber is introduced. (authors)

  11. Radiation monitoring: Quarterly report for the Greater Manchester Fire and Civil Defence Authority and the Manchester Area Pollution Advisory Council. Manchester Area Gamma Radiation Air Monitoring System (MANAGRAMS): report covering period of 3 months 01/07/1996 to 30/09/1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Gamma radiation monitoring data from ten outstations in the Manchester area for the period 01/07/1996 to 30/09/1996 are presented. For each station there is a summary table, a background radiation graph showing 6 hour mean levels and a wind rose graph showing the direction of the wind as a percentage of the total. A line graph comparison between stations is provided for the background 6 hour mean levels and a bar chart comparison of total dose during the reporting period. Graphs of barometric pressure and temperature taken from extra sensors at the Trafford station are also presented. (UK)

  12. Radiation monitoring. Quarterly report for the Greater Manchester Fire and Civil Defence Authority and the Manchester Area Pollution Advisory Council. Manchester Area Gamma Radiation Air Monitoring System (MANAGRAMS), report covering period of 3 months 1 January to 31 March 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Gamma radiation monitoring data from nine outstations in the Manchester area for the period 01/01/96 to 31/03/96 are presented. For each station there is a summary table, a background radiation graph showing 6 hour mean levels and a windrose graph showing the direction of the wind as a percentage of the total. A line graph comparison between stations is provided for the background 6 hour mean levels and a bar chart comparison of total dose. Graphs of temperature and barometric pressure taken from extra sensors at the Trafford station are presented. (UK)

  13. SYNBIOCHEM Synthetic Biology Research Centre, Manchester – A UK foundry for fine and speciality chemicals production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Feuvre RA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The UK Synthetic Biology Research Centre, SYNBIOCHEM, hosted by the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology at the University of Manchester is delivering innovative technology platforms to facilitate the predictable engineering of microbial bio-factories for fine and speciality chemicals production. We provide an overview of our foundry activities that are being applied to grand challenge projects to deliver innovation in bio-based chemicals production for industrial biotechnology.

  14. Mutual interference effects in closely-located HDR and LDR WPANs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Ramjee; Monti, M.; De Sanctis, M.

    2009-01-01

    Wireless Personal Area Networks (WPANs) are short-range ad-hoc networks centered around a person that make use of unlicensed bands for data transmission. Several transmission schemes such as Ultra Wide Band (UWB) or Spread Spectrum (SS) have been proposed for both Low Data Rate (LDR) and High Dat...

  15. Implants with 32P-foils for LDR-brachytherapy of benign stenosis in urology and gastroenterology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assmann, Walter; Becker, Ricarda; Otto, Henrike

    2013-01-01

    For LDR-brachytherapy, a limited number of implant geometries and materials are available. To avoid wound healing related hyper-proliferation (stenosis, keloids) a novel radioactive foil system was developed based on beta emitting 32 P, which can be easily integrated in existing implants such as urethral catheters or bile duct stents. As substrate material for these foils PEEK (polyetherethercetone) was chosen because of its radiation hardness during neutron activation of 32 P. The activity was determined by liquid scintillation counting and gamma spectroscopy, dose distributions were measured with scintillation detectors and radiochromic films. The correlation between activity and dose was checked by Monte-Carlo-simulations (Geant4). Prototypes of the 32 P-implants have shown in wash-out tests the required tightness for sealed radioactive sources. In animal tests on urethra and bile duct, the uncomplicated and save application of 32 P-foils mounted on standard implants has been demonstrated, which is almost unchanged due to the simple radiation protection with plexiglass. This concept of radioactive implants with integrated 32 P-foils could extend essentially the application possibilities of LDR-brachytherapy. (orig.)

  16. An evaluation of a Low-Dose-Rate (LDR) brachytherapy procedure using a systems engineering & error analysis methodology for health care (SEABH) - (SAVE)

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chadwick, Liam

    2012-03-12

    Health Care Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HFMEA®) is an established tool for risk assessment in health care. A number of deficiencies have been identified in the method. A new method called Systems and Error Analysis Bundle for Health Care (SEABH) was developed to address these deficiencies. SEABH has been applied to a number of medical processes as part of its validation and testing. One of these, Low Dose Rate (LDR) prostate Brachytherapy is reported in this paper. The case study supported the validity of SEABH with respect to its capacity to address the weaknesses of (HFMEA®).

  17. The role of long half-life isotopes for use in LDR brachytherapy. Report of the advisory group meeting (325-E3-AG-1086)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    Brachytherapy is a growing activity in the management of cancer. Where indications exist for brachytherapy, LDR still retains a significant but decreasingly important role in the overall management. It remains the preferred form of brachytherapy in a few sites such as the nose, lip, vagina and penis. It is well tested in the paediatric population where long-term sequelae are highly significant and have not yet been evaluated for mHDR. Prostatic cancer permanent seed implant boosts is currently the only application where LDR is receiving increasing clinical support. LDR still can play an equally effective role when brachytherapy is required in gynaecological, breast and head and neck cancer and soft tissue sarcomas. The meeting recognised the growing role of mHDR as the major modality in brachytherapy administration. It is further noted that changing circumstances and opinions regarding mHDR may exert a major influence on the continued future of LDR as a treatment modality. LDR brachytherapy special techniques are becoming less widely distributed and less frequently performed. Only a few centres remain where sufficient procedures are performed to give adequate training in a period of a few months. The meeting recommended that the Agency should promote the creation of regional training centres of excellence where the practice of LDR brachytherapy should be available. The meeting recommended that the Member States should continue support for LDR brachytherapy techniques beyond gynaecological techniques until such time as clear evidence is presented for discontinuation

  18. Molecular characterization of long direct repeat (LDR) sequences expressing a stable mRNA encoding for a 35-amino-acid cell-killing peptide and a cis-encoded small antisense RNA in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Mitsuoki; Oshima, Taku; Kasai, Hiroaki; Mori, Hirotada

    2002-07-01

    Genome sequence analyses of Escherichia coli K-12 revealed four copies of long repetitive elements. These sequences are designated as long direct repeat (LDR) sequences. Three of the repeats (LDR-A, -B, -C), each approximately 500 bp in length, are located as tandem repeats at 27.4 min on the genetic map. Another copy (LDR-D), 450 bp in length and nearly identical to LDR-A, -B and -C, is located at 79.7 min, a position that is directly opposite the position of LDR-A, -B and -C. In this study, we demonstrate that LDR-D encodes a 35-amino-acid peptide, LdrD, the overexpression of which causes rapid cell killing and nucleoid condensation of the host cell. Northern blot and primer extension analysis showed constitutive transcription of a stable mRNA (approximately 370 nucleotides) encoding LdrD and an unstable cis-encoded antisense RNA (approximately 60 nucleotides), which functions as a trans-acting regulator of ldrD translation. We propose that LDR encodes a toxin-antitoxin module. LDR-homologous sequences are not pre-sent on any known plasmids but are conserved in Salmonella and other enterobacterial species.

  19. Is there any place for LDR brachytherapy for head and neck carcinomas in HDR era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijuth, Jacek

    2009-03-01

    In Poland, the classical LDR brachytherapy for head and neck carcinomas with Ir-192 wires or hairpins has completely disappeared some time ago after 30 years of successful clinical use. Can this technique be fully and safely replaced by HDR or PDR application? This option seems attractive because of new possibilities of 3D reconstruction and computer real-time treatment planning and optimization. However, in my opinion, long time is needed to get a clinical and scientific experience that has been accumulated for decades with the use of LDR technique.

  20. Validity of self-assessment of hallux valgus using the Manchester scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wee Elin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hallux valgus (HV is a common condition involving the progressive subluxation of the first metatarsophalangeal joint due to lateral deviation of the hallux and medial deviation of the first metatarsal. The objective of this study was to evaluate the re-test reliability and validity of self-assessment of HV using a simple clinical screening tool involving four standardised photographs (the Manchester scale, in order to determine whether this tool could be used for postal surveys of the condition. Methods HV was assessed with the Manchester scale in 138 people aged 65 to 93 years of age (102 women and 36 men as part of a larger randomised controlled trial. At the six month follow-up assessment, HV was reassessed to determine re-test reliability, and participants were asked to self-assess their degree of HV independent of the examiners. Associations between (i baseline and follow-up assessments of the examiners and (ii participant and examiner assessments were performed using weighted kappa statistics. Analyses were then repeated after HV was dichotomised as present or absent using unweighted kappa, and sensitivity and specificity of self-assessment of HV was determined. Results Re-test reliability of the examiners was substantial to almost perfect (weighted kappa = 0.78 to 0.90, and there was a substantial level of agreement between observations of the participants and the examiners (weighted kappa = 0.71 to 0.80. Overall, there was a slight tendency for participants to rate their HV as less severe than the examiners. When the Manchester scale scores were dichotomised, agreement was substantial to almost perfect for both re-test comparisons (kappa = 0.80 to 0.89 and substantial for comparisons between participants and examiners (kappa = 0.64 to 0.76. The sensitivity and specificity of self-assessment of HV using the dichotomous scale were 85 and 88%, respectively. Conclusions The Manchester scale demonstrates high re

  1. The formation of music-scenes in Manchester and their relation to urban space and the image of the city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tom

    2013-01-01

    and the image of the city. This image has later been utilised in the branding of Manchester as a creative city. The case is interesting in relation to the current ideals of planning ‘creative cities’ and local cultural scenes. The music scenes cannot be seen as participatory projects and has developed in more......The formation of music-scenes in Manchester and their relation to urban space and the image of the city The paper I would like to present derives from a study of the relation between the atmospheric qualities of a city and the formation of music scenes. I have studied Manchester which is a known...

  2. Dose reduction in LDR brachytherapy by implanted prostate gold fiducial markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Lutgens, Ludy; Murrer, Lars; Afsharpour, Hossein; de Haas-Kock, Danielle; Visser, Peter; van Gils, Francis; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-03-01

    The dosimetric impact of gold fiducial markers (FM) implanted prior to external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seed implants performed in the context of combined therapy was investigated. A virtual water phantom was designed containing a single FM. Single and multi source scenarios were investigated by performing Monte Carlo dose calculations, along with the influence of varying orientation and distance of the FM with respect to the sources. Three prostate cancer patients treated with LDR brachytherapy for a recurrence following external beam radiotherapy with implanted FM were studied as surrogate cases to combined therapy. FM and brachytherapy seeds were identified on post implant CT scans and Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed with and without FM. The dosimetric impact of the FM was evaluated by quantifying the amplitude of dose shadows and the volume of cold spots. D(90) was reported based on the post implant CT prostate contour. Large shadows are observed in the single source-FM scenarios. As expected from geometric considerations, the shadows are dependent on source-FM distance and orientation. Large dose reductions are observed at the distal side of FM, while at the proximal side a dose enhancement is observed. In multisource scenarios, the importance of shadows appears mitigated, although FM at the periphery of the seed distribution caused underdosage (LDR brachytherapy seed implant dose distributions. Therefore, reduced tumor control could be expected from FM implanted in tumors, although our results are too limited to draw conclusions regarding clinical significance.

  3. Manchester visual query language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, John P.; Davis, Darryl N.; Shann, Richard T.

    1993-04-01

    We report a database language for visual retrieval which allows queries on image feature information which has been computed and stored along with images. The language is novel in that it provides facilities for dealing with feature data which has actually been obtained from image analysis. Each line in the Manchester Visual Query Language (MVQL) takes a set of objects as input and produces another, usually smaller, set as output. The MVQL constructs are mainly based on proven operators from the field of digital image analysis. An example is the Hough-group operator which takes as input a specification for the objects to be grouped, a specification for the relevant Hough space, and a definition of the voting rule. The output is a ranked list of high scoring bins. The query could be directed towards one particular image or an entire image database, in the latter case the bins in the output list would in general be associated with different images. We have implemented MVQL in two layers. The command interpreter is a Lisp program which maps each MVQL line to a sequence of commands which are used to control a specialized database engine. The latter is a hybrid graph/relational system which provides low-level support for inheritance and schema evolution. In the paper we outline the language and provide examples of useful queries. We also describe our solution to the engineering problems associated with the implementation of MVQL.

  4. Hallé SHINE on Manchester: Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Victoria; Kasim, Adetayo; Kokotsaki, Dimitra; Hewitt, Catherine; Akhter, Nasima; Collyer, Clare; Younger, Kirsty; Wiggins, Andy; Torgerson, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The "Hallé SHINE on Manchester" (HSoM) programme is a Saturday school educational programme designed to increase the reading and maths attainment, as well as engagement with school, of underachieving and disadvantaged pupils at Key Stage 2. Developed in collaboration between the SHINE Trust and Hallé Orchestra, the intervention provides…

  5. An Exploratory Product Evaluation of the Manchester Motor Skills Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodal, Katherine; Bond, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    This study is an exploratory product evaluation of the Manchester Motor Skills Programme (MMSP). A mixed methodology was used to explore intended, unintended, positive and negative outcomes for four Key Stage 2 (KS2) children with motor skills difficulties who participated in the MMSP. The children's motor skills, social skills and self-esteem…

  6. QTL list: ldr1.1 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64342 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr1.1 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_01 ... 3.6 3.6 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  7. QTL list: ldr6.1 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64349 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr6.1 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_04 ... 100 2.8 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  8. QTL list: ldr1.1 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64358 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr1.1 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_07 ... 0 3.7 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  9. QTL list: ldr1.2 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64343 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr1.2 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_01 ... 3.6 5.6 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  10. QTL list: ldr4.4 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64348 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr4.4 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_04 ... 37.9 4.7 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  11. QTL list: ldr1.1 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64356 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr1.1 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_06 ... 101.3 3.1 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  12. QTL list: ldr4.2 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64346 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr4.2 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_01 ... 77.8 6 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  13. QTL list: ldr6.4 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64352 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr6.4 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_06 ... 22.7 7.3 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  14. QTL list: ldr7.1 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64353 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr7.1 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_06 ... 27.8 6.1 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  15. QTL list: ldr6.3 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64351 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr6.3 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_06 ... 22.7 4.2 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  16. QTL list: ldr4.3 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64347 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr4.3 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_04 ... 33.1 5.4 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  17. QTL list: ldr6.2 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64350 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr6.2 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_04 ... 151.9 3.6 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  18. QTL list: ldr4.1 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64345 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr4.1 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_01 ... 77.8 8.6 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  19. QTL list: ldr1.1 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64357 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr1.1 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_07 ... 0 4.2 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  20. QTL list: ldr1.3 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64344 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr1.3 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_01 ... 25.7 4.6 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  1. QTL list: ldr1.1 [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QT64354 Cucumis sativus Cucurbitaceae ldr1.1 Mean length:diameter ratio over three... harvests little-leaf (ll) trait (ldr1.3) 1,6 ... LG_06 ... 60.3 2.6 ... 10.1007/s00122-003-1277-1 12827247

  2. The introduction of the Manchester triage scale to an emergency department in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, J G

    2012-02-03

    Triage is an integral part of the modern emergency department. The use of a recognised triage system has many advantages for the emergency department including reference to a recognised decision-making structure and support in the form of a professionally accepted and validated system. As part of a programme of internal change the Manchester triage system (MTS) was introduced to an emergency department in the Republic of Ireland. This article outlines the introduction of this method of triage and cites the domestic and international drivers of the change.

  3. Differential cellular responses to prolonged LDR-IR in MLH1-proficient and MLH1-deficient colorectal cancer HCT116 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tao; Seo, Yuji; Kinsella, Timothy J

    2009-11-15

    MLH1 is a key DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein involved in maintaining genomic stability by participating in the repair of endogenous and exogenous mispairs in the daughter strands during S phase. Exogenous mispairs can result following treatment with several classes of chemotherapeutic drugs, as well as with ionizing radiation. In this study, we investigated the role of the MLH1 protein in determining the cellular and molecular responses to prolonged low-dose rate ionizing radiation (LDR-IR), which is similar to the clinical use of cancer brachytherapy. An isogenic pair of MMR(+) (MLH1(+)) and MMR(-) (MLH1(-)) human colorectal cancer HCT116 cells was exposed to prolonged LDR-IR (1.3-17 cGy/h x 24-96 h). The clonogenic survival and gene mutation rates were examined. Cell cycle distribution was analyzed with flow cytometry. Changes in selected DNA damage repair proteins, DNA damage response proteins, and cell death marker proteins were examined with Western blotting. MLH1(+) HCT116 cells showed greater radiosensitivity with enhanced expression of apoptotic and autophagic markers, a reduced HPRT gene mutation rate, and more pronounced cell cycle alterations (increased late-S population and a G(2)/M arrest) following LDR-IR compared with MLH1(-) HCT116 cells. Importantly, a progressive increase in MLH1 protein levels was found in MLH1(+) cells during prolonged LDR-IR, which was temporally correlated with a progressive decrease in Rad51 protein (involved in homologous recombination) levels. MLH1 status significantly affects cellular responses to prolonged LDR-IR. MLH1 may enhance cell radiosensitivity to prolonged LDR-IR through inhibition of homologous recombination (through inhibition of Rad51).

  4. Managing risk in healthcare: understanding your safety culture using the Manchester Patient Safety Framework (MaPSaF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dianne

    2009-03-01

    To provide sufficient information about the Manchester Patient Safety Framework (MaPSaF) to allow healthcare professionals to assess its potential usefulness. The assessment of safety culture is an important aspect of risk management, and one in which there is increasing interest among healthcare organizations. Manchester Patient Safety Framework offers a theory-based framework for assessing safety culture, designed specifically for use in the NHS. The framework covers multiple dimensions of safety culture, and five levels of safety culture development. This allows the generation of a profile of an organization's safety culture in terms of areas of relative strength and challenge, which can be used to identify focus issues for change and improvement. Manchester Patient Safety Framework provides a useful method for engaging healthcare professionals in assessing and improving the safety culture in their organization, as part of a programme of risk management.

  5. Absolute measurement of LDR brachytherapy source emitted power: Instrument design and initial measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Martha J; Palmer, Benjamin R; DeWerd, Larry A

    2016-02-01

    Energy-based source strength metrics may find use with model-based dose calculation algorithms, but no instruments exist that can measure the energy emitted from low-dose rate (LDR) sources. This work developed a calorimetric technique for measuring the power emitted from encapsulated low-dose rate, photon-emitting brachytherapy sources. This quantity is called emitted power (EP). The measurement methodology, instrument design and performance, and EP measurements made with the calorimeter are presented in this work. A calorimeter operating with a liquid helium thermal sink was developed to measure EP from LDR brachytherapy sources. The calorimeter employed an electrical substitution technique to determine the power emitted from the source. The calorimeter's performance and thermal system were characterized. EP measurements were made using four (125)I sources with air-kerma strengths ranging from 2.3 to 5.6 U and corresponding EPs of 0.39-0.79 μW, respectively. Three Best Medical 2301 sources and one Oncura 6711 source were measured. EP was also computed by converting measured air-kerma strengths to EPs through Monte Carlo-derived conversion factors. The measured EP and derived EPs were compared to determine the accuracy of the calorimeter measurement technique. The calorimeter had a noise floor of 1-3 nW and a repeatability of 30-60 nW. The calorimeter was stable to within 5 nW over a 12 h measurement window. All measured values agreed with derived EPs to within 10%, with three of the four sources agreeing to within 4%. Calorimeter measurements had uncertainties ranging from 2.6% to 4.5% at the k = 1 level. The values of the derived EPs had uncertainties ranging from 2.9% to 3.6% at the k = 1 level. A calorimeter capable of measuring the EP from LDR sources has been developed and validated for (125)I sources with EPs between 0.43 and 0.79 μW.

  6. Implants with {sup 32}P-foils for LDR-brachytherapy of benign stenosis in urology and gastroenterology; {sup 32}P-haltige Folien als Implantate fuer die LDR-Brachytherapie gutartiger Stenosen in der Urologie und Gastroenterologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, Walter [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ., Muenchen (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Becker, Ricarda; Otto, Henrike [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern (Germany). Laser-Forschungslabor] [and others

    2013-03-01

    For LDR-brachytherapy, a limited number of implant geometries and materials are available. To avoid wound healing related hyper-proliferation (stenosis, keloids) a novel radioactive foil system was developed based on beta emitting {sup 32}P, which can be easily integrated in existing implants such as urethral catheters or bile duct stents. As substrate material for these foils PEEK (polyetherethercetone) was chosen because of its radiation hardness during neutron activation of {sup 32}P. The activity was determined by liquid scintillation counting and gamma spectroscopy, dose distributions were measured with scintillation detectors and radiochromic films. The correlation between activity and dose was checked by Monte-Carlo-simulations (Geant4). Prototypes of the {sup 32}P-implants have shown in wash-out tests the required tightness for sealed radioactive sources. In animal tests on urethra and bile duct, the uncomplicated and save application of {sup 32}P-foils mounted on standard implants has been demonstrated, which is almost unchanged due to the simple radiation protection with plexiglass. This concept of radioactive implants with integrated {sup 32}P-foils could extend essentially the application possibilities of LDR-brachytherapy. (orig.)

  7. A cross-site vascular radiology on-call service: the Manchester experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashleigh, R.J.; Butterfield, J.S.; Asquith, J.; Chalmers, N.; Murphy, G.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: A cross-site vascular radiology on-call service was established 5 years ago to cover two vascular centres in Manchester. We aimed to review the service. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective audit of out-of hours referrals and procedures over a three month period (March-May 2003) was undertaken. RESULTS: There were 52 incidents in 49 patients (mean 4 calls per week). Nine involved telephone advice only, the remainder (82%) required a procedure. Angiography was performed on 88% of patients and therapeutic radiological intervention on 50%. 71% of calls occurred at a weekend. 50% of the calls were from vascular surgery and 50% from other sources. The consultant vascular radiologist was present for 93% of procedures. CONCLUSIONS: The workload suggests that a vascular radiology on call service is justified in Manchester. There have been no major problems with its implementation and operation. This is a consultant led service, with very few cases being devolved to a specialist registrar (SpR)

  8. PCR/LDR/capillary electrophoresis for detection of single-nucleotide differences between fetal and maternal DNA in maternal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ping; Chen, Zhuqin; Zhao, Yan; Guo, Jianxin; Fu, Huabin; Zhou, Yuanguo; Yu, Lili; Li, Li

    2009-03-01

    The discovery of fetal DNA in maternal plasma has opened up an approach for noninvasive diagnosis. We have now assessed the possibility of detecting single-nucleotide differences between fetal and maternal DNA in maternal plasma by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/ligase detection reaction((LDR)/capillary electrophoresis. PCR/LDR/capillary electrophoresis was applied to detect the genotype of c.454-397T>gene (ESR1) from experimental DNA models of maternal plasma at different sensitivity levels and 13 maternal plasma samples.alphaC in estrogen receptor. (1) Our results demonstrated that the technique could discriminate low abundance single-nucleotide mutation with a mutant/normal allele ratio up to 1:10 000. (2) Examination of ESR1 c.454-397T>C genotypes by using the method of restriction fragment length analysis was performed in 25 pregnant women, of whom 13 pregnant women had homozygous genotypes. The c.454-397T>C genotypes of paternally inherited fetal DNA in maternal plasma of these 13 women were detected by PCR/LDR/capillary electrophoresis, which were accordant with the results of umbilical cord blood. PCR/LDR/capillary electrophoresis has very high sensitivity to distinguish low abundance single nucleotide differences and can discriminate point mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) of paternally inherited fetal DNA in maternal plasma.

  9. [Implants with 32P-foils for LDR-brachytherapy of benign stenosis in urology and gastroenterology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, Walter; Becker, Ricarda; Otto, Henrike; Bader, Markus; Clemente, Lucas; Reinhardt, Sabine; Schäfer, Claus; Schirra, Jörg; Uschold, Stephanie; Welzmüller, Andreas; Sroka, Ronald

    2013-02-01

    For LDR-brachytherapy, a limited number of implant geometries and materials are available. To avoid wound healing related hyper-proliferation (stenosis, keloids) a novel radioactive foil system was developed based on beta emitting (32)P, which can be easily integrated in existing implants such as urethral catheters or bile duct stents. As substrate material for these foils PEEK (polyetherethercetone) was chosen because of its radiation hardness during neutron activation of (32)P. The activity was determined by liquid scintillation counting and gamma spectroscopy, dose distributions were measured with scintillation detectors and radiochromic films. The correlation between activity and dose was checked by Monte-Carlo-simulations (Geant4). Prototypes of the (32)P-implants have shown in wash-out tests the required tightness for sealed radioactive sources. In animal tests on urethra and bile duct, the uncomplicated and save application of (32)P-foils mounted on standard implants has been demonstrated, which is almost unchanged due to the simple radiation protection with plexiglass. This concept of radioactive implants with integrated (32)P-foils could extend essentially the application possibilities of LDR-brachytherapy. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  10. ANALISIS PENGARUH LDR, NPL DAN ROA TERHADAP CAR PADA BANK PEMBANGUNAN DAERAH (BPD) SE- INDONESIA TAHUN 2007-2011

    OpenAIRE

    SAM, FATWAL

    2012-01-01

    2012 Analisis Pengaruh LDR, NPL, dan ROA terhadap CAR Pada Bank Pembangunan Daerah (BPD) Se-Indonesia Tahun 2007-2011 Analysis of Effect of Loan to Deposit Ratio, Non Performing Loan, and Return On Assets to the Capital Adequacy Ratio of the Regional Development Banks In Indonesia Period 2007-2011 Fatwal Sam Cepi Pahlevi Gamalca Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis pengaruh variabel LDR, NPL dan ROA terhadap CAR. Data yang digunakan adalah publikasi laporan tahun...

  11. The establishment of the Dalton Nuclear Institute by the University of Manchester in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clegg, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The University of Manchester (UoM) is taking a pioneering step in the UK by identifying nuclear research and education as one of its strategic priorities and establishing the Dalton Nuclear Institute. The UoM was created in 2004 from the merger of the Victoria University of Manchester and UMIST (University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology) which both had distinguished histories dating back more than 180 years. The new University has a bold strategic vision to become over the next decade one of the world's top universities. The Institute will work with government and industry to protect and develop the UK's strategic nuclear skills base. Its scope covers the broad entirety of nuclear requirements spanning reactors, fuel cycles, decommissioning, social policy and regulation, and with connections into nuclear medicine and fusion. Existing nuclear research strengths will be integrated and new capabilities grown in areas of weakness. Two initial appointments are underway in radiation sciences and decommissioning engineering with others being planned. The Institute has also established NTEC (Nuclear Technology Education Consortium) in collaboration with other supporting universities which, with government and industry support, is launching a new national programme for postgraduate-level nuclear learning. (author)

  12. Simulation requirements for the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soosaar, K.

    1984-01-01

    Simulation tools for the large deployable reflector (LDR) are discussed. These tools are often the transfer function variety equations. However, transfer functions are inadequate to represent time-varying systems for multiple control systems with overlapping bandwidths characterized by multi-input, multi-output features. Frequency domain approaches are the useful design tools, but a full-up simulation is needed. Because of the need for a dedicated computer for high frequency multi degree of freedom components encountered, non-real time smulation is preferred. Large numerical analysis software programs are useful only to receive inputs and provide output to the next block, and should be kept out of the direct loop of simulation. The following blocks make up the simulation. The thermal model block is a classical heat transfer program. It is a non-steady state program. The quasistatic block deals with problems associated with rigid body control of reflector segments. The steady state block assembles data into equations of motion and dynamics. A differential raytrace is obtained to establish a change in wave aberrations. The observation scene is described. The focal plane module converts the photon intensity impinging on it into electron streams or into permanent film records.

  13. Comparative quantification of human intestinal bacteria based on cPCR and LDR/LCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhou-Rui; Li, Kai; Zhou, Yu-Xun; Xiao, Zhen-Xian; Xiao, Jun-Hua; Huang, Rui; Gu, Guo-Hao

    2012-01-21

    To establish a multiple detection method based on comparative polymerase chain reaction (cPCR) and ligase detection reaction (LDR)/ligase chain reaction (LCR) to quantify the intestinal bacterial components. Comparative quantification of 16S rDNAs from different intestinal bacterial components was used to quantify multiple intestinal bacteria. The 16S rDNAs of different bacteria were amplified simultaneously by cPCR. The LDR/LCR was examined to actualize the genotyping and quantification. Two beneficial (Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus) and three conditionally pathogenic bacteria (Enterococcus, Enterobacterium and Eubacterium) were used in this detection. With cloned standard bacterial 16S rDNAs, standard curves were prepared to validate the quantitative relations between the ratio of original concentrations of two templates and the ratio of the fluorescence signals of their final ligation products. The internal controls were added to monitor the whole detection flow. The quantity ratio between two bacteria was tested. cPCR and LDR revealed obvious linear correlations with standard DNAs, but cPCR and LCR did not. In the sample test, the distributions of the quantity ratio between each two bacterial species were obtained. There were significant differences among these distributions in the total samples. But these distributions of quantity ratio of each two bacteria remained stable among groups divided by age or sex. The detection method in this study can be used to conduct multiple intestinal bacteria genotyping and quantification, and to monitor the human intestinal health status as well.

  14. LDR reverses DDP resistance in ovarian cancer cells by affecting ERCC-1, Bcl-2, Survivin and Caspase-3 expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xingyan; Yu, Hongsheng; Liang, Donghai; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Yuanwei; Chen, Ling; Dong, Qing; Liu, Xiaoran

    2018-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of death resulting from malignant gynecological tumors. After surgical intervention, cisplatin (DDP) is a major chemotherapy drug for ovarian cancer, but the ovarian cancer cells tend to develop DDP resistance in the clinical setting. Tumor cells are sensitive to low-dose radiation (LDR). However, how the LDR therapy improves the effects of chemotherapy drugs on ovarian cancer is not well understood. This study aimed to explore this issue. The SKOV3/DDP cells were divided into 3 groups, including low-dose group, conventional-dose group, and control group (no radiation). Cell counting kit-8 assay was performed to measure cell proliferation. Flow cytometric analysis was then utilized to quantify the apoptosis with classical Annexin V/propidium iodide co-staining. And Real-time quantitative PCR and western blot were eventually used to analyze the mRNA and protein levels of excision repair cross complementing-group 1 (ERCC1), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Survivin and Caspase-3, respectively. The IC50 value of DDP in the low-dose group was significantly lower compared with the other two groups. Compared with the conventional-dose group and control group, LDR treatment resulted in significantly more apoptosis. Besides, LDR treatment significantly decreased the mRNA and protein expression of ERCC1, Bcl-2, and Survivin, and enhanced the mRNA and protein expression of Caspase-3 compared with the other two groups. LDR reversed DDP resistance in SKOV3/DDP cells possibly by suppressing ERCC1, Bcl-2, and Survivin expressions, and increasing Caspase-3 expression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. An Investigation of the Dose Distribution from LDR Ir-192 Wires in the Triangular Implants of the Paris System using Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizollah Rahimi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Polymer gels are modern dosimeters providing three dimensional dose distributions. These dosimeters can be used in brachytherapy in which the tumor dimension is relatively small and the dose gradient is high. In this study, the ability of the MAGICA polymer gel was investigated for assessing the absolute dose values as well as the dose distribution of low dose rate (LDR Ir-192 wires in interstitial brachytherapy based in triangular implants of the Paris system. Material and Methods: A suitable phantom was made from Perspex. Glass tubes were used as the external tubes for holding the Ir-192 wires in the phantom. The MAGICA polymer gel was made and placed in the phantom. The phantom and the calibration tubes were irradiated using LDR Ir-192 wires and a Co-60 teletherapy unit respectively. They were subsequently imaged using an MRI scanner. The R2 (=1/T2 maps were extracted from several sequential T2-weighted MRI images. The dose values resulting from the polymer gel measurements at the reference points were compared with those from the common calculation method at the same points. In addition, the isodose curves resulting from gel dosimetry were compared with those from a brachytherapy treatment planning system (Flexiplan. Results: The average of the dose values measured with the gel at the reference points was 62.75% higher than those calculated at the same points. Investigating the isodose curves revealed that the maximum distance to agreement (DTAmax between the isodoses resulting from the gel and those obtained from the treatment planning system was less than 3 mm at different dose levels. Discussion and Conclusion: Although the MAGICA gel indicates a higher absolute dose value than those calculated commonly, it can give the relative dose values accurately. Therefore, it can be recommended to be used for the assessment of dose distributions for the treatment of tissues as well as quality control of the treatment planning systems.

  16. Research activities of the nuclear graphite research group at the University of Manchester, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Fok, A.S.L.; Marrow, J.; Mummery, P.

    2004-01-01

    In 2001 the Nuclear Safety Division (NSD) of the UK Health and Safety Executive (HSE) decided to underwrite the Nuclear Graphite Research Group (NGRG) at the University of Manchester, UK with the aim of providing a source of independent research and advice to the HSE (NSD). Since then the group has rapidly expanded to 16 members and attracted considerable funding from the nuclear power industry and the regulator for a wide range of research and consultancy work. It is now also part of the Material Performance Centre within the BNFL Universities Research Alliance. Extensive collaboration exists between the group and other nuclear research institutes, both in the UK and overseas. This paper briefly describes some of the research programmes being carried out by the NGRG at Manchester. (author)

  17. From Broken Glass to Ruf Diamonds: Manchester Hip Hop

    OpenAIRE

    de Paor-Evans, Adam

    2018-01-01

    When one considers music culture in Manchester during the 1980s and 1990s, Hip Hop is not an obvious cultural arena for discussion. However, amidst the spectacle of The Haçienda, the pop boom of Factory Records and the evolution of rave subculture and form of dance music which produced the pop cultural phenomenon of Madchester; in the space of music between The Fall and The Charlatans where brief stardom was found by Inspiral Carpets, Northside and Candyflip, Mancunian Hip Hop was also evolvi...

  18. PENGARUH CAR, NPL, DAN LDR TERHADAP ROA (STUDI PADA BANK UMUM YANG LISTING DI BURSA EFEK INDONESIA TAHUN 2007-2011)

    OpenAIRE

    SANTOSA, ANGGITA PUJI

    2012-01-01

    2012 Pengaruh CAR, NPL, Dan LDR Terhadap ROA(Studi Pada Bank Umum Yang Listing Di Bursa Efek Indonesia Tahun 2007-2011) The Effect of Capital Adequacy Ratio, Non Performing Loan, and Loan to Deposit Ratio to Return On Assets( A study in Commercial Banking that Listed on Indonesian Stock Exchange Period 2007-2011) Anggita Puji Santosa Cepi Pahlevi Gamalca Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis pengaruh CAR, NPL dan LDR terhadap ROA.Data yang digunakan dalam penelitia...

  19. SCHOOL OF MANCHESTER: THE FUTURE IS IN THE PAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia UNGUREANU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In a period full of uncertainties, economists belonging to different economic schools are trying to find solutions for overcoming recession moments and for ensuring a sustainable economic growth. A phenomenon usually found in physics, hysteresis, is according to our opinion, applicable in both theory and economic practice: the current economic situation, but also governing theories and laws, are influenced and dependent of past events. We will turn our attention in this article on Manchester Economic School, a less orthodox one, but with strong principles that are still influencing the contemporary realities.

  20. A dosimetric intercomparison of brachytherapy facilities in Ireland, Scotland and the North of England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeney, Conor; McClean, Brendan; Kelly, Colin

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: A dosimetric intercomparison of brachytherapy remote afterloading units in Ireland, Scotland and the North of England has been carried out involving 9 radiotherapy centres, and sampling 5 HDR and 6 LDR units. Materials and methods: Absolute calibrations have been performed in air on both HDR and LDR sources. The results are expressed in terms of a ratio of local to calibrated value. Frequency distributions were obtained for the multi-source LDR units by individually measuring each source. Using these distributions the effect of non-uniform source strength on the dose rate at Manchester point A was assessed for a typical clinical brachytherapy insertion for carcinoma of the cervix. Both frequency and dose rate distribution curves were modeled using normal statistics and characterised in terms of the mean (μ) and standard deviation (σ). Results: Evaluation of the HDR units indicated a mean ratio of 1.008 (±0.01) while for LDR the mean ratio was 0.997 (±0.02). The LDR frequency distributions demonstrated a variation of σ values extending from 1.4 to 3.0% of μ. It was shown that this non-uniformity in source strength introduced an uncertainty in the treatment planning process of between 0.8 and 1.8% when compared to the assumption of uniform source strength. Conclusions: The results of this intercomparison indicate dosimetric consistency between centres for both LDR and HDR units. The distribution of LDR source strengths were within expected limits and the resultant dose rate distributions were considered clinically acceptable

  1. ANALISIS PENGARUH LDR, NPL DAN OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCY RATIO TERHADAP RETURN ON ASSETS PADA BANK DEVISA DI INDONESIA PERIODE 2010-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidah Hamidah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This research is performed on order to test analysis the influence of the Loan to Deposit Ratio (LDR, Non Performing Loan (NPL and Operational Efficiency Ratio (OER toward Return On Asset (ROA On Foreign Exchange Banks In Indonesia Period 2010-2012. Methodology research as the sample used purposive sampling, sample was accrued from foreign banks in Indonesia. Data analysis with multi linear regression of ordinary least square and hypotheses test used t-statistic and F statistic, a classic assumption examination to test the hypotheses.Based on normality test, multicolinearity test, heterosskedasticity test and auto correlation test were not found variables that deviate from the classical assumptions, this indicate that the available data has fulfill the condition to use multi linear regression model. This result of research show that variable LDR and NPL partially have positive influence but not significant toward ROA. Variable OERpartially have negative significant influence toward ROA. Variable LDR, NPL and OER simultaneously have significant influence toward ROA.

  2. Impact of point A asymmetry on local control and survival for low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opfermann, Krisha J; Wahlquist, Amy; Watkins, John; Kohler, Matthew; Jenrette, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate whether Point A asymmetry in low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy is associated with local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS) and/or overall survival (OS). A retrospective analysis of disease control and survival outcomes was conducted for patients who underwent LDR brachytherapy for advanced cervical cancer. Institutional protocol entailed concurrent chemotherapy and whole pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT) over 5 weeks, followed by placement of Fletcher-Suit tandem and colpostat applicators at weeks 6 and 8. Objective Point A doses, 80-85 Gy, were accomplished by placement of Cesium-137 (Cs-137) sources. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess associations between disease control and survival endpoints with variables of interest. The records of 50 patients with FIGO stage IB1-IVA cervical cancer undergoing LDR brachytherapy at our institution were identified. Thirty of these patients had asymmetry > 2.5%, and 11 patients had asymmetry > 5%. At a median survivor follow-up of 20.25 months, 15 patients had experienced disease failure (including 5 cervical/vaginal apex only failures and 2 failures encompassing the local site). Right/left dose asymmetry at Point A was associated with statistically significantly inferior LC (p = 0.035) and inferior DFS (p = 0.011) for patients with mean Point A dose of > 80 Gy. Insufficient evidence existed to conclude an association with OS. LDR brachytherapy may be associated with clinically significant dose asymmetry. The present study demonstrates that patients with Point A asymmetry have a higher risk of failure for DFS and LC.

  3. Dorothy Davison (1890-1984): Manchester medical artist and her work for neurosurgeon Sir Geoffrey Jefferson (1886-1961).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Peter D

    2017-05-01

    Miss Davison was a medical artist at the Manchester Royal Infirmary and the University of Manchester from around 1918 until her retirement in 1957. She illustrated books and scientific papers on anthropology, anatomy and surgery, and became well known for her striking pictures produced by the 'Ross board technique'- a difficult process that she helped pioneer from the 1930s and which forms the bulk of the work she undertook for neurosurgeon Geoffrey Jefferson during the 1930s-1950s. His Neurosurgical Department became the main base for her work until his retirement in 1953. She was an active member of the Medical Artist Association (MAA) which she helped found in 1949.

  4. Correlation between Manchester Grading Scale and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Score in Patients with Hallux Valgus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliou, Kalliopi; Paraskevas, George; Kanavaros, Panagiotis; Barbouti, Alexandra; Vrettakos, Aristidis; Gekas, Christos; Kitsoulis, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the correlation between the Manchester Grading Scale and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score in patients with a hallux valgus deformity. Subjects and Methods The study sample included 181 feet of 122 patients with hallux valgus and 424 feet of 212 individuals without hallux valgus deformity as the control group. The severity of hallux valgus, utilizing a relative nonmetric scale, the Manchester Grading Scale, and the metric AOFAS score, was determined for all individuals in the hallux valgus and control groups. SPSS version 18 (Chicago, Ill., USA) was used for data analysis. Results According to the Manchester Grading Scale, the 424 feet of the normal group were classified as ‘no deformity−. In the hallux valgus group, 85 feet were classified as ‘mild deformity−, 67 as ‘moderate deformity' and 29 as ‘severe deformity−. The AOFAS total score in the control group was 99.14. In the hallux valgus group, patients with mild or moderate deformity had total scores of 86.20 and 68.19, respectively. For those with severe hallux valgus, the total score was 44.69 and the differences were statistically significant (p = 0.000). Using the Pearson correlation, strong negative correlations were found between the AOFAS score and the hallux valgus angle (HVA; r = −0.899, p = 0.000). Strong negative correlations were demonstrated between the AOFAS score and the first intermetatarsal angle (IMA) as well (r = −0.748, p = 0.000). Conclusions The AOFAS score was negatively associated with the Manchester Grading Scale, HVA and first IMA. As the severity of hallux valgus increased, the AOFAS score seemed to decrease. PMID:26335050

  5. The use of Selectron afterloading equipment to simulate and extend the Manchester system for intracavitary therapy of the cervix uteri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J.M.; Moore, C.J.; Notley, H.M.; Hunter, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    When Selectron afterloading machines were introduced in the Christie Hospital the first aim was to reproduce, as closely as possible, the isodose distributions achieved with the traditional Manchester Radium System. This resulted in the establishment of standard pellet loading patterns, and standard treatment times, for programming the Selectron channels. However, the availability of whole-body CT scanning facilities provides a method of accurately locating the source positions with respect to the local anatomy and hence the possibility of dosage control based on doses to specific pelvic structures. Various computer programs have been written to extract source position data from the CT images, to allow the operator to propose pellet loading patterns and treatment times, and ultimately to display the resultant isodose distribution superposed on the cross-sectional scans. The effects on the dose distribution arising from changing the number of pellets, the pellet positions within the applicators, and the treatment times, are briefly discussed. (author)

  6. Rectal doses during LDR and HDR intracavitary brachytherapy of gyneacological malignancies: comparison of direct measurement with that of calculated from radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, Arun; Agarwal, D.P.

    2001-01-01

    In the present study rectal doses using CaSO 4 :Dy powder has been measured in 14 cases of cancer cervix treated by LDR brachytherapy and 20 cases of cancer cervix treated by HDR brachytherapy. The maximum rectal dose in LDR varied from 1073-1856 cGy for point A dose of 3000 cGy. The maximum rectal dose was found to be at 6-8 cm from the anal verge. The results of the calculation and actual measurements has been compared

  7. Optimal conditions of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes: exposure to 12.5 mGy X-rays for 8 weeks efficiently protects the kidney from diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Li, Fengsheng; Cui, Jiuwei; Guo, Weiying; Li, Cai; Li, Wei; Wang, Guixia; Xing, Xiao; Gao, Ying; Ge, Yuanyuan; Wang, Guanjun; Cai, Lu

    2014-05-08

    We reported the attenuation of diabetes-induced renal dysfunction by exposure to multiple low-dose radiation (LDR) at 25 mGy every other day by suppressing renal oxidative damage. We here explored the optimal conditions of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes. Male C57BL/6J mice with type 1 diabetes were induced with multiple injections of low-dose streptozotocin. Diabetic mice received whole body X-irradiation at a dose of 12.5, 25 or 50 mGy every other day for either 4 or 8 weeks. Age-matched normal mice were similarly irradiated at the dose of 25 mGy for 4 or 8 weeks. The renal function and histopathological changes were examined at the 4th and 8th weeks of the study. Diabetes induced renal dysfunction is shown by the decreased creatinine and increased microalbumin in the urine. Renal oxidative damage, detected by protein nitration and lipid oxidation, and remodeling, reflected by increased expression of connective tissue growth factor, collagen IV and fibronectin, were significantly increased in diabetic mice. All these renal pathological and function changes in diabetic mice were significantly attenuated by exposure to LDR at all regimens, among which, however, exposure to LDR at 12.5 mGy for 8 weeks provided the best protective effect on the kidney of diabetic mice. Our results suggest that whole-body LDR at 12.5 mGy every other day for 8 weeks is the optimal condition of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A seasonal time history of the size resolved composition of fine aerosol in Manchester UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choularton, Thomas; Martin, Claire; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh; Bower, Keith; Gallagher, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in urban centres now using sophisticated instruments that measure aerosol properties needed to determine their effects on human health, air quality and climate change) showing that a significant fraction of urban aerosols (mainly from automotive sources) are composed of organic compounds with implications for human health. In this project we have produced the first seasonal aerosol composition and emission database for the City of Manchester in the UK Several recent projects have been conducted by SEAES looking at fundamental properties of urban atmospheric aerosol to understand their influence on climate. This work is now expanding through collaboration with the School of Geography & Centre for Occupational & Environmental Health to investigate urban aerosol emission impacts on human health In this paper we present a compendium of data from field campaigns in Manchester city centre over the past decade. The data are from six different campaigns, between 2001 - 2007, each campaign was between 2 weeks and 2 months long predominantly from January and June periods . The data analysis includes air parcel trajectory examination and comparisons with external data, including PM10, CO and NOx data from AURN fixed monitoring sites Six Manchester fine aerosol datasets from the past decade have been quality controlled and analysed regarding averages of the size distributions of Organic, NO3, NH4 and SO4 mass loadings. It was found that: Organic material is the largest single component of the aerosol with primary aliphatic material dominating the smallest sizes, but with oxygenated secondary organic material being important in the accumulation mode. In the accumulation mode the organic material seems to be internally mixed with sulphate and nitrate. The accumulation mode particles were effective as cloud condensation nuclei. Seasonal effects surrounding atmospheric stability and photochemistry were found to play an important role in the

  9. MANCHESTER UNITED, INTERNAZIONALE MILANO AND FC BARCELONA – WHAT´S DIFFERENT?

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo Sarmento; M. Teresa Anguera; Jorge Campaniço; Rui Resende; José Leitão

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Although football is considered a universal language, there are particularities that characterize the way it is practiced in several countries. Overall, the style of English football is known as “Kick and Rush”, the Italian as “Catenaccio”, and the Spanish as “Fúria Española”. This study aims to understand which aspects in the characterization of playing styles of the different teams (Manchester United, Internazionale Milano and Barcelona) are the most important for coaches. Met...

  10. Near constant-time optimal piecewise LDR to HDR inverse tone mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Su, Guan-Ming; Yin, Peng

    2015-02-01

    In a backward compatible HDR image/video compression, it is a general approach to reconstruct HDR from compressed LDR as a prediction to original HDR, which is referred to as inverse tone mapping. Experimental results show that 2- piecewise 2nd order polynomial has the best mapping accuracy than 1 piece high order or 2-piecewise linear, but it is also the most time-consuming method because to find the optimal pivot point to split LDR range to 2 pieces requires exhaustive search. In this paper, we propose a fast algorithm that completes optimal 2-piecewise 2nd order polynomial inverse tone mapping in near constant time without quality degradation. We observe that in least square solution, each entry in the intermediate matrix can be written as the sum of some basic terms, which can be pre-calculated into look-up tables. Since solving the matrix becomes looking up values in tables, computation time barely differs regardless of the number of points searched. Hence, we can carry out the most thorough pivot point search to find the optimal pivot that minimizes MSE in near constant time. Experiment shows that our proposed method achieves the same PSNR performance while saving 60 times computation time compared to the traditional exhaustive search in 2-piecewise 2nd order polynomial inverse tone mapping with continuous constraint.

  11. Development of a PCR/LDR/capillary electrophoresis assay with potential for the detection of a beta-thalassemia fetal mutation in maternal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ping; Chen, Zhuqin; Yu, Lili; Zheng, Yingru; Liu, Guodong; Xie, Haichang; Zhou, Yuanguo; Zheng, Xiuhui; Han, Jian; Li, Li

    2010-08-01

    Analysis of fetal DNA in maternal plasma has recently been introduced for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have now investigated the feasibility of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/ligase detection reaction (LDR)/capillary electrophoresis for the detection of fetal point mutations, such as the beta-thalassemia mutation, IVS2 654(C --> T), in maternal plasma DNA. The sensitivity of LDR/capillary electrophoresis was examined by quantifying the mutant PCR products in the presence of a vast excess of non-mutant competitor template, a situation that mimics the detection of rare fetal mutations in the presence of excess maternal DNA. PCR/LDR/capillary electrophoresis was applied to detect the mutation, IVS2 654(C --> T), in an experimental model at different sensitivity levels and from 10 maternal plasma samples. Our results demonstrated that this approach to detect a low abundance IVS2 654(C --> T) mutation achieved a sensitivity of approximately 1:10,000. The approach was applied to maternal plasma DNA to detect the paternally inherited fetal IVS2 654(C --> T) mutation, and the results were equivalent to those obtained by PCR/reverse dot blot of amniotic fluid cell DNA. PCR/LDR/capillary electrophoresis has a very high sensitivity that can distinguish low abundance single nucleotide differences and can detect paternally inherited fetal point mutations in maternal plasma.

  12. ANALISIS PENGARUH CAPITAL ADEQUACY RATIO (CAR) DAN NON PERFORMING LOAN (NPL) TERHADAP LOAN TO DEPOSIT RATIO (LDR) PADA BANK BUMN PERSERO DI INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    TANGKO, IRENE LASTRY FARDANI

    2012-01-01

    Non Performing Loan (NPL)Analisis Pengaruh Capital Adequacy Ratio (CAR) dan Non Performing Loan (NPL) Terhadap Loan to Deposit Ratio (LDR) Pada Bank BUMN Persero Di Indonesia Analysis ofEffect ofCapitalAdequacy Ratio (CAR) and theNon-PerformingLoan(NPL) AgainstLoanto DepositRatio (LDR) Thestate-owned bankinIndonesiaPersero Irene Lastry Fardani Tangko Otto R. Payangan Maat pono Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis pengaruh Capital Adequacy Ratio (CAR) dan Non Performin...

  13. Doses determination in UCCA treatments with LDR brachytherapy using Monte Carlo methods; Determinacion de dosis en tratamientos de CaCU con braquiterapia LDR usando metodos Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites R, J. L. [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Comite de Investigacion, Calz. de la Cruz 118 sur, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: neutronesrapidos@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2017-10-15

    Using Monte Carlo methods, with the code MCNP5, a gynecological mannequin and a vaginal cylinder were modeled. The spatial distribution of absorbed dose rate in uterine cervical cancer (UCCA) treatments was determined under the modality of manual brachytherapy of low dose rate (B-LDR). The design of the model included the gynecological liquid water mannequin, a vaginal cylinder applicator of Lucite (PMMA) with hemisphere termination. The applicator was formed by a vaginal cylinder 10.3 cm long and 2 cm in diameter. This cylinder was mounted on a stainless steel tube 15.2 cm long by 0.6 cm in diameter. A linear array of four radioactive sources of Cesium 137 was inserted into the tube. 13 water cells of 0.5 cm in diameter were modeled around the vaginal cylinder and the absorbed dose was calculated in these. The distribution of the fluence of gamma photons in the mesh was calculated. It was found that the distribution of the absorbed dose is symmetric for cells located in the upper and lower part of the vaginal cylinder. The values of the absorbed dose rate were estimated for the date of manufacture of the sources. This result allows the use of the law of radioactive decay to determine the dose rate at any date of a gynecological treatment of B-LDR. (Author)

  14. PENGARUH RASIO CAR, NPL, LDR, BOPO, DAN NIM TERHADAP KINERJA BANK UMUM DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Priyanto Agung Raharjo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This research is performed on order to test the influence of the variable Capital Adequacy Ratio (CAR, Non Performing Loan (NPL, Loan to Deposit Ratio (LDR, BOPO (Operating Expenses / Operating Income, and Net Interest Margin (NIM, to return on Asset (ROA. The sample used in the study were 120 bank in Indonesia in 2010 and 2011. The data analysis technique used is multiple linear regression, t-statistic and F-statistics test with a significance level of 5%. During research period show as variable and data research was normal distributed. Based on test, multicolinearity, heterosscedasticity and autocorrelation classic assumption deviation has no founded, this indicate that the available data has fulfill the condition to use multi linear regression model. This result of research show that variable CAR, NIM, and LDR positive significant influence toward ROA. Variable NPL and BOPO negative significant influence toward ROA. Prediction capability from these seven variable toward ROA is 78,7 % where the balance 21,3% is affected to other factor which was not to be entered to research model.

  15. Quantifying Peer Interactions for Research and Clinical Use: The Manchester Inventory for Playground Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jenny; Hussain, Jamilla; Holsgrove, Samina; Adams, Catherine; Green, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Direct observation of peer relating is potentially a sensitive and ecologically valid measure of child social functioning, but there has been a lack of standardised methods. The Manchester Inventory for Playground Observation (MIPO) was developed as a practical yet rigorous assessment of this kind for 5-11 year olds. We report on the initial…

  16. The role of the library in scholarly publishing: The University of Manchester experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Bains

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of networked digital methods of scholarly dissemination has transformed the role of the academic library in the context of the research life cycle. It now plays an important role in the dissemination of research outputs (e.g. through repository management and gold open access publication processing as well as more traditional acquisition and collection management. The University of Manchester Library and Manchester University Press have developed a strategic relationship to consider how they can work in partnership to support new approaches to scholarly publishing. They have delivered two projects to understand researcher and student needs and to develop tools and services to meet these needs. This work has found that the creation of new journal titles is costly and provides significant resourcing challenges and that support for student journals in particular is mixed amongst senior academic administrators. Research has suggested that there is more value to the University in the provision of training in scholarly publishing than in the creation of new in-house journal titles. Where such titles are created, careful consideration of sustainable business models is vital.

  17. Dr Eugenia Rose Aylmer Cooper (1898-1991): Manchester's renowned female anatomist and neurohistologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreeve, David R

    2016-11-01

    Having excelled in histology, Dr Eugenia Cooper, following graduation in medicine in Manchester, embarked on a career spanning 44 years in anatomy and histology at Manchester University. Her inimitable character was readily remembered by those she had taught. She was the first female graduate to gain an MD with gold medal for her thesis on the histology of the endocrine organs. However, her main study was the development of the human brainstem from the early weeks of gestation, which remains the basis for anatomical understanding today. More controversial was her theory on circulation and absorption of the cerebrospinal fluid. On retiring as Reader in Histology, she expressed disappointment at not being appointed a professor, which she considered was due to her gender. Possibly to compensate for this, she had studied law as an additional interest. She continued in research for a further 10 years in reproductive pharmacology. After retirement she donated her medals to the University, three to be awarded in medicine and histology, which have now lapsed, but the medals in computer science and music continue to be important rewards. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Crossing the Invisible Line: Establishing Co-Education at the University of Manchester and Northwestern University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Sarah V.

    1994-01-01

    Asserts that, during the second half of the 19th Century, women in England and the United States increasingly sought and gained admission to higher education institutions. Describes the establishment of coeducation at the University of Manchester (England) and Northwestern University (Illinois) in terms of these cultural differences. (CFR)

  19. Curriculum Design, Practice and Evaluation in Ordained Local Ministry in the Diocese of Manchester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracegirdle, Christopher A.

    2005-01-01

    This study reviews and critiques the development of Ordained Local Ministry (OLM) in the Diocese of Manchester, United Kingdom, from the perspective of the tutor for communications and preaching. I undertake this role on a part-time basis, alongside my ministry as vicar of a parish within the diocese. Through a discussion of motivations and models…

  20. The Manchester Color Wheel: validation in secondary school pupils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carruthers Helen R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As part of our research programme into facilitating improved ways of communicating with patients, especially about more sensitive clinical issues, we have been investigating whether there are any non-verbal methods that might aid this process. One such approach is to ask patients to choose a color in response to a particular question, for instance about health or psychological status, and for this purpose we developed the Manchester Color Wheel (MCW. This instrument consists of positive, neutral and negative colors and its validation in normal adults and those with anxiety or depression showed that it is responsive to change and reproducible. It also has the capacity to identify a positive frame of mind. We concluded that it might be a particularly useful instrument in adolescents and therefore this study aimed to validate it in a secondary school. Methods 620 pupils (aged 11–17 years, mean age 14.0 years, 298 (48.1% males, 322 (51.9% females at Sale Grammar School in Greater Manchester were asked to relate their mood to a MCW color and also complete the Hospital Anxiety Depression (HAD questionnaire. To give these pupils an experience in science, 197 were divided into four subgroups for an ‘experiment’ to ascertain whether, compared to controls, a change in mood color choice could be induced by participation in sport, music or art activities. Results Although mood color and HAD depression score are unlikely to be measuring exactly the same psychological state, a negative mood color was chosen by 62.5% of HAD depressed compared to only 14.5% of HAD normal pupils (p  Conclusion This study confirms the potential utility of the MCW to rapidly and easily assess a variety of health issues in large populations, including adolescents. Some of our results should also be of interest to educationalists.

  1. A multiplex PCR/LDR assay for simultaneous detection and identification of the NIAID category B bacterial food and water-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, Mark S; Pingle, Maneesh; Das, Sanchita; Hussain, Aashiq; Ocheretina, Oksana; Charles, Macarthur; Larone, Davise H; Spitzer, Eric D; Golightly, Linnie; Barany, Francis

    2014-06-01

    Enteric pathogens that cause gastroenteritis remain a major global health concern. The goal of this study was to develop a multiplex PCR/ligation detection reaction (LDR) assay for the detection of all NIAID category B bacterial food and water-borne pathogens directly from stool specimens. To validate the PCR/LDR assay, clinical isolates of Campylobacter spp., Vibrio spp., Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolitica, and diarrheagenic Escherichia coli were tested. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were assessed using a large number of seeded culture-negative stool specimens and a smaller set of clinical specimens from Haiti. The overall sensitivity ranged from 91% to 100% (median 100%) depending on the species. For the majority of organisms, the sensitivity was 100%. The overall specificity based on initial testing ranged from 98% to 100% depending on the species. After additional testing of discordant samples, the lowest specificity was 99.4%. PCR/LDR detected additional category B agents (particularly diarrheagenic E. coli) in 11/40 specimens from Haiti that were culture-positive for V. cholerae and in approximately 1% of routine culture-negative stool specimens from a hospital in New York. This study demonstrated the ability of the PCR/LDR assay to detect a large comprehensive panel of category B enteric bacterial pathogens as well as mixed infections. This type of assay has the potential to provide earlier warnings of possible public health threats and more accurate surveillance of food and water-borne pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Stathakis, Sotirios; Smith, Mark; Swanson, Gregory; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) prostate plans to determine the biological effect of dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determined using ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1(®)) to create treatment plans using (103)Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. From the pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP) were determined using the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from -8% to 110%. TCP and the mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreases to the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined that patients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluated using the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volume post-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  3. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Knaup

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR prostate plans to determine the biological effectof dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. Material and methods: In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determinedusing ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1® to create treatmentplans using 103Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. Fromthe pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP were determinedusing the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. Results: The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from –8% to 110%. TCP andthe mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreasesto the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose.A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined thatpatients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. Conclusions: The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluatedusing the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volumepost-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  4. Minimal percentage of dose received by 90% of the urethra (%UD90) is the most significant predictor of PSA bounce in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-brachytherapy) for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Anai, Satoshi; Hirayama, Akihide; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Hirao, Yoshihiko

    2012-09-14

    To clarify the significant clinicopathological and postdosimetric parameters to predict PSA bounce in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-brachytherapy) for prostate cancer. We studied 200 consecutive patients who received LDR-brachytherapy between July 2004 and November 2008. Of them, 137 patients did not receive neoadjuvant or adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. One hundred and forty-two patients were treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone, and 58 were treated with LDR-brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy. The cut-off value of PSA bounce was 0.1 ng/mL. The incidence, time, height, and duration of PSA bounce were investigated. Clinicopathological and postdosimetric parameters were evaluated to elucidate independent factors to predict PSA bounce in hormone-naïve patients who underwent LDR-brachytherapy alone. Fifty patients (25%) showed PSA bounce and 10 patients (5%) showed PSA failure. The median time, height, and duration of PSA bounce were 17 months, 0.29 ng/mL, and 7.0 months, respectively. In 103 hormone-naïve patients treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone, and univariate Cox proportional regression hazard model indicated that age and minimal percentage of the dose received by 30% and 90% of the urethra were independent predictors of PSA bounce. With a multivariate Cox proportional regression hazard model, minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the urethra was the most significant parameter of PSA bounce. Minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the urethra was the most significant predictor of PSA bounce in hormone-naïve patients treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone.

  5. Predictive validity of the Manchester Triage System: evaluation of outcomes of patients admitted to an emergency department Validez predictiva del Protocolo de Clasificación de Riesgo de Manchester: evaluación de la evolución de los pacientes admitidos en un pronto atendimiento Validade preditiva do Protocolo de Classificação de Risco de Manchester: avaliação da evolução dos pacientes admitidos em um pronto atendimento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingos Pinto Júnior

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess the predictive validity of the Manchester Triage System implemented in a municipal hospital in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. METHOD: cohort prospective and analytical study. The sample of 300 patients was stratified by color groups. The outcome measured was the scores, obtained by patients in each classification group in the Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System - 28, 24 hours after admission to the emergency department. RESULTS: A total of 172 (57% patients were men and the average age of all patients was 57.3 years old. The median score concerning the severity of their conditions was 6.5 points in the yellow group, 11.5 in the orange group, and 22 points in the red group. Statistically significant differences were found among the three groups (pOBJETIVO: evaluar la validez predictiva del protocolo de clasificación de riesgo de Manchester implantado en un hospital municipal de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. MÉTODO: estudio de cohorte prospectivo y analítico. La muestra estratificada por colores de la clasificación fue de 300 pacientes. El final evaluado fue la puntuación por el Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System - 28, lograda por los pacientes en cada grupo de clasificación después de 24 horas de la admisión en el servicio de urgencia. RESULTADOS: entre los pacientes, 172 eran hombres (57%; la media de edad de los pacientes evaluados fue de 57,3 años. La mediana de puntuación del índice de gravedad en el grupo amarillo fue 6,5 puntos; en el grupo naranja, 11,5 puntos y, en el grupo rojo, 22 puntos, habiendo diferencia estadística significante entre los tres grupos (pOBJETIVO: avaliar a validade preditiva do protocolo de classificação de risco de Manchester, implantado em um hospital municipal de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. MÉTODO: trata-se de estudo de coorte prospectivo e analítico A amostra estratificada por cores da classificação foi de 300 pacientes. O desfecho avaliado foi a pontuação pelo

  6. Doses determination in UCCA treatments with LDR brachytherapy using Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites R, J. L.; Vega C, H. R.

    2017-10-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods, with the code MCNP5, a gynecological mannequin and a vaginal cylinder were modeled. The spatial distribution of absorbed dose rate in uterine cervical cancer (UCCA) treatments was determined under the modality of manual brachytherapy of low dose rate (B-LDR). The design of the model included the gynecological liquid water mannequin, a vaginal cylinder applicator of Lucite (PMMA) with hemisphere termination. The applicator was formed by a vaginal cylinder 10.3 cm long and 2 cm in diameter. This cylinder was mounted on a stainless steel tube 15.2 cm long by 0.6 cm in diameter. A linear array of four radioactive sources of Cesium 137 was inserted into the tube. 13 water cells of 0.5 cm in diameter were modeled around the vaginal cylinder and the absorbed dose was calculated in these. The distribution of the fluence of gamma photons in the mesh was calculated. It was found that the distribution of the absorbed dose is symmetric for cells located in the upper and lower part of the vaginal cylinder. The values of the absorbed dose rate were estimated for the date of manufacture of the sources. This result allows the use of the law of radioactive decay to determine the dose rate at any date of a gynecological treatment of B-LDR. (Author)

  7. Developing age-friendly cities: case studies from Brussels and Manchester and implications for policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffel, Tine; McGarry, Paul; Phillipson, Chris; De Donder, Liesbeth; Dury, Sarah; De Witte, Nico; Smetcoren, An-Sofie; Verté, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Developing environments responsive to the aspirations of older people has become a major concern for social and public policy. Policies and programs directed at achieving "age-friendly" communities are considered to require a wide range of interventions, including actions at the level of the social and physical environment. This article compares the age-friendly approaches of two European cities, Brussels and Manchester, with a particular focus on policies and initiatives that promote active aging in an urban context. The article examines, first, the demographic, social, and multicultural contexts of Brussels and Manchester; second, the way in which both cities became members of the World Health Organization Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities and Communities; third, similarities and differences in the age-friendly approaches and actions adopted by both cities; and fourth, opportunities and barriers to the implementation of age-friendly policies. The article concludes by discussing the key elements and resources needed to develop age-friendly cities.

  8. "Intelligence and Civilisation": A Ludwig Mond Lecture Delivered at the University of Manchester on 23rd October 1936 by Godfrey H. Thomson. A Reprinting with Background and Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deary, Ian J.; Lawn, Martin; Brett, Caroline E.; Bartholomew, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Here we reprint, and provide background and a commentary on, a recently-rediscovered lecture by Godfrey H. Thomson entitled, "Intelligence and civilisation." It was delivered at the University of Manchester, UK, on 23rd October, 1936, printed in 1937 in the short-lived "Journal of the University of Manchester" and as a pamphlet…

  9. LDR brachytherapy: can low dose rate hypersensitivity from the "inverse" dose rate effect cause excessive cell killing to peripherial connective tissues and organs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, B E; Lucas, A C

    2009-02-01

    Examined here are the possible effects of the "inverse" dose rate effect (IDRE) on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy. The hyper-radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance (HRS/IRR) effect benefits cell killing in radiotherapy, and IDRE and HRS/IRR seem to be generated from the same radioprotective mechanisms. We have computed the IDRE excess cell killing experienced in LDR brachytherapy using permanent seed implants. We conclude, firstly, that IDRE is a dose rate-dependent manifestation of HRS/IRR. Secondly, the presence of HRS/IRR or IDRE in a cell species or tissue must be determined by direct dose-response measurements. Thirdly, a reasonable estimate is that 50-80% of human adjoining connective and organ tissues experience IDRE from permanent implanted LDR brachytherapy. If IDRE occurs for tissues at point A for cervical cancer, the excess cell killing will be about a factor of 3.5-4.0 if the initial dose rate is 50-70 cGy h(-1). It is greater for adjacent tissues at lower dose rates and higher for lower initial dose rates at point A. Finally, higher post-treatment complications are observed in LDR brachytherapy, often for unknown reasons. Some of these are probably a result of IDRE excess cell killing. Measurements of IDRE need be performed for connective and adjacent organ tissues, i.e. bladder, rectum, urinary tract and small bowels. The measured dose rate-dependent dose responses should extended to tissues and organs remain above IDRE thresholds).

  10. Validating the pivotal role of the immune system in low-dose radiation-induced tumor inhibition in Lewis lung cancer-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoying; Li, Hui; Niu, Chao; Yu, Dehai; Yang, Guozi; Liang, Xinyue; Wen, Xue; Li, Min; Cui, Jiuwei

    2018-04-01

    Although low-dose radiation (LDR) possesses the two distinct functions of inducing hormesis and adaptive responses, which result in immune enhancement and tumor inhibition, its clinical applications have not yet been elucidated. The major obstacle that hinders the application of LDR in the clinical setting is that the mechanisms underlying induction of tumor inhibition are unclear, and the risks associated with LDR are still unknown. Thus, to overcome this obstacle and elucidate the mechanisms mediating the antitumor effects of LDR, in this study, we established an in vivo lung cancer model to investigate the participation of the immune system in LDR-induced tumor inhibition and validated the pivotal role of the immune system by impairing immunity with high-dose radiation (HDR) of 1 Gy. Additionally, the LDR-induced adaptive response of the immune system was also observed by sequential HDR treatment in this mouse model. We found that LDR-activated T cells and natural killer cells and increased the cytotoxicity of splenocytes and the infiltration of T cells in the tumor tissues. In contrast, when immune function was impaired by HDR pretreatment, LDR could not induce tumor inhibition. However, when LDR was administered before HDR, the immunity could be protected from impairment, and tumor growth could be inhibited to some extent, indicating the induction of the immune adaptive response by LDR. Therefore, we demonstrated that immune enhancement played a key role in LDR-induced tumor inhibition. These findings emphasized the importance of the immune response in tumor radiotherapy and may help promote the application of LDR as a novel approach in clinical practice. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Low dose rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) as monotherapy for early stage prostate cancer in Italy: practice and outcome analysis in a series of 2237 patients from 11 institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellin, Giovanni; Mirri, Maria A; Santoro, Luigi; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Divan, Claudio; Mussari, Salvatore; Ziglio, Francesco; La Face, Beniamino; Barbera, Fernando; Buglione, Michela; Bandera, Laura; Ghedi, Barbara; Di Muzio, Nadia G; Losa, Andrea; Mangili, Paola; Nava, Luciano; Chiarlone, Renato; Ciscognetti, Nunzia; Gastaldi, Emilio; Cattani, Federica; Spoto, Ruggero; Vavassori, Andrea; Giglioli, Francesca R; Guarneri, Alessia; Cerboneschi, Valentina; Mignogna, Marcello; Paoluzzi, Mauro; Ravaglia, Valentina; Chiumento, Costanza; Clemente, Stefania; Fusco, Vincenzo; Santini, Roberto; Stefanacci, Marco; Mangiacotti, Francesco P; Martini, Marco; Palloni, Tiziana; Schinaia, Giuseppe; Lazzari, Grazia; Silvano, Giovanni; Magrini, Stefano; Ricardi, Umberto; Santoni, Riccardo; Orecchia, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) in localized prostate cancer is available since 15 years in Italy. We realized the first national multicentre and multidisciplinary data collection to evaluate LDR-BT practice, given as monotherapy, and outcome in terms of biochemical failure. Between May 1998 and December 2011, 2237 patients with early-stage prostate cancer from 11 Italian community and academic hospitals were treated with iodine-125 ((125)I) or palladium-103 LDR-BT as monotherapy and followed up for at least 2 years. (125)I seeds were implanted in 97.7% of the patients: the mean dose received by 90% of target volume was 145 Gy; the mean target volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100) was 91.1%. Biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS), disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier method. Log-rank test and multivariable Cox regression were used to evaluate the relationship of covariates with outcomes. Median follow-up time was 65 months. 5- and 7-year DSS, OS and BFFS were 99 and 98%, 94 and 89%, and 92 and 88%, respectively. At multivariate analysis, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network score (p LDR-BT. This first multicentre Italian report confirms LDR-BT as an excellent curative modality for low-/intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Multidisciplinary teams may help to select adequately patients to be treated with brachytherapy, with a direct impact on the implant quality and, possibly, on outcome.

  12. Startup communities: Notes on the sociality of tech-entrepreneurs in Manchester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Pfeilstetter

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution I explore the conflicting moralities and practices of technology entrepreneurship through the lenses of Mary Douglas’ Grid-Group Cultural Theory. Starting from the distinction between communitarian, individualistic and hierarchical culture, I explore my empirical material drawn from ethnographic fieldwork in Manchester, UK. In particular, I describe the sociality of young male tech-entrepreneurs at networking events, ‘coffices’ and coworkspaces around an urban ‘creative quarter’. I argue that ‘startup communities’ simultaneously encourage individualistic market-competition, contribute to feelings of local group-belonging and are narrative constructions promoted by entrepreneurs, corporations and the State.

  13. SU-F-T-43: Prediction of Dose Increments by Brain Metastases Resection Cavity Shrinkage Model with I-125 and Cs-131 LDR Seed Implantations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D; Braunstein, S; Sneed, P; McDermott, M; Ma, L [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This work aims to determine dose variability via a brain metastases resection cavity shrinkage model (RC-SM) with I-125 or Cs-131 LDR seed implantations. Methods: The RC-SM was developed to represent sequential volume changes of 95 consecutive brain metastases patients. All patients underwent serial surveillance MR and change in cavity volume was recorded for each patient. For the initial resection cavity, a prolate-ellipsoid cavity model was suggested and applied volume shrinkage rates to correspond to 1.7, 3.6, 5.9, 11.7, and 20.5 months after craniotomy. Extra-ring structure (6mm) was added on a surface of the resection volume and the same shrinkage rates were applied. Total 31 LDR seeds were evenly distributed on the surface of the resection cavity. The Amersham 6711 I-125 seed model (Oncura, Arlington Heights, IL) and the Model Cs-1 Rev2 Cs-131 seed model (IsoRay, Richland, WA) were used for TG-43U1 dose calculation and in-house-programed 3D-volumetric dose calculation system was used for resection cavity rigid model (RC-RM) and the RC-SM dose calculation. Results: The initial resection cavity volume shrunk to 25±6%, 35±6.8%, 42±7.7%, 47±9.5%, and 60±11.6%, with respect to sequential MR images post craniotomy, and the shrinkage rate (SR) was calculated as SR=56.41Xexp(−0.2024Xt)+33.99 and R-square value was 0.98. The normal brain dose as assessed via the dose to the ring structure with the RC-SM showed 29.34% and 27.95% higher than the RC-RM, I-125 and Cs-131, respectively. The dose differences between I-125 and Cs-131 seeds within the same models, I-125 cases were 9.17% and 10.35% higher than Cs-131 cases, the RC-RM and the RC-SM, respectively. Conclusion: A realistic RC-SM should be considered during LDR brain seed implementation and post-implement planning to prevent potential overdose. The RC-SM calculation shows that Cs-131 is more advantageous in sparing normal brain as the resection cavity volume changes with the LDR seeds implementation.

  14. Varieties of glocalisation: the international economic strategies of Amsterdam, Manchester, and Zurich compared

    OpenAIRE

    Nico van der Heiden; Pieter Terhorst

    2007-01-01

    Our aim in this paper is to explain the international strategies of cities by focusing on market conditions. Drawing on a critique of the glocalisation thesis we show that the design of these strategies can plausibly be explained by the specific characteristics of urban capitalism found in the different cities. Whereas the international strategy of Manchester must be seen as a response to problems of postindustrial restrictions, the importance of the logistic sector in Dutch capitalism strong...

  15. The Manchester Color Wheel: validation in secondary school pupils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Helen R; Magee, Linda; Osborne, Susan; Hall, Linda K; Whorwell, Peter J

    2012-09-05

    As part of our research programme into facilitating improved ways of communicating with patients, especially about more sensitive clinical issues, we have been investigating whether there are any non-verbal methods that might aid this process. One such approach is to ask patients to choose a color in response to a particular question, for instance about health or psychological status, and for this purpose we developed the Manchester Color Wheel (MCW). This instrument consists of positive, neutral and negative colors and its validation in normal adults and those with anxiety or depression showed that it is responsive to change and reproducible. It also has the capacity to identify a positive frame of mind. We concluded that it might be a particularly useful instrument in adolescents and therefore this study aimed to validate it in a secondary school. 620 pupils (aged 11-17 years, mean age 14.0 years, 298 (48.1%) males, 322 (51.9%) females) at Sale Grammar School in Greater Manchester were asked to relate their mood to a MCW color and also complete the Hospital Anxiety Depression (HAD) questionnaire. To give these pupils an experience in science, 197 were divided into four subgroups for an 'experiment' to ascertain whether, compared to controls, a change in mood color choice could be induced by participation in sport, music or art activities. Although mood color and HAD depression score are unlikely to be measuring exactly the same psychological state, a negative mood color was chosen by 62.5% of HAD depressed compared to only 14.5% of HAD normal pupils (p color was chosen by 48.9% of normal and only 18.8% of depressed pupils (p colors which reached significance for sport and music. This study confirms the potential utility of the MCW to rapidly and easily assess a variety of health issues in large populations, including adolescents. Some of our results should also be of interest to educationalists.

  16. PCR/LDR/universal array platforms for the diagnosis of infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingle, Maneesh; Rundell, Mark; Das, Sanchita; Golightly, Linnie M; Barany, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Infectious diseases account for between 14 and 17 million deaths worldwide each year. Accurate and rapid diagnosis of bacterial, fungal, viral, and parasitic infections is therefore essential to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with these diseases. Classical microbiological and serological methods have long served as the gold standard for diagnosis but are increasingly being replaced by molecular diagnostic methods that demonstrate increased sensitivity and specificity and provide an identification of the etiologic agent in a shorter period of time. PCR/LDR coupled with universal array detection provides a highly sensitive and specific platform for the detection and identification of bacterial and viral infections.

  17. Dose rate effect from the relationship between ICRU rectal dose and local control rate in intracavitary radiotherapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Six fraction HDR and three-fraction LDR in three weeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jingu, Kenichi; Akita, Yuzou; Ohmagari, Jyunichi

    2001-01-01

    The dose rate effect, low dose rate radiotherapy (LDR)/high dose rate radiotherapy (HDR), was calculated using the isoeffect ICRU rectal dose by intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT) for uterine cervix cancer. The subjects analyzed consisted of 78 LDR and 74 HDR patients whose ICRU rectal dose could be calculated and whose local control as stage II/III cases could be evaluated. The point A dose in ICRT was 45-55 Gy/3 fractions/3 weeks for LDR and 30 Gy/6 fractions/3 weeks for HDR. The dose effect relationships associated with local control at each whole pelvis external radiation dose were calculated using the double integration method and Probit analysis, and the 50% and 90% local control ICRU rectal doses were calculated from this relationship. Finally, the dose rate effect LDR/HDR was determined from 50% and 90% local control doses. The dose rate effect calculated from the 50% local control dose was 1.24 and that from the 90% local control dose was 1.14. (author)

  18. Health visiting and district nursing in Victorian Manchester; divergent and convergent vocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    Community nursing and public health work provided many Victorian and Edwardian women in Britain with the opportunity of a career and professional training. Such work created contradictions, not least the tension between 'inherent' female skills and the role of learnt professionalism. This article discusses Manchester's neglected district nurses alongside the city's more well-studied health visiting scheme. Comparing these occupations in one city highlights continuities in origins and practice, but a clear divergence in terms of class and purpose. These differences provide historians with opportunities to reconsider the inherent tensions and varied identities of employed women in Victorian and Edwardian Britain.

  19. Sistem Pengendali Peralatan Elektronik dalam Rumah secara Otomatis Menggunakan Sensor PIR, Sensor LM35, dan Sensor LDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Desyantoro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Listrik merupakan hal yang sangat penting di kehidupan kita. Setiap pekerjaan kita pasti dibantu dengan adanya listrik. Mulai dari penerangan hingga pengaturan suhu ruangan pun semuanya dibantu oleh listrik. Ketergantungan manusia terhadap listrik ini menimbulkan kebiasaan buruk. Banyak orang yang terkadang membiarkan suatu peralatan elektronik hidup pada saat tidak dibutuhkan. Terjadi suatu permasalahan untuk menciptakan suatu desain sistem embedded untuk mengendalikan peralatan elektronik dalam rumah secara otomatis. Makalah ini membahas tentang perancangan sistem pengendali peralatan elektronik dalam rumah secara otomatis. Sistem terdiri dari sensor PIR yang berfungsi untuk mendeteksi objek bergerak (manusia, sensor LM35 yang berfungsi untuk mendeteksi suhu, dan sensor LDR berfungsi sebagai sensor cahaya. Mikrokontroller ATMega16 sebagai pengendali jalannya sistem dari pembacaan sensor, menampilkan data sensor pada LCD dan mengatur kontak relay untuk menghidup dan mematikan listrik. Sistem pengendali peralatan elektronik dalam rumah secara otomatis menunjukan sensor LDR dapat membedakan gelap dan terang, sensor suhu LM35 dapat mendeteksi suhu dalam ruangan dengan toleransi kesalahan pembacaan kurang lebih 2o Celcius, dan sensor PIR dapat mendeteksi pergerakan manusia sejauh 5 meter.

  20. HDR and LDR Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Lip Cancer: the Experience of the Catalan Institute of Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerra, Arrate Querejeta; Mena, Estefanía Palacios; Fabregas, Joan Pera; Miguelez, Cristina Gutiérrez; Guedea, Ferran

    2010-03-01

    Lip cancer can be treated by surgery, external radiotherapy, and/or brachytherapy (BT). In recent years, BT has become increasingly favored for this type of cancer. The aim of the present study was to analyze local control and survival of patients treated at our institution between July 1989 and June 2008. We performed a retrospective study of 121 patients (109 males and 12 females) who underwent lip cancer brachytherapy from July 1989 to June 2008. Median age was 67 years and median follow-up was 31.8 months (range 20-188 months). Out of 121 patients, 100 (82.6%) were treated with low dose rate (LDR) BT while the remaining 21 patients (17.4%) received high dose rate (HDR) BT. The most common cell type was squamous cell carcinoma (115 cases; 95%) and most tumors were located on the lower lip (107 patients; 88.4%). Most cases were either stage T1 (62 patients; 51.2%), or T2 (44 cases; 36.4%). After 15 years of follow-up, overall survival was 89.5%, cause-specific survival 97.8%, and disease-free survival 86.6%. Local, regional, and distant control at 15 years were 90%, 92%, and 98.8%, respectively. Grade 3 mucosal toxicity was observed in 23% of patients treated with LDR compared to 33% of HDR patients, and grade 4 mucosal toxicity in 9% versus 0% in the HDR group. Our findings confirm that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for lip cancer. The results from our series are in line with those published elsewhere. Based on our limited data, HDR appears to be equally as good as LDR, although this needs to be confirmed by further studies.

  1. Perbandingan NPL, LDR, CAR, ROA, dan BOPO Antara Bank BNI Dan Bank BUMN Lain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Wahyuningsih

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the differences in financial performance of Bank BNI and other BUMN Banks by the measuring the ratio of Non Performing Loan (NPL, Loan to Deposit Ratio (LDR, Adecuacy Capital Ratio (CAR, Return on Assets (ROA and BOPO. The study was conducted by using descriptive analysis method. The results of this study explained that the performance NPL, LDR, and Bank BNI's CAR on average during the past eight semesters was still better than BUMN Banks on average, while the performance of ROA and BOPO remained below the average Revenues and Operating Expenses of Operational Income of  Bank BUMN. The results also showed that all BUMN banks still showed good and healthy performance and in accordance with the provisions set by Bank Indonesia. This study also presented the strategy undertaken by Bank BNI to improve its financial performance, that is, the business synergy of all units unit, growth in good-quality assets, optimization of the customer engagement, strengthening the network and develop alliances, optimization of existing resources and simplification of processes, and enhancing customer experiences through improving processes and business models to  digital banking. Keywords: Non-Performing Loans, Loan to Deposit Ratio, Capital Adequacy Ratio, Return on Assets, Revenues and Operating Expenses of Operational Income, Bank BNI, Bank BUMN.

  2. Complying with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) for CERCLA remedial actions involving contaminated soil and debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bascietto, J.

    1991-01-01

    CERCLA Sect. 121(e) requires that remedial actions must comply with at least the minimum standards of all ''applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements'' (ARARs) of federal and state laws. EPA has determined that RCRA land disposal restrictions may be ARAR for certain CERCLA remedial actions involving soil and debris. This means that soil and debris contaminated with prohibited or restricted wastes cannot be land disposed if (1) these wastes have not attained the treatment standards set by EPA for a specified waste or (2) have been the subject of a case-by-case extension, national capacity variance, or successful ''no migration'' petition. RCRA LDR treatment standards are based on ''Best Demonstrated Available Technology'' (BDAT), not on health-based concentrations. Because the treatment of the soil and debris matrix presents technological difficulties not yet addressed by EPA (BDAT standards are generally set for industrial process wastes), compliance options such as obtaining a Treatability Variance, are available and will generally be necessary for soil and debris wastes. In the recently promulgated revisions to the National Contingency Plan (NCP) for CERCLA implementation, EPA provides important information for CERCLA project managers regarding LDR compliance, particularly for obtaining a treatability variance for land disposal of contaminated soil and debris

  3. Modulador-Demodulador ASK con codificación Manchester implementado en un microcontrolador PIC

    OpenAIRE

    Tarifa Amaya, Ariel; Del Risco Sánchez, Arnaldo; Cruz Hurtado, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Se presenta el diseño de un Modulador-Demodulador Digital ASK con codificación Manchester implementado en el firmware de un microcontrolador PIC 18F4455, utilizando el estándar de baja frecuencia (LF) el cual maneja valores de 125kHz. Este modulador-demodulador se utiliza en la implementación de una etiqueta RFID activa. Transmite a solicitud de un dispositivo lector el valor de temperatura de un sensor y su identificador. El dispositivo lector, controla la comunicación con la etiqueta. Según...

  4. Measles outbreak in Greater Manchester, England, October 2012 to September 2013: epidemiology and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegorie, M; Shankar, K; Welfare, W S; Wilson, R W; Khiroya, C; Munslow, G; Fiefield, D; Bothra, V; McCann, R

    2014-12-11

    This paper describes the epidemiology and management of a prolonged outbreak of measles across the 2.7 million conurbation of Greater Manchester in the United Kingdom. Over a period of one year (from October 2012 to September 2013), over a thousand suspected measles cases (n = 1,073) were notified across Greater Manchester; of these, 395 (37%) were laboratory-confirmed, 91 (8%) were classed as probable, 312 (29%) were classed as possible and 275 (26%) excluded. Most confirmed and probable cases occurred in children within two age groups—infants (too young to be eligible for measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination according to the national immunisation programme) and children aged 10-19 years (low vaccine uptake in this cohort because of unfounded alleged links between the MMR vaccine and autism). During this one year period, there were a series of local outbreaks and many of these occurred within the secondary school setting. A series of public health measures were taken to control this prolonged outbreak: setting up incident management teams to control local outbreaks, a concerted immunisation catch-up campaign (initially local then national) to reduce the pool of children partially or totally unprotected against measles, and the exclusion of close contacts from nurseries and school settings for a period of 10 days following the last exposure to a case of measles.

  5. A study at Manchester Dental Hospital, of the compliance of IV sedation patients and their escorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Oral surgery, under intravenous sedation, is carried out on a daily basis at Manchester Dental Hospital. This essay discusses the background of conscious sedation in the dental setting and looks at the compliance of patients (and escorts) when having intravenous sedation. The patient journey, from pre-operative assessment through to treatment is considered. Hospital instructions indicate an obligation for patients to attend with a responsible adult (eighteen or over) who remains with them throughout their treatment, escorts them home,and arranges their care for the next twenty-four hours. By following these instructions the patient should receive optimal care. Two questionnaires were devised and given to patients/escorts to assess their compliance with Manchester Dental Hospital postoperative protocols. 100% compliance was the set standard, with results presented as pie charts. This work began during the undergraduate summer vacation of 2012 and continued over a five-month period. Initial results suggested that compliance was generally good but certain improvements could be made. Suggestions for future development are presented. These aim to give clarity to all patients/escorts and their specific roles in the anticipated treatment.

  6. Comparison of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone. The preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, Nivaldo; Novaes, P.E.; Ferrigno, R.; Pellizzon, A.C.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Fogaroli, R.C.; Maia, M.A.C.; Baraldi, H.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare the results between HDR and LDR brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone through a prospective and randomized trial. Materials and Methods: From September 1992 to December 1993, 65 patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer were randomized to one of the following treatment schedule according to the brachytherapy used to complement the dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT): 1 - High dose rate (HDR) - 36 patients - 4 weekly insertions of 6,0 Gy at point A 2 - Low dose rate (LDR) - 29 patients - 2 insertions two weeks apart of 17,5 Gy at point A The External Beam radiotherapy was performed through a Linac 4MV, in box arrangement for whole pelvis and in AP-PA fields for parametrial complementation of dose. The dose at the whole pelvis was 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1,8 Gy and the parametrial dose was 16 Gy. The brachytherapy was realized with Fletcher colpostats and intrauterine tandem, in both arms. The HDR brachytherapy was realized through a Micro-Selectron device, working with Iridium-192 with initial activity of 10 Ci and started ten days after the beginning of EBRT. The total treatment time was shortened in two weeks for this group. The LDR brachytherapy started only after the end of EBRT. Results: With the minimum follow up of 24 months and medium of 31 months, the disease free survival was 50% among the 36 patients in HDR group and 47,8% among the 29 patients in LDR group. Local failures occurred in 50% and 52,8% respectively. Grade I and II complications were restricted to rectites and cistites and the incidence of them was 8,3% for HDR group and 13% for LDR group. Until the time of evaluation there were no grade III complications in any group. Conclusions: Although the number of patients is small and the time of follow up still short, these preliminary results suggest that the HDR brachytherapy has an equivalent efficiency in local control as the LDR in the treatment of stage IIIB

  7. Multiplex quantification of 16S rDNA of predominant bacteria group within human fecal samples by polymerase chain reaction--ligase detection reaction (PCR-LDR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Chen, Bei; Zhou, Yuxun; Huang, Rui; Liang, Yinming; Wang, Qinxi; Xiao, Zhenxian; Xiao, Junhua

    2009-03-01

    A new method, based on ligase detection reaction (LDR), was developed for quantitative detection of multiplex PCR amplicons of 16S rRNA genes present in complex mixtures (specifically feces). LDR has been widely used in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay but never applied for quantification of multiplex PCR products. This method employs one pair of DNA probes, one of which is labeled with fluorescence for signal capture, complementary to the target sequence. For multiple target sequence analysis, probes were modified with different lengths of polyT at the 5' end and 3' end. Using a DNA sequencer, these ligated probes were separated and identified by size and dye color. Then, relative abundance of target DNA were normalized and quantified based on the fluorescence intensities and exterior size standards. 16S rRNA gene of three preponderant bacteria groups in human feces: Clostridium coccoides, Bacteroides and related genera, and Clostridium leptum group, were amplified and cloned into plasmid DNA so as to make standard curves. After PCR-LDR analysis, a strong linear relationship was found between the florescence intensity and the diluted plasmid DNA concentrations. Furthermore, based on this method, 100 human fecal samples were quantified for the relative abundance of the three bacterial groups. Relative abundance of C. coccoides was significantly higher in elderly people in comparison with young adults, without gender differences. Relative abundance of Bacteroides and related genera and C. leptum group were significantly higher in young and middle aged than in the elderly. Regarding the whole set of sample, C. coccoides showed the highest relative abundance, followed by decreasing groups Bacteroides and related genera, and C. leptum. These results imply that PCR-LDR can be feasible and flexible applied to large scale epidemiological studies.

  8. Pengaruh Capital Adequacy Ratio (Car), Loan to Deposit Ratio (Ldr) Dan Bopo Terhadap Profitabilitas (Roa Dan Roe) Bank Persero Indonesia Yang Dipublikasikan Bank Indonesia Periode 2010 – 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Khoirunnisa, Hani Maulida; Rodhiyah, Rodhiyah; Saryadi, Saryadi

    2016-01-01

    State-owned banks have involvement with many parties in their business, so the performance maintenance is benecessary to deal with banking risks that may arise. The downward trend in the profitability of state-ownedbanks indicated by Return on Assets (ROA) and Return on Equity (ROE) becomes a problem when the CapitalAdequacy Ratio (CAR), Loan to Deposit Ratio (LDR), and ROA experiencing upward trend.The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of CAR, LDR and ROA on ROA and ROE withe...

  9. Modulador-Demodulador ASK con codificación Manchester implementado en un microcontrolador PIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Tarifa Amaya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el diseño de un Modulador-Demodulador Digital ASK con codificación Manchester implementado en el firmware de un microcontrolador PIC 18F4455, utilizando el estándar de baja frecuencia (LF el cual maneja valores de 125kHz. Este modulador-demodulador se utiliza en la implementación de una etiqueta RFID activa. Transmite a solicitud de un dispositivo lector el valor de temperatura de un sensor y su identificador. El dispositivo lector, controla la comunicación con la etiqueta. Según la literatura especializada no se reporta un sistema similar.

  10. Manchester Civil Justice Centre: Procuring and Managing an Institutional Building with a Mixed Mode Ventilation System—A Case for Post-Occupancy Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Napier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Manchester Civil Justice Centre is a striking contemporary 14 storey court building which has won awards for many different aspects of its design, construction and sustainability. From November 2002 to July 2005, the author was a key member of Denton Corker Marshall’s London project team having responsibility for key areas of design development, integration of technology and sustainable design including the East elevation’s “environmental veil”. This paper tracks the procurement of the building, describing its low energy features and their performance in practice. The paper reviews the low carbon elements of the design (daylight and natural ventilation systems in the context of similar buildings and the buildings operational performance. The building has a mixed mode ventilation system which is managed centrally; the paper describes the ongoing relationship between the Facilities Management and the building’s users and their expectations of comfort and offers an explanation as to why the building’s energy performance is not as good as predicted at design stage. A case is made that this building is a significant example of low energy design and would form a good example for a detailed Post Occupancy Evaluation. The energy performance of the building could be studied in more detail to encourage the users (judges, staff and the public to improve the building’s energy performance and to share knowledge within the construction industry. Institutional and commercial barriers to the more mainstream adoption of Post Occupancy Evaluation are discussed with respect to the Manchester Civil Justice Centre.

  11. RANCANGAN RANGKAIAN SIMULASI LUXMETER DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN SENSOR LIGHT DEPENDENT RESISTOR (LDR BERBASIS MIKROKONTROLER AT89S52 DENGAN PROGRAM PROTEUS 7.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Kadek Widiantara

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been designed a series of simulations using sensors Luxmeter Light Dependent Resistor (LDR based Microcontroller AT89S52 with proteus 7.0 program that has a variety of functions and can be used to assist the people work. One of its functions can be applied as a measure of light intensity. Program into the controller of the system Lux Meter work and most of the performance is determined by a given program. Speed performance of a device based mikrokontroler also very dependent on the value of the frequency of the crystal oscillator is used.

  12. Atmospheric pollution and melanic moths in Manchester and its environs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askew, R R; Cook, L M; Bishop, J A

    1971-01-01

    Samples of moths have been taken in the Manchester area at sites in localities with moderate to extreme atmospheric pollution. The majority of species collected are dark in color, many typically pale species being represented by dark variants. Four species polymorphic for melanic and non-melanic morphs have been examined in more detail. In Biston betularia the melanic frequency is over 93% at all stations, but the frequency of typicals appears to have increased over the past 15 years. This coincides with a period of extensive smoke control zonation. Gondontis bidentata has a higher frequency of melanics than has been recorded elsewhere in the country. There is significant variation between sites, the higher frequencies occurring in the more polluted localities. Non-melanics segregate into a pale and a dark category. In reared samples males exhibit a greater frequency of melanics than females.

  13. A statistical intercomparison between "urban" and "rural" precipitation chemistry data from greater Manchester and two nearby secondary national network sites in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David S.; Longhurst, James W. S.

    Precipitation chemistry data from a dense urban monitoring network in Greater Manchester, northwest England, were compared with interpolated values from the U.K. secondary national acid deposition monitoring network for the year 1988. Differences were found to be small. However, when data from individual sites from the Greater Manchester network were compared with data from the two nearest secondary national network sites, significant differences were found using simple and complex statistical analyses. Precipitation chemistry at rural sites could be similar to that at urban sites, but the sources of some ions were thought to be different. The synoptic-scale gradients of precipitation chemistry, as shown by the secondary national network, also accounted for some of the differences.

  14. Diagnosticos de enfermagem em pacientes classificados nos niveis I e II de prioridade do Protocolo Manchester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Chaves de Souza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available O estudo objetivou identificar possíveis diagnósticos de enfermagem em pacientes classificados nos níveis I e II de prioridade do protocolo Manchester. Trata-se de estudo descritivo retrospectivo, cuja amostra foi de 40 prontuários de pacientes classificados nos níveis I e II de prioridade. Para identificação dos diagnósticos de enfermagem dois especialistas analisaram sinais e sintomas registrados nos prontuários dos pacientes no momento da classificação de risco. No nível I de prioridade, os diagnósticos de enfermagem mais frequentes foram: dor aguda (65,0%, padrão respiratório ineficaz (45,0% e troca de gases prejudicada (40,0%. No nível II de prioridade foram: dor aguda (80,0%, náusea (10,0% e risco de desequilíbrio eletrolítico (10,0%. Percebeu-se que a utilização do protocolo de Manchester favorece a identificação de características definidoras e fatores relacionados/fatores de risco que subsidiam a elaboração de diagnósticos de enfermagem na classificação de risco.

  15. Is there any place for LDR brachytherapy for head and neck carcinomas in HDR era?

    OpenAIRE

    Fijuth, Jacek

    2009-01-01

    In Poland, the classical LDR brachytherapy for head and neck carcinomas with Ir-192 wires or hairpins has completely disappeared some time ago after 30 years of successful clinical use. Can this technique be fully and safely replaced by HDR or PDR application? This option seems attractive because of new possibilities of 3D reconstruction and computer real-time treatment planning and optimization. However, in my opinion, long time is needed to get a clinical and scientific experience that has ...

  16. SU-E-T-259: Development of a Primary Standard for LDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, H; McEwen, M [National Research Council, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The National Research Council initiated a program in 2012 to develop a primary standard to calibrate I-125 and Pd-103 sources used for LDR brachytherapy and disseminate this through calibration services to Canadian users. This will simplify procedures as Canadian cancer centres currently have to ship instruments to the US. Methods: The standard is based on a commercial version of the wide-angle free air chamber (WAFAC) pioneered by NIST. Significant enhancements were implemented to improve signal-to-noise and measurement reproducibility and eliminate electric field effects. Validation of this ionization chamber was then carried out in a low-energy X -ray beam (∼ 31 keV) where the dose rate had been previously established using the existing NRC primary standard free-air chamber. As a final component of this initial testing, measurements were made with a set of I-125 seeds (with air kerma strength traceable to NIST). Results: Excellent agreement of the two NRC free-air chambers was obtained within the combined standard uncertainty of 0.5 %. However, it was found that the WAFAC response is very sensitive to the beam geometry (distance from the source, diameter of the beam-defining aperture, etc) and Monte Carlo calculations, carried out to evaluate these geometry corrections, have confirmed the experimental results. The results for the seed measurements indicated a precision of better than 1 % is achievable for a reasonable acquisition time and the air kerma strength agreed with the manufacturer (NIST-traceable) value within 2 %. Conclusion: The prototype primary standard for LDR brachytherapy has met accuracy target of 3 % for the determination of air kerma strength. Work is ongoing to refine operation of the device and develop the calibration protocol for clinical users, with an anticipated launch of a calibration service in late 2015.

  17. Urban acid deposition in Greater Manchester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.S.; Longhurst, J.W.S.; Gee, D.R.; Hare, S.E. (Manchester Polytechnic, Manchester (UK). Acid Rain Information Centre)

    1989-08-01

    Data are presented from a monitoring network of 18 bulk precipitation collectors and one wet-only collector in the urban area of Greater Manchester, in the north west of England. Weekly samples were analysed for all the major ions in precipitation along with gaseous nitrogen dioxide concentrations from diffusion tubes. Statistical analysis of the data shows significant spatial variation of non marine sulphate, nitrate, ammonium, acidity and calcium concentrations, and nitrogen dioxide concentrations. Calcium is thought to be responsible for the buffering of acidity and is of local origin. Wet deposition is the likely removal process for calcium in the atmosphere and probably by below cloud scavenging. Nitrate and ammonium concentrations and depositions show close spatial, temporal and statistical association. Examination of high simultaneous episodes of nitrate and ammonium deposition shows that these depositions cannot be explained in terms of trajectories and it is suggested that UK emissions of ammonia may be important. Statistical analysis of the relationships between nitrate and ammonium depositions, concentrations and precipitation amount suggest that ammonia from mesoscale sources reacts reversibly with nitric acid aerosol and is removed by below cloud scavenging. High episodes of the deposition of non marine sulphate are difficult to explain by trajectory analysis alone, perhaps suggesting local sources. In a comparison between wet deposition and bulk deposition, it was shown that only 15.2% of the non marine sulphur was dry deposited to the bulk precipitation collector. 63 refs., 86 figs., 31 tabs.

  18. High-throughput multiplex HLA-typing by ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal array (UA) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolandi, Clarissa

    2009-01-01

    One major goal of genetic research is to understand the role of genetic variation in living systems. In humans, by far the most common type of such variation involves differences in single DNA nucleotides, and is thus termed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). The need for improvement in throughput and reliability of traditional techniques makes it necessary to develop new technologies. Thus the past few years have witnessed an extraordinary surge of interest in DNA microarray technology. This new technology offers the first great hope for providing a systematic way to explore the genome. It permits a very rapid analysis of thousands genes for the purpose of gene discovery, sequencing, mapping, expression, and polymorphism detection. We generated a series of analytical tools to address the manufacturing, detection and data analysis components of a microarray experiment. In particular, we set up a universal array approach in combination with a PCR-LDR (polymerase chain reaction-ligation detection reaction) strategy for allele identification in the HLA gene.

  19. Interstitial prostate brachytherapy. LDR-PDR-HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Gyoergy; Hoskin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The first comprehensive overview of interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. Written by an interdisciplinary team who have been responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Teaching Course. Discusses in detail patient selection, the results of different methods, the role of imaging, and medical physics issues. Prostate brachytherapy has been the subject of heated debate among surgeons and the proponents of the various brachytherapy methods. This very first interdisciplinary book on the subject provides a comprehensive overview of innovations in low dose rate (LDR), high dose rate (HDR), and pulsed dose rate (PDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. In addition to detailed chapters on patient selection and the use of imaging in diagnostics, treatment guidance, and implantation control, background chapters are included on related medical physics issues such as treatment planning and quality assurance. The results obtained with the different treatment options and the difficult task of salvage treatment are fully discussed. All chapters have been written by internationally recognized experts in their fields who for more than a decade have formed the teaching staff responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Prostate Brachytherapy Teaching Course. This book will be invaluable in informing residents and others of the scientific background and potential of modern prostate brachytherapy. It will also prove a useful source of up-to-date information for those who specialize in prostate brachytherapy or intend to start an interstitial brachytherapy service.

  20. Brachytherapy for Buccal Cancer: From Conventional Low Dose Rate (LDR) or Mold Technique to High Dose Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yamazaki, Hideya; Masui, Koji; Yoshida, Ken; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Akiyama, Hironori; Murakami, Shumei; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Eiichi

    2017-12-01

    To examine the effectiveness of newly-installed high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for buccal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 36 patients (25 men and 11 women) with buccal cancer treated with curative brachytherapy with or without external radiotherapy with a median follow-up of 99 months. A total of 15 HDR-ISBT (median 48 Gy/ 8 fractions, range=24-60 Gy) patients were compared to conventional 15 cases LDR-ISBT (70 Gy, range=42.8-110 Gy) and 7 molds techniques (15 Gy, range=9-74 Gy). A total of 31 patients also underwent external radiotherapy (30 Gy, range=24-48 Gy). They comprised of 3T1, 23 T2, 8 T3, 3 T4 including 11 node positive cases. HDR-ISBT provided 82% of local control rate at 5 years, whereas conventional brachytherapy showed 72% [p=0.44; LDR-ISBT (65%), mold therapy (85.7%)]. Patients with early lesions (T1-2 or stage I-II) showed better local control rates than those with advanced lesions (T3-4 or stage III-IV). Severe late grade 3 complications developed in two patients treated with LDR-ISBT and EBRT. There is no significant difference in toxicity grade ≤2 between conventional brachytherapy (5/15=33%) and HDR-ISBT (7/32=32%, p=0.92). HDR-ISBT achieved good and comparable local control rates to conventional brachytherapy without elevating the toxicity. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. A collaborative project to improve identification and management of patients with chronic kidney disease in a primary care setting in Greater Manchester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, John; Harvey, Gill; Coleiro, Michelle; Butler, Brook; Barclay, Anna; Gwozdziewicz, Maciek; O'Donoghue, Donal; Hegarty, Janet

    2012-08-01

    Research has demonstrated a knowledge and practice gap in the identification and management of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In 2009, published data showed that general practices in Greater Manchester had a low detection rate for CKD. A 12-month improvement collaborative, supported by an evidence-informed implementation framework and financial incentives. 19 general practices from four primary care trusts within Greater Manchester. Number of recorded patients with CKD on practice registers; percentage of patients on registers achieving nationally agreed blood pressure targets. The collaborative commenced in September 2009 and involved three joint learning sessions, interspersed with practice level rapid improvement cycles, and supported by an implementation team from the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for Greater Manchester. At baseline, the 19 collaborative practices had 4185 patients on their CKD registers. At final data collection in September 2010, this figure had increased by 1324 to 5509. Blood pressure improved from 34% to 74% of patients on practice registers having a recorded blood pressure within recommended guidelines. Evidence-based improvement can be implemented in practice for chronic disease management. A collaborative approach has been successful in enabling teams to test and apply changes to identify patients and improve care. The model has proved to be more successful for some practices, suggesting a need to develop more context-sensitive approaches to implementation and actively manage the factors that influence the success of the collaborative.

  2. Biological effective dose evaluation in gynaecological brachytherapy: LDR and HDR treatments, dependence on radiobiological parameters, and treatment optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, C; Botta, F; Conte, L; Vanoli, P; Cerizza, L

    2008-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the biological efficacy of different high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) treatments of gynaecological lesions, to identify the causes of possible nonuniformity and to optimise treatment through customised calculation. The study considered 110 patients treated between 2001 and 2006 with external beam radiation therapy and/or brachytherapy with either LDR (afterloader Selectron, (137)Cs) or HDR (afterloader microSelectron Classic, (192)Ir). The treatments were compared in terms of biologically effective dose (BED) to the tumour and to the rectum (linear-quadratic model) by using statistical tests for comparisons between independent samples. The difference between the two treatments was statistically significant in one case only. However, within each technique, we identified considerable nonuniformity in therapeutic efficacy due to differences in fractionation schemes and overall treatment time. To solve this problem, we created a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet allowing calculation of the optimal treatment for each patient: best efficacy (BED(tumour)) without exceeding toxicity threshold (BED(rectum)). The efficacy of a treatment may vary as a result of several factors. Customised radiobiological evaluation is a useful adjunct to clinical evaluation in planning equivalent treatments that satisfy all dosimetric constraints.

  3. Heavy metals, especially lead, deposition recorded in an ombrotrophic peat bog near Manchester, United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, G.; Weiss, D.; Cheburkin, A.; Rausch, N.; Grattant, J.; Krachler, M.; Shotyk, W.

    2003-05-01

    A peat monolith representing up to 4,000 years of peat accumulation near Manchester, England, was collected. Major and trace elements were analysed with XRF and for Cd and Pb in the deeper samples with GF-AAS following acid digestion. Pb isotopic composition was measured with TIMS and ICP-MS. The results show a pollution since the Roman Period due to local lead sources and an increase in lead pollution in the last century due to leaded gasoline as fingerprinted by Pb isotopic signatures.

  4. Methods for prostate stabilization during transperineal LDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Tarun; Sherman, Jason; Rubens, Deborah; Messing, Edward; Strang, John; Ng, Wan-Sing; Yu, Yan

    2008-03-21

    In traditional prostate brachytherapy procedures for a low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation seed implant, stabilizing needles are first inserted to provide some rigidity and support to the prostate. Ideally this will provide better seed placement and an overall improved treatment. However, there is much speculation regarding the effectiveness of using regular brachytherapy needles as stabilizers. In this study, we explored the efficacy of two types of needle geometries (regular brachytherapy needle and hooked needle) and several clinically feasible configurations of the stabilization needles. To understand and assess the prostate movement during seed implantation, we collected in vivo data from patients during actual brachytherapy procedures. In vitro experimentation with tissue-equivalent phantoms allowed us to further understand the mechanics behind prostate stabilization. We observed superior stabilization with the hooked needles compared to the regular brachytherapy needles (more than 40% in bilateral parallel needle configuration). Prostate movement was also reduced significantly when regular brachytherapy needles were in an angulated configuration as compared to the parallel configuration (more than 60%). When the hooked needles were angulated for stabilization, further reduction in prostate displacement was observed. In general, for convenience of dosimetric planning and to avoid needle collision, all needles are desired to be in a parallel configuration. In this configuration, hooked needles provide improved stabilization of the prostate. On the other hand, both regular and hooked needles appear to be equally effective in reducing prostate movement when they are in angulated configurations, which will be useful in seed implantation using a robotic system. We have developed nonlinear spring-damper model for the prostate movement which can be used for adapting dosimetric planning during brachytherapy as well as for developing more realistic haptic devices and

  5. Methods for prostate stabilization during transperineal LDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podder, Tarun; Yu Yan; Sherman, Jason; Rubens, Deborah; Strang, John; Messing, Edward; Ng, Wan-Sing

    2008-01-01

    In traditional prostate brachytherapy procedures for a low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation seed implant, stabilizing needles are first inserted to provide some rigidity and support to the prostate. Ideally this will provide better seed placement and an overall improved treatment. However, there is much speculation regarding the effectiveness of using regular brachytherapy needles as stabilizers. In this study, we explored the efficacy of two types of needle geometries (regular brachytherapy needle and hooked needle) and several clinically feasible configurations of the stabilization needles. To understand and assess the prostate movement during seed implantation, we collected in vivo data from patients during actual brachytherapy procedures. In vitro experimentation with tissue-equivalent phantoms allowed us to further understand the mechanics behind prostate stabilization. We observed superior stabilization with the hooked needles compared to the regular brachytherapy needles (more than 40% in bilateral parallel needle configuration). Prostate movement was also reduced significantly when regular brachytherapy needles were in an angulated configuration as compared to the parallel configuration (more than 60%). When the hooked needles were angulated for stabilization, further reduction in prostate displacement was observed. In general, for convenience of dosimetric planning and to avoid needle collision, all needles are desired to be in a parallel configuration. In this configuration, hooked needles provide improved stabilization of the prostate. On the other hand, both regular and hooked needles appear to be equally effective in reducing prostate movement when they are in angulated configurations, which will be useful in seed implantation using a robotic system. We have developed nonlinear spring-damper model for the prostate movement which can be used for adapting dosimetric planning during brachytherapy as well as for developing more realistic haptic devices and

  6. The Manchester procedure versus vaginal hysterectomy in the treatment of uterine prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Cæcilie Krogsgaard; Lose, Gunnar; Klarskov, Niels

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Uterine prolapse is a common health problem and the number of surgical procedures is increasing. No consensus regarding the surgical strategy for repair of uterine prolapse exists. Vaginal hysterectomy (VH) is the preferred surgical procedure worldwide, but uterus......-intervention rate, complications and operative outcomes. METHODS: We systematically searched Embase, PubMed, the Cochrane databases, Clinicaltrials and Clinical trials register using the MeSh terms "uterine prolapse", "uterus prolapse", "vaginal prolapse" "pelvic organ prolapse", "prolapsed uterus", "Manchester...... procedure" and "vaginal hysterectomy". No limitations regarding language, study design or methodology were applied. In total, nine studies published from 1966 to 2014 comparing the MP to VH were included. RESULTS: The anatomical recurrence rate for the middle compartment was 4-7 % after VH, whereas...

  7. Hybrid deployable support truss designs for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgepeth, J.

    1988-01-01

    Concepts for a 20-meter diameter Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) deployable truss backup structure, and analytical predictions of its structural characteristics are discussed. The concept shown is referred to as the SIXPAC; It is a combination of the PACTRUSS concept and a single-fold beam, which would make up the desired backup structure. One advantage of retaining the PACTRUSS concept is its packaging density and its capability for synchronous deployment. Various 2-meter hexagonal panel arrangements are possible for this Hybrid PACTRUSS structure depending on the panel-to-structure attachment strategies used. Static analyses of the SIXPAC using various assumptions for truss designs and panel masses of 10 kg sq meters were performed to predict the tip displacement of the structure when supported at the center. The tip displacement ranged from 0.20 to 0.44 mm without the panel mass, and from 0.9 to 3.9 mm with the panel mass (in a 1-g field). The data indicate that the structure can be adequately ground tested to validate its required performance in space, assuming the required performance in space is approximately 100 microns. The static displacement at the tip of the structure when subjected to an angular acceleration of 0.001 rad/sec squared were estimated to range from 0.8 to 7.5 microns, depending on the type of truss elements.

  8. Development and validation of a Greek language version of the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index

    OpenAIRE

    Kaoulla, Patricia; Frescos, Nicoletta; Menz, Hylton B

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index (MFPDI) is a 19 item questionnaire used to assess the severity and impact of foot pain. The aim of this study was to develop a Greek-language version of the MFPDI and to assess the instrument's psychometric properties. Methods The MFPDI was translated into Greek by three bilingual content experts and two bilingual language experts, and then back-translated into English to assess for equivalence. The final Greek version was admi...

  9. POLÍTICAS PÚBLICAS DE REVITALIZACIÓN URBANA Y FOMENTO AL OCIO, TURISMO Y ENTRETENIMIENTO: LA CREACIÓN DE RECINTOS URBANO-TURÍSTICOS EN MANCHESTER, INGLATERRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Fontan Köhler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Manchester estructura y promueve su área central a través de nueve recintos urbano- turísticos, dentro de la estrategia más amplia de crear una nueva base económica, transformándola en un centro posindustrial de ocio y turismo, compras y servicios financieros. El artículo tuvo como objetivo comprender la génesis de esos recintos, además de su utilización para atraer turistas y visitantes y estructurar su experiencia en la ciudad. Se evalúa que esos recintos son una manera útil de promover turísticamente Manchester, contribuyendo para transformarla en uno de los principales destinos del país.

  10. Books Right Here Right Now at the University of Manchester Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Rayner

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Books Right Here Right Now is a strategic project to radically change core text provision at the University of Manchester. In order to investigate new models for electronic textbook delivery, the project team are running a series of e-textbook pilots, providing textbooks directly to our students via the virtual learning environment. This paper focuses on how usage data and the views of our students and academic staff are underpinning the project in terms of acquisition models, negotiations with publishers and providing a new product to our students. Having detailed the project findings, the article concludes with the authors’ thoughts on the changing environment of the e-textbook market and the various issues within the existing models of e-textbook provision, giving recommendations as to how academic libraries and publishers can help to shape a sustainable model for the UK.

  11. Cultural differences in clinical leadership: a qualitative study comparing the attitudes of general dental practitioners from Greater Manchester and Tokyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, P; Nomura, M; Ozaki, T; Ferguson, J; Matsuda, R

    2013-11-01

    Leadership has been argued to be a key component in the transformation of services in the United Kingdom and in Japan. In the UK, local professional networks have developed to provide clinician led care in dentistry; working to develop local plans to deliver improvements in the quality of care for patients. In Japan, the remuneration model for dental care has been revised with the aim to improve the service and tackle the current challenges of population health there. The aim of this study was to use semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis to explore general dental practitioners' (GDPs) understanding of the term 'leadership' and determine whether its meaning is culturally bound. Twelve participants were sampled purposively by the research team; identifying GDPs involved in leadership roles from across Greater Manchester and Tokyo. A set of open-ended questions was developed for semi-structured interviews a priori and the interviews continued until saturation. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and codes were developed into a coding frame for thematic analysis. Representative quotations are provided in the results. Fourteen codes were identified according to the aims of the study and organised into five overarching themes. 'Leadership as the relationship' was more pronounced among Japanese GDPs, while 'leadership as the individual' was common in GDPs from Greater Manchester. Differences were also found in respect of education and training in leadership. Training was also considered to be important by the GDPs from Japan, while UK GDPs felt leaders were more likely to be influenced by innate qualities. The interdependence of leadership and entrepreneurship was raised by both sets of GDPs. The concept of leadership was considered to be important by GDPs from both Greater Manchester and Tokyo; leadership was seen as providing strategy and direction for a clinical team. However, cultural influences were evident in how this was conceptualised.

  12. Constraints in the use of repair half times and mathematical modelling for the clinical application of HDR and PDR treatment schedules as an alternative for LDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, L.A.M.; Broek, J.F.C.M. van den; Visser, A.G.; Kogel, A.J. van der

    1996-01-01

    Using theoretical models based on radiobiological principles for the design of new treatment schedules for HDR and PDR brachytherapy, it is important to realise the impact of assumptions regarding the kinetics of repair. Extrapolations based on longer repair half times in a continuous LDR reference scheme may lead to the calculation of dangerously high doses for alternative HDR and PDR treatment schedules. We used the clinical experience obtained with conventional ERT and LDR brachytherapy in head and neck cancer as a clinical guideline to check the impact of the radiobiological parameters used. Biologically equivalent dose (BED) values for the in clinical practice of LDR brachytherapy recommended dose of 65-70 Gy (prescribed at a dose rate between 30-50 cGy/h) are calculated as a function of the repair half time. These BED values are compared with the biological effect of a clinical reference dose of conventional ERT with 2 Gy/day and complete repair between the fractions. From this comparison of LDR and ERT treatment schedules, a range of values for the repair half times of acute or late responding tissues is demarcated with a reasonable fit to the clinical data. For the acute effects (or tumor control) the best fits are obtained for repair half times of about 0.5 h, while for late effects the repair half times are at least 1 h and can be as high as 3 h. Within these ranges of repair half times for acute and late effects, the outcome of 'alternative' HDR or PDR treatment schedules are discussed. It is predominantly the late reacting normal tissue with the longer repair half time for which problems will be encountered and no or only marginal gain is to be expected of decreasing the dose rate per pulse in PDR brachytherapy

  13. Class transformation and work-life balance in urban Britain: the case of Manchester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kevin; Fagan, Colette; McDowell, Linda; Perrons, Diane; Ray, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have seen an expansion in the work on the attitudes, beliefs and preferences of those middle-class groups that have accompanied the return of capital to many North American and western European city centres and their surrounding urban suburbs. Yet despite this, it is argued that there is little research linking gentrification to wider processes of social transformation, particularly debates over housing market decision-making, the balancing of work and life, and the gender division of labour within the household. It is to examining the interaction of these aspects of everyday life in a gentrifying area that this paper turns, using the example of Chorlton, a southern urban suburb of Manchester.

  14. Working with Manchester triage -- job satisfaction in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsgren, Susanne; Forsman, Berit; Carlström, Eric D

    2009-10-01

    This article covers nurses' job satisfaction during triage at emergency departments in Western Sweden. Data was collected from 74 triage nurses using a questionnaire containing 37 short form open questions. The answers were analyzed descriptively and by measuring the covariance. The open questions were analyzed by content analysis. The results showed a high degree of job satisfaction (88%). Triage as a method, the interesting nature of the work, and a certain freedom in connection with the triage tasks contributed to job satisfaction (R(2) = 0.40). The nurses found their work interesting and stimulating, although some reported job dissatisfaction due to a heavy workload and lack of competence. Most of the nurses thought that Manchester triage (MTS) was a clear and straightforward method but in need of development. The rational modelling structure by which the triage method is constructed is unable to distinguish all the parameters that an experienced nurse takes into account. When the model is allowed to take precedence over experience, it can be of hindrance and contribute to certain estimates not corresponding with the patient's needs. The participants requested regular exercises solving and discussing patient scenarios. They also wanted to participate on a regular basis in the development of the instrument.

  15. Radiobiological considerations in gynaecological HDR and LDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.

    1989-01-01

    In brachytherapy the advantages of high dose rate over low dose rate afterloading therapy were obvious. Out-patient treatment becomes possible, the position of the sources is reproducible and can be observed during the treatment and the patients have to be immobilised for only a short time, giving less psychological stress and a decreased risk of thrombosis and embolism. When changing from LDR to HDR afterloading therapy we are not yet able to evaluate its biological impact. Radiobiological considerations and our experimental data, however, give us the following clinical consequences by using HDR brachytherapy: There is a need for about 15 fractions or more and each increase in dose rate requires higher fractioning. Due to the steep dose rate decline and the inhomogeneous dose distribution, multiple equivalence factors are necessary when fractioning is not sufficiently high. Correction factors to reduce the dose close to the source are low, with increasing distance from the source they increase. If HDR radiation therapy is used, the percutaneous dose in the pelvic wall region should be reduced. The reduction of the dose in HDR brachytherapy is a compromise to limit the side effects caused by the radiation. The drawback is a small therapeutic range and reduced therapeutic effectivity at the tumour. (orig.) [de

  16. Management applications of genetic structure of anadromous sturgeon populations in the Lower Danube River (LDR, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ONĂRĂ Dalia Florentina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, the over-exploitation of sturgeon stocks for caviar production simultaneously with severe habitat deteriorations has led to drastic declines in the natural populations of the Danube River. As a result of (i decrease of sturgeon catches from 37.5 tons in year 2002 to 11.8 tons in year 2005, (ii disrupted age class structure of sturgeon adult cohorts in years 2003 and 2004, and (iii lack or low recruitment in the period 2001 – 2004, in 2005 the Romanian Government started the Supportive Stocking Program of Lower Danube River with hatchery-produced young sturgeons in Romania. Subsequently, in 2006 the commercial sturgeon fishing in Romania was banned for a 10-year period. Genetic investigations were undertaken as an attempt to assess the genetic variability of the sturgeon brood fish, captured from the wild, used in two aquaculture facilities in Romania for obtaining juveniles for supportive stocking of LDR with young sturgeons produced by artificial propagation in year 2007. Our data indicate strong genetic diversity in case of stellate sturgeon and lack of diversity within the batch of beluga sturgeon brood fish captured in 2007, analyzed in the current study. Specific measures that could improve the management plan of sturgeon brood fish in the Romanian part of LDR in the light of recent FAO guidelines regarding the sturgeon hatchery practices and management for release were suggested

  17. Development, dimensions, reliability and validity of the novel Manchester COPD fatigue scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-shair, K; Kolsum, U; Berry, P

    2009-01-01

    as well as depressed patients (>or=16 scores in the Center for Epidemiologic Study on Depression (CES-D) scale) had nearly twice as high fatigue scores as those who walked >or=350 m or were not depressed (preliable and valid measurement of total...... was first subjected to constructive validated shortening steps and then to a principal components analysis. RESULTS: The Manchester COPD fatigue scale (MCFS) consists of 27 items, loading into three dimensions: physical, cognitive and psychosocial fatigue. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.......97) and test-retest repeatability (r = 0.97, pvalidity, correlating with the FACIT (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy) fatigue scale and the fatigue in Borg scale at baseline and after a 6 minute walk distance (6MWD) test (r = -0.81, 0.53 and 0...

  18. Current status of research on radiation hormesis in the immune system after low level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuzheng

    1995-01-01

    The paper highlights the chief results of experimental studies recently carried out in the author's laboratory on the stimulatory effects of low level radiation on immunity. The intercellular relationship within the immune system after whole-body irradiation (WBI) with low doses of X- and gamma-rays was briefly outlined with the emphasis on the potential effect of low dose radiation (LDR) on the helper T cells which was thought to occupy a pivotal position in the process of immuno-stimulation. Data suggesting the facilitation by LDR of the signal transduction process within the T cells were presented. Some hypotheses prevailing in the literature for the explanation of the stimulatory effect of LDR were critically evaluated. Existing experimental data both from the literature and from the author's laboratory were analysed giving no strong support to the speculation of either the preferential deletion of the radiosensitive suppressor T subset or the increased apoptosis of the T cell 'precursors' in the thymus leading to secondary immunologic augmentation by low doses which stimulate immune functions. The possible influence of systemic changes, especially those in the neuroendocrine regulation, on the T cell potentiation following LDR was suggested. Finally the biological implications of the hermetic effects of LDR were discussed

  19. High dynamic range coding imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Renfan; Huang, Yifan; Hou, Guangqi

    2014-10-01

    We present a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging system design scheme based on coded aperture technique. This scheme can help us obtain HDR images which have extended depth of field. We adopt Sparse coding algorithm to design coded patterns. Then we utilize the sensor unit to acquire coded images under different exposure settings. With the guide of the multiple exposure parameters, a series of low dynamic range (LDR) coded images are reconstructed. We use some existing algorithms to fuse and display a HDR image by those LDR images. We build an optical simulation model and get some simulation images to verify the novel system.

  20. Rendering of HDR content on LDR displays: an objective approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasula, Lukáš; Narwaria, Manish; Fliegel, Karel; Le Callet, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic range compression (or tone mapping) of HDR content is an essential step towards rendering it on traditional LDR displays in a meaningful way. This is however non-trivial and one of the reasons is that tone mapping operators (TMOs) usually need content-specific parameters to achieve the said goal. While subjective TMO parameter adjustment is the most accurate, it may not be easily deployable in many practical applications. Its subjective nature can also influence the comparison of different operators. Thus, there is a need for objective TMO parameter selection to automate the rendering process. To that end, we investigate into a new objective method for TMO parameters optimization. Our method is based on quantification of contrast reversal and naturalness. As an important advantage, it does not require any prior knowledge about the input HDR image and works independently on the used TMO. Experimental results using a variety of HDR images and several popular TMOs demonstrate the value of our method in comparison to default TMO parameter settings.

  1. In-vivo laser induced urethral stricture animal model for investigating the potential of LDR-brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Lellig, Katja; Bader, Markus; Stief, Christian; Weidlich, Patrick; Wechsel, G.; Assmann, Walter; Becker, R.; Fedorova, O.; Khoder, Wael

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Treatment of urethral strictures is a major challenge in urology. For investigation of different treatment methods an animal model was developed by reproducible induction of urethral strictures in rabbits to mimic the human clinical situation. By means of this model the potential of endoluminal LDR brachytherapy using β-irradiation as prophylaxis of recurrent urethral strictures investigated. Material and Methods: A circumferential urethral stricture was induced by energy deposition using laser light application (wavelength λ=1470 nm, 10 W, 10 s, applied energy 100 J) in the posterior urethra of anaesthetized New Zealand White male rabbits. The radial light emitting fiber was introduced by means of a children resectoscope (14F). The grade of urethral stricture was evaluated in 18 rabbits using videourethroscopy and urethrography at day 28 after stricture induction. An innovative catheter was developed based on a β-irradiation emitting foil containing 32P, which was wrapped around the application system. Two main groups (each n=18) were separated. The "internal urethrotomy group" received after 28days of stricture induction immediately after surgical urethrotomy of the stricture the radioactive catheter for one week in a randomized, controlled and blinded manner. There were 3 subgroups with 6 animals each receiving 0 Gy, 15 Gy and 30 Gy. In contrast animals from the "De Nuovo group" received directly after the stricture induction (day 0) the radioactive catheter also for the duration of one week divided into the same dose subgroups. In order to determine the radiation tolerance of the urethral mucosa, additional animals without any stricture induction received a radioactive catheter applying a total dose of 30 Gy (n=2) and 15 Gy (n=1). Cystourethrography and endoscopic examination of urethra were performed on all operation days for monitoring treatment progress. Based on these investigation a classification of the stricture size was performed and

  2. Transmission x-ray microscopy at Diamond-Manchester I13 Imaging Branchline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vila-Comamala, Joan, E-mail: joan.vila.comamala@gmail.com; Wagner, Ulrich; Bodey, Andrew J.; Garcia-Fernandez, Miryam; Rau, Christoph [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Bosgra, Jeroen; David, Christian [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 PSI-Villigen (Switzerland); Eastwood, David S. [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK and Research Complex at Harwell, Harwell Campus, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-28

    Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) has been shown to be a powerful method for obtaining quantitative internal structural and chemical information from materials at the nanoscale. The installation of a Full-field TXM station will extend the current microtomographic capabilities of the Diamond-Manchester I13 Imaging Branchline at Diamond Light Source (UK) into the sub-100 nm spatial resolution range using photon energies from 8 to 14 keV. The dedicated Full-field TXM station will be built in-house with contributions of Diamond Light Source support divisions and via collaboration with the X-ray Optics Group of Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland) which will develop state-of-the-art diffractive X-ray optical elements. Preliminary results of the I13 Full-field TXM station are shown. The Full-field TXM will become an important Diamond Light Source direct imaging asset for material science, energy science and biology at the nanoscale.

  3. Transmission x-ray microscopy at Diamond-Manchester I13 Imaging Branchline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vila-Comamala, Joan; Wagner, Ulrich; Bodey, Andrew J.; Garcia-Fernandez, Miryam; Rau, Christoph; Bosgra, Jeroen; David, Christian; Eastwood, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) has been shown to be a powerful method for obtaining quantitative internal structural and chemical information from materials at the nanoscale. The installation of a Full-field TXM station will extend the current microtomographic capabilities of the Diamond-Manchester I13 Imaging Branchline at Diamond Light Source (UK) into the sub-100 nm spatial resolution range using photon energies from 8 to 14 keV. The dedicated Full-field TXM station will be built in-house with contributions of Diamond Light Source support divisions and via collaboration with the X-ray Optics Group of Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland) which will develop state-of-the-art diffractive X-ray optical elements. Preliminary results of the I13 Full-field TXM station are shown. The Full-field TXM will become an important Diamond Light Source direct imaging asset for material science, energy science and biology at the nanoscale

  4. Transmission x-ray microscopy at Diamond-Manchester I13 Imaging Branchline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Comamala, Joan; Bosgra, Jeroen; Eastwood, David S.; Wagner, Ulrich; Bodey, Andrew J.; Garcia-Fernandez, Miryam; David, Christian; Rau, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) has been shown to be a powerful method for obtaining quantitative internal structural and chemical information from materials at the nanoscale. The installation of a Full-field TXM station will extend the current microtomographic capabilities of the Diamond-Manchester I13 Imaging Branchline at Diamond Light Source (UK) into the sub-100 nm spatial resolution range using photon energies from 8 to 14 keV. The dedicated Full-field TXM station will be built in-house with contributions of Diamond Light Source support divisions and via collaboration with the X-ray Optics Group of Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland) which will develop state-of-the-art diffractive X-ray optical elements. Preliminary results of the I13 Full-field TXM station are shown. The Full-field TXM will become an important Diamond Light Source direct imaging asset for material science, energy science and biology at the nanoscale.

  5. The Manchester Uveitis Clinic: the first 3000 patients--epidemiology and casemix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nicholas P

    2015-04-01

    To demonstrate the demography, anatomical, and diagnostic classification of patients with uveitis attending the Manchester Uveitis Clinic (MUC), a specialist uveitis clinic in the northwest of England, UK. Retrospective retrieval of data on a computerized database incorporating all new referrals to MUC from 1991 to 2013. A total of 3000 new patients with uveitis were seen during a 22-year period. The anatomical types seen were anterior 46%; intermediate 11.1%; posterior 21.8%; and panuveitis 21.1%. The most common diagnoses were Fuchs heterochromic uveitis (11.5% of total), sarcoidosis-related uveitis (9.7%), idiopathic intermediate uveitis (7.9%), idiopathic acute anterior uveitis (7.0%), and toxoplasmosis (6.9%). Syphilis and tuberculosis-associated uveitis increased markedly in frequency during the study period. The uveitis casemix in this region reflects a predominantly white Caucasian population in a temperate country, but with changing characteristics owing to increasing immigration, enhanced diagnostic techniques, changes in referral pattern, and some real changes in disease incidence.

  6. The Manchester Fly Facility: Implementing an objective-driven long-term science communication initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjai; Prokop, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Science communication is increasingly important for scientists, although research, teaching and administration activities tend to eat up our time already, and budgets for science communication are usually low. It appears impossible to combine all these tasks and, in addition, to develop engagement activities to a quality and impact that would make the efforts worth their while. Here we argue that these challenges are easier addressed when centering science communication initiatives on a long-term vision with a view to eventually forming outreach networks where the load can be shared whilst being driven to higher momentum. As one example, we explain the science communication initiative of the Manchester Fly Facility. It aims to promote public awareness of research using the model organism Drosophila, which is a timely, economic and most efficient experimental strategy to drive discovery processes in the biomedical sciences and must have a firm place in the portfolios of funding organisations. Although this initiative by the Manchester Fly Facility is sustained on a low budget, its long-term vision has allowed gradual development into a multifaceted initiative: (1) targeting university students via resources and strategies for the advanced training in fly genetics; (2) targeting the general public via science fairs, educational YouTube videos, school visits, teacher seminars and the droso4schools project; (3) disseminating and marketing strategies and resources to the public as well as fellow scientists via dedicated websites, blogs, journal articles, conference presentations and workshops - with a view to gradually forming networks of drosophilists that will have a greater potential to drive the science communication objective to momentum and impact. Here we explain the rationales and implementation strategies for our various science communication activities - which are similarly applicable to other model animals and other areas of academic science - and share our

  7. SU-G-TeP4-05: An Evaluation of a Low Dose Rate (LDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Procedure Using a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, S-K; Kim, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study is the application of a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to access the risks for patients undergoing a Low Dose Rate (LDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Treatment. Methods: FMEA was applied to identify all the sub processes involved in the stages of identifying patient, source handling, treatment preparation, treatment delivery, and post treatment. These processes characterize the radiation treatment associated with LDR Prostate Brachytherapy. The potential failure modes together with their causes and effects were identified and ranked in order of their importance. Three indexes were assigned for each failure mode: the occurrence rating (O), the severity rating (S), and the detection rating (D). A ten-point scale was used to score each category, ten being the number indicating most severe, most frequent, and least detectable failure mode, respectively. The risk probability number (RPN) was calculated as a product of the three attributes: RPN = O X S x D. The analysis was carried out by a working group (WG) at UPMC. Results: The total of 56 failure modes were identified including 32 modes before the treatment, 13 modes during the treatment, and 11 modes after the treatment. In addition to the protocols already adopted in the clinical practice, the prioritized risk management will be implanted to the high risk procedures on the basis of RPN score. Conclusion: The effectiveness of the FMEA method was established. The FMEA methodology provides a structured and detailed assessment method for the risk analysis of the LDR Prostate Brachytherapy Procedure and can be applied to other radiation treatment modes.

  8. SU-G-TeP4-05: An Evaluation of a Low Dose Rate (LDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Procedure Using a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, S-K; Kim, J [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study is the application of a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to access the risks for patients undergoing a Low Dose Rate (LDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Treatment. Methods: FMEA was applied to identify all the sub processes involved in the stages of identifying patient, source handling, treatment preparation, treatment delivery, and post treatment. These processes characterize the radiation treatment associated with LDR Prostate Brachytherapy. The potential failure modes together with their causes and effects were identified and ranked in order of their importance. Three indexes were assigned for each failure mode: the occurrence rating (O), the severity rating (S), and the detection rating (D). A ten-point scale was used to score each category, ten being the number indicating most severe, most frequent, and least detectable failure mode, respectively. The risk probability number (RPN) was calculated as a product of the three attributes: RPN = O X S x D. The analysis was carried out by a working group (WG) at UPMC. Results: The total of 56 failure modes were identified including 32 modes before the treatment, 13 modes during the treatment, and 11 modes after the treatment. In addition to the protocols already adopted in the clinical practice, the prioritized risk management will be implanted to the high risk procedures on the basis of RPN score. Conclusion: The effectiveness of the FMEA method was established. The FMEA methodology provides a structured and detailed assessment method for the risk analysis of the LDR Prostate Brachytherapy Procedure and can be applied to other radiation treatment modes.

  9. Estimates of emissions of SO sub 2 , NO sub x , HCl and NH sub 3 from Greater Manchester and the North-West of England

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.S.; Longhurst, J.W.S.

    1990-11-01

    Estimates of emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, HCl and NH{sub 3} have been made for Greater Manchester and the North West of England. These estimates were made using data on power generation, fuel useage, animal and human population statistics. A large fossil fuel fired power station is the largest known point source for emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and HCl. However, emissions from motor vehicles make the largest contribution to NO{sub x} emissions in the North-West as a whole. The largest contribution to NH{sub 3} emissions in the North-West is from cattle. However in the Metropolitan Counties of Merseyside and Greater Manchester, it has been calculated that humans could contribute 73% and 81%, respectively, to the emissions of NH{sub 3}. The uncertainties in the methodologies used are highlighted, and where possible, recommendations made as to how future emissions estimates might be improved. 33 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Nurse Staffing Calculation in the Emergency Department - Performance-Oriented Calculation Based on the Manchester Triage System at the University Hospital Bonn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Gräff

    Full Text Available To date, there are no valid statistics regarding the number of full time staff necessary for nursing care in emergency departments in Europe.Staff requirement calculations were performed using state-of-the art procedures which take both fluctuating patient volume and individual staff shortfall rates into consideration. In a longitudinal observational study, the average nursing staff engagement time per patient was assessed for 503 patients. For this purpose, a full-time staffing calculation was estimated based on the five priority levels of the Manchester Triage System (MTS, taking into account specific workload fluctuations (50th-95th percentiles.Patients classified to the MTS category red (n = 35 required the most engagement time with an average of 97.93 min per patient. On weighted average, for orange MTS category patients (n = 118, nursing staff were required for 85.07 min, for patients in the yellow MTS category (n = 181, 40.95 min, while the two MTS categories with the least acute patients, green (n = 129 and blue (n = 40 required 23.18 min and 14.99 min engagement time per patient, respectively. Individual staff shortfall due to sick days and vacation time was 20.87% of the total working hours. When extrapolating this to 21,899 (2010 emergency patients, 67-123 emergency patients (50-95% percentile per month can be seen by one nurse. The calculated full time staffing requirement depending on the percentiles was 14.8 to 27.1.Performance-oriented staff planning offers an objective instrument for calculation of the full-time nursing staff required in emergency departments.

  11. The Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) score predicts biochemical recurrence in intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) dose escalation or low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vimal; Delouya, Guila; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Larrivée, Sandra; Taussky, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    To study the prognostic value of the University of California, San Francisco Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) score to predict biochemical failure (bF) after various doses of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or permanent seed low-dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (PB). We retrospectively analysed 345 patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer, with PSA levels of 10-20 ng/mL and/or Gleason 7 including 244 EBRT patients (70.2-79.2 Gy) and 101 patients treated with LDR PB. The minimum follow-up was 3 years. No patient received primary androgen-deprivation therapy. bF was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the differences between CAPRA groups. The overall bF rate was 13% (45/345). The CAPRA score, as a continuous variable, was statistically significant in multivariate analysis for predicting bF (hazard ratio [HR] 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-1.72, P = 0.006). There was a trend for a lower bF rate in patients treated with LDR PB when compared with those treated by EBRT ≤ 74 Gy (HR 0.234, 95% CI 0.05-1.03, P = 0.055) in multivariate analysis. In the subgroup of patients with a CAPRA score of 3-5, CAPRA remained predictive of bF as a continuous variable (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.01-2.27, P = 0.047) in multivariate analysis. The CAPRA score is useful for predicting biochemical recurrence in patients treated for intermediate-risk prostate cancer with EBRT or LDR PB. It could help in treatment decisions. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  12. ANALISIS PENGARUH LDR, NPL DAN OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCY RATIO TERHADAP RETURN ON ASSETS PADA BANK DEVISA DI INDONESIA PERIODE 2010-2012

    OpenAIRE

    Hamidah Hamidah; Goldan Merion Siallagan; Umi Mardiyati

    2014-01-01

    This research is performed on order to test analysis the influence of the Loan to Deposit Ratio (LDR), Non Performing Loan (NPL) and Operational Efficiency Ratio (OER) toward Return On Asset (ROA) On Foreign Exchange Banks In Indonesia Period 2010-2012. Methodology research as the sample used purposive sampling, samplewas accured fromforeign banks in Indonesia. Data analysis with multi liniearregression of ordinary least square and hypotheses test used t-statistic and Fstatistic, a classic as...

  13. Manchester calling’ ¿Por qué? «Manchester calling» For what?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Parker

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El “barrio norte” de Manchester, una zona objetivo de rehabilitación –hoteles baratos, clubs, viejos negocios textiles y modernos cafés– se convirtió aquel martes por la tarde en una tienda que cerraba sus puertas apresuradamente. A última hora de la tarde circulaban rumores de que en Salford, a escasa distancia de allí, se había armado. Los dueños de los restaurantes no estaban para correr ningún riesgo. Nos refugiamos en un libanés de una bocacalle de Oldham Street mientras los niños marchaban en bici a echar un vistazo un par de edificios hacia el sur; venían de tanto en cuando a dar el parte sobre los acontecimientos, del parque de Piccadilly. Podíamos ver algún que otro destello azul, personas que pasaban corriendo de un callejón a otro, relatos de piedras lanzadas; todo transcurría en medio de un silencio cada vez más tenso, expectante, inusual. Los tranvías y autobuses habían dejado de funcionar a media tarde, las autoridades pidieron que los locales de conciertos cerraran pronto, de modo que a esas horas el ambiente era distinto a otros días. Los trabajadores y clientes del centro de la ciudad empezaban a marcharse, inquietos por cómo volver a sus casas, algunos bajaban al centro para ver qué pasaba, y pequeños grupos de jóvenes permanecían en las esquinas sin lugar al que ir. Todos parecían sospechosos, todos se miraban, todos se habían convertido en objeto de sospecha; se iniciaba el proceso de separación, de división entre unos y otros, que no dejaba espacio a la solidaridad; un escenario de desorganización e incertidumbre sobre lo estaba por venirManchester’s ‘northern quarter’, an area targeted for regeneration – cheap hostels, clubs, old textile businesses and new cafe bars – was, on the Tuesday evening, rapidly shutting up shop. There had been rumours from late afternoon that Salford about a mile away had seen trouble, and restaurant owners round here were taking no chances. We took

  14. Evaluation of treatment results in patients with early glottic cancer (stage T 1a N 0, T 1b N 0) treated with Manchester irradiation modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przeorek, W.; Skladowski, K.; Przeorek, C.

    2007-01-01

    Data charts of 64 patients with stage I glottic cancer treated with Manchester irradiation modality in the 1 st Radiotherapy Clinic of Msc Memorial Institute in Gliwice has been retrospectively analyzed. There were 55 males and 9 females at median age 63 years (range from 37 to 83 years). In 40 (62%) patients pathological subtype of squamous cell cancer has not been established. In 19 (30%) patients microscopic examination revealed keratinizing and in 5 (8%) nonkeratinizing type of neoplasm. In 49 (77%) patients the tumour involved only one vocal cord, in 11 (17%) both, in 3 (5%) vocal cord and commissure and 1 (1%) patient both cords and commissure. All patients were treated with 60C o machines (36 patients - 56%) or high energy photons (28 patients - 44%). Radiotherapy was conducted with so called Manchester modality with one daily fraction of 3 Gy to a total dose of 51-54 Gy. Overall treatment time varied between 21 and 23 days. Acute mucosal reaction was evaluated with the morphological-functional Dische scale as well as with the EORTC/RTOG scoring system. The criteria of treatment efficacy were: 5-year local control, 5-year survival without serious complications (3 and 4 EORTC) and 5-year survival after salvage surgery in relapsed patients. In 63 patients complete regression of the tumour was observed up to 6 months of follow-up. One patient failed at the time of radiotherapy ending. In one case distant metastases to lungs were noticed. In 6 patients local relapses were discovered of which 3 were successfully salvaged with the surgery. In one patient, 18 months after radiotherapy massive oedema of laryngeal mucosa occurred. In this case tracheostomy was needed. 5-year local control, local control after salvage surgery and survival without serious complication rates are 89%, 97% and 95% respectively. 1. Radiotherapy with Manchester modality is a safe and effective treatment of stage I glottic cancer. 2. Despite hypofractionation the risk of severe complication

  15. A statistical intercomparison between 'urban' and 'rural' precipitation chemistry data from Greater Manchester and the two nearby secondary national network sites in the United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.S.; Longhurst, J.W.S. (Manchester Polytechnic, Manchester (United Kingdom). Acid Rain Information Centre, Dept. of Environmental and Graphical Studies)

    1992-11-01

    Precipitation chemistry data from a dense urban monitoring network in Greater Manchester, northwest England, were compared with interpolated values from the U.K. secondary national acid deposition monitoring network for the year 1988. Differences were found to be small. However, when data from individual sites from the Greater Manchester network were compared with data from the two nearest secondary national network sites, significant differences were found using simple and complex statistical analyses. Precipitation chemistry at rural sites could be similar to that at urban sites, but the sources of some ions were thought to be different. The synoptic-scale gradients of precipitation chemistry, as shown by the secondary national network, also accounted for some of the differences. 34 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Breast cancer risk in a screening cohort of Asian and white British/Irish women from Manchester UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D Gareth; Brentnall, Adam R; Harvie, Michelle; Astley, Susan; Harkness, Elaine F; Stavrinos, Paula; Donnelly, Louise S; Sampson, Sarah; Idries, Faiza; Watterson, Donna; Cuzick, Jack; Wilson, Mary; Jain, Anil; Harrison, Fiona; Maxwell, Anthony J; Howell, Anthony

    2018-01-25

    The differences between breast cancer risk factors in white British/Irish and Asian women attending screening in the UK are not well documented. Between 2009-15 ethnicity and traditional breast cancer risk factors were self-identified by a screening cohort from Greater Manchester, with follow up to 2016. Risk factors and incidence rates were compared using age-standardised statistics (European standard population). Eight hundred and seventy-nine Asian women and 51,779 unaffected white British/Irish women aged 46-73 years were recruited. Asian women were at lower predicted breast cancer risk from hormonal and reproductive risk factors than white British/Irish women (mean 10 year risk 2.6% vs 3.1%, difference 0.4%, 95%CI 0.3-0.5%). White British/Irish women were more likely to have had a younger age at menarche, be overweight or obese, taller, used hormone replacement therapy and not to have had children.. However, despite being less overweight Asian women had gained more weight from age 20 years and were less likely to undertake moderate physical activity. Asian women also had a slightly higher mammographic density. Asian age-standardised incidence was 3.2 (95%CI 1.6-5.2, 18 cancers) per thousand women/year vs 4.5 (95%CI 4.2-4.8, 1076 cancers) for white British/Irish women. Asian women attending screening in Greater Manchester are likely to have a lower risk of breast cancer than white British/Irish women, but they undertake less physical activity and have more adult weight gain.

  17. A tool based on Ligation Detection Reaction-Universal Array (LDR-UA) for the characterization of VTEC by identification of virulence-associated and serogroup-specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauri, Andrea; Castiglioni, Bianca; Morabito, Stefano; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Consolandi, Clarissa; Mariani, Paola

    2011-02-01

    Verocytoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) are zoonotic pathogens whose natural reservoir is represented by ruminants, particularly cattle. Infections are mainly acquired by consumption of undercooked contaminated food of animal origin, contact with infected animals and contaminated environment. VTEC O157 is the most frequently isolated serogroup from cases of human disease, however, other VTEC serogroups, such as O26, O111, O145 and O103, are increasingly reported as causing Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) worldwide. The identification of VTEC is troublesome, hindering the development of effective prevention strategies. In fact, VTEC are morphologically indistinguishable from harmless E. coli and their pathogenic potential is not strictly dependent on the serogroup, but relies on the presence of a collection of virulence genes. We developed a diagnostic tool for VTEC based on the Ligation Detection Reaction coupled to Universal Array (LDR-UA) for the simultaneous identification of virulence factors and serogroup-associated genes. The method includes the investigation of 40 sites located in 13 fragments from 12 genes (sodCF1/F2, adfO, terB, ehxA, eae, vtx1, vtx2, ihp1, wzx, wbdI, rfbE, dnaK) and was evaluated by performing a trial on a collection of 67 E. coli strains, both VTEC and VT-negative E. coli, as well as on 25 isolates belonging to other related species. Results of this study showed that the LDR-UA technique was specific in identifying the target microorganism. Moreover, due to its higher throughput, the LDR-UA can be a valid and cheaper alternative to real time PCR-based (rt-PCR) methods for VTEC identification. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Liquid Droplet Radiator - an Ultralightweight Heat Rejection System for Efficient Energy Conversion in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattick, A. T.; Hertzberg, A.

    1984-01-01

    A heat rejection system for space is described which uses a recirculating free stream of liquid droplets in place of a solid surface to radiate waste heat. By using sufficiently small droplets ( 100 micron diameter) of low vapor pressure liquids the radiating droplet sheet can be made many times lighter than the lightest solid surface radiators (heat pipes). The liquid droplet radiator (LDR) is less vulnerable to damage by micrometeoroids than solid surface radiators, and may be transported into space far more efficiently. Analyses are presented of LDR applications in thermal and photovoltaic energy conversion which indicate that fluid handling components (droplet generator, droplet collector, heat exchanger, and pump) may comprise most of the radiator system mass. Even the unoptimized models employed yield LDR system masses less than heat pipe radiator system masses, and significant improvement is expected using design approaches that incorporate fluid handling components more efficiently. Technical problems (e.g., spacecraft contamination and electrostatic deflection of droplets) unique to this method of heat rejectioon are discussed and solutions are suggested.

  19. MANCHESTER UNITED, INTERNAZIONALE MILANO AND FC BARCELONA – WHAT´S DIFFERENT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Sarmento

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although football is considered a universal language, there are particularities that characterize the way it is practiced in several countries. Overall, the style of English football is known as “Kick and Rush”, the Italian as “Catenaccio”, and the Spanish as “Fúria Española”. This study aims to understand which aspects in the characterization of playing styles of the different teams (Manchester United, Internazionale Milano and Barcelona are the most important for coaches. Methods: We chose 8 expert high-performance Portuguese first league football coaches (Coach 1 to 8 with a professional experience (as first coach ranging from 2 to 30 years (14.9 ± 8.6 years. Semi-structured interviews were carried out and the data analyzed trough content analysis using the software QSR NVivo 9. Results and discussion: The data were grouped in four mainly categories: i game culture/identity (n=18; ii strategical-Tatical factors (n=17; iii player characteristics (n=14; iv coach philosophy (n=14. When analyzing the specific characteristics of the three teams, the coaches mainly referred to aspects related to a playing/identity culture of each team that is influenced by their history, their tradition and a set of values underlying the different clubs. Our coaches described each team’s differences based on strategic and tactical aspects. Overall, all coaches recognized the quality and merit with which Barcelona plays, basing their views on a ball possession that is very difficult to equal by any other team in the world. In contrast, Manchester United plays in a way where strong ball possession is primary, but also their ability to play quickly and offensively, through a more "direct" playing style. Finally, Inter Milan’s style is defined essentially by their defensive tactical rigor and the capacity to develop effective offensive sequences of quick attacks and counterattacks. The players that form these teams are only one element

  20. The Manchester earthquake swarm of October 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptie, B.; Ottemoeller, L.

    2003-04-01

    An earthquake sequence started in the Greater Manchester area of the United Kingdom on October 19, 2002. This has continued to the time of writing and has consisted of more than 100 discrete earthquakes. Three temporary seismograph stations were installed to supplement existing permanent stations and to better understand the relationship between the seismicity and local geology. Due to the urban location, these were experienced by a large number of people. The largest event on October 21 had a magnitude ML 3.9. The activity appears to be an earthquake swarm, since there is no clear distinction between a main shock and aftershocks. However, most of the energy during the sequence was actually released in two earthquakes separated by a few seconds in time, on October 21 at 11:42. Other examples of swarm activity in the UK include Comrie (1788-1801, 1839-46), Glenalmond (1970-72), Doune (1997) and Blackford (1997-98, 2000-01) in central Scotland, Constantine (1981, 1986, 1992-4) in Cornwall, and Johnstonbridge (mid1980s) and Dumfries (1991,1999). The clustering of these events in time and space does suggest that there is a causal relationship between the events of the sequence. Joint hypocenter determination was used to simultaneously locate the swarm earthquakes, determine station corrections and improve the relative locations. It seems likely that all events in the sequence originate from a relatively small source volume. This is supported by the similarities in source mechanism and waveform signals between the various events. Focal depths were found to be very shallow and of the order of about 2-3 km. Source mechanisms determined for the largest of the events show strike-slip solutions along either northeast-southwest or northwest-southeast striking fault planes. The surface expression of faults in the epicentral area is generally northwest-southeast, suggesting that this is the more likely fault plane.

  1. Neoliberalismo en la Universidad Metropolitana de Manchester... y una alternativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Third Person

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Una campaña contra la persecución a miembros del sindicato de la Metropolitan University of Manchester (MMU ha logrado una victoria importante. La campaña ha sido liderada por el University and College Union (UCU y un grupo de estudiantes de postgrado y profesores visitantes. Todos ellos aunaron esfuerzos en acto de solidaridad con Ian Parker, catedrático de psicología crítica y representante sindical de la  UCU, tras su suspensión provisional del Departamento de Psicología desde principios del mes de octubre. La campaña también ha permitido reforzar el apoyo a Christine Vié, Copresidenta de la sede de UCU en la MMU, también cesada tras la suspensión de las asignaturas de postgrados que impartía. Los motivos de la suspensión de Ian Parker, la campaña a favor de su caso (y el de otros colegas en situación parecida y el posterior intento de la MMU de desdecirse para intentar salir bien parada, son todos ellos representativos de una política de gestión neoliberal universitaria así como de acciones posibles para contrarrestarla.

  2. Optical fibre luminescence sensor for real-time LDR brachytherapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woulfe, P.; O'Keeffe, S.; Sullivan, F. J.

    2018-02-01

    An optical fibre sensor for monitoring low dose radiation is presented. The sensor is based on a scintillation material embedded within the optical fibre core, which emits visible light when exposed to low level ionising radiation. The incident level of ionising radiation can be determined by analysing the optical emission. An optical fibre sensor is developed, based on radioluminescence whereby radiation sensitive scintillation material, terbium doped gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd2O2S:Tb), is embedded in a cavity of 700μm of a 1mm plastic optical fibre. The sensor is designed for in-vivo monitoring of the radiation dose during radio-active seed implantation for low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy, in prostate cancer treatment, providing radiation oncologists with real-time information of the radiation dose to the target area and/or nearby organs at risk (OARs). The radiation from the brachytherapy seeds causes emission of visible light from the scintillation material through the process of radioluminescence, which penetrates the fibre, propagating along the optical fibre for remote detection using a multi-pixel photon counter. The sensor demonstrates a high sensitivity to 0.397mCi of Iodine125, the radioactive source most commonly used in brachytherapy for treating prostate cancer.

  3. Evaluation of water-mimicking solid phantom materials for use in HDR and LDR brachytherapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A.; Thieben, Maike; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2017-12-01

    In modern HDR or LDR brachytherapy with photon emitters, fast checks of the dose profiles generated in water or a water-equivalent phantom have to be available in the interest of patient safety. However, the commercially available brachytherapy photon sources cover a wide range of photon emission spectra, and the range of the in-phantom photon spectrum is further widened by Compton scattering, so that the achievement of water-mimicking properties of such phantoms involves high requirements on their atomic composition. In order to classify the degree of water equivalence of the numerous commercially available solid water-mimicking phantom materials and the energy ranges of their applicability, the radial profiles of the absorbed dose to water, D w, have been calculated using Monte Carlo simulations in these materials and in water phantoms of the same dimensions. This study includes the HDR therapy sources Nucletron Flexisource Co-60 HDR (60Co), Eckert und Ziegler BEBIG GmbH CSM-11 (137Cs), Implant Sciences Corporation HDR Yb-169 Source 4140 (169Yb) as well as the LDR therapy sources IsoRay Inc. Proxcelan CS-1 (131Cs), IsoAid Advantage I-125 IAI-125A (125I), and IsoAid Advantage Pd-103 IAPd-103A (103Pd). Thereby our previous comparison between phantom materials and water surrounding a Varian GammaMed Plus HDR therapy 192Ir source (Schoenfeld et al 2015) has been complemented. Simulations were performed in cylindrical phantoms consisting of either water or the materials RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, Plastic Water LR, Original Plastic Water (2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, polystyrene and PMMA. While for 192Ir, 137Cs and 60Co most phantom materials can be regarded as water equivalent, for 169Yb the materials Plastic Water LR, Plastic Water DT and RW1 appear as water equivalent. For the low-energy sources 106Pd, 131Cs and 125I, only Plastic Water LR can be classified as water equivalent.

  4. The core content of the undergraduate curriculum in Manchester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, P A; Metcalfe, D; David, T J

    1999-02-01

    To identify the core content for the new undergraduate medical curriculum in Manchester. The initial step was to produce a list of 'index clinical situations' (ICSs), for which a newly graduated doctor must have a required level of competence. Using repeated consultation with consultants and general practitioners involved in medical education in the North-West of England, a list of 215 ICSs was agreed. Specialists and generalists were then asked to identify the components of the knowledge base and the performance (skills) base for each ICS. The knowledge base was divided into technical (biomedical facts/concepts) and contextual (effect/management of disease within the individual, family and society) domains. The performance base was divided into intellectual (problem solving and decision making) and interpersonal (history, examination, communication and procedural skills) domains. Forty specialties were consulted and 11,021 items (defined as a piece of knowledge, a concept or a skill) were identified. There was considerable overlap in the items listed, such that when the returns for each ICS were amalgamated, the 215 ICSs contained 6434 items with a mean of 34 +/- 14.2 per situation (range 6-85). UTILISATION: We have used the defined ICSs in the design of the trigger material used in the weekly problem-based learning sessions. Over 4 years almost all (207/215, 96%) of the ICS are covered, with many being revisited at several points in the curriculum.

  5. Code-division multiple-access protocol for active RFID systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Gustaw; Szabatin, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    Most of the Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems operating in HF and UHF bands employ narrowband modulations (FSK or ASK) with Manchester coding. However, these simple transmission schemes are vulnerable to narrowband interference (NBI) generated by other radio systems working in the same frequency band, and also suffer from collision problem and need special anti-collision procedures. This becomes especially important when operating in a noisy, crowded industrial environment. In this paper we show the performance of RFID system with DS-CDMA transmission in comparison to a standard system with FSK modulation defined in ISO 18000-7. Our simulation results show that without any bandwidth expansion the immunity against NBI can be improved by 8 dB and the system capacity can be 7 times higher when using DS-CDMA transmission instead of FSK modulation with Manchester coding.

  6. Production data from a Leica ZBA31H+ shaped e-beam mask writer located at the Photronics facility, Manchester, England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen; Loughran, Dominic; Osborne, Peter; Sixt, Pierre; Doering, Hans-Joachim

    1999-06-01

    The ZBA31H+) is a variable shaped spot, vector scan e- beam lithography system operating at 20 keV. The specified performance is designed to produce reticles to 250 nanometer design rules, and beyond. In November 98 the acceptance results of a newly installed Leica ZBA31H+), at Photonic Manchester, were presented in a paper at the VDE/VDI 15th European Conference on Mask Technology. This paper is a continuation of that work and presents data from a capability study carried out, on 4000 angstrom EBR9 HS31 resist. Analysis of: mean to target, uniformity, X/Y bias, isolated vs. dense linewidths, linearity, and registration performance of the tool is presented, and the effects of re- iterative develop on process capability compared. Theoretically, a shaped beam system has advantages over raster scan in terms of write time and edge definition capabilities. In this paper, comparative write times against an Etec Mebes 4500 system are included. The ZBA31H+) has to write very small polygons in order to image non-axial or non-45 degree features. The resulting effect on image quality and write time is investigated. In order to improve the fidelity of small OPC structures, Leica have investigated alternative writing strategies, and their results to data are presented here.

  7. SU-F-BRA-13: Knowledge-Based Treatment Planning for Prostate LDR Brachytherapy Based On Principle Component Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roper, J; Bradshaw, B; Godette, K; Schreibmann, E [Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Chanyavanich, V [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Denver, CO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To create a knowledge-based algorithm for prostate LDR brachytherapy treatment planning that standardizes plan quality using seed arrangements tailored to individual physician preferences while being fast enough for real-time planning. Methods: A dataset of 130 prior cases was compiled for a physician with an active prostate seed implant practice. Ten cases were randomly selected to test the algorithm. Contours from the 120 library cases were registered to a common reference frame. Contour variations were characterized on a point by point basis using principle component analysis (PCA). A test case was converted to PCA vectors using the same process and then compared with each library case using a Mahalanobis distance to evaluate similarity. Rank order PCA scores were used to select the best-matched library case. The seed arrangement was extracted from the best-matched case and used as a starting point for planning the test case. Computational time was recorded. Any subsequent modifications were recorded that required input from a treatment planner to achieve an acceptable plan. Results: The computational time required to register contours from a test case and evaluate PCA similarity across the library was approximately 10s. Five of the ten test cases did not require any seed additions, deletions, or moves to obtain an acceptable plan. The remaining five test cases required on average 4.2 seed modifications. The time to complete manual plan modifications was less than 30s in all cases. Conclusion: A knowledge-based treatment planning algorithm was developed for prostate LDR brachytherapy based on principle component analysis. Initial results suggest that this approach can be used to quickly create treatment plans that require few if any modifications by the treatment planner. In general, test case plans have seed arrangements which are very similar to prior cases, and thus are inherently tailored to physician preferences.

  8. WE-A-17A-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Development of a Calorimeter for the Measurement of the Power Emitted From LDR Brachytherapy Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malin, M; Palmer, B; DeWerd, L [University of WI-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Model-based dose calculation algorithms for brachytherapy sources are designed to compute dose per particle or dose per unit energy leaving the encapsulation of a brachytherapy source. As such, the power leaving the encapsulation of a source, called emitted power (EP), would be a natural source strength metric for these new algorithms. However, no instrument is currently capable of an absolute measurement of EP. A calorimeter operating with a liquid helium thermal sink was designed and constructed to measure the EP of low-dose rate (LDR) I-125 and Pd-103 brachytherapy sources. Methods: Calorimeter design was optimized through thermal and Monte Carlo (MC) modeling. Thermal modeling showed that specific thermal conditions would be necessary for accurate calorimeter measurements. These conditions were experimentally verified. The EP of two LDR I-125 source models was measured. An air-kermastrength (AKS)-to-EP conversion coefficient was determined through MC simulations and applied to well-type ionization chamber measurements of AKS to enable comparison with EP measurements. Results: MCdetermined EP per unit AKS conversion coefficients were source model dependent and are on the order of 0.1 μW/U. The signal-to-noise ratio was a function of source strength, and was 294 for a 0.5 μW source. Measurements were repeatable to within 3.6% for a 0.5 μW source. Initial EP measurements were made with two I-125 source models, a 5.7 U Oncura 6711 and a 2.9 U Best Medical 2301. Model 2301 results agreed with the MC-converted AKS value to within the measurement uncertainty of 4.3% at k=1. The Model 6711 results were systematically high and are under investigation. Conclusion: A calorimeter was designed to provide an absolute measurement of the EP for LDR brachytherapy sources and preliminary EP measurements have been made. This new calorimeter design shows promise of providing a more fundamentally useful source strength standard.

  9. Micro-controller based air pressure monitoring instrumentation system using optical fibers as sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, D.; Pegu, D. S.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes a micro-controller based instrumentation system to monitor air pressure using optical fiber sensors. The principle of macrobending is used to develop the sensor system. The instrumentation system consists of a laser source, a beam splitter, two multi mode optical fibers, two Light Dependent Resistance (LDR) based timer circuits and a AT89S8252 micro-controller. The beam splitter is used to divide the laser beam into two parts and then these two beams are launched into two multi mode fibers. One of the multi mode fibers is used as the sensor fiber and the other one is used as the reference fiber. The use of the reference fiber is to eliminate the environmental effects while measuring the air pressure magnitude. The laser beams from the sensor and reference fibers are applied to two identical LDR based timer circuits. The LDR based timer circuits are interfaced to a micro-controller through its counter pins. The micro-controller samples the frequencies of the timer circuits using its counter-0 and counter-1 and the counter values are then processed to provide the measure of air pressure magnitude.

  10. Development of a Danish Language Version of the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian K; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Garrow, Adam P

    2013-01-01

    Scale (VAS). Reproducibility was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and 95% limits of agreement (Bland-Altman plot). Construct validity was evaluated with Pearson's Rho, using a priori hypothesized correlations with SF-36 subscales and VASmean. Results. The MFPDI-DK showed very......Introduction. The Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index (MFPDI) is a 19-item questionnaire for the assessment of disability caused by foot pain. The aim was to develop a Danish language version of the MFPDI (MFPDI-DK) and evaluate its reproducibility and construct validity. Methods. A Danish...... good reliability with an ICC of 0.92 (0.88-0.95). The 95% limits of agreement ranged from -6.03 to 6.03 points. Construct validity was supported by moderate to very strong correlations with the SF-36 physical subscales and VASmean. Conclusion. The MFPDI-DK appears to be a valid and reproducible...

  11. Reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Spanish Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) in patients with foot or ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés, Juan B Gerstner; Winson, Ian; Goldhahn, Sabine; Castro, Michael D; Swords, Michael P; Grujic, Leslie; Rammelt, Stefan; Sands, Andrew K

    2016-03-01

    The Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) has been validated in Spanish for use in patients undergoing foot and ankle surgery. 120 patients completed the MOXFQ and the SF-36 before surgery and 6 and 12 months postoperative. Surgeons completed the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Clinical Rating System. Psychometric properties were assessed for all three MOXFQ dimensions, and for the MOXFQ Index. The Spanish MOXFQ demonstrated consistency with Cronbach's alpha values between 0.65 and 0.90, and reliability ([ICCs] >0.95). It shows a moderate to strong correlation between the Walking/standing dimension and the related domains of the SF-36 (|r|>0.6), the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Scale (|r|>0.47) and Hallux-MTP-IP Scale (|r|>0.64). Responsiveness was excellent, (effect sizes >2.1). The respective minimal detectable change (MDC90) was 14.18 for the MOXFQ Index. The Spanish version of the MOXFQ showed good psychometric properties in patients with foot and ankle disorders. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Manchester Civil Justice Centre: Procuring and Managing an Institutional Building with a Mixed Mode Ventilation System—A Case for Post-Occupancy Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Napier, John

    2013-01-01

    Manchester Civil Justice Centre is a striking contemporary 14 storey court building which has won awards for many different aspects of its design, construction and sustainability. From November 2002 to July 2005, the author was a key member of Denton Corker Marshall’s London project team having responsibility for key areas of design development, integration of technology and sustainable design including the East elevation’s “environmental veil”. This paper tracks the procurement of the buildi...

  13. Jedenáctá mezinárodní konference o barokní hudbě, The Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester 14.–18. 7. 2004

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kapsa, Václav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 41, 3-4 (2004), s. 399-402 ISSN 0018-7003. [Biennial International Conference on Baroque Music /11./. Manchester, 04.07.14-04.07.18] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD408/03/H049 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z9058907 Keywords : baroque music * conference * report Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  14. OPTIMIZACIÓN DE REDES 3G UTILIZANDO ALGORITMOS CONTROL DE ADMISIÓN DE LLAMADA (CAC Y REORGANIZACIÓN DE CARGA (LDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Fernando Romo Cabrera

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta el comportamiento de los algoritmos control de admisión de llamada CAC y reorganización de la carga LDR. Se  analizan dos escenarios donde son utilizados para mejorar el rendimiento de la red 3G. En el primero de ellos se presenta un caso de congestión de potencia en el uplink y en el segundo se analiza el nivel de congestión de elementos de canal CE en el uplink.

  15. Podemos como un acontecimiento o no: lo que vemos desde Manchester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Parker

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se analiza a Podemos desde la noción de “acontecimiento” teorizada por Alain Badiou y sobre la base de dos cuestiones que se relacionan con Podemos como fenómeno anti-político. En primer lugar, en lo relativo a la relación entre discurso académico y acontecimientos políticos, llegando a la conclusión de que tanto Badiou como el grupo de la Complutense que rodea a Iglesias intervinieron con éxito sobre el mundo real, desde la Universidad, desde un marco académico. La segunda cuestión tiene que ver con el modo en que nos relacionamos con acontecimientos que aun no han ocurrido. Parker concluye que el futuro de Podemos está íntimamente ligado a lo que pueda ocurrir en Grecia tras la victoria de Syriza. En este artículo se describe el impacto positivo que ha tenido Podemos para el “Left Unity” en Manchester y se aboga por un compromiso con ambas formaciones más allá de lo puramente académico. Podemos y Syriza son posibles acontecimientos cuyo carácter está aún por determinar, y cuyas implicaciones traspasan incluso las fronteras de Europa.

  16. The DEEP-South: Scheduling and Data Reduction Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Hong-Suh; Kim, Myung-Jin; Bae, Youngho; Moon, Hong-Kyu; Choi, Young-Jun; Roh, Dong-Goo; the DEEP-South Team

    2015-08-01

    The DEep Ecliptic Patrol of the Southern sky (DEEP-South), started in October 2012, is currently in test runs with the first Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) 1.6 m wide-field telescope located at CTIO in Chile. While the primary objective for the DEEP-South is physical characterization of small bodies in the Solar System, it is expected to discover a large number of such bodies, many of them previously unknown.An automatic observation planning and data reduction software subsystem called "The DEEP-South Scheduling and Data reduction System" (the DEEP-South SDS) is currently being designed and implemented for observation planning, data reduction and analysis of huge amount of data with minimum human interaction. The DEEP-South SDS consists of three software subsystems: the DEEP-South Scheduling System (DSS), the Local Data Reduction System (LDR), and the Main Data Reduction System (MDR). The DSS manages observation targets, makes decision on target priority and observation methods, schedules nightly observations, and archive data using the Database Management System (DBMS). The LDR is designed to detect moving objects from CCD images, while the MDR conducts photometry and reconstructs lightcurves. Based on analysis made at the LDR and the MDR, the DSS schedules follow-up observation to be conducted at other KMTNet stations. In the end of 2015, we expect the DEEP-South SDS to achieve a stable operation. We also have a plan to improve the SDS to accomplish finely tuned observation strategy and more efficient data reduction in 2016.

  17. Beyond institutional critique: Mark Dion’s surrealist wunderkammer at the Manchester Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Endt-Jones

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Mark Dion’s Bureau of the Centre for the Study of Surrealism and its Legacy, which opened at the Manchester Museum in May 2005, seems to represent a crossover between an old curator’s office, a storage room and a sixteenth century cabinet of curiosities. This essay closely examines two aspects of the installation, its inaccessibility and its concern with ‘alternative’, pre-Enlightenment taxonomy and classification, and explores in which ways they contrast and challenge the Museum’s display strategies. It investigates how the artist, by drawing on the university museum’s wunderkammer legacy and taking a detour via surrealism in the process, manages to undermine the binary logic earlier forms of institutional critique got entrapped in. By engaging in a symbiotic and cooperative, rather than parasitic and aggressive, relationship with the institution, the artist reminds us to focus on the museum’s ‘unique selling propositions’: the object’s historicity and the employees’ specialist expertise. The paper draws on the ideas of André Breton, Roger Caillois and Michel de Certeau to show how Dion proposes a new understanding of what is meant by ‘institutional critique’.

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 8, (MANCTH00060008) on Town Highway 6, crossing Bourn Brook, Manchester, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MANCTH00060008 on Town Highway 6 crossing Bourn Brook, Manchester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  19. Development of an adjoint sensitivity field-based treatment-planning technique for the use of newly designed directional LDR sources in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaswal, V; Thomadsen, B R; Henderson, D L

    2012-02-21

    The development and application of an automated 3D greedy heuristic (GH) optimization algorithm utilizing the adjoint sensitivity fields for treatment planning to assess the advantage of directional interstitial prostate brachytherapy is presented. Directional and isotropic dose kernels generated using Monte Carlo simulations based on Best Industries model 2301 I-125 source are utilized for treatment planning. The newly developed GH algorithm is employed for optimization of the treatment plans for seven interstitial prostate brachytherapy cases using mixed sources (directional brachytherapy) and using only isotropic sources (conventional brachytherapy). All treatment plans resulted in V100 > 98% and D90 > 45 Gy for the target prostate region. For the urethra region, the D10(Ur), D90(Ur) and V150(Ur) and for the rectum region the V100cc, D2cc, D90(Re) and V90(Re) all are reduced significantly when mixed sources brachytherapy is used employing directional sources. The simulations demonstrated that the use of directional sources in the low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of the prostate clearly benefits in sparing the urethra and the rectum sensitive structures from overdose. The time taken for a conventional treatment plan is less than three seconds, while the time taken for a mixed source treatment plan is less than nine seconds, as tested on an Intel Core2 Duo 2.2 GHz processor with 1GB RAM. The new 3D GH algorithm is successful in generating a feasible LDR brachytherapy treatment planning solution with an extra degree of freedom, i.e. directionality in very little time.

  20. Development of an adjoint sensitivity field-based treatment-planning technique for the use of newly designed directional LDR sources in brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaswal, V.; Thomadsen, B. R.; Henderson, D. L.

    2012-02-01

    The development and application of an automated 3D greedy heuristic (GH) optimization algorithm utilizing the adjoint sensitivity fields for treatment planning to assess the advantage of directional interstitial prostate brachytherapy is presented. Directional and isotropic dose kernels generated using Monte Carlo simulations based on Best Industries model 2301 I-125 source are utilized for treatment planning. The newly developed GH algorithm is employed for optimization of the treatment plans for seven interstitial prostate brachytherapy cases using mixed sources (directional brachytherapy) and using only isotropic sources (conventional brachytherapy). All treatment plans resulted in V100 > 98% and D90 > 45 Gy for the target prostate region. For the urethra region, the D10Ur, D90Ur and V150Ur and for the rectum region the V100cc, D2cc, D90Re and V90Re all are reduced significantly when mixed sources brachytherapy is used employing directional sources. The simulations demonstrated that the use of directional sources in the low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of the prostate clearly benefits in sparing the urethra and the rectum sensitive structures from overdose. The time taken for a conventional treatment plan is less than three seconds, while the time taken for a mixed source treatment plan is less than nine seconds, as tested on an Intel Core2 Duo 2.2 GHz processor with 1GB RAM. The new 3D GH algorithm is successful in generating a feasible LDR brachytherapy treatment planning solution with an extra degree of freedom, i.e. directionality in very little time.

  1. Histological characterization of dilated cardiomyopathy in the juvenile toy Manchester terrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legge, C H; López, A; Hanna, P; Côté, E; Hare, E; Martinson, S A

    2013-11-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), the most common form of cardiomyopathy in the dog, most often occurs in certain breeds. The objective of this study was to describe a rapidly progressive form of DCM that has been recently recognized in juvenile Toy Manchester Terrier dogs (TMTs). The clinical history and gross findings were reviewed in a group of 14 TMTs, and histologic sections of heart were examined in 12 of those 14 TMTs with DCM. Histochemical and histomorphometric analyses were employed to compare the heart in TMTs affected by DCM with that of control dogs. TMTs ranged in age from 10 to 58.3 weeks, with males and females being equally affected. Affected TMT hearts contained foci of degeneration and loss of myofibers with fibrosis and mild lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates. Less prominent features included foci of acute myofiber degeneration and necrosis with or without intralesional mineralization and mild to moderate suppurative and lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates. Morphometric quantification demonstrated that the right ventricle was more severely affected (P ≤ .05) than the left ventricle with variable involvement of the interventricular septum. Immunohistochemistry for canine parvovirus was negative in all heart samples. However, the absence of parvoviral antigen does not rule out a possible viral or autoimmune cause. The presence of these myocardial lesions among closely related dogs suggests a genetic contribution to this disease process in the TMT.

  2. Prevalence of recreational drug use reported by men who have sex with men attending sexual health clinics in Manchester, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkins, A; Ahmad, S; Cannon, L; Higgins, S P; Kliner, M; Kolyva, A; Ward, C; Vivancos, R

    2018-03-01

    Recreational drug use (RDU) has been reported to be disproportionately higher in men who have sex with men (MSM) when compared to their heterosexual counterparts. To identify RDU, links to risky sexual practices and infections for MSM attending three sexual health clinics across Manchester, United Kingdom, a retrospective case note review was conducted using a random powered sample of service users attending three sites during 2014. Three hundred and fifty-seven case notes were reviewed across three sites. Eighteen per cent of service users reported any type of RDU. Use of at least one of the three drugs associated with chemsex (crystal methamphetamine, mephedrone, gamma hydroxybutyrate/gamma butyrolactone) was reported by 3.6%. A statistically significant difference was identified between non-drug users and any-drug users reporting: group sex (odds ratio [OR] 5.88, p = 0.013), condomless receptive anal intercourse (CRAI) (OR 2.77, p = 0.003) and condomless oral intercourse (OR 2.52, p = 0.016). A statistically significant difference was identified between chemsex-related drug user and non-drug user groups reporting: group sex (OR 13.05, p = 0.023), CRAI (OR 3.69, p = 0.029) and condomless insertive anal intercourse (OR 1.27, p = 0.039). There was also a statistically higher incidence of gonorrhoea infection in chemsex-related drug use compared with those not using drugs (p = 0.002, OR 6.88). This study identifies that substance use is common in MSM attending sexual health clinics in Manchester. High-risk sexual practices and certain sexually transmitted infections are more common in MSM reporting RDU.

  3. Robust Allocation of Reserve Policies for a Multiple-Cell Based Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Junjie; Lan, Tian; Heussen, Kai

    2018-01-01

    modifications. The LDR method can effectively adapt the participation factors of reserve providers to respond to system imbalance signals. The policies considered the covariance of historic system imbalance signals to reduce the overall reserve cost. When applying this method to the cell-based power system...... for a certain horizon, the influence of different time resolutions on policy-making is also investigated, which presents guidance for its practical application. The main results illustrate that: (a) the LDR-based method shows better performance, by producing smaller reserve costs compared to the costs given...... by a reference method; and (b) the cost index decreases with increased time intervals, however, longer intervals might result in insufficient reserves, due to low time resolution. On the other hand, shorter time intervals require heavy computational time. Thus, it is important to choose a proper time interval...

  4. MATS--Management Accounting Tutorial System. Version 1.0. Project Documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Andrew; O'Connor, Rodric

    The Management Accounting Tutorial System (MATS) is a management accounting database for a carpet manufacturing company. The system allows the display and output of monthly activities, and is intended to provide a means of illustrating the main topics of the second year management accounting course at Manchester University. The system itself…

  5. MATS--Management Accounting Tutorial System. Version 1.0. User Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Andrew; O'Connor, Rodric

    The Management Accounting Tutorial System (MATS) is a management accounting database for a carpet manufacturing company. The system allows the display and output of monthly activities, and is intended to provide a means of illustrating the main topics of the second year management accounting course at Manchester University. The system itself…

  6. Basic and applied research related to the technology of space energy conversion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, A.; Mattick, A. T.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1988-01-01

    The first six months' research effort on the Liquid Droplet Radiator (LDR) focussed on experimental and theoretical studies of radiation by an LDR droplet cloud. Improvements in the diagnostics for the radiation facility have been made which have permitted an accurate experimental test of theoretical predictions of LDR radiation over a wide range of optical depths, using a cloud of Dow silicone oil droplets. In conjunction with these measurements an analysis was made of the evolution of the cylindrical droplet cloud generated by a 2300-hole orifice plate. This analysis indicates that a considerable degree of agglomeration of droplets occurs over the first meter of travel. Theoretical studies have centered on developments of an efficient means of computing the angular scattering distribution from droplets in an LDR droplet cloud, so that a parameter study can be carried out for LDR radiative performance vs fluid optical properties and cloud geometry.

  7. EFISIENSI ENERGI SMART HOME ( RUMAH PINTAR BERBASIS REMOTE RELAY DAN LDR (LIGHT DEPENDENT RESISTANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Abdul Rozaq

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Perkembangan teknologi saat ini sangat berkembang pesat, dan dapat dirasakan dalam dunia industri maupun masyarakat biasa.Dengan memanfaatkan teknologi yang ada sekarang salah satunya adalah remot relay sebagai alat untuk mengendalikan alat rumah tangga seperti lampu, pagar, pintu jendela dan sebagainya.Metode penelitian dalam penelitian ini adalah riset dan pengembangan. Rencana kerja dari alat ini adalah dengan menggunakan dua mode yaitu mode manual dan mode otomatis, dengan perincian cara pengendalian pada masing-masing beban. Pertama untuk lampu pada kondisi otomatis akan menggunakan LDR sehingga tidak perlumenyalakan lampu pada malam hari dan mematikan lampu pada siang hari. Pada kondisi manual pada tombol ditekan pertama untuk menyalakan lampu dan ditekan yang kedua akan mematikan lampu.Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa alat bekerja dengan baik, dimana untuk kondisi kendali otomatis, pada waktu kondisi siang maka lampu akan mati dan kondisi malam lampu menyala, kemudian untuk kondisi kendali manualnya, pada sistem ini dapat dilakukan kendali menggunakan remote sejauh 90 meter. Tingkat efisiensi dengan memanfaatkan sistem ini 53% lebih efisien dibandingkan dengan tidak memanfaatkan sistem smart home.

  8. Gender and Educational Differences in Perception of Domestic Violence Against Women Among Libyan Migrants in Manchester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Abani, Suaad; Pourmehdi, Mansour

    2018-02-01

    Domestic violence against women (DVAW) is a worldwide phenomenon and refers to any act committed against women that results in physical and psychological harm, and coercion, loss of liberty, and deprivation. There is a dearth of research and information about the extent and prevalence of domestic violence among Libyan communities. The aim of the study was to explore community knowledge of, and attitudes toward, DVAW and to improve our understanding of the factors that influence knowledge, attitudes, and responses, particularly educational and gender differences. Using snowball sampling, we analyzed 20 semistructured interviews with Libyans living in Manchester, United Kingdom. We found gender and education-influenced participants' perception of DVAW. Men in general did not recognize DVAW as a serious social problem; noticeably, they saw it as a personal and family issue. Knowing attitudes toward DVAW is necessary for government and communities' prevention policies as attitudes influence perpetration of DVAW.

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The generalized extreme value distribution is fitted to data from each location to ... distribution provides the most reasonable model for four of the five locations ... School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD, UK.

  10. Validation of the Manchester scoring system for predicting BRCA1/2 mutations in 9,390 families suspected of having hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Karin; Schmutzler, Rita K; Rhiem, Kerstin; Kiechle, Marion; Fischer, Christine; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Grimm, Tiemo; Speiser, Dorothee; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Varga, Dominic; Horvath, Judit; Beer, Marit; Briest, Susanne; Meindl, Alfons; Engel, Christoph

    2014-11-15

    The Manchester scoring system (MSS) allows the calculation of the probability for the presence of mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes in families suspected of having hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. In 9,390 families, we determined the predictive performance of the MSS without (MSS-2004) and with (MSS-2009) consideration of pathology parameters. Moreover, we validated a recalibrated version of the MSS-2009 (MSS-recal). Families were included in the registry of the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer, using defined clinical criteria. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was used to determine the predictive performance. The recalibrated model was developed using logistic regression analysis and tested using an independent random validation sample. The area under the ROC curves regarding a mutation in any of the two BRCA genes was 0.77 (95%CI 0.75-0.79) for MSS-2004, 0.80 (95%CI 0.78-0.82) for MSS-2009, and 0.82 (95%CI 0.80-0.83) for MSS-recal. Sensitivity at the 10% mutation probability cutoff was similar for all three models (MSS-2004 92.2%, MSS-2009 92.2%, and MSS-recal 90.3%), but specificity of MSS-recal (46.0%) was considerably higher than that of MSS-2004 (25.4%) and MSS-2009 (32.3%). In the MSS-recal model, almost all predictors of the original MSS were significantly predictive. However, the score values of some predictors, for example, high grade triple negative breast cancers, differed considerably from the originally proposed score values. The original MSS performed well in our sample of high risk families. The use of pathological parameters increased the predictive performance significantly. Recalibration improved the specificity considerably without losing much sensitivity. © 2014 UICC.

  11. Millimeter radiometer system technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W. J.; Swanson, P. N.

    1989-07-01

    JPL has had a large amount of experience with spaceborne microwave/millimeter wave radiometers for remote sensing. All of the instruments use filled aperture antenna systems from 5 cm diameter for the microwave Sounder Units (MSU), 16 m for the microwave limb sounder (MLS) to 20 m for the large deployable reflector (LDR). The advantages of filled aperture antenna systems are presented. The requirements of the 10 m Geoplat antenna system, 10 m multified antenna, and the MLS are briefly discussed.

  12. Liquid droplet radiator technology issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattick, A.T.; Hertzberg, A.

    1985-01-01

    The operation of the liquid droplet radiator (LDR) is analyzed to establish design constraints for the LDR components and to predict the performance of an integrated LDR system. The design constraints largely result from mass loss considerations: fluid choice is governed by evaporation loss; droplet generation techniques must be capable of precise aiming of >10 5 droplet streams; and collection losses must be less than 1 droplet in 10 7 . Concepts for droplet generation and collection components are discussed and incorporated into a mass model for an LDR system. This model predicts that LDR's using lithium, Dow 705 silicone fluid, or NaK may be several times lighter than heat pipe radiators. 13 refs

  13. Supporting Social Interaction in Intelligent Competence Development Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sereno, Bertrand; Boursinou, Eleni; Maxwell, Katrina; Angehrn, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Sereno, B., Boursinou, E., Maxwell, K., & Angehrn, A. A. (2007). Supporting Social Interaction in Intelligent Competence Development Systems. In D. Griffiths, R. Koper & O. Liber (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd TENCompetence Open Workshop (pp. 29-35). January, 11-12, 2007, Manchester, United Kingdom.

  14. Walter Max Dale (formerly Deutsch) (1894-1969): pioneer and eminent radiobiochemist at the Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreeve, David R

    2010-05-01

    The political upheaval in Germany in 1933 and subsequent movement of medical scholars with the support of the Rockefeller Foundation allowed Manchester to benefit from the arrival of Dr Walter Deutsch, later known as Dr Walter Dale. His research background enabled him to develop a radiobiochemistry laboratory at the Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute where he became a world authority on the effects of X-rays on enzymes and also the protective effect of additional solutes. In 1959 he initiated and then edited the International Journal of Radiation Biology. By the time of his retirement in 1962 the strength of his research resulted in his laboratory being recognized by the Medical Research Council.

  15. INTRODUCTION Introduction to the conference proceeding of the Workshop on Electromagnetic Inverse ProblemsThe University of Manchester, UK, 15-18 June, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Oliver; Lionheart, Bill

    2010-11-01

    -source electromagnetic techniques for imaging the earth in a marine environment. It focuses in particular on taking into account anisotropy effects in the inversion. Results of this technique are demonstrated from simulated and from real field data. Furthermore, in the contribution Multiple level-sets for elliptic Cauchy problems in three-dimensional domains by A Leitão and M Marques Alves the authors consider a TV-H1regularization technique for multiple level-set inversion of elliptic Cauchy problems. Generalized minimizers are defined and convergence and stability results are provided for this method, in addition to several numerical experiments. Finally, in the paper Development of in-vivo fluorescence imaging with the matrix-free method, the authors A Zacharopoulos, A Garofalakis, J Ripoll and S Arridge address a recently developed non-contact fluorescence molecular tomography technique where the use of non-contact acquisition systems poses new challenges on computational efficiency during data processing. The matrix-free method is designed to reduce computational cost and memory requirements during the inversion. Reconstructions from a simulated mouse phantom are provided for demonstrating the performance of the proposed technique in realistic scenarios. We hope that this selection of strong and thought-provoking papers will help stimulating further cross-disciplinary research in the spirit of the workshop. We thank all authors for providing us with this excellent set of high-quality contributions. We also thank EPSRC for having provided funding for the workshop under grant EP/G065047/1. Oliver Dorn, Bill Lionheart School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Rd Manchester, M13 9PL, UK E-mail: oliver.dorn@manchester.ac.uk, bill.lionheart@manchester.ac.uk Guest Editors

  16. Split heat pipe heat recovery system

    OpenAIRE

    E. Azad

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical analysis of a split heat pipe heat recovery system. The analysis is based on an Effectiveness-NTU approach to deduce its heat transfer characteristics. In this study the variation of overall effectiveness of heat recovery with the number of transfer units are presented. Copyright , Manchester University Press.

  17. Creating a three level building classification using topographic and address-based data for Manchester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M.; Chen, D.

    2014-11-01

    Buildings, the basic unit of an urban landscape, host most of its socio-economic activities and play an important role in the creation of urban land-use patterns. The spatial arrangement of different building types creates varied urban land-use clusters which can provide an insight to understand the relationships between social, economic, and living spaces. The classification of such urban clusters can help in policy-making and resource management. In many countries including the UK no national-level cadastral database containing information on individual building types exists in public domain. In this paper, we present a framework for inferring functional types of buildings based on the analysis of their form (e.g. geometrical properties, such as area and perimeter, layout) and spatial relationship from large topographic and address-based GIS database. Machine learning algorithms along with exploratory spatial analysis techniques are used to create the classification rules. The classification is extended to two further levels based on the functions (use) of buildings derived from address-based data. The developed methodology was applied to the Manchester metropolitan area using the Ordnance Survey's MasterMap®, a large-scale topographic and address-based data available for the UK.

  18. WE-DE-201-04: Cross Validation of Knowledge-Based Treatment Planning for Prostate LDR Brachytherapy Using Principle Component Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roper, J; Ghavidel, B; Godette, K; Schreibmann, E [Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, GA (United States); Chanyavanich, V [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, CO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To validate a knowledge-based algorithm for prostate LDR brachytherapy treatment planning. Methods: A dataset of 100 cases was compiled from an active prostate seed implant service. Cases were randomized into 10 subsets. For each subset, the 90 remaining library cases were registered to a common reference frame and then characterized on a point by point basis using principle component analysis (PCA). Each test case was converted to PCA vectors using the same process and compared with each library case using a Mahalanobis distance to evaluate similarity. Rank order PCA scores were used to select the best-matched library case. The seed arrangement was extracted from the best-matched case and used as a starting point for planning the test case. Any subsequent modifications were recorded that required input from a treatment planner to achieve V100>95%, V150<60%, V200<20%. To simulate operating-room planning constraints, seed activity was held constant, and the seed count could not increase. Results: The computational time required to register test-case contours and evaluate PCA similarity across the library was 10s. Preliminary analysis of 2 subsets shows that 9 of 20 test cases did not require any seed modifications to obtain an acceptable plan. Five test cases required fewer than 10 seed modifications or a grid shift. Another 5 test cases required approximately 20 seed modifications. An acceptable plan was not achieved for 1 outlier, which was substantially larger than its best match. Modifications took between 5s and 6min. Conclusion: A knowledge-based treatment planning algorithm for prostate LDR brachytherapy is being cross validated using 100 prior cases. Preliminary results suggest that for this size library, acceptable plans can be achieved without planner input in about half of the cases while varying amounts of planner input are needed in remaining cases. Computational time and planning time are compatible with clinical practice.

  19. SU-F-19A-11: Retrospective Evaluation of Thermal Coverage by Thermobrachytherapy Seed Arrangements of Clinical LDR Prostate Implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warrell, G; Shvydka, D; Chen, C; Parsai, E [University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The superiority of a properly-administered combination of radiation therapy and hyperthermia over radiation alone in treatment of human cancers has been demonstrated in multiple studies examining radiobiology, local control, and survival. Unfortunately, hyperthermia is not yet a common modality in oncology practice, due in part to the technical difficulty of heating a deep-seated target volume to sufficient temperature. To address this problem, our group has invented a thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed based on a commonly-used low dose-rate permanent brachytherapy seed for implant in solid tumors. Instead of the tungsten radiographic marker of the standard seed, the TB seed contains one of a self-regulating ferromagnetic alloy. Placement of a patient implanted with such seeds in an oscillating magnetic field generates heat via induction of eddy currents. We present the results of studies of the capability of clinically-realistic TB seed arrangements to adequately heat defined target volumes. Methods: Seed distributions for several past LDR prostate permanent implant brachytherapy patients were reproduced in the finite element analysis software package COMSOL Multiphysics 4.4, with the difference that TB seeds were modelled, rather than the radiation-only seeds actually used for their treatments. The implant geometries were mainly of the modified peripheral loading type; a range of prostatic volumes and blood perfusion rates likely to be seen in a clinical setting were examined. Results: According to the simulations, when distributed to optimize radiation dose, TB seeds also produce sufficient heat to provide thermal coverage of the target given proper selection of the magnetic field strength. However, the thermal distributions may be improved by additional use of hyperthermia-only seeds. Conclusion: A dual-modality seed intended as an alternative to and using the same implantation apparatus and technique as the standard LDR permanent implant seed has been

  20. Experimental test of liquid droplet radiator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattick, A.T.; Simon, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    This liquid droplet radiator (LDR) is evolving rapidly as a lightweight system for heat rejection in space power systems. By using recirculating free streams of submillimeter droplets to radiate waste energy directly to space, the LDR can potentially be an order of magnitude lighter than conventional radiator systems which radiate from solid surfaces. The LDR is also less vulnerable to micrometeoroid damage than are conventional radiators, and it has a low transport volume. Three major development issues of this new heat rejection system are the ability to direct the droplet streams with sufficient precision to avoid fluid loss, radiative performance of the array of droplet streams which comprise the radiating elements of the LDR, and the efficacy of the droplet stream collector, again with respect to fluid loss. This paper reports experimental results bearing on the first two issues - droplet aiming in a multikilowatt-sized system, and radiated power from a large droplet array. Parallel efforts on droplet collection and LDR system design are being pursued by several research groups

  1. Volume and dose rate dependent (MDR-LDR Ir-192 afterloading interstitial brachytherapy) treatment optimisation, for squamouscell carcinoma of the lip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stas, Nathalie; Goncalves, Julieta; Pinho, Eliana; Trigo, Lurdes; Fernandes, Tome; Vieira, Elio

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: From 1/1/90 to 1/1/95, 53 patients with squamouscell carcinoma of the lip were treated by MDR or LDR Ir-192 afterloading interstitital brachytherapy. We compare the oncological and aesthetical results and sequelae depending on the volume and the dose rate. Material and methods: 53 patients, 41 men and 12 women, median age = 66y; 48 primary tumors (T1 = 26; T2 = 16; T3 = 6; N0 = 47; N1 = 1; M0 = 48) and 5 recurrencies; squamouscell carcinoma (grade 1 =45, g2 =6, g3 =2); clinical extension: buccal comissure=3, check =2, muscular =15, skin =7, lower and upper lip =1. Before radiotherapy, 28 biopsies and 25 excisional surgeries (19 with positive margins, 6 with negative margins) were performed. Brachytherapy was performed alone (dose 60-75 Gy BD85%) or as a boost (dose 10-30 Gy BD85%) associated with external beam (dose 46-50 Gy). MDR or LDR microselectron's afterloading was done after a computerised dosimetry (Paris System): treatment mean time = 30, 98 hours; mean volume = 10,2 cc (T1-T2 8, 61cc); Ir - 192 activity = range 0,7 - 4,792 mCi/cm; reference dose rate 45,6 - 290, 1 cGy/h. Results: 46 patients are alive without cancer, 1 died without responding, 6 died from non oncological diseases; 8 patients had recurrences (5 local, 3 nodal) but are alive. Mean follow-up 30,83 months (range 3-60m), mean DFS = 22,49 m (range 5-57m). Acute secondary effects: 30 radioepithelyties (grade 1 = 7, g2=23, g3=14), and 39 radiomucitis (g1=3; g2=23; g3=13); mean time for complete healing = 21, 66 days. Sequelae: moderate sclerosis of the skin =11, skin retraction = 1, hyperpigmentation2, depigmentation= 10, edema= 6, gingivitis= 7. Aesthetical results: good32; moderate= 18; bad= 2, very bad= 1 (uncontrolled tumor). Conclusions: The sequelae and aesthetical results are closely dependent on the treated volume and the dose rate, less dependent on the total dose, and independent on the Iridium activity. Complete healing time does not influence the late aesthetical results

  2. Monte Carlo study of LDR seed dosimetry with an application in a clinical brachytherapy breast implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furstoss, C; Reniers, B; Bertrand, M J; Poon, E; Carrier, J-F; Keller, B M; Pignol, J P; Beaulieu, L; Verhaegen, F

    2009-05-01

    ). Important differences between the dose along the transverse axis of the seed in water and in adipose tissue are obtained (10% at 3.5 cm). The comparisons between the full MC and the TG-43 calculations show that there are no significant differences for V85 and V100. For V200, 8.4% difference is found coming mainly from the tissue composition effect. Larger differences (about 10.5% for the model 6711 seed and about 13% for the InterSource125) are determined for D90 and D50. These differences depend on the composition of the breast tissue modeled in the simulation. A variation in percentage by mass of the mammary gland and adipose tissue can cause important differences in the clinical dose metrics V200, D90, and D50. Even if the authors can conclude that clinically, the differences in V85, V100, and V200 are acceptable in comparison to the large variation in dose in the treated volume, this work demonstrates that the development of a MC treatment planning system for LDR brachytherapy will improve the dose determination in the treated region and consequently the dose-outcome relationship, especially for the skin toxicity.

  3. Toward Coordinated Robust Allocation of Reserve Policies for a Cell-based Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Junjie; Heussen, Kai; Claessens, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Conventional regulation reserves have fixed participation factors and are thus not well suited to utilize differentiated capabilities of ancillary service providers. This study applies linear decision rules-based (LDR) control policies, which effectively adapt the present participation factor...... in dependence of the imbalance signal of previous time steps. The LDR-policies are centrally computed using a robust optimization approach which takes into account both the covariances of historic imbalance signals and the operational flexibility of ancillary service providers. The concept is then extended...... to the cooperation of multiple cells. Two illustrating examples are presented to show the functioning of the proposed LDR method....

  4. Assessing sensitivity and specificity of the Manchester Triage System in the evaluation of acute coronary syndrome in adult patients in emergency care: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Fernanda Ayache; de Motta Maia, Flávia Oliveira; de Lopes Monteiro da Cruz, Dina Almeida

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this review is to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the Manchester Triage System in the evaluation of adult patients with acute coronary syndrome in emergency departments. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a group of clinical conditions that include myocardial infarction with or without elevation of the ST segment and unstable angina. The term acute myocardial infarction (AMI) can be applied when there is evidence of myocardium necrosis with a clinical sign compatible with myocardial ischaemia. Acute myocardial infarction can be identified using clinical methods including electrocardiography (ECG), elevation in myocardium necrosis biomarkers, and imaging. Acute myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide, and may be the first manifestation of coronary artery disease.Estimating the prevalence of coronary diseases in the general population is quite a complex task. In 2010, the prevalence of coronary diseases was reported as 6.4% among the general population in the United States.One of the main manifestations of ACS is chest pain. However, even in the presence of this typical symptom, early diagnosis of ACS is a challenge for health care professionals who initially attend to these patients. Several authors have indicated the importance and difficulty of recognizing chest pain of cardiac origin, where immediate medical attention is required.Triage, or risk classification, is a clinical management tool used in emergency services to guide patient flow when the need for medical attention exceeds that available. The Manchester Triage Group was developed in 1994 in the United Kingdom. The aim was to establish a consensus among physicians and nurses in the emergency room by creating a triage pattern focused on the development of the following:Thus, the Manchester Triage System (MTS) was created. The MTS simplifies the clinical management of each patient, and consequently, the whole service, by utilizing a

  5. Deep Drawing for high LDR by a new Hydro-rim Forming Process with Differential Temperature- Analysis and Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Y. Ben; Tirosh, J.; Rubinski, Ludmila

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze and test a possible increase of the Limit Drawing Ratio (LDR) in Deep Drawing by Hydro-rim process (a certain subset of the classical Hydroforming) which includes the newly differential temperature effect. The idea is to facilitate the plastic flow by local heating along the flange and to cool the area where strength is needed. The suggested analysis is based on the dual bounds approach (upper and lower bounds simultaneously) using the highly versatile Johnson-Cook constitutive material model. The advantage of combined high hydraulic pressure (about 1000 bar) with relatively high blank temperature (with magnitude of about one third the melting temperature of the considered material) in the same operation is discussed. Emphasis is given to the rule of blank temperature difference (between the flange and the wall of the product) conjugate with optimal hydro rim pressure in increasing the limit drawing ratio of the products (Aluminum, Copper and various Steels)

  6. Cross-cultural adaptation of the korean version of the minneapolis-manchester quality of life instrument-adolescent form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeon Jin; Yang, Hyung Kook; Shin, Dong Wook; Kim, Yoon Yi; Kim, Young Ae; Yun, Young Ho; Nam, Byung Ho; Bhatia, Smita; Park, Byung Kiu; Ghim, Thad T; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Park, Kyung Duk; Shin, Hee Young; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2013-12-01

    We verified the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the Minneapolis-Manchester Quality of Life Instrument-Adolescent Form (KMMQL-AF) among Korean childhood cancer survivors. A total of 107 childhood cancer patients undergoing cancer treatment and 98 childhood cancer survivors who completed cancer treatment were recruited. To assess the internal structure of the KMMQL-AF, we performed multi-trait scaling analyses and exploratory factor analysis. Additionally, we compared each domains of the KMMQL-AF with those of the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale and the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS). Internal consistency of the KMMQL-AF was sufficient (Cronbach's alpha: 0.78-0.92). In multi-trait scaling analyses, the KMMQL-AF showed sufficient construct validity. The "physical functioning" domain showed moderate correlation with Karnofsky scores and the "psychological functioning" domain showed moderate-to-high correlation with the RCMAS. The KMMQL-AF discriminated between subgroups of different adolescent cancer survivors depending on treatment completion. The KMMQL-AF is a sufficiently reliable and valid instrument for measuring quality of life among Korean childhood cancer survivors.

  7. Fc receptor gamma subunit polymorphisms and systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ansari, Aliya; Ollier, W.E.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Gul, Ahmet; Inanac, Murat; Ordi, Jose; Teh, Lee-Suan; Hajeer, Ali H.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the possible association between Fc receptor gamma polymorphisms and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We have investigated the full FcR gamma gene for polymorphisms using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand confirmational polymorphisms and DNA sequencing .The polymorphisms identified were genotype using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Systemic lupus erythematosus cases and controls were available from 3 ethnic groups: Turkish, Spanish and Caucasian. The study was conducted in the year 2001 at the Arthritis Research Campaign, Epidemiology Unit, Manchester University Medical School, Manchester, United Kingdom. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, 2 in the promoter, one in intron 4 and, 2 in the 3'UTR. Four of the 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were relatively common and investigated in the 3 populations. Allele and genotype frequencies of all 4 investigated SNPs were not statistically different cases and controls. fc receptor gamma gene does not appear to contribute to SLE susceptibility. The identified polymorphisms may be useful in investigating other diseases where receptors containing the FcR gamma subunit contribute to the pathology. (author)

  8. Partners in Information Literacy: The Research Mentor Program at UNH Manchester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Donahue

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Research Mentor Program is a partnership between the UNH Manchester Library and the College’s Center for Academic Enrichment whereby student peer tutors receive training in both practical writing and research strategies along with theoretical applications for peer-assisted learning. Research Mentors are able to holistically support the research process from brainstorming topics; developing effective search strategies; and evaluating sources to preparing outlines; developing thesis statements; and drafting through the writing/revision cycle. The Research Mentor Program originated in 2004 and evolved during the past decade in response to classroom assessment and program evaluation findings. In the current adaptation, the research mentor training curriculum aligns with the ACRL Frameworks for Information Literacy. Mentors engage with each of the Frames through class discussions, hands-on activities, role-playing exercises, and reflective writing entries. In one-to-one tutorials, research mentors are able to apply the Frames’ dispositions thereby guiding students to engage more effectively with scholarly inquiry, contextualizing authority, and acknowledging value in the research process. In this way, Research Mentors contribute to the effectiveness of information literacy instruction by recognizing gaps in students’ evidence, modelling the dispositions of the information literacy Frames in their interactions with students, and connecting students to the librarians for further research instruction. UNH Manchester’s Research Mentor Program impacts library instruction by extending the influence of information literacy principles beyond the librarian’s classroom instructional sessions into the research mentor led tutorials and circling back to the library for individually focused instruction. Our Creating Knowledge VIII conference presentation is available at http://libraryguides.unh.edu/partnersinfolit. This presentation is based on our

  9. 76 FR 72311 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ..., subject to certain continued verification and monitoring conditions; and (2) to use the Delisting Risk... wastes, EPA has already made the determination based on lengthy and thorough LDR rulemakings that... ash. Response 8. The Delisting Program and the LDR program serve different purposes and because they...

  10. Sci-Sat AM(2): Brachy-07: Tomosynthesis-based seed reconstruction in LDR prostate brachytherapy: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet-Benkhoucha, M; Verhaegen, F; Lassalle, S; Béliveau-Nadeau, D; Reniers, B; Donath, D; Taussky, D; Carrier, J-F

    2008-07-01

    To develop a tomosynthesis-based dose assessment procedure that can be performed after an I-125 prostate seed implantation, while the patient is still under anaesthesia on the treatment table. Our seed detection procedure involves the reconstruction of a volume of interest based on the backprojection of 7 seed-only binary images acquired over an angle of 60° with an isocentric imaging system. A binary seed-only volume is generated by a simple thresholding of the volume of interest. Seeds positions are extracted from this volume with a 3D connected component analysis and a statistical classifier that determines the number of seeds in each cluster of connected voxels. A graphical user interface (GUI) allows to visualize the result and to introduce corrections, if needed. A phantom and a clinical study (24 patients) were carried out to validate the technique. A phantom study demonstrated a very good localization accuracy of (0.4+/-0.4) mm when compared to CT-based reconstruction. This leads to dosimetric error on D90 and V100 of respectively 0.5% and 0.1%. In a patient study with an average of 56 seeds per implant, the automatic tomosynthesis-based reconstruction yields a detection rate of 96% of the seeds and less than 1.5% of false-positives. With the help of the GUI, the user can achieve a 100% detection rate in an average of 3 minutes. This technique would allow to identify possible underdosage and to correct it by potentially reimplanting additional seeds. A more uniform dose coverage could then be achieved in LDR prostate brachytherapy. © 2008 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Single Low-Dose Radiation Induced Regulation of Keratinocyte Differentiation in Calcium-Induced HaCaT Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Youn, Hae Jeong; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; An, Sungkwan

    2016-01-01

    Background We are continually exposed to low-dose radiation (LDR) in the range 0.1 Gy from natural sources, medical devices, nuclear energy plants, and other industrial sources of ionizing radiation. There are three models for the biological mechanism of LDR: the linear no-threshold model, the hormetic model, and the threshold model. Objective We used keratinocytes as a model system to investigate the molecular genetic effects of LDR on epidermal cell differentiation. Methods To identify keratinocyte differentiation, we performed western blots using a specific antibody for involucrin, which is a precursor protein of the keratinocyte cornified envelope and a marker for keratinocyte terminal differentiation. We also performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We examined whether LDR induces changes in involucrin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Results Exposure of HaCaT cells to LDR (0.1 Gy) induced p21 expression. p21 is a key regulator that induces growth arrest and represses stemness, which accelerates keratinocyte differentiation. We correlated involucrin expression with keratinocyte differentiation, and examined the effects of LDR on involucrin levels and keratinocyte development. LDR significantly increased involucrin mRNA and protein levels during calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Conclusion These studies provide new evidence for the biological role of LDR, and identify the potential to utilize LDR to regulate or induce keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:27489424

  12. SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzibak, A; Fatemi-Ardekani, A; Soliman, A; Mashouf, S; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, WY [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Han, D [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify and analyze the appearance of calcifications and brachytherapy seeds on magnitude and phase MRI images and to investigate whether they can be distinguished from each other on corrected phase images for application to prostate and breast low dose rate (LDR) implant dosimetry. Methods: An agar-based gel phantom containing two LDR brachytherapy seeds (Advantage Pd-103, IsoAid, 0.8mm diameter, 4.5mm length) and two spherical calcifications (large: 7mm diameter and small: 4mm diameter) was constructed and imaged on a 3T Philips MR scanner using a 16-channel head coil and a susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) sequence (2mm slices, 320mm FOV, TR/ TE= 26.5/5.3ms, 15 degree flip angle). The phase images were unwrapped and corrected using a 32×32, 2D Hanning high pass filter to remove background phase noise. Appearance of the seeds and calcifications was assessed visually and quantitatively using Osirix (http://www.osirix-viewer.com/). Results: As expected, calcifications and brachytherapy seeds appeared dark (hypointense) relative to the surrounding gel on the magnitude MRI images. The diameter of each seed without the surrounding artifact was measured to be 0.1 cm on the magnitude image, while diameters of 0.79 and 0.37 cm were measured for the larger and smaller calcifications, respectively. On the corrected phase images, the brachytherapy seeds and the calcifications appeared bright (hyperintense). The diameter of the seeds was larger on the phase images (0.17 cm) likely due to the dipole effect. Conclusion: MRI has the best soft tissue contrast for accurate organ delineation leading to most accurate implant dosimetry. This work demonstrated that phase images can potentially be useful in identifying brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate and breast due to their bright appearance, which helps in their visualization and quantification for accurate dosimetry using MR-only. Future work includes optimizing phase filters to best identify

  13. Topological methods for the comparison of structures using LDR-brachytherapy of the prostate as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, H; von Toggenburg, F; Seelentag, W W; Plasswilm, L; Ries, G; Schmid, H-P; Leippold, T; Krusche, B; Roth, J; Engeler, D

    2009-08-21

    The dose coverage of low dose rate (LDR)-brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer is monitored 4-6 weeks after intervention by contouring the prostate on computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging sets. Dose parameters for the prostate (V100, D90 and D80) provide information on the treatment quality. Those depend strongly on the delineation of the prostate contours. We therefore systematically investigated the contouring process for 21 patients with five examiners. The prostate structures were compared with one another using topological procedures based on Boolean algebra. The coincidence number C(V) measures the agreement between a set of structures. The mutual coincidence C(i, j) measures the agreement between two structures i and j, and the mean coincidence C(i) compares a selected structure i with the remaining structures in a set. All coincidence parameters have a value of 1 for complete coincidence of contouring and 0 for complete absence. The five patients with the lowest C(V) values were discussed, and rules for contouring the prostate have been formulated. The contouring and assessment were repeated after 3 months for the same five patients. All coincidence parameters have been improved after instruction. This shows objectively that training resulted in more consistent contouring across examiners.

  14. A social work contribution to suicide prevention through assertive brief psychotherapy and community linkage: use of the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life (MANSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakis, Melissa; Joubert, Lynette

    2013-01-01

    There is a striking absence of literature articulating and evaluating clinical social work contributions to suicide prevention, despite considerable practice in this important field. This article reports on a model of assertive brief psychotherapeutic intervention and facilitated linkage to community services utilized in a prospective cohort study of emergency department suicide attempt aftercare. A key outcome measure, the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life (MANSA), was used with 65 patients to assess psychosocial domains at initial presentation, 4-weeks, 3-months, and 6-months. There were significant improvements in the domains of work, finance, leisure, social life, living situation, personal safety and health by 3 months. There were highly significant correlations between psychosocial improvements and improved depression scores.

  15. A Modular Approach To Developing A Large Deployable Reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, R.; Leidich, C.; Mascy, F.; Swenson, B.

    1984-01-01

    NASA is currently studying the feasibility of developing a Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) astronomical facility to perform astrophysical studies of the infrared and submillimeter portion of the spectrum in the mid 1990's. The LDR concept was recommended by the Astronomy Survey Committee of the National Academy of Sciences as one of two space based projects to be started this decade. The current baseline calls for a 20 m (65.6 ft) aperture telescope diffraction limited at 30 μm and automatically deployed from a single Shuttle launch. The volume, performance, and single launch constraints place great demands on the technology and place LDR beyond the state-of-the-art in certain areas such as lightweight reflector segments. The advent of the Shuttle is opening up many new options and capabilities for producing large space systems. Until now, LDR has always been conceived as an integrated system, deployed autonomously in a single launch. This paper will look at a combination of automatic deployment and on-orbit assembly that may reduce the technological complexity and cost of the LDR system. Many technological tools are now in use or under study that will greatly enhance our capabilities to do assembly in space. Two Shuttle volume budget scenarios will be examined to assess the potential of these tools to reduce the LDR system complexity. Further study will be required to reach the full optimal combination of deployment and assembly, since in most cases the capabilities of these new tools have not been demonstrated. In order to take maximum advantage of these concepts, the design of LDR must be flexible and allow one subsystem to be modified without adversely affecting the entire system. One method of achieving this flexibility is to use a modular design approach in which the major subsystems are physically separated during launch and assembled on orbit. A modular design approach facilitates this flexibility but requires that the subsystems be interfaced in a simple

  16. Mixing ratios and eddy covariance flux measurements of volatile organic compounds from an urban canopy (Manchester, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Langford

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Mixing ratios and fluxes of six selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs were measured above the city of Manchester (UK during the summer of 2006. A proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer was used for the measurement of mixing ratios, and fluxes were calculated from these using both the disjunct and the virtual disjunct eddy covariance techniques. The two flux systems, which operated in alternate half hours, showed good agreement, with R2 values ranging between 0.74 and 0.9 for the individual analytes. On average, fluxes measured in the disjunct mode were approximately 20% lower than those measured in the virtual mode. This difference is due to both the dampening of the VOC signal by the disjunct flux sampler and carry over from one sample to the next. Correcting for these effects reduced the difference to less than 7%. Observed fluxes are thought to be largely controlled by anthropogenic sources, with vehicle emissions the major contributor. However, both evaporative and biogenic emissions may account for some of the VOCs present. Concentrations and fluxes of the oxygenated compounds were highest on average, ranging between 0.15 to 1 mg m−2 h−1; the fluxes of aromatic compounds were lower, between 0.12 to 0.28 mg m−2 h−1. The observed fluxes were up-scaled to give city wide emission estimates for each compound and the results compared to estimates made by the National Atmospheric Emission Inventory (NAEI for the same flux footprint. Fluxes of toluene and benzene compared most closely differing by approximately 50%, while in contrast the oxygenated fluxes were found to be between 3.6–6.3 times larger than the annual average predicted by the NAEI.

  17. Light Dependent Resistance as a Sensor in Spectroscopy Setups Using Pulsed Light and Compared with Electret Microphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Acosta-Avalos

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Light-dependent resistances (LDR are cheap light sensors. A less known lightdetector is the electret microphone, whose electret membrane functions as a perfectabsorber, but only detects pulsed light. The aim of this study was to analyze the use of aLDR and an electret microphone as a light sensor in an optical spectroscopy system usingpulsed light. A photoacoustic spectroscopy setup was used, substituting the photoacousticchamber by the light sensor proposed. The absorption spectra of two different liquids wereanalyzed. The results obtained allow the recommendation of the LDR as the first choice inthe construction of cheap homemade pulsed light spectroscopy systems.

  18. High dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) interstitial irradiation (IRT) of the rat spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, Lucas A.M.; Plas, Mirjam van der; Skwarchuk, Mark W.; Hanssen, Alex E.J.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a newly developed technique to study radiation tolerance of rat spinal cord to continuous interstitial irradiation (IRT) at different dose rates. Material and methods: Two parallel catheters are inserted just laterally on each side of the vertebral bodies from the level of Th 10 to L 4 . These catheters are afterloaded with two 192 Ir wires of 4 cm length each (activity 1-2.3 mCi/cm) for the low dose rate (LDR) IRT or connected to the HDR micro-Selectron for the high dose rate (HDR) IRT. Spinal cord target volume is located at the level of Th 12 -L 2 . Due to the rapid dose fall-off around the implanted sources, a dose inhomogeneity across the spinal cord thickness is obtained in the dorso-ventral direction. Using the 100% reference dose (rate) at the ventral side of the spinal cord to prescribe the dose, experiments have been carried out to obtain complete dose response curves at average dose rates of 0.49, 0.96 and 120 Gy/h. Paralysis of the hind-legs after 5-6 months and histopathological examination of the spinal cord of each irradiated rat are used as experimental endpoints. Results: The histopathological damage seen after irradiation is clearly reflected the inhomogeneous dose distribution around the implanted catheters, with the damage predominantly located in the dorsal tract of the cord or dorsal roots. With each reduction in average dose rate, spinal cord radiation tolerance is significantly increased. When the dose is prescribed at the 100% reference dose rate, the ED 50 (induction of paresis in 50% of the animals) for the HDR-IRT is 17.3 Gy. If the average dose rate is reduced from 120 Gy/h to 0.96 or 0.49 Gy/h, a 2.9- or 4.7-fold increase in the ED 50 values to 50.3 Gy and 80.9 Gy is observed; for the dose prescribed at the 150% reference dose rate (dorsal side of cord) ED 50 values are 26.0, 75.5 and 121.4 Gy, respectively. Using different types of analysis and in dependence of the dose prescription and reference dose rate, the

  19. Low-Dose Radiation Promotes Dendritic Cell Migration and IL-12 Production via the ATM/NF-KappaB Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Wang, Sinian; Song, Xiujun; Gao, Ling; Li, Wei; Yu, Huijie; Zhou, Chuanchuan; Wang, Zhenxia; Li, Fengsheng; Jiang, Qisheng

    2018-04-01

    For dendritic cells (DCs) to initiate an immune response, their ability to migrate and to produce interleukin-12 (IL-12) is crucial. It has been previously shown that low-dose radiation (LDR) promoted IL-12 production by DCs, resulting in increased DC activity that contributed to LDR hormesis in the immune system. However, the molecular mechanism of LDR-induced IL-12 production, as well as the effect of LDR on DC migration capacity require further elucidation. Using the JAWSII immortalized mouse dendritic cell line, we showed that in vitro X-ray irradiation (0.2 Gy) of DCs significantly increased DC migration and IL-12 production, and upregulated CCR7. The neutralizing antibody against CCR7 has been shown to abolish LDR-enhanced DC migration, demonstrating that CCR7 mediates LDR-promoting DC migration. We identified nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) as the central signaling pathway that mediated LDR-enhanced expression of IL-12 and CCR7 based on findings that 0.2 Gy X-ray irradiation activated NF-κB, showing increased nuclear p65 translocation and NF-κB DNA-binding activity, while an NF-κB inhibitor blocked LDR-enhanced expression of IL-12 and CCR7, as well as DC migration. Finally, we demonstrated that 0.2 Gy X-ray irradiation promoted ATM phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species generation; however, only the ATM inhibitor abolished the LDR-induced NF-κB-mediated expression of IL-12 and CCR7. Altogether, our data show that exposure to LDR resulted in a hormetic effect on DCs regarding CCR7-mediated migration and IL-12 production by activating the ATM/NF-κB pathway.

  20. Two-Axis Solar Heat Collection Tracker System for Solar Thermal Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Chieh Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was performed to investigate the effect of using a continuous operation two-axes tracking on the solar heat energy collected. This heat-collection sun tracking which LDR (light dependent resistor sensors installed on the Fersnel lens was used to control the tracking path of the sun with programming method of control with a closed loop system. The control hardware was connected to a computer through Zigbee wireless module and it also can monitor the whole tracking process information on a computer screen. An experimental study was performed to investigate the effect of using two-axes tracking on the solar heat energy collected. The results indicate that sun tracking systems are being increasingly employed to enhance the efficiency of heat collection by polar-axis tracking of the sun. Besides, the heating power was also measured by designed power measurement module at the different focal length of Fresnel lens, and the design of shadow mask of LDR sensors is an important factor for solar photothermal applications. Moreover, the results also indicated that the best time to obtain the largest solar irradiation power is during 11:00 –13:00  in Taiwan.

  1. Single Low-Dose Radiation Induced Regulation of Keratinocyte Differentiation in Calcium-Induced HaCaT Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Youn, Hae Jeong; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; An, Sungkwan; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2016-01-01

    Background We are continually exposed to low-dose radiation (LDR) in the range 0.1 Gy from natural sources, medical devices, nuclear energy plants, and other industrial sources of ionizing radiation. There are three models for the biological mechanism of LDR: the linear no-threshold model, the hormetic model, and the threshold model. Objective We used keratinocytes as a model system to investigate the molecular genetic effects of LDR on epidermal cell differentiation. Methods To identify kera...

  2. Cancer Control Related to Stimulation of Immunity by Low-Dose Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shu-Zheng

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies showed that low dose radiation (LDR) could stimulate the immune system in both animal and human populations. This paper reviews the present status of relevant research as support to the use of LDR in clinical practice for cancer prevention and treatment. It has been demonstrated that radiation-induced changes in immune activity follows an inverse J-shaped curve, i.e., low dose stimulation and high dose suppression. The stimulation of immunity by LDR concerns most anticancer p...

  3. Study on generalized Toda mechanics system with loop algebra L(Dr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Qiao; Yang Zhanying; Shi Kangjie

    2005-01-01

    The authors generalize the Toda mechanics system with long range interaction to the case of Loop algebra L(D r ). By using a pair of ordered positive integer (X, Y) to describe Toda chains, authors extract the equation of motion and the Hamiltonian structure of this system for (3, 2) Toda chain. It turns out that both extra coordinates and standard Toda variables are Poisson non-commutative in the case of nontrivial generalization, and for some case, extra variables appear linearly on the right hand side of the Poisson bracket. (authors)

  4. Time-driven activity-based costing of low-dose-rate and high-dose-rate brachytherapy for low-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, Annette M; Laviana, Aaron A; Kamrava, Mitchell; Veruttipong, Darlene; Steinberg, Michael; Park, Sang-June; Burke, Michael A; Niedzwiecki, Douglas; Kupelian, Patrick A; Saigal, Christopher

    Cost estimates through traditional hospital accounting systems are often arbitrary and ambiguous. We used time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) to determine the true cost of low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer and demonstrate opportunities for cost containment at an academic referral center. We implemented TDABC for patients treated with I-125, preplanned LDR and computed tomography based HDR brachytherapy with two implants from initial consultation through 12-month followup. We constructed detailed process maps for provision of both HDR and LDR. Personnel, space, equipment, and material costs of each step were identified and used to derive capacity cost rates, defined as price per minute. Each capacity cost rate was then multiplied by the relevant process time and products were summed to determine total cost of care. The calculated cost to deliver HDR was greater than LDR by $2,668.86 ($9,538 vs. $6,869). The first and second HDR treatment day cost $3,999.67 and $3,955.67, whereas LDR was delivered on one treatment day and cost $3,887.55. The greatest overall cost driver for both LDR and HDR was personnel at 65.6% ($4,506.82) and 67.0% ($6,387.27) of the total cost. After personnel costs, disposable materials contributed the second most for LDR ($1,920.66, 28.0%) and for HDR ($2,295.94, 24.0%). With TDABC, the true costs to deliver LDR and HDR from the health system perspective were derived. Analysis by physicians and hospital administrators regarding the cost of care afforded redesign opportunities including delivering HDR as one implant. Our work underscores the need to assess clinical outcomes to understand the true difference in value between these modalities. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Retrospective Dosimetric Comparison of Low-Dose-Rate and Pulsed-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy Using a Tandem and Mini-Ovoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourtada, Firas; Gifford, Kent A.; Berner, Paula A.; Horton, John L.; Price, Michael J.; Lawyer, Ann A.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dose distribution of Iridium-192 ( 192 Ir) pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy to that of Cesium-137 ( 137 Cs) low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy around mini-ovoids and an intrauterine tandem. Ten patient treatment plans were selected from our clinical database, all of which used mini-ovoids and an intrauterine tandem. A commercial treatment planning system using AAPM TG43 formalism was used to calculate the dose in water for both the 137 Cs and 192 Ir sources. For equivalent system loadings, we compared the dose distributions in relevant clinical planes, points A and B, and to the ICRU bladder and rectal reference points. The mean PDR doses to points A and B were 3% ± 1% and 6% ± 1% higher than the LDR doses, respectively. For the rectum point, the PDR dose was 4% ± 3% lower than the LDR dose, mainly because of the 192 Ir PDR source anisotropy. For the bladder point, the PDR dose was 1% ± 4% higher than the LDR dose. We conclude that the PDR and LDR dose distributions are equivalent for intracavitary brachytherapy with a tandem and mini-ovoids. These findings will aid in the transfer from the current practice of LDR intracavitary brachytherapy to PDR for the treatment of gynecologic cancers

  6. The liquid droplet radiator: Status of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, J.

    1991-12-01

    The ever greater amounts of power to be dissipated onboard future spacecraft, together with their limited external dimensions, will make it increasingly difficult to use conventional radiator technology without imposing a severe mass penalty. Hunting for lightweight alternatives to current heat rejection systems has become a matter of growing urgency, which explains the great interest that the Liquid Droplet Radiator (LDR) has attracted. Tradeoff analyses indicate that an LDR may be as much as an order of magnitude lighter than a comparable conventional radiator. A literature study examining the progress of the LDR research and some of its possible applications is reviewed. An investigation of the LDR heat rejection capability is presented.

  7. Manchester-Fothergill procedure versus vaginal hysterectomy with uterosacral ligament suspension: an activity-based costing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husby, Karen Ruben; Tolstrup, Cæcilie Krogsgaard; Lose, Gunnar; Klarskov, Niels

    2018-02-26

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a common diagnosis that imposes high and ever-growing costs to the healthcare economy. Numerous surgical techniques for the treatment of POP exist, but there is no consensus about which is the ideal technique for treating apical prolapse. The aim of this study was to estimate hospital costs for the most frequently performed operation, vaginal hysterectomy with uterosacral ligament suspension (VH) and the uterus-preserving Manchester-Fothergill procedure (MP), when including costs of postoperative activities. The study was based on a historical matched cohort including 590 patients (295 pairs) who underwent VH or MP during 2010-2014 owing to apical prolapse. The patients were matched according to age and preoperative prolapse stage and followed for a minimum of 20 months. Data were collected from four national registries and electronic medical records. Unit costs were obtained from relevant departments, hospital administration, calculated, or estimated by experts. The hospital perspective was applied for costing the resource use. Total costs for the first 20 months after operation were 3,514 € per VH patient versus 2,318 € per MP patient. The cost difference between the techniques was 898 € (95% confidence interval [CI]: 818-982) per patient when analyzing the primary operation only and 1,196 € (CI: 927-1,465) when including subsequent activities within 20 months (p costs can be reduced by one third if MP is preferred over VH in the treatment of apical prolapse.

  8. Minimally important change was estimated for the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire after foot/ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jill; Boller, Irene; Doll, Helen; Lavis, Grahame; Sharp, Robert; Cooke, Paul; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2014-06-01

    To ascertain the smallest amounts of change for the three Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) domains that are likely to be clinically meaningful and beyond measurement error for conditions affecting the foot/ankle. Estimates were compared with those from the Short-Form 36 (SF-36). A prospective observational study of 671 consecutive patients undergoing foot or ankle surgery at an orthopedic hospital. Before and 9 months after surgery, patients completed the MOXFQ and SF-36; transition items (anchor) asked about perceived changes in foot/ankle pain or problems since the surgery. Four hundred ninety-one patients completed pre- and postoperative questionnaires. Anchor-based minimal clinically important change (MCIC) values were ~13 points for each of the MOXFQ Walking/standing (W/S), Pain, and Social Interaction (S-I) domains [and greater than the standard error of measurement (SEM)]. MCIC values for all SF-36 domains fell within the SEM. Between-group MCIDs for the MOXFQ were W/S, 16.2; Pain, 9.9; S-I, 9.3. Distribution-based minimal detectable change (MDC90) values for the MOXFQ were ~11, ~12, and ~16 score points for the W/S, Pain, and S-I scales, respectively. This article provides information for aiding the interpretability of MOXFQ outcomes data and for planning future studies. The SF-36 is not recommended as a primary outcome for foot/ankle surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mathematical programming models for the economic design and assessment of wind energy conversion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, K. A.

    The use of linear decision rules (LDR) and chance constrained programming (CCP) to optimize the performance of wind energy conversion clusters coupled to storage systems is described. Storage is modelled by LDR and output by CCP. The linear allocation rule and linear release rule prescribe the size and optimize a storage facility with a bypass. Chance constraints are introduced to explicitly treat reliability in terms of an appropriate value from an inverse cumulative distribution function. Details of deterministic programming structure and a sample problem involving a 500 kW and a 1.5 MW WECS are provided, considering an installed cost of $1/kW. Four demand patterns and three levels of reliability are analyzed for optimizing the generator choice and the storage configuration for base load and peak operating conditions. Deficiencies in ability to predict reliability and to account for serial correlations are noted in the model, which is concluded useful for narrowing WECS design options.

  10. Inter-comparison of interpolated background nitrogen dioxide concentrations across Greater Manchester, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, S. J.; Walsh, T.

    There are many modelling methods dedicated to the estimation of spatial patterns in pollutant concentrations, each with their distinctive advantages and disadvantages. The derivation of a surface of air quality values from monitoring data alone requires the conversion of point-based data from a limited number of monitoring stations to a continuous surface using interpolation. Since interpolation techniques involve the estimation of data at un-sampled points based on calculated relationships between data measured at a number of known sample points, they are subject to some uncertainty, both in terms of the values estimated and their spatial distribution. These uncertainties, which are incorporated into many empirical and semi-empirical mapping methodologies, could be recognised in any further usage of the data and also in the assessment of the extent of an exceedence of an air quality standard and the degree of exposure this may represent. There is a wide range of available interpolation techniques and the differences in the characteristics of these result in variations in the output surfaces estimated from the same set of input points. The work presented in this paper provides an examination of uncertainties through the application of a number of interpolation techniques available in standard GIS packages to a case study nitrogen dioxide data set for the Greater Manchester conurbation in northern England. The implications of the use of different techniques are discussed through application to hourly concentrations during an air quality episode and annual average concentrations in 2001. Patterns of concentrations demonstrate considerable differences in the estimated spatial pattern of maxima as the combined effects of chemical processes, topography and meteorology. In the case of air quality episodes, the considerable spatial variability of concentrations results in large uncertainties in the surfaces produced but these uncertainties vary widely from area to area

  11. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alff, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility and costs were determined for a 1 m to 30 m diameter ambient temperature, infrared to submillimeter orbiting astronomical telescope which is to be shuttle-deployed, free-flying, and have a 10 year orbital life. Baseline concepts, constraints on delivery and deployment, and the sunshield required are examined. Reflector concepts, the optical configuration, alignment and pointing, and materials are also discussed. Technology studies show that a 10 m to 30 m diameter system which is background and diffraction limited at 30 micron m is feasible within the stated time frame. A 10 m system is feasible with current mirror technology, while a 30 m system requires technology still in development.

  12. Aspects of Reactor Physics Research at the Victoria University of Manchester; Quelques Aspects des Experiences de Physique des Reacteurs a l'Universite Victoria de Manchester; Aspekty ehksperimental'nykh issledovanij po fizike reaktorov v universitete viktorii v manchestere; Trabajos de Fisica Experimental con Reactores Efectuados en la Universidad Victoria de Manchester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, M. J.; Walton, D. G. [Victoria University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1964-02-15

    The Nuclear Engineering Department at Manchester University was established in 1959. Since that time post-graduate reactor physics studies have gradually enlarged and developed, starting virtually from scratch; experimental studies have concentrated on light-water systems and centred on the accelerator-driven, natural-uranium, light-water exponential. The paper contains a survey of the work to date, discussion of the results obtained, outlines of proposed future work, and, as they arise in the text, descriptions of various low-cost, labour-saving experimental techniques which have been adopted. The various divisions of the work are described below. The authors have studied neutron diffusion in light water using both pulsed source and steady source methods. In the former method they have particularly stressed full harmonic analysis to the extent of actually studying the higher modes as opposed to most former work which has tried only to eliminate them. In the study of steady source methods they have concentrated on eliminating all effects from finite source and detector size, resonance activation, flux perturbation and so on. The results of both are discussed and compared. A very careful measurement of absorption cross-sections by the pulsed technique, taking care to eliminate harmonic and other effects likely to lead to error is also in progress and is described. Thermal neutron spectra in ''poisoned'' light water are being measured as a means of investigating and developing integral detector techniques. This discussion includes some interesting time- and cost-saving examples. Large foil activation and counting techniques for measuring spatially averaged neutron densities, and hence a number of reactor parameters, have been studied. Some interesting points have arisen, particularly with regard to spectrum measurement. The method makes possible many reactor physics investigations with limited resources. A low-cost natural uranium, light-water exponential has been

  13. PENGEMBANGAN SISTEM EKSPERIMEN VISKOSITAS BERBASIS PERSONAL KOMPUTER DAN MIKROKONTROLER MCS-51

    OpenAIRE

    Yohandri Yohandri

    2010-01-01

    In this work, viscosity experiment system based on personal computer and microcontroller MCS-51 has been developed. The new model of viscosity experiment system is purposed to perfom the time and viscosity calculation automatically on the personal computer. The graph and statical analysis are used to determine characteristics of LDR sensor and experiment system such as sensitivity, accuracy, and precision. There were four main results of this research as follow : 1). LDR sensor resistance dec...

  14. Validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire for hallux valgus deformity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talu, Burcu; Bayramlar, Kezban; Bek, Nilgün; Yakut, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) in patients affected by hallux valgus in order to assess the accuracy of this cross-cultural adaption. Thirty female volunteers aged between 18 and 55 years were included in the study. Subjects with hallux valgus were asked to complete the MOXFQ and the Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). After receiving permission from the author, the MOXFQ was translated into Turkish twice and then back translated to English, after which its compatibility was evaluated. The Turkish version of the MOXFO was applied twice, 1-3 days apart, to the study subjects. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were assessed using Cronbach's alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), respectively. Construct validity was assessed with the use of Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, using a priori hypothesized correlations with SF-36 domains. Subjects achieved similar scores at the first and second administration of the questionnaire (validity was supported by the presence of all the hypothesized correlations, with SF-36 within its physical parameters. The Turkish version of the MOXFQ is a valid and reliable tool for evaluating foot pain and functional status in patients affected by hallux valgus.

  15. Late change of normal tissue treated either by high dose rate or low dose rate interstitial brachytherapy. A retrospective comparative study on oral and oropharyngeal mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nose, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare late changes of normal tissue treated either by high dose rate (HDR) or low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy. For HDR group, 22 oropharynx cancer patients who were treated by HDR Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy with/without external beam radiotherapy in Osaka (Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases and Osaka University Hospital) during June 1994 through April 2000 and came to the follow-up clinics during July 2000 through December 2000 were studied. For LDR group, 26 oropharynx cancer patients who were treated by LDR Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy with/without external beam radiotherapy in Nancy (Centre Alexis Vautrin) during February 1989 through July 1998 and came to the follow-up clinics during April 1999 through July 1999 were studied. The standard HDR schedules were 54 Gy/9 fr/5-6 days for monotherapy and 18-24 Gy/3-4 fr/2-3 days following 45 Gy external beam radiotherapy. The standard LDR schedules were 65 Gy/5-6 days for monotherapy and 15-25 Gy/2-3 days following 50 Gy external beam radiotherapy. For evaluation of the late changes, we scored the mucosal and muscular changes inside the treated volume using the modified Dische score system and the RTOG/EORTC late radiation morbidity scoring scheme. For 6 items of the modified Dische score system, no significant difference was found between HDR and LDR groups. For the remaining 2 items (pallor, mobility impairment of faucial pillars), LDR group showed higher scores (p=0.010, 0.002). LDR group showed a trend toward higher scores for the RTOG/EORTC scheme (p=0.059). Some predict late effects by HDR interstitial brachytherapy to be severer than by LDR because no dose-rate effects can be expected. Our study, however, showed at least equivalent or even milder late changes by HDR. Appropriate fractionation schedule and extra geometrical sparing effects by optimized dose distribution of HDR group might result in milder late changes. With our

  16. Mentoring in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shiria Banu, Fatema Zehra Juma, Tamkin Abas Manchester Medical School, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK  We read the paper by Al Qahtani1 with great interest and agree that mentoring is an important educational tool. As medical students from the University of Manchester who have been exposed to various mentoring schemes, we have experienced some of the benefits mentioned in this article. We found that the mentoring schemes provided us with a valuable support system, enhanced our professional and social development, and opened doors for networking. We have primarily been involved in two different types of mentoring schemes and feel that each has its own benefits.  View the original paper by Al Qahtani.

  17. Development of a Pilot Data Management Infrastructure for Biomedical Researchers at University of Manchester – Approach, Findings, Challenges and Outlook of the MaDAM Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meik Poschen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Management and curation of digital data has been becoming ever more important in a higher education and research environment characterised by large and complex data, demand for more interdisciplinary and collaborative work, extended funder requirements and use of e-infrastructures to facilitate new research methods and paradigms. This paper presents the approach, technical infrastructure, findings, challenges and outlook (including future development within the successor project, MiSS of the ‘MaDAM: Pilot data management infrastructure for biomedical researchers at University of Manchester’ project funded under the infrastructure strand of the JISC Managing Research Data (JISCMRD programme. MaDAM developed a pilot research data management solution at the University of Manchester based on biomedical researchers’ requirements, which includes technical and governance components with the flexibility to meet future needs across multiple research groups and disciplines.

  18. An automated tool for solar power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsheh, E.M.; Natsheh, A.R.; Albarbar, AH

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a novel model of smart grid-connected solar power system is developed. The model is implemented using MatLab/SIMULINK software package. Artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm is used for maximizing the generated power based on maximum power point tracker (MPPT) implementation. The dynamic behavior of the proposed model is examined under different operating conditions. Solar irradiance, and temperature data are gathered from a grid connected, 28.8 kW solar power system located in central Manchester. The developed system and its control strategy exhibit excellent performance with tracking efficiency exceed 94.5%. The proposed model and its control strategy offer a proper tool for smart grid performance optimization. (author)

  19. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index into Spanish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijon-Nogueron, Gabriel; Ndosi, Mwidimi; Luque-Suarez, Alejandro; Alcacer-Pitarch, Begonya; Munuera, Pedro Vicente; Garrow, Adam; Redmond, Anthony C

    2014-03-01

    The Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index (MFPDI) is a self-assessment 19-item questionnaire developed in the UK to measure foot pain and disability. This study aimed at conducting cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the MFPDI for use in Spain. Principles of good practice for the translation and cultural adaptation process for patient-reported outcomes measures were followed in the MFPDI adaptation into Spanish. The cross-cultural validation involved Rasch analysis of pooled data sets from Spain and the UK. Spanish data set comprised 338 patients, five used in the adaptation phase and 333 in the cross-cultural validation phase, mean age (SD) = 55.2 (16.7) and 248 (74.5 %) were female. A UK data set (n = 682) added in the cross-cultural validation phase; mean age (SD) = 51.6 (15.2 %) and 416 (61.0 %) were female. A preliminary analysis of the 17-item MFPDI revealed significant local dependency of items causing significant deviation from the Rasch model. Grouping all items into testlets and re-analysing the MFPDI as a 3-testlet scale resulted in an adequate fit to the Rasch model, χ (2) (df) = 15.945 (12), p = 0.194, excellent reliability and unidimensionality. Lack of cross-cultural invariance was evident on the functional and personal appearance testlets. Splitting the affected testlets discounted the cross-cultural bias and satisfied requirements of the Rasch model. Subsequently, the MFPDI was calibrated into interval-level scales, fully adjusted to allow parametric analyses and cross-cultural data comparisons when required. Rasch analysis has confirmed that the MFPDI is a robust 3-subscale measure of foot pain, function and appearance in both its English and Spanish versions.

  20. Influence of length-to-diameter ratio on shrinkage of basalt fiber concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijie, MA; Yang, Jiansen; Liu, Yuan; Zheng, Xiaojun

    2017-09-01

    In order to study the shrinkage performance of basalt concrete, using the shrinkage rate as index, the work not only studied the influence of different length-to-diameter ratio (LDR) on plastic shrinkage and drying shrinkage of basalt fiber concrete, but also analyzed the action mechanism. The results show that when the fiber content is 0.1%, the LDR of 800 and 1200 take better effects on reducing plastic shrinkage, however the fiber content is 0.3%, that of LDR 600 is better. To improve drying shrinkage, the fiber of LDR 800 takes best effect. In the concrete structure, the adding basalt fibers form a uniform and chaotic supporting system, optimize the pore and the void structure of concrete, make the material further compacted, reduce the water loss, so as to decrease the shrinkage of concrete effectively.

  1. Development and validation of a Greek language version of the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaoulla, Patricia; Frescos, Nicoletta; Menz, Hylton B

    2008-06-01

    The Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index (MFPDI) is a 19 item questionnaire used to assess the severity and impact of foot pain. The aim of this study was to develop a Greek-language version of the MFPDI and to assess the instrument's psychometric properties. The MFPDI was translated into Greek by three bilingual content experts and two bilingual language experts, and then back-translated into English to assess for equivalence. The final Greek version was administered, along with a questionnaire consisting medical history and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36), to 104 Greek-speaking, community-dwelling people (64 female, 40 male), aged between 64 and 90 years (mean 73.00, SD 5.26) with disabling foot pain. The Greek translation of the MFPDI was found to have high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha= 0.89, and item-total correlation coefficients from 0.33 to 0.72). Principal components analysis revealed a four-factor structure representing the constructs of functional limitation, pain intensity, concern with appearance and activity restriction, which explained 60.8% of the variance, with 38.9% of the variance explained by the first construct (functional limitation). Six items demonstrated different factor loadings to the original English version. The Greek-language version of the MFPDI appears to be a valid tool in assessing foot pain in Greek-speaking older people. The total MFPDI scores are comparable between the Greek and English version, however due to differences in the factor loadings of some items, between-language comparisons of MFPDI should be undertaken with some caution.

  2. Comparison of risk assessment models of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carrier in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybchenko L.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of efficiency of the algorithm BOADICEA using and Manchester scoring system to predict the carrier of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Ukranian patients with breast cancer was performed. Materials for this study were the results of clinical, imunogistological, pathogistological, genealogical, molecular genetic researches of 146 patients with breast cancer. Calculations of mutations risk were performed using BOADICEA algorithm and Manchester scoring system. In the total group of patients the area under the curve while predicting BRCA1 mutations with algorithm BOADICEA was 0.86, with Manchester scoring system - 0.84, and in calculation of the combined risk of BRCA mutations - 0.83 and 0.84, respectively. However, statistical difference between the areas of algorithms has not been established (p> 0.05, it indicates to the same discriminatory power of the test models. Better sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of results of BOADICEA algorithm was reached in 6% of BRCA1 probability and in 8% threshold of BRCA1/2 mutations. The Manchester scoring system has showed the best operating characteristics with 6 and 13-point probability of BRCA1 and BRCA1/2 mutations respectively. Patients with probability of mutations with such thresholds may be offered molecular study of pathogenic alleles.

  3. Experimental test of liquid droplet radiator performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattick, A. T.; Simon, M. A.

    The liquid droplet radiator (LDR) is a heat rejection system for space power systems wherein an array of heated liquid droplets radiates energy directly to space. The use of submillimeter droplets provides large radiating area-to-mass ratio, resulting in radiator systems which are several times lighter than conventional solid surface radiators. An experiment is described in which the power radiated by an array of 2300 streams of silicone oil droplets is measured to test a previously developed theory of the LDR radiation process. This system would be capable of rejecting several kW of heat in space. Furthermore, it would be suitable as a modular unit of an LDR designed for 100-kW power levels. The experiment provided confirmation of the theoretical dependence of droplet array emissivity on optical depth. It also demonstrated the ability to create an array of more than 1000 droplet streams having a divergence less than 1 degree.

  4. Effect of low dose radiation on cell cycle and expression of its related proteins of HCT-8 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ying; Ma Kewei; Li Wei; Wang Guanjun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of low dose radiation (LDR) on cell cycle and the expression of its related proteins of HCT-8 cells and provide theoretical basis for clinical application of LDR. Methods: Human colon carcinoma cells (HCT-8) cultivated in vitro were divided into seven groups: sham radiation group (0 mGy), LDR groups (25, 50, 75, 100 and 200 mGy) and high dose radiation group (1000 mGy). The proliferation rate was detected with the method of cell count and MTT, the ratios of G 0 /G 1 , S, G 2 /M in cell cycle were determined with flow cytometry after LDR, The cell cycle and expressions of related signal proteins were analyzed with protein assay system. Results: The results of cell count and MTT showed that there were no significant differences of proliferation rate of HCT-8 cells between 25, 50, 75, 100, 200 mGy LDR groups and sham radiation group (P>0.05); compared with high dose radiation group, there were significant differences (P 0 /G 1 phase of HCT-8 cells increased (P>0.05), the ratio of S phase decreased significantly (P 2 /M phase increased obviously (P 0 /G 1 , S, and G 2 /M phases of HCT-8 cells 48 h after radiation compared with sham radiation group (P>0.05). The protein assay result indicated that the expressions of AKt, PCNA, p27, CDK2, cyclin E, EGFR, ERK1/2, p-ERK, p-GSK-32/β in HCT-8 cells after LDR decreased compared with sham radiation group. Conclusion: LDR has no stimulating effect on HCT-8 cells. However, to some extent LDR suppress the expressions of some proteins related to proliferation and cell cycle. (authors)

  5. Radiobiology of systemic radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, David; McEwan, Alexander J

    2007-02-01

    Although systemic radionuclide therapy (SRT) is effective as a palliative therapy in patients with metastatic cancer, there has been limited success in expanding patterns of utilization and in bringing novel systemic radiotherapeutic agents to routine clinical use. Although there are many factors that contribute to this situation, we hypothesize that a better understanding of the radiobiology and mechanism of action of SRT will facilitate the development of future compounds and the future designs of prospective clinical trials. If these trials can be rationalized to the biological basis of the therapy, it is likely that the long-term outcome would be enhanced therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we provide perspectives of the current state of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation research and offer linkages where appropriate with current clinical knowledge. These include the recently described phenomena of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity-increased radioresistance (LDH-IRR), adaptive responses, and biological bystander effects. Each of these areas require a major reconsideration of existing models for radiation action and an understanding of how this knowledge will integrate into the evolution of clinical SRT practice. Validation of a role in vivo for both LDH-IRR and biological bystander effects in SRT would greatly impact the way we would assess therapeutic response to SRT, the design of clinical trials of novel SRT radiopharmaceuticals, and risk estimates for both therapeutic and diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals. We believe that the current state of research in LDR effects offers a major opportunity to the nuclear medicine community to address the basic science of clinical SRT practice, to use this new knowledge to expand the use and roles of SRT, and to facilitate the introduction of new therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals.

  6. Tevatron serial data repeater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducar, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    A ten megabit per second serial data repeater system has been developed for the 6.28km Tevatron accelerator. The repeaters are positioned at each of the thirty service buildings and accommodate control and abort system communications as well as distribution of the Tevatron time and energy clocks. The repeaters are transparent to the particular protocol of the transmissions. Serial data are encoded locally as unipolar two volt signals employing the self-clocking Manchester Bi-Phase code. The repeaters modulate the local signals to low-power bursts of 50 MHz rf carrier for the 260m transmission between service buildings. The repeaters also demodulate the transmission and restructure the data for local utilization. The employment of frequency discrimination techniques yields high immunity to the characteristic noise spectrum

  7. Performance of droplet generator and droplet collector in liquid droplet radiator under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totani, T.; Itami, M.; Nagata, H.; Kudo, I.; Iwasaki, A.; Hosokawa, S.

    2002-06-01

    The Liquid Droplet Radiator (LDR) has an advantage over comparable conventional radiators in terms of the rejected heat power-weight ratio. Therefore, the LDR has attracted attention as an advanced radiator for high-power space systems that will be prerequisite for large space structures. The performance of the LDR under microgravity condition has been studied from the viewpoint of operational space use of the LDR in the future. In this study, the performances of a droplet generator and a droplet collector in the LDR are investigated using drop shafts in Japan: MGLAB and JAMIC. As a result, it is considered that (1) the droplet generator can produce uniform droplet streams in the droplet diameter range from 200 to 280 [µm] and the spacing range from 400 to 950 [µm] under microgravity condition, (2) the droplet collector with the incidence angle of 35 degrees can prevent a uniform droplet stream, in which droplet diameter is 250 [µm] and the velocity is 16 [m/s], from splashing under microgravity condition, whereas splashes may occur at the surface of the droplet collector in the event that a nonuniform droplet stream collides against it.

  8. Fractionation in medium dose rate brachytherapy of cancer of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leborgne, Felix; Fowler, Jack F.; Leborgne, Jose H.; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Chappell, Rick

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To establish an optimum fractionation for medium dose rate (MDR) brachytherapy from retrospective data of patients treated with different MDR schedules in comparison with a low dose rate (LDR) schedule. Methods and Materials: The study population consists of consecutive Stage IB-IIA-IIB patients who received radiotherapy alone with full dose brachytherapy plus external beam pelvic and parametrial irradiation from 1986-1993. Patients also receiving surgery or chemotherapy were excluded. The LDR group (n = 102, median follow-up: 80 months) received a median dose to Point A of two 32.5 Gy fractions at 0.44 Gy/h plus 18 Gy of external whole pelvic irradiation. The MDR1 group (n = 30, median follow-up: 45 months) received a mean dose of two 32 Gy fractions at 1.68 Gy/h. An individual dose reduction of 12.5% was planned for this group according to the Manchester experience, but only a 4.8% dose reduction was achieved. The MDR2 group (n = 10, median follow-up: 36 months) received a dose of two 24 Gy fractions at 1.65 Gy/h. The MDR3 group (n = 10, median follow-up 33 months) received a mean dose of three 15.3 Gy fractions at 1.64 Gy/h. And finally, the MDR4 group (n = 38, median follow-up: 24 months) received six 7.7 Gy fractions from two pulses 6 h apart in each of three insertions at 1.61 Gy/h. The median external pelvic dose to MDR schedules was between 12 and 20 Gy. The linear quadratic (LQ) formula was used to calculate the biologically effective dose (BED) to tumor (Gy 10 ) and rectum (Gy 3 ), assuming T(1(2)) for repair = 1.5 h. Results: The crude central recurrence rate was 6% for LDR (mean BED = 95.4 Gy 10 ) and 10% for MDR4 (mean BED = 77.0 Gy 10 ) (p = NS). The remaining MDR groups had no recurrences. Grade 2 and 3 rectal or bladder complications were 0% for LDR (rectal BED = 109 Gy 3 ), 83% for MDR1 (BED = 206 Gy 3 ), and 30% for MDR3 (BED = 127 Gy 3 ). The MDR2 and MDR4 groups presented no complications (BED, 123 Gy 3 , and 105 Gy 3 , respectively

  9. Development and validation of a Greek language version of the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index (MFPDI is a 19 item questionnaire used to assess the severity and impact of foot pain. The aim of this study was to develop a Greek-language version of the MFPDI and to assess the instrument's psychometric properties. Methods The MFPDI was translated into Greek by three bilingual content experts and two bilingual language experts, and then back-translated into English to assess for equivalence. The final Greek version was administered, along with a questionnaire consisting medical history and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36, to 104 Greek-speaking, community-dwelling people (64 female, 40 male, aged between 64 and 90 years (mean 73.00, SD 5.26 with disabling foot pain. Results The Greek translation of the MFPDI was found to have high internal consistency (Cronbach's α= 0.89, and item-total correlation coefficients from 0.33 to 0.72. Principal components analysis revealed a four-factor structure representing the constructs of functional limitation, pain intensity, concern with appearance and activity restriction, which explained 60.8% of the variance, with 38.9% of the variance explained by the first construct (functional limitation. Six items demonstrated different factor loadings to the original English version. Conclusion The Greek-language version of the MFPDI appears to be a valid tool in assessing foot pain in Greek-speaking older people. The total MFPDI scores are comparable between the Greek and English version, however due to differences in the factor loadings of some items, between-language comparisons of MFPDI should be undertaken with some caution.

  10. Effects of low dose radiation on kidney function and morphology of diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chi; Li Xiaokun; Gong Shouliang; Meng Tao; Li Cai; Cai Lu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose radiation (LDR) on the kidney function and morphology in C57BL/6J mice with diabetic nephropathy (DN) induced by streptozotocin (STZ) and illuminate the protective function of LDR on kidney damage caused by diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods: The healthy and right age C57BL/6J mice were divided into 4 groups including control, DM, LDR and DM/LDR. The mice in DM and DM/LDR groups were injected intraperitoneally with STZ to set up DM models. The mice in DM/LDR and LDR groups were irradiated with 25 mGy X-rays every other day for 4 weeks. The changes of blood glucose level, urine index level and the morphology of glomerular were detected at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 weeks after radiation. Results: The blood glucose levels of mice in DM and DM/LDR groups after STZ-induced DM model preparation were higher than those in LDR and control groups (P<0.05). After treated with LDR for 2 weeks, the blood glucose level in DM/LDR group was supressed and significantly lower than that in DM group (P<0.05). Moreover the the change had been kept to 16 weeks. In addition, compared with DM group, the level of urine micro albumin(MALB) in DM/LDR group was decreased and the urine creatinine (Cre) level was increased. Compared with DM group, the morphological results showed that the glomerular mesangial expansion and mesangial cell proliferation were significantly supressed in DM/LDR group (P<0.05). Conclusion: LDR can promote the decease of blood glucose level efficiently, relief the change of kidney function, supress and delay the pathological changes of DN. (authors)

  11. Low dose radiation and diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongguang; Gong Shouliang; Cai Lu

    2006-01-01

    Induction of hormesis and adaptive response by low-dose radiatio (LDR) has been extensively indicated. It's mechanism may be related with the protective protein and antioxidants that LDR induced, which take effects on the diabetes mellitus (DM) and other diseases. This review will summarize available dat with emphasis on three points: the preventive effect of LDR on the development of diabetes, the therapeutic effect of LDR on diabetic complications and possible mechanisms by which LDR prevents the development of diabetes and diabetic complications. Finally, the perspectives of LDR clinical, diabetes-related implication are discussed. (authors)

  12. Confocal laser-induced fluorescence detector for narrow capillary system with yoctomole limit of detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Mitchell T; Lynch, Kyle B; Zhu, Zaifang; Chen, Huang; Lu, Joann J; Pu, Qiaosheng; Liu, Shaorong

    2017-04-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detectors for low-micrometer and sub-micrometer capillary on-column detection are not commercially available. In this paper, we describe in details how to construct a confocal LIF detector to address this issue. We characterize the detector by determining its limit of detection (LOD), linear dynamic range (LDR) and background signal drift; a very low LOD (~70 fluorescein molecules or 12 yoctomole fluorescein), a wide LDR (greater than 3 orders of magnitude) and a small background signal drift (~1.2-fold of the root mean square noise) are obtained. For detecting analytes inside a low-micrometer and sub-micrometer capillary, proper alignment is essential. We present a simple protocol to align the capillary with the optical system and use the position-lock capability of a translation stage to fix the capillary in position during the experiment. To demonstrate the feasibility of using this detector for narrow capillary systems, we build a 2-μm-i.d. capillary flow injection analysis (FIA) system using the newly developed LIF prototype as a detector and obtain an FIA LOD of 14 zeptomole fluorescein. We also separate a DNA ladder sample by bare narrow capillary - hydrodynamic chromatography and use the LIF prototype to monitor the resolved DNA fragments. We obtain not only well-resolved peaks but also the quantitative information of all DNA fragments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Low dose radiation prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xin; Hong, Yaqiong; Zhao, Di; Meng, Xinxin; Zhao, Lijing; Du, Yanwei; Wang, Zan; Zheng, Yan; Cai, Lu; Jiang, Hongyu

    2018-01-02

    This study aimed to develop a novel and non-invasive approach, low-dose radiation (LDR, 75 mGy X-rays), to prevent doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity. BALB/c mice were randomly divided into five groups, Control, LDR (a single exposure), Sham (treated same as LDR group except for irradiation), DOX (a single intraperitoneal injection of DOX at 7.5 mg/kg), and LDR/DOX (received LDR and 72 h later received DOX). Electrocardiogram analysis displayed several kinds of abnormal ECG profiles in DOX-treated mice, but less in LDR/DOX group. Cardiotoxicity indices included histopathological changes, oxidative stress markers, and measurements of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Pretreatment of DOX group with LDR reduced oxidative damages (reactive oxygen species formation, protein nitration, and lipid peroxidation) and increased the activities of antioxidants (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) in the heart of LDR/DOX mice compared to DOX mice. Pretreatment of DOX-treated mice with LDR also decreased DOX-induced cardiac cell apoptosis (TUNEL staining and cleaved caspase-3) and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway (increased p53, Bax, and caspase-9 expression and decreased Bcl2 expression and ΔΨm dissipation). These results suggest that LDR could induce adaptation of the heart to DOX-induced toxicity. Cardiac protection by LDR may attribute to attenuate DOX-induced cell death via suppressing mitochondrial-dependent oxidative stress and apoptosis signaling.

  14. High versus low dose-rate intracavitary irradiation for adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Gwi Eon; Chung, Eun Ji; Suh, Chang Ok; Hong, Soon Won; Cho, Young Kap; Loh, John Jk

    1999-01-01

    The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix is low. Traditionally, Low Dose Rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been used as a standard modality in the treatment for patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the effects of the High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the patients with adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix compared with the LDR. From January 1971 to December 1992, 106 patients of adenocarcinoma of uterine cervix were treated with radiation therapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University with curative intent. LDR brachytherapy was carried out on 35 patients and 71 patients were treated with HDR brachytherapy. In LDR Group, 8 patients were in stage I, 18 in stage II and 9 in stage III. external radiation therapy was delivered with 10 MV X-ray, daily 2 Gy fractionation, total dose 40-46 Gy (median 48 Gy). And LDR Radium intracavitary irradiation was performed with Henschke applicator, 22-56 Gy to point A (median 43 Gy). In HDR Group, there were 16 patients in stage I, 38 in stage II and 17 in stage III. The total dose of external radiation was 40-61 Gy (median 45 Gy), daily 1.8-2.0 Gy. HDR Co-60 intracavitary irradiation was performed with RALS(Remote Afterloading System), 30-57 Gy (median 39 Gy) to point A, 3 times a week, 3 Gy per fraction. The 5-year overall survival rate in LDR Group was 72.9%, 61.9%, 45.0% in stage I, II, III, respectively and corresponding figures for HDR were 87.1%, 58.3%, 41.2%, respectively (p>0.05). There was no statistical difference in terms of the 5-year overall survival rate between HDR Group and LDR Group in adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix. There was 11% of late complication rates in LDR Group and 27% in HDR Group. There were no prognostic factors compared HDR with LDR group. The incidence of the late complication rate in HDR Group stage II, III was higher than that in LDR Group (16.7% vs. 31.6% in stage II, 11.1% vs. 35.3% in stage III, p>0

  15. Comparison of traditional low-dose-rate to optimized and nonoptimized high-dose-rate tandem and ovoid dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, William E.; Erickson, Beth; Albano, Katherine; Gillin, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Few dose specification guidelines exist when attempting to perform high-dose-rate (HDR) dosimetry. The purpose of this study was to model low-dose-rate (LDR) dosimetry, using parameters common in HDR dosimetry, to achieve the 'pear-shape' dose distribution achieved with LDR tandem and ovoid applications. Methods and Materials: Radiographs of Fletcher-Suit LDR applicators and Nucletron 'Fletcher-like' HDR applicators were taken with the applicators in an idealized geometry. Traditional Fletcher loadings of 3M Cs-137 sources and the Theratronics Planning System were used for LDR dosimetry. HDR dosimetry was performed using the Nucletron Microselectron HDR UPS V11.22 with an Ir-192 source. Dose optimization points were initially located along a line 2 cm lateral to the tandem, beginning at the tandem tip at 0.5-cm intervals, ending at the sail, and optimized to 100% of the point A dose. A single dose optimization point was also placed laterally from the center of each ovoid equal to the radius of the ovoid (ovoid surface dose). For purposes of comparison, dose was also calculated for points A and B, and a point located 1 cm superior to the tandem tip in the plane of the tandem, (point F). Four- and 6-cm tandem lengths and 2.0-, 2.5-, and 3.0-cm ovoid diameters were used for this study. Based on initial findings, dose optimization schemes were developed to best approximate LDR dosimetry. Finally, radiographs were obtained of HDR applications in two patients. These radiographs were used to compare the optimization schemes with 'nonoptimized' treatment plans. Results: Calculated doses for points A and B were similar for LDR, optimized HDR, and nonoptimized HDR. The optimization scheme that used tapered dose points at the tandem tip and optimized a single ovoid surface point on each ovoid to 170% of point A resulted in a good approximation of LDR dosimetry. Nonoptimized HDR resulted in higher doses at point F, the bladder, and at points lateral to the tandem tip

  16. The NIHR Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) for Greater Manchester: combining empirical, theoretical and experiential evidence to design and evaluate a large-scale implementation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Gill; Fitzgerald, Louise; Fielden, Sandra; McBride, Anne; Waterman, Heather; Bamford, David; Kislov, Roman; Boaden, Ruth

    2011-08-23

    In response to policy recommendations, nine National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRCs) were established in England in 2008, aiming to create closer working between the health service and higher education and narrow the gap between research and its implementation in practice. The Greater Manchester (GM) CLAHRC is a partnership between the University of Manchester and twenty National Health Service (NHS) trusts, with a five-year mission to improve healthcare and reduce health inequalities for people with cardiovascular conditions. This paper outlines the GM CLAHRC approach to designing and evaluating a large-scale, evidence- and theory-informed, context-sensitive implementation programme. The paper makes a case for embedding evaluation within the design of the implementation strategy. Empirical, theoretical, and experiential evidence relating to implementation science and methods has been synthesised to formulate eight core principles of the GM CLAHRC implementation strategy, recognising the multi-faceted nature of evidence, the complexity of the implementation process, and the corresponding need to apply approaches that are situationally relevant, responsive, flexible, and collaborative. In turn, these core principles inform the selection of four interrelated building blocks upon which the GM CLAHRC approach to implementation is founded. These determine the organizational processes, structures, and roles utilised by specific GM CLAHRC implementation projects, as well as the approach to researching implementation, and comprise: the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) framework; a modified version of the Model for Improvement; multiprofessional teams with designated roles to lead, facilitate, and support the implementation process; and embedded evaluation and learning. Designing and evaluating a large-scale implementation strategy that can cope with and

  17. Comprehensive analysis of Salmonella sequence polymorphisms and development of a LDR-UA assay for the detection and characterization of selected serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauri, Andrea; Castiglioni, Bianca; Mariani, Paola

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of food-borne disease, and Salmonella enterica subspecies I includes the most clinically relevant serotypes. Salmonella serotype determination is important for the disease etiology assessment and contamination source tracking. This task will be facilitated by the disclosure of Salmonella serotype sequence polymorphisms, here annotated in seven genes (sefA, safA, safC, bigA, invA, fimA, and phsB) from 139 S. enterica strains, of which 109 belonging to 44 serotypes of subsp. I. One hundred nineteen polymorphic sites were scored and associated to single serotypes or to serotype groups belonging to S. enterica subsp. I. A diagnostic tool was constructed based on the Ligation Detection Reaction-Universal Array (LDR-UA) for the detection of polymorphic sites uniquely associated to serotypes of primary interest (Salmonella Hadar, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Gallinarum, Salmonella Virchow, and Salmonella Paratyphi B). The implementation of promiscuous probes allowed the diagnosis of ten further serotypes that could be associated to a unique hybridization pattern. Finally, the sensitivity and applicability of the tool was tested on target DNA dilutions and with controlled meat contamination, allowing the detection of one Salmonella CFU in 25 g of meat.

  18. Theoretical Properties for Neural Networks with Weight Matrices of Low Displacement Rank

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Liang; Liao, Siyu; Wang, Yanzhi; Li, Zhe; Tang, Jian; Pan, Victor; Yuan, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Recently low displacement rank (LDR) matrices, or so-called structured matrices, have been proposed to compress large-scale neural networks. Empirical results have shown that neural networks with weight matrices of LDR matrices, referred as LDR neural networks, can achieve significant reduction in space and computational complexity while retaining high accuracy. We formally study LDR matrices in deep learning. First, we prove the universal approximation property of LDR neural networks with a ...

  19. Validation of the Korean Version of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire in Patients With Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Man-Jun; Ko, Young-Chul; Huh, Jung-Wook; Park, Sook-Hyun; Park, Tae-Hong; Park, Joon-Hyung

    The Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) is a practical, reliable, and valid questionnaire for hallux valgus surgery and has been translated into several languages. However, the MOXFQ has not been translated into Korean. In the present study, we aimed to translate and evaluate the validity and reliability of the Korean version of the MOXFQ for patients affected by hallux valgus. In accordance with the guidelines of cross-cultural adaptation, we translated the English version of MOXFQ into Korean and then backward translated it into English. We sent out letters that included the Korean version of the MOXFQ, a visual analog scale measure of pain, and a validated Korean version of the short-form 36-item Health Survey to 135 patients with hallux valgus. A retest was administered after 2 weeks. Of the 135 patients, 104 responded to the first questionnaire, and 82 of the first-time responders returned their second questionnaires. We evaluated the test-retest reliability, internal consistency, concurrent validity, and construct validity of the Korean version of the MOXFQ. The intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability was 0.82 for the total MOXFQ and ranged from 0.81 to 0.82 for the 3 subscales. Cronbach's alpha for the total MOXFQ was 0.85 and ranged from 0.8 to 0.92 for the 3 subscales. Concurrent and construct validity was supported by significant correlation with the visual analog scale and short-form 36-item Health Survey subscale scores. The Korean version of the MOXFQ was tested, and it was found to be a valid and reliable instrument for patients with hallux valgus. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Manchester-Fothergill procedure versus vaginal hysterectomy with uterosacral ligament suspension: a matched historical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstrup, Cæcilie Krogsgaard; Husby, Karen Ruben; Lose, Gunnar; Kopp, Tine Iskov; Viborg, Petra Hall; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler; Klarskov, Niels

    2018-03-01

    This study compares vaginal hysterectomy with uterosacral ligament suspension (VH) with the Manchester-Fothergill procedure (MP) for treating pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in the apical compartment. Our matched historical cohort study is based on data from four Danish databases and the corresponding electronic medical records. Patients with POP surgically treated with VH (n = 295) or the MP (n = 295) in between 2010 and 2014 were matched for age and preoperative POP stage in the apical compartment. The main outcome was recurrent or de novo POP in any compartment. Secondary outcomes were recurrent or de novo POP in each compartment and complications. The risk of recurrent or de novo POP in any compartment was higher after VH (18.3%) compared with the MP (7.8%) (Hazard ratio, HR = 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3-4.8). Recurrence in the apical compartment occurred in 5.1% after VH vs. 0.3% after the MP (hazard ratio (HR) = 10.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-78.1). In the anterior compartment, rates of recurrent or de novo POP were 11.2% after VH vs. 4.1% after the MP (HR = 3.5, 95% CI 1.4-8.7) and in the posterior compartment 12.9% vs. 4.7% (HR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.3-5.4), respectively. There were more perioperative complications (2.7 vs. 0%, p = 0.007) and postoperative intra-abdominal bleeding (2 vs. 0%, p = 0.03) after VH. This study shows that the MP is superior to VH; if there is no other indication for hysterectomy, the MP should be preferred to VH for surgical treatment of POP in the apical compartment.

  1. Overview of Radiosensitivity of Human Tumor Cells to Low-Dose-Rate Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Jerry R.; Zhang Yonggang; Zhou Haoming; Gridley, Daila S.; Koch, Cameron J.; Slater, James M.; Little, John B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We compared clonogenic survival in 27 human tumor cell lines that vary in genotype after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose rate (HDR) irradiation. We measured susceptibility to LDR-induced redistribution in the cell cycle in eight of these cell lines. Methods and Materials: We measured clonogenic survival after up to 96 hours of LDR (0.25 Gy/h) irradiation. We compared these with clonogenic survival after HDR irradiation (50 Gy/h). Using flow cytometry, we measured LDR-induced redistribution as a function of time during LDR irradiation in eight of these cell lines. Results: Coefficients that describe clonogenic survival after both LDR and HDR irradiation segregate into four radiosensitivity groups that associate with cell genotype: mutant (mut)ATM, wild-type TP53, mutTP53, and an unidentified gene in radioresistant glioma cells. The LDR and HDR radiosensitivity correlates at lower doses (∼2 Gy HDR, ∼6 Gy LDR), but not at higher doses (HDR > 4 Gy; LDR > 6 Gy). The rate of LDR-induced loss of clonogenic survival changes at approximately 24 hours; wild-type TP53 cells become more resistant and mutTP53 cells become more sensitive. Redistribution induced by LDR irradiation also changes at approximately 24 hours. Conclusions: Radiosensitivity of human tumor cells to both LDR and HDR irradiation is genotype dependent. Analysis of coefficients that describe cellular radiosensitivity segregates 27 cell lines into four statistically distinct groups, each associating with specific genotypes. Changes in cellular radiosensitivity and redistribution in the cell cycle are strongly time dependent. Our data establish a genotype-dependent time-dependent model that predicts clonogenic survival, explains the inverse dose-rate effect, and suggests possible clinical applications

  2. Control of optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Founds, D.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the current and planned activities at the Air Force Systems Command in structures and controls for optical-type systems are summarized. Many of the activities are contracted to industry; one task is an in-house program which includes a hardware test program. The objective of the in-house program, referred to as the Aluminum Beam Expander Structure (ABES), is to address issues involved in on-orbit system identification. The structure, which appears similar to the LDR backup structure, is about 35 feet tall. The activity to date has been limited to acquisition of about 250 hours of test data. About 30 hours of data per excitation force is gathered in order to obtain sufficient data for a good statistical estimate of the structural parameters. The development of an Integrated Structural Modeling (ISM) computer program is being done by Boeing Aerospace Company. The objective of the contracted effort is to develop a combined optics, structures, thermal, controls, and multibody dynamics simulation code.

  3. Effects of low dose radiation on expressions of ICAM-1 mRNA and protein in kidney of diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chi; Li Xiaokun; Gong Shouliang; Liu Xiaoju; Zhao Xue; Liu Xiaoju; Zhao Xue; Shen Wenjie; Li Cai; Cai Lu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of low dose radiation (LDR) on the expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA and protein in kidney of diabetes mellitus (DM) mice and illuminate that anti-inflammation of LDR is a main mechanism for diabetic therapy. Methods: The healthy and right age C57BL/6J mice were divided into 4 groups including control, DM, LDR and DM/LDR. The mice in DM and DM/LDR groups were injected intraperitoneally with streptozocin (STZ) to set up DM models. The mice in DM/LDR and LDR groups were irradiated with 25 mGy every other day for 4 weeks. The expressions of ICAM-1 mRNA and protein in kidney were detected with RT-PCR and Western blotting 2, 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks after irradiation. Results: The expressions of ICAM-1 mRNA and protein in kidney had no significant difference among 4 groups before LDR (P>0.05). The expressions of ICAM-1 mRNA and protein 2 weeks after irradiation with LDR were higher than those in the other 3 groups (P<0.05). The expressions of ICAM-1 mRNA and protein in the DM/LDR group 4 weeks after irradiation were also significantly higher than those in non-DM groups (P<0.05), but still significantly lower than those in DM group (P<0.05), and the significant differences were kept to 16 weeks after irradiation. But the expressions of ICAM-1 mRNA and protein in LDR group were significantly higher than those in control group (P<0.05). IHC assay showed that the glomerular and tubular in DM and DM/LDR groups were abnormal and the quantities of the positive staining cells were significantly increased compared with non-DM groups. However the damage of glomerular and tubular in DM/LDR was significantly supressed compared with DM group and the positive staining cells were also decreased. Conclusion: Under the circumstance of DM, LDR can significantly decrease the expressions of ICAM-1 mRNA and protein in mouse kidney to relief the inflammation reaction in kidney; but in normal condition, LDR can improve the immunity and

  4. A prospective audit of early stoma complications in colorectal cancer treatment throughout the Greater Manchester and Cheshire colorectal cancer network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, K L; Zammit, M; Smith, A; Kenyon, D; Lees, N P

    2011-08-01

    The study aimed to identify the incidence of early stoma problems after surgery for colorectal cancer to identify predisposing factors and to assess the effect on discharge from hospital and the greater need for community stoma care. A prospective study of 192 patients was carried out over a six-month period in the 13 units of the Greater Manchester and Cheshire Cancer Network. Stoma problems were categorized into fistula, leakage, pancaking, necrosis, retraction, separation, stenosis, skin problems, parastomal hernia, suboptimal stoma site and need for resiting or refashioning. Differences in incidence between units (anonymized) were analysed, and the effect of stoma complications on length of hospital stay and the need for additional community stoma care was determined. One hundred and ninety-two patients with stomas were included, of which 52 (27.1%) were identified as being problematic (range 0-66.7% between units). Significant risk factors included stoma type (colostomy) (P stoma length (P = 0.006), higher BMI (P = 0.043), emergency surgery (P = 0.002) and lack of preoperative site marking (P stomas were associated with longer hospital stay (P care (P Stoma type, stoma length, body mass index, emergency surgery and lack of preoperative marking were significant risk factors. Overall complication rates compare favourably with other studies. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Confirming the Environmental Concerns of Community Members Utilizing Participatory-Based Research in the Houston Neighborhood of Manchester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansom, Garett; Berke, Philip; McDonald, Thomas; Shipp, Eva; Horney, Jennifer

    2016-08-23

    In the last few decades, there has been an increase in community-based participatory research being conducted within the United States. Recent research has demonstrated that working with local community organizations, interest groups, and individuals can assist in the creation of, and sustainability in, health initiatives, adoption of emergency protocols, and potentially improve health outcomes for at-risk populations. However little research has assessed if communal concerns over environmental contaminants would be confirmed through environmental research. This cross-sectional study collected survey data and performed surface water analysis for heavy metals in a small neighborhood in Houston, TX, which is characterized by industrial sites, unimproved infrastructure, nuisance flooding, and poor air quality. Surveys were completed with 109 residents of the Manchester neighborhood. Water samples were taken from thirty zones within the neighborhood and assessed for arsenic (As), barium (Ba), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), selenium (Se), silver (Ag), and mercury (Hg). Survey results showed that the vast majority of all respondents were concerned over proximity to industry and waste facilities, as well as exposure to standing surface water. Barium was discovered in every sample and many of the zones showed alarming levels of certain metals. For example, one zone, two blocks from a public park, showed levels of arsenic at 180 (μg/L), barium at 3296 (μg/L), chromium at 363 (μg/L), lead at 1448 (μg/L), and mercury at 10 (μg/L). These findings support the hypothesis that neighborhood members are aware of the issues affecting their community and can offer researchers valuable assistance in every stage of study design and execution.

  6. Confirming the Environmental Concerns of Community Members Utilizing Participatory-Based Research in the Houston Neighborhood of Manchester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garett Sansom

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, there has been an increase in community-based participatory research being conducted within the United States. Recent research has demonstrated that working with local community organizations, interest groups, and individuals can assist in the creation of, and sustainability in, health initiatives, adoption of emergency protocols, and potentially improve health outcomes for at-risk populations. However little research has assessed if communal concerns over environmental contaminants would be confirmed through environmental research. This cross-sectional study collected survey data and performed surface water analysis for heavy metals in a small neighborhood in Houston, TX, which is characterized by industrial sites, unimproved infrastructure, nuisance flooding, and poor air quality. Surveys were completed with 109 residents of the Manchester neighborhood. Water samples were taken from thirty zones within the neighborhood and assessed for arsenic (As, barium (Ba, cadmium (Cd, chromium (Cr, lead (Pb, selenium (Se, silver (Ag, and mercury (Hg. Survey results showed that the vast majority of all respondents were concerned over proximity to industry and waste facilities, as well as exposure to standing surface water. Barium was discovered in every sample and many of the zones showed alarming levels of certain metals. For example, one zone, two blocks from a public park, showed levels of arsenic at 180 (μg/L, barium at 3296 (μg/L, chromium at 363 (μg/L, lead at 1448 (μg/L, and mercury at 10 (μg/L. These findings support the hypothesis that neighborhood members are aware of the issues affecting their community and can offer researchers valuable assistance in every stage of study design and execution.

  7. The role of insulin detemir in overweight type 2 diabetes management

    OpenAIRE

    Soran, Handrean

    2009-01-01

    Yared N Demssie1, Naveed Younis2, Handrean Soran31Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Salford Royal Foundation NHS Trust, Salford, UK; 2Department of Medicine, University Hospital South Manchester Foundation NHS Trust, Wythenshawe, Manchester, UK; 3University Department of Medicine, Central Manchester and Manchester Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UKAbstract: The recent evidence-based shift towards an algorithm of early initiation and aggressive titration of insul...

  8. Commissioning of a well type chamber for HDR and LDR brachytherapy applications: a review of methodology and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukwada, Godfrey; Neveri, Gabor; Alkhatib, Zaid; Waterhouse, David K; Ebert, Martin

    2016-03-01

    For safe and accurate dose delivery in brachytherapy, associated equipment is subject to commissioning and ongoing quality assurance (QA). Many centres depend on the use of a well-type chamber ('well chamber') for performing brachytherapy dosimetry. Documentation of well chamber commissioning is scarce despite the important role the chamber plays in the whole brachytherapy QA process. An extensive and structured commissioning of the HDR 1000 plus well chamber (Standard Imaging Inc, Middleton WI) for HDR and LDR dosimetry was undertaken at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital. The methodology and outcomes of this commissioning is documented and presented as a guideline to others involved in brachytherapy. The commissioning tests described include mechanical integrity, leakage current, directional dependence, response, length of uniform response, the influence of insert holders, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, accuracy of measured air kerma strength (S(K)) or reference air kerma rate (K(R)) and baseline setting (for ongoing constancy checks). For the HDR 1000 plus well chamber, some of the insert holders modify the response curve. The measured sweet length was 2.5 cm which is within 0.5% of that specified by the manufacturer. Correction for polarity was negligible (0.9999) and ion recombination was small (0.9994). Directional dependence was small (less than 0.2%) and leakage current was negligible. The measured K(R) for (192)Ir agreed within 0.11% compared with a second well chamber of similar model and was within 0.5% of that determined via a free-in-air measurement method. Routine constancy checks over a year agreed with the baseline within 0.4%.

  9. Exopolysaccharides from Lactobacillus delbrueckii OLL1073R-1 modulate innate antiviral immune response in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanmani, Paulraj; Albarracin, Leonardo; Kobayashi, Hisakazu; Iida, Hikaru; Komatsu, Ryoya; Humayun Kober, A K M; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, Wakako; Suda, Yoshihito; Aso, Hisashi; Makino, Seiya; Kano, Hiroshi; Saito, Tadao; Villena, Julio; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) produced by Lactobacillus delbrueckii OLL1073R-1 (LDR-1) improve antiviral immunity, especially in the systemic and respiratory compartments. However, it was not studied before whether those EPSs are able to beneficially modulate intestinal antiviral immunity. In addition, LDR-1-host interaction has been evaluated mainly with immune cells while its interaction with intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) was not addressed before. In this work, we investigated the capacity of EPSs from LDR-1 to modulate the response of porcine IECs (PIE cells) to the stimulation with the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-3 agonist poly(I:C) and the role of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR negative regulators in the immunoregulatory effect. We showed that innate immune response triggered by TLR3 activation in porcine IECs was differentially modulated by EPS from LDR-1. EPSs treatment induced an increment in the expression of interferon (IFN)-α and IFN-β in PIE cells after the stimulation with poly(I:C) as well as the expression of the antiviral factors MxA and RNase L. Those effects were related to the reduced expression of A20 in EPS-treated PIE cells. EPS from LDR-1 was also able to reduce the expression of IL-6 and proinflammatory chemokines. Although further in vivo studies are needed, our results suggest that these EPSs or a yogurt fermented with LDR-1 have potential to improve intestinal innate antiviral response and protect against intestinal viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Advance of study on hormesis of low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Liaoyuan

    2003-01-01

    There have been growing interests in recent years over the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on human. The paper gives a brief review on the LDR studies, which include LDR-induced hormesis and adaptive response, LDR experiments in vivo or in vitro and epidemiologic investigation, and clinical applications of LDR as well

  11. Low-dose radiation pretreatment improves survival of human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) under hypoxia via HIF-1 alpha and MMP-2 induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Naoki; Kubota, Yoshitaka; Kosaka, Kentarou; Akita, Shinsuke; Sasahara, Yoshitarou; Kira, Tomoe; Kuroda, Masayuki; Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Bujo, Hideaki; Satoh, Kaneshige

    2015-01-01

    Poor survival is a major problem of adipocyte transplantation. We previously reported that VEGF and MMPs secreted from transplanted adipocytes are essential for angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Pretreatment with low-dose (5 Gy) radiation (LDR) increased VEGF, MMP-2, and HIF-1 alpha mRNA expression in human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (hccdPAs). Gene expression after LDR differed between adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and hccdPAs. Pretreatment with LDR improved the survival of hccdPAs under hypoxia, which is inevitable in the early stages after transplantation. Upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 after LDR in hccdPAs is mediated by HIF-1 alpha expression. Our results suggest that pretreatment with LDR may improve adipocyte graft survival in a clinical setting through upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 via HIF-1 alpha. - Highlights: • Ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) react to radiation. • Low-dose radiation (LDR) pretreatment improves survival of ccdPAs under hypoxia. • Gene expression after LDR differs between ccdPAs and adipose-derived stem cells. • LDR-induced increase in MMP-2 and VEGF is dependent on HIF-1 alpha induction. • LDR pretreatment may improve the adipocyte graft survival rate in clinical settings

  12. Low-dose radiation pretreatment improves survival of human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) under hypoxia via HIF-1 alpha and MMP-2 induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Naoki [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kubota, Yoshitaka, E-mail: kubota-cbu@umin.ac.jp [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kosaka, Kentarou; Akita, Shinsuke; Sasahara, Yoshitarou; Kira, Tomoe [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kuroda, Masayuki [Center for Advanced Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Bujo, Hideaki [Department of Clinical-Laboratory and Experimental-Research Medicine, Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, 564-1 Shimoshizu, Sakura-shi, Chiba, #285-8741 (Japan); Satoh, Kaneshige [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Poor survival is a major problem of adipocyte transplantation. We previously reported that VEGF and MMPs secreted from transplanted adipocytes are essential for angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Pretreatment with low-dose (5 Gy) radiation (LDR) increased VEGF, MMP-2, and HIF-1 alpha mRNA expression in human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (hccdPAs). Gene expression after LDR differed between adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and hccdPAs. Pretreatment with LDR improved the survival of hccdPAs under hypoxia, which is inevitable in the early stages after transplantation. Upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 after LDR in hccdPAs is mediated by HIF-1 alpha expression. Our results suggest that pretreatment with LDR may improve adipocyte graft survival in a clinical setting through upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 via HIF-1 alpha. - Highlights: • Ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) react to radiation. • Low-dose radiation (LDR) pretreatment improves survival of ccdPAs under hypoxia. • Gene expression after LDR differs between ccdPAs and adipose-derived stem cells. • LDR-induced increase in MMP-2 and VEGF is dependent on HIF-1 alpha induction. • LDR pretreatment may improve the adipocyte graft survival rate in clinical settings.

  13. Identification of cellular responses to low-dose radiation by antibody array in human B-lymphoblasts IM-9 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hyeon Soo; Kim, Ji Young; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. LTD., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The low-dose radiation (LDR)-induced various responses can reduce genetic mutation, enhance cell survival, and increase infection resistance (1). The antibody array for global analysis of phosphorylated proteins might be very useful to study signaling networks of LDR-induced cellular responses (2). Therefore, global analysis of phospho- proteins in cells exposed to radiation is important to understand the signaling mechanisms induced by changes of protein phosphorylation which lead to various biological effects by radiation. The aim is to explore the possibility of LDR-specific signaling for various beneficial effects and elucidate the potential signaling pathways representing LDR responses. Our results suggest that LDR did not affect cell death and that the increased proteins phosphorylation by LDR might be involved in various cellular responses for cell homeostasis. These results might be useful to further studies aimed at investigating potential regulatory markers that represent responses to LDR.

  14. Hesperidin and low dose gamma irradiation alleviate rosiglitazone -induced cardiotoxicity in type 2 diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcos, N.Y.; Abdel-Ghaffar, A.B.; Osman, S.A.; Mohamed, M.Kh.; Arbid, M.S.; El-Eraky, W.I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The present study was designed to investigate the cardio protective effect of hesperidin and low dose γ- irradiation (LDR) against rosiglitazone cardiotoxicity. Experiment: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was induced in rats by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) followed by nicotinamide (NIC) (65 and 110 mg/kg b.wt, respectively). The diabetic rats were divided into 5 groups: untreated, LDR, LDR+ rosiglitazone, LDR + Hesperidin, LDR+ rosiglitazone + Hesperidin for one month, and blood and tissue samples were collected. Results: The diabetic rats showed elevated serum creatine kinase (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP), hyaluronidase activity, and reduced serum nitric oxide (NO) level, hematocrit % as well as final body weight, and pathological alterations in myocardial tissue. Treatment with LDR + rosiglitazone + Hesperidin ameliorated all these abnormalities approaching control levels. Conclusion: Results indicate the possible cardio protective role of hesperidin and LDR against rosiglitazone cardiotoxicity.

  15. Identification of cellular responses to low-dose radiation by antibody array in human B-lymphoblasts IM-9 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Hyeon Soo; Kim, Ji Young; Nam, Seon Young

    2017-01-01

    The low-dose radiation (LDR)-induced various responses can reduce genetic mutation, enhance cell survival, and increase infection resistance (1). The antibody array for global analysis of phosphorylated proteins might be very useful to study signaling networks of LDR-induced cellular responses (2). Therefore, global analysis of phospho- proteins in cells exposed to radiation is important to understand the signaling mechanisms induced by changes of protein phosphorylation which lead to various biological effects by radiation. The aim is to explore the possibility of LDR-specific signaling for various beneficial effects and elucidate the potential signaling pathways representing LDR responses. Our results suggest that LDR did not affect cell death and that the increased proteins phosphorylation by LDR might be involved in various cellular responses for cell homeostasis. These results might be useful to further studies aimed at investigating potential regulatory markers that represent responses to LDR

  16. Effects of Centralizing Acute Stroke Services on Stroke Care Provision in Two Large Metropolitan Areas in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Stephen; Hoffman, Alex; Hunter, Rachael M.; Boaden, Ruth; McKevitt, Christopher; Perry, Catherine; Pursani, Nanik; Rudd, Anthony G.; Turner, Simon J.; Tyrrell, Pippa J.; Wolfe, Charles D.A.; Fulop, Naomi J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— In 2010, Greater Manchester and London centralized acute stroke care into hyperacute units (Greater Manchester=3, London=8), with additional units providing ongoing specialist stroke care nearer patients’ homes. Greater Manchester patients presenting within 4 hours of symptom onset were eligible for hyperacute unit admission; all London patients were eligible. Research indicates that postcentralization, only London’s stroke mortality fell significantly more than elsewhere in England. This article attempts to explain this difference by analyzing how centralization affects provision of evidence-based clinical interventions. Methods— Controlled before and after analysis was conducted, using national audit data covering Greater Manchester, London, and a noncentralized urban comparator (38 623 adult stroke patients, April 2008 to December 2012). Likelihood of receiving all interventions measured reliably in pre- and postcentralization audits (brain scan; stroke unit admission; receiving antiplatelet; physiotherapist, nutrition, and swallow assessments) was calculated, adjusting for age, sex, stroke-type, consciousness, and whether stroke occurred in-hospital. Results— Postcentralization, likelihood of receiving interventions increased in all areas. London patients were overall significantly more likely to receive interventions, for example, brain scan within 3 hours: Greater Manchester=65.2% (95% confidence interval=64.3–66.2); London=72.1% (71.4–72.8); comparator=55.5% (54.8–56.3). Hyperacute units were significantly more likely to provide interventions, but fewer Greater Manchester patients were admitted to these (Greater Manchester=39%; London=93%). Differences resulted from contrasting hyperacute unit referral criteria and how reliably they were followed. Conclusions— Centralized systems admitting all stroke patients to hyperacute units, as in London, are significantly more likely to provide evidence-based clinical

  17. Prototype specification of antenna and radio front-end schemes for PAN devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yu; Nguyen, Hung Tuan; johansson, Anders

    2007-01-01

    be implemented in the prototype directly, or used as references in antenna selections for the prototype. Interference mitigation on antenna system level for both HDR and LDR systems is investigated. For the LDR system, interference from the HDR system and UWB systems is identified as most critical. Front......This document provides antenna system specifications for the MAGNET Beyond prototype. Requirements on selecting antenna elements and diversity antenna systems are presented. A number of antenna elements and diversity systems suitable for MAGNET systems are specified. Presented antennas can......-end filtering with high attenuation on 5.2 GHz is suggested to suppress interference from the HDR system. A low-complexity switching diversity antenna system is designed to mitigate UWB interference. The performance of proposed scheme is evaluated with measured channels. The implementation of the scheme...

  18. Comparison of PSA value at last follow-up of patients who underwent low-dose rate brachytherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Nakai, Yasushi; Miyake, Makito; Anai, Satoshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2017-08-25

    To compare the PSA value at the last follow-up of patients who underwent prostate low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) with that of patients who underwent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A total of 610 prostate cancer patients (cT1c-3bN0M0) were enrolled, and 445 of them underwent LDR-BT, while 165 received IMRT (74-76 Gy). The median follow-up period of these two groups was 75 months (LDR-BT) and 78 months (IMRT), respectively. We also evaluated the biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free rate using two definitions (Phoenix definition and PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/mL). The percentage of patients who achieved PSA LDR-BT group and 49.7% in the IMRT group (p LDR-BT group and 32.1% in the IMRT group (p LDR-BT groups was 89.5 and 95.0% (p LDR-BT groups, respectively (p LDR-BT was significantly lower than that of IMRT, and this result was particularly marked in patients with a normal testosterone level at the last follow-up.

  19. Application of PCR-LDR-nucleic acid detection strip in detection of YMDD mutation in hepatitis B patients treated with lamivudine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gaolian; You, Qimin; Pickerill, Sam; Zhong, Huayan; Wang, Hongying; Shi, Jian; Luo, Ying; You, Paul; Kong, Huimin; Lu, Fengmin; Hu, Lin

    2010-07-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (CHBV) infection causes cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Lamivudine (LAM) has been successfully used to treat CHBV infections but prolonged use leads to the emergence of drug-resistant variants. This is primarily linked to a mutation in the tyrosine-methionine-aspartate-aspartate (YMDD) motif of the HBV polymerase gene at position 204. Rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant HBV is necessary for a prompt treatment response. Common diagnostic methods such as sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis lack sensitivity and require significant processing. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of a novel diagnostic method that combines polymerase chain reaction (PCR), ligase detection reaction (LDR) and a nucleic acid detection strip (NADS) in detecting site-specific mutations related to HBV LAM resistance. We compared this method (PLNA) to direct sequencing and RFLP analysis in 50 clinical samples from HBV infected patients. There was 90% concordance between all three results. PLNA detected more samples containing mutant variants than both sequencing and RFLP analysis and was more sensitive in detecting mixed variant populations. Plasmid standards indicated that the sensitivity of PLNA is at or below 3,000 copies per ml and that it can detect a minor variant at 5% of the total viral population. This warrants its further development and suggests that the PLNA method could be a useful tool in detecting LAM resistance. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Brachytherapy Boost Utilization and Survival in Unfavorable-risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Skyler B; Lester-Coll, Nataniel H; Kelly, Jacqueline R; Kann, Benjamin H; Yu, James B; Nath, Sameer K

    2017-11-01

    There are limited comparative survival data for prostate cancer (PCa) patients managed with a low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR-B) boost and dose-escalated external-beam radiotherapy (DE-EBRT) alone. To compare overall survival (OS) for men with unfavorable PCa between LDR-B and DE-EBRT groups. Using the National Cancer Data Base, we identified men with unfavorable PCa treated between 2004 and 2012 with androgen suppression (AS) and either EBRT followed by LDR-B or DE-EBRT (75.6-86.4Gy). Treatment selection was evaluated using logistic regression and annual percentage proportions. OS was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test, Cox proportional hazards, and propensity score matching. We identified 25038 men between 2004 and 2012, during which LDR-B boost utilization decreased from 29% to 14%. LDR-B was associated with better OS on univariate (7-yr OS: 82% vs 73%; pLDR-B boost (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.66-0.89). The OS benefit of LDR-B boost persisted when limited to men aged LDR-B boost utilization declined and was associated with better OS compared to DE-EBRT alone. LDR-B boost is probably the ideal treatment option for men with unfavorable PCa, pending long-term results of randomized trials. We compared radiotherapy utilization and survival for prostate cancer (PCa) patients using a national database. We found that low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR-B) boost, a method being used less frequently, was associated with better overall survival when compared to dose-escalated external-beam radiotherapy alone for men with unfavorable PCa. Randomized trials are needed to confirm that LDR-B boost is the ideal treatment. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. High versus low dose rate intracavitary irradiation for adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo-Chul; Loh, John J.K.; Kim, Gwi-Eon; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been used as a standard modality in the treatment of patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effects of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patients with adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix and to compare them with the effects of LDR brachytherapy. From January 1971 to December 1992, 104 patients suffering from adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated with radiation therapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University. LDR brachytherapy was carried out on 34 patients and HDR brachytherapy on 70 patients. In the LDR group, eight patients were in stage IB, six in IIA, 12 in IIB, three in IIIA and five in IIIB. External radiation therapy was delivered with 10 MV X-rays, 2 Gy fraction per day, total dose of whole pelvis 36-52 Gy (median 46 Gy). LDR radium intracavitary irradiation was performed with a Henschke applicator, 37-59 Gy targeted at point A (median 43 Gy). In the HDR group, there were 16 patients in stage IB, six in IIA, 32 in IIB and 16 in IIIB. The total whole pelvis dose of external radiation was 40-50 Gy (median 44 Gy), daily 1.8-2.0 Gy. HDR Co-60 intracavitary irradiation was performed with a remotely controlled after-loading system (RALS), 30-48 Gy (median 39 Gy) targeted at point A, three times per week, 3 Gy per fraction. The 5-year overall survival rate in the LDR group was 72.9, 61.9 and 35.7% in stage I, II and III, respectively and the corresponding figures for HDR were 87.1, 58.3 and 43.8% (p 0.05). No prognostic factors were evident in the comparison between the two groups. There was no difference in terms of 5-year survival rate in the patients with adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix between those treated with HDR and those treated with LDR brachytherapy. Even though late complication rates were higher in the HDR group, most of them were classified as grade I. This retrospective study suggests that HDR

  2. Low dose rate and high dose rate intracavitary treatment for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atsushi; Shidou, Mitsuo

    1997-01-01

    From 1984 through 1993, 144 previous untreated patients with carcinoma of uterine cervix were treated with either low dose rate 137 Cs therapy (LDR) or high dose rate 60 Co therapy (HDR). The local failure rates for more than 2-years for the primary lesions were 11.8% (8 of 63 patients) for LDR and 18.0% (11 of 61 patients). Rectal complication rates were significantly lower for HDR versus LDR (14.3% VS. 32.8%. p<0.01). Also, bladder complication rates were significantly lower for HDR versus LDR (0% VS. 10.4%, p<0.005). Treatment results in term of local control were equivalent for HDR and LDR treatment. However, the incidence of complications was higher for the LDR group than for the HDR group. (author)

  3. Validation of the (Troponin-only) Manchester ACS decision aid with a contemporary cardiac troponin I assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Va Den Berg, Patricia; Burrows, Gillian; Lewis, Philip; Carley, Simon; Body, Richard

    2018-04-01

    The Manchester Acute Coronary Syndromes (MACS) decision aid can 'rules in' and 'rule out' acute coronary syndromes (ACS) by combining a patient's symptoms with the results of a single blood test taken at the time of arrival in the Emergency Department (ED). The original model (MACS) included two biomarkers: high sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) and heart-type fatty acid binding protein (h-FABP). A refined model without h-FABP was found to have comparable sensitivity but greater specificity. We sought to validate MACS and T-MACS using the contemporary Siemens Advia Centaur cardiac troponin I assay to increase usability in practice. This is a secondary analysis from prospective diagnostic cohort study at Stepping Hill Hospital, United Kingdom. Patients presenting with chest pain of suspected cardiac nature warranting rule out for ACS were included. All patients underwent hs-cTnT testing at least 12h after peak symptoms. The primary outcome was a diagnosis of ACS, defined as either prevalent acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or incident major adverse cardiac events (death, AMI or coronary revascularization) within 30days. Of 405 included patients, 76 (18.8%) had ACS. MACS and T-MACS had similar C-statistics (0.94 for each, p=0.36) and sensitivity (difference 1.3%, 95% CI -1.3 to 3.9%, p=1.00) but T-MACS had significantly greater specificity (difference 16.7%, 95% CI 14.6-18.9%, p<0.0001). T-MACS and MACS would have allowed 36.3% and 22.5% patients to be immediately discharged respectively. Of patients classified as 'very low risk', none had ACS when MACS was used compared to one (0.7%) with T-MACS. Both MACS and T-MACS effectively ruled out ACS even with a contemporary troponin I assay and could be used to reduce unnecessary hospital admissions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. SU-E-T-431: Feasiblity of Using CT Scout Images for 2D LDR Brachytherpay Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, J; Weaver, R [LAC+USC Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, M. Mariscal (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: i) To show the feasibility of using CT scout images for 2D low-dose rate brachytherapy planning with BrachyVision (version 10.4); ii) to show their advantages and disadvantages over DRRs. Methods: A phantom was constructed to house a Fletcher-Suite applicator. The phantom is made of Styrofoam with metal BBs positioned at well-defined separations. These markers are used to assess the image distortion in the scout images. Unlike DRRs, scout images are distorted only in the direction normal to the couch direction; therefore, they needed to be scaled unidirectionally prior to importing into BrachyVision. In addition to confirming the scaling is performed correctly by measuring distances between well-positioned BB, we also compare a LDR plan using scout images to a 3D CT-based plan. Results: There is no distortion of the image along the couch direction due to the collimation of the CT scanner. The distortion in the transverse plane can be corrected by multiplying by the ratio of distances between source-to-isocenter and source-to-detector. The results show the distance separations between BBs as measured in scout images and by a caliber are within a few millimeters. Dosimetrically, the difference between the dose rates to points A and B based on scout images and on 3D CT are less than a few percents. The accuracy can be improved by correcting for the distortion on the transverse plane. Conclusion: It is possible to use CT scout images for 2D planning in BrachyVision. This is an advantage because scout images have no metal artifacts often present in CT images or DRRs. Another advantage is the lack of distortion in the couch direction. One major disadvantage is that the image distortion due to beam divergence can be large. This is due to the inherent short distance between source-to-isocenter and source-to-detector on a CT scanner.

  5. Augmentation of natural cytotoxicity by chronic low-dose ionizing radiation in murine natural killer cells primed by IL-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonn, Chung-Hee; Choi, Jong-Rip; Kim, Tae-Jin

    2012-01-01

    The possible beneficial effects of chronic low-dose irradiation (LDR) and its mechanism of action in a variety of pathophysiological processes such as cancer are a subject of intense investigation. While animal studies involving long-term exposure to LDR have yielded encouraging results, the influence of LDR at the cellular level has been less well defined. We reasoned that since natural killer (NK) cells constitute an early responder to exogenous stress, NK cells may reveal sentinel alterations in function upon exposure to LDR. When purified NK cells received LDR at 4.2 mGy/h for a total of 0.2 Gy in vitro, no significant difference in cell viability was observed. Likewise, no functional changes were detected in LDR-exposed NK cells, demonstrating that LDR alone was insufficient to generate changes at the cellular level. Nonetheless, significant augmentation of cytotoxic, but not proliferative, function was detected when NK cells were stimulated with low-dose IL-2 prior to irradiation. This enhancement of NK cytotoxicity was not due to alterations in NK-activating receptors, NK1.1, NKG2D, CD69 and 2B4, or changes in the rate of early or late apoptosis. Therefore, LDR, in the presence of suboptimal cytokine levels, can facilitate anti-tumor cytotoxicity of NK cells without influencing cellular proliferation or apoptosis. Whether these results translate to in vivo consequences remains to be seen; however, our data provide initial evidence that exposure to LDR can lead to subtle immune-enhancing effects on NK cells and may explain, in part, the functional basis underlying, diverse beneficial effects seen in the animals chronically exposed to LDR. (author)

  6. A comparison of anti-tumor effects of high dose rate fractionated and low dose rate continuous irradiation in multicellular spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Nobuo; Omura, Motoko; Matsubara, Sho.

    1997-01-01

    In a clinical experience, high dose rate (HDR) fractionated interstitial radiotherapy can be an alternative to traditional low dose rate (LDR) continuous interstitial radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. To investigate biological effect of HDR, compared to LDR, comparisons have been made using spheroids of human squamous carcinoma cells. Both LDR and HDR were delivered by 137 Cs at 37degC. Dose rate of LDR was 8 Gy/day and HDR irradiations of fraction size of 4, 5 or 6 Gy were applied twice a day with an interval time of more than 6 hr. We estimated HDR fractionated dose of 31 Gy with 4 Gy/fr to give the same biological effects of 38 Gy by continuous LDR for spheroids. The ratio of HDR/LDR doses to control 50% spheroids was 0.82. (author)

  7. Dose specification and normal tissue reference points in the treatment of cancer cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, D.K.; Kumar, P.; Misra, D.K.; Das, R.; Kumar, A.; Maji, T.; Chaudhuri, P.; Sinha, T.P.

    2007-01-01

    Carcinoma of uterine cervix is one of the most common diseases among the women in India where radiotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. Most common practice of dose prescription point is the Manchester Point A. American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommends a point H equivalent to that used in the classical Manchester system. Many centre practices Madison point M as dose specification point which is 20 mm cephaled along the tandem from a line joining the mid dwell positions in the ovoids/ring and 20 mm lateral to the tandem. In the present study has compared the dose prescription points between Manchester Point A and Madison Point M for ring applicators and their implication in the assessment of rectal and bladder doses in patients of Carcinoma of uterine cervix

  8. System-level change in mental health services in North Wales: An observational study using systems thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S; Huxley, P J; Maxwell, N; Huxley, K L S

    2014-06-01

    To describe changes to mental health services using systems thinking. Structured standardized quality of life assessment (Manchester Short Quality of Life Assessment: MANSA) was used to establish service user priorities for changes to service provision (part of a process known as check in systems thinking). Current service performance in these priority areas was identified, and changes to service arrangements were planned, implemented and monitored by task and finish (T&F) groups (making use of a process known as flow in systems thinking). 81 MANSA assessments were completed at the check stage (by NM). Work finances and leisure activities emerged as service user priority areas for change, and T&F groups were established with representation of all sectors and service users. Ways to make improvements were observed, planned and implemented by T&F groups (the flow stage). The systems approach reveals how services and quality of life have been changed for patients in Wrexham. Further generalizable research is needed into the potential benefits of using systems thinking in mental health service evaluation. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Stereo Vision-Based High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Differently-Exposed Image Pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Jae Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a high dynamic range (HDR imaging method based on the stereo vision system is presented. The proposed method uses differently exposed low dynamic range (LDR images captured from a stereo camera. The stereo LDR images are first converted to initial stereo HDR images using the inverse camera response function estimated from the LDR images. However, due to the limited dynamic range of the stereo LDR camera, the radiance values in under/over-exposed regions of the initial main-view (MV HDR image can be lost. To restore these radiance values, the proposed stereo matching and hole-filling algorithms are applied to the stereo HDR images. Specifically, the auxiliary-view (AV HDR image is warped by using the estimated disparity between initial the stereo HDR images and then effective hole-filling is applied to the warped AV HDR image. To reconstruct the final MV HDR, the warped and hole-filled AV HDR image is fused with the initial MV HDR image using the weight map. The experimental results demonstrate objectively and subjectively that the proposed stereo HDR imaging method provides better performance compared to the conventional method.

  10. Automatic Lamp and Fan Control Based on Microcontroller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widyaningrum, V. T.; Pramudita, Y. D.

    2018-01-01

    In general, automation can be described as a process following pre-determined sequential steps with a little or without any human exertion. Automation is provided with the use of various sensors suitable to observe the production processes, actuators and different techniques and devices. In this research, the automation system developed is an automatic lamp and an automatic fan on the smart home. Both of these systems will be processed using an Arduino Mega 2560 microcontroller. A microcontroller is used to obtain values of physical conditions through sensors connected to it. In the automatic lamp system required sensors to detect the light of the LDR (Light Dependent Resistor) sensor. While the automatic fan system required sensors to detect the temperature of the DHT11 sensor. In tests that have been done lamps and fans can work properly. The lamp can turn on automatically when the light begins to darken, and the lamp can also turn off automatically when the light begins to bright again. In addition, it can concluded also that the readings of LDR sensors are placed outside the room is different from the readings of LDR sensors placed in the room. This is because the light intensity received by the existing LDR sensor in the room is blocked by the wall of the house or by other objects. Then for the fan, it can also turn on automatically when the temperature is greater than 25°C, and the fan speed can also be adjusted. The fan may also turn off automatically when the temperature is less than equal to 25°C.

  11. Burn related mortality in Greater Manchester: 11-year review of Regional Coronial Department Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Amer; Dunn, Ken

    2015-03-01

    The Coroners Department (CD) records hold important demographic, injury and death details for victims of burn injuries derived from various sources yet this rich source of data has been infrequently utilised previously in describing the epidemiology of burn related mortality. The aim of this study was to use CD data to comprehensively investigate burn related mortality in the Greater Manchester region of United Kingdom. A retrospective study design was used to collect data for deceased demographics, injury details, site of death and cause of death from four CD offices in GM over an 11-year period (2000-2010 inclusive). Office of National Statistics (ONS) population metrics were used to calculate age- and gender-specific population denominators and mortality rates. Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) was used to correlate mortality with deprivation. Linear regression and Pearson's/Spearman's rank correlation were used to calculate trends and correlations. Poisson regression was used to calculate relative risk (IRR) between age- and gender groups. There were 314 recorded deaths in the region over the study period and thermal injury was 3-times less likely to result in death in 2010 compared to 2000. The largest proportion of these deaths (24.8%) was comprised of individuals ≥75 years in age. The relative risk of mortality in males was nearly 1.5-times higher and a significant majority of victims (77%) sustained their burn injury at their own home/residence. Inhalation injury without cutaneous burns was the most frequent type of injury (33%) and accidental house fires caused nearly half (49%) the injuries resulting in death. Sixty-five percent of deaths during this period were recorded to have occurred outside of regional burn service (RBS) hospitals and the commonest cause of immediate death on the death certificates was "inhalation of products of combustion" (32.1%). Within the >75 years age group the risk of death significantly increased with every quintile

  12. Perceived aesthetic impact of malocclusion and oral self-perceptions in 14-15-year-old Asian and Caucasian children in greater Manchester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandall, N A; McCord, J F; Blinkhorn, A S; Worthington, H V; O'Brien, K D

    2000-04-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate (i) the effect of ethnicity, social deprivation, and normative orthodontic treatment need on orthodontic aesthetic self-perception, self-perceived need for orthodontic treatment, and oral aesthetic impact of malocclusion; (ii) the effect of ethnicity, social deprivation, and gender on perceived orthodontic treatment need and use of orthodontic services; (iii) the influence of perceived oral aesthetic impact of malocclusion on perceived need and wish for orthodontic treatment; and (iv) whether orthodontic treatment experience influences perceived oral aesthetic impact of malocclusion. A stratified, random sample of 434 14-15-year-old children from schools in Manchester, UK, was obtained. Information was collected on orthodontic aesthetic self-perception and orthodontic treatment experience using a questionnaire. The former data were combined to form an Oral Aesthetic Subjective Impact Scale (OASIS). Normative orthodontic treatment need was measured with the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). Children with higher clinical need for orthodontic treatment perceived themselves as worse off than their peers with lower need. More socially deprived children or those with high IOTN aesthetic component (AC) scores had a higher (i.e. more negative) aesthetic impact (OASIS) score. Asians and females had higher IOTN dental health component (DHC) scores, but a better aesthetic appearance than Caucasians and males. More deprived children were less likely to have received orthodontic treatment. Despite this, OASIS scores were similar between treated and untreated children. Untreated children who wished for orthodontic treatment had higher IOTN AC and OASIS scores.

  13. Inverse dose-rate-effects on the expressions of extra-cellular matrix-related genes in low-dose-rate γ-ray irradiated murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Takashi; Tanaka, Kimio; Oghiso, Yoichi; Murano, Hayato

    2008-01-01

    Based on the results of previous microarray analyses of murine NIH3T3/PG13Luc cells irradiated with continuous low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-ray or end-high-dose-rate-irradiations (end-HDR) at the end of the LDR-irradiation period, the inverse dose-rate-effects on gene expression levels were observed. To compare differences of the effects between LDR-irradiation and HDR-irradiation, HDR-irradiations at 2 different times, one (ini-HDR) at the same time at the start of LDR-irradiation and the other (end-HDR), were performed. The up-regulated genes were classified into two types, in which one was up-regulated in LDR-, ini-HDR-, and end-HDR irradiation such as Cdkn1a and Ccng1, which were reported as p53-dependent genes, and the other was up-regulated in LDR- and ini-HDR irradiations such as pro-collagen TypeIa2/Colla2, TenascinC/Tnc, and Fibulin5/Fbln5, which were reported as extra-cellular matrix-related (ECM) genes. The time dependent gene expression patterns in LDR-irradiation were also classified into two types, in which one was an early response such as in Cdkn1a and Ccng1 and the other was a delayed response such as the ECM genes which have no linearity to total dose. The protein expression pattern of Cdkn1a increased dose dependently in LDR- and end-HDR-irradiations, but those of p53Ser15/18 and MDM2 in LDR-irradiations were different from end-HDR-irradiations. Furthermore, the gene expression levels of the ECM genes in embryonic fibroblasts from p53-deficient mice were not increased by LDR- and end-HDR-irradiation, so the delayed expressions of the ECM genes seem to be regulated by p53. Consequently, the inverse dose-rate-effects on the expression levels of the ECM genes in LDR- and end-HDR-irradiations may be explained from different time responses by p53 status. (author)

  14. Radiation-induced adaptive response and intracellular signal transduction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Akira

    2009-01-01

    As an essential biological function, cells can sense the radiation even at low dose and respond to it, and which is one of bases of the radiation-induced adaptive response (AR) where effects caused by high dose radiation are reduced by prior exposure to low dose radiation (LDR). Here described are studies of AR in well established m5S cells on the intracellular signal transduction that involves sensing of LDR and transmitting of its signal within the cell network. The first signal for AR yielded by LDR on the cell membrane is exactly unknown though hydrogen peroxide and phorbol ester (PMA) can reportedly cause AR. As PMA activates protein kinase C (PKC) and its inhibitors suppress AR, participation of PKC in AR has been suggested and supported by studies showing PKCα activation by LDR. In addition, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is shown to participate in AR by those facts that the enzyme is activated by LDR, a p38 MAPK inhibitor suppresses AR, and PKC inhibitors suppress the enzyme activation, which also suggesting that the signaling from PKC to p38 MAPK can become operative by LDR. However, the possible reverse signaling is also suggested, and thus the activation of positive feedback mechanism is postulated in PKC/p38 MAPK/phospholipase δ1/ PKC pathway. Cells introduced with siRNA against Prkca gene (coding PKCs) produce reduced amount of the enzyme, particularly, of PKCα. In those cells, AR by 5 Gy X-ray is not observed and thereby PKCα is involved in AR. The signaling in AR is only partly elucidated at present as above, and more detailed studies including identification of more PKC subtypes and signaling to DNA repair system are considered necessary. (K.T.)

  15. Comparison between beta radiation dose distribution due to LDR and HDR ocular brachytherapy applicators using GATE Monte Carlo platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Laoues; Rachid, Khelifi; Ahmed, Sidi Moussa

    2016-08-01

    Eye applicators with 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources are generally used in brachytherapy for the treatment of eye diseases as uveal melanoma. Whenever, radiation is used in treatment, dosimetry is essential. However, knowledge of the exact dose distribution is a critical decision-making to the outcome of the treatment. The Monte Carlo technique provides a powerful tool for calculation of the dose and dose distributions which helps to predict and determine the doses from different shapes of various types of eye applicators more accurately. The aim of this work consisted in using the Monte Carlo GATE platform to calculate the 3D dose distribution on a mathematical model of the human eye according to international recommendations. Mathematical models were developed for four ophthalmic applicators, two HDR 90Sr applicators SIA.20 and SIA.6, and two LDR 106Ru applicators, a concave CCB model and a flat CCB model. In present work, considering a heterogeneous eye phantom and the chosen tumor, obtained results with the use of GATE for mean doses distributions in a phantom and according to international recommendations show a discrepancy with respect to those specified by the manufacturers. The QC of dosimetric parameters shows that contrarily to the other applicators, the SIA.20 applicator is consistent with recommendations. The GATE platform show that the SIA.20 applicator present better results, namely the dose delivered to critical structures were lower compared to those obtained for the other applicators, and the SIA.6 applicator, simulated with MCNPX generates higher lens doses than those generated by GATE. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence, persistence, and phenotypic variation of Aspergillus fumigatus in the outdoor environment in Manchester, UK, over a 2-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshareef, Fadwa; Robson, Geoffrey D

    2014-05-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes invasive aspergillosis in immunosuppressed patients, is considered to be the world's most dangerous mould. It is widely distributed in the environment, and airborne asexual conidia serve as the main mode of transport for pulmonary lung infection. It is important to monitor seasonal airborne conidia levels when assessing the risk of acquiring this infection. In this study, air was sampled for total viable fungal spores and viable A. fumigatus conidia monthly over a 2-year period (2009 and 2010) close to Manchester, UK, city center. Total viable airborne fungal counts varied seasonally, peaking in the summer and autumn for both years and reaching levels of approximately 1100-1400 colony-forming units (CFU)/m(3); counts were strongly positively correlated to mean temperature (R(2) = 0.697). By contrast, A. fumigatus viable airborne counts were not seasonally associated; persistent low levels were between 3 and 20 CFU/m(3) and were not correlated with mean temperature (R(2) = 0.018). A total of 220 isolates of A. fumigatus were recovered on potato dextrose agar (PDA) at 45°C, and internal transcribed spacer sequencing and restriction digestion of a partial polymerase chain reaction amplicon of the β-tubulin gene (benA) of 34 randomly selected isolates were used to confirm the isolates as A. fumigatus. When the colony radial growth rates (Kr) were determined, the highest rates were observed on PDA, followed by Vogel's medium supplemented with phosphatidylcholine and Vogel's medium alone. Clinical isolates had a significantly higher mean colony Kr on PDA compared with environmental isolates.

  17. Delivery of chlamydia screening to young women requesting emergency hormonal contraception at pharmacies in Manchester, UK: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Brien Karen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More women are requesting Emergency Hormonal Contraception (EHC at pharmacies where screening for Chlamydia trachomatis is not routinely offered. The objective of this study was to assess the uptake of free postal chlamydia screening by women under 25 years who requested EHC at pharmacies in Manchester, UK. Methods Six Primary Care Trusts (PCTs that had contracted with pharmacies to provide free EHC, requested the largest EHC providers (≥ 40 doses annually to also offer these clients a coded chlamydia home testing kit. Pharmacies kept records of the ages and numbers of women who accepted or refused chlamydia kits. Women sent urine samples directly to the laboratory for testing and positive cases were notified. Audit data on EHC coverage was obtained from PCTs to assess the proportion of clients eligible for screening and to verify the uptake rate. Results 33 pharmacies participated. Audit data for 131 pharmacy months indicated that only 24.8% (675/2718 of women provided EHC were also offered chlamydia screening. Based on tracking forms provided by pharmacies for the whole of the study, 1348/2904 EHC clients (46.4% who had been offered screening accepted a screening kit. 264 (17.6% of those who accepted a kit returned a sample, of whom 24 (9.1% were chlamydia-positive. There was an increase in chlamydia positivity with age (OR: 1.2 per year; 1.04 to 1.44; p = 0.015. Conclusion Chlamydia screening for EHC pharmacy clients is warranted but failure of pharmacists to target all EHC clients represented a missed opportunity for treating a well defined high-risk group.

  18. Gamma Low-Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Adaptive Functional and Molecular Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells in a Threshold-, Dose-, and Dose Rate-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Dias, Juliana; Gloaguen, Celine; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Manens, Line; Tack, Karine; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2018-01-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is whether low-dose and low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures to ionizing radiation play a role in progression of cardiovascular disease. The response of endothelial cells to different LDR exposures may help estimate risk of cardiovascular disease by providing the biological mechanism involved. We investigated the effect of chronic LDR radiation on functional and molecular responses of human aorta endothelial cells (HAoECs). Human aorta endothelial cells were continuously irradiated at LDR (6 mGy/h) for 15 days and analyzed at time points when the cumulative dose reached 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy. The same doses were administered acutely at high-dose rate (HDR; 1 Gy/min). The threshold for the loss of angiogenic capacity for both LDR and HDR radiations was between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. At 2.0 Gy, angiogenic capacity returned to normal only for HAoEC exposed to LDR radiation, associated with increased expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes. Pre-LDR, but not pre-HDR, radiation, followed by a single acute 2.0 Gy challenge dose sustained the expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes and stimulated angiogenesis. Our results suggest that dose rate is important in cellular response and that a radioadaptive response is involved for a 2.0 Gy dose at LDR.

  19. Gamma Low-Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Adaptive Functional and Molecular Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells in a Threshold-, Dose-, and Dose Rate–Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Dias, Juliana; Gloaguen, Celine; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Manens, Line; Tack, Karine; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2018-01-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is whether low-dose and low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures to ionizing radiation play a role in progression of cardiovascular disease. The response of endothelial cells to different LDR exposures may help estimate risk of cardiovascular disease by providing the biological mechanism involved. We investigated the effect of chronic LDR radiation on functional and molecular responses of human aorta endothelial cells (HAoECs). Human aorta endothelial cells were continuously irradiated at LDR (6 mGy/h) for 15 days and analyzed at time points when the cumulative dose reached 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy. The same doses were administered acutely at high-dose rate (HDR; 1 Gy/min). The threshold for the loss of angiogenic capacity for both LDR and HDR radiations was between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. At 2.0 Gy, angiogenic capacity returned to normal only for HAoEC exposed to LDR radiation, associated with increased expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes. Pre-LDR, but not pre-HDR, radiation, followed by a single acute 2.0 Gy challenge dose sustained the expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes and stimulated angiogenesis. Our results suggest that dose rate is important in cellular response and that a radioadaptive response is involved for a 2.0 Gy dose at LDR. PMID:29531508

  20. Effects of low dose radiation on differentiation, activation and apoptosis of thymocytes in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Xu; Zhang Yingchun; Wan Hong; Liu Shuzheng

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the possible mechanism of immunoenhancement after low dose radiation (LDR), the differentiation, activation and apoptosis of thymocytes following low dose irradiation were studied. Method: Kunming mice were whole-body irradiated (WBI) with low dose X-rays. The expressions of CD4, CD8, TCR, CD3, IL-2R, (Ca 2+ ) i , Bcl-2 Bax and apoptosis of thymocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: It was found that the ratio of T H /T S showed no significant changes after LDR. Thymocyte apoptosis was not increased after LDR. The increase of Bcl-2/Bax ratio after LDR might be one of its mechanisms. LDR could expedites the process of differentiation of, and facilitate the signal transduction in, thymocytes. Conclusion: The results indicate that the mechanism of immunoenhancement might be related to the expedition of the maturation, differentiation and activation of thymocytes, thus up-regulating the capability of supplying more mature T lymphocytes to the periphery by the thymus after LDR

  1. Double Ramp Loss Based Reject Option Classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-22

    of convex (DC) functions. To minimize it, we use DC programming approach [1]. The proposed method has following advantages: (1) the proposed loss LDR ...space constraints. We see that LDR does not put any restriction on ρ for it to be an upper bound of L0−d−1. 2.2 Risk Formulation Using LDR Let S = {(xn...classifier learnt using LDR based approach (C = 100, μ = 1, d = .2). Filled circles and triangles represent the support vectors. 4 Experimental Results We show

  2. Time Course and Accumulated Risk of Severe Urinary Adverse Events After High- Versus Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tward, Jonathan D., E-mail: Jonathan.Tward@hci.utah.edu [Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Thorpe, Cameron; Shrieve, Dennis C. [Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Elliott, Sean [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Severe urinary adverse events (UAEs) include surgical treatment of urethral stricture, urinary incontinence, and radiation cystitis. We compared the incidence of grade 3 UAEs, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, after low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, as well as after LDR plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and HDR plus EBRT. Methods and Materials: Men aged >65 years with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database who were treated with LDR (n=12,801), HDR (n=685), LDR plus EBRT (n=8518), or HDR plus EBRT (n=2392). The populations were balanced by propensity weighting, and the Kaplan-Meier incidence of severe UAEs was compared. Propensity-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the adjusted hazard of UAEs. These UAEs were compared with those in a cohort of men not treated for prostate cancer. Results: Median follow-up was 4.3 years. At 8 years, the propensity-weighted cumulative UAE incidence was highest after HDR plus EBRT (26.6% [95% confidence interval, 23.8%-29.7%]) and lowest after LDR (15.7% [95% confidence interval, 14.8%-16.6%]). The absolute excess risk over nontreated controls at 8 years was 1.9%, 3.8%, 8.4%, and 12.9% for LDR, HDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT, respectively. These represent numbers needed to harm of 53, 26, 12, and 8 persons, respectively. The additional risk of development of a UAE related to treatment for LDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT was greatest within the 2 years after treatment and then continued to decline over time. Beyond 4 years, the risk of development of a new severe UAE matched the baseline risk of the control population for all treatments. Conclusions: Toxicity differences were observed between LDR and HDR, but the differences did not meet statistical significance. However, combination radiation therapy (either HDR plus EBRT or LDR plus

  3. Time Course and Accumulated Risk of Severe Urinary Adverse Events After High- Versus Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tward, Jonathan D.; Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao; Thorpe, Cameron; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Elliott, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Severe urinary adverse events (UAEs) include surgical treatment of urethral stricture, urinary incontinence, and radiation cystitis. We compared the incidence of grade 3 UAEs, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, after low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, as well as after LDR plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and HDR plus EBRT. Methods and Materials: Men aged >65 years with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database who were treated with LDR (n=12,801), HDR (n=685), LDR plus EBRT (n=8518), or HDR plus EBRT (n=2392). The populations were balanced by propensity weighting, and the Kaplan-Meier incidence of severe UAEs was compared. Propensity-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the adjusted hazard of UAEs. These UAEs were compared with those in a cohort of men not treated for prostate cancer. Results: Median follow-up was 4.3 years. At 8 years, the propensity-weighted cumulative UAE incidence was highest after HDR plus EBRT (26.6% [95% confidence interval, 23.8%-29.7%]) and lowest after LDR (15.7% [95% confidence interval, 14.8%-16.6%]). The absolute excess risk over nontreated controls at 8 years was 1.9%, 3.8%, 8.4%, and 12.9% for LDR, HDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT, respectively. These represent numbers needed to harm of 53, 26, 12, and 8 persons, respectively. The additional risk of development of a UAE related to treatment for LDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT was greatest within the 2 years after treatment and then continued to decline over time. Beyond 4 years, the risk of development of a new severe UAE matched the baseline risk of the control population for all treatments. Conclusions: Toxicity differences were observed between LDR and HDR, but the differences did not meet statistical significance. However, combination radiation therapy (either HDR plus EBRT or LDR plus

  4. Time Course and Accumulated Risk of Severe Urinary Adverse Events After High- Versus Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tward, Jonathan D; Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao; Thorpe, Cameron; Shrieve, Dennis C; Elliott, Sean

    2016-08-01

    Severe urinary adverse events (UAEs) include surgical treatment of urethral stricture, urinary incontinence, and radiation cystitis. We compared the incidence of grade 3 UAEs, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, after low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, as well as after LDR plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and HDR plus EBRT. Men aged >65 years with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database who were treated with LDR (n=12,801), HDR (n=685), LDR plus EBRT (n=8518), or HDR plus EBRT (n=2392). The populations were balanced by propensity weighting, and the Kaplan-Meier incidence of severe UAEs was compared. Propensity-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the adjusted hazard of UAEs. These UAEs were compared with those in a cohort of men not treated for prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 4.3 years. At 8 years, the propensity-weighted cumulative UAE incidence was highest after HDR plus EBRT (26.6% [95% confidence interval, 23.8%-29.7%]) and lowest after LDR (15.7% [95% confidence interval, 14.8%-16.6%]). The absolute excess risk over nontreated controls at 8 years was 1.9%, 3.8%, 8.4%, and 12.9% for LDR, HDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT, respectively. These represent numbers needed to harm of 53, 26, 12, and 8 persons, respectively. The additional risk of development of a UAE related to treatment for LDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT was greatest within the 2 years after treatment and then continued to decline over time. Beyond 4 years, the risk of development of a new severe UAE matched the baseline risk of the control population for all treatments. Toxicity differences were observed between LDR and HDR, but the differences did not meet statistical significance. However, combination radiation therapy (either HDR plus EBRT or LDR plus EBRT) increases the risk of severe UAEs compared with HDR

  5. Apoptosis of bone marrow leukemia cells in mice after low dose radiation at different time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guangyu; Yu Mingming; Li Xianjun; Liu Zhixiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the apoptosis of bone marrow leukemia cell in mice after low dose radiation (LDR) at different time and the experimental basis for LDR auxiliary therapy on leukemia. Methods: WEHI-3 cells were injected into BALB/c mice through tail veins to make an experimental mice model of myelornonocytic leukemia. 60 leukemia mice models were divided half-and half. 30 mice models in experimental group were irradiated with LDR of 75mGy at the same time while the others 30 in the control group were not. 6 mice models with LDR and 6 mice models without LDR would be killed at the time the 1st day, the 2nd day, the 3rd day, the 5th day- and the l0th day after LDR in order to extract bone marrow samples. The apoptosis percentage of leukemia cells in bone marrow was examined. Results: The apoptosis percentage of leukemia cells in experimental group was increasing after LDR and went to top on the 2nd day and the 3rd day. The apoptosis percentage of leukemia cells was remarkably different between experimental and control group, all P<0.05. Conclusion: LDR could significantly increase the apoptosis percentage of bone marrow leukemia cells in mice. Its mechanism is remarkably different in kill and wound of big dose radiation to tumour cells. It is probably related to of the increase immune exciting response as to promote some cytokine secretion, in leukemia mice. (authors)

  6. How to optimize therapeutic ratio in brachytherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeron, J.J.; Simon, J.M.; Hardiman, C.; Gerbaulet, A.

    1998-01-01

    Considerable experience has been accumulated with low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx, 4 cm or less in diameter. Recent analysis of large clinical series provided data indicating that modalities of LDR brachytherapy should be optimized in treating these tumours for increasing therapeutic ratio. LDR brachytherapy is now challenged by high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy. Preliminary results obtained with the last two modalities are discussed in comparison with those achieved with LDR brachytherapy. (orig.)

  7. Assembly considerations for large reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, H.

    1988-01-01

    The technologies developed at LaRC in the area of erectable instructures are discussed. The information is of direct value to the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) because an option for the LDR backup structure is to assemble it in space. The efforts in this area, which include development of joints, underwater assembly simulation tests, flight assembly/disassembly tests, and fabrication of 5-meter trusses, led to the use of the LaRC concept as the baseline configuration for the Space Station Structure. The Space Station joint is linear in the load and displacement range of interest to Space Station; the ability to manually assemble and disassemble a 45-foot truss structure was demonstrated by astronauts in space as part of the ACCESS Shuttle Flight Experiment. The structure was built in 26 minutes 46 seconds, and involved a total of 500 manipulations of untethered hardware. Also, the correlation of the space experience with the neutral buoyancy simulation was very good. Sections of the proposed 5-meter bay Space Station truss have been built on the ground. Activities at LaRC have included the development of mobile remote manipulator systems (which can traverse the Space Station 5-meter structure), preliminary LDR sun shield concepts, LDR construction scenarios, and activities in robotic assembly of truss-type structures.

  8. 1997 Hanford site report on land disposal restrictions for mixed waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, D.G.

    1997-04-07

    The baseline land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan was prepared in 1990 in accordance with the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (commonly referred to as the Tn-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-00 (Ecology et al, 1989). The text of this milestone is below. ''LDR requirements include limitations on storage of specified hazardous wastes (including mixed wastes). In accordance with approved plans and schedules, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shall develop and implement technologies necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements for mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. LDR plans and schedules shall be developed with consideration of other action plan milestones and will not become effective until approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (or Washington State Department of Ecology [Ecology]) upon authorization to administer LDRs pursuant to Section 3006 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Disposal of LDR wastes at any time is prohibited except in accordance with applicable LDR requirements for nonradioactive wastes at all times. The plan will include, but not be limited to, the following: Waste characterization plan; Storage report; Treatment report; Treatment plan; Waste minimization plan; A schedule depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements; and A process for establishing interim milestones.

  9. 1997 Hanford site report on land disposal restrictions for mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    The baseline land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan was prepared in 1990 in accordance with the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (commonly referred to as the Tn-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-00 (Ecology et al, 1989). The text of this milestone is below. ''LDR requirements include limitations on storage of specified hazardous wastes (including mixed wastes). In accordance with approved plans and schedules, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shall develop and implement technologies necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements for mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. LDR plans and schedules shall be developed with consideration of other action plan milestones and will not become effective until approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (or Washington State Department of Ecology [Ecology]) upon authorization to administer LDRs pursuant to Section 3006 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Disposal of LDR wastes at any time is prohibited except in accordance with applicable LDR requirements for nonradioactive wastes at all times. The plan will include, but not be limited to, the following: Waste characterization plan; Storage report; Treatment report; Treatment plan; Waste minimization plan; A schedule depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements; and A process for establishing interim milestones

  10. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, high-dose rate brachytherapy, and low-dose rate permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ruijie, E-mail: ruijyang@yahoo.com; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Anyan; Wang, Hao; Qu, Ang

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, and low-dose rate (LDR) permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer. A total of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer were selected for this study. VMAT, HDR brachytherapy, and LDR permanent seeds implant plans were created for each patient. For VMAT, planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the clinical target volume plus a margin of 5 mm. Rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads were considered as organs at risk. A 78 Gy in 39 fractions were prescribed for PTV. For HDR and LDR plans, the dose prescription was D{sub 90} of 34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction, and 145 Gy to clinical target volume, respectively. The dose and dose volume parameters were evaluated for target, organs at risk, and normal tissue. Physical dose was converted to dose based on 2-Gy fractions (equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction, EQD{sub 2}) for comparison of 3 techniques. HDR and LDR significantly reduced the dose to rectum and bladder compared with VMAT. The D{sub mean} (EQD{sub 2}) of rectum decreased 22.36 Gy in HDR and 17.01 Gy in LDR from 30.24 Gy in VMAT, respectively. The D{sub mean} (EQD{sub 2}) of bladder decreased 6.91 Gy in HDR and 2.53 Gy in LDR from 13.46 Gy in VMAT. For the femoral heads and normal tissue, the mean doses were also significantly reduced in both HDR and LDR compared with VMAT. For the urethra, the mean dose (EQD{sub 2}) was 80.26, 70.23, and 104.91 Gy in VMAT, HDR, and LDR brachytherapy, respectively. For localized prostate cancer, both HDR and LDR brachytherapy were clearly superior in the sparing of rectum, bladder, femoral heads, and normal tissue compared with VMAT. HDR provided the advantage in sparing of urethra compared with VMAT and LDR.

  11. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, high-dose rate brachytherapy, and low-dose rate permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ruijie; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Anyan; Wang, Hao; Qu, Ang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, and low-dose rate (LDR) permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer. A total of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer were selected for this study. VMAT, HDR brachytherapy, and LDR permanent seeds implant plans were created for each patient. For VMAT, planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the clinical target volume plus a margin of 5 mm. Rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads were considered as organs at risk. A 78 Gy in 39 fractions were prescribed for PTV. For HDR and LDR plans, the dose prescription was D 90 of 34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction, and 145 Gy to clinical target volume, respectively. The dose and dose volume parameters were evaluated for target, organs at risk, and normal tissue. Physical dose was converted to dose based on 2-Gy fractions (equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction, EQD 2 ) for comparison of 3 techniques. HDR and LDR significantly reduced the dose to rectum and bladder compared with VMAT. The D mean (EQD 2 ) of rectum decreased 22.36 Gy in HDR and 17.01 Gy in LDR from 30.24 Gy in VMAT, respectively. The D mean (EQD 2 ) of bladder decreased 6.91 Gy in HDR and 2.53 Gy in LDR from 13.46 Gy in VMAT. For the femoral heads and normal tissue, the mean doses were also significantly reduced in both HDR and LDR compared with VMAT. For the urethra, the mean dose (EQD 2 ) was 80.26, 70.23, and 104.91 Gy in VMAT, HDR, and LDR brachytherapy, respectively. For localized prostate cancer, both HDR and LDR brachytherapy were clearly superior in the sparing of rectum, bladder, femoral heads, and normal tissue compared with VMAT. HDR provided the advantage in sparing of urethra compared with VMAT and LDR.

  12. Wireless ZigBee home automation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciunescu, Razvan; Halunga, Simona; Fratu, Octavian

    2015-02-01

    The home automation system concept existed for many years but in the last decade, due to the rapid development of sensors and wireless technologies, a large number of various such "intelligent homes" have been developed. The purpose of the present paper is to demonstrate the flexibility, reliability and affordability of home automation projects, based on a simple and affordable implementation. A wireless sensing and control system have been developed and tested, having a number of basic functionalities such as switching on/off the light according to ambient lighting and turning on/off the central heating. The system has been built around low power microcontrollers and ZigBee modems for wireless communication, using a set of Vishay 640 thermistor sensors for temperature measurements and Vishay LDR07 photo-resistor for humidity measurements. A trigger is activated when the temperature or light measurements are above/below a given threshold and a command is transmitted to the central unit through the ZigBee radio module. All the data processing is performed by a low power microcontroller both at the sensing device and at the control unit.

  13. Low dose radiation induced protein and its experimental and ophthalmic clinical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Wei; Su Liaoyuan; Liu Fenju; Ding Jie; Li Longbiao; Pan Chengsi

    2001-01-01

    The protective effects of low dose radiation (LDR) induced protein on cellular impairments caused by some harmful chemical and physical factors were studied. Male Kunming mice were irradiated with LDR, then the spleen cells of the mice were broken with ultrasonic energy and then ultracentrifugalized. The supernatant solution contained with LDR induced protein. The newly emerging protein was detected by gel filtration and its molecular weight was determined by gel electrophoresis. The content of newly emerging protein (LDR induced protein) was determined by Lowry's method. The method of isotope incorporation was used to observe the biological activity and its influence factors, the protective effects of LDR induced protein on the cells impaired by irradiating with ultraviolet (UV), high doses of 60 Co γ-rays and exposed to heat respectively, and the stimulative effects of LDR induced protein on human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Newly emerging protein has been observed in the experiment. The molecular weight of the protein is in the region 76.9 KD+- - 110.0 KD+-, the yield of the protein was 613.33 +- 213.42 μg per 3 x 10 7 spleen cells. DPM values (isotope were incorporated) of normal and injured mice spleen cells increased significantly after stimulating with the solution contained LDR induced protein. It is concluded that LDR induced protein could be obtained from mice spleen cells exposed to 5 - 15 cGy radiation for 2 - 16 h. The protein had biological activity and was able to stimulate the transformation of the spleen cells in vitro. It had obvious protective effects on some impaired cells caused by high dose radiation, UV radiation, heat and so on. It also had stimulative effects on the transformation of peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes of healthy individual and patients with eye diseases. It indicates that LDR induced protein increased immune function of human

  14. Phase III trial of high and low dose rate interstitial radiotherapy for early oral tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Teshima, Teruki; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Fuchihata, Hajime; Furukawa, Souhei

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Oral tongue carcinomas are highly curable with radiotherapy. In the past, patients with tongue carcinoma have usually been treated with low dose rate (LDR) interstitial radiation. This Phase III study was designed to compare the treatment results obtained with LDR with those obtained with high dose rate (HDR) interstitial radiotherapy for tongue carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The criteria for patient selection for the Phase III study were: (a) presence of a T1T2N0 tumor that could be treated with single-plane implantation, (b) localization of tumor at the lateral tongue border, (c) tumor thickness of 10 mm or less, (d) performance status between O and 3, and (e) absence of any severe concurrent disease. From April 1992 through December 1993, 15 patients in the LDR group (70 Gy/4 to 9 days) and 14 patients in the HDR group (60 Gy/10 fractions/6 days) were accrued. The time interval between two fractions of the HDR brachytherapy was more than 6 h. Results: Local recurrence occurred in two patients treated with LDR brachytherapy but in none of the patients treated with HDR. One- and 2-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were both 86%, compared with 100% in the HDR group (p = 0.157). There were four patients with nodal metastasis in the LDR group and three in the HDR group. Local recurrence occurred in two of the four patients with nodal metastases in the LDR group. One- and 2-year nodal control rates for patients in the LDR group are were 85%, compared with 79% in the HDR group. Conclusion: HDR fractionated interstitial brachytherapy can be an alternative to traditional LDR brachytherapy for early tongue cancer and eliminate the radiation exposure for medical staffs

  15. DOE Land Disposal Restrictions Strategy Report for Radioactive Mixed Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    This report represents an effort by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors to develop a strategy for achieving radioactive mixed waste (RMW) compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Preliminary information provided by the Operations Offices has been reviewed to formulate an overall strategy that will enable DOE operations to comply with the Land Disposal Restrictions. The effort has concluded that all DOE Operations Offices are impacted by LDR due to the inability to meet existing and future LDR storage prohibition requirements or treatment standards for RMW. A total of 178 RMW streams subject to LDR are identified in this report. Quantities of RMW impacted by LDR have been estimated at approximately 710,785 cubic meters. DOE must place a high priority on resolving LDR compliance issues. Failure to resolve these issues could result in the curtailment of waste generating operations at DOE facilities. Actions will be required from both DOE (Headquarters and Operations Offices) and EPA in order to achieve DOE complex-wide compliance. Specific recommendations are included. 1 fig., 4 tabs

  16. modelling of directed evolution: Implications for experimental design and stepwise evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wedge , David C.; Rowe , William; Kell , Douglas B.; Knowles , Joshua

    2009-01-01

    In silico modelling of directed evolution: Implications for experimental design and stepwise evolution correspondence: Corresponding author. Tel.: +441613065145. (Wedge, David C.) (Wedge, David C.) Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, University of Manchester - 131 Princess Street--> , Manchester--> , M1 7ND--> - UNITED KINGDOM (Wedge, David C.) UNITED KINGDOM (Wedge, David C.) Man...

  17. Geim, Prof. Sir Andre Konstantin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2015 Honorary. Geim, Prof. Sir Andre Konstantin FRS. Date of birth: 21 October 1958. Address: Royal Society Research Professor, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK Contact: Office: (+44-161) 275 4120. Email: geim@manchester.ac.uk. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  18. Extending the Regular Curriculum through Creative Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohan, Harry; Bohan, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Uses ancient Egyptian numeration system in a new setting to extend the concepts of base, place value, and correspondence. Discusses similarities and differences between the Egyptian and decimal systems. Students are asked to propose changes to make the Egyptian system easier. (LDR)

  19. HDR Image Quality Enhancement Based on Spatially Variant Retinal Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horiuchi Takahiko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing demand for being able to display high dynamic range (HDR images on low dynamic range (LDR devices. Tone mapping is a process for enhancing HDR image quality on an LDR device by converting the tonal values of the original image from HDR to LDR. This paper proposes a new tone mapping algorithm for enhancing image quality by deriving a spatially-variant operator for imitating S-potential response in human retina, which efficiently improves local contrasts while conserving good global appearance. The proposed tone mapping operator is studied from a system construction point of view. It is found that the operator is regarded as a natural extension of the Retinex algorithm by adding a global adaptation process to the local adaptation. The feasibility of the proposed algorithm is examined in detail on experiments using standard HDR images and real HDR scene images, comparing with conventional tone mapping algorithms.

  20. Inverse gamma ray dose rate effect in californium-252 RBE experiment with human T-1 cells irradiated in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, P.; Feola, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Metabolically deoxygenated suspensions of human T-1 cells were used to determine the RBE in hypoxia of low dose rate (LDR) Cf-252 radiation compared to LDR gamma radiation. Based upon the initial portion of the survival curves the RBE was 5.0 ± 1.0 for all components of the Cf-252 radiation and 7.1 ± 1.7 for the neutrons alone. An inverse dose rate effect was observed for LDR gamma radiation in which greater cell sensitivity was observed at lower dose rates and longer irradiation periods. It was demonstrated that there was little or no sublethal damage repair or cell progression during LDR at 21 deg C, and the observed decrease in cell survival probability with increasing irradiation time at a given dose was attributable to reoxygenation of the cell suspensions during the course of LDR exposures. (Auth.)

  1. Waste management and the land disposal restriction storage prohibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    RCRA Sect. 3004(j) prohibits storage of wastes that have been prohibited from land disposal, unless that storage is for the purpose of accumulating sufficient quantities of hazardous wastes to facilitate proper recovery, treatment, or disposal. This requirement was incorporated as part of the Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) regulations. Under the LDR storage prohibition, facilities may only store restricted wastes in containers and tanks. As stated in the Third LDR rule, storage of prohibited waste is only allowed in non-land based storage units since land-based storage is a form of disposal. The EPA has recognized that generators and storers of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) may find it impossible to comply with storage prohibition in cases where no available treatment capacity exists. Additionally, under the current regulatory interpretation, there is no provision that would allow for storage of wastes for which treatment capacity and capability are not available, even where capacity is legitimately being developed. Under the LDR program, restricted wastes that are disposed of, or placed into storage before an LDR effective date, are not subject to the LDR requirements. However, if such wastes are removed from a storage or disposal site after the effective date, such wastes would be subject to LDR requirements. The purpose of this information brief is to clarify what waste management practices constitute removal from storage

  2. 19 January 2011 - British University of Manchester, Vice-President and Dean for the Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences Professor of Structural Engineering School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering C. Bailey in CERN Control Centre with Department Head P. Collier; at LHCb with R. Lindner and ATLAS underground experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson D. Charlton, througout accompanied by . Collier with R. Appleby and F. Loebinger

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    19 January 2011 - British University of Manchester, Vice-President and Dean for the Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences Professor of Structural Engineering School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering C. Bailey in CERN Control Centre with Department Head P. Collier; at LHCb with R. Lindner and ATLAS underground experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson D. Charlton, througout accompanied by . Collier with R. Appleby and F. Loebinger

  3. Final Report - Epigenetics of low dose radiation effects in an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-10-22

    This project sought mechanistic understanding of the epigenetic response of tissues as well as the consequences of those responses, when induced by low dose irradiation in a well-established model system (mouse). Based on solid and extensive preliminary data we investigated the molecular epigenetic mechanisms of in vivo radiation responses, particularly – effects of low, occupationally relevant radiation exposures on the genome stability and adaptive response in mammalian tissues and organisms. We accumulated evidence that low dose irradiation altered epigenetic profiles and impacted radiation target organs of the exposed animals. The main long-term goal was to dissect the epigenetic basis of induction of the low dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response and the specific fundamental roles of epigenetic changes (i.e. DNA methylation, histone modifications and miRNAs) in their generation. We hypothesized that changes in global and regional DNA methylation, global histone modifications and regulatory microRNAs played pivotal roles in the generation and maintenance low-dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response. We predicted that epigenetic changes influenced the levels of genetic rearrangements (transposone reactivation). We hypothesized that epigenetic responses from low dose irradiation were dependent on exposure regimes, and would be greatest when organisms are exposed in a protracted/fractionated manner: fractionated exposures > acute exposures. We anticipated that the epigenetic responses were correlated with the gene expression levels. Our immediate objectives were: • To investigate the exact nature of the global and locus-specific DNA methylation changes in the LDR exposed cells and tissues and dissect their roles in adaptive response • To investigate the roles of histone modifications in the low dose radiation effects and adaptive response • To dissect the roles of regulatory microRNAs and their targets in low

  4. A Comparison Between Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, External Beam Radiation Therapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, and Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Adjuvant or Salvage Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciezki, Jay P.; Weller, Michael; Reddy, Chandana A.; Kittel, Jeffrey; Singh, Harguneet; Tendulkar, Rahul; Stephans, Kevin L.; Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Klein, Eric A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: We compare the efficacy and toxicity among the 3 major modalities available used to treat high-risk prostate cancer (HRCaP). Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2012, 2557 HRCaP patients were treated: 734 received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), 515 received low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without ADT, and 1308 received radical prostatectomy (RP) with or without EBRT. Biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS), and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were assessed. Toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.03. The log-rank test compared bRFS and cRFS among the modalities, and Cox regression identified factors associated with bRFS and cRFS. Gray's test compared differences in late toxicity and PSCM among the modalities. Competing risk regression identified factors associated with PCSM. Results: The median follow-up time and age were 63.5 months and 65 years, respectively. The bRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 74% and 53% for EBRT, 74% and 52% for LDR, and 65% and 47% for RP (P=.0001). The cRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 85% and 73% for EBRT, 90% and 76% for LDR, and 89% and 75% for RP (P=.121). The PCSM at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 5.3% and 11.2% for EBRT, 3.2% and 3.6% for LDR, and 2.8% and 6.8% for RP (P=.0004). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was 8.1% for EBRT, 7.2% for LDR, and 16.4% for RP (P<.0001). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity was 4.6% for EBRT, 1.1% for LDR, and 1.0% for RP (P<.0001). Conclusion: HRCaP treated with EBRT, LDR, or RP yields efficacy showing better bRFS for LDR and EBRT relative to RP, equivalence for cRFS, and a PCSM advantage of LDR and RP over EBRT. The toxicity is lowest for LDR.

  5. A Comparison Between Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, External Beam Radiation Therapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, and Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Adjuvant or Salvage Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciezki, Jay P., E-mail: ciezkij@ccf.org [Taussig Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Weller, Michael; Reddy, Chandana A.; Kittel, Jeffrey; Singh, Harguneet; Tendulkar, Rahul; Stephans, Kevin L. [Taussig Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Klein, Eric A. [Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Department of Urology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: We compare the efficacy and toxicity among the 3 major modalities available used to treat high-risk prostate cancer (HRCaP). Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2012, 2557 HRCaP patients were treated: 734 received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), 515 received low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without ADT, and 1308 received radical prostatectomy (RP) with or without EBRT. Biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS), and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were assessed. Toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.03. The log-rank test compared bRFS and cRFS among the modalities, and Cox regression identified factors associated with bRFS and cRFS. Gray's test compared differences in late toxicity and PSCM among the modalities. Competing risk regression identified factors associated with PCSM. Results: The median follow-up time and age were 63.5 months and 65 years, respectively. The bRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 74% and 53% for EBRT, 74% and 52% for LDR, and 65% and 47% for RP (P=.0001). The cRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 85% and 73% for EBRT, 90% and 76% for LDR, and 89% and 75% for RP (P=.121). The PCSM at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 5.3% and 11.2% for EBRT, 3.2% and 3.6% for LDR, and 2.8% and 6.8% for RP (P=.0004). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was 8.1% for EBRT, 7.2% for LDR, and 16.4% for RP (P<.0001). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity was 4.6% for EBRT, 1.1% for LDR, and 1.0% for RP (P<.0001). Conclusion: HRCaP treated with EBRT, LDR, or RP yields efficacy showing better bRFS for LDR and EBRT relative to RP, equivalence for cRFS, and a PCSM advantage of LDR and RP over EBRT. The toxicity is lowest for LDR.

  6. Chronic low-dose γ-irradiation of Drosophila melanogaster larvae induces gene expression changes and enhances locomotive behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cha Soon; Lee, Byung Sub; Lee, In Kyung; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Nam, Seon Young; Seong, Ki Moon

    2015-01-01

    Although radiation effects have been extensively studied, the biological effects of low-dose radiation (LDR) are controversial. This study investigates LDR-induced alterations in locomotive behavior and gene expression profiles of Drosophila melanogaster. We measured locomotive behavior using larval pupation height and the rapid iterative negative geotaxis (RING) assay after exposure to 0.1 Gy γ-radiation (dose rate of 16.7 mGy/h). We also observed chronic LDR effects on development (pupation and eclosion rates) and longevity (life span). To identify chronic LDR effects on gene expression, we performed whole-genome expression analysis using gene-expression microarrays, and confirmed the results using quantitative real-time PCR. The pupation height of the LDR-treated group at the first larval instar was significantly higher (∼2-fold increase in PHI value, P < 0.05). The locomotive behavior of LDR-treated male flies (∼3 − 5 weeks of age) was significantly increased by 7.7%, 29% and 138%, respectively (P < 0.01), but pupation and eclosion rates and life spans were not significantly altered. Genome-wide expression analysis identified 344 genes that were differentially expressed in irradiated larvae compared with in control larvae. We identified several genes belonging to larval behavior functional groups such as locomotion (1.1%), oxidation reduction (8.0%), and genes involved in conventional functional groups modulated by irradiation such as defense response (4.9%), and sensory and perception (2.5%). Four candidate genes were confirmed as differentially expressed genes in irradiated larvae using qRT-PCR (>2-fold change). These data suggest that LDR stimulates locomotion-related genes, and these genes can be used as potential markers for LDR. (author)

  7. Relative biological effectiveness (R.B.E.) of Cf-252 vs. acute Co-60 and low dose rate Cs-137 irradiation by spleen weight loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Y.; Feola, J.M.; Magura, C.; Beach, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    R.B.E. of Cf-252 on lymphoid tissue was assessed by radiation study of spleen weight loss following acute Co-60, and low dose rate (L.D.R.) Cs-137 and Cf-252 irradiations. Acute Co-60 and L.D.R. Cs-137 dose-response followed two component exponential curves with a 1.3-fold greater effect of L.D.R. Cs-137 vs. acute Co-60 on the first slope and 1.9-fold greater effect for the 2nd slope. L.D.R. Cf-252 response was 1.3 x greater than acute Co-60 but was 1.0 vs. L.D.R. Cs-137 for the first slope indicating a similar effect of Cf-252 mixed neutron/gamma radiation to L.D.R. gamma radiation in producing spleen shrinkage. There was no effect of different sequences and schedules of mixing acute Co-60 with Cf-252 irradiation observed by endogenous CFU-S survival. The R.B.E. of 1.0 - 1.9 indicates that lymphohemopoietic in vivo, presumably well oxygenated, does not respond acutely or as sensitively as hypoxic tumor where R.B.E. is 5 - 7. (author)

  8. Low dose radiation induced protein and its effect on expression of CD25 molecule in lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Duicai; Su Liaoyuan

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To find the substantial basis for effects of low dose radiation, on development, extraction, and the biogical activity of the low-dose radiation-induced proteins, and the effects of LDR induced proteins on CD25 molecule expression of human lymphocytes. Methods: 1. Healthy Kumning male mice exposed to radiation of 226 Ra γ-rays at 5, 10 and 15 cGy respectively. The mice were killed 2 hours after exposure, the spleen cells were broken with ultrasonic energy and then ultra-centrifugalized at low temperature (4 degree C). The LDR-induced proteins were obtained in the supernatant solution. Then the changes of CD25 molecule was measured by flow cytometry (FCM) with immunofluorescence technique, which was used to reflect the effect of LDR induced proteins on CD25 molecule expression of human lymphocytes. Results: LDR induced proteins were obtained from spleen cells in mice exposed to 5-15 cGy whole body radiation. Conclusion: The expression of CD25 molecule of lymphocytes was increased significantly after use of LDR induced proteins. LDR induced proteins can enhance expression of CD25 molecule of lymphocytes slightly

  9. Anti-tumor effect of low dose radiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Zhengping; Lu Jiaben; Zhu Bingchai

    1997-01-01

    The author reports the effects of the total body irradiation of low dose radiation (LDR) and/or the local irradiation of large dose on average tumor weights and tumor inhibitory rates in 170 mice inoculated S 180 sarcoma cell, and the influence of LDR on average longevity in 40 tumor-bearing animals. Results show (1) LDR in the range of 75∼250 mGy can inhibit tumor growth to some extent; (2) fractionated irradiation of 75 mGy and local irradiation of 10 Gy may produce a synergism in tumor growth inhibition; and (3)LDR may enhance average longevity in ascitic tumor-bearing mice

  10. Low-Dose Radiation Induces Cell Proliferation in Human Embryonic Lung Fibroblasts but not in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyue Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormesis and adaptive responses are 2 important biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (LDR. In normal tissue, LDR induces hormesis as evinced by increased cell proliferation; however, whether LDR also increases tumor cell proliferation needs to be investigated. In this study, cell proliferation was assayed by total cell numbers and the Cell Counting Kit 8 assay. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3′ -kinase(PI3K-Akt (PI3K/AKT phosphorylation were determined by Western blot analysis. Human embryonic lung fibroblast 2BS and lung cancer NCI-H446 cell lines were irradiated with LDR at different doses (20-100 mGy. In response to 20 to 75 mGy X-rays, cell proliferation was significantly increased in 2BS but not in NCI-H446 cells. In 2BS cells, LDR at 20 to 75 mGy also stimulated phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK pathway proteins including ERK, MEK, and Raf and of the PI3K/AKT pathway protein AKT. To test whether ERK1/2 and AKT pathway activation was involved in the stimulation of cell proliferation in 2BS cells, the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways were inhibited using their specific inhibitors, U0126 and LY294002. U0126 decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and LY294002 decreased the phosphorylation of AKT; each could significantly inhibit LDR-induced 2BS cell proliferation. However, LDR did not stimulate these kinases, and kinase inhibitors also did not affect cell proliferation in the NCI-H446 cells. These results suggest that LDR stimulates cell proliferation via the activation of both MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in 2BS but not in NCI-H446 cells. This finding implies the potential for applying LDR to protect normal tissues from radiotherapy without diminishing the efficacy of tumor therapy.

  11. SU-G-201-02: Application of RayStretch in Clinical Cases: A Calculation for Heterogeneity Corrections in LDR Permanent I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueso-Gonzalez, F [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiooncology, Dresden (Germany); Vijande, J [University of Valencia, Burjassot and IFIC (CSIC-UV) (Spain); Ballester, F [University of Valencia, Burjassot (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J [Hospital Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, and Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Siebert, F [Clinic of Radiotherapy (Radiooncology), Kiel (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Tissue heterogeneities and calcifications have significant impact on the dosimetry of low energy brachytherapy (BT). RayStretch is an analytical algorithm developed in our institution to incorporate heterogeneity corrections in LDR prostate brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to study its application in clinical cases by comparing its predictions with the results obtained with TG-43 and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: A clinical implant (71 I-125 seeds, 15 needles) from a real patient was considered. On this patient, different volumes with calcifications were considered. Its properties were evaluated in three ways by i) the Treatment planning system (TPS) (TG-43), ii) a MC study using the Penelope2009 code, and iii) RayStretch. To analyse the performance of RayStretch, calcifications located in the prostate lobules covering 11% of the total prostate volume and larger calcifications located in the lobules and underneath the urethra for a total occupied volume of 30% were considered. Three mass densities (1.05, 1.20, and 1.35 g/cm3) were explored for the calcifications. Therefore, 6 different scenarios ranging from small low density calcifications to large high density ones have been discussed. Results: DVH and D90 results given by RayStretch agree within 1% with the full MC simulations. Although no effort has been done to improve RayStretch numerical performance, its present implementation is able to evaluate a clinical implant in a few seconds to the same level of accuracy as a detailed MC calculation. Conclusion: RayStretch is a robust method for heterogeneity corrections in prostate BT supported on TG-43 data. Its compatibility with commercial TPSs and its high calculation speed makes it feasible for use in clinical settings for improving treatment quality. It will allow in a second phase of this project, its use during intraoperative ultrasound planning. This study was partly supported by a fellowship grant from the Spanish Ministry of

  12. Effects of low dose radiation combined with cyclophosphamide on tumor cell apoptosis, cell cycle and proliferation of bone marrow in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hongsheng; Fei Conghe; Shen Fangzhen; Liang Jun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose radiation (LDR) combined with cyclophosphamide on tumor cell apoptosis, cell cycle, and proliferation of bone marrow in mice tumor-bearing mice. Methods: Kunming strain male mice were implanted with S180 sarcoma cells in the left hind leg subcutaneously as an experimental animal model. Five and 8 days after implantation, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body γ-ray radiation and CTX(300 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection 36 hour after LDR. All mice were sacrificed to measure the tumor volume, tumor cell apoptosis, and cell cycle; the proliferation of bone marrow was analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: Tumor growth was significantly slowed down in the treated groups. The apoptosis of tumor cells increased significantly after LDR. The tumor cells were arrested in G 1 phase in CTX and CTX+LDR groups, more significantly in the latter group than in the former group. Concentration of bone marrow cells and proliferation index in CTX + LDR group were higher than those in CTX group, although concentration of bone marrow cells in CTX and CTX+LDR groups were much lower than that in normal mice. Conclusion: Low dose radiation combined with cyclophosphamide causes more significant G 1 -phase arrest than cyclophosphamide alone and enhances anti-tumor effect markedly. At the same time LDR significantly protects hematopoietic function of bone marrow, which is of practical significance as an adjuvant chemotherapy

  13. Comparison of low and high dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of uterine cervix cancer. Retrospective analysis of two sequential series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Nishimoto, Ines Nobuko; Ribeiro dos Santos Novaes, Paulo Eduardo; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Conte Maia, Maria Aparecida; Fogarolli, Ricardo Cesar; Salvajoli, Joao Victor

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This retrospective analysis aims to report on the comparative outcome of cervical cancer patients treated with low dose rate (LDR) and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1989 to 1995, 190 patients were treated with low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy (LDR group) and from 1994 to 2001, 118 patients were treated with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy (HDR group). FIGO stage distribution for the LDR group was Stage I: 6.3%; Stage II: 57.4%; and Stage III: 36.3% and for the HDR group Stage I: 9.3%; Stage II: 43.2%; and Stage III: 47.4%. All patients were treated with telecobalt external-beam radiotherapy (EBR). Median doses of LDR brachytherapy at Point A were 40 Gy and 50 Gy for patients treated with 1 and 2 implants, respectively. All patients from the HDR group were treated with 24 Gy in 4 fractions of 6 Gy to Point A. Survival, disease-free survival, local control, and late complications at 5 years, were endpoints compared for both groups. Results: Median follow-up time for LDR and HDR groups was 70 months (range, 8-127 months) and 33 months (range, 4-117 months), respectively. For all stages combined, overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years were better in the LDR group (69% vs. 55%, p = 0.007; 73% vs. 56%, p = 0.002; and 74% vs. 65%; p = 0.04, respectively). For clinical Stages I and II, no differences was seen in overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years between the two groups. For clinical Stage III, overall survival and disease-free survival at 5 years were better in the LDR group than in the HDR group (46% vs. 36%, p = 0.04 and 49% vs. 37%, p = 0.03, respectively), and local control was marginally higher in the LDR group than in the HDR group (58% vs. 50%, p = 0.19). The 5-year probability of rectal complications was higher in the LDR group than in the HDR group (16% vs. 8%, p = 0.03) and 5-year probability of small bowel and urinary complications was not

  14. Radical radiation therapy for adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toita, T.; Takizawa, Y.; Nakano, M.; Sueyama, H.; Kushi, A.; Kakihana, Y.; Ogawa, K.; Hara, R.; Higashi, M.; Sakumoto, K.; Moromizato, H.; Kanazawa, K.

    1994-01-01

    20 patients with uterine cervical adenocarcinoma were treated with a combination of external beam and intracavitary irradiation (four patients stage IB, one stage IIA, three stage IIB and twelve patients stage IIIB). Seven patients were treated with high dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary irradiation, eleven with low dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary irradiation and two with HDR and LDR. Six out of the 20 patients experienced pelvic recurrence (all stage IIIB patients). Analysis of the relation between pelvic recurrence and dose rate of intracavitary irradiation revealed that LDR showed a higher pelvic disease control rate than HDR (6/7 vs. 0/4) in stage IIIB patients. Intracavitary irradiation doses of LDR were 1.2 to 1.5 times higher than those of HDR. Three out of the 20 patients developed rectal complication grade 2 (two patients treated with HDR, one with LDR). The five-year cumulative survival rate was 67.2% for all, 100% for stage I and II, and 43.3% for stage IIIB patients. (orig./MG) [de

  15. New land disposal restrictions on contaminated soil and debris, and newly identified toxicity characteristic organics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortune, William B.; Schumann, Jean C.; Fallon, William E.; Badden, Janet W.; Smith, Edward H.

    1992-01-01

    The applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) program to radioactive mixed wastes (RMW) has been clarified through U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) rulemakings and notices. However, a number of waste management concerns involving RMW and RMW-contaminated soil and debris continue to exist with respect to achieving compliance with LDR provisions and treatment standards. Consequently, DOE has become increasingly proactive in its participation in the LDR rulemaking process and in the identification of LDR compliance issues associated with its RMW inventories. Both data and recommendations from across the DOE complex were collected and transmitted to EPA in response to proposed requirements that would implement LDR for contaminated soil and debris, and certain newly identified toxicity characteristic (TC) organics. Much of this information focused on concerns related to the application of proposed regulatory approaches to RMW streams. Highlights from the information included in these DOE responses are presented. (author)

  16. Liquid droplet radiator performance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattick, A. T.; Hertzberg, A.

    By making use of droplets rather than solid surfaces to radiate waste heat in space, the liquid droplet radiator (LDR) achieves a radiating area/mass much larger than that of conventional radiators which use fins or heat pipes. The lightweight potential of the LDR is shown to be limited primarily by the radiative properties of the droplets. The requirement that the LDR heat transfer fluid have a very low vapor pressure limits the choice of fluids to relatively few—several liquid metals and Dow 705 silicone fluid are the only suitable candidates so far identified. An experimental determination of the emittance of submillimeter droplets of Dow 705 fluid indicates than an LDR using this fluid at temperatures of 275-335 K would be ⋍ 10 times lighter than the lightest solid surface radiators. Although several liquid metals appear to offer excellent performance in LDR applications at temperatures between 200 K and 975 K, experimental determination of liquid metal emissivities is needed for a conclusive assessment.

  17. City-regions and the development of sustainable energy-supply systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEvoy, D.; Gibbs, D.C. [Hull Univ., Dept. of Geography, Hull (United Kingdom); Longhurst, J.W.S. [University of the West of England, Environmental Health and Science Dept., Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    To achieve the CO{sub 2} reductions deemed necessary to limit the impact of adverse climate change will require real changes in the way we both use and supply energy. Although explicit international and national frameworks are necessary to facilitate reduction strategies, regional implementation and local initiatives are increasingly seen as having an important role to play, both in meeting national CO{sub 2} reduction targets and improving the local environment. This paper deals with supply side of the energy equation for Greater Manchester in the U.K., examining the potential for 'regional' energy supply options to contribute to a reduction in carbon intensity. By assessing actual and latent regional opportunities, the potential for achieving a more sustainable energy supply system is evaluated. (Author)

  18. Multiple low-dose radiation prevents type 2 diabetes-induced renal damage through attenuation of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance and subsequent renal inflammation and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minglong Shao

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia and lipotoxicity-induced insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress are the key pathogeneses of renal damage in type 2 diabetes. Increasing evidence shows that whole-body low dose radiation (LDR plays a critical role in attenuating insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress.The aims of the present study were to investigate whether LDR can prevent type 2 diabetes-induced renal damage and the underlying mechanisms.Mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD, 40% of calories from fat for 12 weeks to induce obesity followed by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 50 mg/kg to develop a type 2 diabetic mouse model. The mice were exposed to LDR at different doses (25, 50 and 75 mGy for 4 or 8 weeks along with HFD treatment. At each time-point, the kidney weight, renal function, blood glucose level and insulin resistance were examined. The pathological changes, renal lipid profiles, inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis were also measured.HFD/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic mice exhibited severe pathological changes in the kidney and renal dysfunction. Exposure of the mice to LDR for 4 weeks, especially at 50 and 75 mGy, significantly improved lipid profiles, insulin sensitivity and protein kinase B activation, meanwhile, attenuated inflammation and oxidative stress in the diabetic kidney. The LDR-induced anti-oxidative effect was associated with up-regulation of renal nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf-2 expression and function. However, the above beneficial effects were weakened once LDR treatment was extended to 8 weeks.These results suggest that LDR exposure significantly prevented type 2 diabetes-induced kidney injury characterized by renal dysfunction and pathological changes. The protective mechanisms of LDR are complicated but may be mainly attributed to the attenuation of dyslipidemia and the subsequent lipotoxicity-induced insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress.

  19. Low dose radiation enhances the Locomotor activity of D. melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Ki Moon; Lee, Buyng Sub; Nam Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Choi, Tae In; Kim, Cha Soon [Radiation Effect Research Team, Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Mild stresses at low level including radiation can induce the beneficial effects in many vertebrate and invertebrate species. However, a large amount of studies in radiation biology have focused on the detrimental effects of high dose radiation (HDR) such as the increased incidence of cancers and developmental diseases. Low dose radiation (LDR) induces biologically favorable effects in diverse fields, for example, cancer development, genomic instability, immune response, and longevity. Our previous data indicated that LDR promotes cells proliferation of which degree is not much but significant, and microarray data explained that LDR irradiated fruit flies showing the augmented immunity significantly changed the program for gene expression of many genes in Gene Ontology (GO) categories related to metabolic process. Metabolic process in development one of major contributors in organism growth, interbreeding, motility, and aging. Therefore, it is valuable to examine whether LDR change the physiological parameters related to metabolism, and how LDR regulates the metabolism in D. melanogaster. In this study, to investigate that LDR influences change of the metabolism, a representative parameter, locomotor activity. In addition, the activation of several cellular signal molecules was determined to investigate the specific molecular mechanism of LDR effects on the metabolism. We explored whether ionizing radiation affects the motility activity. We performed the RING assays to evaluate the locomotor activity, a representative parameter presenting motility of fruit flies. HDR dramatically decreased the motor activity of irradiated flies. Surprisingly, the irradiated flies at low dose radiation in both acute and chronic showed the significantly increased locomotor activity, compared to non-irradiated flies. Irradiation would induce change of the several signal pathways for flies to respond to it. The activation of some proteins involved in the cells proliferation and stress

  20. High dose rate versus low dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervical cancer, and the importance of brachytherapy timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petereit, Daniel G.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Czyzewski, Ann; Buchler, Dolores A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the efficacy of HDR versus LDR brachytherapy for Stage IIIB cervical cancer patients. Material and Methods: Forty-four HDR patients were retrospectively compared to 51 LDR patients treated at the same institution from 1977 to 1988 (LDR) and from 1989 to 1995 (HDR). A tumor burden score (TBS) of 2-9 was calculated for both groups of patients to assess volume of disease (2-4 low tumor burden, 5-9 high tumor burden). LDR and HDR patients received 60 Gy to the whole pelvis at 1.7 Gy/Fx. The majority of LDR patients were treated after completion of external beam radiation (EBR) with one 25 Gy implant to Point A (55 cGy/h). The HDR patients were treated with 4-5 HDR fractions of 3.7 Gy to 5.8 Gy/Fx for an LDR equivalence of 20-25 Gy (median dose/Fx 4.3 Gy, median insertion number 5). Clinical endpoints were calculated actuarially with significance determined by the log rank test and the relative risk (RR). Results: The median follow-up for the HDR and LDR groups was 1.8 and 5 years, respectively. Pelvic control and survival was better in the LDR group than the HDR group, 51%, 73%, 32%, 44% (p = 0.004, RR = 0.4), with grade III and above RTOG complications of 19% and 15%, respectively. The median age and performance status were similar between the two groups; however, a TBS score ≥7 was present in 23% of the HDR patients and in 9% of the LDR patients. Pelvic control in the HDR group was 58% with a TBS ≤4, and 17% with a TBS >4 (p = 0.01, RR = 0.4). The median EBR dose at the first HDR insertion was 31 Gy while all the LDR patients received 60 Gy before the insertion. Pelvic control rates in Table 1 indicate a trend towards improved outcome within the HDR group and same TBS if more external beam radiation was given prior to the first HDR insertion. Pelvic control was also higher within the HDR group when Point A received a BED Gy 10≥100 versus <100: 62%, 40%, respectively (RR 0.6). Conclusion: These retrospective results of HDR versus

  1. Faroese long-distance reflexives face off against Icelandic long-distance reflexives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania E. Strahan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance reflexives (LDRs in Faroese are often compared to those in Icelandic, and are even considered to have the same distribution (Thráinsson et al., 2004. In this paper I evaluate the extent to which this is true. The results from recent fieldwork show that there are clear differences between the LDR in the two closely related languages, in particular that Faroese speakers often reject LDR sentences that contain a non-third person, and that Faroese LDR is often completely acceptable out of a non-complement clause. In addition, initial findings suggest that there may be dialectal variation with respect to at least these two aspects of LDR in Faroese.

  2. Effects of low dose radiation pretreatment on radiation injuried brain's free radicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Fuqi; Wang Cheng; Xie Hong; Tian Ye

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of low dose radiation pretreatment on radiation in- juried brain's free radicle to provide some useful data of brain radiation injury protection. Methods: One hundred mGy was selected as the pretreatment does, 25 Gy was selected as the challenge does. Experiment rats were divided into three groups randomly, group one as simple group:the group irradiated without exposing to pre-irradiation; group two as 6 h-group: the group irradiated with LDR pretreatment 6 h before exposing to 25 Gy irradiation; group three as 24 h-group:the group irradiated with LDR pretreatment 24 h before 25 Gy irradiation. The observation was done 6 hour's after irradiation, the effect of LDR pretreatment on increasing activity of the superoxide dismutase(SOD) and the content of malondialdehyde(MDA) after the brain tissue homogenate were detected. Results: Com- pared with the simple group, the group with LDR pretreatment showed increasing of SOD and decreasing of MDA at the 6th hour after 25Gy irradiation. In addition, there was no difference between the 6 h-group and the 24 h-group. Conclusion: LDR pretreatment can increase SOD and decrease MDA in some period. It could infer that the suitable LDR pretreatment could play a protective role in the brain radiation injury. (authors)

  3. Independent technique of verifying high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, Cheng B.; Korb, Leroy J.; Darnell, Brenda; Krishna, K. V.; Ulewicz, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: An independent technique for verifying high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment plans has been formulated and validated clinically. Methods and Materials: In HDR brachytherapy, dwell times at respective dwell positions are computed, using an optimization algorithm in a HDR treatment-planning system to deliver a specified dose to many target points simultaneously. Because of the variability of dwell times, concerns have been expressed regarding the ability of the algorithm to compute the correct dose. To address this concern, a commercially available low-dose rate (LDR) algorithm was used to compute the doses at defined distances, based on the dwell times obtained from the HDR treatment plans. The percent deviation between doses computed using the HDR and LDR algorithms were reviewed for HDR procedures performed over the last year. Results: In this retrospective study, the difference between computed doses using the HDR and LDR algorithms was found to be within 5% for about 80% of the HDR procedures. All of the reviewed procedures have dose differences of less than 10%. Conclusion: An independent technique for verifying HDR brachytherapy treatment plans has been validated based on clinical data. Provided both systems are available, this technique is universal in its applications and not limited to either a particular implant applicator, implant site, or implant type

  4. Brachytherapy for cervix cancer: low-dose rate or high-dose rate brachytherapy – a meta-analysis of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Eduardo J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature supporting high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR in the treatment of cervical carcinoma derives primarily from retrospective series. However, controversy still persists regarding the efficacy and safety of HDR brachytherapy compared to low-dose rate (LDR brachytherapy, in particular, due to inadequate tumor coverage for stage III patients. Whether LDR or HDR brachytherapy produces better results for these patients in terms of survival rate, local control rate and the treatment complications remain controversial. Methods A meta-analysis of RCT was performed comparing LDR to HDR brachytherapy for cervix cancer treated for radiotherapy alone. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT and Cochrane Library databases, as well as abstracts published in the annual proceedings were systematically searched. We assessed methodological quality for each outcome by grading the quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE methodology. We used "recommend" for strong recommendations, and "suggest" for weak recommendations. Results Pooled results from five randomized trials (2,065 patients of HDR brachytherapy in cervix cancer showed no significant increase of mortality (p = 0.52, local recurrence (p = 0.68, or late complications (rectal; p = 0.7, bladder; p = 0.95 or small intestine; p = 0.06 rates as compared to LDR brachytherapy. In the subgroup analysis no difference was observed for overall mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stages I, II and III. The quality of evidence was low for mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stage I, and moderate for other clinical stages. Conclusion Our meta-analysis shows that there are no differences between HDR and LDR for overall survival, local recurrence and late complications for clinical stages I, II and III. By means of the GRADE system, we recommend the use of HDR for all clinical stages of cervix

  5. Brachytherapy for cervix cancer: low-dose rate or high-dose rate brachytherapy – a meta-analysis of clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Gustavo A; Manta, Gustavo B; Stefano, Eduardo J; de Fendi, Ligia I

    2009-01-01

    Background The literature supporting high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) in the treatment of cervical carcinoma derives primarily from retrospective series. However, controversy still persists regarding the efficacy and safety of HDR brachytherapy compared to low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy, in particular, due to inadequate tumor coverage for stage III patients. Whether LDR or HDR brachytherapy produces better results for these patients in terms of survival rate, local control rate and the treatment complications remain controversial. Methods A meta-analysis of RCT was performed comparing LDR to HDR brachytherapy for cervix cancer treated for radiotherapy alone. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT and Cochrane Library databases, as well as abstracts published in the annual proceedings were systematically searched. We assessed methodological quality for each outcome by grading the quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. We used "recommend" for strong recommendations, and "suggest" for weak recommendations. Results Pooled results from five randomized trials (2,065 patients) of HDR brachytherapy in cervix cancer showed no significant increase of mortality (p = 0.52), local recurrence (p = 0.68), or late complications (rectal; p = 0.7, bladder; p = 0.95 or small intestine; p = 0.06) rates as compared to LDR brachytherapy. In the subgroup analysis no difference was observed for overall mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stages I, II and III. The quality of evidence was low for mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stage I, and moderate for other clinical stages. Conclusion Our meta-analysis shows that there are no differences between HDR and LDR for overall survival, local recurrence and late complications for clinical stages I, II and III. By means of the GRADE system, we recommend the use of HDR for all clinical stages of cervix cancer. PMID:19344527

  6. Implementation Of Automatic Wiper Speed Control And Headlight Modes Control Systems Using Fuzzy Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ThetKoKo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This research paper describes the design and simulation of the automatic wiper speed and headlight modes controllers using fuzzy logic. This proposed system consists of a fuzzy logic controller to control a cars wiper speed and headlight modes. The automatic wiper system detects the rain and its intensity. And according to the rain intensity the wiper speed is automatically controlled. Headlight modes automatically changes either from low beam mode to high beam mode or form high beam mode to low beam mode depending on the light intensity from the other vehicle coming from the opposite direction. The system comprises of PIC impedance sensor piezoelectric vibration sensor LDR headlamps and a DC motor to accurate the windshield wiper. Piezoelectric sensor is used to detect the rain intensity which is based on the piezoelectric effect. MATLAB software is used to achieve the designed goal.

  7. Isolated data acquisition system for high voltage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waitz, A.; Donaldson, A.

    1985-06-01

    This report describes the design and operation of a microcomputer controlled system for acquisition of both analog and binary data within the high voltage stages of a linac modulator. The system is comprised of a microprocessor Controller which communicates with the remote data Acquisition circuits via an optical bus. The bus, which uses a 1 MHz Manchester II format, is configured as a loop, starting at the Controller, daisy-chaining the remote cards and terminating back at the Controller. Upon receiving a linac timing pulse, the Controller sends addressed commands to the individual remote cards and receives data back. It then passes this data to the linac control system through a Multibus connection. Each remote circuit can return 16 binary sense and 7 (12 bit) analog parameters within 270 us. This speed is possible because of a pipelined design where one word is transmitted while another is being converted. A data conversion cycle is initiated when a remote data acquisition card receives the proper command and address from the controller

  8. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Category A Infectious Pathogens: Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever and Variola Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchita Das

    Full Text Available CDC designated category A infectious agents pose a major risk to national security and require special action for public health preparedness. They include viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF syndrome as well as variola virus, the agent of smallpox. VHF is characterized by hemorrhage and fever with multi-organ failure leading to high morbidity and mortality. Smallpox, a prior scourge, has been eradicated for decades, making it a particularly serious threat if released nefariously in the essentially non-immune world population. Early detection of the causative agents, and the ability to distinguish them from other pathogens, is essential to contain outbreaks, implement proper control measures, and prevent morbidity and mortality. We have developed a multiplex detection assay that uses several species-specific PCR primers to generate amplicons from multiple pathogens; these are then targeted in a ligase detection reaction (LDR. The resultant fluorescently-labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array enabling simultaneous identification of the pathogens. The assay was evaluated on 32 different isolates associated with VHF (ebolavirus, marburgvirus, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Dengue virus, and Yellow fever virus as well as variola virus and vaccinia virus (the agent of smallpox and its vaccine strain, respectively. The assay was able to detect all viruses tested, including 8 sequences representative of different variola virus strains from the CDC repository. It does not cross react with other emerging zoonoses such as monkeypox virus or cowpox virus, or six flaviviruses tested (St. Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Powassan virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus.

  9. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Category A Infectious Pathogens: Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever and Variola Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sanchita; Rundell, Mark S; Mirza, Aashiq H; Pingle, Maneesh R; Shigyo, Kristi; Garrison, Aura R; Paragas, Jason; Smith, Scott K; Olson, Victoria A; Larone, Davise H; Spitzer, Eric D; Barany, Francis; Golightly, Linnie M

    2015-01-01

    CDC designated category A infectious agents pose a major risk to national security and require special action for public health preparedness. They include viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) syndrome as well as variola virus, the agent of smallpox. VHF is characterized by hemorrhage and fever with multi-organ failure leading to high morbidity and mortality. Smallpox, a prior scourge, has been eradicated for decades, making it a particularly serious threat if released nefariously in the essentially non-immune world population. Early detection of the causative agents, and the ability to distinguish them from other pathogens, is essential to contain outbreaks, implement proper control measures, and prevent morbidity and mortality. We have developed a multiplex detection assay that uses several species-specific PCR primers to generate amplicons from multiple pathogens; these are then targeted in a ligase detection reaction (LDR). The resultant fluorescently-labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array enabling simultaneous identification of the pathogens. The assay was evaluated on 32 different isolates associated with VHF (ebolavirus, marburgvirus, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Dengue virus, and Yellow fever virus) as well as variola virus and vaccinia virus (the agent of smallpox and its vaccine strain, respectively). The assay was able to detect all viruses tested, including 8 sequences representative of different variola virus strains from the CDC repository. It does not cross react with other emerging zoonoses such as monkeypox virus or cowpox virus, or six flaviviruses tested (St. Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Powassan virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus).

  10. Nonlinear NDT: A Route to Conventional Ultrasonic Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Solodov

    2016-01-01

    The bottleneck problem of nonlinear NDT is a low efficiency of conversion from fundamental frequency to nonlinear frequency components. In this paper, it is proposed to use a combination of nonlinearity with Local Defect Resonance (LDR) to enhance substantially the input-output conversion. Since LDR is an efficient resonance “amplifier” of the local vibrations, it manifests a profound nonlinearity even at moderate ultrasonic excitation level. As the driving frequency matches the LDR-frequency...

  11. System Security And Monitoring On Smart Home Using Android

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romadhon, A. S.

    2018-01-01

    Home security system is needed for homeowners who have a lot of activities, as a result, they often leave the house without locking the door and even leave the house in a state of lights that are not lit. In order to overcome this case, a system that can control and can monitor the state of the various devices contained in the house or smart home system is urgently required. The working principle of this smart home using android is when the homeowner sends a certain command using android, the command will be forwarded to the microcontroller and then it will be executed based on the parameters that have been determined. For example, it can turn off and on the light using android app. In this study, testing was conducted to a smart home prototype which is equipped with light bulbs, odour sensors, heat sensors, ultrasonic sensors, LDR, buzzer and camera. The test results indicate that the application has been able to control all the sensors of home appliances well.

  12. Evaluation and Verification of Channel Transmission Characteristics of Human Body for Optimizing Data Transmission Rate in Electrostatic-Coupling Intra Body Communication System: A Comparative Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhwai Tseng

    Full Text Available Intra-body communication is a new wireless scheme for transmitting signals through the human body. Understanding the transmission characteristics of the human body is therefore becoming increasingly important. Electrostatic-coupling intra-body communication system in a ground-free situation that integrate electronic products that are discretely located on individuals, such as mobile phones, PDAs, wearable computers, and biomedical sensors, are of particular interest.The human body is modeled as a simplified Resistor-Capacitor network. A virtual ground between the transmitter and receiver in the system is represented by a resister-capacitor network. Value of its resistance and capacitance are determined from a system perspective. The system is characterized by using a mathematical unit step function in digital baseband transmission scheme with and without Manchester code. As a result, the signal-to-noise and to-intersymbol-interference ratios are improved by manipulating the load resistor. The data transmission rate of the system is optimized. A battery-powered transmitter and receiver are developed to validate the proposal.A ground-free system fade signal energy especially for a low-frequency signal limited system transmission rate. The system transmission rate is maximized by simply manipulating the load resistor. Experimental results demonstrate that for a load resistance of 10k-50k Ω, the high-pass 3 dB frequency of the band-pass channel is 400kHz-2MHz in the worst-case scenario. The system allows a Manchester-coded baseband signal to be transmitted at speeds of up to 20M bit per second with signal-to-noise and signal-to-intersymbol-interference ratio of more than 10 dB.The human body can function as a high speed transmission medium with a data transmission rate of 20Mbps in an electrostatic-coupling intra-body communication system. Therefore, a wideband signal can be transmitted directly through the human body with a good signal

  13. Evaluation and Verification of Channel Transmission Characteristics of Human Body for Optimizing Data Transmission Rate in Electrostatic-Coupling Intra Body Communication System: A Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yuhwai; Su, Chauchin; Ho, Yingchieh

    2016-01-01

    Intra-body communication is a new wireless scheme for transmitting signals through the human body. Understanding the transmission characteristics of the human body is therefore becoming increasingly important. Electrostatic-coupling intra-body communication system in a ground-free situation that integrate electronic products that are discretely located on individuals, such as mobile phones, PDAs, wearable computers, and biomedical sensors, are of particular interest. The human body is modeled as a simplified Resistor-Capacitor network. A virtual ground between the transmitter and receiver in the system is represented by a resister-capacitor network. Value of its resistance and capacitance are determined from a system perspective. The system is characterized by using a mathematical unit step function in digital baseband transmission scheme with and without Manchester code. As a result, the signal-to-noise and to-intersymbol-interference ratios are improved by manipulating the load resistor. The data transmission rate of the system is optimized. A battery-powered transmitter and receiver are developed to validate the proposal. A ground-free system fade signal energy especially for a low-frequency signal limited system transmission rate. The system transmission rate is maximized by simply manipulating the load resistor. Experimental results demonstrate that for a load resistance of 10k-50k Ω, the high-pass 3 dB frequency of the band-pass channel is 400kHz-2MHz in the worst-case scenario. The system allows a Manchester-coded baseband signal to be transmitted at speeds of up to 20M bit per second with signal-to-noise and signal-to-intersymbol-interference ratio of more than 10 dB. The human body can function as a high speed transmission medium with a data transmission rate of 20Mbps in an electrostatic-coupling intra-body communication system. Therefore, a wideband signal can be transmitted directly through the human body with a good signal-to-noise quality of 10 dB if

  14. Toward Finding Driving Communications Factors in the System of Systems Survivability Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    model (Davidson & Pogel, 2010). PLT LDRs make tactical decisions based on the information they have using projection algorithms and task...making projections. Using this information, the PLT LDRs create alternative scenarios for completing the mission and choose the best scenario to...to the blue force platoons  using  the company DMP PLT  LDR ‐X Provides C2 to the respective platoon  using  the platoon leader DMP; there  are three

  15. Low-level radiation effects on immune cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makinodan, T.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation (LDR) on murine immune cells. Previously, it had been reported that LDR enhances the proliferative activity of T cells in vitro and delays the growth of transplantable immunogenic tumors in vivo. This suggests that LDR eliminates immune suppressor cells, which downregulates immune response and/or adoptively upregulates the responsiveness of immune effector cells. It had also been reported that human lymphocytes become refractive to high dose radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations by pretreating mitotically active lymphocytes in vitro with very low doses of ionizing radiation, and the adaptive effect can be abrogated by cycloheximide. This suggests that protein synthesis is required for lymphocytes to respond adoptively to LDR

  16. Brachytherapy Improves Biochemical Failure–Free Survival in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Compared With Conventionally Fractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy: A Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Graham D.; Pickles, Tom; Crook, Juanita; Martin, Andre-Guy; Vigneault, Eric; Cury, Fabio L.; Morris, Jim; Catton, Charles; Lukka, Himu; Warner, Andrew; Yang, Ying; Rodrigues, George

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, biochemical failure-free survival (bFFS) and overall survival (OS) in low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients who received brachytherapy (BT) (either low-dose-rate brachytherapy [LDR-BT] or high-dose-rate brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy [HDR-BT+EBRT]) versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) alone. Methods and Materials: Patient data were obtained from the ProCaRS database, which contains 7974 prostate cancer patients treated with primary radiation therapy at four Canadian cancer institutions from 1994 to 2010. Propensity score matching was used to obtain the following 3 matched cohorts with balanced baseline prognostic factors: (1) low-risk LDR-BT versus EBRT; (2) intermediate-risk LDR-BT versus EBRT; and (3) intermediate-risk HDR-BT+EBRT versus EBRT. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to compare differences in bFFS (primary endpoint) and OS in the 3 matched groups. Results: Propensity score matching created acceptable balance in the baseline prognostic factors in all matches. Final matches included 2 1:1 matches in the intermediate-risk cohorts, LDR-BT versus EBRT (total n=254) and HDR-BT+EBRT versus EBRT (total n=388), and one 4:1 match in the low-risk cohort (LDR-BT:EBRT, total n=400). Median follow-up ranged from 2.7 to 7.3 years for the 3 matched cohorts. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that all BT treatment options were associated with statistically significant improvements in bFFS when compared with EBRT in all cohorts (intermediate-risk EBRT vs LDR-BT hazard ratio [HR] 4.58, P=.001; intermediate-risk EBRT vs HDR-BT+EBRT HR 2.08, P=.007; low-risk EBRT vs LDR-BT HR 2.90, P=.004). No significant difference in OS was found in all comparisons (intermediate-risk EBRT vs LDR-BT HR 1.27, P=.687; intermediate-risk EBRT vs HDR-BT+EBRT HR 1.55, P=.470; low-risk LDR-BT vs EBRT HR 1.41, P=.500). Conclusions: Propensity score matched analysis showed that BT options led

  17. Effect of low dose X-ray irradiation on apoptosis in spermatogenic cells of mouse testes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangwei; Liu Shuchun; Lu Zhe; Gong Shouliang

    2003-01-01

    To study the effects of low dose radiation (LDR) with different doses of X-rays on the apoptosis in spermatogenic cells of male Kunming mouse testes. The time-effect and dose-effect of apoptosis in the different stages of spermatogenic cell cycles of mouse testis after LDR with different doses of X-rays were studied with light microscope using the methods of TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and HE staining. The apoptosis of spermatogenic cells induced by LDR had a remarkable regularity in cell types. When the dose was 0.025 Gy, spermatogonium apoptosis was taken as main. With the dose increase of irradiation (0.025-0.2 Gy), spermatocytes also showed an apoptotic change, but the apoptotic rate of spermatogonia was significantly higher than that of spermatocytes. Moreover, the apoptosis of spermatids and spermatozoa scarcely occurred after irradiation with low dose. The apoptosis of spermatogenic cells induced by LDR has a regular change, which provides a further experimental evidence for the mechanism study of hormesis by LDR

  18. Comparison of high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayed, Alaa; Mutch, David G.; Rader, Janet S.; Gibb, Randall K.; Powell, Matthew A.; Wright, Jason D.; El Naqa, Issam; Zoberi, Imran; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes for endometrial carcinoma patients treated with either high-dose-rate (HDR) or low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 1,179 patients divided into LDR (1,004) and HDR groups (175). Patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) surgical Stages I-III were included. All patients were treated with postoperative irradiation. In the LDR group, the postoperative dose applied to the vaginal cuff was 60-70 Gy surface doses to the vaginal mucosa. The HDR brachytherapy prescription was 6 fractions of 2 Gy each to a depth of 0.5 cm from the surface of the vaginal mucosa. Overall survival, disease-free survival, local control, and complications were endpoints. Results: For all stages combined, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years in the LDR group were 70%, 69%, and 81%, respectively. For all stages combined, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years in the HDR group were 68%, 62%, and 78%, respectively. There were no significant differences in early or late Grade III and IV complications in the HDR or LDR groups. Conclusion: Survival outcomes, pelvic tumor control, and Grade III and IV complications were not significantly different in the LDR brachytherapy group compared with the HDR group

  19. Effect of Bcl-2/Bax gene expression on apoptosis of spermatogenic cells of mouse testes induced by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangwei; Wang Chunyan; Lu Zhe; Liu Shunchun; Gong Shouliang

    2003-01-01

    The different kinds of spermatogenic cells were separated using density gradient centrifugation and their apoptosis and Bcl-2 and Bax protein expression were measured with flow cytometry and immunohistochemical method, respectively. The results showed the apoptosis in all kinds of spermatogenic cells induced by low dose radiation (LDR) had a obvious regularity. When the doses were 0.025 and 0.05 Gy, spermatogonia apoptosis was dominant. With the increase of irradiation dose (0.075-0.2 Gy), spermatocytes also showed an apoptotic change, but the apoptotic percentage of spermatogonia was significantly higher than that of spermatocytes. Moreover, the apoptosis of spermatids and spermatozoa scarcely occurred after LDR. Bax protein was primarily expressed in spermatogonia and spermatocytes, and the former was significantly higher than that of the latter after LDR. With the increase of irradiation dose, Bax protein expression showed a upgrading tendency, but that of spermatids and spermatozoa scarcely occurred. Bcl-2 protein was primarily expressed in spermatids and spermatozoa, but the Bcl-2 protein expressions of spermatogonia and spermatocytes scarcely occurred after LDR. These results imply that the interacting regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax gene expression might be involved in selective apoptosis of spermatogenic cells induced by LDR, which provided an experimental evidence for further exploring the apoptotic mechanism of adaptive response of spermatogenic cells by LDR

  20. Simultaneous detection of hepatitis B virus genotypes and mutations associated with resistance to lamivudine, adefovir, and telbivudine by the polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Zhong Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Detection of mutations associated to nucleos(tide analogs and hepatitis B virus (HBV genotyping are essential for monitoring treatment of HBV infection. We developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction (PCR-LDR assay for the rapid detection of HBV genotypes and mutations associated with lamivudine, adefovir, and telbivudine resistance in HBV-infected patients. METHODS: HBV templates were amplified by PCR, followed by LDR and electrophoresis on a sequencer. The assay was evaluated using plasmids that contained wild-type or mutant HBV sequences and 216 clinical samples. RESULTS: The PCR-LDR assay and sequencing gave comparable results for 158 of the 216 samples (73.1% with respect to mutation detection and genotyping. Complete agreement between the two methods was observed for all the samples (100% at codon 180 and codon 204. Concordant results were observed for 99.4% of the 158 samples at codon 181 and 98.7% at codon 236. The genotyping results were completely concordant between the PCR-LDR assay and sequencing. The PCR-LDR assay could detect a proportion of 1% mutant plasmid in a background of wild-type plasmid. CONCLUSION: The PCR-LDR assay is sensitive and specific for detection of HBV genotypes and drug resistance mutations, and could be helpful for decision making in the treatment of HBV infection.

  1. The Manchester Respiratory Activities of Daily Living questionnaire for use in COPD patients: translation into Portuguese and cross-cultural adaptation for use in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkes-Cunha, Maíra; Mayer, Anamaria Fleig; Reis, Cardine; Yohannes, Abebaw M; Maurici, Rosemeri

    2016-01-01

    To translate The Manchester Respiratory Activities of Daily Living (MRADL) questionnaire into Portuguese and to create a version of the MRADL that is cross-culturally adapted for use in Brazil. The English-language version of the MRADL was translated into Portuguese by two health care researchers who were fluent in English. A consensus version was obtained by other two researchers and a pulmonologist. That version was back-translated into English by another translator who was a native speaker of English and fluent in Portuguese. The cognitive debriefing process consisted in having 10 COPD patients complete the translated questionnaire in order to test its understandability, clarity, and acceptability in the target population. On the basis of the results, the final Portuguese-language version of the MRADL was produced and approved by the committee and one of the authors of the original questionnaire. The author of the MRADL questioned only a few items in the translated version, and some changes were made to the mobility and personal hygiene domains. Cultural differences regarding the domestic activities domain were found, in particular regarding the item "Do you have the ability to do a full clothes wash and hang them out to dry?", due to socioeconomic and climatic issues. The item "Do you take care of your garden?" was questioned by the participants who lived in apartments, being modified to "Do you take care of your garden or plants in your apartment?" The final Portuguese-language version of the MRADL adapted for use in Brazil was found to be easy to understand and easily applied.

  2. Alzheimer ’s Disease: Possible Mechanisms Behind Neurohormesis Induced by Exposure to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevelacqua, J.J.; Mortazavi, S.M.J.

    2018-01-01

    In 2016, scientists reported that human exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (CT scans of the brain) might relieve symptoms of both Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD). The findings were unbelievable for those who were not familiar with neurohormesis. X-ray stimulation of the patient’s adaptive protection systems against neurodegenerative diseases was the mechanism proposed by those authors. Now, some more recent studies performed in the field of neurobiological research confirm that low levels of stress can produce protective responses against the pathogenic processes. This paper outlines possible protective consequences of LDR in preventing the pathogenesis of AD through mechanisms such as restoring the myelin sheath and preventing neurodegeneration caused by oxidative stress. Focal demyelination is frequently reported in the proximity of beta-amyloid plaques within neocortex. Extracellular accumulation of amyloid is among well-characterized pathological changes in AD. It should be noted that LDR has been shown to contribute to the regeneration and functional recovery after transverse peripheral nerve injury (through inducing increased production of VEGF and GAP-43), which advances both the axonal regeneration and myelination. Another mechanism which is possibly involved is preventing neurodegeneration caused by oxidative stress. While high doses can induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, oxidative stress and neuro-inflammation, substantial evidence now indicates that LDR can mitigate tissue damage through antioxidant defenses. Although adult neurogenesis has been reported to be beneficial for the regeneration of nervous system, some studies demonstrate that neurogenesis increases in AD brains. In spite of these reports, cellular therapy is introduced as a promising strategy for AD, and hence, LDR can affect the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Although such mechanisms are not fully known yet, it is hoped

  3. Evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff, and resources during interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. DEGRO-QUIRO trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tselis, N.; Zamboglou, N.; Maurer, U.; Popp, W.; Sack, H.

    2014-01-01

    The German Society of Radiation Oncology initiated a multicenter trial to evaluate core processes and subprocesses of radiotherapy by prospective evaluation of all important procedures in the most frequent malignancies treated by radiation therapy. The aim of this analysis was to assess the required resources for interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (BRT) based on actual time measurements regarding allocation of personnel and room occupation needed for specific procedures. Two radiotherapy centers (community hospital of Offenbach am Main and community hospital of Eschweiler) participated in this prospective study. Working time of the different occupational groups and room occupancies for the workflow of prostate BRT were recorded and methodically assessed during a 3-month period. For HDR and LDR BRT, a total of 560 and 92 measurements, respectively, were documented. The time needed for treatment preplanning was median 24 min for HDR (n=112 measurements) and 6 min for LDR BRT (n=21). Catheter implantation with intraoperative HDR real-time planning (n=112), postimplantation HDR treatment planning (n=112), and remotely controlled HDR afterloading irradiation (n=112) required median 25, 39, and 50 min, respectively. For LDR real-time planning (n=39) and LDR treatment postplanning (n=32), the assessed median duration was 91 and 11 min, respectively. Room occupancy and overall mean medical staff times were 194 and 910 min respectively, for HDR, and 113 and 371 min, respectively, for LDR BRT. In this prospective analysis, the resource requirements for the application of HDR and LDR BRT of prostate cancer were assessed methodically and are presented for first time. (orig.)

  4. High dose rate versus low dose rate interstitial radiotherapy for carcinoma of the floor of mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yamazaki, Hideya; Koizumi, Masahiko; Kagawa, Kazufumi; Yoshida, Ken; Shiomi, Hiroya; Imai, Atsushi; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Tanaka, Eichii; Nose, Takayuki; Teshima, Teruki; Furukawa, Souhei; Fuchihata, Hajime

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with cancer of the floor of mouth are treated with radiation because of functional and cosmetic reasons. We evaluate the treatment results of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) interstitial radiation for cancer of the floor of mouth. Methods and Materials: From January 1980 through March 1996, 41 patients with cancer of the floor of mouth were treated with LDR interstitial radiation using 198 Au grains, and from April 1992 through March 1996 16 patients with HDR interstitial radiation. There were 26 T1 tumors, 30 T2 tumors, and 1 T3 tumor. For 21 patients treated with interstitial radiation alone, a total radiation dose of interstitial therapy was 60 Gy/10 fractions/6-7 days in HDR and 85 Gy within 1 week in LDR. For 36 patients treated with a combination therapy, a total dose of 30 to 40 Gy of external radiation and a total dose of 48 Gy/8 fractions/5-6 days in HDR or 65 Gy within 1 week in LDR were delivered. Results: Two- and 5-year local control rates of patients treated with HDR interstitial radiation were 94% and 94%, and those with LDR were 75% and 69%, respectively. Local control rate of patients treated with HDR brachytherapy was slightly higher than that with 198 Au grains (p = 0.113). For late complication, bone exposure or ulcer occurred in 6 of 16 (38%) patients treated with HDR and 13 of 41 (32%) patients treated with LDR. Conclusion: HDR fractionated interstitial brachytherapy can be an alternative to LDR brachytherapy for cancer of the floor of mouth and eliminate radiation exposure for the medical staff

  5. Brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer. Low dose rate to high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Toshihiko; Furukawa, Souhei; Kakimoto, Naoya

    2003-01-01

    To examine the compatibility of low dose rate (LDR) with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, we reviewed 399 patients with early oral tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0) treated solely by brachytherapy at Osaka University Hospital between 1967 and 1999. For patients in the LDR group (n=341), the treatment sources consisted of Ir-192 pin for 227 patients (1973-1996; irradiated dose, 61-85 Gy; median, 70 Gy), Ra-226 needle for 113 patients (1967-1986; 55-93 Gy; median, 70 Gy). Ra-226 and Ir-192 were combined for one patient. Ir-192 HDR (microSelectron-HDR) was used for 58 patients in the HDR group (1991-present; 48-60 Gy; median, 60 Gy). LDR implantations were performed via oral and HDR via a submental/submandibular approach. The dose rates at the reference point for the LDR group were 0.30 to 0.8 Gy/h, and for the HDR group 1.0 to 3.4 Gy/min. The patients in the HDR group received a total dose of 48-60 Gy (8-10 fractions) during one week. Two fractions were administered per day (at least a 6-h interval). The 3- and 5-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were 85% and 80%, respectively, and those in the HDR group were both 84%. HDR brachytherapy showed the same lymph-node control rate as did LDR brachytherapy (67% at 5 years). HDR brachytherapy achieved the same locoregional result as did LDR brachytherapy. A converting factor of 0.86 is applicable for HDR in the treatment of early oral tongue cancer. (author)

  6. Evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff, and resources during interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. DEGRO-QUIRO trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselis, N.; Zamboglou, N. [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Maurer, U. [St.-Antonius-Hospital, Strahlentherapie, Eschweiler (Germany); Popp, W. [Prime Networks AG, Basel (Switzerland); Sack, H. [University of Essen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Essen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    The German Society of Radiation Oncology initiated a multicenter trial to evaluate core processes and subprocesses of radiotherapy by prospective evaluation of all important procedures in the most frequent malignancies treated by radiation therapy. The aim of this analysis was to assess the required resources for interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (BRT) based on actual time measurements regarding allocation of personnel and room occupation needed for specific procedures. Two radiotherapy centers (community hospital of Offenbach am Main and community hospital of Eschweiler) participated in this prospective study. Working time of the different occupational groups and room occupancies for the workflow of prostate BRT were recorded and methodically assessed during a 3-month period. For HDR and LDR BRT, a total of 560 and 92 measurements, respectively, were documented. The time needed for treatment preplanning was median 24 min for HDR (n=112 measurements) and 6 min for LDR BRT (n=21). Catheter implantation with intraoperative HDR real-time planning (n=112), postimplantation HDR treatment planning (n=112), and remotely controlled HDR afterloading irradiation (n=112) required median 25, 39, and 50 min, respectively. For LDR real-time planning (n=39) and LDR treatment postplanning (n=32), the assessed median duration was 91 and 11 min, respectively. Room occupancy and overall mean medical staff times were 194 and 910 min respectively, for HDR, and 113 and 371 min, respectively, for LDR BRT. In this prospective analysis, the resource requirements for the application of HDR and LDR BRT of prostate cancer were assessed methodically and are presented for first time. (orig.)

  7. After low and high dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy followed by IMRT radiotherapy for intermediate and high risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Murakami, Naoya; Inaba, Koji; Wakita, Akihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Takahashi, Kana; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Umezawa, Rei; Morota, Madoka; Sumi, Minako; Igaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Itami, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to compare urinary symptoms in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer after a combination of either low-dose-rate or high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy along with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (LDR-ISBT + IMRT or HDR-ISBT + IMRT). From June 2009 to April 2014, 16 and 22 patients were treated with LDR-ISBT + IMRT and HDR-ISBT + IMRT, respectively. No patient from these groups was excluded from this study. The prescribed dose of LDR-ISBT, HDR-ISBT, and IMRT was 115 Gy, 20 Gy in 2 fractions, and 46 Gy in 23 fractions, respectively. Obstructive and irritative urinary symptoms were assessed by the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) examined before and after treatments. After ISBT, IPSS was evaluated in the 1st and 4th weeks, then every 2–3 months for the 1st year, and every 6 months thereafter. The median follow-up of the patients treated with LDR-ISBT + IMRT and HDR-ISBT + IMRT was 1070.5 days and 1048.5 days, respectively (p = 0.321). The IPSS-increment in the LDR-ISBT + IMRT group was greater than that in the HDR-ISBT + IMRT between 91 and 180 days after ISBT (p = 0.015). In the LDR-ISBT + IMRT group, the IPSS took longer time to return to the initial level than in the HDR-ISBT + IMRT group (in LDR-ISBT + IMRT group, the recovery time was 90 days later). The dose to urethra showed a statistically significant association with the IPSS-increment in the irritative urinary symptoms (p = 0.011). Clinical outcomes were comparable between both the groups. Both therapeutic modalities are safe and well suited for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer; however, it took patients longer to recover from LDR-ISBT + IMRT than from HDR-ISBT + IMRT. It is possible that fast dose delivery induced early symptoms and early recovery, while gradual dose delivery induced late symptoms and late recovery. Urethral dose reductions were associated with small increments in IPSS

  8. Treatment Outcome of Medium-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Comparison With Low-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kita, Midori; Okawa, Tomohiko; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Kohno, Mari; Sonoda, Tatsuo; Hirabayashi, Hisae; Nagata, Yasushi; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of medium-dose-rate (MDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 419 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated by radical radiotherapy with curative intent at Tokyo Women’s Medical University from 1969 to 1999. LDR was used from 1969 to 1986, and MDR has been used since July 1987. When compared with LDR, fraction dose was decreased and fraction size was increased (1 or 2 fractions) for MDR to make the total dose of MDR equal to that of LDR. In general, the patients received a total dose of 60 to 70 Gy at Point A with external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. In the LDR group, 32 patients had Stage I disease, 81 had Stage II, 182 had Stage III, and 29 had Stage IVA; in the MDR group, 9 patients had Stage I disease, 19 had Stage II, 55 had Stage III, and 12 had Stage IVA. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for Stages I, II, III, and IVA in the LDR group were 78%, 72%, 55%, and 34%, respectively. In the MDR group, the 5-year overall survival rates were 100%, 68%, 52%, and 42%, respectively. No significant statistical differences were seen between the two groups. The actuarial rates of late complications Grade 2 or greater at 5 years for the rectum, bladder, and small intestine in the LDR group were 11.1%, 5.8%, and 2.0%, respectively. The rates for the MDR group were 11.7%, 4.2%, and 2.6%, respectively, all of which were without statistical differences. Conclusion: These data suggest that MDR ICBT is effective, useful, and equally as good as LDR ICBT in daytime (about 5 hours) treatments of patients with cervical cancer.

  9. A Comparison Between Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, External Beam Radiation Therapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, and Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Adjuvant or Salvage Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciezki, Jay P; Weller, Michael; Reddy, Chandana A; Kittel, Jeffrey; Singh, Harguneet; Tendulkar, Rahul; Stephans, Kevin L; Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Klein, Eric A

    2017-04-01

    We compare the efficacy and toxicity among the 3 major modalities available used to treat high-risk prostate cancer (HRCaP). From 1996 to 2012, 2557 HRCaP patients were treated: 734 received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), 515 received low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without ADT, and 1308 received radical prostatectomy (RP) with or without EBRT. Biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) were assessed. Toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.03. The log-rank test compared bRFS and cRFS among the modalities, and Cox regression identified factors associated with bRFS and cRFS. Gray's test compared differences in late toxicity and PSCM among the modalities. Competing risk regression identified factors associated with PCSM. The median follow-up time and age were 63.5 months and 65 years, respectively. The bRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 74% and 53% for EBRT, 74% and 52% for LDR, and 65% and 47% for RP (P=.0001). The cRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 85% and 73% for EBRT, 90% and 76% for LDR, and 89% and 75% for RP (P=.121). The PCSM at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 5.3% and 11.2% for EBRT, 3.2% and 3.6% for LDR, and 2.8% and 6.8% for RP (P=.0004). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was 8.1% for EBRT, 7.2% for LDR, and 16.4% for RP (PLDR, and 1.0% for RP (PLDR, or RP yields efficacy showing better bRFS for LDR and EBRT relative to RP, equivalence for cRFS, and a PCSM advantage of LDR and RP over EBRT. The toxicity is lowest for LDR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment Outcome of Medium-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Comparison With Low-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko, E-mail: kaneyasu@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kita, Midori [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Tama Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Okawa, Tomohiko [Evaluation and Promotion Center, Utsunomiya Memorial Hospital, Tochigi (Japan); Maebayashi, Katsuya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Mari [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sonoda, Tatsuo; Hirabayashi, Hisae [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of medium-dose-rate (MDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 419 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated by radical radiotherapy with curative intent at Tokyo Women's Medical University from 1969 to 1999. LDR was used from 1969 to 1986, and MDR has been used since July 1987. When compared with LDR, fraction dose was decreased and fraction size was increased (1 or 2 fractions) for MDR to make the total dose of MDR equal to that of LDR. In general, the patients received a total dose of 60 to 70 Gy at Point A with external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. In the LDR group, 32 patients had Stage I disease, 81 had Stage II, 182 had Stage III, and 29 had Stage IVA; in the MDR group, 9 patients had Stage I disease, 19 had Stage II, 55 had Stage III, and 12 had Stage IVA. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for Stages I, II, III, and IVA in the LDR group were 78%, 72%, 55%, and 34%, respectively. In the MDR group, the 5-year overall survival rates were 100%, 68%, 52%, and 42%, respectively. No significant statistical differences were seen between the two groups. The actuarial rates of late complications Grade 2 or greater at 5 years for the rectum, bladder, and small intestine in the LDR group were 11.1%, 5.8%, and 2.0%, respectively. The rates for the MDR group were 11.7%, 4.2%, and 2.6%, respectively, all of which were without statistical differences. Conclusion: These data suggest that MDR ICBT is effective, useful, and equally as good as LDR ICBT in daytime (about 5 hours) treatments of patients with cervical cancer.

  11. Pulse foods: processing, quality and nutraceutical applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tiwari, Brijesh K; Gowen, Aoife; McKenna, B. M

    2011-01-01

    ... Applications Edited by Brijesh K. Tiwari Department of Food and Tourism, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK Aoife Gowen UCD School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary ­ M edicine,...

  12. TU-AB-201-11: A Novel Theoretical Framework for MRI-Only Image Guided LDR Prostate and Breast Brachytherapy Implant Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, A; Elzibak, A; Fatemi, A; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Han, D [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a novel framework for accurate model-based dose calculations using only MR images for LDR prostate and breast seed implant brachytherapy. Methods: Model-based dose calculation methodologies recommended by TG-186 require further knowledge about specific tissue composition, which is challenging with MRI. However, relying on MRI-only for implant dosimetry would reduce the soft tissue delineation uncertainty, costs, and uncertainties associated with multi-modality registration and fusion processes. We propose a novel framework to address this problem using quantitative MRI acquisitions and reconstruction techniques. The framework includes three steps: (1) Identify the locations of seeds(2) Identify the presence (or absence) of calcification(s)(3) Quantify the water and fat content in the underlying tissueSteps (1) and (2) consider the sources that limit patient dosimetry, particularly the inter-seed attenuation and the calcified regions; while step (3) targets the quantification of the tissue composition to consider the heterogeneities in the medium. Our preliminary work has shown that the seeds and the calcifications can be identified with MRI using both the magnitude and the phase images. By employing susceptibility-weighted imaging with specific post-processing techniques, the phase images can be further explored to distinguish the seeds from the calcifications. Absolute quantification of tissue, water, and fat content is feasible and was previously demonstrated in phantoms and in-vivo applications, particularly for brain diseases. The approach relies on the proportionality of the MR signal to the number of protons in an image volume. By employing appropriate correction algorithms for T1 - and T2*-related biases, B1 transmit and receive field inhomogeneities, absolute water/fat content can be determined. Results: By considering calcification and interseed attenuation, and through the knowledge of water and fat mass density, accurate patient

  13. ANALISIS PENGARUH KINERJA PERBANKAN TERHADAP DANA PIHAK KETIGA BANK PERSERO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    iqbal firdausi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the effect of the performance of banks consisting of CAR, ROA, ROA, LDR simultaneously and partially on the Third Party Funds and analyze between the performance of banks consisting of CAR, ROA, ROA, LDR the dominant influence on the Third party Fund. Forms of this research is descriptive explanatory nature of causality through hypothesis testing. The number of samples in the study of 4 Bank Limited for 11 years i.e. from 2004 to 2014 year. The analysis technique used multiple regression analysis. The analysis showed that the performance of banks consisting of CAR, ROA, ROA, LDR simultaneously affect the Third Party Funds. Performance of banks consisting of CAR, ROA, ROA, LDR partially affect the Third Party Funds. ROA dominant influence on Third Party Funds.

  14. Hierarchical tone mapping for high dynamic range image visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guoping; Duan, Jiang

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, we present a computationally efficient, practically easy to use tone mapping techniques for the visualization of high dynamic range (HDR) images in low dynamic range (LDR) reproduction devices. The new method, termed hierarchical nonlinear linear (HNL) tone-mapping operator maps the pixels in two hierarchical steps. The first step allocates appropriate numbers of LDR display levels to different HDR intensity intervals according to the pixel densities of the intervals. The second step linearly maps the HDR intensity intervals to theirs allocated LDR display levels. In the developed HNL scheme, the assignment of LDR display levels to HDR intensity intervals is controlled by a very simple and flexible formula with a single adjustable parameter. We also show that our new operators can be used for the effective enhancement of ordinary images.

  15. The repeatability of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and C-reactive protein in COPD patients over one year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umme Kolsum

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Umme Kolsum, Kay Roy, Cerys Starkey, Zoë Borrill, Nick Truman, Jørgen Vestbo, Dave SinghNorth West Lung Research Centre, University of Manchester, South Manchester University Hospitals Trust, Wythenshawe, Manchester, UKBackground: Many of the systemic manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are mediated through increased systemic levels of inflammatory proteins. We assessed the long term repeatability of Interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and C-reactive protein (CRP over one year and examined the relationships between these systemic markers in COPD.Methods: Fifty-eight stable COPD patients completed a baseline and one-year visit. Serum IL-6, plasma CRP, and plasma TNF-α were measured. Repeatability was expressed by intraclass correlation coefficient (Ri and the Bland–Altman method. Pearson correlations were used to determine the relationships between the systemic markers at both visits.Results: There was moderate repeatability with a very high degree of statistical significance (p ≤ 0.001 between the two visits for all the systemic biomarkers (IL-6, CRP, and TNF-α. CRP was significantly associated with IL-6 at both visits (r = 0.55, p = 0.0001, r = 0.51, p = 0.0002, respectively. There were no other significant associations between the systemic markers at either of the visits.Conclusions: Systemic inflammatory biomarkers IL-6, CRP, and TNF-α were moderately repeatable over a twelve month period in COPD patients. We have also shown that a robust and repeatable association between IL-6 and CRP exists.Keywords: interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, C-reactive protein, repeatability, COPD   

  16. Interactive simulation of nuclear power systems using a dedicated minicomputer - computer graphics facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tye, C.; Sezgen, A.O.

    1980-01-01

    The design of control systems and operational procedures for large scale nuclear power plant poses a difficult optimization problem requiring a lot of computational effort. Plant dynamic simulation using digital minicomputers offers the prospect of relatively low cost computing and when combined with graphical input/output provides a powerful tool for studying such problems. The paper discusses the results obtained from a simulation study carried out at the Computer Graphics Unit of the University of Manchester using a typical station control model for an Advanced Gas Cooled reactor. Particular reference is placed on the use of computer graphics for information display, parameter and control system optimization and techniques for using graphical input for defining and/or modifying the control system topology. Experience gained from this study has shown that a relatively modest minicomputer system can be used for simulating large scale dynamic systems and that highly interactive computer graphics can be used to advantage to relieve the designer of many of the tedious aspects of simulation leaving him free to concentrate on the more creative aspects of his work. (author)

  17. Genetic disorders from an endogamous population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdulbari Bener

    b Dept. of Evidence for Population Health Unit, School of Epidemiology and Health Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK ... genetics counseling and screening for the hereditary diseases programme. Results: The ..... Elementary.

  18. The specificity of mathematics learning and the disavowal of the political in research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pais, Alexandre; Valero, Paola

    Paper presented at the International conference on Mathematics Education and Contemporary Theory. Manchester, 17-19 July.......Paper presented at the International conference on Mathematics Education and Contemporary Theory. Manchester, 17-19 July....

  19. High-dose-rate versus low-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: analysis of tumor recurrence - the University of Wisconsin experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petereit, Daniel G.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Potter, David M.; Schink, Julian C.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the clinical outcome for cervical cancer patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) vs. low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: One hundred ninety-one LDR patients were treated from 1977 to 1988 and compared to 173 HDR patients treated from 1989 to 1996. Patients of similar stage and tumor volumes were treated with identical external beam fractionation schedules. Brachytherapy was given in either 1 or 2 LDR implants for the earlier patient cohort, and 5 HDR implants for the latter cohort. For both patient groups, Point A received a minimum total dose of 80 Gy. The linear-quadratic formula was used to calculate the LDR dose-equivalent contribution to Point A for the HDR treatments. The primary endpoints assessed were survival, pelvic control, relapse-free survival, and distant metastases. Endpoints were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparisons between treatment groups were performed using the log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: The median follow-up was 65 months (2 to 208 months) in the LDR group and 22 months (1 to 85 months) in the HDR group. For all stages combined there was no difference in survival, pelvic control, relapse-free survival, or distant metastases between LDR and HDR patients. For Stage IB and II HDR patients, the pelvic control rates were 85% and 80% with survival rates of 86% and 65% at 3 years, respectively. In the LDR group, Stage IB and II patients had 91% and 78% pelvic control rates, with 82% and 58% survival rates at 3 years, respectively. No difference was seen in survival or pelvic control for bulky Stage I and II patients combined (> 5 cm). Pelvic control at 3 years was 44% (HDR) versus 75% (LDR) for Stage IIIB patients (p = 0.002). This difference in pelvic control was associated with a lower survival rate in the Stage IIIB HDR versus LDR population (33% versus 58%, p = 0.004). The only major difference, with regard to patient characteristics

  20. Effects of multiple low dose radiation on the apoptosis of splenocytes and immune factor in male diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanbo; Guo Caixia; Dong Lihua; Wang Jianfeng; Liu Shuchun; Lu Zhe; Gong Shouliang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of multiple low dose radiation (LDR) on the apoptosis of splenocytes and immune factors in diabetes mellitus (DM) rats. Methods: The rats were randomly divided into control, DM and DM + LDR groups. The irradiation doses were 25, 50 and 75 mGy, and the irradiated times were 15. At the fourth weekend after the DM rats irradiated, the apoptotic rate and TCRαβ percentage of splenocytes were detected by flow cytometry, and the content of IL-2 in both serum and supernatant of cultured splenocytes were detected by ELISA. Results: Compared with that in the control, the body weight (BW) decreased in the DM and DM + LDR groups,particularly in DM group. The blood glucose (BG) level in the DM + LDR groups was higher than that in the control, but decreased significantly as compared with that in the DM group (P < 0.01). As compared with those in the control, the apoptotic rate in DM + 50 mGy (P < 0.05) and the content of serum IL-2 in DM + 75 mGy group (P < 0.01) all increased significantly, while the content of IL-2 in supernatant of cultured splenocytes decreased significantly in the DM + LDR groups. Compared with those in the DM group, the apoptotic rate and the percentage of TCRαβ in splenocytes in the DM + LDR groups (P < 0.01-P < 0.001) and the content of IL-2 in serum in DM + 50 mGy group (P < 0.01) decreased significantly. Conclusions: The multiple LDR could weaken the loss of BW and increase of BG caused by DM, decrease the splenocyte apoptosis induced by DM, and regulate the immune factors. (authors)

  1. Low dose rate radiation favors apoptosis as a mechanism of cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtha, Albert D.; Rupnow, Brent; Knox, Susan J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has demonstrated promising results in the treatment of chemotherapy refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The radiation associated with this therapy is emitted in a continuous fashion at low dose rates (LDR). Results from studies comparing the relative efficacy of LDR radiation and high dose rate (HDR) radiation on malignant cell killing have been variable. This variability may be due in part to the relative contribution of different mechanisms of cell killing (apoptosis or necrosis) at different dose rates. Materials and Methods: In order to test this hypothesis, the relative efficacy of LDR (16.7 cGy/hr) and HDR radiation (422 cGy/min) were compared using a human B cell lymphoma cell line (PW) and a PW clone (c26) stably transfected to overexpress the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2. The endpoints evaluated included the relative amount of cell killing, the fraction of cell killing attributable to apoptosis versus necrosis, and the impact of Bcl-2 overexpression on both overall cell killing and the fraction of killing attributable to apoptosis. Results: HDR and LDR radiation resulted in similar overall cell killing in the PW wild type cell line. In contrast, killing of clone c26 cells was dose rate dependent. One third less killing was seen following LDR irradiation of c26 cells compared with equivalent doses of HDR radiation. Analysis of the relative mechanisms of killing following LDR irradiation revealed a relative increase in the proportion of killing attributable to apoptosis. Conclusion: These findings support the hypothesis that in PW cells, LDR radiation appears to be highly dependent on apoptosis as a mechanism of cell death. These findings may have implications for the selection of patients for RIT, and for the treatment of tumors that overexpress Bcl-2. They may also help form the basis for future rational design of effective combined modality therapies utilizing RIT

  2. Integrated process analysis of treatment systems for mixed low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, C.R.; Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Bechtold, T.E.

    1997-10-01

    Selection of technologies to be developed for treatment of DOE's mixed low level waste (MLLW) requires knowledge and understanding of the expected costs, schedules, risks, performance, and reliability of the total engineered systems that use these technologies. Thus, an integrated process analysis program was undertaken to identify the characteristics and needs of several thermal and nonthermal systems. For purposes of comparison, all systems were conceptually designed for a single facility processing the same amount of waste at the same rate. Thirty treatment systems were evaluated ranging from standard incineration to innovative thermal systems and innovative nonthermal chemical treatment. Treating 236 million pounds of waste in 20 years through a central treatment was found to be the least costly option with total life cycle cost ranging from $2.1 billion for a metal melting system to $3.9 billion for a nonthermal acid digestion system. Little cost difference exists among nonthermal systems or among thermal systems. Significant cost savings could be achieved by working towards maximum on line treatment time per year; vitrifying the final waste residue; decreasing front end characterization segregation and sizing requirements; using contaminated soil as the vitrifying agent; and delisting the final vitrified waste form from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) requirements

  3. Technical aspects of the integration of three-dimensional treatment planning dose parameters (GEC-ESTRO Working Group) into pre-implant planning for LDR gynecological interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, A; Gao, M; Nguyen, N P; Albuquerque, K

    2009-06-01

    This study investigates the technical feasibility of pre-implant image-based treatment planning for LDR GYN interstitial brachytherapy(IB) based on the GEC-ESTRO guidelines. Initially, a virtual plan is generated based on the prescription dose and GEC-ESTRO defined OAR dose constraints with a pre-implant CT. After the actual implant, a regular diagnostic CT was obtained and fused with our pre-implant scan/initial treatment plan in our planning software. The Flexi-needle position changes, and treatment plan modifications were made if needed. Dose values were normalized to equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (LQED 2 Gy) derived from the linear-quadratic model with alpha/beta of 3 for late responding tissues and alpha/beta of 10 for early responding tissues. D(90) to the CTV, which was gross tumor (GTV) at the time of brachytherapy with a margin to count for microscopic disease, was 84.7 +/- 4.9% of the prescribed dose. The OAR doses were evaluated by D(2cc) (EBRT+IB). Mean D(2cc) values (LQED(2Gy)) for the rectum, bladder, sigmoid, and small bowel were the following: 63.7 +/- 8.4 Gy, 61.2 +/- 6.9 Gy, 48.0 +/- 3.5 Gy, and 49.9 +/- 4.2 Gy. This study confirms the feasibility of applying the GEC-ESTRO recommended dose parameters in pre-implant CT-based treatment planning in GYN IB. In the process, this pre-implant technique also demonstrates a good approximation of the target volume dose coverage, and doses to the OARs.

  4. Attitude of Healthcare Professionals: A Major Limiting Factor in Organ Donation from Brain-Dead Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Kosieradzki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Public attitude toward deceased donor organ recovery in Poland is quite positive, with only 15% opposing to donation of their own organs, yet actual donation rate is only 16/pmp. Moreover, donation rate varies greatly (from 5 to 28 pmp in different regions of the country. To identify the barriers of organ donation, we surveyed 587 physicians involved in brain death diagnosis from regions with low (LDR and high donation rates (HDR. Physicians from LDR were twice more reluctant to start diagnostic procedure when clinical signs of brain death were present (14% versus 5.5% physicians from HDR who would not diagnose death, resp.. Twenty-five percent of LDR physicians (as opposed to 12% of physicians from HDR would either continue with intensive therapy or confirm brain death and limit to the so-called minimal therapy. Only 32% of LDR physicians would proceed with brain death diagnosis regardless of organ donation, compared to 67% in HDR. When donation was not an option, mechanical ventilation would be continued more often in LDR regions (43% versus 26.7%; P<0.01. In conclusion, low donation activity seems to be mostly due to medical staff attitude.

  5. Phase III trial of high- vs. low-dose-rate interstitial radiotherapy for early mobile tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimamoto, Shigetoshi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Teshima, Teruki; Furukawa, Souhei

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Early mobile tongue cancer can be controlled with interstitial radiotherapy (ISRT). We carried out a Phase III trial to compare the treatment results of low-dose-rate (Ld) ISRT and high-dose-rate (HDR) ISRT for early mobile tongue cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 1992 through October 1996, 59 patients with cancer of the early mobile tongue were registered in this Phase III study. Eight patients were excluded from the evaluation because of violations of the requirements for this study. Of 51 eligible patients, 26 patients were treated with LDR-ISRT (70 Gy/4-9 days) and 25 patients with HDR-ISRT (60 Gy/10 fractions/1 week). For the hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT, the time interval between 2 fractions was more than 6 h. Results: Five-year local control rates of the LDR and HDR groups were 84% and 87% respectively. Nodal metastasis occurred in 6 patients in each group. Five-year nodal control rates of the LDR and HDR groups were 77% and 76%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT for early mobile tongue cancer has the same local control compared with continuous LDR-ISRT. Hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT is an alternative treatment for continuous LDR-ISRT

  6. Factors Influencing Land Development and Redevelopment during China’s Rapid Urbanization: Evidence from Haikou City, 2003–2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Land development and redevelopment (LDR is essential to economic growth and the advancement of urbanization in urban China. Moreover, various factors affect LDR. Based on an investigation, during 2003–2016, which involves 420 parcels within a 2-km section of the Nandu River, Haikou city, this paper employs a logistic model, so as to judge the impact of LDR on these parcels, and then with an improved hedonic model, it sets out to explore the LDR influencing factors. Specifically, the results show that the impact mechanism of LDR in China is different from countries where economy is the main influencing force. Moreover, China’s urban land development results from the cooperation and competition between local government and enterprises, with a particular focus on multiple political and economic factors. Hence, the paper innovatively incorporates quantifiable political and property factors that significantly influence the results. Finally, the paper tries to explain the variance from macro-level government and micro-level enterprises perspectives. In conclusion, China’s land development requires cooperation among the government and enterprises, in order to improve the economic, social, and environmental benefits of land use.

  7. Recovering corporate memory. Wine porters’ guilds and religious traditions in pre-industrial northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Laborda-Pemán

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Lester K. Little, Indispensable immigrants: The wine porters of northern Italy and their saint, 1200-1800, Manchester, Manchester University Press, 2015, 229 p., ISBN: 978071909522, £ 70.00.

  8. Vascular diagnostics for Raynaud's phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinsdale G

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Graham Dinsdale, Ariane L Herrick Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK Abstract: Raynaud's phenomenon (RP is common, and in most patients is primary (idiopathic when due to reversible vasospasm and does not progress to irreversible tissue injury. However, in those patients for whom RP is secondary to an underlying disease (eg, systemic sclerosis or atherosclerosis, progression to digital ulceration or critical ischemia can occur. Therefore, the key question for the clinician is “Why does this patient have RP?” Vascular diagnostics play a key role in answering this. In this review, we firstly discuss the different vascular investigations relevant to clinical practice: nail fold capillaroscopy (including the different methodologies for examining the nail fold capillaries, and the role of capillaroscopy in helping to differentiate between primary and systemic sclerosis-related RP, thermography (available in specialist centers, and evaluation of large vessel disease (for example, due to atherosclerosis. We then discuss research tools, mainly laser Doppler methods, including laser Doppler imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging. These are commercially available as complete imaging systems and are (relatively easy to use. The main current goal in vascular imaging research is to validate these novel state-of-the-art techniques as outcome measures of digital vascular disease, and then apply them in early and later phase studies of new treatment approaches, thus facilitating drug development programs. Keywords: Raynaud's phenomenon, systemic sclerosis, nail fold capillaroscopy, thermography, laser Doppler, angiography

  9. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow at Arnold Air Force Base, Coffee and Franklin counties, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, C.J.; Mahoney, E.N.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Air Force at Arnold Air Force Base (AAFB), in Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee, is investigating ground-water contamination in selected areas of the base. This report documents the results of a comprehensive investigation of the regional hydrogeology of the AAFB area. Three aquifers within the Highland Rim aquifer system, the shallow aquifer, the Manchester aquifer, and the Fort Payne aquifer, have been identified in the study area. Of these, the Manchester aquifer is the primary source of water for domestic use. Drilling and water- quality data indicate that the Chattanooga Shale is an effective confining unit, isolating the Highland Rim aquifer system from the deeper, upper Central Basin aquifer system. A regional ground-water divide, approximately coinciding with the Duck River-Elk River drainage divide, underlies AAFB and runs from southwest to northeast. The general direction of most ground-water flow is to the north- west or to the northwest or to the southeast from the divide towards tributary streams that drain the area. Recharge estimates range from 4 to 11 inches per year. Digital computer modeling was used to simulate and provide a better understanding of the ground-water flow system. The model indicates that most of the ground-water flow occurs in the shallow and Manchester aquifers. The model was most sensitive to increases in hydraulic conductivity and changes in recharge rates. Particle-tracking analysis from selected sites of ground-water contamination indicates a potential for contami- nants to be transported beyond the boundary of AAFB.

  10. High Reynolds number liquid layer flow with flexible walls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK ... tions have potential application to aerodynamic and marine flows. .... Next, assume that the displacement of the free-surface induces a transverse pressure gradient.

  11. Avatar' remarks on the carbon input threshold in the sloping croplands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Agata; Gristina, Luciano; García-Díaz, Andrés; Menghin, Riccardo; Cerdà, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    sequestration rates in a semiarid environment. Land Degradation & Development, 23: 82- 91. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1055 Barua, A. K., Haque, S. M. S. 2013. Soil characteristics and carbon sequestration potentials of vegetation in degraded hills of Chittagong, Bangladesh. Land Degradation & Development, 24: 63- 71. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1107 Batjes NH. 2014. Projected changes in soil organic carbon stocks upon adoption of recommended soil and water practices in teh Upper Tana River Catchment, Kenia. Land Degradation and Development, 25, 278-287. DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2141 Beatriz Lozano-García and Luis Parras-Alcántara 2014 VARIATION IN SOIL ORGANIC CARBON AND NITROGEN STOCKS ALONG A TOPOSEQUENCE IN A TRADITIONAL MEDITERRANEAN OLIVE GROVE Land Degradation and development, 25, 297-304 | DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2284 Cerdà, A., Flanagan, D.C., le Bissonnais, Y., Boardman, J. 2009. Soil Erosion and Agriculture. Soil and Tillage Research, 107-108. doi:10.1016/j.still.2009.10.006 Cerdà, A., Giménez-Morera, A., Bodí, M.B. 2009. Soil and water losses from new citrus orchards growing on sloped soils in the western Mediterranean basin. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 34, 1822-1830. DOI: 10.1002/esp.1889 Debasish-Saha, S.S. Kukal and S.S. Bawa, 2014. SOIL ORGANIC CARBON STOCK AND FRACTIONS IN RELATION TO LAND USE AND SOIL DEPTH IN THE DEGRADED SHIWALIKS HILLS OF LOWER HIMALAYAS Land Degradation and Development, 25, 407-416. DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2151 Debasish-Saha, S.S. Kukal and S.S. Bawa, 2014. SOIL ORGANIC CARBON STOCK AND FRACTIONS IN RELATION TO LAND USE AND SOIL DEPTH IN THE DEGRADED SHIWALIKS HILLS OF LOWER HIMALAYAS Land Degradation and Development, 25, 407-416. DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2151 García-Orenes, F., Guerrero, C., Roldán, A.,Mataix-Solera, J., Cerdà, A., Campoy, M., Zornoza, R., Bárcenas, G., Caravaca. F. 2010. Soil microbial biomass and activity under different agricultural management systems in a semiarid Mediterranean agroecosystem. Soil and Tillage Research. 109 (2): 110-115. 10.1016/j

  12. Commissioning a CT-compatible LDR tandem and ovoid applicator using Monte Carlo calculation and 3D dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, Justus; Newton, Joseph; Yang Yun; Steffey, Beverly; Cai, Jing; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark; Chino, Junzo; Craciunescu, Oana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Rider University, Lawrenceville, New Jersey 08648 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the geometric and dose attenuation characteristics of a new commercially available CT-compatible LDR tandem and ovoid (T and O) applicator using Monte Carlo calculation and 3D dosimetry. Methods: For geometric characterization, we quantified physical dimensions and investigated a systematic difference found to exist between nominal ovoid angle and the angle at which the afterloading buckets fall within the ovoid. For dosimetric characterization, we determined source attenuation through asymmetric gold shielding in the buckets using Monte Carlo simulations and 3D dosimetry. Monte Carlo code MCNP5 was used to simulate 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} photon histories from a {sup 137}Cs source placed in the bucket to achieve statistical uncertainty of 1% at a 6 cm distance. For 3D dosimetry, the distribution about an unshielded source was first measured to evaluate the system for {sup 137}Cs, after which the distribution was measured about sources placed in each bucket. Cylindrical PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} dosimeters (9.5 cm diameter, 9.2 cm height) with a central channel bored for source placement were supplied by Heuris Inc. The dosimeters were scanned with the Duke Large field of view Optical CT-Scanner before and after delivering a nominal dose at 1 cm of 5-8 Gy. During irradiation the dosimeter was placed in a water phantom to provide backscatter. Optical CT scan time lasted 15 min during which 720 projections were acquired at 0.5 Degree-Sign increments, and a 3D distribution was reconstructed with a (0.05 cm){sup 3} isotropic voxel size. The distributions about the buckets were used to calculate a 3D distribution of transmission rate through the bucket, which was applied to a clinical CT-based T and O implant plan. Results: The systematic difference in bucket angle relative to the nominal ovoid angle (105 Degree-Sign ) was 3.1 Degree-Sign -4.7 Degree-Sign . A systematic difference in bucket angle of 1 Degree-Sign , 5 Degree-Sign , and

  13. Commissioning a CT-compatible LDR tandem and ovoid applicator using Monte Carlo calculation and 3D dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Justus; Newton, Joseph; Yang, Yun; Steffey, Beverly; Cai, Jing; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark; Chino, Junzo; Craciunescu, Oana

    2012-07-01

    To determine the geometric and dose attenuation characteristics of a new commercially available CT-compatible LDR tandem and ovoid (T&O) applicator using Monte Carlo calculation and 3D dosimetry. For geometric characterization, we quantified physical dimensions and investigated a systematic difference found to exist between nominal ovoid angle and the angle at which the afterloading buckets fall within the ovoid. For dosimetric characterization, we determined source attenuation through asymmetric gold shielding in the buckets using Monte Carlo simulations and 3D dosimetry. Monte Carlo code MCNP5 was used to simulate 1.5 × 10(9) photon histories from a (137)Cs source placed in the bucket to achieve statistical uncertainty of 1% at a 6 cm distance. For 3D dosimetry, the distribution about an unshielded source was first measured to evaluate the system for (137)Cs, after which the distribution was measured about sources placed in each bucket. Cylindrical PRESAGE(®) dosimeters (9.5 cm diameter, 9.2 cm height) with a central channel bored for source placement were supplied by Heuris Inc. The dosimeters were scanned with the Duke Large field of view Optical CT-Scanner before and after delivering a nominal dose at 1 cm of 5-8 Gy. During irradiation the dosimeter was placed in a water phantom to provide backscatter. Optical CT scan time lasted 15 min during which 720 projections were acquired at 0.5° increments, and a 3D distribution was reconstructed with a (0.05 cm)(3) isotropic voxel size. The distributions about the buckets were used to calculate a 3D distribution of transmission rate through the bucket, which was applied to a clinical CT-based T&O implant plan. The systematic difference in bucket angle relative to the nominal ovoid angle (105°) was 3.1°-4.7°. A systematic difference in bucket angle of 1°, 5°, and 10° caused a 1% ± 0.1%, 1.7% ± 0.4%, and 2.6% ± 0.7% increase in rectal dose, respectively, with smaller effect to dose to Point A, bladder

  14. Design and fabrication of an automatic dual axis solar tracker by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology. Vol. 9, No. 2, 2017, pp. ... All rights reserved. Design and fabrication of an automatic dual axis solar tracker by using LDR ..... It may be like a wiper of the car. Nomenclature. LDR.

  15. The Manchester Respiratory Activities of Daily Living questionnaire for use in COPD patients: translation into Portuguese and cross-cultural adaptation for use in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkes-Cunha, Maíra; Mayer, Anamaria Fleig; Reis, Cardine; Yohannes, Abebaw M.; Maurici, Rosemeri

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To translate The Manchester Respiratory Activities of Daily Living (MRADL) questionnaire into Portuguese and to create a version of the MRADL that is cross-culturally adapted for use in Brazil. Methods : The English-language version of the MRADL was translated into Portuguese by two health care researchers who were fluent in English. A consensus version was obtained by other two researchers and a pulmonologist. That version was back-translated into English by another translator who was a native speaker of English and fluent in Portuguese. The cognitive debriefing process consisted in having 10 COPD patients complete the translated questionnaire in order to test its understandability, clarity, and acceptability in the target population. On the basis of the results, the final Portuguese-language version of the MRADL was produced and approved by the committee and one of the authors of the original questionnaire. Results : The author of the MRADL questioned only a few items in the translated version, and some changes were made to the mobility and personal hygiene domains. Cultural differences regarding the domestic activities domain were found, in particular regarding the item "Do you have the ability to do a full clothes wash and hang them out to dry?", due to socioeconomic and climatic issues. The item "Do you take care of your garden?" was questioned by the participants who lived in apartments, being modified to "Do you take care of your garden or plants in your apartment?" Conclusions : The final Portuguese-language version of the MRADL adapted for use in Brazil was found to be easy to understand and easily applied. PMID:26982036

  16. Digital remote control system for power supplies of particle channel magnetooptical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetrov, P.B.; Ermolina, G.P.; Kuznetsov, V.S.; Mojbenko, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Current control of magnetooptical elements of accelerator particle channels is based on control of reference voltage of current stabilizers. Advent of industrial multidigit (12 bits) integral analog-to-digital converters permitted to develop simple digital sources of reference voltage. A digital control system of 30 spatially remoted power supplies of magnetooptical elements of particle channels on the basis of the ''Elektronika-60'' microcomputer is described. The microcomputer is connected by the standard communication line (20 mA) with the SM-4 computer. The ''Summa'' crate is connected with the microcomputer through the branch driver. Digit data are transmitted by the multibranch trunk of sequential communication (Manchester-2 code) at the rate of 0.5 Mband. Feedback was realized by connection of analog signals through the distributed commutator to the measuring line with a digital voltmeter

  17. A virtual laboratory system for physiology teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KArl Bohme

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available There exist a number of areas in the teaching of physiology which potentially lend themselves to a Computer-Based Learning approach. One such area which has been explored at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU and elsewhere (Dewhurst, 1993; Kwan, 1993 is the use of multimedia tools to simulate aspects of experiments traditionally performed on animals. The use of real animal specimens (for example, frogs or rats for dissection and experimentation is both costly and contrary to the ethics of some students.

  18. An analysis of Euroqol EQ-5D and Manchester Oxford Foot Questionnaire scores six months following podiatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Anthony J; Kilmartin, Timothy E

    2012-07-09

    In the United Kingdom patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS) have been adopted as a key measure of foot surgery outcomes. The intention of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness of a regional outcome measure; the Manchester Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) and a generic measure; the EuroQol EQ-5D, in the context of day care Podiatric Surgery. A prospective audit of 375 consecutive day care surgical admissions was undertaken. All patients attending for surgery, who agreed to participate, were included. Pre operation patients completed the MOXFQ and the EQ-5D. Both questionnaires