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Sample records for lcls undulator magnets

  1. Magnetic Measurement Results of the LCLS Undulator Quadrupoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Scott; Caban, Keith; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reese, Ed; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2011-08-18

    This note details the magnetic measurements and the magnetic center fiducializations that were performed on all of the thirty-six LCLS undulator quadrupoles. Temperature rise, standardization reproducibility, vacuum chamber effects and magnetic center reproducibility measurements are also presented. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) undulator beam line has 33 girders, each with a LCLS undulator quadrupole which focuses and steers the beam through the beam line. Each quadrupole has main quadrupole coils, as well as separate horizontal and vertical trim coils. Thirty-six quadrupoles, thirty-three installed and three spares were, manufactured for the LCLS undulator system and all were measured to confirm that they met requirement specifications for integrated gradient, harmonics and for magnetic center shifts after current changes. The horizontal and vertical dipole trims of each quadrupole were similarly characterized. Each quadrupole was also fiducialized to its magnetic center. All characterizing measurements on the undulator quads were performed with their mirror plates on and after a standardization of three cycles from -6 to +6 to -6 amps. Since the undulator quadrupoles could be used as a focusing or defocusing magnet depending on their location, all quadrupoles were characterized as focusing and as defocusing quadrupoles. A subset of the undulator quadrupoles were used to verify that the undulator quadrupole design met specifications for temperature rise, standardization reproducibility and magnetic center reproducibility after splitting. The effects of the mirror plates on the undulator quadrupoles were also measured.

  2. Triggering for Magnetic Field Measurements of the LCLS Undulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-12-13

    A triggering system for magnetic field measurements of the LCLS undulators has been built with a National Instruments PXI-1002 and a Xylinx FPGA board. The system generates single triggers at specified positions, regardless of encoder sensor jitter about a linear scale.

  3. Triggering for Magnetic Field Measurements of the LCLS Undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    A triggering system for magnetic field measurements of the LCLS undulators has been built with a National Instruments PXI-1002 and a Xylinx FPGA board. The system generates single triggers at specified positions, regardless of encoder sensor jitter about a linear scale.

  4. Measurement, sorting and tuning of LCLS undulator magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Vasserman, I B; Dejus, Roger J; Moog, E; Trakhtenberg, E; Vinokurov, N A

    2002-01-01

    Currently, a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) prototype undulator is under construction. The prototype is a 3.4-m-long hybrid-type undulator with fixed gap of 6 mm. The period length is 30 mm and the number of poles is 226. For this undulator, 450 NdFeB magnet blocks are used. This project does not have demanding requirements for multipole component errors, but the field strength at x=0 should be as precise as possible to provide proper particle steering and phase errors. The first set of magnetic blocks has been measured. The strength and direction of magnetization of the magnet blocks are measured using a Helmholtz coil system. In addition to this, Hall probe measurements are performed for magnet blocks while they are mounted in a specially designed cassette with vanadium-permendur poles. The magnet blocks will be sorted using these data to minimize errors. Computer simulations show that magnets may be sorted in decreasing strengths with little or no additional tuning of the undulators.

  5. LCLS undulator production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakhtenberg, E.; Barsz, T.; Lawrence, G.; Sasaki, S.; Vasserman, I.; White, M.; Goldfarb, G.; Lagonsky, S.; Sorsher, S.; Becker, T.; Dufresne, S.; Schuermann, R.

    2008-01-01

    Design and construction of the undulators for the linac coherent light source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is the responsibility of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A full-scale prototype undulator was constructed in-house and extensively tested at Argonne's advanced photon source (APS). The device was tunable to well within the LCLS requirements and was stable for five years. Experience constructing the prototype undulator led us to conclude that with appropriate engineering design and detailed assembly procedures, precision undulators can be constructed by highly-qualified industrial vendors without undulator-construction experience. Argonne's detailed technological knowledge and experience were transferred to the successful bidders who produced outstanding undulators. Our production concept for the 3.4-m-long, fixed-gap, planar-hybrid undulators with a 30-mm period is discussed. Manufacturing, quality assurance, and acceptance testing details are also presented.

  6. Status of the LCLS-II undulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallén, E., E-mail: ejwallen@lbl.gov; Arbelaez, D.; Brown, A.; Dougherty, J.; Corlett, J.; DeMello, A.; Hanzel, K.; Jung, J.-Y.; Leitner, M.; Madur, A.; McCombs, K.; Marks, S.; Munson, D.; Plate, D.; Pucci, J.; Ray, K.; Schlueter, R.; Mateo, E. San [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); D’Ewart, M.; Rowen, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    The new free electron laser facility Linear Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) under construction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will use planar variable gap undulators of hybrid type for the production of free electron laser (FEL) radiation. The LCLS-II will include two FELs with two separate rows of undulators to generate soft and hard x-rays. The soft x-rays will be produced by undulators with 39 mm period length (SXR) and the hard x-rays will be produced by undulators with 26 mm period length (HXR). Both the SXR and the HXR undulators are 3.4 m long and they use a common support structure and frame. In total 21 SXR and 32 HXR undulators will be produced by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in collaboration with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. A full-scale prototype with 32 mm period length, called HXU, has been assembled at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The present status of the design, prototyping, and pre-series production of the SXR and HXR undulators are presented in this paper together with the first results from measurements on the full scale HXU prototype.

  7. Wakefields in the LCLS Undulator Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, K.L.F.; /SLAC; Zagorodov, I.; /DESY

    2006-07-17

    For a short bunch in an elliptical collimator we demonstrate that, as in a purely round collimator, the wake can be estimated from the primary fields of the beam alone. We obtain the wakes in the LCLS rectangular-to-round, undulator transitions using a hybrid method that includes indirect numerical (field) integration and an analytical potential energy term. For the LCLS 1 nC bunch charge configuration, we find the wake-induced energy change in the transitions to be small compared to that due to the resistance of the beam pipe walls.

  8. The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor Readout System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusatko, John; Browne, M.; Fisher, A.S.; Kotturi, D.; Norum, S.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor System is required to detect any loss radiation seen by the FEL undulators. The undulator segments consist of permanent magnets which are very sensitive to radiation damage. The operational goal is to keep demagnetization below 0.01% over the life of the LCLS. The BLM system is designed to help achieve this goal by detecting any loss radiation and indicating a fault condition if the radiation level exceeds a certain threshold. Upon reception of this fault signal, the LCLS Machine Protection System takes appropriate action by either halting or rate limiting the beam. The BLM detector consists of a PMT coupled to a Cherenkov radiator located near the upstream end of each undulator segment. There are 33 BLMs in the system, one per segment. The detectors are read out by a dedicated system that is integrated directly into the LCLS MPS. The BLM readout system provides monitoring of radiation levels, computation of integrated doses, detection of radiation excursions beyond set thresholds, fault reporting and control of BLM system functions. This paper describes the design, construction and operational performance of the BLM readout system.

  9. Wakefields in the LCLS Undulator Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, Karl L.F.; /SLAC; Zagorodnov, Igor A.; /DESY

    2005-08-15

    We have studied longitudinal wakefields of very short bunches in non-cylindrically symmetric (3D) vacuum chamber transitions using analytical models and the computer program ECHO. The wake (for pairs of well-separated, non-smooth transitions) invariably is resistive, with its shape proportional to the bunch distribution. For the example of an elliptical collimator in a round beam pipe we have demonstrated that--as in the cylindrically symmetric (2D) case--the wake can be obtained from the static primary field of the beam alone. We have obtained the wakes of the LCLS rectangular-to-round transitions using indirect (numerical) field integration combined with a primary beam field calculation. For the LCLS 1 nC bunch charge configuration we find that the total variation in wake-induced energy change is small (0.03% in the core of the beam, 0.15% in the horns of the distribution) compared to that due to the resistive wall wakes of the undulator beam pipe (0.6%).

  10. Linac coherent light source (LCLS) undulator RF BPM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lill, R.; Waldschmidt, G.; Morrison, L.; Smith, S.; Straumann, T; Li, Z.; Johnson, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) when it becomes operational in 2009. The LCLS is currently in the construction phase. The beam position monitor (BPM) system planned for the LCLS undulator will incorporate a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM system described in this paper. The BPM system will provide high-resolution measurements of the electron beam trajectory on a pulse-to-pulse basis and over many shots. The X-band cavity BPM size, simple fabrication, and high resolution make it an ideal choice for LCLS beam position detection. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results.

  11. Electron Beam Alignment Strategy in the LCLS Undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuhn, H

    2007-01-01

    The x-ray FEL process puts very tight tolerances on the straightness of the electron beam trajectory (2 (micro)m rms) through the LCLS undulator system. Tight but less stringent tolerances of 80 (micro)m rms vertical and 140 (micro)m rms horizontally are to be met for the placement of the individual undulator segments with respect to the beam axis. The tolerances for electron beam straightness can only be met through beam-based alignment (BBA) based on electron energy variations. Conventional alignment will set the start conditions for BBA. Precision-fiducialization of components mounted on remotely adjustable girders and the use of beam-finder wires (BFW) will satisfy placement tolerances. Girder movement due to ground motion and temperature changes will be monitored continuously by an alignment monitoring system (ADS) and remotely corrected. This stabilization of components as well as the monitoring and correction of the electron beam trajectory based on BPMs and correctors will increase the time between BBA applications. Undulator segments will be periodically removed from the undulator Hall and measured to monitor radiation damage and other effects that might degrade undulator tuning

  12. Impact of a Vertically Polarized Undulator on LCLS Hard X-ray Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, David [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-11-14

    The LCLS-II project will install two variable gap, horizontally polarized undulators into the LCLS undulator hall. One undulator is designed to produce soft x-rays spanning an energy range of 200-1250 eV (SXU) while the other is designed for the hard spectral range of 1-25 keV (HXU). The hard x-ray LCLS instruments (X-ray Pump- Probe [XPP], X-ray correlation Spectroscopy [XCS], Coherent X-ray Imaging [CXI], Matter in Extreme Conditions [MEC]) will be repurposed to operate on the HXU line while two new soft x-ray beamlines will be created for the SXU line. An alternate HXU undulator design is being considered that could provide advantages over the present design choice. In particular, the project team is collaborating with Argonne National Laboratory to develop a vertically polarized undulator (VPU). A 1-m prototype VPU device was successfully constructed this year and a full size prototype is in process. A decision to alter the project baseline, which is the construction of a horizontally polarized device, must be made in the coming weeks to not impact the present project schedule. Please note that a change to the soft x-ray undulator is not under discussion at the moment.

  13. Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavanne, J.; Lebec, G.; Penel, C.; Revol, F.; Kitegi, C.

    2010-01-01

    For an in-vacuum undulator operated at small gaps the permanent magnet material needs to be highly resistant to possible electron beam exposure. At room temperature, one generally uses Sm 2 Co 17 or high coercivity NdFeB magnets at the expense of a limited field performance. In a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator (CPMU), at a temperature of around 150 K, any NdFeB grade reveals a coercivity large enough to be radiation resistant. In particular, very high remanence NdFeB material can be used to build undulators with enhanced field and X-ray brilliance at high photon energy provided that the pre-baking of the undulator above 100 deg. C can be eliminated. The ESRF has developed a full scale 2 m long CPMU with a period of 18 mm. This prototype has been in operation on the ID6 test beamline since January 2008. A significant effort was put into the characterization of NdFeB material at low temperature, the development of dedicated magnetic measurement systems and cooling methods. The measured heat budget with beam is found to be larger than expected without compromising the smooth operation of the device. Leading on from this first experience, new CPMUs are currently being considered for the upgrade of the ESRF.

  14. LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Highly Time-Dependent Undulator Wakefields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, Karl L.F.; Emma, Paul; Huang, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn; Stupakov, Gennady; Fawley, William M.; Reiche, Sven

    2005-01-01

    Energy loss due to wakefields within a long undulator, if not compensated by an appropriate tapering of the magnetic field strength, can degrade the FEL process by detuning the resonant FEL frequency. The wakefields arise from the vacuum chamber wall resistivity, its surface roughness, and abrupt changes in its aperture. For LCLS parameters, the resistive-wall component is the most critical and depends upon the chamber material (e.g., Cu) and its radius. Of recent interest[1] is the so-called ''AC'' component of the resistive-wall wake which can lead to strong variations on very short timescales (e.g., ∼ 20 0fs). To study the expected performance of the LCLS in the presence of these wakefields, we have made an extensive series of start-to-end SASE simulations with tracking codes PARMELA and ELEGANT, and time-dependent FEL simulation codes GENESIS1.3 and GINGER. We discuss the impact of the wakefield losses upon output energy, spectral bandwidth, and temporal envelope of the output FEL pulse, as well as the benefits of a partial compensation of the time-dependent wake losses obtained with a slight z-dependent taper in the undulator field. We compare the taper results to those predicted analytically[2

  15. LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Highly Time-Dependent Undulator Wakefields

    CERN Document Server

    Fawley, W M; Emma, P; Huang, Z; Nuhn, H D; Reiche, S; Stupakov, G

    2005-01-01

    Energy loss due to wakefields within a long undulator, if not compensated by an appropriate tapering of the magnetic field strength, can degrade the FEL process by detuning the resonant FEL frequency. The wakefields arise from the vacuum chamber wall resistivity, its surface roughness, and abrupt changes in its aperture. For LCLS parameters, the resistive component is the most critical and depends upon the chamber wall material (e.g. Cu) and its radius. Of recent interest [1] is the so-called "AC" component of the resistive wake which can lead to strong variations on very short timescales (e.g. ~20 fs). To study the expected performance of the LCLS in the presence of these wakefields, we have made an extensive series of start-to-end SASE simulations with tracking codes PARMELA and ELEGANT, and time-dependent FEL simulation codes GENESIS1.3 and GINGER. We discuss the impact of the wakefield losses upon output energy, spectral bandwidth, and temporal envelope of the output FEL pulse, as well a...

  16. Development of cryogenic permanent magnet undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Takashi; Shirasawa, Katsutoshi; Kitamura, Hideo; Bizen, Teruhiko; Seike, Takamitsu; Marechal, Xavier; Tsuru, Rieko; Iwaki, Daisuke

    2005-01-01

    A short period undulator increases not only the photon energy of undulator radiation, but also the brilliance due to its increased number of undulator periods. As a result, brilliant undulator radiation becomes available in the photon energy range, which is currently covered by wigglers. In order to develop a short period undulator, high performance magnets are indispensable and superconductive undulators have been actively investigated in recent years. In this paper, however, we propose a new approach, so called a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator using NdFeB magnets at the temperatures around 150 K. The current status of this cryogenic permanent magnet undulator development at SPring-8 is presented including the results of the magnetic field measurements on a prototype undulator. (author)

  17. High-field strong-focusing undulator designs for X-ray Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspi, S.; Schlueter, R.; Tatchyn, R.

    1995-01-01

    Linac-driven X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (e.g., Linac Coherent Light Sources (LCLSs)), operating on the principle of single-pass saturation in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime typically require multi-GeV beam energies and undulator lengths in excess of tens of meters to attain sufficient gain in the 1 angstrom--0.1 angstrom range. In this parameter regime, the undulator structure must provide: (1) field amplitudes B 0 in excess of 1T within periods of 4cm or less, (2) peak on-axis focusing gradients on the order of 30T/m, and (3) field quality in the 0.1%--0.3% range. In this paper the authors report on designs under consideration for a 4.5--1.5 angstrom LCLS based on superconducting (SC), hybrid/PM, and pulsed-Cu technologies

  18. Optimization of the LCLS X-Rray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Strong Undulator Wakefields

    CERN Document Server

    Reiche, Sven; Emma, Paul; Fawley, William M; Huang, Zhirong; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Stupakov, Gennady

    2005-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Free-Electron Laser will operate in the wavelength range of 1.5 to 15 Angstroms. Energy loss due to wakefields within the long undulator can degrade the FEL process by detuning the resonant FEL frequency. The wakefields arise from the vacuum chamber wall resistivity, its surface roughness, and abrupt changes in its aperture. For LCLS parameters, the resistive component is the most critical and depends upon the chamber material (e.g. Cu) and its radius. To study the expected performance in the presence of these wakefields, we make a series of "start-to-end" simulations with tracking codes PARMELA and ELEGANT and time-dependent FEL simulation codes Genesis 1.3 and Ginger. We discuss the impact of the wakefield on output energy, spectral bandwidth, and temporal envelope of the output FEL pulse, as well as the benefits of a partial compensation obtained with a slight z dependent taper in the undulator field. We compare these results to those obtained by decreasing the bunch ...

  19. Permanent magnets including undulators and wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Bahrdt, J

    2010-01-01

    After a few historic remarks on magnetic materials we introduce the basic definitions related to permanent magnets. The magnetic properties of the most common materials are reviewed and the production processes are described. Measurement techniques for the characterization of macroscopic and microscopic properties of permanent magnets are presented. Field simulation techniques for permanent magnet devices are discussed. Today, permanent magnets are used in many fields. This article concentrates on the applications of permanent magnets in accelerators starting from dipoles and quadrupoles on to wigglers and undulators.

  20. Superconducting Magnet Performance in LCLS-II Cryomodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V. [Fermilab; Cheban, S. [Fermilab; DiMarco, J. [Fermilab; Harms, E. [Fermilab; Makarov, A. [Fermilab; Strauss, T. [Fermilab; Tartaglia, M. [Fermilab

    2018-04-01

    New LCLS-II Linear Superconducting Accelerator Cry-omodules are under construction at Fermilab. Installed in-side each SCRF Cryomodule is a superconducting magnet package to focus and steer an electron beam. The magnet package is an iron dominated configuration with conduc-tively cooled racetrack-type quadrupole and dipole coils. For easier installation the magnet can be split in the vertical plane. Initially the magnet was tested in a liquid helium bath, and high precision magnetic field measurements were performed. The first (prototype) Cryomodule with the magnet inside was built and successfully tested at Fermilab test facility. In this paper the magnet package is discussed, the Cryomodule magnet test results and current leads con-duction cooling performance are presented. So far magnets in nine Cryomodules were successfully tested at Fermilab.

  1. Helical undulator based on partial redistribution of uniform magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balal, N.; Bandurkin, I. V.; Bratman, V. L.; Fedotov, A. E.

    2017-12-01

    A new type of helical undulator based on redistribution of magnetic field of a solenoid by ferromagnetic helix has been proposed and studied both in theory and experiment. Such undulators are very simple and efficient for promising sources of coherent spontaneous THz undulator radiation from dense electron bunches formed in laser-driven photo-injectors.

  2. Helical undulator based on partial redistribution of uniform magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Balal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A new type of helical undulator based on redistribution of magnetic field of a solenoid by ferromagnetic helix has been proposed and studied both in theory and experiment. Such undulators are very simple and efficient for promising sources of coherent spontaneous THz undulator radiation from dense electron bunches formed in laser-driven photo-injectors.

  3. Mechanical design and fabrication of pure-permanent magnet undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouksey, Sanjay; Vinit Kumar; Abhay Kumar; Krishnagopal, Srinivas

    2003-01-01

    A 50 mm period, 2.5 m long (50 periods), pure permanent magnet, variable gap undulator using NdFeB magnets is being built in two sections, each 1.25 m long. We present details of the mechanical design, fabrication experience, assembly and inspection of the undulator. (author)

  4. Magnetic Measurements of the Background Field in the Undulator Hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The steel present in the construction of the undulator hall facility has the potential for changing the ambient fields present in the undulator hall. This note describes a measurement done to make a comparison between the fields in the hall and in the Magnetic Measurement Facility. In order for the undulators to have the proper tuning, the background magnetic field in the Undulator Hall should agree with the background field in the Magnetic Measurements Facility within .5 gauss. In order to verify that this was the case measurements were taken along the length of the undulator hall, and the point measurements were compared to the mean field which was measured on the MMF test bench.

  5. Synchrotron radiation from magnetic undulators as a prospective diagnostic tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbini, R.; Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Torre, A.; Ginnessi, L.

    1989-01-01

    The brightness of the radiation emitted by an ultrarelativistic e-beam passing through a magnetic undulator is sensitive to the beam quality (namely, energy spread and emittances) and to the undulator characteristics (i.e., possible random errors both in intensity and direction of magnetization, etc.) The spectrum distortion induced by the above effects and the possibility of using the undulator radiation as a diagnostic tool is discussed. Finally the importance of near-field effects when the radiation is detectedunfocussed off-axis and how they can combine with the effects induced by the beam emittances to produced a larger on-axis inhomogeneous broadening

  6. Development of a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator at the ESRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitegi, Ch.

    2008-12-01

    In 2004, at SPring-8, Toru Hara proposed a new concept of undulator with a short period and a high field: the Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU). The purpose of this concept is to cool Nd 2 Fe 14 B magnets at 150 K. This cooling allows magnets which have a higher remanence to be used, up to 40% higher than that of the magnets traditionally used in undulators. In order to assess the technological possibility of producing such undulator, a 2 m long undulator with a 18 mm period has been proposed at the ESRF. This piece of work presents the design and the construction of this CPMU at the ESRF. First a magnetic model of the CPMU is introduced; it is based on measurements of the magnetization curve at cryogenic temperature performed at the Louis Neel Laboratory. This model forecasts an increase of the peak field of 8% and of the field integral of 0.2 Gm at around 150 K. A unique magnetic measurement bench has been developed at the ESRF. This bench allows both the in vacuum local field and field integral to be measured. Its design and construction are presented. Finally we have reviewed the measurements at room and cryogenic temperature. These measurements are in agreement with the magnetic model. (author)

  7. Permanent magnet steerers for canted undulators at the ESRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bec, G., E-mail: lebec@esrf.fr [ESRF, 6 r. J. Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Chavanne, J. [ESRF, 6 r. J. Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-02-01

    A number of canted undulators will be installed at the ESRF. Permanent Magnet Steerers will be used for providing canting angles up to 5.4 mrad. These steerers have been optimized in view of the limited space available and the required field quality. The magnetic interaction between the steerers and the undulators may lead to additional optical phase errors: auxiliary poles have been added to obtain a fast decrease of the fringe field. The transverse homogeneity of the magnetic field integral is another strong design constraint. Good homogeneity was reached by optimizing the profiles of the iron poles. Eight steerers have been constructed and magnetic measurements have been performed.

  8. Design Features of a Planar Hybrid/Permanent Magnet Strong Focusing Undulator for Free Electron Laser (FEL) And Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatchyn, Roman; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    Insertion devices for Angstrom-wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifiers driven by multi-GeV electron beams generally require distributed focusing substantially stronger than their own natural focusing fields. Over the last several years a wide variety of focusing schemes and configurations have been proposed for undulators of this class, ranging from conventional current-driven quadrupoles external to the undulator magnets to permanent magnet (PM) lattices inserted into the insertion device gap. In this paper we present design studies of a flexible high-field hybrid/PM undulator with strong superimposed planar PM focusing proposed for a 1.5 Angstrom Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) driven by an electron beam with a 1 mm-mr normalized emittance. Attainable field parameters, tuning modes, and potential applications of the proposed structure are discussed.

  9. Permanent-magnet helical undulator for a millimeter-wave free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jongmin; Jeong, Young-Uk; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kim, Sun-Kook; Cho, Sung-Oh

    1995-01-01

    Permanent-magnet helical undulator for a millimeter-wave free-electron laser was designed and constructed. The configuration of the undulator is based on bifilar-type permanent-magnet helical undulator and Halbach-type planar undulator. This new configuration shows enhanced magnetic field and low field error. Period, total length and peak magnetic-field amplitude of the undulator is 36 mm, 900 mm and 1.44 kG, respectively. Adiabatic tapering of the magnetic field in end sides of the undulator was achieved using stepped soft-iron tubes. (author)

  10. Magnetic measurement, sorting optimization and adjustment of SDUV-FEL hybrid undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Tao; Jia Qika

    2007-01-01

    Construction of an undulator includes magnet block measurement, sorting, field measurement and adjustment. Optimizing SDUV-FEL undulator by simulated annealing algorithm using measurement results of the magnet blocks by Helmholtz coil before installing undulator magnets, the cost function can be reduced by three orders of magnitude. The practical parameters of one segment meet the design specifications after adjusting the magnetic field. (authors)

  11. Way to increase the user access at the LCLS baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Although the LCLS photon beam is meant for a single user, the baseline undulator is long enough to serve two users simultaneously. To this end, we propose a setup composed of two simple elements: an X-ray mirror pair for X-ray beam deflection, and a short (4 m-long) magnetic chicane, which creates an offset for mirror pair installation in the middle of the baseline undulator. The insertable mirror pair can be used for spatial separation of the X-ray beams generated in the first and in the second half of the baseline undulator. The method of deactivating one half and activating another half of the undulator is based on the rapid switching of the FEL amplification process. As proposed elsewhere, using a kicker installed upstream of the LCLS baseline undulator and an already existing corrector in the first half of the undulator, it is possible to rapidly switch the X-ray beam from one user to another, thus providing two active beamlines at any time. We present simulation results dealing with the LCLS baseline, and show that it is possible to generate two saturated SASE X-ray beams in the whole 0.8-8 keV photon energy range in the same baseline undulator. These can be exploited to serve two users. Implementation of the proposed technique does not perturb the baseline mode of operation of the LCLS undulator. Moreover, the magnetic chicane setup is very flexible, and can be used as a self-seeding setup too. We present simulation results for the LCLS baseline undulator with SHAB (second harmonic afterburner) and show that one can produce monochromatic radiation at the 2nd harmonic as well as at the 1st. We describe an efficient way for obtaining multi-user operation at the LCLS hard X-ray FEL. To this end, a photon beam distribution system based on the use of crystals in the Bragg reflection geometry is proposed. The reflectivity of crystal deflectors can be switched fast enough by flipping the crystals with piezoelectric devices similar to those for X-ray phase retarders

  12. Construction of CHESS compact undulator magnets at Kyma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lyndaker, Aaron; Kokole, Mirko; Milharcic, Tadej; Pockar, Jure; Geometrante, Raffaella

    2015-05-01

    In 2014 KYMA S.r.l. has built two CHESS Compact Undulator (CCU) magnets that are at present installed and successfully operate at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. This type of undulator was developed for upgrade of Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source beam-lines, but it can be used elsewhere as well. CCU magnets are compact, lightweight, cost efficient and in-vacuum compatible. They are linearly polarized undulators and have a fixed gap. Magnetic field tuning is achieved by phasing (shifting) top magnetic array relative bottom. Two CCUs constructed by KYMA S.r.l. have 28.4 mm period, 6.5 mm gap, 0.93 T peak field. Magnetic structure is of PPM type, made with NdFeB (40UH grade) permanent magnet material. Transitioning from the laboratory to industrial environment for a novel design required additional evaluation, design adjusting and extensive testing. Particular attention was given to the soldering technique used for fastening of the magnetic blocks to holders. This technique had thus far never been used before for undulator magnet construction by industry. The evaluation included tests of different types of soldering paste, measurements of strength of solder and determining the deformations of the soldered magnet and holder under simulated loading forces. This paper focuses on critical features of the CCU design, results of the soldering technique testing and the data regarding permanent magnets magnetization change due to soldering. In addition it deals with optimization-assisted assembly and the performance of the assembled devices and assesses some of the results of the CCU magnets operation at CESR.

  13. Calculations of magnetic field errors caused by mechanical accuracy at infra-red undulator construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyushevskij, E.A.; Morozov, N.A.; Syresin, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    At the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna) the electromagnetic undulator with maximal magnetic field 1.2 T and 40 cm period is under development. The computer models for the undulator magnet system were realized on the basis of POISSON and RADIA codes. The undulator magnetic field imperfections due to the design errors were simulated by the models

  14. Optimization of permanent-magnet undulator magnets ordering using simulated annealing algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Nian; He Duohui; Li Ge; Jia Qika; Zhang Pengfei; Xu Hongliang; Cai Genwang

    2005-01-01

    Pure permanent-magnet undulator consists of many magnets. The unavoidable remanence divergence of these magnets causes the undulator magnetic field error, which will affect the functional mode of the storage ring and the quality of the spontaneous emission spectrum. Optimizing permanent-magnet undulator magnets ordering using simulated annealing algorithm before installing undulator magnets, the first field integral can be reduced to 10 -6 T·m, the second integral to 10 -6 T·m 2 and the peak field error to less than 10 -4 . The optimized results are independent of the initial solution. This paper gives the optimizing process in detail and puts forward a method to quickly calculate the peak field error and field integral according to the magnet remanence. (authors)

  15. Magnetic design of a 14 mm period prototype superconducting undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehlot, Mona, E-mail: mona_gehlot@yahoo.com [Insertion Device Development Laboratory, School of Physics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore 452001, MP (India); Mishra, G. [Insertion Device Development Laboratory, School of Physics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore 452001, MP (India); Institute of Engineering, UNAM (Mexico); Soleil, Paris (France); Trillaud, Frederic [Institute of Engineering, UNAM (Mexico); Sharma, Geetanjali [Soleil, Paris (France)

    2017-02-21

    In this paper we report the design of a 14 mm period prototype superconducting undulator that is under fabrication at Insertion Device Development Laboratory (IDDL) at Devi Ahilya Vishwavidyalaya, Indore, India. The field computations are made in RADIA and results are presented in an analytical form for computation of the on axis field and the field on the surface of the coil. On the basis of the findings, a best fit is presented for the model to calculate the field dependence on the gap and the current density. The fit is compared with Moser-Rossmanith formula proposed earlier to predict the magnetic flux density of a superconducting undulator. The field mapping is used to calculate the field integrals and its dependence on gap and current densities as well.

  16. Magnetic performance of DEVU25.20h undulator at IDDL, DAVV,India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, G.; Gehlot, Mona; Sharma, Geetanjali; Khullar, Roma

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we describe the design development and magnetic performance of a prototype DEVU25.20h, variable gap hybrid undulator at IDD laboratory, DAVV, Indore, India. The undulator is NdFeB based hybrid undulator with twenty five period and 20 mm each period length. Low cost M35 grade cobalt steel is used as the pole material of the undulator. The abc coefficients of the new pole material is prescribed and the measured performance and characteristics of the undulator is evaluated using RADIA. The detailed design parameters and performance indicators are summarized in Table 1 and Table 2 respectively.

  17. CSEM-steel hybrid wiggler/undulator magnetic field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbach, K.; Hoyer, E.; Marks, S.; Plate, D.; Shuman, D.

    1985-05-01

    Current design of permanent magnet wiggler/undulators use either pure charge sheet equivalent material (CSEM) or the CSEM-Steel hybrid configuration. Hybrid configurations offer higher field strength at small gaps, field distributions dominated by the pole surfaces and pole tuning. Nominal performance of the hybrid is generally predicted using a 2-D magnetic design code neglecting transverse geometry. Magnetic measurements are presented showing transverse configuration influence on performance, from a combination of models using CSEMs, REC (H/sub c/ = 9.2 kOe) and NdFe (H/sub c/ = 10.7 kOe), different pole widths and end configurations. Results show peak field improvement using NdFe in place of REC in identical models, gap peak field decrease with pole width decrease (all results less than computed 2-D fields), transverse gap field distributions, and importance of CSEM material overhanging the poles in the transverse direction for highest gap fields

  18. Selection of the optimum magnet design for the International Linear Collider positron source helical undulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Scott

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of possible undulator designs for the International Linear Collider positron source has resulted in a superconducting bifilar wire design being selected. After a comprehensive paper study and fabrication of the two preeminent designs, the superconducting undulator was chosen instead of the permanent magnet alternative. This was because of its superior performance in terms of magnetic field strength and quality, operational flexibility, risk of radiation damage, ease in achieving the required vacuum, and cost. The superconducting undulator design will now be developed into a complete system design for the full 200 m long magnet that is required.

  19. A dynamic method for continuously measuring magnetic field profiles in planar micropole undulators with submillimeter gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatchyn, R.; Oregon Univ., Eugene

    1989-01-01

    Conventional techniques for measuring magnetic field profiles in ordinary undulators rely predominantly on Hall probes for making point-by-point static measurements. As undulators with submillimeter periods and gaps become available, such techniques will start becoming untenable, due to the relative largeness of conventional Hall probe heads and the rapidly increasing number of periods in devices of fixed length. In this paper a method is presented which can rapidly map out field profiles in undulators with periods and gaps extending down to the 100 μm range and beyond. The method, which samples the magnetic field continuously, has been used successfully in profiling a recently constructed 726 μm period undulator, and seems to offer some potential advantages over conventional Hall probe techniques in measuring large-scale undulator fields as well. (orig.)

  20. Magnetic Measurement System for the NSLS Superconducting Undulator Vertical Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Harder, David; Skaritka, John

    2005-01-01

    One of the challenges of small-gap superconducting undulators is measurement of magnetic fields within the cold bore to characterize the device performance and to determine magnetic field errors for correction or shimming, as is done for room-temperature undulators. Both detailed field maps and integrated field measurements are required. This paper describes a 6-element, cryogenic Hall probe field mapper for the NSLS Superconducting Undulator Vertical Test Facility (VTF). The probe is designed to work in an aperture only 3 mm high. A pulsed-wire insert is also being developed, for visualization of the trajectory, for locating steering errors and for determining integrated multi-pole errors. The pulsed-wire insert will be interchangeable with the Hall probe mapper. The VTF and the magnetic measurement systems can accommodate undulators up to 0.4 m in length.

  1. LCLS The First Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galayda, John N

    2003-02-10

    The Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has selected six scientific experiments for the early phase of the project. The LCLS, with proposed construction in the 2003-2006 time frame, has been designed to utilize the last third of the existing Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) linac. The linac produces a high-current 5-15 GeV electron beam that is bunched into 230 fs slices with a 120 Hz repetition rate. When traveling through a sufficiently long (of order of 100 m) undulator, the electron bunches will lead to self amplification of the emitted x-ray intensity constituting an x-ray free electron laser (XFEL). If funded as proposed, the LCLS will be the first XFEL in the world, operating in the 800-8,000 eV energy range. The emitted coherent x-rays will have unprecedented brightness with 10{sup 12}-10{sup 13} photons/pulse in a 0.2-0.4% energy bandpass and an unprecedented time structure with a design pulse length of 230 fs. Studies are under way to reduce the pulse length to tens of femtoseconds. This document presents descriptions of the early scientific experiments selected by SAC in the spring of 2000. They cover a wide range of scientific fields. The experimental teams consist of many internationally recognized scientists who are excited about the unprecedented x-ray capabilities of LCLS that surely will lead to new scientific frontiers. More generally, this document serves to forward the scientific case for an accelerator-based XFEL source, as requested by the BESAC subpanel on Novel Coherent Light Sources, chaired by Stephen R. Leone. Two general classes of experiments are proposed for the LCLS. The first class consists of experiments where the x-ray beam is used to probe the sample without modifying it, as is done in most experiments at current synchrotron sources. In the second class, the LCLS beam is used to induce non-linear photo-processes or matter in extreme conditions. The same source can be used for

  2. Circular polarization control for the LCLS baseline in the soft X-ray regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    The LCLS baseline includes a planar undulator system, which produces intense linearly polarized light in the wavelength range 0.15-1.5 nm. In the soft X-ray wavelength region polarization control from linear to circular is highly desirable for studying ultrafast magnetic phenomena and material science issues. Several schemes using helical undulators have been discussed in the context of the LCLS. One consists in replacing three of the last planar undulator segments by helical (APPLE III) ones. A second proposal, the 2nd harmonic helical afterburner, is based on the use of short, crossed undulators tuned to the second harmonic. This last scheme is expected to be the better one. Its advantages are a high (over 90%) and stable degree of circular polarization and a low cost. Its disadvantage is a small output power (1% of the power at the fundamental harmonic) and a narrow wavelength range. We propose a novel method to generate 10 GW level power at the fundamental harmonic with 99% degree of circular polarization from the LCLS baseline. Its merits are low cost, simplicity and easy implementation. In the option presented here, the microbunching of the planar undulator is used too. After the baseline undulator, the electron beam is sent through a 40 m long straight section, and subsequently passes through a short helical (APPLE II) radiator. In this case the microbunch structure is easily preserved, and intense coherent radiation is emitted in the helical radiator. The background radiation from the baseline undulator can be easily suppressed by letting radiation and electron beamthrough horizontal and vertical slits upstream the helical radiator, where the radiation spot size is about ten times larger than the electron bunch transverse size. Using thin Beryllium foils for the slits the divergence of the electron beam halo will increase by Coulomb scattering, but the beam will propagate through the setup without electron losses. The applicability of our method is not

  3. Multi-Objective Optimization for Pure Permanent-Magnet Undulator Magnets Ordering Using Modified Simulated Annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Nian; Li, Ge

    2004-01-01

    Undulator field errors influence the electron beam trajectories and lower the radiation quality. Angular deflection of electron beam is determined by first field integral, orbital displacement of electron beam is determined by second field integral and radiation quality can be evaluated by rms field error or phase error. Appropriate ordering of magnets can greatly reduce the errors. We apply a modified simulated annealing algorithm to this multi-objective optimization problem, taking first field integral, second field integral and rms field error as objective functions. Undulator with small field errors can be designed by this method within a reasonable calculation time even for the case of hundreds of magnets (first field integral reduced to 10-6T·m, second integral to 10-6T·m2 and rms field error to 0.01%). Thus, the field correction after assembling of undulator will be greatly simplified. This paper gives the optimizing process in detail and puts forward a new method to quickly calculate the rms field e...

  4. Development of cryogenic undulators with PrFeB magnets at SOLEIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valléau, M., E-mail: valleau@synchrotron-soleil.fr; Benabderrahmane, C.; Briquez, F.; Berteaud, P.; Tavakoli, K.; Zerbib, D.; Chapuis, L.; Marteau, F.; Marcouillé, O.; El Ajjouri, T.; Vétéran, J.; Sharma, G.; Tilmont, M.; Castro, J. Da Silva; N’Guyen, M.-H.; Béchu, N.; Rommeluère, P.; Louvet, M.; Nadji, A.; Herbeaux, C. [Synchrotron-Soleil, L’Orme des Merisisers, 91192 BP 34, Gif Sur Yvette (France); and others

    2016-07-27

    Short period high field undulators are of interest for X-ray brilliance enhancement in synchrotron radiation applications and for compact Free Electron Lasers. Cryogenic in-vacuum undulators [1] are one of the possible solutions. At SOLEIL, PrFeB magnets were directly chosen, even if still under development at that time. Indeed, they enable to avoid the spin transition reorientation phenomenon which occurs with NdFeB magnets [2] and the magnets can be cooled down directly at 77 K. The first selected grade CR53 from Hitachi presents a remanence of 1.35 T at 293 K and 1.57 T at 77 K, with a coercivity of 1355 kA/m at 293 K and 6000 kA/m at 77 K. A 2 m long cryogenic undulator of period 18 mm was first built in-house, with a specific Hall probe bench directly installed in the final vacuum chamber. This first cryogenic undulator has been in operation on the storage ring for 4 years [3]. A second U18 cryo-ready undulator using a slightly different magnet grade with a higher coercivity and modules with magnets surrounded by two half poles for easier magnetic optimization is under construction. A third 3 m long cryo-ready undulator U15 with a period of 15 mm is under development. It will be first used for the LUNEX5 FEL [4, 5] project (COXINEL demonstration of FEL amplification with a laser wakefield acceleration [6]). The measurement bench will include a correction of the Hall probe position and angle, the field integrals will be measured with a stretched wire.

  5. Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about ±2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

  6. Magnet system optimization for segmented adaptive-gap in-vacuum undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitegi, C., E-mail: ckitegi@bnl.gov; Chubar, O.; Eng, C. [Energy Sciences Directorates, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY1 1973 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Segmented Adaptive Gap in-vacuum Undulator (SAGU), in which different segments have different gaps and periods, promises a considerable spectral performance gain over a conventional undulator with uniform gap and period. According to calculations, this gain can be comparable to the gain achievable with a superior undulator technology (e.g. a room-temperature in-vacuum hybrid SAGU would perform as a cryo-cooled hybrid in-vacuum undulator with uniform gap and period). However, for reaching the high spectral performance, SAGU magnetic design has to include compensation of kicks experienced by the electron beam at segment junctions because of different deflection parameter values in the segments. We show that such compensation to large extent can be accomplished by using a passive correction, however, simple correction coils are nevertheless required as well to reach perfect compensation over a whole SAGU tuning range. Magnetic optimizations performed with Radia code, and the resulting undulator radiation spectra calculated using SRW code, demonstrating a possibility of nearly perfect correction, are presented.

  7. Magnetic field measurements of the harmonic generation FEL superconducting undulator at BNL-NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, L.; Graves, W.S.; Lehrman, I.

    1994-01-01

    A three stage superconducting undulator (modulator, dispersive section, and radiator) is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Sections of the radiator, consisting of 25cm long steel yokes, each with 18mm period, 0.54 Tesla field, and 8.6mm gap are under test. The magnetic measurements and operational characteristics of the magnet are discussed. Measurement results and analysis are presented, with emphasis on the integrated field quality. The magnet winding and the effects of the various trims are discussed

  8. Microbunching phenomena in LCLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Qiang, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Papadopoulos, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ding, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Emma, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marcus, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marinelli, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nosochkov, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Raubenheimer, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wang, L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Woodley, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-07-14

    The microbunching instability has long been recognized as a potential limiting factor to the performance of X-ray FELs. It is of particular relevance in LCLS-II due, in part, to a layout that includes a long bypass beamline between the Linac and the undulators. Here we focus on two aspects of the instability that highlight the importance of 3D effects.

  9. A simple model based magnet sorting algorithm for planar hybrid undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakowsky, G.

    2010-01-01

    Various magnet sorting strategies have been used to optimize undulator performance, ranging from intuitive pairing of high- and low-strength magnets, to full 3D FEM simulation with 3-axis Helmholtz coil magnet data. In the extreme, swapping magnets in a full field model to minimize trajectory wander and rms phase error can be time consuming. This paper presents a simpler approach, extending the field error signature concept to obtain trajectory displacement, kick angle and phase error signatures for each component of magnetization error from a Radia model of a short hybrid-PM undulator. We demonstrate that steering errors and phase errors are essentially decoupled and scalable from measured X, Y and Z components of magnetization. Then, for any given sequence of magnets, rms trajectory and phase errors are obtained from simple cumulative sums of the scaled displacements and phase errors. The cost function (a weighted sum of these errors) is then minimized by swapping magnets, using one's favorite optimization algorithm. This approach was applied recently at NSLS to a short in-vacuum undulator, which required no subsequent trajectory or phase shimming. Trajectory and phase signatures are also obtained for some mechanical errors, to guide 'virtual shimming' and specifying mechanical tolerances. Some simple inhomogeneities are modeled to assess their error contributions.

  10. Challenges of in-vacuum and cryogenic permanent magnet undulator technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Che Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An in-vacuum undulator (IVU provides a means to reach high-brilliance x rays in medium energy storage rings. The development of short period undulators with low phase errors creates the opportunity for an unprecedented brilliant light source in a storage ring. Since the spectral quality from cryogenic permanent magnet undulators (CPMUs has surpassed that of IVUs, NdFeB or PrFeB CPMUs have been proposed for many new advanced storage rings to reach high brilliance x-ray photon beams. In a low emittance ring, not only the performance of the undulator but also the choice of the lattice functions are important design considerations. Optimum betatron functions and a zero-dispersion function shall be provided in the straight sections for IVU/CPMUs. In this paper, relevant factors and design issues for IVUs and CPMUs are discussed together with many technological challenges in short period undulators associated with beam induced–heat load, phase errors, and the deformation of support girders.

  11. Challenges of in-vacuum and cryogenic permanent magnet undulator technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jui-Che; Kitamura, Hideo; Yang, Chin-Kang; Chang, Cheng-Hsing; Chang, Cheng-Hsiang; Hwang, Ching-Shiang

    2017-06-01

    An in-vacuum undulator (IVU) provides a means to reach high-brilliance x rays in medium energy storage rings. The development of short period undulators with low phase errors creates the opportunity for an unprecedented brilliant light source in a storage ring. Since the spectral quality from cryogenic permanent magnet undulators (CPMUs) has surpassed that of IVUs, NdFeB or PrFeB CPMUs have been proposed for many new advanced storage rings to reach high brilliance x-ray photon beams. In a low emittance ring, not only the performance of the undulator but also the choice of the lattice functions are important design considerations. Optimum betatron functions and a zero-dispersion function shall be provided in the straight sections for IVU/CPMUs. In this paper, relevant factors and design issues for IVUs and CPMUs are discussed together with many technological challenges in short period undulators associated with beam induced-heat load, phase errors, and the deformation of support girders.

  12. Pure-type superconducting permanent-magnet undulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takashi; Tsuru, Rieko; Kitamura, Hideo

    2005-07-01

    A novel synchrotron radiation source is proposed that utilizes bulk-type high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) as permanent magnets (PMs) by in situ magnetization. Arrays of HTSC blocks magnetized by external magnetic fields are placed below and above the electron path instead of conventional PMs, generating a periodic magnetic field with an offset. Two methods are presented to magnetize the HTSCs and eliminate the field offset, enabling the HTSC arrays to work as a synchrotron radiation source. An analytical formula to calculate the peak field achieved in a device based on this scheme is derived in a two-dimensional form for comparison with synchrotron radiation sources using conventional PMs. Experiments were performed to demonstrate the principle of the proposed scheme and the results have been found to be very promising.

  13. Design and test of a short mockup magnet for the superconducting undulator at the SSRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jieping, E-mail: jpxu@sinap.ac.cn; Ding, Yi; Cui, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Hongfei; Yin, Lixin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China)

    2016-07-27

    A superconducting planar undulator is under development at the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) to provide the SSRF users with higher photon fluxes at higher photon energies. A 5-period magnet was designed and built for feasibility study. The short mockup magnet is composed of NbTi/Cu winding and low carbon steel former and was tested in a vertical cryocooler-cooled cryostat. The nominal current of 387 A was reached after 2 quenches and the maximum current of 433.2 A was achieved. The magnetic field profile was measured and a peak field of 0.93 T was obtained when stably operating at 400 A.

  14. Micropole undulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatchyn, R.O.; Csonka, P.L.; Cremer, J.T.

    1990-12-11

    Micropole undulators for use in the generation of x-rays from moving charged particles are disclosed. Two rows of spaced apart poles are arranged so that each pole produces a magnetic field aligned with all other similar fields. The poles are the ends of C''-shaped magnets. In each row, adjacent poles are separated by spacers made of a superconducting material. 11 figs.

  15. Magnetic measurements of the wedge-pole prototype undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasserman, I.; Pflueger, J.; Gluskin, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), a 7-GeV positron storage ring, will have as many as 34 straight sections available for installation of multiple insertion devices (IDs). The size and the taper of the gap of the IDs will be able to be varied to tune the energy of the emitted radiation to the experiments. The IDs must not affect the particle beam motion. Therefore, the disturbances should be kept within tight boundaries to assure that the ring performance parameters are maintained and that the emitted radiation shows little degradation from an ideal device. These requirements are derived from the stability criteria of the beam to be stable within 10% of the emittance: The requirements cannot be met without using closed loop orbit compensation. With such a system installed, it is reasonable to relax the requirements on the ID magnetic field performance

  16. CHESS upgrade with compact undulator magnets: Operating experience and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temnykh, A., E-mail: abt6@cornell.edu; Dale, D.; Fontes, E.; Lyndaker, A.; Li, Y.; Ruff, J.; Revesz, P.; Woll, A. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (United States)

    2016-07-27

    In November 2014 two in-air 1.5 m CHESS Compact Undulator (CCU) magnets built by KYMA S.R.l. were installed in Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) in canted arrangement and after few days of commissioning their regular operation started. CCU magnets are compact, lightweight and cost efficient devices. They have very stable magnetic field integrals independent of deflection parameter value. This feature greatly simplifies the storage ring operation. The CCU concept was developed at Cornell in 2011 and the first 1 m in-vacuum CCU magnet was beam-tested in 2012. The article presents CCU concept and some details of the design. It describes also the layout of CCUs installation in CESR, their performance and characteristics. The current status of operation and future plans are discussed as well. Presently, at CHESS two CCU magnets provide radiation for 5 out of 11 experimental stations.

  17. CHESS upgrade with compact undulator magnets: Operating experience and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temnykh, A.; Dale, D.; Fontes, E.; Lyndaker, A.; Li, Y.; Ruff, J.; Revesz, P.; Woll, A.

    2016-01-01

    In November 2014 two in-air 1.5 m CHESS Compact Undulator (CCU) magnets built by KYMA S.R.l. were installed in Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) in canted arrangement and after few days of commissioning their regular operation started. CCU magnets are compact, lightweight and cost efficient devices. They have very stable magnetic field integrals independent of deflection parameter value. This feature greatly simplifies the storage ring operation. The CCU concept was developed at Cornell in 2011 and the first 1 m in-vacuum CCU magnet was beam-tested in 2012. The article presents CCU concept and some details of the design. It describes also the layout of CCUs installation in CESR, their performance and characteristics. The current status of operation and future plans are discussed as well. Presently, at CHESS two CCU magnets provide radiation for 5 out of 11 experimental stations.

  18. Flux shunts for undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1993-05-01

    Undulators for high-performance applications in synchrotron-radiation sources and periodic magnetic structures for free-electron lasers have stringent requirements on the curvature of the electron's average trajectory. Undulators using the permanent magnet hybrid configuration often have fields in their central region that produce a curved trajectory caused by local, ambient magnetic fields such as those of the earth. The 4.6 m long Advanced Light Source (ALS) undulators use flux shunts to reduce this effect. These flux shunts are magnetic linkages of very high permeability material connecting the two steel beams that support the magnetic structures. The shunts reduce the scalar potential difference between the supporting beams and carry substantial flux that would normally appear in the undulator gap. Magnetic design, mechanical configuration of the flux shunts and magnetic measurements of their effect on the ALS undulators are described

  19. Modeling and measurement of the ALS U5 undulator end magnetic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, D.; Halbach, K.; Hoyer, E.; Kincaid, B.; Marks, S.; Schlueter, R.

    1993-05-01

    The end structures for the ALS U5.0 undulators utilize a system of dual permanent magnet rotors intended to establish gap independent field performance. They may also be used for tuning of the first and second magnetic field integrals of these devices. The behavior of these structures has been studied by means of a two dimensional modeling with the POISSON Group of computer codes. A parametric study of the magnetic field distribution and first and second integrals of the fields has been conducted. In parallel, magnetic measurements of the final completed structures have been performed using an automated Hall probe measurement system. Results of the modeling and measurements are compared. Implications for tuning of the ends of the devices within the context of the electron beam parameters of the ALS are discussed

  20. Image tuning techniques for enhancing the performance of pure permanent magnet undulators with small gap/period ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatchyn, R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The on-axis field of a small-gap undulator constricted out of pure permanent magnet (PM) blocks arranged in an alternating-dipole (i.e., 2 dipoles/period) array can be substantially varied by positioning monolithic permeable plates above and below the undulator jaws. This simple technique, which can be used to control the 1st harmonic energy in conventional synchrotron radiation (SR) or Free Electron Laser (FEL) applications requiring sub-octave tuning, can also be shown to suppress magnetic inhomogeneities that can contribute to the undulator`s on-axis field errors. If a standard 4 block/period Halbach undulator, composed of PM blocks with square cross sections, is rearranged into an alternating-dipole array with the same period, the peak field that can be generated with superimposed image plates can substantially exceed that of the pure-PM Halbach array. This design technique, which can be viewed as intermediate between the {open_quotes}pure-PM{close_quotes} and standard {open_quotes}hybrid/PM{close_quotes} configurations, provides a potentially cost-effective method of enhancing the performance of small-gap, pure-PM insertion devices. In this paper we report on the analysis and recent characterization of pure-PM undulator structures with superimposed image plates, and discuss possible applications to FEL research.

  1. LCLS Gun Solenoid Design Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmerge, John

    2010-01-01

    The LCLS photocathode rf gun requires a solenoid immediately downstream for proper emittance compensation. Such a gun and solenoid have been operational at the SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) for over eight years. Based on magnetic measurements and operational experience with the GTF gun solenoid multiple modifications are suggested for the LCLS gun solenoid. The modifications include adding dipole and quadrupole correctors inside the solenoid, increasing the bore to accommodate the correctors, decreasing the mirror plate thickness to allow the solenoid to move closer to the cathode, cutouts in the mirror plate to allow greater optical clearance with grazing incidence cathode illumination, utilizing pancake coil mirror images to compensate the first and second integrals of the transverse fields and incorporating a bipolar power supply to allow for proper magnet standardization and quick polarity changes. This paper describes all these modifications plus the magnetic measurements and operational experience leading to the suggested modifications.

  2. Magnetic measurements and tuning of undulators for the APS FEL project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasserman, I. B.

    1999-01-01

    Two insertion device magnetic structures have been prepared for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) FEL project [1]. The magnetic structures are standard APS undulatory, 2.4 m long with a 3.3-cm period. Measurements and tuning of the undulatory have been completed at a magnetic gap of about 9.3 mm, where K is 3.1. Special measurement and tuning techniques were used to satisfy the tight trajectory straightness requirement that the second field integral be less than 3.3 kG-cm 2 . The magnetic field strengths of the undulators must be well matched; this leads to the requirement that the magnetic gap must be controlled to better than 10 microns. Proper phasing between the undulatory is ensured by adjusting the length of the drift space between the undulatory. The drift space length that is needed is strongly affected by the end fields of the magnetic structures. The results of measurements of the magnetic field and calculations of the drift length are provided

  3. Combined electromagnetic and permanent magnet undulator to achieve higher field and easier field variation without mechanical movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogachenkov, V.A.; Papadichev, V.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Hybrid or pure permanent magnet undulators (PMU) are widely used because they have high field quality, allow easy field correction and do not consume power. Their main drawback is the necessity of moving one half of the magnet relative to the other to change field value, which requires a high precision, remotely controlled (and thus costly) driving system On the other hand, electromagnetic undulatory (EMU) have no problem with field variation, but consume too much power (100 - 400 kW) for high fields. Adding permanent magnets to EMU results in a considerable decrease of power consumption, while retaining the advantage of easily changing field level. A model of a CW combined EM+PM plane undulator having a 4.8 cm period and 8 periods long is described. It is simple in design and cheap in manufacturing: magnet yokes are made of soft steel rings in which 1.6 cm air gaps were cut to form pole faces. Odd yokes are placed to one side of the undulator axis and even yokes to the other with the air gaps on the axis. Each set of yokes is excited by its own separate winding of simple racetrack shape. Undulator deflection parameter K = 1.1 (B = 2.4 kG) can be reached at a 0.78kW power level, i.e., less than 100 W per period, while without PM only a maximum K = 0.8 can be obtained and requires 4 kW power. No water cooling is needed, which greatly simplifies undulator design. The undulator was not optimized relative to the axial-air-gap to ring-width ratio: one might expect some increase in field level for thinner rings. Field amplitude depends also on relative transverse position of odd and even pole faces.

  4. Combined electromagnetic and permanent magnet undulator to achieve higher field and easier field variation without mechanical movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogachenkov, V.A.; Papadichev, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    Hybrid or pure permanent magnet undulators (PMU) are widely used because they have high field quality, allow easy field correction and do not consume power. Their main drawback is the necessity of moving one half of the magnet relative to the other to change field value, which requires a high precision, remotely controlled (and thus costly) driving system On the other hand, electromagnetic undulatory (EMU) have no problem with field variation, but consume too much power (100 - 400 kW) for high fields. Adding permanent magnets to EMU results in a considerable decrease of power consumption, while retaining the advantage of easily changing field level. A model of a CW combined EM+PM plane undulator having a 4.8 cm period and 8 periods long is described. It is simple in design and cheap in manufacturing: magnet yokes are made of soft steel rings in which 1.6 cm air gaps were cut to form pole faces. Odd yokes are placed to one side of the undulator axis and even yokes to the other with the air gaps on the axis. Each set of yokes is excited by its own separate winding of simple racetrack shape. Undulator deflection parameter K = 1.1 (B = 2.4 kG) can be reached at a 0.78kW power level, i.e., less than 100 W per period, while without PM only a maximum K = 0.8 can be obtained and requires 4 kW power. No water cooling is needed, which greatly simplifies undulator design. The undulator was not optimized relative to the axial-air-gap to ring-width ratio: one might expect some increase in field level for thinner rings. Field amplitude depends also on relative transverse position of odd and even pole faces

  5. Simulations of laser undulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, S. V.; Biedron, S. B.; Einstein, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    We perform a series of single-pass, one-D free-electron laser simulations based on an electron beam from a standard linear accelerator coupled with a so-called laser undulator, a specialized device that is more compact than a standard undulator based on magnetic materials. The longitudinal field profiles of such lasers undulators are intriguing as one must and can tailor the profile for the needs of creating the virtual undulator. We present and discuss several results of recent simulations and our future steps.

  6. Research of a hybrid undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Youwu; Wu Bing; Liu Bo

    1995-12-01

    A 1.5 m tapered hybrid undulator has been designed and built for mid-infrared free electron laser experiments at CIAE. The undulator utilizes the REC-steel hybrid configuration. The magnetic gap and magnetic field taper can be continuously adjusted. The rms error of the peak field is less than 0.53%. The electron trajectory deviation is around 0.03 mm. The design of undulator, sorting of magnets in hybrid undulator using simulated annealing technique, the motion of electron beam in the ideal and measured magnetic field, magnetic field measurement technique and magnetic field adjustment are described. (6 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab)

  7. Magnetic field calculation of variably polarizing undulator (APPLE-type) for SX beamline in the SPring-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Sasaki, Shigemi; Shimada, Taihei; Takao, Masaru; Yokoya, Akinori; Miyahara, Yoshikazu

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the design of a variably polarizing undulator (APPLE-type) to be installed in soft X-ray beamline in the SPring-8 facility. The magnetic field distribution and radiation spectrum expected from this undulator were calculated. The magnetic field strength is varied by changing the gap distance of upper and lower jaws, so it changes the photon energy in soft X-ray range. By moving the relative position of pairs of magnet rows (phase shift), the polarization of radiation is varied circularly, elliptically and linearly in the horizontal and vertical direction. We expect that right and left handed circular polarizations are obtained alternately at a rate of 1 Hz by high speed phase shifting. The repulsive and attractive magnetic force working on the magnet rows were calculated which interfere in phase shifting at high speed. The magnetic force changes with gap distance and phase shift position, and the magnetic force working on a row in the direction of phase shift becomes up to 500 kgf. The construction of this undulator is started in 1996, that will be inserted in the storage ring in 1997. (author)

  8. Online monitoring of absorbed dose in undulator magnets with RADFET dosimeters at FERMI@Elettra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fröhlich, L.; Casarin, K.; Quai, E.; Holmes-Siedle, A.; Severgnini, M.; Vidimari, R.

    2013-01-01

    The FERMI@Elettra free-electron laser, based on a 1.3 GeV electron linac, requires the monitoring of radiation doses up to a few kGy for the protection of sensitive equipment such as permanent magnet undulators. A new dosimetry system DOSFET-L01, employing an array of RADFETs spread throughout the accelerator, was developed. So far, the system has performed flawlessly for almost two years, taking one dose reading per minute around the clock. The REM RFT-300 sensors were set in zero-bias mode, i.e. with all electrodes grounded during exposure. This choice of mode allows the measurement of a high range of integrated doses – up to a few kGy. The paper describes the new read-out system and its application, calibration measurements in cobalt-60 and 6 MeV bremsstrahlung radiation sources giving rise to a novel response function, and new data on “fade” under the zero-bias mode of use for over 300 days at room temperature. Regular readings from 28 RADFETs placed within seven undulators over the first 20 months of operation of the accelerator demonstrate how the system tracks and locates periods of high and low dose rate and thereby contributes to the protection from beam loss. The readings from the RADFET system are found to be in good agreement with Gafchromic EBT2 film dosimeters. Based on the results reported, the choice of bias mode may be revised so as to reduce fade and improve the accuracy conferred by a positive-bias mode. -- Highlights: ► We developed a system for online dosimetry with RADFET sensors under zero bias. ► The system is calibrated for doses up to 10 kGy with REM RFT-300 sensors. ► We collected data on fade for over 300 days from irradiation. ► We present undulator dose measurements for 20 months of operation of FERMI@Elettra. ► Dose measurements are in good agreement with chemical film dosimeters

  9. Microwave undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.

    1986-03-01

    The theory of a microwave undulator utilizing a plane rectangular waveguide operating in the TE/sub 10n/ mode and other higher order modes is presented. Based on this, a possible undulator configuration is analyzed, leading to the conclusion that the microwave undulator represents a viable option for undulator wavelength down to about 1 cm where peak voltage and available microwave power considerations limit effectiveness. 4 refs., 4 figs

  10. An Energy-Stabilized Varied-Line-Space-Monochromator Undulator Beam Line for PEEM Illumination and Magnetic Circular Dichroism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, Tony; McKinney, Wayne; Domning, Ed; Doran, Andrew; Padmore, Howard

    2006-01-01

    A new undulator beam line has been built and commissioned at the Advanced Light Source for illumination of the PEEM3 microscope. The beam line delivers high flux beams over an energy range from C1s through the transition metals to include the M edges of the magnetic rare earth elements. We present details of the optical design, and data on the performance of the zero-order tracking of the photon energy

  11. Results of stretched wire field integral measurements on the mini-undulator magnet - comparison of results obtained from circular and translational motion of the integrating wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, L.

    1998-05-01

    Measurements of the multipole content of the Mini-Undulator magnet have been made with two different integrating wire techniques. Both measurements used 43 strand Litz wire stretched along the length of the magnet within the magnet gap. In the first technique, the wire motion was purely translational, while in the second technique the wire was moved along a circular path. The induced voltage in the Litz wire was input into a Walker integrator, and the integrator output was analyzed as a function of wire position for determination of the multipole content of the magnetic field. The mini-undulator magnet is a 10 period, 80 mm per period hybrid insertion device. For all the data contained herein the magnet gap was set at 49 mm. In the mini-undulator magnet, the iron poles are 18mm x 32mm x 86 mm, and the Samarium Cobalt permanent magnet blocks are 22mm x 21mm x 110mm. For this magnet, which is a shortened prototype for the NSLS Soft X-Ray Undulator Magnet, the undulator parameter K = 0.934 B (Tesla)λ(cm), and B(tesla) = 0.534/sinh(πGap/λ). At a gap of 49 mm, the magnetic field is 1590 Gauss

  12. Surface-micromachined magnetic undulator with period length between 10μm and 1 mm for advanced light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jere; Joshi, Abhijeet; Lake, Jonathan; Candler, Rob; Musumeci, Pietro

    2012-07-01

    A technological gap exists between the μm-scale wiggling periods achieved using electromagnetic waves of high intensity laser pulses and the mm scale of permanent-magnet and superconducting undulators. In the sub-mm range, surface-micromachined soft-magnetic micro-electro-mechanical system inductors with integrated solenoidal coils have already experimentally demonstrated 100 to 500 mT field amplitude across air gaps as large as 15μm. Simulations indicate that magnetic fields as large as 1.5 T across 50μm inductor gaps are feasible. A simple rearranging of the yoke and pole geometry allows for fabrication of 10+ cm long undulator structures with period lengths between 12.5μm and 1 mm. Such undulators find application both in high average power spontaneous emission sources and, if used in combination with ultrahigh-brightness electron beams, could lead to the realization of low energy compact free-electron lasers. Challenges include electron energy broadening due to wakefields and Joule heating in the electromagnet.

  13. Development and operation of a Pr_{2}Fe_{14}B based cryogenic permanent magnet undulator for a high spatial resolution x-ray beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Benabderrahmane

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Short period, high field undulators are used to produce hard x-rays on synchrotron radiation based storage ring facilities of intermediate energy and enable short wavelength free electron laser. Cryogenic permanent magnet undulators take benefit from improved magnetic properties of RE_{2}Fe_{14}B (Rare Earth based magnets at low temperatures for achieving short period, high magnetic field and high coercivity. Using Pr_{2}Fe_{14}B instead of Nd_{2}Fe_{14}B, which is generally employed for undulators, avoids the limitation caused by the spin reorientation transition phenomenon, and simplifies the cooling system by allowing the working temperature of the undulator to be directly at the liquid nitrogen one (77 K. We describe here the development of a full scale (2 m, 18 mm period Pr_{2}Fe_{14}B cryogenic permanent magnet undulator (U18. The design, construction and optimization, as well as magnetic measurements and shimming at low temperature are presented. The commissioning and operation of the undulator with the electron beam and spectrum measurement using the Nanoscopmium beamline at SOLEIL are also reported.

  14. Self-seeded operation of the LCLS hard X-ray FEL in the long-bunch mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Self-seeding options for the LCLS baseline were recently investigated using a scheme which relies on a single-crystal monochromator in Bragg-transmission geometry. The LCLS low-charge (0.02 nC) mode of operation was considered in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme. The wakefield effects from the linac and from the undulator vacuum chamber are much reduced at such low charge, and can be ignored. In this paper we extend our previous investigations to the case of the LCLS mode of operation with nominal charge. Based on the LCLS start-to-end simulation for an electron beam charge of 0.25 nC, and accounting for the wakefields from the undulator vacuum chamber we demonstrate that the same simplest self-seeding system (two undulators with a single-crystal monochromator in between) is appropriate not only for short (few femtosecond) bunches, but for longer bunches too. (orig.)

  15. Self-seeded operation of the LCLS hard X-ray FEL in the long-bunch mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2010-12-01

    Self-seeding options for the LCLS baseline were recently investigated using a scheme which relies on a single-crystal monochromator in Bragg-transmission geometry. The LCLS low-charge (0.02 nC) mode of operation was considered in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme. The wakefield effects from the linac and from the undulator vacuum chamber are much reduced at such low charge, and can be ignored. In this paper we extend our previous investigations to the case of the LCLS mode of operation with nominal charge. Based on the LCLS start-to-end simulation for an electron beam charge of 0.25 nC, and accounting for the wakefields from the undulator vacuum chamber we demonstrate that the same simplest self-seeding system (two undulators with a single-crystal monochromator in between) is appropriate not only for short (few femtosecond) bunches, but for longer bunches too. (orig.)

  16. THE VISA FEL UNDULATOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARR, R.; CORNACCHIA, M.; EMMA, P.; NUHN, H.D.; FULAND, R.; JOHNSON, E.; RAKOWSKY, G.; LIDIA, S.; BERTOLINI, L.; LIBKIND, M.; FRIGOLA, P.; PELLEGRINI, C.; ROSENZWEIG, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Visible-Infrared SASE Amplifier (VISA) FEL is an experimental device designed to show Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) to saturation in the visible light energy range. It will generate a resonant wavelength output from 800--600 nm, so that silicon detectors may be used to characterize the optical properties of the FEL radiation. VISA is the first SASE FEL designed to reach saturation, and its diagnostics will provide important checks of theory. This paper includes a description of the VISA undulator, the magnet measuring and shimming system, and the alignment strategy. VISA will have a 4 m pure permanent magnet undulator comprising four 99 cm segments, each with 55 periods of 18 mm length. The undulator has distributed focusing built into it, to reduce the average beta function of the 70--85 MeV electron beam to about 30 cm. There are four FODO cells per segment. The permanent magnet focusing lattice consists of blocks mounted on either side of the electron beam, in the undulator gap. The most important undulator error parameter for a free electron laser is the trajectory walkoff or lack of overlap of the photon and electron beams. Using pulsed wire magnet measurements and magnet shimming, the authors expect to be able to control trajectory walkoff to less than ±50 pm per field gain length

  17. Alignment of the VISA Undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruland, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the R and D program towards a fourth generation light source, a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) demonstration is being prepared. The Visible-Infrared SASE Amplifier (VISA) undulator is being installed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The VISA undulator is an in-vacuum, 4-meter long, 1.8 cm period, pure-permanent magnet device, with a novel, strong focusing, permanent magnet FODO array included within the fixed, 6 mm undulator gap. The undulator is constructed of 99 cm long segments. To attain maximum SASE gain requires establishing overlap of electron and photon beams to within 50 pm rms. This imposes challenging tolerances on mechanical fabrication and magnetic field quality, and necessitates use of laser straightness interferometry for calibration and alignment of the magnetic axes of the undulator segments. This paper describes the magnetic centerline determination, and the fiducialization and alignment processes, which were performed to meet the tolerance goal

  18. Chirping the LCLS Electron Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emma, P.

    2005-01-01

    We explore scenarios for generating a linear time-correlated energy spread in the LCLS electron bunch, prior to the undulator, that is needed for optical (x-ray) pulse compression. The correlated energy spread (''chirp'') is formed by generating an energy gradient along the length of the electron bunch using RF phasing and/or longitudinal wakefields of the accelerating structures. The sign of the correlation is an important limitation. Excluding a complete re-design of the compression systems, the best possibility is to use ''over-compression'' to effect the required energy chirp. This is easily done with only a slight strength increase (∼10%) in the chicane bends of the second compressor. In this case, the bend-plane emittance dilution associated with the increased coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the bunch compressor may, however, significantly compromise the electron beam density. The CSR calculations for the momentary extremely short (∼1 (micro)m) electron bunch during over-compression are quite subtle and an adequate confidence level may not be achievable. A practical limit in this short-pulse scenario may be to use spontaneous rather than FEL radiation. Ignoring the potential emittance growth, a FWHM electron energy spread of 2% is possible

  19. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) design study report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the University of California at Los Angeles, is proposing to build a Free-Electron-Laser (FEL) R and D facility operating in the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode in the wavelength range 1.5--15 {angstrom}. This FEL, called Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC linac and produces sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength x-rays with very high peak brightness and full transverse coherence. In this report, the Design Team has established performance parameters for all the major components of the LCLS and developed a layout of the entire system. Chapter 1 is the Executive Summary. Chapter 2 (Overview) provides a brief description of each of the major sections of the LCLS, from the rf photocathode gun, through the experimental stations and electron beam dump. Chapter 3 describes the scientific case for the LCLS. Chapter 4 provides a review of the principles of the FEL physics that the LCLS is based on, and Chapter 5 discusses the choice of the system's physical parameters. Chapters 6 through 10 describe in detail each major element of the system. Chapters 11 through 13 respectively cover undulator controls, mechanical alignment, and radiation issues.

  20. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) design study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the University of California at Los Angeles, is proposing to build a Free-Electron-Laser (FEL) R and D facility operating in the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode in the wavelength range 1.5--15 angstrom. This FEL, called Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC linac and produces sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength x-rays with very high peak brightness and full transverse coherence. In this report, the Design Team has established performance parameters for all the major components of the LCLS and developed a layout of the entire system. Chapter 1 is the Executive Summary. Chapter 2 (Overview) provides a brief description of each of the major sections of the LCLS, from the rf photocathode gun, through the experimental stations and electron beam dump. Chapter 3 describes the scientific case for the LCLS. Chapter 4 provides a review of the principles of the FEL physics that the LCLS is based on, and Chapter 5 discusses the choice of the system's physical parameters. Chapters 6 through 10 describe in detail each major element of the system. Chapters 11 through 13 respectively cover undulator controls, mechanical alignment, and radiation issues

  1. LCLS II Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharadwaj, V.

    2005-01-31

    A one-day workshop was held on July 21st, 1998 to consider upgrade paths to the existing LCLS design with a view to making a facility with multiple FEL and spontaneous synchrotron radiation beamlines. The agenda, working groups and participants in this workshop are listed in Appendix 1. This technical note summarizes the ideas generated by this workshop.

  2. Research and development toward a 4.5-1.5{angstrom} linac coherent light source (LCLS) at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatchyn, R.; Arthur, J.; Baltay, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    In recent years significant studies have been initiated on the theoretical and technical feasibility of utilizing a portion of the 3km S-band accelerator at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to drive a short wavelength (4.5-1.5 {Angstrom}) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) operating in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime. Electron beam requirements for single-pass saturation include: (1) a peak current in the 3-7 kA range, (2) a relative energy spread of <0.05%, ad (3) a transverse emittance, {epsilon}{le}{lambda}/4{pi}, where {lambda}[m] is the output wavelength. Requirements on the insertion device include field error levels of 0.1-0.2% for keeping the electron bunch centered on and in phase with the amplified photons, and a focusing beta of 4-8 m for inhibiting the dilution of its transverse density. Although much progress techniques necessary for LCLS operation down to {approximately}20 {angstrom}, a substantial amount of research and development is still required in a number of theoretical and experimental areas leading to the construction and operation of a 4.5-1.5 {angstrom} LCLS. In this paper we report on a research and development program underway and in planning at SLAC for addressing critical questions in these areas. These include the construction and operation of a linac test stand for developing laser-driven photocathode rf guns with normalized emittances approaching 1 mm-mr; development of advanced beam compression, stability, an emittance control techniques at multi-GeV energies; the construction and operation of a FEL Amplifier Test Experiment (FATE) for theoretical and experimental studies of SASE at IR wavelengths; an undulator development program to investigate superconducting, hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM), and pulsed-Cu technologies; theoretical and computational studies of high-gain FEL physics and LCLS component designs.

  3. Comparison of Achievable Magnetic Fields with Superconducting and Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators – A Comprehensive Study of Computed and Measured Values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moog, E. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dejus, R. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sasaki, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic modeling was performed to estimate achievable magnetic field strengths of superconducting undulators (SCUs) and to compare them with those of cryogenically cooled permanent magnet undulators (CPMUs). Starting with vacuum (beam stay-clear) gaps of 4.0 and 6.0 mm, realistic allowances for beam chambers (in the SCU case) and beam liners (in the CPMU case) were added. (A 6.0-mm vacuum gap is planned for the upgraded APS). The CPMU magnetic models consider both CPMUs that use NdFeB magnets at ~150 K and PrFeB magnets at 77 K. Parameters of the magnetic models are presented along with fitted coefficients of a Halbach-type expression for the field dependence on the gap-to-period ratio. Field strengths for SCUs are estimated using a scaling law for planar SCUs; an equation for that is given. The SCUs provide higher magnetic fields than the highest-field CPMUs – those using PrFeB at 77 K – for period lengths longer than ~14 mm for NbTi-based SCUs and ~10 mm for Nb3Sn-based SCUs. To show that the model calculations and scaling law results are realistic, they are compared to CPMUs that have been built and NbTi-based SCUs that have been built. Brightness tuning curves of CPMUs (PrFeB) and SCUs (NbTi) for the upgraded APS lattice are also provided for realistic period lengths.

  4. Linac Coherent Light Source Undulator RF BPM System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lill, R.M.; Morrison, L.H.; Waldschmidt, G.J.; Walters, D.R.; Argonne; Johnson, R.; Li, Z.; Smith, S.; Straumann, T.; SLAC

    2007-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) when it becomes operational in 2009. The LCLS is currently in the construction phase. The beam position monitor (BPM) system planned for the LCLS undulator will incorporate a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM system described in this paper. The BPM system will provide high-resolution measurements of the electron beam trajectory on a pulse-to-pulse basis and over many shots. The X-band cavity BPM size, simple fabrication, and high resolution make it an ideal choice for LCLS beam position detection. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results

  5. Magnetic design of an Apple-X afterburner for the SASE3 undulator of the European XFEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Wei, Tao; Li, Yuhui; Pflueger, Joachim

    2017-10-01

    In its startup configuration the SASE3 beamline of the European XFEL provides only soft X-ray radiation, linearly polarized in the horizontal plane. In order to enhance capabilities of this beamline an afterburner scheme is proposed. It will be used as a coherent radiator using the micro-bunched electron beam of the linear SASE3 system. Radiation with variable polarization, which covers the full SASE3 wavelength range can be generated. For the radiator a new type of undulator design called Apple-X will be used. In this paper the design is described and magnet parameters, which are compatible with the SASE3 afterburner are determined using RADIA simulations. The end structure of such a device is optimized for minimum 1st field integrals.

  6. Linac design for the LCLS project at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharadwaj, V.K.; Bane, K.; Clendenin, J.

    1997-05-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC is being designed to produce intense, coherent 0.15-nm x-rays. These x-rays will be produced by a single pass of a 15 GeV bunched electron beam through a long undulator. Nominally, the bunches have a charge of 1 nC, normalized transverse emittances of less than 1.5π mm-mr and an rms bunch length of 20 μm. The electron beam will be produced using the last third of the SLAC 3-km linac in a manner compatible with simultaneous operation of the remainder of the linac for PEP-II. The linac design necessary to produce an electron beam with the required brightness for LCLS is discussed, and the specific linac modifications are described

  7. Transition undulator radiation as bright infrared sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Undulator radiation contains, in addition to the usual component with narrow spectral features, a broad-band component in the low frequency region emitted in the near forward direction, peaked at an angle 1/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the relativistic factor. This component is referred to as the transition undulator radiation, as it is caused by the sudden change in the electron`s longitudinal velocity as it enters and leaves the undulator. The characteristic of the transition undulator radiation are analyzed and compared with the infrared radiation from the usual undulator harmonics and from bending magnets.

  8. Diffusion effects in undulator radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Agapov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantum diffusion effects in undulator radiation in semiclassical approximation are considered. Short-term effects on the electron beam motion are discussed and it is shown that approaches based on diffusion approximation with drift-diffusion coefficients derived from undulator or bending magnet radiation spectrum, and on Poisson statistics with radiation spectrum defined by the local beding field, all lead to similar results in terms of electron energy spread for cases of practical interest. An analytical estimate of the influence of quantum diffusion on the undulator radiation spectrum is derived.

  9. Research on transition undulator radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Shuzhuang; Dai Zhimin; Zhao Xiaofeng

    2000-01-01

    The theory of transition undulator radiation was described first, then the properties of infrared and far-infrared transition undulator radiation of SSRF U9.0 were explored by the methods of analytical treatment and numerical simulation, and the influence of beam energy spread, emittance, and magnetic field errors on transition undulator radiation was given also. It was shown that the flux density of the infrared and far-infrared transition undulator radiation of the SSRF U9.0 was high (e.g., the maximum flux density might reach 35 x 10 13 photons/(s·mrad 2 ·BW), collecting angle φ = 0.23 mrad, and the effects of beam energy spread, emittance and magnetic field errors on the radiation flux density were small

  10. The LCLS Gas Attenuator Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryutov, D

    2005-01-01

    In the report ''X-ray attenuation cell'' [1] a preliminary analysis of the gas attenuator for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) was presented. This analysis was carried out for extremely stringent set of specifications. In particular, a very large diameter for the unobstructed beam was set (1 cm) to accommodate the spontaneous radiation; the attenuator was supposed to cover the whole range of energies of the coherent radiation, from 800 eV to 8000 eV; the maximum attenuation was set at the level of 10 4 ; the use of solid attenuators was not allowed, as well as the use of rotating shutters. The need to reach a sufficient absorption at the high-energy end of the spectrum predetermined the choice of Xe as the working gas (in order to have a reasonable absorption at a not-too-high pressure). A sophisticated differential pumping system that included a Penning-type ion pump was suggested in order to minimize the gas leak into the undulator/accelerator part of the facility. A high cost of xenon meant also that an efficient (and expensive) gas-recovery system would have to be installed. The main parameter that determined the high cost and the complexity of the system was a large radius of the orifice. The present viewpoint allows for much smaller size of the orifice, r 0 = 1.5 mm. (1) The use of solid attenuators is also allowed (R.M. Bionta, private communication). It is, therefore, worthwhile to reconsider various parameters of the gas attenuator for these much less stringent conditions. This brief study should be considered as a physics input for the engineering design. As a working gas we consider now the argon, which, on the one hand, provides a reasonable absorption lengths and, on the other hand, is inexpensive enough to be exhausted into the atmosphere (no recovery). The absorption properties of argon are illustrated by Fig.1 where the attenuation factor A is shown for various beam energies, based on Ref. [2]. The other relevant parameters for argon are

  11. Development of a Planar Undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deyhim, Alex; Johnson, Eric; Kulesza, Joe; Lyndaker, Aaron; Waterman, Dave; Eisert, Dave; Green, Michael A.; Rogers, Greg; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar

    2007-01-01

    The design of a planar pure permanent magnet undulator is presented. The design requirements and mechanical difficulties for holding, positioning, and driving the magnetic arrays are explored. The structural, thermal, and electrical considerations that influenced the design are then analyzed. And finally detailed magnetic measurements are presented

  12. Undulators at the ALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, E.; Akre, J.; Chin, J.

    1994-07-01

    At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) Advanced Light Source (ALS), three 4.6 m long undulators have been completed, tested and installed. A fourth is under construction. The completed undulators include two 5.0 cm period length, 89 period devices (U5.0s) which achieve a 0.85 T effective field at a 14 mm minimum gap and a 8.0 cm period length, 55 period device (U8.0) that reaches a 1.2 T effective field at a 14 mm minimum gap. The undulator under construction is a 10.0 cm period length, 43 period device (U10.0) that is designed to achieve 0.98 T at a 23 mm gap. Undulator magnetic gap variation (rms) is within 25 microns over the periodic structure length. Reproducibility of the adjustable magnetic gap has been measured to be within +/- 5 microns. Gap adjusting range is from 14 mm to 210 mm, which can be scanned in one minute. The 5.1 m long vacuum chambers are flat in the vertical direction to within 0.74 mm and straight in the horizontal direction to within 0.08 mm over the 4.6 m magnetic structure sections. Vacuum chamber base pressures after UHV beam conditioning are. in the mid 10 -11 Torr range and storage ring operating pressures with full current are in the low 10 -10 Torr range. Measurements show that the uncorrelated magnetic field errors are 0.23%, and 0.20% for the two U5.Os and the U8.0 respectively and that the field integrals are small over the 1 cm by 6 cm beam aperture. Device description, fabrication, and measurements are presented

  13. Hybrid undulator numerical optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hairetdinov, A.H. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zukov, A.A. [Solid State Physics Institute, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    3D properties of the hybrid undulator scheme arc studied numerically using PANDIRA code. It is shown that there exist two well defined sets of undulator parameters which provide either maximum on-axis field amplitude or minimal higher harmonics amplitude of the basic undulator field. Thus the alternative between higher field amplitude or pure sinusoidal field exists. The behavior of the undulator field amplitude and harmonics structure for a large set of (undulator gap)/(undulator wavelength) values is demonstrated.

  14. Surface-micromachined magnetic undulator with period length between 10  μm and 1 mm for advanced light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jere Harrison

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A technological gap exists between the μm-scale wiggling periods achieved using electromagnetic waves of high intensity laser pulses and the mm scale of permanent-magnet and superconducting undulators. In the sub-mm range, surface-micromachined soft-magnetic micro-electro-mechanical system inductors with integrated solenoidal coils have already experimentally demonstrated 100 to 500 mT field amplitude across air gaps as large as 15  μm. Simulations indicate that magnetic fields as large as 1.5 T across 50  μm inductor gaps are feasible. A simple rearranging of the yoke and pole geometry allows for fabrication of 10+ cm long undulator structures with period lengths between 12.5  μm and 1 mm. Such undulators find application both in high average power spontaneous emission sources and, if used in combination with ultrahigh-brightness electron beams, could lead to the realization of low energy compact free-electron lasers. Challenges include electron energy broadening due to wakefields and Joule heating in the electromagnet.

  15. Realization of an X-Band RF System for LCLS

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Peter; Brooks, William; Emma, Paul; Rago, Carl

    2005-01-01

    A single X-band (11.424 GHz) accelerating structure is to be incorporated in the LCLS Linac design to linearize the energy-time correlation (or gradient) across each bunch, features which originate in the preceding accelerating structures (L0 and L1). This harmonic RF system will operate near the negative RF crest to decelerate the beam, reducing these non-linear components of the correlation, providing a more efficient compression in the downstream bunch compressor chicanes (BC1 and BC2). These non-linear correlation components, if allowed to grow, would lead to Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) instabilities in the chicanes, effectively destroying the coherence of the photon radiation in the main LCLS undulator. The many years devoted at SLAC in the development of X-band RF components for the NLC/JLC linear collider project, has enabled the technical and financial realization of such an RF system for LCLS. This paper details the requirements for the X-band system and the proposed scheme planned for achie...

  16. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2002-11-25

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the University of California at Los Angeles, have collaborated to create a conceptual design for a Free-Electron-Laser (FEL) R&D facility operating in the wavelength range 1.5-15 {angstrom}. This FEL, called the ''Linac Coherent Light Source'' (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC linac and produces sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength x-rays with very high peak brightness and full transverse coherence. The first two-thirds of the SLAC linac are used for injection into the PEP-II storage rings. The last one-third will be converted to a source of electrons for the LCLS. The electrons will be transported to the SLAC Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility, which will be extended to house a 122-m undulator system. In passing through the undulators, the electrons will be bunched by the force of their own synchrotron radiation to produce an intense, spatially coherent beam of x-rays, tunable in energy from 0.8 keV to 8 keV. The LCLS will include two experiment halls as well as x-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to make use of this x-ray beam for research in a variety of disciplines such as atomic physics, materials science, plasma physics and biosciences. This Conceptual Design Report, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of constructing an x-ray FEL based on the SLAC linac.

  17. Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and Pr{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B magnets characterisation and modelling for cryogenic permanent magnet undulator applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benabderrahmane, C., E-mail: chamseddine.benabderrahmane@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, St Aubin (France); Berteaud, P.; Valleau, M.; Kitegi, C.; Tavakoli, K.; Bechu, N.; Mary, A.; Filhol, J.M.; Couprie, M.E. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, St Aubin (France)

    2012-03-21

    Cryogenic permanent magnet undulators take benefit from improved magnetic properties of RE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (Rare Earth based magnets) at cryogenic temperatures for achieving short period high magnetic field. In particular, using Praseodymium instead of Neodymium generally employed for insertion devices avoids limitation due to Spin Reorientation Transition phenomenon. Magnetic properties of magnet samples (Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and Pr{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B) versus temperature have been investigated and applied to a 20 mm period Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (BH50) and to a 18 mm period Pr{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (CR53) systems. Four period undulators have been built, characterised and compared to the models.

  18. The LCLS Timing Event System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusatko, John; Allison, S.; Browne, M.; Krejcik, P.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    The Linac Coherent Light Source requires precision timing trigger signals for various accelerator diagnostics and controls at SLAC-NAL. A new timing system has been developed that meets these requirements. This system is based on COTS hardware with a mixture of custom-designed units. An added challenge has been the requirement that the LCLS Timing System must co-exist and 'know' about the existing SLC Timing System. This paper describes the architecture, construction and performance of the LCLS timing event system.

  19. Induction shimming: A new shimming concept for superconductive undulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wollmann

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Undulators are the most advanced sources for the generation of synchrotron radiation. The photons generated by a single electron add up coherently along the electron trajectory. In order to do so, the oscillatory motion of the electron has to be in phase with the emitted photons along the whole undulator. Small magnetic errors can cause unwanted destructive interferences. In standard permanent magnet undulators, the magnetic errors are reduced by applying shimming techniques. Superconductive undulators have higher magnetic fields than permanent magnet undulators but shimming is more complex. In this paper it is shown that coupled superconductive loops installed along the surface of the superconductive undulator coil can significantly reduce the destructive effect of the field errors. This new idea might allow the building of undulators with a superior field quality.

  20. The properties of undulator radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.; Kincaid, B.M.

    1993-09-01

    A new generation of synchrotron radiation light sources covering the VUV, soft x-ray, and hard x-ray spectral regions is under construction in several countries. These sources are designed specifically to use periodic magnetic undulators and low-emittance electron or positron beams to produce high-brightness near-diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation beams. Some of the novel features of the new sources are discussed, along with the characteristics of the radiation produced, with emphasis on the Advanced Light Source, a third-generation 1.5 GeV storage ring optimized for undulator use. A review of the properties of undulator radiation is presented, followed by a discussion of some of the unique challenges being faced by the builders and users of the new undulator sources. These include difficult mechanical and magnetic tolerance limits, a complex interaction with the storage ring, high x-ray beam power, partial coherence, harmonics, optics contamination, and the unusual spectral and angular properties of undulator radiation

  1. Electron Signal Detection for the Beam-Finder Wire of the Linac Coherent Light Source Undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Juhao; Emma, P.; Field, R.C.; SLAC

    2006-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based on the final kilometer of the Stanford Linear Accelerator. The tight tolerances for positioning the electron beam close to the undulator axis calls for the introduction of Beam Finder Wire (BFW) device. A BFW device close to the upstream end of the undulator segment and a quadrupole close to the down stream end of the undulator segment will allow a beam-based undulator segment alignment. Based on the scattering of the electrons on the BFW, we can detect the electron signal in the main dump bends after the undulator to find the beam position. We propose to use a threshold Cherenkov counter for this purpose. According to the signal strength at such a Cherenkov counter, we then suggest choice of material and size for such a BFW device in the undulator

  2. Cost-effective way to enhance the capabilities of the LCLS baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    This paper discusses the potential for enhancing the LCLS hard X-ray FEL capabilities. In the hard X-ray regime, a high longitudinal coherence will be the key to such performance upgrade. The method considered here to obtain high longitudinal coherence is based on a novel single-bunch self-seeding scheme exploiting a single crystal monochromator, which is extremely compact and can be straightforwardly installed in the LCLS baseline undulator. We present simulation results dealing with the LCLS hard X-ray FEL, and show that this method can produce fully-coherent X-ray pulses at 100 GW power level. With the radiation beam monochromatized down to the Fourier transform limit, a variety of very different techniques leading to further improvements of the LCLS performance become feasible. In particular, we describe an efficient way for obtaining full polarization control at the LCLS hard X-ray FEL. We also propose to exploit crystals in the Bragg reflection geometry as movable deflectors for the LCLS X-ray transport systems. The hard X-ray beam can be deflected of an angle of order of a radian without perturbations. The monochromatization of the output radiation constitutes the key for reaching such result. Finally, we describe a newoptical pump - hard X-ray probe technique which will allow time-resolved studies at the LCLS baseline on the femtosecond time scale. The principle of operation of the proposed scheme is essentially based on the use of the time jitter between pump and probe pulses. This eliminates the need for timing XFELs to high-power conventional lasers with femtosecond accuracy. (orig.)

  3. Cost-effective way to enhance the capabilities of the LCLS baseline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2010-08-01

    This paper discusses the potential for enhancing the LCLS hard X-ray FEL capabilities. In the hard X-ray regime, a high longitudinal coherence will be the key to such performance upgrade. The method considered here to obtain high longitudinal coherence is based on a novel single-bunch self-seeding scheme exploiting a single crystal monochromator, which is extremely compact and can be straightforwardly installed in the LCLS baseline undulator. We present simulation results dealing with the LCLS hard X-ray FEL, and show that this method can produce fully-coherent X-ray pulses at 100 GW power level. With the radiation beam monochromatized down to the Fourier transform limit, a variety of very different techniques leading to further improvements of the LCLS performance become feasible. In particular, we describe an efficient way for obtaining full polarization control at the LCLS hard X-ray FEL. We also propose to exploit crystals in the Bragg reflection geometry as movable deflectors for the LCLS X-ray transport systems. The hard X-ray beam can be deflected of an angle of order of a radian without perturbations. The monochromatization of the output radiation constitutes the key for reaching such result. Finally, we describe a newoptical pump - hard X-ray probe technique which will allow time-resolved studies at the LCLS baseline on the femtosecond time scale. The principle of operation of the proposed scheme is essentially based on the use of the time jitter between pump and probe pulses. This eliminates the need for timing XFELs to high-power conventional lasers with femtosecond accuracy. (orig.)

  4. Microbunch preserving in-line system for an APPLE II helical radiator at the LCLS baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL Project Team, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    In a previous work we proposed a scheme for polarization control at the LCLS baseline, which exploited the microbunching from the planar undulator. After the baseline undulator, the electron beam is transported through a drift by a FODO focusing system, and through a short helical radiator. The microbunching structure can be preserved, and intense coherent radiation is emitted in the helical undulator at fundamental harmonic. The driving idea of this proposal is that the background linearly-polarized radiation from the baseline undulator is suppressed by spatial filtering. Filtering is achieved by letting radiation and electron beam through Be slits upstream of the helical radiator, where the radiation spot size is about ten times larger than the electron beam transverse size. Several changes considered in the present paper were made to improve the previous design. Slits are now placed immediately behind the helical radiator. The advantage is that the electron beam can be spoiled by the slits, and narrower slits width can be used for spatial filtering. Due to this fundamental reason, the present setup is shorter than the previous one. The helical radiator is now placed immediately behind the SHAB undulator. It is thus sufficient to use the existing FODO focusing system of the SHAB undulator for transporting themodulated electron beam. This paper presents complete GENESIS code calculations for the new design, starting from the baseline undulator entrance up to the helical radiator exit including the modulated electron beam transport by the SHAB FODO focusing system. (orig.)

  5. Microbunch preserving in-line system for an APPLE II helical radiator at the LCLS baseline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2011-05-01

    In a previous work we proposed a scheme for polarization control at the LCLS baseline, which exploited the microbunching from the planar undulator. After the baseline undulator, the electron beam is transported through a drift by a FODO focusing system, and through a short helical radiator. The microbunching structure can be preserved, and intense coherent radiation is emitted in the helical undulator at fundamental harmonic. The driving idea of this proposal is that the background linearly-polarized radiation from the baseline undulator is suppressed by spatial filtering. Filtering is achieved by letting radiation and electron beam through Be slits upstream of the helical radiator, where the radiation spot size is about ten times larger than the electron beam transverse size. Several changes considered in the present paper were made to improve the previous design. Slits are now placed immediately behind the helical radiator. The advantage is that the electron beam can be spoiled by the slits, and narrower slits width can be used for spatial filtering. Due to this fundamental reason, the present setup is shorter than the previous one. The helical radiator is now placed immediately behind the SHAB undulator. It is thus sufficient to use the existing FODO focusing system of the SHAB undulator for transporting themodulated electron beam. This paper presents complete GENESIS code calculations for the new design, starting from the baseline undulator entrance up to the helical radiator exit including the modulated electron beam transport by the SHAB FODO focusing system. (orig.)

  6. High harmonics focusing undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varfolomeev, A.A.; Hairetdinov, A.H.; Smirnov, A.V.; Khlebnikov, A.S. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    It was shown in our previous work that there exist a possibility to enhance significantly the {open_quote}natural{close_quote} focusing properties of the hybrid undulator. Here we analyze the actual undulator configurations which could provide such field structure. Numerical simulations using 2D code PANDIRA were carried out and the enhanced focusing properties of the undulator were demonstrated. The obtained results provide the solution for the beam transport in a very long (short wavelength) undulator schemes.

  7. Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Conceptual Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohr, J.

    2011-01-01

    The LCLS-II Project is designed to support the DOE Office of Science mission, as described in the 22 April 2010 Mission Need Statement. The scope of the Project was chosen to provide an increase in capabilities and capacity for the facility both at project completion in 2017 and in the subsequent decade. The Project is designed to address all points of the Mission Need Statement (MNS): (1) Expanded spectral reach; (2) Capability to provide x-ray beams with controllable polarization; (3) Capability to provide 'pump' pulses over a vastly extended range of photon energies to a sample, synchronized to LCLS-II x-ray probe pulses with controllable inter-pulse time delay; and (4) Increase of user access through parallel rather than serial x-ray beam use within the constraint of a $300M-$400M Total Project Cost (TPC) range. The LCLS-II Project will construct: (1) A hard x-ray undulator source (2-13 keV); (2) A soft x-ray undulator source (250-2,000 eV); (3) A dedicated, independent electron source for these new undulators, using sectors 10-20 of the SLAC linac; (4) Modifications to existing SLAC facilities for the injector and new shielded enclosures for the undulator sources, beam dumps and x-ray front ends; (5) A new experiment hall capable of accommodating four experiment stations; and (6) Relocation of the two soft x-ray instruments in the existing Near Experiment Hall (NEH) to the new experiment hall (Experiment Hall-II). A key objective of LCLS-II is to maintain near-term international leadership in the study of matter on the fundamental atomic length scale and the associated ultrafast time scales of atomic motion and electronic transformation. Clearly, such studies promise scientific breakthroughs in key areas of societal needs like energy, environment, health and technology, and they are uniquely enabled by forefront X-ray Free Electron Laser (X-FEL) facilities. While the implementation of LCLS-II extends to about 2017, it is important to realize that LCLS-II only

  8. Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stohr, J

    2011-11-16

    The LCLS-II Project is designed to support the DOE Office of Science mission, as described in the 22 April 2010 Mission Need Statement. The scope of the Project was chosen to provide an increase in capabilities and capacity for the facility both at project completion in 2017 and in the subsequent decade. The Project is designed to address all points of the Mission Need Statement (MNS): (1) Expanded spectral reach; (2) Capability to provide x-ray beams with controllable polarization; (3) Capability to provide 'pump' pulses over a vastly extended range of photon energies to a sample, synchronized to LCLS-II x-ray probe pulses with controllable inter-pulse time delay; and (4) Increase of user access through parallel rather than serial x-ray beam use within the constraint of a $300M-$400M Total Project Cost (TPC) range. The LCLS-II Project will construct: (1) A hard x-ray undulator source (2-13 keV); (2) A soft x-ray undulator source (250-2,000 eV); (3) A dedicated, independent electron source for these new undulators, using sectors 10-20 of the SLAC linac; (4) Modifications to existing SLAC facilities for the injector and new shielded enclosures for the undulator sources, beam dumps and x-ray front ends; (5) A new experiment hall capable of accommodating four experiment stations; and (6) Relocation of the two soft x-ray instruments in the existing Near Experiment Hall (NEH) to the new experiment hall (Experiment Hall-II). A key objective of LCLS-II is to maintain near-term international leadership in the study of matter on the fundamental atomic length scale and the associated ultrafast time scales of atomic motion and electronic transformation. Clearly, such studies promise scientific breakthroughs in key areas of societal needs like energy, environment, health and technology, and they are uniquely enabled by forefront X-ray Free Electron Laser (X-FEL) facilities. While the implementation of LCLS-II extends to about 2017, it is important to realize that

  9. Investigating excitation-dependent and fringe-field effects of electromagnet and permanent-magnet phase shifters for a crossed undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Ting-Yi, E-mail: chung.albert@nsrrc.org.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Yang, Chih-Sheng; Chu, Yun-Liang; Lin, Fu-Yuan; Jan, Jyh-Chyuan [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Ching-Shiang [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30050, Taiwan (China)

    2017-04-01

    To enhance the flux density or to control polarization, a phase shifter was designed and used to modulate the phase matching between segmented undulators. A larger hysteresis loop causes, however, a repeatability issue in the phase matching; the fringe field of the phase shifter creates an extra magnetic-field error. The design of the phase shifter must therefore minimize the hysteresis loop and fringe field to maintain the phases exact and to ignore the crosstalk effect. Two critical issues are the hysteresis-loop problem and the fringe-field effect, which determine the radiation performance and the stability of the ring. To investigate these issues, a phase shifter was constructed to operate in accordance with electromagnetic- and permanent-type magnets; the results from the field measurements and shims are discussed here. The shimming algorithm and a compact permanent-magnet phase shifter that eliminates the issues are also presented.

  10. Multi-Device Knob Utility for LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelazny, Michael; Chevtsov, Sergei; Chu, Chungming Paul; Fairley, Diane; Krejcik, Patrick; Rogind, Deborah; Smith, Howard; White, Greg; Yocky, Gerald; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    At the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) the Controls Department (CD) has developed a new Multi-Device Knob Utility (MKB) based on the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) toolkit for controlling one or more Process Variables (PVs) in unison, or simultaneously, from a physical knob located in the control room, or from various software tools such as the EPICS Extensible Display Manager (EDM) or a Swing slider in Java. A group of devices are hooked up to a knob, and then the value written to the devices is a simple function of the value of the knob. This is used, most commonly, to create a bump in the electron beam for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Control system variables typically controlled are magnetic fields, phases, and timing offsets. This paper describes the technologies used to implement this utility.

  11. Temperature Measurements in the Magnetic Measurement Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    Several key LCLS undulator parameter values depend strongly on temperature primarily because of the permanent magnet material the undulators are constructed with. The undulators will be tuned to have specific parameter values in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF). Consequently, it is necessary for the temperature of the MMF to remain fairly constant. Requirements on undulator temperature have been established. When in use, the undulator temperature will be in the range 20.0 {+-} 0.2 C. In the MMF, the undulator tuning will be done at 20.0 {+-} 0.1 C. For special studies, the MMF temperature set point can be changed to a value between 18 C and 23 C with stability of {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure that the MMF temperature requirements are met, the MMF must have a system to measure temperatures. The accuracy of the MMF temperature measurement system must be better than the {+-}0.1 C undulator tuning temperature tolerance, and is taken to be {+-}0.01 C. The temperature measurement system for the MMF is under construction. It is similar to a prototype system we built two years ago in the Sector 10 alignment lab at SLAC. At that time, our goal was to measure the lab temperature to {+-}0.1 C. The system has worked well for two years and has maintained its accuracy. For the MMF system, we propose better sensors and a more extensive calibration program to achieve the factor of 10 increase in accuracy. In this note we describe the measurement system under construction. We motivate our choice of system components and give an overview of the system. Most of the software for the system has been written and will be discussed. We discuss error sources in temperature measurements and show how these errors have been dealt with. The calibration system is described in detail. All the LCLS undulators must be tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at the same temperature to within {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure this, we are building a system to measure the temperature of the

  12. Concept of quasi-periodic undulator - control of radiation spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Shigemi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-02-01

    A new type of undulator, the quasi-periodic undulator (QPU) is considered which generates the irrational harmonics in the radiation spectrum. This undulator consists of the arrays of magnet blocks aligned in a quasi-periodic order, and consequentially lead to a quasi-periodic motion of electron. A combination of the QPU and a conventional crystal/grating monochromator provides pure monochromatic photon beam for synchrotron radiation users because the irrational harmonics do not be diffracted in the same direction by a monochromator. The radiation power and width of each radiation peak emitted from this undulator are expected to be comparable with those of the conventional periodic undulator.

  13. Analysis of field errors in existing undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kincaid, B.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) and other third generation synchrotron light sources have been designed for optimum performance with undulator insertion devices. The performance requirements for these new undulators are explored, with emphasis on the effects of errors on source spectral brightness. Analysis of magnetic field data for several existing hybrid undulators is presented, decomposing errors into systematic and random components. An attempts is made to identify the sources of these errors, and recommendations are made for designing future insertion devices. 12 refs., 16 figs

  14. Phasing multi-segment undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavanne, J.; Elleaume, P.; Vaerenbergh, P. Van

    1996-01-01

    An important issue in the manufacture of multi-segment undulators as a source of synchrotron radiation or as a free-electron laser (FEL) is the phasing between successive segments. The state of the art is briefly reviewed, after which a novel pure permanent magnet phasing section that is passive and does not require any current is presented. The phasing section allows the introduction of a 6 mm longitudinal gap between each segment, resulting in complete mechanical independence and reduced magnetic interaction between segments. The tolerance of the longitudinal positioning of one segment with respect to the next is found to be 2.8 times lower than that of conventional phasing. The spectrum at all gaps and useful harmonics is almost unchanged when compared with a single-segment undulator of the same total length. (au) 3 refs

  15. Coherent Diffractive Imaging at LCLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Joachim

    2010-03-01

    Soft x-ray FEL light sources produce ultrafast x-ray pulses with outstanding high peak brilliance. This might enable the structure determination of proteins that cannot be crystallized. The deposited energy would destroy the molecules completely, but owing to the short pulses the destruction will ideally only happen after the termination of the pulse. In order to address the many challenges that we face in attempting molecular diffraction, we have carried out experiments in coherent diffraction from protein nanocrystals at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. The periodicity of these objects gives us much higher scattering signals than uncrystallized proteins would. The crystals are filtered to sizes less than 2 micron, and delivered to the pulsed X-ray beam in a liquid jet. The effects of pulse duration and fluence on the high-resolution structure of the crystals have been studied. Diffraction patterns are recorded at a repetition rate of 30 Hz with pnCCD detectors. This allows us to take 108,000 images per hour. With 2-mega-pixel-detectors this gives a data-rate of more than 400 GB per hour. The automated sorting and evaluation of hundreds of thousands images is another challenge of this kind of experiments. Preliminary results will be presented on our first LCLS experiments. This work was carried out as part of a collaboration, for which Henry Chapman is the spokesperson. The collaboration consists of CFEL DESY, Arizona State University, SLAC, Uppsala University, LLNL, The University of Melbourne, LBNL, the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, and the Max Planck Advanced Study Group (ASG) at the CFEL. The experiments were carried out using the CAMP apparatus, which was designed and built by the Max Planck ASG at CFEL. The LCLS is operated by Stanford University on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  16. LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baradaran, Samira; Bergmann, Uwe; Durr, Herrmann; Gaffney, Kelley; Goldstein, Julia; Guehr, Markus; Hastings, Jerome; Heimann, Philip; Lee, Richard; Seibert, Marvin; Stohr, Joachim; /SLAC

    2012-08-08

    heterogeneous catalysis. Of particular interest is the efficient conversion of light to electrical or chemical energy, which requires understanding the non-adiabatic dynamics of electronic excited states. Ultrafast x-ray scattering presents an excellent opportunity to investigate structural dynamics of molecular systems with atomic resolution, and x-ray scattering and spectroscopy present an excellent opportunity to investigating the dynamics of the electronic charge distribution. Harnessing solar energy to generate fuels, either indirectly with photovoltaics and electrochemical catalysis or directly with photocatalysts, presents a critical technological challenge that will require the use of forefront scientific tools such as ultrafast x-rays. At the center of this technical challenge is the rational design of efficient and cost effective catalysts. Important materials science opportunities relate to information technology applications, in particular the transport and storage of information on increasingly smaller length- and faster time-scales. Of interest are the understanding of the intrinsic size limits associated with the storage of information bits and the speed limits of information or bit processing. Key questions revolve about how electronic charges and spins of materials can be manipulated by electric and magnetic fields. This requires the exploration of speed limits subject to the fundamental conservation laws of energy and linear and angular momentum and the different coupling of polar electric and axial magnetic fields to charge and spin. Of interest are novel composite materials, including molecular systems combining multi electric and magnetic functionality. Ultrafast x-rays offer the required probing speed, can probe either the charge or spin properties through polarization control and through scattering and spectroscopy cover the entire energy-time-momentum-distance phase space. In the field of atomic and molecular science, LCLS II promises to elucidate the

  17. LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baradaran, Samira; Bergmann, Uwe; Durr, Herrmann; Gaffney, Kelley; Goldstein, Julia; Guehr, Markus; Hastings, Jerome; Heimann, Philip; Lee, Richard; Seibert, Marvin; Stohr, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    heterogeneous catalysis. Of particular interest is the efficient conversion of light to electrical or chemical energy, which requires understanding the non-adiabatic dynamics of electronic excited states. Ultrafast x-ray scattering presents an excellent opportunity to investigate structural dynamics of molecular systems with atomic resolution, and x-ray scattering and spectroscopy present an excellent opportunity to investigating the dynamics of the electronic charge distribution. Harnessing solar energy to generate fuels, either indirectly with photovoltaics and electrochemical catalysis or directly with photocatalysts, presents a critical technological challenge that will require the use of forefront scientific tools such as ultrafast x-rays. At the center of this technical challenge is the rational design of efficient and cost effective catalysts. Important materials science opportunities relate to information technology applications, in particular the transport and storage of information on increasingly smaller length- and faster time-scales. Of interest are the understanding of the intrinsic size limits associated with the storage of information bits and the speed limits of information or bit processing. Key questions revolve about how electronic charges and spins of materials can be manipulated by electric and magnetic fields. This requires the exploration of speed limits subject to the fundamental conservation laws of energy and linear and angular momentum and the different coupling of polar electric and axial magnetic fields to charge and spin. Of interest are novel composite materials, including molecular systems combining multi electric and magnetic functionality. Ultrafast x-rays offer the required probing speed, can probe either the charge or spin properties through polarization control and through scattering and spectroscopy cover the entire energy-time-momentum-distance phase space. In the field of atomic and molecular science, LCLS II promises to elucidate the

  18. Wp specific methylation of highly proliferated LCLs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Shim, Sung-Mi; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Joon-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee; Lee, Suman

    2007-01-01

    The epigenetic regulation of viral genes may be important for the life cycle of EBV. We determined the methylation status of three viral promoters (Wp, Cp, Qp) from EBV B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by pyrosequencing. Our pyrosequencing data showed that the CpG region of Wp was methylated, but the others were not. Interestingly, Wp methylation was increased with proliferation of LCLs. Wp methylation was as high as 74.9% in late-passage LCLs, but 25.6% in early-passage LCLs. From two Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines, Wp specific hypermethylation was also found (>80%). Interestingly, the expression of EBNA2 gene which located directly next to Wp was associated with its methylation. Our data suggested that Wp specific methylation may be important for the indicator of the proliferation status of LCLs, and the epigenetic viral gene regulation of EBNA2 gene by Wp should be further defined possibly with other biological processes

  19. Generation of radiation by intense plasma and electromagnetic undulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, C.

    1991-10-01

    We examine the characteristics of the classical radiation emission resulting from the interaction of a relativistic electron beam that propagates perpendicularly through a large amplitude relativistic plasma wave. Such a study is useful for evaluating the feasibility of using relativistic plasma waves as extremely short wavelength undulators for generating short wavelength radiation. The electron trajectories in a plasma wave undulator and in an ac FEL undulator are obtained using perturbation techniques. The spontaneous radiation frequency spectrum and angular distribution emitted by a single electron oscillating in these two undulators are then calculated. The radiation gain of a copropagating electromagnetic wave is calculated. The approximate analytic results for the trajectories, spontaneous radiation and gain are compared with 3-D simulation results. The characteristics of the plasma wave undulator are compared with the ac FEL undulator and linearly polarized magnetic undulator. 50 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Generation of radiation by intense plasma and electromagnetic undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, C.

    1991-10-01

    We examine the characteristics of the classical radiation emission resulting from the interaction of a relativistic electron beam that propagates perpendicularly through a large amplitude relativistic plasma wave. Such a study is useful for evaluating the feasibility of using relativistic plasma waves as extremely short wavelength undulators for generating short wavelength radiation. The electron trajectories in a plasma wave undulator and in an ac FEL undulator are obtained using perturbation techniques. The spontaneous radiation frequency spectrum and angular distribution emitted by a single electron oscillating in these two undulators are then calculated. The radiation gain of a copropagating electromagnetic wave is calculated. The approximate analytic results for the trajectories, spontaneous radiation and gain are compared with 3-D simulation results. The characteristics of the plasma wave undulator are compared with the ac FEL undulator and linearly polarized magnetic undulator. 50 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Infrared (IR) vs x-ray power generation in the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatchyn, R.

    1993-05-01

    The LCLS, a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) designed for operation at a first harmonic energy of 300 eV (λ congruent 40 Angstrom) in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime, will utilize electron bunches compressed down to durations of <0.5ps, or lengths of <150 μ. It is natural to inquire whether coherent radiation of this (and longer) wavelength will constitute a significant component of the total coherent output of the FEL. In this paper a determination of a simple upper bound on the IR that can be generated by the compressed bunches is outlines. Under the assumed operating parameters of the LCLS undulator, it is shown that that IR component of the coherent output should be strongly dominated by the x-ray component

  2. An electron undulating ring for VLSI lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimasu, T.; Mikado, T.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S.; Yamazaki, T.

    1985-01-01

    The development of the ETL storage ring ''TERAS'' as an undulating ring has been continued to achieve a wide area exposure of synchrotron radiation (SR) in VLSI lithography. Stable vertical and horizontal undulating motions of stored beams are demonstrated around a horizontal design orbit of TERAS, using two small steering magnets of which one is used for vertical undulating and another for horizontal one. Each steering magnet is inserted into one of the periodic configulation of guide field elements. As one of useful applications of undulaing electron beams, a vertically wide exposure of SR has been demonstrated in the SR lithography. The maximum vertical deviation from the design orbit nCcurs near the steering magnet. The maximum vertical tilt angle of the undulating beam near the nodes is about + or - 2mrad for a steering magnetic field of 50 gauss. Another proposal is for hith-intensity, uniform and wide exposure of SR from a wiggler installed in TERAS, using vertical and horizontal undulating motions of stored beams. A 1.4 m long permanent magnet wiggler has been installed for this purpose in this April

  3. Science Driven Instrumentation for LCLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, John [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bergmann, Uwe [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Brunger, Axel [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bostedt, Christoph [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Boutet, Sebastien [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bozek, John [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cocco, Daniele [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Devereaux, Tom [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ding, Yuantao [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Durr, Hermann [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fritz, David [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gaffney, Kelly [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Galayda, John [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Goldstein, Julia [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Guhr, Markus [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hastings, Jerome [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Heimann, Philip [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hodgson, Keith [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, Zirong [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kelez, Nicholas [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Montanez, Paul [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-03-24

    The world’s first x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), LCLS, has now been operating for more than three years and all six experimental stations are supporting user science and producing high impact scientific results. Other countries are rapidly catching up and a second XFEL, SACLA, is already operating in Japan with others coming on line in Germany, Korea and Switzerland within the next three to five years. In order to increase capability and capacity of LCLS, the Department of Energy has funded LCLS-II.

  4. KIAE-1.5-3 undulator performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varfolomeev, A.A.; Ivanchenko, S.N.; Khlebnikov, A.S. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Hybrid type undulator with 60 periods of {lambda}{sub w} = 1.5 cm and tunable gap in wide range has been designed and manufactured. Additional side magnet arrays provide high magnetic field (near Halbach limit) along with transverse field profiles for e.b. focusing.

  5. Undulator A diagnostics at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilinski, P.

    1998-01-01

    Diagnostics of Undulator A number-sign 2 (UA2) radiation was performed during the October 1997 mn at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The UA2 undulator is a standard 3.3-cm-period APS Undulator A, which was positioned downstream from the center of the straight section at Sector 8. The diagnostics included the angular-spectral measurements of the undulator radiation to determine the undulator radiation absolute spectral flux and the particle beam divergence. The results of the absolute spectral flux measurements are compared to the undulator spectrum calculated from measured undulator magnetic field. The particle's energy spread was determined from spectra comparison. Previously, the authors reported the first measurements made on Undulator A at the APS. The purpose of the present report is to summarize the results of the diagnostics performed on the Sector 8 undulator at the request of the IMM-CAT staff, and to present a more general discussion of undulator radiation sources at the APS and details of their diagnostics

  6. A 2--4 nm Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using the SLAC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-05-01

    We describe the use of the SLAC linac to drive a unique, powerful. short wavelength Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Operating as an FEL, lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a high peak current electron beam through a long undulator by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). The main components are a high-brightness rf photocathode electron gun; pulse compressors; about 1/5 of the SLAC linac; and a long undulator with a FODO quadrupole focussing system. Using electrons below 8 GeV, the system would operate at wavelengths down to about 3 nm, producing ≥10 GW peak power in sub-ps pulses. At a 120 Hz rate the average power is ∼ 1 W

  7. LCLS-II Cryomodules Production at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkan, Tug [Fermilab; Grimm, Chuck [Fermilab; Kaluzny, Joshua [Fermilab; Orlov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Peterson, Thomas [Fermilab; Premo, Ken [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    LCLS-II is an upgrade project for the linear coherent light source (LCLS) at SLAC. The LCLS-II linac will consist of thirty-five 1.3 GHz and two 3.9 GHz superconducting RF continuous wave (CW) cryomodules that Fermilab and Jefferson Lab (JLab) will assemble in collaboration with SLAC. The LCLS-II 1.3 GHz cryomodule design is based on the European XFEL pulsed-mode cryomodule design with modifications needed for CW operation. Fermilab and JLab will each assemble and test a prototype 1.3 GHz cryomodule to assess the results of the CW modifications, in advance of 16 and 17 production 1.3 GHz cryomodules, respectively. Fermilab is solely responsible for the 3.9 GHz cryomodules. After the prototype cryomodule tests are complete and lessons learned incorporated, both laboratories will increase their cryomodule production rates to meet the challenging LCLS-II project requirement of approximately one cryomodule per month per laboratory. This paper presents the Fermilab Cryomodule Assembly Facility (CAF) infrastructure for LCLS-II cryomodule production, the Fermilab prototype 1.3 GHz CW cryomodule (pCM) assembly and readiness for production assembly.

  8. Field Optimization for short Period Undulators

    CERN Document Server

    Peiffer, P; Rossmanith, R; Schoerling, D

    2011-01-01

    Undulators dedicated to low energy electron beams, like Laser Wakefield Accelerators, require very short period lengths to achieve X-ray emission. However, at these short period length (LambdaU ~ 5 mm) it becomes difficult to reach magnetic field amplitudes that lead to a K parameter of >1, which is generally desired. Room temperature permanent magnets and even superconductive undulators using Nb-Ti as conductor material have proven insufficient to achieve the desired field amplitudes. The superconductor Nb$_{3}$Sn has the theoretical potential to achieve the desired fields. However, up to now it is limited by several technological challenges to much lower field values than theoretically predicted. An alternative idea for higher fields is to manufacture the poles of the undulator body from Holmium instead of iron or to use Nb-Ti wires with a higher superconductor/copper ratio. The advantages and challenges of the different options are compared in this contribution.

  9. Experience with small-gap undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefan, P.; Krinsky, S.

    1996-01-01

    Small-gap undulators offer enhanced performance as synchrotron radiation sources, by providing extended tuning range and the possibility of higher photon energies via short-period, small-gap devices. Challenges associated with the operation of small-gap undulators arise from their requirement for small beam apertures and the resulting possibility of lifetime degradation, beam instabilities, and radiation hazards. To investigate these fundamental limitations, we have constructed an R ampersand D small-gap undulator for the X13 straight section of the NSLS 2.584 GeV X-ray Ring and have tested it during studies shifts and normal user shifts during the last year. This device, the NSLS prototype small-gap undulator (PSGU), consists of a variable-aperture vacuum chamber and a 16-mm-period pure-permanent-magnet undulator, both mounted to a common elevator base stage. The design output spectrum of 2.5 keV in the fundamental (and 7.5 keV in the third harmonic) was obtained with a magnet gap of 5.6 mm and an electron beam aperture of 2.5 mm. The partial lifetime contribution for these parameters was observed to be about 40 hr. Details of the synchrotron radiation output spectrum, lifetime dependence on aperture, and bremsstrahlung radiation production will be presented. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  10. LCLS Maximum Credible Beam Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.

    2005-01-01

    The maximum credible beam power is defined as the highest credible average beam power that the accelerator can deliver to the point in question, given the laws of physics, the beam line design, and assuming all protection devices have failed. For a new accelerator project, the official maximum credible beam power is determined by project staff in consultation with the Radiation Physics Department, after examining the arguments and evidence presented by the appropriate accelerator physicist(s) and beam line engineers. The definitive parameter becomes part of the project's safety envelope. This technical note will first review the studies that were done for the Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SSRL, where a photoinjector similar to the one proposed for the LCLS is being tested. In Section 3 the maximum charge out of the gun for a single rf pulse is calculated. In Section 4, PARMELA simulations are used to track the beam from the gun to the end of the photoinjector. Finally in Section 5 the beam through the matching section and injected into Linac-1 is discussed

  11. First test results for an adjustable phase undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, R.; Nuhn, H.D.; Corbett, J.

    1992-01-01

    An Adjustable Phase Undulator (APU) was installed and tested on the beamline 5 of the SPEAR storage ring. The APU has the same magnetic structure as a conventional adjustable gap undulator (AGU), but its magnetic field is varied by changing the longitudinal position between the rows of magnets, while keeping the gap between them fixed. The tests described here show that this undulator performs according to theoretical predictions and numerical models. The main reason to consider a phase adjustable design is the substantial reduction in size, complexity, and cost over comparable conventional designs. (author) 4 refs.; 3 figs

  12. Variable Gap Undulator for 1.5-48 Kev Free Electron Laser at Linac Coherent Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    We study the feasibility of generating femtosecond duration Free-Electron Laser with a variable photon energy from 1.5 to 48 keV, using an electron bunch with the same characteristics of the LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) bunch, and a planar undulator with additional focusing. We assume that the electron bunch energy can be changed, and the undulator has a variable gap, allowing a variable undulator parameter. It is assumed to be operated in an ultra-low charge and ultra-short pulse regime. We study the feasibility of a tunable, short pulse, X-ray FEL with photon energy from 1.5 to 48 keV, using an electron beam like the one in the LCLS and a 2:5 cm period, variable gap, planar undulator. The beam energy changes from 4.6 to 13.8 GeV, the electorn charge is kept at 10 pC, and the undulator parameter varies from 1 to 3. The undulator length needed to saturate the 48 keV FEL is about 55 m, with a peak power around 5 GW. At longer wavelength the saturation length is as short as 15 m, and the peak power around 20 GW. The results from the analytical models and the GENESIS simulations show that the system is feasible. The large wavelength range, full tunability and short, few femtosecond pulses, together with the large peak power, would provide a powerful research tool.

  13. Scheme for generating and transporting THz radiation to the X-ray experimental floor at LCLS baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    This paper describes a novel scheme for integrating a coherent THz source in the baseline of the LCLS facility. Any method relying on the spent electron beam downstream of the baseline undulator should provide a way of transporting the radiation up to the experimental floor.Herewe propose to use the dump area access maze. In this way the THz output must propagate with limited size at least for one hundred meters in a maze, following many turns, to reach the near experimental hall. The use of a standard, discrete, open beam-waveguide formed by periodic reflectors, that is a mirror guide, would lead to unacceptable size of the system. To avoid these problems, in this paper we propose an alternative approach based on periodically spaced metallic screens with holes. This quasi-optical transmission line is referred to as an iris line. We present complete calculations for the iris line using both analytical and numerical methods, which we find in good agreement. We present a design of a THz edge radiation source based on the use of an iris line. The proposed setup takes almost no cost nor time to be implemented at the LCLS baseline, and can be used at other facilities as well. The edge radiation source is limited in maximally achievable field strength at the sample. An extension based on the use of an undulator in the presence of the iris line, which is feasible at the LCLS energies, is proposed as a possible upgrade of the baseline THz source. (orig)

  14. Scheme for generating and transporting THz radiation to the X-ray experimental floor at LCLS baseline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes a novel scheme for integrating a coherent THz source in the baseline of the LCLS facility. Any method relying on the spent electron beam downstream of the baseline undulator should provide a way of transporting the radiation up to the experimental floor.Herewe propose to use the dump area access maze. In this way the THz output must propagate with limited size at least for one hundred meters in a maze, following many turns, to reach the near experimental hall. The use of a standard, discrete, open beam-waveguide formed by periodic reflectors, that is a mirror guide, would lead to unacceptable size of the system. To avoid these problems, in this paper we propose an alternative approach based on periodically spaced metallic screens with holes. This quasi-optical transmission line is referred to as an iris line. We present complete calculations for the iris line using both analytical and numerical methods, which we find in good agreement. We present a design of a THz edge radiation source based on the use of an iris line. The proposed setup takes almost no cost nor time to be implemented at the LCLS baseline, and can be used at other facilities as well. The edge radiation source is limited in maximally achievable field strength at the sample. An extension based on the use of an undulator in the presence of the iris line, which is feasible at the LCLS energies, is proposed as a possible upgrade of the baseline THz source. (orig)

  15. Spontaneous Radiation Background Calculation for LCLS

    CERN Document Server

    Reiche, Sven

    2004-01-01

    The intensity of undulator radiation, not amplified by the FEL interaction, can be larger than the maximum FEL signal in the case of an X-ray FEL. In the commissioning of a SASE FEL it is essential to extract an amplified signal early to diagnose eventual misalignment of undulator modules or errors in the undulator field strength. We developed a numerical code to calculate the radiation pattern at any position behind a multi-segmented undulator with arbitrary spacing and field profiles. The output can be run through numerical spatial and frequency filters to model the radiation beam transport and diagnostic. In this presentation we estimate the expected background signal for the FEL diagnostic and at what point along the undulator the FEL signal can be separated from the background. We also discusses how much information on the undulator field and alignment can be obtained from the incoherent radiation signal itself.

  16. Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  17. Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  18. Canonical particle tracking in undulator fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuestefeld, G.; Bahrdt, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new algebraic mapping routine for particle tracking across wiggler and undulator fields in presented. It is based on a power series expansion of the generating function to guarantee fully canonical transformations. This method is 10 to 100 times faster than integration routines, applied in tracking codes like BETA or RACETRACK. The tracking method presented is not restricted to wigglers and undulators, it can be applied to other magnetic fields as well such as fringing fields of quadrupoles or dipoles if the suggested expansion converges

  19. A short period undulator for MAX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahola, H.; Meinander, T.

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid undulator for generation of high brilliance synchrotron radiation in the photon energy range of 60--600 eV at the 550 MeV electron storage ring MAX in Lund, Sweden has been designed and built at the Technical Research Centre of Finland in close collaboration with MAX-lab of Lund University. At the rather modest electron energy of MAX this photon energy range can be reached only by an undulator featuring a fairly short period and the smallest possible magnetic gap. Even then, higher harmonics (up to the 13th) of the radiation spectrum must be utilized. An optimization of the magnetic design resulted in a hybrid configuration of NdFeB magnets and soft iron poles with a period of 24 mm and a minimum magnetic gap of 7--10 mm. A variable-gap vacuum chamber allows reduction of the vacuum gap from a maximum of 20 mm, needed for injection, down to 6 mm during stored beam operation. A special design of this chamber permits a magnetic gap between pole tips that is only 1 mm larger than the vacuum gap. Adequate field uniformity was ensured by calibration of magnets to equal strength at their true operating point and verification of the homogeneity of their magnetization. Magnetic measurements included Hall probe scans of the undulator field and flip coil evaluations of the field integral

  20. Longitudinal impedance and wake from XFEL undulators. Impact on current-enhanced SASE schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, G.; Saldin, E.; Schneidmiller, E.; Yurkov, M.

    2007-06-15

    In this article we derive longitudinal impedance and wake function for an undulator setup with arbitrary undulator parameter, taking into account a finite transverse size of the electron bunch. Earlier studies considered a line density-distribution of electrons instead. We focus our attention on the long-wavelength asymptote (compared with resonance wavelength), at large distance of the electron bunch from the undulator entrance compared to the overtaking length, and for large vacuumchamber size compared to the typical transverse size of the field. These restrictions define a parameter region of interest for practical applications. We calculate a closed expression for impedance and wake function that may be evaluated numerically in the most general case. Such expression allows us to derive an analytical solution for a Gaussian transverse and longitudinal bunch shape. Finally, we study the feasibility of current-enhanced SASE schemes (ESASE) recently proposed for LCLS, that fall well-within our approximations. Numerical estimations presented in this paper indicate that impedance-induced energy spread is sufficient to seriously degrade the FEL performance. Our conclusion is in contrast with results in literature, where wake calculations for the LCLS case are given in free-space, as if the presence of the undulator were negligible. (orig.)

  1. Delta undulator for Cornell energy recovery linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander B. Temnykh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In anticipation of a new era of synchrotron radiation sources based on energy recovery linac techniques, we designed, built, and tested a short undulator magnet prototype whose features make optimum use of the unique conditions expected in these facilities. The prototype has pure permanent magnet (PPM structure with 24 mm period, 5 mm diameter round gap, and is 30 cm long. In comparison with conventional undulator magnets it has the following: (i full x-ray polarization control.—It may generate varying linear polarized as well as left and right circular polarized x rays with photon flux much higher than existing Apple-II–type devices. (ii 40% stronger magnetic field in linear and approximately 2 times stronger in circular polarization modes. This advantage translates into higher x-ray flux. (iii Compactness.—The prototype can be enclosed in a ∼20  cm diameter cylindrical vacuum vessel. These advantages were achieved through a number of unconventional approaches. Among them is control of the magnetic field strength via longitudinal motion of the magnet arrays. The moving mechanism is also used for x-ray polarization control. The compactness is achieved using a recently developed permanent magnet soldering technique for fastening PM blocks. We call this device a “Delta” undulator after the shape of its PM blocks. The presented article describes the design study, various aspects of the construction, and presents some test results.

  2. Scheme for generation of fully-coherent, TW power level hard X-ray pulses from baseline undulators at the European X-ray FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2010-07-01

    The most promising way to increase the output power of an X-ray FEL (XFEL) is by tapering the magnetic field of the undulator. Also, significant increase in power is achievable by starting the FEL process from a monochromatic seed rather than from noise. This report proposes to make use of a cascade self-seeding scheme with wake monochromators in a tunable-gap baseline undulator at the European XFEL to create a source capable of delivering coherent radiation of unprecedented characteristics at hard X-ray wavelengths. Compared with SASE X-ray FEL parameters, the radiation from the new source has three truly unique aspects: complete longitudinal and transverse coherence, and a peak brightness three orders of magnitude higher than what is presently available at LCLS. Additionally, the new source will generate hard X-ray beam at extraordinary peak (TW) and average (kW) power level. The proposed source can thus revolutionize fields like single biomolecule imaging, inelastic scattering and nuclear resonant scattering. The self-seeding scheme with the wake monochromator is extremely compact, and takes almost no cost and time to be implemented. The upgrade proposed in this paper could take place during the commissioning stage of the European XFEL, opening a vast new range of applications from the very beginning of operations.We present feasibility study and examplifications for the SASE2 line of the European XFEL. (orig.)

  3. The performance of a superconducting micro-undulator prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Jiang, Z.Y.; Ingold, G.; Yu, L.H.; Sampson, W.B.

    1990-05-01

    We report on the performance of a prototype of a super-ferric micro-undulator. The micro-undulator consists of a continuous winding of niobium-titanium wire wound on a low carbon steel yoke. It is about 3 periods long with a period of 8.8 mm and a gap of 4.4 mm. The undulator achieves the a peak magnetic field on axis of over 0.5 Tesla. Asymmetry of the field pattern due to a dipole component was identified, analyzed and a correction has been applied to the undulator ends to produce a symmetric field distribution. Within the precision of the measurement the field pattern produced by the super-ferric undulator needed no correction. 4 refs., 7 figs

  4. Inductive Shimming of Superconductive Undulators - Preparations for a realistic test

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, D; Bernhard,; Burkart, F; Ehlers, S; Gerstl, S; Grau, A; Peiffer, P; Rossmanith, R; Wollmann, D

    2010-01-01

    The monochromaticity and intensity of synchrotron light emitted by undulators strongly depend on the undulator field quality. For the particular case of superconductive undulators it was shown recently that their field quality can be significantly improved by an array of coupled high temperature superconductor loops attached to the surface of the superconductive undulator. Local field errors induce currents in the coupled closed superconducting loops and, as a result, the hereby generated magnetic field minimizes the field errors. In previous papers the concept was described theoretically and a proof-of-principle experiment was reported. This paper reports on a prepatation experiment for the first quantitative measurement of the phase error reduction in a 13-period short model undulator equipped with a full-scale induction shimming system.

  5. Superconducting Undulator with Variably Polarized Light

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Ching Shiang; Ching Fan, Tai; Li, W P; Lin, P H

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates planar in-vacuo superconducting undulators with periodic length of 5 cm (IVSU5) producing linearly and circularly polarized infrared rays or xrays source. The vertically wound racetrack coil is selected for the coil and pole fabrication of the IVSU5. When the up and down magnetic pole arrays with alternative directions rotated wires in the horizontal plane, a helical field radiates circularly polarized light in the electron storage ring, the free electron laser (FEL), and the energy recovery linac (ERL) facilities. Meanwhile, an un-rotated wire is constructed together with the rotated wire on the same undulator is used to switch the linear horizontal and vertical, the right- and left-circular polarization radiation. Given a periodic length of 5 cm and a gap of 23 mm, the maximum magnetic flux density in the helical undulator are Bz = 1.5 T and Bx = 0.5 T when the wires rotated by 20°. This article describes the main factors of the planar and helical undulator design for FEL and...

  6. RF Design of the LCLS Gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limborg-Deprey, C.

    2010-01-01

    Final dimensions for the LCLS RF gun are described. This gun, referred to as the LCLS gun, is a modified version of the UCLA/BNL/SLAC 1.6 cell S-Band RF gun (1), referred to as the prototype gun. The changes include a larger mode separation (15 MHz for the LCLS gun vs. 3.5 MHz for the prototype gun), a larger radius at the iris between the 2 cells, a reduced surface field on the curvature of the iris between the two cells, Z power coupling, increased cooling channels for operation at 120 Hz, dual rf feed, deformation tuning of the full cell, and field probes in both cells. Temporal shaping of the klystron pulse, to reduce the average power dissipated in the gun, has also been adopted. By increasing the mode separation, the amplitude of the 0-mode electric field on the cathode decreases from 10% of the peak on axis field for the prototype gun to less than 3% for the LCLS gun for the steady state fields. Beam performance is improved as shown by the PARMELA simulations. The gun should be designed to accept a future load lock system. Modifications follow the recommendations of our RF review committee (2). Files and reference documents are compiled in Section IV.

  7. Improvement of the crossed undulator design for effective circular polarization control in X-ray FELs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    The production of X-ray radiation with a high degree of circular polarization constitutes an important goal at XFEL facilities. A simple scheme to obtain circular polarization control with crossed undulators has been proposed so far. In its simplest configuration the crossed undulators consist of pair of short planar undulators in crossed position separated by an electromagnetic phase shifter. An advantage of this configuration is a fast helicity switching. A drawback is that a high degree of circular polarization (over 90 %) can only be achieved for lengths of the insertion devices significantly shorter than the gain length, i.e. at output power significantly lower than the saturation power level. The obvious and technically possible extension considered in this paper, is to use a setup with two or more crossed undulators separated by phase shifters. This cascade crossed undulator scheme is distinguished, in performance, by a fast helicity switching, a high degree of circular polarization (over 95%) and a high output power level, comparable with the saturation power level in the baseline undulator at fundamental wavelength. We present feasibility study and exemplifications for the LCLS baseline in the soft X-ray regime. (orig.)

  8. APPLE-II type quasi-periodic variably polarizing undulator at HiSOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shigemi; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Goto, Kiminori

    2012-01-01

    A newly constructed quasi-periodic APPLE-II undulator was installed in the HiSOR ring at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University during the summer shutdown period in 2011. This 1.8 m-long undulator has a period length of 78 mm. In this article, the mechanism of magnetic field generation for various polarization modes of APPLE undulator, the principle of quasi-periodic undulator and the performance of HiSOR QP-APPLE-II undulator are described. (author)

  9. Design of a short-period superconducting undulator at KEK-PF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmi, K.; Ikeda, N.; Ishii, S.

    1998-06-01

    A short-period undulator using a superconducting magnet is proposed. This undulator has been designed to install in the KEK-Photon Factory 2.5-GeV or 6.5-GeV storage ring. The idea of a staggered wiggler, developed in Stanford university, is used in this undulator. The target of the period and K value of the undulator are set to be 1 cm and 1, respectively. We can obtain monochromatic photons with an energy of {approx} 5keV or {approx} 40 keV by using the undulator. (author)

  10. Undulator physics and coherent harmonic generation at the MAX-lab electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werin, Sverker.

    1991-01-01

    This work presents the undulator and harmonic generation project at the electron storage ring MAX-lab at University of Lund. The theory of undulator radiation, laser coherent harmonic generation, optical klystron amplifiers and FELs is treated in one uniform way, with complete solutions of the necessary equations. The permanent magnet undulator is described in some detail, along with the installation of the undulator in the storage ring. Details regarding the emitted radiation, the electron beam path in the undulator and other results are analysed. Finally harmonic generation using a Nd:YAG laser and the creation of coherent photons at the third harmonic (355 nm) is described. (author)

  11. Geoid undulation accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Richard H.

    1993-01-01

    The determination of the geoid and equipotential surface of the Earth's gravity field, has long been of interest to geodesists and oceanographers. The geoid provides a surface to which the actual ocean surface can be compared with the differences implying information on the circulation patterns of the oceans. For use in oceanographic applications the geoid is ideally needed to a high accuracy and to a high resolution. There are applications that require geoid undulation information to an accuracy of +/- 10 cm with a resolution of 50 km. We are far from this goal today but substantial improvement in geoid determination has been made. In 1979 the cumulative geoid undulation error to spherical harmonic degree 20 was +/- 1.4 m for the GEM10 potential coefficient model. Today the corresponding value has been reduced to +/- 25 cm for GEM-T3 or +/- 11 cm for the OSU91A model. Similar improvements are noted by harmonic degree (wave-length) and in resolution. Potential coefficient models now exist to degree 360 based on a combination of data types. This paper discusses the accuracy changes that have taken place in the past 12 years in the determination of geoid undulations.

  12. Spontaneous emission spectra from a staggered-array undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Shigeki; Okada, Kouji; Masuda, Kai; Sobajima, Masaaki; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Ohnishi, Masami; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Toku, Hisayuki

    1997-01-01

    A staggered-array undulator set inside the superconducting solenoid coils is shown to be able to provide high undulator fields larger than the longitudinal magnetic fields, a small undulator period, easy tunability through the solenoid coil current, and compact and easy fabrication. The overall performance characteristics of this undulator were studied mainly with respect to iron and aluminum disk widths, and spontaneous emission spectra through the numerical calculations. The maximum undulator field is found to be obtained for the ratio of the aluminum disk width to the undulator period of 0.45. The line widths (FWHM) of the spontaneous emission spectra, however, do not show N w -1 dependence on the number of the undulator period N w for practical beams with a Gaussian distribution, compared with for a single electron. The energy spread among various parameters is seen to play an important role in reducing the FWHM with increase of N w . The large tunability of the wavelength is proved to cover 6-10 mm by changing the solenoid magnetic field from 0.4 T to 1.6 T. (author)

  13. Fabrication and Test of a Nb$_{3}$Sn Model Magnet With Ceramic Insulation for the Next Generation Undulator of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Elias, N; Dalexandro, N; Giloux, C; Bordini, B; Maccaferri, R

    2010-01-01

    The future run of the Large Hadron Collider with lead ions will require important modifications in the synchrotron radiation profile monitor system, which at present comprises two superconducting undulators wound from Nb-Ti conductor, delivering 5 T in a 60 mm gap, and with a period of 280 mm. Whilst the gap and the nominal field of the future undulators will remain the same, the period shall be 140 mm, which translates to a peak field of over 8 T in the coils and hence requires the use of Nb$_{3}$Sn technology. In this paper the electromagnetic design of the undulator is summarized. We describe the fabrication of a race-track coil wound with a 0.8 mm diameter Nb$_{3}$Sn strand with ceramic insulation. Finally, the results of successful tests made at 4.3 K and 1.9 K in a mirror configuration are presented. 10 T at 4.3 K and 11.5 T at 1.9 K were measured in the yoke gap, thus validating this concept for the future undulator.

  14. Tapered undulators for SASE FELs

    CERN Document Server

    Fawley, W M; Vinokurov, N A

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the use of tapered undulators to enhance the performance of free-electron lasers (FELs) based upon self-amplified spontaneous emission, where the radiation tends to have a relatively broad bandwidth and limited temporal coherence. Using the polychromatic FEL simulation code GINGER, we numerically demonstrate the effectiveness of tapered undulators for parameters corresponding to the Argonne low-energy undulator test line FEL and the proposed linac coherent light source.

  15. Coherent synchrotron radiation experiments for the LCLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsten, B.E.; Russell, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    The authors describe a coherent synchrotron radiation experiment planned at Los Alamos to support the design of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray FEL. Preliminary simulations of the LCLS compressors show that a clever tuning strategy can be used to minimize the electron's beam emittance growth due to noninertial space-charge forces by employing a delicate cancellation of these forces. The purpose of the Los Alamos experiment, using a sub-picosecond chicane compressor, is to benchmark these simulations tools. In this paper, the authors present detailed numerical simulations of the experiment, and point out unique signatures of this effect that are measurable. As predicted previously, the largest emittance growths and induced energy spreads result from the nonradiative components of this space-charge force

  16. Some new ideas about undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbach, K.

    1985-11-01

    There are still no helical undulators that satisfy all major requirements. A new helical undulator is described that has at least some of the properties that were not obtainable until now. It can be used in a synchrotron storage ring, is completely accessible from both sides, light with both helicities can be produced, the helical field can be made quite strong, and the period length can be adjusted over a small range. Similarly, there have been some efforts lately to develop undulators with very short periods. It is shown how a hybrid undulator with a period of the order 1 mm can be constructed

  17. Undulator tunability and synchrotron ring-energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viccaro, P.J.; Sheony, G.K.

    1992-01-01

    An undulator has two properties which make it an extremely attractive source of electromagnetic radiation. The first is that the radiation is concentrated in a number of narrow energy bands known as harmonics of the device. The second characteristic is that under favorable operating conditions, the energy of these harmonics can be shifted or open-quote tunedclose quotes over an energy interval which can be as large as two or three times the value of the lowest energy harmonic. Both the photon energy of an undulator as well as its tunability are determined by the period, λ, of the device, the magnetic gap, G (which is larger than the minimum aperture required for injection and operation of the storage ring) and the storage ring energy E R . Given the photon energy, E p , the above parameters ultimately define the limits of operation or tunability of the undulator. In general, the larger the tunability range, the more useful the device. Therefore, for a given required maximum photon energy, it is desirable to find the operating conditions and device parameters which result in the largest tunability interval possible. With this in mind, we have investigated the question of undulator tunability with emphasis on the role of the ring energy in order to find the smallest E R consistent with the desired tunability interval and photon energy. As a guideline, we have included a preliminary criteria, concerning the tunability requirements for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to be built at Argonne. The analysis is aimed at X-ray undulator sources on the APS but is applicable to any storage ring

  18. Advanced photon source low-energy undulator test line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    The injector system of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) consists of a linac capable of producing 450-MeV positrons or > 650-MeV electrons, a positron accumulator ring (PAR), and a booster synchrotron designed to accelerate particles to 7 GeV. There are long periods of time when these machines are not required for filling the main storage ring and instead can be used for synchrotron radiation research. We describe here an extension of the linac beam transport called the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL). The LEUTL will have a twofold purpose. The first is to fully characterize innovative, future generation undulators, some of which may prove difficult or impossible to measure by traditional techniques. These might include small-gap and superconducting undulators, very long undulators, undulators with designed-in internal focusing, and helical undulators. This technique also holds the promise of extending the magnetic measurement sensitivity beyond that presently attainable. This line will provide the capability to directly test undulators before their possible insertion into operating storage rings. A second use for the test line will be to investigate the generation of coherent radiation at wavelengths down to a few tens of nanometers

  19. Multi-Device Knob Utility for LCLS at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelazny, Michael

    2009-01-01

    At the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) the Controls Department (CD) has developed a new Multi-Device Knob Utility (MKB) based on the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) toolkit for controlling one or more Process Variables (PVs) in unison, or simultaneously, from a physical knob located in the control room, or from various software tools such as the EPICS Extensible Display Manager (EDM) or a Swing slider in Java. A group of devices are hooked up to a knob, and then the value written to the devices is a simple function of the value of the knob. This is used, most commonly, to create a bump in the electron beam for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Control system variables typically controlled are magnetic fields, phases, and timing offsets. This paper describes the technologies used to implement this utility.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Shoreline Undulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kasper Hauberg

    model has been developed which describes the longshore sediment transport along arbitrarily shaped shorelines. The numerical model is based on a spectral wave model, a depth integrated flow model, a wave-phase resolving sediment transport description and a one-line shoreline model. First the theoretical...... of the feature and under predicts the migration speeds of the features. On the second shoreline, the shoreline model predicts undulations lengths which are longer than the observed undulations. Lastly the thesis considers field measurements of undulations of the bottom bathymetry along an otherwise straight...... length of the shoreline undulations is determined in the linear regime using a shoreline stability analysis based on the numerical model. The analysis shows that the length of the undulations in the linear regime depends on the incoming wave conditions and on the coastal profile. For larger waves...

  1. Undulators and free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Luchini, P

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference text for all those working in free-electron laser research as well as being a learning aid for physicists and graduate students who wish an introduction to this field. Only a basic understanding of relativistic mechanics and electromagnetism is presupposed. After an overview of early developments and general principles of operation, the different models that can be used to describe free-electron lasers are presented, organized according to their range of applicability. The relevent conceptual and mathematical constructs are built up from first principles with attention to obtaining the practically important results in a simple but rigorous way. Interaction of the undulator with the driving electron accelerator and the laser cavity and design of undulator magnets are treated and an overview is given of some typical experiments.

  2. Compact Undulator for the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source: Design and Beam Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temnykh, A.; Dale, D.; Fontes, E.; Li, Y.; Lyndaker, A.; Revesz, P.; Rice, D.; Woll, A.

    2013-03-01

    We developed, built and beam tested a novel, compact, in-vacuum undulator magnet based on an adjustable phase (AP) scheme. The undulator is 1 m long with a 5mm gap. It has a pure permanent magnet structure with 24.4mm period and 1.1 Tesla maximum peak field. The device consists of two planar magnet arrays mounted on rails inside of a rectangular box-like frame with 156 mm × 146 mm dimensions. The undulator magnet is enclosed in a 273 mm (10.75") diameter cylindrical vacuum vessel with a driver mechanism placed outside. In May 2012 the CHESS Compact Undulator (CCU) was installed in Cornell Electron Storage Ring and beam tested. During four weeks of dedicated run we evaluated undulator radiation properties as well as magnetic, mechanical and vacuum properties of the undulator magnet. We also studied the effect of the CCU on storage ring beam. The spectral characteristics and intensity of radiation were found to be in very good agreement with expected. The magnet demonstrated reproducibility of undulator parameter K at 1.4 × 10-4 level. It was also found that the undulator K. parameter change does not affect electron beam orbit and betatron tunes.

  3. High-Level Application Framework for LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, P; Chevtsov, S.; Fairley, D.; Larrieu, C.; Rock, J.; Rogind, D.; White, G.; Zalazny, M.; /SLAC

    2008-04-22

    A framework for high level accelerator application software is being developed for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The framework is based on plug-in technology developed by an open source project, Eclipse. Many existing functionalities provided by Eclipse are available to high-level applications written within this framework. The framework also contains static data storage configuration and dynamic data connectivity. Because the framework is Eclipse-based, it is highly compatible with any other Eclipse plug-ins. The entire infrastructure of the software framework will be presented. Planned applications and plug-ins based on the framework are also presented.

  4. Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Kirk

    2008-01-01

    'Project Title: Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Photons' DOE Contract Number: FG02-04ER41355 Principal Investigator: Prof. Kirk McDonald Period of Performance: 09/10/2004 thru 08/31/2006 This award was to fund Princeton's activity on SLAC experiment E166, 'Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Positrons' which was performed at SLAC during June and September 2005. Princeton U. fabricated a magnetic spectrometer for this experiment, and participated in the commissioning, operation, and analysis of the experiment, for which Prof. McDonald was a co-spokesperson. The experiment demonstrated that an intense positron beam with 80% longitudinal polarization could be generated by conversion of MeVenergy circularly polarized photons in a thin target, which photons were generated by passage of high-energy electrons through a helical undulator. This technique has since been adopted as the baseline for the polarized positron source of the proposed International Linear Collider. Results of the experiment have been published in Physical Review Letters, vol 100, p 210801 (2008) (see attached .pdf file), and a longer paper is in preparation.

  5. Micropole undulators: Novel insertion devices for synchrotron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toor, A.; Csonka, P.; Tatchyn, R.

    1989-01-01

    Micropole undulators (wigglers) are undulators (wigglers) with submillimeter periods and are referred to, generically, as micropole insertion devices. Compared to ordinary insertion devices, whose period λ u is typically ≥l cm, micropole devices have periods smaller by a factor f≤10. Therefore, the first-harmonic radiation emitted by a micropole undulator will have its photon energy E γ increased by f and its spectral purity Δλ/λ by f, provided the total length of the undulator l u stays unchanged, and magnetic field errors, as well as the electron-beam emittance, are sufficiently small. Furthermore, to generate photons of the same E γ as from the conventional device, the electron-beam energy E e can be reduced by f 1/2 , resulting in significantly lower construction and operating costs. Radiative energy losses can be correspondingly diminished for the associated storage rings. In this paper we report on results recently obtained by us in the practical implementation and design of micropole undulators at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Based on our work, micropole undulators with f≤10 4 appear feasible at the present time

  6. LCLS-II CRYOMODULE TRANSPORT SYSTEM TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, Naeem [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward F. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); McGee, Michael W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2018-04-01

    The Cryomodules (CM) for the Linear Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) will be shipped to SLAC (Menlo Park, California) from JLab (Newport News, Virginia) and FNAL (Batavia, Illinois). A transportation system has been designed and built to safely transport the CMs over the road. It uses an array of helical isolator springs to attenuate shocks on the CM to below 1.5g in all directions. The system rides on trailers equipped with Air-Ride suspension, which attenuates vibration loads. The prototype LCLS-II CM (pCM) was driven 750 miles to test the transport system; shock loggers recorded the shock attenuation on the pCM and vacuum gauges were used to detect any compromises in beamline vacuum. Alignment measurements were taken before and after the trip to check whether cavity positions had shifted beyond the ± 0.2mm spec. Passband frequencies and cavity gradients were measured at 2K at the Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) at JLab to identify any degradation of CM performance after transportation. The transport system was found to have safely carried the CM and is cleared to begin shipments from JLab and FNAL to SLAC.

  7. An electromagnetic micro-undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassiri, A.; Turner, L.R.

    1997-01-01

    Microfabrication technology using the LIGA (a German acronym for Lithography, Electroforming, and Molding) process offers an attractive alternative for fabricating precision devices with micron-sized features. One such device is a mm-sized micro-undulator with potential applications in a table-top synchrotron light source for medical and other industrial uses. The undulator consists of a silver conductor embedded in poles and substrate of nickel-iron. Electromagnetic modeling of the undulator is done using the eddy current computer code ELEKTRA. Computations predict a field pattern of appropriate strength and quality if the current can be prevented from being shunted from silver by the nickel-iron poles either through insulation or through slotted poles. The design of the undulator along with the computational results are discussed

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF SHORT UNDULATORS FOR ELECTRON-BEAM-RADIATION INTERACTION STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piot, P. [NICADD, DeKalb; Andorf, M. B. [NICADD, DeKalb; Fagerberg, G. [Northern Illinois U.; Figora, M. [Northern Illinois U.; Sturtz, A. [Northern Illinois U.

    2016-10-19

    Interaction of an electron beam with external field or its own radiation has widespread applications ranging from coherent-radiation generation, phase space cooling or formation of temporally-structured beams. An efficient coupling mechanism between an electron beam and radiation field relies on the use of a magnetic undulator. In this contribution we detail our plans to build short (11-period) undulators with 7-cm period refurbishing parts of the aladdin U3 undulator [1]. Possible use of these undulators at available test facilities to support experiments relevant to cooling techniques and radiation sources are outlined.

  9. Up-grading a 4.7-cm-period plane electromagnetic undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Bogachenkov, V A; Papadichev, V A

    1999-01-01

    Electromagnetic undulators have a number of advantages over permanent-magnet undulators. They are less expensive to fabricate and their field is easily regulated by changing the current, without requiring a complex and expensive precision system for changing the undulator gap. Their main weaknesses are that they require a large power supply and that the field is limited due to yoke saturation mainly because of large axial stray fluxes, particularly in simple constructions. Modernization of a 4.7-cm-period, 20-period long plane electromagnetic undulator of simple design is described. Samarium-cobalt permanent magnets were used to increase the field and decrease power consumption. They were placed between adjacent rings (with opposite sign of field) and while increasing the working field they decreased saturation of the iron yokes. Small lateral displacements of permanent magnets were used to equalize field amplitudes in half periods of the undulator with 0.1% accuracy. Matched input and output to and from the ...

  10. Photon energy tunability of advanced photon source undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viccaro, P.J.; Shenoy, G.K.

    1987-08-01

    At a fixed storage ring energy, the energy of the harmonics of an undulator can be shifted or ''tuned'' by changing the magnet gap of the device. The possible photon energy interval spanned in this way depends on the undulator period, minimum closed gap, minimum acceptable photon intensity and storage ring energy. The minimum magnet gap depends directly on the stay clear particle beam aperture required for storage ring operation. The tunability of undulators planned for the Advanced Photon Source with first harmonic photon energies in the range of 5 to 20 keV are discussed. The results of an analysis used to optimize the APS ring energy is presented and tunability contours and intensity parameters are presented for two typical classes of devices

  11. Development of a superconducting elliptically polarized undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S D; Liang, K S; Jan, J C; Hwang, C S

    2010-01-01

    A superconducting, elliptically polarized undulator (SEPU24) with a period of length 24 mm was developed to provide first-harmonic photons from a 0.8 GeV storage ring for extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography experiment. In SEPU24, two layers of a magnet array structure - with and without rotated magnet arrays - are combined to generate a helical field that provides radiation with wavelength 13.5 nm in the in-band energy. The arrays of iron and aluminium poles were wound with a racetrack coil vertically as for the magnet pole array. The elliptical field is created when the up and down magnet-pole arrays pass excitation currents in alternate directions. SEPU24 is designed with a magnet of gap 6.8 mm, yielding magnetic flux density B x =B z =0.61 T of the helical field. A prototype magnet was fabricated with a diode for quench protection, and assembled in a test dewar to test the magnet performance. A cryogenic Hall-probe system with a precise linear stage was used to measure the distribution of the magnetic field. We describe the design concept and algorithm, the engineering design, the calculation of the magnetic field, the construction and testing of the 10-pole prototype magnet and related issues.

  12. Design issues for cryogenic cooling of short period superconducting undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Dietderich, D.R.; Marks, S.; Prestemon, S.O.; Schlueter, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting insertion devices, which produce periodic magnetic fields, have been built and installed in a number of synchrotron-light source storage-rings. For the most part, these devices have been wigglers, which have relatively long period lengths. This report concerns itself with the special cryogenic issues associated with short period undulators. The motivation for considering the incorporation of superconducting technology in insertion device designs is to achieve higher magnetic fields than can be achieved with more conventional permanent magnet technology. Since the peak field decreases sharply with increased magnet gap to period ratio, the cryogenic design of the magnet system is crucial. In particular, the insulation required for a warm vacuum bore device is impractical for short period undulators. This report describes the issues that are related to a cold bore (∼4 K) and an intermediate temperature bore (30 to 70 K) designs. The criteria for the use of small cryocoolers for cooling a short period undulator are presented. The problems associated with connecting small coolers to an undulator at 4.2 K are discussed

  13. Interferometry using undulator sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beguiristain, R.; Goldberg, K.A.; Tejnil, E.; Bokor, J.; Medecki, H.; Attwood, D.T.; Jackson, K.

    1996-01-01

    Optical systems for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography need to use optical components with subnanometer surface figure error tolerances to achieve diffraction-limited performance [M.D. Himel, in Soft X-Ray Projection Lithography, A.M. Hawryluk and R.H. Stulen, eds. (OSA, Washington, D.C., 1993), 18, 1089, and D. Attwood et al., Appl. Opt. 32, 7022 (1993)]. Also, multilayer-coated optics require at-wavelength wavefront measurement to characterize phase effects that cannot be measured by conventional optical interferometry. Furthermore, EUV optical systems will additionally require final testing and alignment at the operational wavelength for adjustment and reduction of the cumulative optical surface errors. Therefore, at-wavelength interferometric measurement of EUV optics will be the necessary metrology tool for the successful development of optics for EUV lithography. An EUV point diffraction interferometer (PDI) has been developed at the Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO) and has been already in operation for a year [K. Goldberg et al., in Extreme Ultra Lithography, D.T. Attwood and F. Zernike, eds. (OSA, Washington, D.C., 1994), K. Goldberg et al., Proc. SPIE 2437, to be published, and K. Goldberg et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 13, 2923 (1995)] using an undulator radiation source and coherent optics beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. An overview of the PDI interferometer and some EUV wavefront measurements obtained with this instrument will be presented. In addition, future developments planned for EUV interferometry at CXRO towards the measurement of actual EUV lithography optics will be shown. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. Radiation containment at a 1 MW high energy electron accelerator: Status of LCLS-II radiation physics design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitner M. Santana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available LCLS-II will add a 4 GeV, 1 MHz, SCRF electron accelerator in the first 700 meters of the SLAC 2-mile Linac, as well as adjustable gap polarized undulators in the down-beam electron lines, to produce tunable, fully coherent X-rays in programmable bunch patterns. This facility will work in unison with the existing Linac Coherent Light Source, which uses the legacy copper cavities in the last third of the linac to deliver electrons between 2 and 17 GeV to an undulator line. The upgrade plan includes new beam lines, five stages of state of the art collimation that shall clean the high-power beam well up-beam of the radio-sensitive undulators, and new electron and photon beam dumps. This paper describes the challenges encountered to define efficient measures to protect machine, personnel, public and the environment from the potentially destructive power of the beam, while maximizing the reuse of existing components and infrastructure, and allowing for complex operational modes.

  15. A proposed injector for the LCLS linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeremian, A.D.; Bharadwaj, V.K.; Emma, P.; Miller, R.H.; Palmer, D.T.; Woodley, M.D.

    1996-11-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will use the last portion of the SLAC accelerator as a driver for a short wavelength FEL. The injector must produce 1-nC, 3-ps rms electron bunches at a repetition rate of up to 120 Hz with a normalized rms emittance of about 1 mm-mrad. The injector design takes advantage of the photocathode rf gun technology developed since its conception in the mid 1980's, in particular the S-band rf gun developed by the SLAC/BNL/UCLA collaboration, and emittance compensation techniques developed in the last decade. The injector beamline has been designed using the SUPERFISH, POISSON, PARMELA, and TRANSPORT codes in a consistent way to simulate the beam from the gun up to the entrance of the main accelerator linac where the beam energy is 150 MeV. PARMELA simulations indicate that at 150 MeV, space charge effects are negligible

  16. Mechanical design and fabrication of a prototype undulator for Indus-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veerabhadhraiah, T.; Sinha, Gautam; Prabhu, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    An Apple II type undulator is proposed for 2.5 GeV SRS. For initial studies of magnetic parameters and manufacturing feasibilities, a 6 periods prototype undulator of period length 72 mm and pole gap 20 mm is under development. Mechanical structure with stringent tolerances is required to achieve the required field quality. Stress analysis has been done to study the deflection under the magnetic forces. The prototype structure along with the magnet block holders has been made and mechanical dimensions and geometric tolerances have been measured. In this paper we present the preliminary mechanical design and assembly of static parts of prototype undulator structure. (author)

  17. Performance Characterization of LCLS-II Superconducting Radiofrequency Cryomodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, RuthAnn [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2017-11-10

    This paper will describe the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source)-II, Fermilab’s role in the development of LCLS-II, and my contributions as a Lee Teng intern. LCLS-II is a second generation x-ray free electron laser being constructed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Fermilab is responsible for the design, construction, and testing of several 1.3 GHz cryomodules to be used in LCLS-II. These cryomodules are currently being tested at Fermilab. Some software was written to analyze the data from the cryomodule tests. This software assesses the performance of the cryomodules by looking at data on the cavity voltage, cavity gradient, dark current, and radiation.

  18. Undulator radiation in a waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, G.; Saldin, E.; Schneidmiller, E.; Yurkov, M.

    2007-03-15

    We propose an analytical approach to characterize undulator radiation near resonance, when the presence of the vacuum-pipe considerably affects radiation properties. This is the case of the far-infrared undulator beamline at the Free-electron LASer (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH), that will be capable of delivering pulses in the TeraHertz (THz) range. This undulator will allow pump-probe experiments where THz pulses are naturally synchronized to the VUV pulse from the FEL, as well as the development of novel electron-beam diagnostics techniques. Since the THz radiation diffraction-size exceeds the vacuum-chamber dimensions, characterization of infrared radiation must be performed accounting for the presence of a waveguide.We developed a theory of undulator radiation in a waveguide based on paraxial and resonance approximation. We solved the field equation with a tensor Green's function technique, and extracted figure of merits describing in a simple way the influence of the vacuum-pipe on the radiation pulse as a function of the problem parameters. Our theory, that makes consistent use of dimensionless analysis, allows treatment and physical understanding of many asymptotes of the parameter space, together with their region of applicability. (orig.)

  19. Undulator radiation in a waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, G.; Saldin, E.; Schneidmiller, E.; Yurkov, M.

    2007-03-01

    We propose an analytical approach to characterize undulator radiation near resonance, when the presence of the vacuum-pipe considerably affects radiation properties. This is the case of the far-infrared undulator beamline at the Free-electron LASer (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH), that will be capable of delivering pulses in the TeraHertz (THz) range. This undulator will allow pump-probe experiments where THz pulses are naturally synchronized to the VUV pulse from the FEL, as well as the development of novel electron-beam diagnostics techniques. Since the THz radiation diffraction-size exceeds the vacuum-chamber dimensions, characterization of infrared radiation must be performed accounting for the presence of a waveguide.We developed a theory of undulator radiation in a waveguide based on paraxial and resonance approximation. We solved the field equation with a tensor Green's function technique, and extracted figure of merits describing in a simple way the influence of the vacuum-pipe on the radiation pulse as a function of the problem parameters. Our theory, that makes consistent use of dimensionless analysis, allows treatment and physical understanding of many asymptotes of the parameter space, together with their region of applicability. (orig.)

  20. Obtaining high degree of circular polarization at X-ray FELs via a reverse undulator taper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2013-08-15

    Baseline design of a typical X-ray FEL undulator assumes a planar configuration which results in a linear polarization of the FEL radiation. However, many experiments at X-ray FEL user facilities would profit from using a circularly polarized radiation. As a cheap upgrade one can consider an installation of a short helical (or cross-planar) afterburner, but then one should have an efficient method to suppress powerful linearly polarized background from the main undulator. In this paper we propose a new method for such a suppression: an application of the reverse taper in the main undulator. We discover that in a certain range of the taper strength, the density modulation (bunching) at saturation is practically the same as in the case of non-tapered undulator while the power of linearly polarized radiation is suppressed by orders of magnitude. Then strongly modulated electron beam radiates at full power in the afterburner. Considering SASE3 undulator of the European XFEL as a practical example, we demonstrate that soft X-ray radiation pulses with peak power in excess of 100 GW and an ultimately high degree of circular polarization can be produced. The proposed method is rather universal, i.e. it can be used at SASE FELs and seeded (self-seeded) FELs, with any wavelength of interest, in a wide range of electron beam parameters, and with any repetition rate. It can be used at different X-ray FEL facilities, in particular at LCLS after installation of the helical afterburner in the near future.

  1. Tapering of the CHESS-APS undulator: Results and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, B.; Viccaro, P.J.; Dejus, R.; Gluskin, E.; Yun, W.B.; McNulty, I.; Henderson, C.; White, J.; Shen, Q.; Finkelstein, K.

    1992-01-01

    When the magnetic gap of an undulator is tapered along the beam direction, the slowly varying peak field B o introduces a spread in the value of the deflection parameter K. The result is a broad energy-band undulator that still maintains high degree of spatial collimation. These properties are very useful for EXAFS and energy dispersive techniques. We have characterized the CHESS-APS undulator (1 υ = 3.3cm) at one tapered configuration (10% change of the magnetic gap from one end of the undulator to the other). Spatial distribution and energy spectra of the first three harmonics through a pinhole were measured. The on-axis first harmonic width increased from 0.27 keV to 0.61 keV (FWHM) at the central energy of E 1 = 6.6 keV (K average = 0.69). Broadening in the angular distribution due to tapering was minimal. These results will be compared with computer modelling which simulates the actual electron trajectory in the tapered case

  2. Advanced Instrumentation for Ultrafast Science at the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrah, Nora [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-10-13

    This grant supported a Single Investigator and Small Group Research (SISGR) application to enable multi-user research in Ultrafast Science using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first hard x-ray free electron laser (FEL) which lased for the first time at 1.5 Å on April 20, 2009. The goal of our proposal was to enable a New Era of Science by requesting funds to purchase and build Advanced Instrumentation for Ultrafast Science (AIUS), to utilize the intense, short x-ray pulses produced by the LCLS. The proposed instrumentation will allow peer review selected users to probe the ultrasmall and capture the ultrafast. These tools will expand on the investment already made in the construction of the light source and its instrumentation in both the LCLS and LUSI projects. The AIUS will provide researchers in the AMO, Chemical, Biological and Condensed Matter communities with greater flexibility in defining their scientific agenda at the LCLS. The proposed instrumentation will complement and significantly augment the present AMO instrument (funded through the LCLS project) through detectors and capabilities not included in the initial suite of instrumentation at the facility. We have built all of the instrumentations and they have been utilized by scientists. Please see report attached.

  3. THE ANALYSIS OF ANALYTICAL FUNCTIONS FOR APPROXIMATIVE DO-ALL MAGNETIC CHARACTERISTIC OF DIRECT – CURRENT AND UNDULATED – CURRENT TRACTION MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Hetman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of functions for approximating the universal magnetic curve and its derivatives, their accuracy and conformity to the requirements put forward by the authors have been studied.

  4. The U5.0 Undulator for the ALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1991-05-01

    The U5.0 Undulator, an 89 period, 5 cm period length, 4.6 m long insertion device has been designed and is in fabrication. This undulator will be the first high brightness source, in the 50 to 1500 eV range, for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and is scheduled for completion in 1992. A modular hybrid configuration utilizing Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet material and vanadium permendur is used that achieves 0.837 Tesla effective peak field. Correction of the vertical field integral is with permanent magnet rotors at the ends. Gap adjustment is with an arrangement of roller screws, chains drives, a gear reduction unit and a stepper motor driven by a closed loop control system. The vacuum chamber design is a two-piece, machined and welded 5083-H321 aluminum construction of 5.1 m length. Magnetic design, subsystem design and fabrication progress are presented. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Up-grading a 4.7-cm-period plane electromagnetic undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogachenkov, V.A.; Kondratyev, K.V.; Papadichev, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    Electromagnetic undulators have a number of advantages over permanent-magnet undulators. They are less expensive to fabricate and their field is easily regulated by changing the current, without requiring a complex and expensive precision system for changing the undulator gap. Their main weaknesses are that they require a large power supply and that the field is limited due to yoke saturation mainly because of large axial stray fluxes, particularly in simple constructions. Modernization of a 4.7-cm-period, 20-period long plane electromagnetic undulator of simple design is described. Samarium-cobalt permanent magnets were used to increase the field and decrease power consumption. They were placed between adjacent rings (with opposite sign of field) and while increasing the working field they decreased saturation of the iron yokes. Small lateral displacements of permanent magnets were used to equalize field amplitudes in half periods of the undulator with 0.1% accuracy. Matched input and output to and from the undulator, respectively, were formed by means of auxiliary permanent magnets and special magnetic screens

  6. ePix100 camera: Use and applications at LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carini, G. A., E-mail: carini@slac.stanford.edu; Alonso-Mori, R.; Blaj, G.; Caragiulo, P.; Chollet, M.; Damiani, D.; Dragone, A.; Feng, Y.; Haller, G.; Hart, P.; Hasi, J.; Herbst, R.; Herrmann, S.; Kenney, C.; Lemke, H.; Manger, L.; Markovic, B.; Mehta, A.; Nelson, S.; Nishimura, K. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (United States); and others

    2016-07-27

    The ePix100 x-ray camera is a new system designed and built at SLAC for experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The camera is the first member of a family of detectors built around a single hardware and software platform, supporting a variety of front-end chips. With a readout speed of 120 Hz, matching the LCLS repetition rate, a noise lower than 80 e-rms and pixels of 50 µm × 50 µm, this camera offers a viable alternative to fast readout, direct conversion, scientific CCDs in imaging mode. The detector, designed for applications such as X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS) and wavelength dispersive X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) in the energy range from 2 to 10 keV and above, comprises up to 0.5 Mpixels in a very compact form factor. In this paper, we report the performance of the camera during its first use at LCLS.

  7. Observational constraints on undulant cosmologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; /Valencia U.; Mena Requejo, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    In an undulant universe, cosmic expansion is characterized by alternating periods of acceleration and deceleration. We examine cosmologies in which the dark-energy equation of state varies periodically with the number of e-foldings of the scale factor of the universe, and use observations to constrain the frequency of oscillation. We find a tension between a forceful response to the cosmic coincidence problem and the standard treatment of structure formation.

  8. Coherent radiation in an undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Yong Ho.

    1990-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the synchrotron radiation from an undulating electron beam in a rectangular waveguide. The analysis is based on the dyadic Green's function approach to solve Maxwell's equations in terms of the vector potential. It is shown analytically and numerically that the radiated energy spectrum may differ significantly from the free space results when the undulator length divided by the Lorentz factor of the electron beam is larger than the transverse size of the waveguide. Then, the appearance of the spectrum is changed into a small number of sharp peaks, each corresponding to an excited waveguide mode. The undulator radiation is identified with the wake field in beam instabilities. The concepts of wake function and impedance are introduced to formulate the present problem in the same manner as the beam instability problem, so that the accumulated techniques of the latter can be applied. It is shown that the obtained impedances satisfy the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem and other properties inevitable for wake fields. 4 refs., 2 figs

  9. Correction of dynamic multipoles for APPLE-II undulator with flat wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Hosaka, M.; Takashima, Y.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Zen, H.; Katoh, M.

    2010-01-01

    APPLE-II undulator can produce quasi-monochromatic light of different polarization though it is a relatively simple magnetic circuit. Therefore, it has been installed in many synchrotron radiation facilities and will be installed in Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility under construction in Aichi prefecture. APPLE-II undulator also has been installed in UVSOR facility. When the undulator is operated in vertical polarization mode with narrower gap of 40 mm, the lifetime of electron beam through the storage ring significantly decreases.The reason is considered as dynamic multipole kicks in the undulator, which strongly depends on the undulator gap. Multi-wires, which are installed in the upper surface and the under surface of undulator beam duct, are candidate to compensate the multipole effects, because the multi-wires can generate arbitrary magnetic fields. This paper reports the result of numerical investigation on multipoles in the undulator by a three-dimensional magnetostatics computer code RADIA, the orbital calculation based on the numerical analysis and the preliminary experiment with flat wires. (author)

  10. Surface Characterization of the LCLS RF Gun Cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachmann, Axel; Decker, Franz-Josef; Ding, Yuantao; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Frisch, Josef; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Gregory; Hering, Philippe; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Loos, Henrik; Miahnahri, Alan; Nordlund, Dennis; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Pianetta, Piero; Turner, James; Welch, James; White, William; Wu, Juhao; Xiang, Dao

    2012-01-01

    The first copper cathode installed in the LCLS RF gun was used during LCLS commissioning for more than a year. However, after high charge operation (> 500 pC), the cathode showed a decline of quantum efficiency within the area of drive laser illumination. They report results of SEM, XPS and XAS studies that were carried out on this cathode after it was removed from the gun. X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal surface contamination by various hydrocarbon compounds. In addition they report on the performance of the second installed cathode with emphasis on the spatial distribution of electron emission.

  11. Femtosecond Synchronization of Laser Systems for the LCLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, John; Doolittle, Lawrence; Huang, Gang; Staples, John; Wilcox, Russell; Arthur, John; Frisch, Josef; White, William

    2012-01-01

    The scientific potential of femtosecond x-ray pulses at linac-driven free-electron lasers such as the Linac Coherent Light Source is tremendous. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments require a measure of the relative arrival time of each x-ray pulse with respect to the experimental pump laser. An optical timing system based on stabilized fiber links has been developed for the LCLS to provide this synchronization. Preliminary results show synchronization of the installed stabilized links at the sub-20-femtosecond level. We present details of the implementation at LCLS and potential for future development.

  12. Status of the LCLS-II Accelerating Cavity Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Ed [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Marhauser, Frank [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Fitzpatrick, Jarrod A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Palczewski, Ari D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Preble, Joe [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wilson, Katherine M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Grimm, C. J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Burrill, Andrew B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gonnella, Daniel [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Cavity serial production for the LCLS-II 4 GeV CM SRF linac has started. A quantity of 266 accelerating cavities has been ordered from two industrial vendors. Jefferson Laboratory leads the cavity procurement activities for the project and has successfully transferred the Nitrogen-Doping process to the industrial partners in the initial phase, which is now being applied for the production cavities. We report on the results from vendor qualification and the status of the cavity production for LCLS-II.

  13. Design and test of a trial undulator for a compact FEL THz radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Shuhua; Xiong Yongqian; Yang Lei; Liu Xialing; Wei Wei; Chen Jinhua

    2012-01-01

    The undulator is the key component in the THz radiation source based on FEL. We created a trial undulator in order to verify the feasibility of property requirements, and the accumulation of engineering experience. With the use of the finite element calculation software OPERA3D, we modify the structural parameters of the undulator gradually to meet the requirements of the peak, width of the good field and first integration. We also proved that the correction magnet could make the field meet the requirement of the second integration by calculation. After fabrication and acceptance, the electron trajectory is calculated based on the measured field. (authors)

  14. Computation of the brightness of the variably-polarizing undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Torre, A.; Schettini, G.; Carpanese, M.

    1999-02-01

    Undulators, producing variably polarized radiation, generate magnetic fields which induce different types of electron motion (vertically, horizontally sinusoidal and helical). The properties of the emitted radiation reflect the complexity of the motion and cannot be described with the method based on the conventional Bessel functions expansion. It's shown that the problem can be overcome by exploiting a method which employs generalized forms of Bessel functions. The proposed technique provides an effective tool to analyze the properties of the emitted radiation [it

  15. LCLS-II high power RF system overview and progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeremian, Anahid Dian

    2015-10-07

    A second X-ray free electron laser facility, LCLS-II, will be constructed at SLAC. LCLS-II is based on a 1.3 GHz, 4 GeV, continuous-wave (CW) superconducting linear accelerator, to be installed in the first kilometer of the SLAC tunnel. Multiple types of high power RF (HPRF) sources will be used to power different systems on LCLS-II. The main 1.3 GHz linac will be powered by 280 1.3 GHz, 3.8 kW solid state amplifier (SSA) sources. The normal conducting buncher in the injector will use four more SSAs identical to the linac SSAs but run at 2 kW. Two 185.7 MHz, 60 kW sources will power the photocathode dual-feed RF gun. A third harmonic linac section, included for linearizing the bunch energy spread before the first bunch compressor, will require sixteen 3.9 GHz sources at about 1 kW CW. A description and an update on all the HPRF sources of LCLS-II and their implementation is the subject of this paper.

  16. An undulator with non-adiabatic tapering for the IFEL project

    CERN Document Server

    Varfolomeev, A A; Yarovoi, T V; Musumeci, P; Pellegrini, C; Rosenzweig, J

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design of a planar undulator with unusually strong tapering, for the inverse FEL experiment to be carried out in Neptune Lab. (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 410 (1998) 437) at UCLA. A powerful TW CO sub 2 laser will be used to accelerate electrons up to 50-60 MeV in 50 cm long undulator. A strong undulator tapering is needed because of the short Rayleigh length of the laser beam. Both the magnetic field and the undulator period are tapered to provide synchronicity of the laser beam interaction with a captured electron bunch along the whole undulator length. The most critical part of the undulator is the region near the laser focus. The main characteristics of the IFEL, such as the percentage of trapped electrons, energy of accelerated electrons and sensitivity to the laser focus transverse position, are given. The general principles of the design of this undulator construction can also be useful for high efficiency FEL amplifiers of intense laser modes.

  17. The U5.0 Undulator for the ALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1991-01-01

    the U5.0 Undulator, and 89 period, 5 cm period length, 4.6 m long insertion device has been designed, is being fabricated and is scheduled for completion in early 1992. This undulator will be the first high brightness source, in the 50 to 1500 eV range, for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A hybrid magnetic configuration using Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet material and vanadium permendur poles has been selected to achieve the field quality needed to meet performance requirements. The magnetic structure is modular with each half consisting of 5 assembly sections, which provide the periodic structure, and end structures, for entrance and exit correction, mounted on a steel backing beam. Each assembly section consists of 35 half-period pole assemblies bolted to a mount. The required 0.837 Tesla effective peak field at a 1.4 cm gap has been verified with model measurements. Vertical field integral correction is accomplished with the end structures, each having an arrangement of permanent magnet rotors which will be adjusted to minimize electron beam missteering over the undulator operating field range. To reduce the effect of environmental fields, the steel backing beams are connected through parallel, low-reluctance, Ni-Fe hinges. The magnetic structure is connected through four roller-nuts to the drive system that provides gap adjustment with an arrangement of roller screws, chain drives, a gear reduction unit and a stepper motor driven by a closed loop control system. Magnetic structure and drive system support are from a 2.4 m high structure which includes a support base with four vertical supports. The vacuum chamber design is a two-piece machined and welded 5083-H321 aluminum construction of 5.1 m length. Pumping is with a combination of ion, TSP and NEG pumps. Magnetic design, subsystem design and fabrication progress are presented

  18. Modulated electron bunch with amplitude front tilt in an undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2015-12-01

    In a previous paper we discussed the physics of a microbunched electron beam kicked by the dipole field of a corrector magnet by describing the kinematics of coherent undulator radiation after the kick. We demonstrated that the effect of aberration of light supplies the basis for understanding phenomena like the deflection of coherent undulator radiation by a dipole magnet. We illustrated this fact by examining the operation of an XFEL under the steady state assumption, that is a harmonic time dependence. We argued that in this particular case the microbunch front tilt has no objective meaning; in other words, there is no experiment that can discriminate whether an electron beam is endowed with a microbunch front tilt of not. In this paper we extend our considerations to time-dependent phenomena related with a finite electron bunch duration, or SASE mode of operation. We focus our attention on the spatiotemporal distortions of an X-ray pulse. Spatiotemporal coupling arises naturally in coherent undulator radiation behind the kick, because the deflection process involves the introduction of a tilt of the bunch profile. This tilt of the bunch profile leads to radiation pulse front tilt, which is equivalent to angular dispersion of the output radiation. We remark that our exact results can potentially be useful to developers of new generation XFEL codes for cross-checking their results.

  19. Vacuum systems for the ILC helical undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshev, O B; Clarke, J A; Bailey, I R; Dainton, J B; Malysheva, L I; Barber, D P; Cooke, P; Baynham, E; Bradshaw, T; Brummitt, A; Carr, S; Ivanyushenkov, Y; Rochford, J; Moortgat-Pick, G A

    2007-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) positron source uses a helical undulator to generate polarized photons of ∼10MeV∼10MeV at the first harmonic. Unlike many undulators used in synchrotron radiation sources, the ILC helical undulator vacuum chamber will be bombarded by photons, generated by the undulator, with energies mostly below that of the first harmonic. Achieving the vacuum specification of ∼100nTorr∼100nTorr in a narrow chamber of 4–6mm4–6mm inner diameter, with a long length of 100–200m100–200m, makes the design of the vacuum system challenging. This article describes the vacuum specifications and calculations of the flux and energy of photons irradiating the undulator vacuum chamber and considers possible vacuum system design solutions for two cases: cryogenic and room temperature.

  20. A concept of a new undulator that will generate irrational higher harmonics in synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Shinya; Sasaki, Shigemi

    1994-03-01

    A preliminary consideration has been made on an undulator with magnetic poles quasi-periodically aligned along the path of electron beams to discriminate the rational higher harmonics of radiation that are harmful in some synchrotron radiation experiments. The harmonics with irrational ratios in energy generated by the undulator is never simultaneously reflected by a crystal monochromator in the same orientation. A combination of the new undulator and high-resolution crystal monochromator is expected to be very useful on beamlines of high energy radiation in which X-ray mirrors are useless because of too small critical angles of total reflection. Further, a possibility of manufacturing the new undulator has been discussed. (author)

  1. First undulators for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, E.; Akre, J.; Chin, J.

    1993-05-01

    The first three undulators, each 4.6 m in length, for the Advanced Light source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are near completion and are undergoing qualification tests before installation into the storage ring. Two devices have 5.0-cm period lengths, 89 periods, and achieve an effective field of 0.85 T at the 14 mm minimum magnetic gap. The other device has a period length of 8.0 cm, 55 periods, and an effective field of 1.2 T at the minimum 14 mm gap. Measurements on the first 5 cm period device show the uncorrelated field errors to be 0.23%, which is less than the required 0.25%. Measurements of gap control show reproducibility of ±5 microns or better. The first vacuum chamber, 5.0 m long, is flat to within 0.53 mm over the 4.6 m magnetic structure section and a 4 x 10 -11 Torr pressure was achieved during vacuum tests. Device description, fabrication, and measurements are presented

  2. Experience on the operation of the 2-in-1 electromagnetic undulator of FELICITA I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geisler, A.; Noelle, D.; Ridder, M.

    1995-01-01

    The 5m-Undulator of FELICITA I has been installed at the final position in the storage ring DELTA in spring 95. Detailed magnetic measurements have been performed in place to get a complete characterization of this device in both possible modes, pure undulator and optical klystron mode, respectively. The undulator consists of 38 identic poles. Four power supplies are connected to the main coils. Three of them drive the central six poles to get the dispersive section with its matching to the outer undulator sections. This setup allows a change between the optical klystron and the pure undulator mode without changing the hardware. For measuring the magnetic field components a hall-probe was used. It was found that correction coils for compensating peak field variations were not necessary, because of errors less then 0.2 %. Only for the purpose of steering correction coils had to be used. The field integrals were also measured with the pulsed-wire technique. For fast response concerning the matching, in particular of the dispersive section this technique was found to be very useful. Because of the large period length of 25 cm the wire sag in the rather long undulator could be neglected

  3. Performance of a superconducting, high field subcentimeter undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Sampson, W.; Woodle, M.

    1991-01-01

    A Superconducting 8.80mm wavelength undulator is under construction for the 500nm Free-Electron Laser at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We present results on the design, construction and performance of this novel undulator structure. A field on axis of 0.51T has been measured for a 4.40mm gap, with a current 20% below the quench current. Our simple design focuses on minimizing the accumulation of errors by minimizing the numbers of parts and by using a ferromagnetic yoke. The magnetic field error is less than 0.30% rms as manufactured (without shimming). The third harmonic content is less than 0.1% of the fundamental

  4. A second-generation superconducting undulator cryostat for the APS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, J.; Hasse, Q.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2017-12-01

    A second-generation cryocooler-based cryostat has been designed and built to support a new helically wound superconducting undulator (SCU) magnet for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The design represents an evolution of existing SCU cryostats currently in operation in the APS storage ring. Value engineering and lessons learned have resulted in a smaller, cheaper, and simpler cryostat design compatible with existing planar magnets as well as the new helically wound device. We describe heat load and quench response results, design and operational details, and the “build-to-spec” procurement strategy.

  5. Operational Experience from LCLS-II Cryomodule Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Renzhuo [Fermilab; Hansen, Benjamin [Fermilab; White, Michael [Fermilab; Hurd, Joseph [Fermilab; Atassi, Omar Al [Fermilab; Bossert, Richard [Fermilab; Pei, Liujin [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab; Makara, Jerry [Fermilab; Theilacker, Jay [Fermilab; Kaluzny, Joshua [Fermilab; Wu, Genfa [Fermilab; Harms, Elvin [Fermilab

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes the initial operational experience gained from testing Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) cryomodules at Fermilab’s Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF). Strategies for a controlled slow cooldown to 100 K and a fast cooldown past the niobium superconducting transition temperature of 9.2 K will be described. The test stand for the cryomodules at CMTF is sloped to match gradient in the LCLS-II tunnel at Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) laboratory, which adds an additional challenge to stable liquid level control. Control valve regulation, Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) power compensation, and other methods of stabilizing liquid level and pressure in the cryomodule 2.0 K SRF cavity circuit will be discussed. Several different pumping configurations using cold compressors and warm vacuum pumps have been used on the cryomodule 2.0 K return line and the associated results will be described.

  6. Operational experience from LCLS-II cryomodule testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Hansen, B.; White, M.; Hurd, J.; Atassi, O. Al; Bossert, R.; Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Makara, J.; Theilacker, J.; Kaluzny, J.; Wu, G.; Harms, E.

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the initial operational experience gained from testing Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) cryomodules at Fermilab’s Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF). Strategies for a controlled slow cooldown to 100 K and a fast cooldown past the niobium superconducting transition temperature of 9.2 K will be described. The test stand for the cryomodules at CMTF is sloped to match gradient in the LCLS-II tunnel at Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) laboratory, which adds an additional challenge to stable liquid level control. Control valve regulation, Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) power compensation, and other methods of stabilizing liquid level and pressure in the cryomodule 2.0 K SRF cavity circuit will be discussed. Several different pumping configurations using cold compressors and warm vacuum pumps have been used on the cryomodule 2.0 K return line and the associated results will be described.

  7. Process simulations for the LCLS-II cryogenic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, V.; Bai, H.; Heloin, V.; Fauve, E.; Pflueckhahn, D.; Peterson, T.; Arenius, D.; Bevins, M.; Scanlon, C.; Than, R.; Hays, G.; Ross, M.

    2017-12-01

    Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II), a 4 GeV continuous-wave (CW) superconducting electron linear accelerator, is to be constructed in the existing two mile Linac facility at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The first light from the new facility is scheduled to be in 2020. The LCLS-II Linac consists of thirty-five 1.3 GHz and two 3.9 GHz superconducting cryomodules. The Linac cryomodules require cryogenic cooling for the super-conducting niobium cavities at 2.0 K, low temperature thermal intercept at 5.5-7.5 K, and a thermal shield at 35-55 K. The equivalent 4.5 K refrigeration capacity needed for the Linac operations range from a minimum of 11 kW to a maximum of 24 kW. Two cryogenic plants with 18 kW of equivalent 4.5 K refrigeration capacity will be used for supporting the Linac cryogenic cooling requirements. The cryogenic plants are based on the Jefferson Lab’s CHL-II cryogenic plant design which uses the “Floating Pressure” design to support a wide variation in the cooling load. In this paper, the cryogenic process for the integrated LCLS-II cryogenic system and the process simulation for a 4.5 K cryoplant in combination with a 2 K cold compressor box, and the Linac cryomodules are described.

  8. MaRIE Undulator & XFEL Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marksteiner, Quinn R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anisimov, Petr Mikhaylovich [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-03-23

    The 22 slides in this presentation treat the subject under the following headings: MaRIE XFEL Performance Parameters, Input Electron Beam Parameters, Undulator Design, Genesis Simulations, Risks, and Summary It is concluded that time-dependent Genesis simulations show the MaRIE XFEL can deliver the number of photons within the required bandwidth, provided a number of assumptions are met; the highest risks are associated with the electron beam driving the XFEL undulator; and risks associated with the undulator and/or distributed seeding technique may be evaluated or retired by performing early validation experiments.

  9. Development of a superconducting undulator for the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanyushenkov, Y; Abliz, M; Doose, C; Fuerst, J; Hasse, Q; Kasa, M; Trakhtenberg, E; Vasserman, I; Gluskin, E; Lev, V; Mezentsev, N; Syrovatin, V; Tsukanov, V

    2013-01-01

    As the western hemisphere's premier x-ray synchrotron radiation source, the Advanced Photon Source (APS) continues to advance the state of the art in insertion device technology in order to maintain record high brightness, especially in the hard x-ray wavelength region. Due to the unique bunch pattern used for normal APS operations and its ultimate capabilities, the APS has chosen superconducting technology for its future hard x-ray undulator sources. In the last several years, the APS in collaboration with the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics has being developing the technology for planar, small-period superconducting undulators (SCUs). These developments include the design and construction of several prototypes and the construction of the necessary mechanical, vacuum, and cryogenic infrastructure at the APS site. Several prototypes of the SCU magnetic structure have been built and tested. The first SCU is assembled and will be installed in the APS storage ring at the end of 2012. Expected SCU performance in terms of x-ray brightness should noticeably exceed that of existing APS undulators. Immediately after commissioning, the SCU will be used at APS Sector 6 as the radiation source for high-energy x-ray studies.

  10. Resorting the NIST undulator using simulated annealing for field error reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denbeaux, Greg; Johnson, Lewis E.; Madey, John M.J.

    2000-01-01

    We have used a simulated annealing algorithm to sort the samarium cobalt blocks and vanadium permendur poles in the hybrid NIST undulator to optimize the spectrum of the emitted light. While simulated annealing has proven highly effective in sorting of the SmCo blocks in pure REC undulators, the reliance on magnetically 'soft' poles operating near saturation to concentrate the flux in hybrid undulators introduces a pair of additional variables - the permeability and saturation induction of the poles - which limit the utility of the assumption of superposition on which most simulated annealing codes rely. Detailed magnetic measurements clearly demonstrated the failure of the superposition principle due to random variations in the permeability in the 'unsorted' NIST undulator. To deal with the issue, we measured both the magnetization of the REC blocks and the permeability of the NIST's integrated vanadium permendur poles, and implemented a sorting criteria which minimized the pole-to-pole variations in permeability to satisfy the criteria for realization of superposition on a nearest-neighbor basis. Though still imperfect, the computed spectrum of the radiation from the re-sorted and annealed NIST undulator is significantly superior to that of the original, unsorted device

  11. Modeling and designing of variable-period and variable-pole-number undulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Davidyuk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of permanent-magnet variable-period undulator (VPU was proposed several years ago and has found few implementations so far. The VPUs have some advantages as compared with conventional undulators, e.g., a wider range of radiation wavelength tuning and the option to increase the number of poles for shorter periods. Both these advantages will be realized in the VPU under development now at Budker INP. In this paper, we present the results of 2D and 3D magnetic field simulations and discuss some design features of this VPU.

  12. Effects of angular misalignment on optical klystron undulator radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, G., E-mail: gmishra_dauniv@yahoo.co.in; Prakash, Bramh; Gehlot, Mona

    2015-11-21

    In this paper ,we analyze the important effects of optical klystron undulator radiation with an angular offset of the relativistic electron beam in the second undulator section. An anlytical expression for the undulator radiation is obtained through a transparent and simple procedure.It is shown that the effects of the angular offset is more severe for longer undulator lengths and with higher dispersive field strengths.Both these effects are less pronounced for undulators with large K values.

  13. Low-frequency quadrupole impedance of undulators and wigglers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Blednykh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An analytical expression of the low-frequency quadrupole impedance for undulators and wigglers is derived and benchmarked against beam-based impedance measurements done at the 3 GeV NSLS-II storage ring. The adopted theoretical model, valid for an arbitrary number of electromagnetic layers with parallel geometry, allows to calculate the quadrupole impedance for arbitrary values of the magnetic permeability μ_{r}. In the comparison of the analytical results with the measurements for variable magnet gaps, two limit cases of the permeability have been studied: the case of perfect magnets (μ_{r}→∞, and the case in which the magnets are fully saturated (μ_{r}=1.

  14. Preparing the BESSY APPLE Undulators for Top-Up Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrdt, J.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Scheer, M.

    2007-01-01

    BESSY plans to go to topping up operation in the near future. A high injection efficiency is essential to avoid particle losses inside the undulator magnets and to ensure a low radiation background in the beamlines. Dynamic and static multipoles of the insertion devices have to be minimized to accomplish this requirement. APPLE II devices show strong dynamic multipoles in the elliptical and vertical polarization mode. Measurements before and after shimming of these multipoles are presented. The static multipoles of the BESSY UE56-2 which are due to systematic block inhomgeneities have successfully been shimmed recovering the full dynamic aperture.

  15. Final construction of the C.R.E.O.L. 8 millimeter period hybrid undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesch, P.; Gallagher, J.; Elias, L. [Center for Research and Education in Optics and Lasers, Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The construction of an 8 millimeter period hybrid undulator for the C.R.E.O.L. high power far-infared free electron laser has just been completed. This FEL is expected to come on-line in the fall of 1995 and produce close to a kilowatt of continuous power at wavelengths of 225 - 800 microns. The undulator has extremely precise mechanical tolerances and high field uniformity allowing for high electron beam recovery rates. Almost complete beam recovery is required for DC operation at high currents. A novel method for measuring the magnetic properties of individual magnets and sorting the magnets to reduce magnetic field errors will be reported. The peak field and phase errors of the undulator without the pole pieces are reduced through a magnet ordering procedure. These errors are further reduced by inserting and tuning adjustable pole pieces. The reduction of field errors through these two techniques will be presented. An analysis of the final undulator errors and the results of measurements of the mechanical tolerances will be presented.

  16. UHV testing of vacuum components and diagnostic devices, related to installation of Undulators in Indus-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratnakala, K.C.; Tiwari, S.K.; Bhange, N.J.; Yadav, D.P.; Babbar, L.K.; Netram; Sridhar, R.

    2015-01-01

    Two Insertion Devices, both planar Undulators (U1 and U2), have been successfully installed and commissioned in Indus-2, in Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore. The radiation from these Undulators are expected to be 2 to 3 orders of magnitude brighter than the radiation from the Bending Magnets. As required for the installation of these Insertion Devices in Indus-2 ring, two vacuum sections (LS 2 and LS 3) were modified. Apart from the main Undulator chambers (which were procured from the Manufacturer), several other components were developed in UHVT Section and Beam Diagnostic Section, for this purpose. The components include Taper chambers, Beam Position Indicators (both Insertion Device BPI-s and Upgraded BPI-s) and RF shielded bellows.Taper chambers were needed for the smooth transition of cross-section of vacuum envelope, from the normal straight section chamber (with dimensions: 36 mm x 86 mm) to the Undulator chamber (with dimensions: 17 mm x 81 mm). These chambers were required at both entry and exit of Undulator chambers. IDBPI-s and Upgraded BPI-s were needed for the precise monitoring of electron beam position, before the entry into the Undulator and after exiting the Undulator, at various critical positions. Bellows were required to be connected at various positions, during the assembly of vacuum chambers, for the mechanical flexibility. RF shielding was mandatory inside these bellows, to provide a smooth contour of the vacuum envelope, inside these bellows. All these components were tested in the UHV Lab, and confirmed for their UHV compatibility, prior to the actual assembly in the ring. Afterwards, these components were successfully installed in Indus-2 ring, by December, 2014. This paper narrates the UHV-tests carried out, including the assembly, leak-testing, baking, pumping etc. and the results. (author)

  17. A hybrid type undulator for far-infrared FELs at FELI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zako, A.; Miyauchi, Y.; Koga, A. [Free Electron Laser Research Institute, Inc., Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Two FEL facilities of the FELI are now operating in the wavelength range of 1-20 {mu}m. A 3.2-m hybrid type undulator ({lambda}{sub u}=80mm, N=40) has been designed for far-infrared FELs and will be installed in December. It can cover the wavelength of 20-60 {mu}m by changing K-value from 1 to 2.7 for a 28.0-MeV electron beam. It is composed of ferrite magnetic poles and Sm-Co permanent magnets. Commonly wound coils induce alternating magnetic field in ferrite poles. Combination of the induced field and the permanent magnet field can controls the magnetic field between the undulator gap.

  18. Knot Undulator to Generate Linearly Polarized Photons with Low on-Axis Power Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, S.

    2009-01-01

    Heat load on beamline optics is a serious problem to generate pure linearly polarized photons in the third generation synchrotron radiation facilities. For permanent magnet undulators, this problem can be overcome by a figure-8 operating mode. But there is still no good method to tackle this problem for electromagnetic elliptical undulators. Here, a novel operating mode is suggested, which can generate pure linearly polarized photons with very low on-axis heat load. Also the available minimum photon energy of linearly polarized photons can be extended much by this method.

  19. Operation of a small-gap undulator on the NSLS X-ray Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan, P.M.; Krinsky, S.; Rakowsky, G.; Solomon, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The authors report results of an on-going experiment being carried out in the X13 straight section of the NSLS X-ray Ring which explores the limits of the operation of small-gap undulators. In particular, they discuss the operation of a 16 mm period small-gap undulator. At an electron beam current of 300 mA the variable gap vacuum chamber has been closed to an inner aperture of 3.8 mm with no effect on the electron beam lifetime. Measurements of the output radiation spectrum at a magnet gap of 7.5 mm are described.

  20. Ginzburg's invention of undulators and their role in modern synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulipanov, Gennadii N

    2007-01-01

    Undulators - periodic magnetic structures that were originally introduced by Vitalii Ginzburg in 1947 for electromagnetic radiation generation using relativistic electrons - are among the key elements of modern synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers (FELs). In this talk, the history of three generations of storage ring-based synchrotron X-ray sources using wigglers and undulators is briefly traced. Prospects for two types of next-generation space-coherent X-ray sources are discussed, which use long undulators and energy recovery accelerators or, alternatively, employ linear accelerator-based FELs. The recently developed Novosibirsk terahertz FEL facility, currently the world' s most powerful terahertz source, is described. It was the generation of electromagnetic radiation in this range that Ginzburg discussed in his 1947 work. (oral issue of the journal 'uspekhi fizicheskikh nauk')

  1. Laser-driven soft-X-ray undulator source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    The experimental results described in this thesis demonstrate the successful synergy between the research fields described above: the development of an undulator source driven by laser-plasma accelerated electron beams. First efforts in this new field have led to the production of radiation in the visible to infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum [Schlenvoigt et al., 2008]. In contrast to these early achievements, the experiment described here shows the successful production of laser-driven undulator radiation in the soft-X-ray range with a remarkable reproducibility. The source produced tunable, collimated beams with a wavelength of ∝17 nm from a compact setup. Undulator spectra were detected in ∝70% of consecutive driver-laser shots, which is a remarkable reproducibility for a first proof-of-concept demonstration using ultra-high intensity laser systems. This can be attributed to a stable electron acceleration scheme as well as to the first application of miniature magnetic quadrupole lenses with laseraccelerated beams. The lenses significantly reduce the electron beam divergence and its angular shot-to-shot fluctuations The setup of this experiment is the foundation of potential university-laboratory-sized, highly-brilliant hard X-ray sources. By increasing the electron energy to about 1 GeV, X-ray pulses with an expected duration of ∝10 fs and a photon energy of 1 keV could be produced in an almost identical arrangement. It can also be used as a testbed for the development of a free-electron laser of significantly smaller dimension than facilities based on conventional accelerators [Gruener et al., 2007]. Such compact sources have the potential for application in many fields of science. In addition, these developments could lead to ideal sources for ultrafast pump-probe experiments due to the perfect synchronization of the X-ray beam to the driver laser. (orig.)

  2. Laser-driven soft-X-ray undulator source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Matthias

    2010-08-04

    The experimental results described in this thesis demonstrate the successful synergy between the research fields described above: the development of an undulator source driven by laser-plasma accelerated electron beams. First efforts in this new field have led to the production of radiation in the visible to infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum [Schlenvoigt et al., 2008]. In contrast to these early achievements, the experiment described here shows the successful production of laser-driven undulator radiation in the soft-X-ray range with a remarkable reproducibility. The source produced tunable, collimated beams with a wavelength of {proportional_to}17 nm from a compact setup. Undulator spectra were detected in {proportional_to}70% of consecutive driver-laser shots, which is a remarkable reproducibility for a first proof-of-concept demonstration using ultra-high intensity laser systems. This can be attributed to a stable electron acceleration scheme as well as to the first application of miniature magnetic quadrupole lenses with laseraccelerated beams. The lenses significantly reduce the electron beam divergence and its angular shot-to-shot fluctuations The setup of this experiment is the foundation of potential university-laboratory-sized, highly-brilliant hard X-ray sources. By increasing the electron energy to about 1 GeV, X-ray pulses with an expected duration of {proportional_to}10 fs and a photon energy of 1 keV could be produced in an almost identical arrangement. It can also be used as a testbed for the development of a free-electron laser of significantly smaller dimension than facilities based on conventional accelerators [Gruener et al., 2007]. Such compact sources have the potential for application in many fields of science. In addition, these developments could lead to ideal sources for ultrafast pump-probe experiments due to the perfect synchronization of the X-ray beam to the driver laser. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of two superconducting elliptical undulators for generating circularly polarized light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Hwang

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of two planar superconducting elliptical undulators—a vertically wound racetrack coil structure and a staggered array structure—to generate a circularly polarized hard x-ray source was investigated. The magnetic poles and wires of the up and down magnet arrays were rotated in alternating directions on the horizontal plane, an elliptical field is generated to provide circularly polarized light in the electron-storage ring and the energy-recovery linac accelerator. Rapid switching between right- and left-circularly polarized radiations is performed using two undulators with oppositely rotated wires and poles. Given a periodic length of 15 mm and a gap of 5 mm, the magnetic-flux densities in the elliptical undulator are B_{z}=1.2   T (B_{x}=0.6   T and B_{z}=0.35   T (B_{x}=0.15   T in the planar vertically wound racetrack coil and the staggered structure with poles rotated by 35° and 25°, respectively. In maximizing the merit of the flux and the width of the effective field region in the two superconducting elliptical undulators, the trade-off rotation angles of the coils and poles are 20° and 5°, for vertically wound racetrack coil and staggered undulators, respectively.

  4. Overview of the superconducting undulator development program at ANKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casalbuoni, S., E-mail: sara.casalbuoni@kit.edu; Cecilia, A.; Gerstl, S.; Glamann, N.; Grau, A.; Holubek, T.; Meuter, C.; Saez de Jauregui, D.; Voutta, R. [ANKA, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Boffo, C.; Gerhard, Th.; Turenne, M.; Walter, W. [Babcock Noell GmbH, Alfred Nobel Str. 20, 97080 Würzburg (Germany)

    2016-07-27

    Superconducting undulators (SCUs) have the potential to reach higher brilliance and flux with respect to the state of the art permanent magnet insertion devices. ANKA is collaborating with the industrial partner Babcock Noell GmbH (BNG) to realize NbTi conduction cooled planar devices for low emittance light sources, and is developing the instrumentation to characterize the magnetic field properties and to measure the beam heat load to a cold bore needed for the cryogenic design of SCUs. We present here: the most recent results obtained within the ANKA-BNG collaboration, the progress achieved in the development of the instrumentation, and the in house studies on the application of high temperature superconducting (HTS) tape to the SCU technology.

  5. Electron Bunch Length Measurement for LCLS at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelazny, M.; Allison, S.; Chevtsov, Sergei; Emma, P.; Kotturi, K.d.; Loos, H.; Peng, S.; Rogind, D.; Straumann, T.

    2007-01-01

    At Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) a Bunch Length Measurement system has been developed to measure the length of the electron bunch for its new Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This destructive measurement uses a transverse-mounted RF deflector (TCAV) to vertically streak the electron beam and an image taken with an insertable screen and a camera. The device control software was implemented with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) toolkit. The analysis software was implemented in Matlab(trademark) using the EPICS/Channel Access Interface for Scilab(trademark) and Matlab(trademark) (labCA). This architecture allowed engineers and physicists to develop and integrate their control and analysis without duplication of effort

  6. Probing Complexity using the LCLS and the ALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrah, Nora [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-02-19

    The goal of our research program is to investigate fundamental interactions between photons and molecular/nano-systems to advance our quantitative understanding of electron correlations, charge transfer and many body phenomena. Our research projects focus on probing, on a femtosecond time-scale, multi-electron interactions and tracing nuclear motion in order to understand, and ultimately control energy flow and charge transfer processes from electromagnetic radiation to matter. The experiments will be carried out with state of the art instrumentation built by the P.I. team with funds from a DoE "Single Investigator and Small Group Research" (SISGR) grant. The research projects carried out the past three years consisted of first experiments using the linac coherent light source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facility at the SLAC National Laboratory, as well as the study of correlated processes in select anions using the ALS. A report for the past cycle is described in section II. These studies have paved the way for our renewal application for the next three years. Our research interests for the next three years extend our past and present research by carrying out time-resolved measurements described in section III. They will consist of: a) The study of molecular dynamics that happen on ultrafast time scales, using pump-probe schemes and the study of non-linear physics in the x-ray regime via multi-photon absorption from the LCLS. This will be achieved by measuring and examining both electronic and nuclear dynamics subsequent to the interaction of molecules and nano-systems with LCLS pulses of various wavelength, intensity and pulse duration as described in section III.A. b) The study of molecular dynamics and correlated processes via absorption of vuv-soft x-rays from the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide single-photon ionization baseline results for LCLS studies. In addition, we will study the photodetachment of anions

  7. Computation of undulator tuning curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejus, Roger J.

    1997-01-01

    Computer codes for fast computation of on-axis brilliance tuning curves and flux tuning curves have been developed. They are valid for an ideal device (regular planar device or a helical device) using the Bessel function formalism. The effects of the particle beam emittance and the beam energy spread on the spectrum are taken into account. The applicability of the codes and the importance of magnetic field errors of real insertion devices are addressed. The validity of the codes has been experimentally verified at the APS and observed discrepancies are in agreement with predicted reduction of intensities due to magnetic field errors. The codes are distributed as part of the graphical user interface XOP (X-ray OPtics utilities), which simplifies execution and viewing of the results

  8. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Design Study Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornacchia, Massimo

    1998-12-04

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the University of California at Los Angeles, is proposing to build a Free-Electron-Laser (FEL) R and D facility operating in the wavelength range 1.5-15 {angstrom}. This FEL, called the ''Linac Coherent Light Source'' (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC linac and produces sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength x-rays with very high peak brightness and full transverse coherence. Starting in FY 1998, the first two-thirds of the SLAC linac will be used for injection into the B factory. This leaves the last one-third free for acceleration to 15 GeV. The LCLS takes advantage of this opportunity, opening the way for the next generation of synchrotron light sources with largely proven technology and cost effective methods. This proposal is consistent with the recommendations of the Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (Synchrotron Radiation Light Source Working Group, October 18-19, 1997). The report recognizes that ''fourth-generation x-ray sources...will in all likelihood be based on the free electron laser concepts. If successful, this technology could yield improvements in brightness by many orders of magnitude.'' This Design Study, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of constructing an x-ray FEL based on the SLAC linac. Although this design is based on a consistent and feasible set of parameters, some components require more research and development to guarantee the performance. Given appropriate funding, this R and D phase can be completed in 2 years.

  9. Performance of an undulator for visible and UV FELs at FELI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyauchi, Y.; Zako, A.; Koga, A. [Free Electron Laser Research Institute, Inc., Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Two infrared free electron lasers (FELs) of the FELI project are now operating in the wavelength range of 1-20{mu}m. A 2.68-m undulator has been constructed for visible and UV FELs covering the wavelength of 1-0.2{mu}m for 100-165 MeV electron beams. It generates alternating, horizontal magnetic field, and wiggles electron beam on a vertical plane. The undulator length and period are 2.68m and 40mm, respectively. The gap of undulator magnets can be changed remotely by using servomotors with an accuracy of 1 {mu}m from the control room. The maximum K-value and related magnetic field strength are 1.9 and 0.5T, respectively, when its gap is set to the minimum value of 16mm. In order to minimize magnetic field reduction due to radiation damage, Sm-Co permanent magnet was adopted. Its structure and the results of magnetic field measurement will be reported.

  10. Tuning and characterization of the {open_quotes}Teufel{close_quotes}-undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verschuur, J.W.J.; Ernst, G.J.; Witteman, W.J. [Univ. of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Three important criteria are used to tune the undulator are: reduce longitudinal phase errors, have approximately equal two plane focusing and have a good overlap between the electron beam and the optical beam. Although these criteria are the main design goals it is hard to meet them directly from the assembling. Small errors inevitably appear during the assembly, even when care is taken to keep the tolerances as tight as possible. The magnetic field was constantly monitored during construction using the pulsed wire method. However some kind of tuning mechanism is always needed to improve the performance of the undulator. The undulator we designed and build is of the Hybrid type, i.e. permanent magnets and high permeable poles. The well known method of using small permanent magnets to correct the field errors is nearly impossible due to the presence of iron poles. Hence, as a logical step, we decided to try to correct the various errors with shims in the form of small iron plates. The shims were put on the pole face at the edge of the poles. Different configurations were used to correct the different kind of errors. In the presentation an overview of the various shim configurations will be discussed. Steering errors are quite easy to correct, since only dipole fields are involved. We did put quite some effort in correcting the quadrupole errors. Gradients dBy/dx and dBx/dy were easy to correct with two shims on one side. The other gradients, on the other hand needed extensive shimming to be corrected. The error correction is limited by the presence of sextupole errors. We even found by experience that sextupole errors increased with the number of shims used. The ratio of the focusing strength of the undulator is measured to be 3/2, being slightly stronger in the direction of the wiggle motion. Longitudinal phase errors are introduced by amplitude and wavelength deviations in the undulator.

  11. Commissioning of an APPLE-II Undulator at Daresbury Laboratory for the SRS

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, James; Scott, Duncan; Shepherd, Ben; Wyles, Naomi

    2005-01-01

    A new variable polarisation undulator of the APPLE-II type has been designed and constructed at Daresbury Laboratory. Initial magnet testing of the 56mm period device was followed by an intensive period of shimming to improve the field quality. After this was successfully completed the undulator was installed into the SRS and tests made of the effect of the device upon the electron beam. This beam commissioning was completed in a very short space of time with the beamline being given full control of the gap and phase of the magnet within a few weeks of installation. This paper summarises the measurement of the magnet and the shimming techniques employed to improve the field quality. It also describes the effect of the device upon the stored 2 GeV electron beam and the measures taken to minimise these effects during user operations.

  12. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutet, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has become the first ever operational hard X-ray Free Electron Laser in 2009. It will operate as a user facility capable of delivering unique research opportunities in multiple fields of science. The LCLS and the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) construction projects are developing instruments designed to make full use of the capabilities afforded by the LCLS beam. One such instrument is being designed to utilize the LCLS coherent beam to image with high resolution any sub-micron object. This instrument is called the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument. This instrument will provide a flexible optical system capable of tailoring key beam parameters for the users. A suite of shot-to-shot diagnostics will also be provided to characterize the beam on every pulse. The provided instrumentation will include multi-purpose sample environments, sample delivery and a custom detector capable of collecting 2D data at 120 Hz. In this article, the LCLS will be briefly introduced along with the technique of Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI). A few examples of scientific opportunities using the CXI instrument will be described. Finally, the conceptual layout of the instrument will be presented along with a description of the key requirements for the overall system and specific devices required.

  13. In vacuum undulator task force report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.C.; Stefan, P. [and others

    1998-06-01

    Historically the NSLS has been active in R&D for state-of-the-art electron beams, photon beams and x-ray optics. One of the available straight sections has therefore been dedicated to insertion device R&D. Over the past five to seven years a program aimed at exploiting the very small vertical {beta} function in the straight sections has yielded first a prototype small gap undulator (PSGU) and then an in-vacuum undulator (IVUN). The IVUN sources attain a brightness similar to the existing hybrid wigglers in X21 and X25. They radiate significantly lower total power than the wigglers but produce higher power densities. They provide undulator rather than wiggler spectra. Because of the small gaps and small periods there is not much tunability in these devices and they will have to be purpose-built for a specific scientific program. The original IVUN parameters were chosen for in-elastic x-ray scattering, similar to the scientific program on X21. This put the fundamental at 4.6 keV and the third harmonic at 13.8 keV. The question that this new possible insertion device poses is what science programs can best take advantage of this new insertion device source? To answer this, a task force was formed by M. Hart, NSLS Department Chair and charged with identifying viable scientific programs that could seek outside funding to construct IVUN beamlines. The task force concentrated on experimental programs that are presently being pursued on new insertion devices worldwide. For example, x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, which takes advantage of the large coherent flux from undulator sources, was considered. However, this program was not considered as the highest priority. The general area of protein crystallography, however, is ideal for the IVUN source. The unique electron beam optics that makes the IVUN possible in the first place also makes the IVUN ideal as a source for microdiffraction.

  14. Generation of radiation by intense plasma and electromagnetic undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, C.

    1989-01-01

    This is a second year progress report which details the work on the generation of radiation by intense plasma and electromagnetic undulators being carried out at UCLA. The status of the experimental work is described and the future directions are outlined. We have completed the first phase of experiments on the plasma wiggler generation and characterization. Suitability of a null-pinch as a plasma source was investigated in great detail. It is found that a w of a few percent can be excited but there are trapped magnetic fields within null-pinch plasma which hinder the injection of the electrons. A new more uniform and field-free plasma source is now being characterized

  15. Generation of radiation by intense plasma and electromagnetic undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, C.

    1989-01-01

    This is a second year progress report which details the work on the generation of radiation by intense plasma and electromagnetic undulators being carried out at UCLA. The status of the experimental work is described and the future directions are outlined. We have completed the first phase of experiments on the plasma wiggler generation and characterization. Suitability of a θ-pinch as a plasma source was investigated in great detail. It is found that a w of a few percent can be excited but there are trapped magnetic fields within θ-pinch plasma which hinder the injection of the electrons. A few more uniform and field-free plasma source is now being characterized. 8 refs., 5 figs

  16. Undulator-based production of polarized positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, G. [Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel); Barley, J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Batygin, Y. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA (US)] (and others)

    2009-05-15

    Full exploitation of the physics potential of a future International Linear Collider will require the use of polarized electron and positron beams. Experiment E166 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which an electron beam passes through a helical undulator to generate photons (whose first-harmonic spectrum extended to 7.9 MeV) with circular polarization, which are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons and electrons. The experiment was carried out with a one-meter-long, 400-period, pulsed helical undulator in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) operated at 46.6 GeV. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at five positron energies from 4.5 to 7.5 MeV. In addition, the electron polarization has been determined at 6.7MeV, and the effect of operating the undulator with a ferrofluid was also investigated. To compare the measurements with expectations, detailed simulations were made with an upgraded version of GEANT4 that includes the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons with matter. The measurements agree with calculations, corresponding to 80% polarization for positrons near 6 MeV and 90% for electrons near 7 MeV. (orig.)

  17. Control software of a variably polarizing undulator (APPLE type) for SX beamline in the SPring-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramatsu, Yoichi [Kansai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Mikazuki, Hyogo (Japan); Shimada, Taihei; Miyahara, Yoshikazu

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes the control software of a variably polarizing undulator (APPLE Type) that was installed at the SX beamline (cell number 23) in the SPring-8 storage ring in February, 1998. This undulator produces a polarized radiation in the energy range of soft X-ray by changing the gap distance between two pairs of permanent magnet arrays (gap movement). The main characteristic of the undulator is a capability to generate right and left circular polarization alternately at a period of 2 sec (0.5 Hz) by high speed phase-shifting (periodic phase movement). The developed software makes a fast correction of the closed orbit distortion (COD) of an electron beam by exciting steering magnets at a rate of time interval of 24 msec (42 Hz) during the movement of magnet arrays. Also, the software is capable to put these magnet arrays into a constant periodic phase movement with an error less than 0.1% for the period of 2 sec. The software was developed in accordance with the directions of SPring-8 standard for software development. (author)

  18. Orbit Correction for the Newly Developed Polarization-Switching Undulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obina, Takashi; Honda, Tohru; Shioya, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Yukinori; Tsuchiya, Kimichika; Yamamoto, Shigeru

    2007-01-01

    A new scheme of undulator magnet arrangements has been proposed and developed as a polarization-switching radiation source, and its test-stand was installed in the 2.5-GeV Photon Factory storage ring (PF ring) in order to investigate the effects on the beam orbit. The closed orbit distortion (COD) over 200 μm was produced in a vertical direction when we switched the polarization of the radiation from the test-stand. In a horizontal direction, the COD was less than 50μm. The results agreed well with the predictions from the magnetic-field measurement on the bench. In order to suppress the CODs and realize a stable operation of the ring with the polarization-switching, we developed an orbit correction system which consists of an encoder to detect motion of magnets, a pair of beam position monitors (BPMs), signal processing parts, and a pair of steering magnets. We succeeded in suppressing the CODs to the level below 3μm using the system even when we switch the polarization at a maximum frequency of 0.8 Hz.

  19. Current-enhanced SASE using an optical laser and its application to the LCLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.; Emma, Paul; Huang, Zhirong; Reiche, Sven; Stupakov, Gennady

    2004-01-01

    We propose a significant enhancement of the electron peak current entering a SASE undulator by inducing an energy modulation in an upstream wiggler magnet via resonant interaction with an optical laser, followed by microbunching of the energy-modulated electrons at the accelerator exit. This current enhancement allows a reduction of the FEL gain length. The x-ray output consists of a series of uniformly spaced spikes, each spike being temporally coherent. The duration of this series is controlled by the laser pulse and in principle can be narrowed down to just a single, 200-attosecond spike. Given potentially absolute temporal synchronization of the x-ray spikes to the energy-modulating laser pulse, this scheme naturally makes pump-probe experiments available to SASE FEL's. We also study various detrimental effects related to the high electron peak current

  20. LCLS-S1 optical transition radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, W.J.; Yang, B.; Erwin, L.L.; Shoaf, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a high- resolution optical transition radiation (OTR) imaging monitor for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) injection linac at SLAC. The imaging station,OTR-S1, will be located at the S1 spectrometer with a beam energy of 135 MeV. The system will be used to acquire 2-D transverse beam distributions of the accelerated photocathode-gun-generated electron beam. We anticipate an average beam current of 0.2 to 1 nC and nominal beam spot size of 130 mum (sigmax), 100 mum (sigmay). The imaging system was designed for a field of view x/y: 10 times 7.5 mm. The spatial resolution of ∼12 microns was verified over the central 5times4 mm region in the visible. A 12-bit digital camera acquires the image and a Mac-based digital frame-capturing system was employed for the initial lab-based performance testing of the device. We report on system development, testing methods, and data analysis.

  1. Radiological Environmental Protection for LCLS-II High Power Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu James

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The LCLS-II superconducting electron accelerator at SLAC plans to operate at up to 4 GeV and 240 kW average power, which would create higher radiological impacts particularly near the beam loss points such as beam dumps and halo collimators. The main hazards to the public and environment include direct or skyshine radiation, effluent of radioactive air such as 13N, 15O and 41Ar, and activation of groundwater creating tritium. These hazards were evaluated using analytic methods and FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The controls (mainly extensive bulk shielding and local shielding around high loss points and monitoring (neutron/photon detectors with detection capabilities below natural background at site boundary, site-wide radioactive air monitors, and groundwater wells were designed to meet the U.S. DOE and EPA, as well as SLAC requirements. The radiological design and controls for the LCW systems [including concrete housing shielding for 15O and 11C circulating in LCW, 7Be and erosion/corrosion products (22Na, 54Mn, 60Co, 65Zn, etc. captured in resin and filters, leak detection and containment of LCW with 3H and its waste water discharge; explosion from H2 build-up in surge tank and release of radionuclides] associated with the high power beam dumps are also presented.

  2. Radiological Environmental Protection for LCLS-II High Power Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, James; Blaha, Jan; Cimeno, Maranda; Mao, Stan; Nicolas, Ludovic; Rokni, Sayed; Santana, Mario; Tran, Henry

    2017-09-01

    The LCLS-II superconducting electron accelerator at SLAC plans to operate at up to 4 GeV and 240 kW average power, which would create higher radiological impacts particularly near the beam loss points such as beam dumps and halo collimators. The main hazards to the public and environment include direct or skyshine radiation, effluent of radioactive air such as 13N, 15O and 41Ar, and activation of groundwater creating tritium. These hazards were evaluated using analytic methods and FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The controls (mainly extensive bulk shielding and local shielding around high loss points) and monitoring (neutron/photon detectors with detection capabilities below natural background at site boundary, site-wide radioactive air monitors, and groundwater wells) were designed to meet the U.S. DOE and EPA, as well as SLAC requirements. The radiological design and controls for the LCW systems [including concrete housing shielding for 15O and 11C circulating in LCW, 7Be and erosion/corrosion products (22Na, 54Mn, 60Co, 65Zn, etc.) captured in resin and filters, leak detection and containment of LCW with 3H and its waste water discharge; explosion from H2 build-up in surge tank and release of radionuclides] associated with the high power beam dumps are also presented.

  3. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments at the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glownia, James; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Cryan, J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Andreasson, J.; /Uppsala U.; Belkacem, A.; /LBNL, Berkeley; Berrah, N.; /Western Michigan U.; Blaga, C.L.; /Ohio State U.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; /SLAC; DiMauro, L.F.; /Ohio State U.; Fang, L.; /Western Michigan U.; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Gessner, O.; /LBNL; Guhr, M.; /SLAC; Hajdu, J.; /Uppsala U.; Hertlein, M.P.; /LBNL; Hoener, M.; /Western Michigan U. /LBNL; Huang, G.; Kornilov, O.; /LBNL; Marangos, J.P.; /Imperial Coll., London; March, A.M.; /Argonne; McFarland, B.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /IRAMIS, Saclay /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Georgia Tech /Argonne /Kansas State U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /LBNL /Argonne /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    The first time-resolved x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) used a combination of feedback methods and post-analysis binning techniques to synchronize an ultrafast optical laser to the linac-based x-ray laser. Transient molecular nitrogen alignment revival features were resolved in time-dependent x-ray-induced fragmentation spectra. These alignment features were used to find the temporal overlap of the pump and probe pulses. The strong-field dissociation of x-ray generated quasi-bound molecular dications was used to establish the residual timing jitter. This analysis shows that the relative arrival time of the Ti:Sapphire laser and the x-ray pulses had a distribution with a standard deviation of approximately 120 fs. The largest contribution to the jitter noise spectrum was the locking of the laser oscillator to the reference RF of the accelerator, which suggests that simple technical improvements could reduce the jitter to better than 50 fs.

  4. Helium cryosystem for the X-ray laser LCLS-II; Heliumkryosystem fuer den Roentgenlaser LCLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflueckhahn, Dirk; Fauve, Eric; Heloin, Vincent; Ravindranath, Viswanath; Ross, Marc [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source-II project represents the expansion of the LCLS free-electron laser, which has been successfully operated at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory since 2009. In collaboration with several national institutes, 37 cryomodules with superconducting accelerator cavities will be installed in a 700 m long section of the existing tunnel. The use of superconducting accelerator technology will enable particle energy of up to 4 GeV in CW (continuous wave) operation. Two identical cryogenic systems with an equivalent output of 18 kW each at 4.5 K are described below. The plants supply the linear accelerator with helium at several temperature levels. Superfluid helium II provides the cooling necessary to maintain superconductivity in the cavities. The operating temperature of the 1.3 GHz cavities has been set at 2 K. Two further helium circuits are used for shield cooling at approx. 35 K and cooling of heat loads at 5 K level. The purely dynamic compression of the cold helium vapour is a technical feature of the systems described here. In a five-stage chain of cold compressors of 32 mbar at the cavities, it is absolutely compressed to the suction pressure of the circulation compressors at approx. 1 bar. [German] Das Linac Coherent Light Source-II Projekt stellt die Erweiterung des seit 2009 erfolgreich betriebenen Freie- Elektronen-Lasers LCLS am SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory dar. In Kollaboration mit mehreren nationalen Instituten werden in einem 700 m langen Teilstueck des bereits bestehenden Tunnels 37 Kryomodule mit supraleitenden Beschleunigerkavitaeten installiert. Der Einsatz von supraleitender Beschleunigertechnologie wird eine Teilchenenergie von bis zu 4 GeV im CW (continous wave) Betrieb ermoeglichen. Zwei identische Kryoanlagen mit einer aequivalenten Leistung von je 18 kW bei 4,5 K werden im Folgenden beschrieben. Die Anlagen versorgen den Linearbeschleuniger mit Helium auf mehreren Temperaturniveaus. Superfluides Helium

  5. Undulator systems for the TESLA X-FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pflueger, J.; Tischer, M.

    2002-01-01

    A large X-ray FEL lab is under consideration within the TESLA project and is supposed to be operated in parallel with the TESLA linear collider. There will be five SASE FELs and five conventional spontaneous undulators. A conceptual design study has been made for the undulator systems for these X-FELs. It includes segmentation into 6.1 m long undulator 'cells'. Each consists of a 5 m long undulator 'segment', a separate quadrupole, one horizontal and one vertical corrector, and a phase shifter. These items are presented and discussed

  6. An elliptically-polarizing undulator with phase adjustable energy and polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidia, S.

    1993-08-01

    The authors present a planar helical undulator designed to produce elliptically polarized light. Helical magnetic fields may be produced by a variety of undulators with four parallel cassettes of magnets. In their design, all cassettes are mounted in two planes on slides so that they may be moved parallel to the electron beam. This allows the undulator to produce x-rays of left- or right-handed elliptical or circular polarization as well as horizontal or vertical linear polarization. In model calculations, they have found that by sliding the top pair of rows with respect to the bottom pair, or the left pair with respect to the right pair, they retain the polarization setting but change the magnetic field strength, and hence the x-ray energy. This allows them to select both energy and polarization by independent phase adjustments alone, without changing the gap between the rows. Such a design may be simpler to construct than an adjustable gap machine. The authors present calculations that model its operation and its effects on an electron beam

  7. Textured dysprosium and gadolinium poles for high-field, short-period hybrid undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murokh, Alex; Solovyov, Vyacheslav; Agustsson, Ron; O'Shea, Finn H.; Chubar, Oleg; Chen, Yung; Grandsaert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the feasibility of enhancement of the gap field in a short-period hybrid undulator by using pole inserts with the saturation inductance B s , over that of iron, 2 T. Dysprosium metal, with the saturation inductance of 3.4 T below 90 K, and Gadolinium with B s =2.7 T, appear as good candidates as the optimized pole material. However, due to the high magnetic anisotropy of Dy, such a high level of magnetization can only be realized when the external field lies in the basal plane. This implies that the pole has to be single-crystalline or highly textured. Considering that growing large, >10mm, Dy single crystals is difficult, we propose secondary recrystallization as a method to induce the required texture in thin Dy and Gd foils. The textured foils can be stacked to produce pole inserts of the desired geometry and orientation. Results of small-scale processing and magnetic measurements of thin (20–60 μ) foils provide evidence that the required texture quality can be achieved by a relatively simple sequence of heat-treatments and cold rolling. The advantage of textured Dy and Gd poles is demonstrated in a several period test undulator. -- Highlights: • Textured rare-earth materials for use as undulator pole materials. • We measure the development of texture in Dy and Gd. • We compare the rare-earth materials with high saturation steel in undulators. • Thin sheets of Dy and Gd materials perform similar to single crystals

  8. BEAM OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR AN X-RAY FEL OSCILLATOR AT THE LCLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Weilun; Huang, S.; Liu, K.X.; Huang, Z; Ding, Y.; Maxwell, T.J.; Kim, K.-J.

    2016-06-01

    The 4 GeV LCLS-II superconducting linac with high repetition beam rate enables the possibility to drive an X-Ray FEL oscillator at harmonic frequencies *. Compared to the regular LCLS-II machine setup, the oscillator mode requires a much longer bunch length with a relatively lower current. Also a flat longitudinal phase space distribution is critical to maintain the FEL gain since the X-ray cavity has extremely narrow bandwidth. In this paper, we study the longitudinal phase space optimization including shaping the initial beam from the injector and optimizing the bunch compressor and dechirper parameters. We obtain a bunch with a flat energy chirp over 400 fs in the core part with current above 100 A. The optimization was based on LiTrack and Elegant simulations using LCLS-II beam parameters.

  9. RESULTS OF ACCELERATED LIFE TESTING OF LCLS-II CAVITY TUNER MOTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, Naeem [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward F. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Pischalnikov, Yuriy [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2018-04-01

    An Accelerated Life Test (ALT) of the Phytron stepper motor used in the LCLS-II cavity tuner has been conducted at JLab. Since the motor will reside inside the cryomodule, any failure would lead to a very costly and arduous repair. As such, the motor was tested for the equivalent of 30 lifetimes before being approved for use in the production cryomodules. The 9-cell LCLS-II cavity is simulated by disc springs with an equivalent spring constant. Plots of the motor position vs. tuner position ' measured via an installed linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) ' are used to measure motor motion. The titanium spindle was inspected for loss of lubrication. The motor passed the ALT, and is set to be installed in the LCLS-II cryomodules.

  10. The U5.0 Undulator for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1992-01-01

    The U5.0 Undulator, an 89 period, 5 cm period length, 4.6 m long insertion device has been designed, is being fabricated, and is scheduled for completion in early 1992. This undulator will be the first high brightness source, in the 50 to 1,500 eV range, for the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A hybrid magnetic configuration using Nd--Fe--B permanent magnet material and vanadium permendur poles has been selected to achieve the field quality needed to meet performance requirements. The magnetic structure is modular with each half consisting of five assembly sections, which provide the periodic structure, and end structures, for entrance and exit correction, mounted on a steel backing beam. Each assembly section consists of 35 half-period pole assemblies bolted to a mount. The required 0.837 T effective peak field at a 1.4 cm gap has been verified with model measurements. Vertical field integral correction is accomplished with the end structures, each having an arrangement of permanent magnet rotors which will be adjusted to minimize electron beam missteering over the undulator operating field range. To reduce the effect of environmental fields, the steel backing beams are connected through parallel, low-reluctance, Ni--Fe hinges. The magnetic structure is connected through four rollernuts to the drive system that provides gap adjustment with an arrangement of roller screws, chain drives, a gear reduction unit, and a stepper motor driven by a closed loop control system. Magnetic structure and drive system support are from a 2.4 m high structure which includes a support base with four vertical supports. The vacuum chamber design is a two-piece machined and welded 5083-H321 aluminum construction of 5.1 m length. Pumping is with a combination of ion, titanium sublimation pump and nonevaporable getter pumps. Magnetic design, subsystem design, and fabrication progress are presented

  11. Negative-mass mitigation of Coulomb repulsion for terahertz undulator radiation of electron bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balal, N.; Magory, E. [Ariel University, Ariel 40700 (Israel); Bandurkin, I. V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov St., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Bratman, V. L. [Ariel University, Ariel 40700 (Israel); Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov St., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Savilov, A. V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov St., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin Avenue, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-19

    It is proposed to utilize the effect of negative mass for stabilization of the effective axial size of very dense and short electron bunches produced by photo-injector guns by using combined undulator and strong uniform magnetic fields. It has been shown that in the “abnormal” regime, an increase in the electron energy leads to a decrease in the axial velocity of the electron; due to the negative-mass effect, the Coulomb repulsion of electrons leads to their attraction and formation of a fairly stable and compact bunch “nucleus.” An undulator with a strong uniform magnetic field providing the negative-mass effect is designed for an experimental source of terahertz radiation. The use of the negative-mass regime in this experiment should result in a long-pulse coherent spontaneous undulator emission from a short dense moderately relativistic (5.5 MeV) photo-injector electron bunch with a high (up to 20%) efficiency and a narrow frequency spectrum.

  12. Scheme for Generation highly monochromatic X-Rays from a baseline XFEL undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2010-03-01

    One goal of XFEL facilities is the production of narrow bandwidth X-ray radiation. The self-seeding scheme was proposed to obtain a bandwidth narrower than that achievable with conventional X-ray SASE FELs. A self-seeded FEL is composed of two undulators separated by a monochromator and an electron beam bypass that must compensate for the path delay of X-rays in the monochromator. This leads to a long bypass, with a length in the order of 40-60 m, which requires modifications of the baseline undulator configuration. As an attempt to get around this obstacle, together with a study of the self-seeding scheme for the European XFEL, here we propose a novel technique based on a pulse doubler concept. Using a crystal monochromator installed within a short magnetic chicane in the baseline undulator, it is possible to decrease the bandwidth of the radiation well beyond the XFEL design down to 10 -5 . The magnetic chicane can be installed without any perturbation of the XFEL focusing structure, and does not interfere with the baseline mode of operation. We present a feasibility study and we make exemplifications with the parameters of the SASE2 line of the European XFEL. (orig.)

  13. Widely tunable narrow-band coherent Terahertz radiation from an undulator at THU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, X.; Wang, D.; Tian, Q.; Liang, Y.; Niu, L.; Yan, L.; Du, Y.; Huang, W.; Tang, C.

    2018-01-01

    There is anxious demand for intense widely tunable narrow-band Terahertz (THz) radiation in scientific research, which is regarded as a powerful tool for the coherent control of matter. We report the generation of widely tunable THz radiation from a planar permanent magnet undulator at Tsinghua University (THU). A relativistic electron beam is compressed by a magnetic chicane into sub-ps bunch length to excite THz radiation in the undulator coherently. The THz frequency can be tuned from 0.4 THz to 10 THz continuously with narrow-band spectrums when the undulator gap ranges from 23 mm to 75 mm. The measured pulse THz radiation energy from 220 pC bunch is 3.5 μJ at 1 THz and tens of μJ pulse energy (corresponding peak power of 10 MW) can be obtained when excited by 1 nC beam extrapolated from the property of coherent radiation. The experimental results agree well with theoretical predictions, which demonstrates a suitable THz source for the many applications that require intense and widely tunable THz sources.

  14. Short-Period RF Undulator for a SASE Nanometer source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis is described towards development of a RF undulator with a period < 1 cm, an undulator parameter K of the order of unity, and a gap greater than 2.25 mm. The application for the undulator is for a SASE source to produce 1 nm wavelength radiation using a low energy electron beam in the range 1-2 GeV. Particle orbit calculations in a conventional standing-wave resonator configuration show that the presence of a co-propagating component of RF field can cause deleterious motion for the undulating electrons that can seriously degrade their radiation spectrum. To obviate this problem, resonator designs were devised in which only the counter-propagating field components interact with the particles. Two resonator configurations with the same undulator parameter K = 0.4 have been devised and are described in this report.

  15. Thermal analysis of the first canted-undulator front-end components at SSRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhongmin, E-mail: xuzhongmin@sinap.ac.cn; Feng, Xinkang; Wang, Naxiu; Wu, Guanyuan; Zhang, Min; Wang, Jie

    2015-02-21

    The performance of three kinds of masks: pre-mask, splitter mask and fixed mask-photon shutter, used for the first canted-undulator front end under heat loads at SSRF, is studied. Because these components are shared with two beamlines, the X-rays from both dual undulators and bending magnets can strike on them. Under these complicated conditions, they will absorb much more thermal power than when they operate in usual beamline. So thermal and stress analysis is indispensable for their mechanical design. The method of applying the non-uniform power density using Ansys is presented. During thermal stress analysis, the normal operation or the worst possible case is considered. The finite element analyses results, such as the maximum temperature of the body and the cooling wall and the maximum stress of these components, show the design of them is reasonable and safe.

  16. Small-gap undulator experiment on the NSLS X-ray Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefan, P.M.; Krinsky, S.; Rakowsky, G.; Solomon, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report results of an on-going experiment being carried out in the X13 straight section of the NSLS X-ray Ring which explores the limits of the operation of small-gap undulators. In particular, we discuss measurements of stored electron beam lifetime as a function of the vertical aperture presented by a 4-jaw scraper or a variable-aperture vacuum vessel. At an electron beam current of 300 mA the variable-aperture vacuum chamber was closed to an inner aperture of 3.8 mm with no effect on the electron beam lifetime. Measurements of the output radiation spectrum of a 16 mm period undulator at a magnet gap of 7.5 mm are also described

  17. First lasings at IR-and FIR range using hybrid type undulator (FEL facility 4) and Halbach type undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takii, T.; Oshita, E.; Okuma, S.; Wakita, K.; Koga, A.; Tomimasu, T.; Ohasi, K.

    1997-01-01

    First lasing at 18μm was achieved by using a 2.7-m long hybrid type undulator (undulator 4) for far-infrared FELs and a 6.72-m long optical cavity installed at the 33-MeV beam line of the downstream of the FEL facility 1 (FEL-1). We are challenged at two-color FEL oscillation in mid-infrared range using the undulator 1 (λ u=3.4mm) and in far-infrared range using the undulator 4 (λ u=9mm). At first, a 30-MeV, 60-A beam passed through the undulator 1 without lasing is transported using a QFQDBQFQDBQFQDQF system and is used for lasing at the undulator 4. However, six pairs of steering coils had to be attached on the beam duct to reduce the deviation of the electron beam trajectory due to the vertical field distribution induced by the built-in electromagnets. The minimum gap of the undulator 4 was designed to be 35mm. However, the steering coils attached on the beam duct increased the gap up to 52mm. Therefore, the hybrid type undulator was replaced by a new Halbach type one (λ u=8mm, N=30) after the first lasing at 18μm on October 24, '96. The New FEL facility 4 was installed in the middle of December and first lasing at 18.6μm was achieved on December 26, within 10 hours operation. (author)

  18. Design, development, installation and commissioning of water-cooled pre-masks for undulator front-ends of Indus-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghuvanshi, V.K.; Prasad, Vijendra; Garg, S.R.; Jain, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Recently two undulators U1 and U2 are installed in Indus-2 storage ring at RRCAT, Indore. When U1 and U2 are put in operation, a bright synchrotron radiation (SR) is produced which is transmitted through the zero degree port of the dipole vacuum chamber. In addition, a part of SR beam from the bending magnets, at the upstream and downstream of the undulator, is also overlapped with the undulator SR beam and transmitted in to the front-end through the same port. The front-end is a long ultra high vacuum (UHV) assembly consisting of water-cooled pre-mask, water-cooled shutters, UHV valves, diagnostic devices, safety shutter, vacuum pumps etc which acts as an interface between Indus-2 ring and beamline. Water-cooled pre- masks have been designed to cut a part of unwanted SR beam from the bending magnets. The pre-mask is a first active component in the undulator front-end which is also capable of absorbing high thermal load due to mis-steering of the SR beam from the undulator in the worst case scenario. The watercooled pre-mask consists of a copper block which has fixed aperture with slant faces to distribute the heat flux over a large surface area. The cooling channels are made on outer periphery of the block. The copper block is vacuum brazed with two conflat flanges of stainless steel at the two ends. The pre-mask is designed to absorb thermal load of 3 kW of synchrotron beam from undulator U1 and 2 kW of synchrotron beam from undulator U2. The thermal analysis of the pre-masks was carried out with the help of ANSYS® and the design was optimized with different cooling configurations. The main design criteria was to limit the maximum temperature of the mask less than 60 °C. This is to avoid substantial thermal outgassing from the heated portion which may deteriorate the ultra high vacuum. Pre-masks have been successfully tested, installed and commissioned with synchrotron beam in the undulator front-ends and are operating under vacuum of 5x10 -10 mbar. (author)

  19. Results of the SLAC LCLS Gun High-Power RF Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, D.H.; Jongewaard, E.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; Wang, J.; Lewandowski, J.; Vlieks, A.

    2007-01-01

    The beam quality and operational requirements for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) currently being constructed at SLAC are exceptional, requiring the design of a new RF photocathode gun for the electron source. Based on operational experience at SLAC's GTF and SDL and ATF at BNL as well as other laboratories, the 1.6cell s-band (2856MHz) gun was chosen to be the best electron source for the LCLS, however a significant redesign was necessary to achieve the challenging parameters. Detailed 3-D analysis and design was used to produce near-perfect rotationally symmetric rf fields to achieve the emittance requirement. In addition, the thermo-mechanical design allows the gun to operate at 120Hz and a 140MV/m cathode field, or to an average power dissipation of 4kW. Both average and pulsed heating issues are addressed in the LCLS gun design. The first LCLS gun is now fabricated and has been operated with high-power RF. The results of these high-power tests are presented and discussed

  20. Enhancement of harmonic generation using a two section undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prazeres, R.; Glotin, F.; Jaroszynski, D.A.; Ortega, J.M.; Rippon, C.

    1999-01-01

    Enhancement of the 2nd and 3rd harmonic of the wavelength of a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) has been measured when a single electron beam is crossing a two-section undulator. To produce the harmonic radiation enhancement, the undulator is arranged so that the resonance wavelength of the 2nd undulator (downstream) matches a harmonic of the 1st undulator (upstream). Both the fundamental and the harmonic optical fields evolve in the same optical cavity and are coupled out with different extraction efficiency, through a hole in one of the cavity mirrors. We present measurements that show that the optical power at the 2nd and 3rd harmonic can be enhanced, by about one order of magnitude, in two configurations: when the resonance wavelength of the 2nd undulator matches the harmonic of 1st one (harmonic configuration), or when the gap of the 2nd undulator is slightly larger than first one (step-tapered configuration). We examine the dependence of the harmonic power on the gap of the 2nd undulator. This fundamental/harmonic mode of operation of the FEL may have useful applications in the production of coherent X-ray and VUV radiation, a spectral range where high reflectivity optical cavity mirrors are difficult or impossible to manufacture

  1. Generation of x-ray radiation in a storage ring by a superconductive cold-bore in-vacuum undulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Casalbuoni

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The first beam measurements with a cold-bore superconducting in-vacuum undulator in a storage ring are reported. Undulators are x-ray generators in light sources. The physical limitations of these devices limit the intensity and the brilliance of the x-ray beam. At present the undulators are made from permanent magnets. It was shown in earlier papers that at low electron beam intensities superconductive wires in the vacuum beam pipe can overcome the limitations inherent to permanent magnet undulators. It was argued that the use of these novel devices in light sources with high beam currents may be limited by the extreme anomalous skin effect regime in Cu at 4.2 K, which has so far undergone very little investigation, and the power deposited by the infrared part of the synchrotron radiation. The purpose of this paper is to present measurements of these effects at the synchrotron light source ANKA with stored currents up to 200 mA.

  2. Performance of a hard x-ray undulator at CHESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilderback, D.H.; Batterman, B.W.; Bedzyk, M.J.; Finkelstein, K.; Henderson, C.; Merlini, A.; Schildkamp, W.; Shen, Q.; White, J.; Blum, E.B.; Viccaro, P.J.; Mills, D.M.; Kim, S.; Shenoy, G.K.; Robinson, K.E.; James, F.E.; Slater, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A 3.3-cm period Nd-Fe-B hybrid undulator has been designed and successfully operated in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR). This 2-m-long, 123-pole insertion device is a prototype of one of the undulators planned for the Advanced Photon Source. In dedicated operation, the undulator produced the expected brightness at 5.437 GeV with the fundamental x-ray energy ranging from 4.3 to 7.9 keV corresponding to a change in gap from 1.5 to 2.8 cm

  3. Perspectives on micropole undulators in synchrotron radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatchyn, R.; Csonka, P.; Toor, A.

    1989-01-01

    Micropole undulators promise to advance synchrotron radiation (SR) technology in two distinct ways. The first is in the development of economical, low-energy storage rings, or linacs, as soft x-ray sources, and the second is in the opening up of gamma-ray spectral ranges on high-energy storage rings. In this paper the promise and current status of micropole undulator (MPU) technology are discussed, and a review of some practical obstacles to the implementation of MPU's on present-day storage rings is given. Some successful results of recent performance measurements of micropole undulators on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory linac are briefly summarized

  4. Perspectives on micropole undulators in synchrotron radiation technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatchyn, Roman; Csonka, Paul; Toor, Arthur

    1989-07-01

    Micropole undulators promise to advance synchrotron radiation (SR) technology in two distinct ways. The first is in the development of economical, low-energy storage rings, or linacs, as soft x-ray sources, and the second is in the opening up of gamma-ray spectral ranges on high-energy storage rings. In this paper the promise and current status of micropole undulator (MPU) technology are discussed, and a review of some practical obstacles to the implementation of MPU's on present-day storage rings is given. Some successful results of recent performance measurements of micropole undulators on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory linac are briefly summarized.

  5. Reprogramming LCLs to iPSCs Results in Recovery of Donor-Specific Gene Expression Signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha M Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Renewable in vitro cell cultures, such as lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, have facilitated studies that contributed to our understanding of genetic influence on human traits. However, the degree to which cell lines faithfully maintain differences in donor-specific phenotypes is still debated. We have previously reported that standard cell line maintenance practice results in a loss of donor-specific gene expression signatures in LCLs. An alternative to the LCL model is the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC system, which carries the potential to model tissue-specific physiology through the use of differentiation protocols. Still, existing LCL banks represent an important source of starting material for iPSC generation, and it is possible that the disruptions in gene regulation associated with long-term LCL maintenance could persist through the reprogramming process. To address this concern, we studied the effect of reprogramming mature LCL cultures from six unrelated donors to iPSCs on the ensuing gene expression patterns within and between individuals. We show that the reprogramming process results in a recovery of donor-specific gene regulatory signatures, increasing the number of genes with a detectable donor effect by an order of magnitude. The proportion of variation in gene expression statistically attributed to donor increases from 6.9% in LCLs to 24.5% in iPSCs (P < 10-15. Since environmental contributions are unlikely to be a source of individual variation in our system of highly passaged cultured cell lines, our observations suggest that the effect of genotype on gene regulation is more pronounced in iPSCs than in LCLs. Our findings indicate that iPSCs can be a powerful model system for studies of phenotypic variation across individuals in general, and the genetic association with variation in gene regulation in particular. We further conclude that LCLs are an appropriate starting material for iPSC generation.

  6. Initial studies of Bremsstrahlung energy deposition in small-bore superconducting undulator structures in linac environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, T.; Tatchyn, R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    One of the more promising technologies for developing minimal-length insertion devices for linac-driven, single-pass Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the x-ray range is based on the use of superconducting (SC) materials. In recent FEL simulations, for example, a bifilar helical SC device with a 2 cm period and 1.8 T field was found to require a 30 m saturation length for operation at 1.5{Angstrom} on a 15 GeV linac, more than 40% shorter than an alternative hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM) undulator. AT the same time, however, SC technology is known to present characteristic difficulties for insertion device design, both in engineering detail and in operation. Perhaps the most critical problem, as observed, e.g., by Madey and co-workers in their initial FEL experiments, was the frequent quenching induced by scattered electrons upstream of their (bifilar) device. Postulating that this quenching was precipitated by directly-scattered or bremsstrahlung-induced particle energy deposited into the SC material or into material contiguous with it, the importance of numerical and experimental characterizations of this phenomenon for linac-based, user-facility SC undulator design becomes evident. In this paper we discuss selected prior experimental results and report on initial EGS4 code studies of scattered and bremsstrahlung induced particle energy deposition into SC structures with geometries comparable to a small-bore bifilar helical undulator.

  7. Undulators to FELs: Nanometers, Femtoseconds, Coherence and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attwood, David [University of California Berkeley

    2011-11-30

    For scientists in many fields, from material science to the life sciences and archeology, synchrotron radiation, and in particular undulator radiation, has provide an intense source of x-rays which are tunable to the absorption edges of particular elements of interest, often permitting studies at high spatial and spectral resolution. Now a close cousin to the undulator, the x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) has emerged with improved spatial coherence and, perhaps more importantly, femtosecond pulse durations which permit dynamical studies. In the future attosecond x-ray capabilities are anticipated. In this colloqium we will describe some state of the art undulator studies, how undulators work, the evolution to FELs, their pulse and coherence properties, and the types of experiments envisioned.

  8. Propagation of electromagnetic waves in the plasma near electron cyclotron resonance: Undulator-induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvets, G.; Tushentsov, M.; Tokman, M.D.; Kryachko, A.

    2005-01-01

    Propagation of electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasma near the electron cyclotron frequency can be strongly modified by adding a weak magnetic undulator. For example, both right- and left-hand circularly polarized waves can propagate along the magnetic field without experiencing resonant absorption. This effect of entirely eliminating electron cyclotron heating is referred to as the undulator-induced transparency (UIT) of the plasma, and is the classical equivalent of the well-known quantum mechanical effect of electromagnetically induced transparency. The basics of UIT are reviewed, and various ways in which UIT can be utilized to achieve exotic propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in plasmas are discussed. For example, UIT can dramatically slow down the waves' group velocity, resulting in the extreme compression of the wave energy in the plasma. Compressed waves are polarized along the propagation direction, and can be used for synchronous electron or ion acceleration. Strong coupling between the two wave helicities are explored to impart the waves with high group velocities ∂ω/∂k for vanishing wave numbers k. Cross-helicity coupling for realistic density and magnetic field profiles are examined using a linearized fluid code, particle-in-cell simulations, and ray-tracing WKB calculations

  9. Investigation of the nonlinear effects of Wiggler and undulator fields on the beam dynamics of particle storage rings in the case of DORIS III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decking, W.

    1995-11-01

    In this thesis I analyze the effects of wiggler and undulator magnetic fields on the beam dynamics of electron/positron storage rings. DORIS III, DESY's synchrotron radiation source is taken as an example. Wigglers and undulators are used for the production of synchrotron radiation or to control beam sizes in storage rings. Their introduction in the lattices of storage rings causes some problems due to the strong nonlinearities of the magnetic fields. Therefore a detailed analysis of the particle dynamics under the influence of wiggler magnetic fields and their field errors is necessary. This thesis provides such an analysis. The problem will be attacked analytically, numerically and experimentally. The analytic approach is based on the treatment of the appropriate Hamiltonian with perturbation theory. The magnetic fields are described with a Fourier series, which covers the main characteristics of wiggler and undulator fields. The main effect of wigglers and undulators is the excitation of fourth order synchro-betatron resonances. The description of field errors and other details of the magnetic fields is achieved by integrating over appropriately distributed current sheets. This allows the modeling of different parameters such as magnet pole width, periodicity errors and errors in the field gradients. (orig./WL)ons of motion in the fields calculated with this method can only be integrated numerically. This would be much too slow to be used in particle tracking codes. Therefore a transfer map b

  10. Laser-plasma accelerator-based single-cycle attosecond undulator source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibai, Z.; Tóth, Gy.; Nagyváradi, A.; Sharma, A.; Mechler, M. I.; Fülöp, J. A.; Almási, G.; Hebling, J.

    2018-06-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs), producing high-quality electron beams, provide an opportunity to reduce the size of free-electron lasers (FELs) to only a few meters. A complete system is proposed here, which is based on FEL technology and consists of an LPA, two undulators, and other magnetic devices. The system is capable to generate carrier-envelope phase stable attosecond pulses with engineered waveform. Pulses with up to 60 nJ energy and 90-400 attosecond duration in the 30-120 nm wavelength range are predicted by numerical simulation. These pulses can be used to investigate ultrafast field-driven electron dynamics in matter.

  11. Development of pattern aware unit (PAU) for the LCLS beam based fast feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.H.; Allison, S.; Fairley, D.; Himel, T.M.; Krejcik, P.; Rogind, D.; Williams, E.

    2012-01-01

    LCLS is now successfully operating at its design beam repetition rate of 120 Hz, but in order to ensure stable beam operation at this high rate we have developed a new timing pattern aware EPICS controller for beam line actuators. Actuators that are capable of responding at 120 Hz are controlled by the new Pattern Aware Unit (PAU) as part of the beam-based feedback system. The beam at the LCLS is synchronized to the 60 Hz AC power line phase and is subject to electrical noise which differs according to which of the six possible AC phases is chosen from the 3-phase site power line. Beam operation at 120 Hz interleaves two of these 60 Hz phases and the feedback must be able to apply independent corrections to the beam pulse according to which of the 60 Hz timing patterns the pulse is synchronized to. The PAU works together with the LCLS Event Timing system which broadcasts a timing pattern that uniquely identifies each pulse when it is measured and allows the feedback correction to be applied to subsequent pulses belonging to the same timing pattern, or time slot, as it is referred to at SLAC. At 120 Hz operation this effectively provides us with two independent, but interleaved feedback loops. Other beam programs at the SLAC facility such as LCLS-II and FACET will be pulsed on other time slots and the PAUs in those systems will respond to their appropriate timing patterns. This paper describes the details of the PAU development: real-time requirements and achievement, scalability, and consistency. The operational results will also be described. (authors)

  12. Laser power meters as an X-ray power diagnostic for LCLS-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimann, Philip; Moeller, Stefan; Carbajo, Sergio; Song, Sanghoon; Dakovski, Georgi; Nordlund, Dennis; Fritz, David

    2018-01-01

    For the LCLS-II X-ray instruments, laser power meters are being developed as compact X-ray power diagnostics to operate at soft and tender X-ray photon energies. These diagnostics can be installed at various locations along an X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) beamline in order to monitor the transmission of X-ray optics along the beam path. In addition, the power meters will be used to determine the absolute X-ray power at the endstations. Here, thermopile power meters, which measure average power, and have been chosen primarily for their compatibility with the high repetition rates at LCLS-II, are evaluated. A number of characteristics in the soft X-ray range are presented including linearity, calibrations conducted with a photodiode and a gas monitor detector as well as ultra-high-vacuum compatibility tests using residual gas analysis. The application of these power meters for LCLS-II and other X-ray FEL sources is discussed.

  13. Industrialization of the nitrogen-doping preparation for SRF cavities for LCLS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, D.; Aderhold, S.; Burrill, A.; Daly, E.; Davis, K.; Grassellino, A.; Grimm, C.; Khabiboulline, T.; Marhauser, F.; Melnychuk, O.; Palczewski, A.; Posen, S.; Ross, M.; Sergatskov, D.; Sukhanov, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Wilson, K. M.

    2018-03-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) is a new state-of-the-art coherent X-ray source being constructed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. It employs 280 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities in order operate in continuous wave (CW) mode. To reduce the overall cryogenic cost of such a large accelerator, nitrogen-doping of the SRF cavities is being used. Nitrogen-doping has consistently been shown to increase the efficiency of SRF cavities operating in the 2.0 K regime and at medium fields (15-20 MV/m) in vertical cavity tests and horizontal cryomodule tests. While nitrogen-doping's efficacy for improvement of cavity performance was demonstrated at three independent labs, Fermilab, Jefferson Lab, and Cornell University, transfer of the technology to industry for LCLS-II production was not without challenges. Here we present results from the beginning of LCLS-II cavity production. We discuss qualification of the cavity vendors and the first cavities from each vendor. Finally, we demonstrate that nitrogen-doping has been successfully transferred to SRF cavity vendors, resulting in consistent production of cavities with better cryogenic efficiency than has ever been achieved for a large-scale accelerator.

  14. Undulator sources at a 8 GeV storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harami, Taikan.

    1989-06-01

    The use of undulators plays an important role as a high brilliance sources of synchrotron photon at a facility having an electron (or positron) storage ring. This paper describes the characteristics, tunability from gap variation and brilliance of synchrotron photon from undulators at a 8 GeV storage ring. The numerical studies show the following results. (1) Undulators for a 8 GeV storage ring can cover the first harmonic photon energy range from about 0.3 to 30 keV and the third harmonic photon from 0.85 to 70 keV. (2) The brilliance of undulator can be expected to be the order of 10 21 photons/(sec mm 2 mrad 2 0.1% band width mA), without size and angular spread in the electron beam (diffraction limit). (3) The peak brilliance has a broad maximum as a function of β function of the lattice and is shown to be practically independent on the β function. The peak brilliance is calculated to be the order of 10 16 photons/(sec mm 2 mrad 2 0.1% band width mA) at the electron beam emittance of 5 x 10 -9 m·rad (undulator length 2 m). (4) The nuclei of 57 Fe, 119 Sn and 238 U are expected to be the candidates for the Moessbauer scattering experiment using synchrotron photon from a 8 GeV storage ring. (author)

  15. Production of linear polarization by segmentation of helical undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, T.; Kitamura, H.

    2002-01-01

    A simple scheme to obtain linearly polarized radiation (LPR) with a segmented undulator is proposed. The undulator is composed of several segments each of which forms a helical undulator and has helicity opposite to those of adjacent segments. Due to coherent sum of radiation, the circularly polarized component is canceled out resulting in production of LPR without any higher harmonics. The radiation from the proposed device is investigated analytically, which shows that a high degree of linear polarization is obtained in spite of a finite beam emittance and angular acceptance of optics, if a sufficiently large number of segments and an adequate photon energy are chosen. Results of calculation to investigate practical performances of the proposed device are presented

  16. Intensity interferometry at the X13A undulator beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluskin, E.; McNulty, I.; Yang, L.; Randall, K.J.; Johnson, E.D.

    1993-01-01

    We are constructing a soft x-ray intensity interferometer and an undulator based beamline to demonstrate intensity interferometry in the x-ray region. The 10-period soft x-ray undulator at the NSLS provides the necessary coherent flux; the X13A beamline is designed to preserve the spatial coherence of the bright x-ray beam and provide sufficient temporal coherence using a horizontally deflecting spherical grating monochromator. Using the interferometer, which consists of an array of small slits, a wedge-shaped beamsplitter and two fast microchannel plate detectors, we expect to measure the spatial coherence of the undulator beam and therefore the size of the source in the vertical plane. Details of the bean-dine design and the interferometer experiment are discussed

  17. Coherent harmonic production using a two-section undulator FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaroszynski, D.A. [Commissariat a l`Energie, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Prazeres, R.; Glotin, F. [Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud (France)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    We present measurements and a theoretical analysis of a new method of generating harmonic radiation in a free-electron laser oscillator with a two section undulator in a single optical cavity. To produce coherent harmonic radiation the undulator is arranged so that the downstream undulator section resonance frequency matches a harmonic of the upstream undulator. Both the fundamental and the harmonic optical fields evolve in the same optical cavity and are coupled out with different extraction fractions using a hole in one of the cavity mirrors. We present measurements that show that the optical power at the second and third harmonic can be enhanced by more than an order of magnitude in this fundamental/harmonic configuration. We compare the production of harmonic radiation of a two sectioned fundamental/harmonic undulator with that produced from a FEL operating at its highest efficiency with a step-tapered undulator, where the bunching at the end of the first section is very large. We examine, the dependence of the harmonic power on the intracavity power by adjusting the optical cavity desynchronism, {delta}L. We also examine the evolution of the fundamental and harmonic powers as a function of cavity roundtrip number to evaluate the importance of the small signal gain at the harmonic. We compare our measurements with predictions of a multi-electron numerical model that follows the evolution of fundamental and harmonic power to saturation. This fundamental/harmonic mode, of operation of the FEL may have useful applications in the production of coherent X-ray and VUV radiation, a spectral range where high reflectivity optical cavity mirrors are difficult or impossible to manufacture.

  18. Characterization and long term operation of a novel superconducting undulator with 15 mm period length in a synchrotron light source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Casalbuoni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A new cryogen-free full scale (1.5 m long superconducting undulator with a period length of 15 mm (SCU15 has been successfully tested in the ANKA storage ring. This represents a very important milestone in the development of superconducting undulators for third and fourth generation light sources carried on by the collaboration between the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the industrial partner Babcock Noell GmbH. SCU15 is the first full length device worldwide that with beam reaches a higher peak field than what expected with the same geometry (vacuum gap and period length with an ideal cryogenic permanent magnet undulator built with the best material available PrFeB. After a summary on the design and main parameters of the device, we present here the characterization in terms of spectral properties and the long term operation of the SCU15 in the ANKA storage ring.

  19. Characterization of undulator radiation at the Photon Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maezawa, Hideki; Kitamura, Hideo; Sasaki, Taizo; Suzuki, Yoshio

    1986-01-01

    Spectra of undulator radiation of the Photon Factory undulator, model PMU-2, were measured in a scale of absolute brightness in the soft X-ray region for various values of the K-parameter from 0.72 to 1.66. A significant reduction of the peak brightness was observed, whereas we also observed a relatively sharp edge at the high energy side of the first harmonic. The results show that the peak brightness and the band width are highly dependent on the beam parameters and the geometry of spectral observation. (orig.)

  20. Characterization of undulator radiation at the photon factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maezawa, Hideki; Suzuki, Yoshio; Kitamura, Hideo; Sasaki, Taizo

    1986-05-01

    Spectra of undulator radiation of the Photon Factory undulator, model PMU-2, were measured in a scale of absolute brightness in the soft X-ray region for various values of the K-parameter from 0.72 to 1.66. A significant reduction of the peak brightness was observed, whereas we also observed a relatively sharp edge at the high energy side of the first harmonic. The results show that the peak brightness and the band width are highly dependent on the beam parameters and the geometry of spectral observation.

  1. Observation of the undulator radiation from the positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maezawa, Hideki.

    1986-02-01

    A spectral measurement of the 1st harmonic of the undulator radiation emitted from positron beam was made on Dec. 21, 1985 during a test operation of the Photon Factory storage ring with the 2.5 GeV positron beam which was stored up to 5.5 mA. In comparison to the same measurement performed with the electron beam, no appreciable difference in the spectral properties of the undulator radiation was found between the two cases under the condition of the low beam current of a few mA. (author)

  2. Formation test of the plasma micro-undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Noriyasu; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi; Aoki, Nobutada; Kimura, Hironobu; Konagai, Chikara; Nakagawa, Satoshi [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Suzuki, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    An electrostatic plasma micro-undulator was demonstrated by utilizing methods of a laser interference and resonant photoionization. An ion-ripple can be formed across a relativistic electron beam injected into the micro-undulator. Thereby, synchrotron radiation light can be projected. Neodymium (Nd) target is ablated by a pulsed Nd-YAG laser beam, and the vapor is ionized by another laser beam with a wavelength tuned to a resonant ionization line of Nd atom. The laser beam for ionization is irradiated into Nd vapor using interference optics, and a micro-sized plasma-ripple corresponding to the interference fringes is shaped. In the experiment, the interference fringe with a periodic length from 10 to 300 {mu}m was formed, and the plasma-ripple was observed. The plasma density of order of 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}, under the experimental condition, was not sufficient to obtain an effect expected as an undulator. However, optimization of a distance from the ablation spot to the laser plasma fringe and increase of laser power could achieve an undulator parameter K of more than 0.1. (author)

  3. Test of an undulated vacuum chamber for the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This picture shows mechanical tests of an undulated vacuum chamber for downstream arms of ISR intersections. This chamber, made of 0.3 mm thick inconel, had inner dimensions of 150 mm by 50 mm. The deflection under vacuum is measured by dial gauges. On the left one sees the large vessel where vacuum chambers were tested at pressures above atmospheric pressure.

  4. The E166 experiment: Development of an undulator-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A longitudinal polarized positron beam is foreseen for the international linear collider (ILC). A proof-of-principle experiment has been performed in the final focus test beam at SLAC to demonstrate the production of polarized positrons for implementation at the ILC. The E166 experiment uses a 1 m long helical undulator in a ...

  5. Advantage and Challenges of $Nb_3Sn$ Superconducting Undulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlobin, A. V. [Fermilab; Barzi, E. [Fermilab; Turrinoni, D. [Fermilab; Ivanyushenkov, Yu. [Argonne; Kesgin, I. [Argonne

    2018-04-01

    Utilization of Nb3Sn superconducting wires offers the possibility to increase undulators’ nominal operation field and temperature margin, but requires overcoming chal-lenges that are described in this paper. The achievable field levels for a Nb3Sn version of superconducting undulators being developed at APS-ANL and the conductor choice are also presented and discussed.

  6. Spatial uncertainty of a geoid undulation model in Guayaquil, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chicaiza E.G.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Geostatistics is a discipline that deals with the statistical analysis of regionalized variables. In this case study, geostatistics is used to estimate geoid undulation in the rural area of Guayaquil town in Ecuador. The geostatistical approach was chosen because the estimation error of prediction map is getting. Open source statistical software R and mainly geoR, gstat and RGeostats libraries were used. Exploratory data analysis (EDA, trend and structural analysis were carried out. An automatic model fitting by Iterative Least Squares and other fitting procedures were employed to fit the variogram. Finally, Kriging using gravity anomaly of Bouguer as external drift and Universal Kriging were used to get a detailed map of geoid undulation. The estimation uncertainty was reached in the interval [-0.5; +0.5] m for errors and a maximum estimation standard deviation of 2 mm in relation with the method of interpolation applied. The error distribution of the geoid undulation map obtained in this study provides a better result than Earth gravitational models publicly available for the study area according the comparison with independent validation points. The main goal of this paper is to confirm the feasibility to use geoid undulations from Global Navigation Satellite Systems and leveling field measurements and geostatistical techniques methods in order to use them in high-accuracy engineering projects.

  7. Undulator based scanning microscope at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rarback, H.; Shu, D.; Ade, H.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; McNulty, I.; Rosser, R.

    1986-01-01

    A second generation scanning soft x-ray microscope is under construction, designed to utilize the dramatic increase in source bightness available at the soft x-ray undulator. The new instrument is expected to reduce image acquisition time by a factor of about 100, and to improve resolution, stability, and reproducibility

  8. Spatial uncertainty of a geoid undulation model in Guayaquil, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicaiza, E. G.; Leiva, C. A.; Arranz, J. J.; Buenańo, X. E.

    2017-06-01

    Geostatistics is a discipline that deals with the statistical analysis of regionalized variables. In this case study, geostatistics is used to estimate geoid undulation in the rural area of Guayaquil town in Ecuador. The geostatistical approach was chosen because the estimation error of prediction map is getting. Open source statistical software R and mainly geoR, gstat and RGeostats libraries were used. Exploratory data analysis (EDA), trend and structural analysis were carried out. An automatic model fitting by Iterative Least Squares and other fitting procedures were employed to fit the variogram. Finally, Kriging using gravity anomaly of Bouguer as external drift and Universal Kriging were used to get a detailed map of geoid undulation. The estimation uncertainty was reached in the interval [-0.5; +0.5] m for errors and a maximum estimation standard deviation of 2 mm in relation with the method of interpolation applied. The error distribution of the geoid undulation map obtained in this study provides a better result than Earth gravitational models publicly available for the study area according the comparison with independent validation points. The main goal of this paper is to confirm the feasibility to use geoid undulations from Global Navigation Satellite Systems and leveling field measurements and geostatistical techniques methods in order to use them in high-accuracy engineering projects.

  9. Numerical modeling of shoreline undulations part 1: Constant wave climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kasper Hauberg; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    integrated flow model, a wave-phase resolving sediment transport description and a one-line shoreline model.First the length of the shoreline undulations is determined in the linear regime using a stability analysis. Next the further evolution from the linear to the fully non-linear regime is described...

  10. Evaluation of Laser Stabilization and Imaging Systems for LCLS-II - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Matthew [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2015-08-20

    By combining the top performing commercial laser beam stabilization system with the most ideal optical imaging configuration, the beamline for the Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) will deliver the highest quality and most stable beam to the cathode. To determine the optimal combination, LCLS-II beamline conditions were replicated and the systems tested with a He-Ne laser. The Guidestar-II and MRC active laser beam stabilization systems were evaluated for their ideal positioning and stability. Both a two and four lens optical imaging configuration was then evaluated for beam imaging quality, magnification properties, and natural stability. In their best performances when tested over fifteen hours, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable over approximately 70-110um while the MRC system kept it stable over approximately 90-100um. During short periods of time, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable between 10-20um, but was more susceptible to drift over time, while the MRC system maintained the beam between 30-50um with less overall drift. The best optical imaging configuration proved to be a four lens system that images to the iris located in the cathode room and from there, imaged to the cathode. The magnification from the iris to the cathode was 2:1, within an acceptable tolerance to the expected 2.1:1 magnification. The two lens configuration was slightly more stable in small periods of time (less than 10 minutes) without the assistance of a stability system, approximately 55um compared to approximately 70um, but the four lens configurations beam image had a significantly flatter intensity distribution compared to the two lens configuration which had a Gaussian distribution. A final test still needs to be run with both stability systems running at the same time through the four lens system. With this data, the optimal laser beam stabilization system can be determined for the beamline of LCLS-II.

  11. Ultrafast studies of shock-induced melting and phase transitions at LCLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Malcolm

    The study of shock-induced phase transitions, which is vital to the understanding of material response to rapid pressure changes, dates back to the 1950s, when Bankcroft et al reported a transition in iron. Since then, many transitions have been reported in a wide range of materials, but, due to the lack of sufficiently bright x-ray sources, the structural details of these new phases has been notably lacking. While the development of nanosecond in situ x-ray diffraction has meant that lattice-level studies of such phenomena have become possible, including studies of the phase transition reported 60 years ago in iron, the quality of the diffraction data from such studies is noticeably poorer than that obtained from statically-compressed samples on synchrotrons. The advent of x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs), such as the LCLS, has resulted in an unprecedented improvement in the quality of diffraction data that can be obtained from shock-compressed matter. Here I describe the results from three recent experiment at the LCLS that looked at the solid-solid and solid-liquid phase transitions in Sb, Bi and Sc using single 50 fs x-ray exposures. The results provide new insight into the structural changes and melting induced by shock compression. This work is supported by EPSRC under Grant No. EP/J017051/1. Use of the LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  12. Evidence of Wigner rotation phenomena in the beam splitting experiment at the LCLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2016-07-01

    A result from particle tracking states that, after a microbunched electron beam is kicked, its trajectory changes while the orientation of the microbunching wavefront remains as before. Experiments at the LCLS showed that radiation in the kicked direction is produced practically without suppression. This could be explained if the orientation of the microbunching wavefront is readjusted along the kicked direction. In previous papers we showed that when the evolution of the electron beam modulation is treated according to relativistic kinematics, the orientation of the microbunching wavefront in the ultrarelativistic asymptotic is always perpendicular to the electron beam velocity. There we refrained from using advanced theoretical concepts to explain or analyze the wavefront rotation. For example, we only hinted to the relation of this phenomenon with the concept of Wigner rotation. This more abstract view of wavefront rotation underlines its elementary nature. The Wigner rotation is known as a fundamental effect in elementary particle physics. The composition of non collinear boosts does not result in a simple boost but, rather, in a Lorentz transformation involving a boost and a rotation, the Wigner rotation. Here we show that during the LCLS experiments, a Wigner rotation was actually directly recorded for the first time with a ultrarelativistic, macroscopic object: an ultrarelativistic electron bunch in an XFEL modulated at nm-scale of the size of about 10 microns. Here we point out the role of Wigner rotation in the analysis and interpretation of experiments with ultrarelativistic, microbunched electron beams in FELs. After the beam splitting experiment at the LCLS it became clear that, in the ultrarelativistic asymptotic, the projection of the microbunching wave vector onto the beam velocity is a Lorentz invariant, similar to the helicity in particle physics.

  13. Evidence of Wigner rotation phenomena in the beam splitting experiment at the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    A result from particle tracking states that, after a microbunched electron beam is kicked, its trajectory changes while the orientation of the microbunching wavefront remains as before. Experiments at the LCLS showed that radiation in the kicked direction is produced practically without suppression. This could be explained if the orientation of the microbunching wavefront is readjusted along the kicked direction. In previous papers we showed that when the evolution of the electron beam modulation is treated according to relativistic kinematics, the orientation of the microbunching wavefront in the ultrarelativistic asymptotic is always perpendicular to the electron beam velocity. There we refrained from using advanced theoretical concepts to explain or analyze the wavefront rotation. For example, we only hinted to the relation of this phenomenon with the concept of Wigner rotation. This more abstract view of wavefront rotation underlines its elementary nature. The Wigner rotation is known as a fundamental effect in elementary particle physics. The composition of non collinear boosts does not result in a simple boost but, rather, in a Lorentz transformation involving a boost and a rotation, the Wigner rotation. Here we show that during the LCLS experiments, a Wigner rotation was actually directly recorded for the first time with a ultrarelativistic, macroscopic object: an ultrarelativistic electron bunch in an XFEL modulated at nm-scale of the size of about 10 microns. Here we point out the role of Wigner rotation in the analysis and interpretation of experiments with ultrarelativistic, microbunched electron beams in FELs. After the beam splitting experiment at the LCLS it became clear that, in the ultrarelativistic asymptotic, the projection of the microbunching wave vector onto the beam velocity is a Lorentz invariant, similar to the helicity in particle physics.

  14. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation as a Diagnostic Tool for the LCLS Longitudinal Feedback System

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Juhao; Huang, Zhirong

    2005-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL). To ensure the vitality of FEL lasing, a longitudinal feedback system is required together with other diagnostics. In this paper, we study the possibility of using Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) from the chicane as the diagnostic tool for bunch length feedback. Calculations show that CSR is a good candidate, even for the non-Gaussian, double-horn longitudinal charge distribution. We further check the feasibility for low and high charge options, and also the possibility for detecting the microbunching.

  15. Mechanical Design and Analysis of LCLS II 2 K Cold Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S.; Dixon, K.; Laverdure, N.; Rath, D.; Bevins, M.; Bai, H.; Kaminski, S.; Ravindranath, V.

    2017-12-01

    The mechanical design and analysis of the LCLS II 2 K cold box are presented. Its feature and functionality are discussed. ASME B31.3 was used to design its internal piping, and compliance of the piping code was ensured through flexibility analysis. The 2 K cold box was analyzed using ANSYS 17.2; the requirements of the applicable codes—ASME Section VIII Division 2 and ASCE 7-10—were satisfied. Seismic load was explicitly considered in both analyses.

  16. Circular polarization with crossed-planar undulators in high-gain FELs

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, K J K J

    2000-01-01

    We propose a crossed undulator configuration for a high-gain free-electron laser to allow versatile polarization control. This configuration consists of a long (saturation length) planar undulator, a dispersive section, and a short (a few gain lengths) planar undulator oriented perpendicular to the first one. In the first undulator, a radiation component linearly polarized in the x-direction is amplified to saturation. In the second undulator, the x-polarized component propagates freely, while a new component, polarized in the y-direction, is generated and reaches saturation in a few gain lengths. By adjusting the strength of the dispersive section, the relative phase of two radiation components can be adjusted to obtain a suitable polarization for the total radiation field, including the circular polarization. The operating principle of the high-gain crossed undulator, which is quite different from that of the crossed undulator for spontaneous radiation, is illustrated in terms of 1-D FEL theory.

  17. Laser Safety for the Experimental Halls at SLAC_s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Michael; Anthony, Perry; /SLAC; Barat, Ken; /LBL, Berkeley; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Greg; White, William E.; /SLAC

    2009-01-15

    The LCLS at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will be the world's first source of an intense hard x-ray laser beam, generating x-rays with wavelengths of 1nm and pulse durations less than 100fs. The ultrafast x-ray pulses will be used in pump-probe experiments to take stop-motion pictures of atoms and molecules in motion, with pulses powerful enough to take diffraction images of single molecules, enabling scientists to elucidate fundamental processes of chemistry and biology. Ultrafast conventional lasers will be used as the pump. In 2009, LCLS will deliver beam to the Atomic Molecular and Optical (AMO) Experiment, located in one of 3 x-ray Hutches in the Near Experimental Hall (NEH). The NEH includes a centralized Laser Hall, containing up to three Class 4 laser systems, three x-ray Hutches for experiments and vacuum transport tubes for delivering laser beams to the Hutches. The main components of the NEH laser systems are a Ti:sapphire oscillator, a regen amplifier, green pump lasers for the oscillator and regen, a pulse compressor and a harmonics conversion unit. Laser safety considerations and controls for the ultrafast laser beams, multiple laser controlled areas, and user facility issues are discussed.

  18. LCLS-II 1.3 GHz cryomodule design - lessons learned from testing at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzny, J.; Hurd, J.; Orlov, Y.; He, Y.; Bossert, R.; Grimm, C.; Schappert, W.; Atassi, O. Al; Wang, R.; Arkan, T.; Theilacker, J.; Klebaner, A.; White, M.; Wu, G.; Makara, J.; Ginsburg, C.; Pei, L.; Holzbauer, J.; Hansen, B.; Stanek, R.; Peterson, T.; Harms, E.

    2017-12-01

    Fermilab’s 1.3 GHz prototype cryomodule for the Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade (LCLS-II) has been tested at Fermilab’s Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF). Aspects of the cryomodule design have been studied and tested. The cooldown circuit was used to quickly cool the cavities through the transition temperature, and a heater on the circuit was used to heat incoming helium for warmup. Due to the 0.5% slope of the cryomodule, the liquid level is not constant along the length of the cryomodule. This slope as well as the pressure profile caused liquid level management to be a challenge. The microphonics levels in the cryomodule were studied and efforts were made to reduce them throughout testing. Some of the design approaches and studies performed on these aspects will be presented. Fermilab is operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. De-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy. This work was supported, in part, by the LCLS-II Project.

  19. In vacuum undulator task force report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HASTINGS, J.B.; KAO, C.C.; STEFAN, P.; BURLEY, S.; CARGILL, G.S.; CHANCE, M.; DIERKER, S.; HENDRICKSON, W.; EVANS-LUDERODT, K.; MAO, H.K.

    1998-01-01

    The Green-Chasman lattice, which is the basis for both NSLS storage rings, was conceived with insertion devices in mind. Long, field-free straight sections were provided in the design. The electron optics were chosen so that these sections had zero dispersion and the effects of new magnetic structures placed in these regions would have minimal effect on the emittance of the electron beam. This design concept has been followed by all high-brightness rings which were built subsequent to the NSLS. The X-Ray Ring straight sections also have a very small vertical β function, in addition to the zero dispersion. This was done to optimize the brightness of wiggler sources. There is a further benefit however. The β function determines the beam size and divergence at a particular point in the storage ring lattice. The size is proportional to √β and the divergence is proportional to 1/√β. Thus the electron beam is very small at the center of the X-Ray Ring straight sections. In the initial development of the insertion device program, no specific advantage was taken of this feature. Of the eight straight sections in the X-Ray Ring lattice, five are readily available for magnetic insertion devices and the remaining three are dedicated to radio-frequency drive cavities (2) and injection (1)

  20. IN VACUUM UNDULATOR TASK FORCE REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HASTINGS,J.B.; KAO,C.C.; STEFAN,P.; BURLEY,S.; CARGILL,G.S.; CHANCE,M.; DIERKER,S.; HENDRICKSON,W.; EVANS-LUDERODT,K.; MAO,H.K.

    1998-06-01

    The Green-Chasman lattice, which is the basis for both NSLS storage rings, was conceived with insertion devices in mind. Long, field-free straight sections were provided in the design. The electron optics were chosen so that these sections had zero dispersion and the effects of new magnetic structures placed in these regions would have minimal effect on the emittance of the electron beam. This design concept has been followed by all high-brightness rings which were built subsequent to the NSLS. The X-Ray Ring straight sections also have a very small vertical {beta} function, in addition to the zero dispersion. This was done to optimize the brightness of wiggler sources. There is a further benefit however. The {beta} function determines the beam size and divergence at a particular point in the storage ring lattice. The size is proportional to {radical}{beta} and the divergence is proportional to 1/{radical}{beta}. Thus the electron beam is very small at the center of the X-Ray Ring straight sections. In the initial development of the insertion device program, no specific advantage was taken of this feature. Of the eight straight sections in the X-Ray Ring lattice, five are readily available for magnetic insertion devices and the remaining three are dedicated to radio-frequency drive cavities (2) and injection (1).

  1. Design and performance of the APPLE-Knot undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Fuhao; Chang, Rui; Zhou, Qiaogen; Zhang, Wei; Ye, Mao; Sasaki, Shigemi; Qiao, Shan

    2015-01-01

    The design and performance of the Apple-Knot undulator which can generate photons with arbitrary polarization and low on-axis heat load are presented. Along with the development of accelerator technology, synchrotron emittance has continuously decreased. This results in increased brightness, but also causes a heavy heat load on beamline optics. Recently, optical surfaces with 0.1 nm micro-roughness and 0.05 µrad slope error (r.m.s.) have become commercially available and surface distortions due to heat load have become a key factor in determining beamline performance, and heat load has become a serious problem at modern synchrotron radiation facilities. Here, APPLE-Knot undulators which can generate photons with arbitrary polarization, with low on-axis heat load, are reported

  2. Design and performance of the APPLE-Knot undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Fuhao [Department of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, and Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, 2005 Songhu Road, Shanghai 200438, People’s Republic of (China); Chang, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050, People’s Republic of (China); Zhou, Qiaogen; Zhang, Wei [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 239 Zhangheng Road, Shanghai 201204, People’s Republic of (China); Ye, Mao [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050, People’s Republic of (China); Sasaki, Shigemi [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, 2-313 Kagamiyama, Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Qiao, Shan, E-mail: qiaoshan@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050, People’s Republic of (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, 319 Yueyang Road, Shanghai 200031, People’s Republic of (China)

    2015-06-09

    The design and performance of the Apple-Knot undulator which can generate photons with arbitrary polarization and low on-axis heat load are presented. Along with the development of accelerator technology, synchrotron emittance has continuously decreased. This results in increased brightness, but also causes a heavy heat load on beamline optics. Recently, optical surfaces with 0.1 nm micro-roughness and 0.05 µrad slope error (r.m.s.) have become commercially available and surface distortions due to heat load have become a key factor in determining beamline performance, and heat load has become a serious problem at modern synchrotron radiation facilities. Here, APPLE-Knot undulators which can generate photons with arbitrary polarization, with low on-axis heat load, are reported.

  3. Enhanced coherent undulator radiation from bunched electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, K.W.; Crosson, E.R.; Ricci, K.N.; Smith, T.I.

    1996-01-01

    When energetic bunches of electrons traverse an undulator field, they can spontaneously emit radiation both coherently and incoherently. Although it has generally been assumed that undulator radiation is incoherent at wavelengths short compared to the longitudinal size of the electron bunch, several recent observations have proved this assumption false. Furthermore, the appearance of coherent radiation is often accompanied by a significant increase in radiated power. Here we report observations of strongly enhanced coherent spontaneous radiation together with direct measurements, using transition radiation techniques, of the electron distributions responsible for the coherent emission. We also report demonstrated enhancements in the predicted spontaneous radiated power by as much as 6x10 4 using electron bunch compression. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  4. Absolute measurement of undulator radiation in the extreme ultraviolet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maezawa, H.; Kitamura, H.; Sasaki, T.; Mitani, S.; Osaka City Univ.; Suzuki, Y.; Kanamori, H.; Tamamushi, S.; Tokyo Univ.; Mikuni, A.; Tokyo Univ., Tanashi

    1983-01-01

    The spectral brightness of undulator radiation emitted by the model PMU-1 incorporated in the SOR-RING, the dedicated synchrotron radiation source in Tokyo, has been studied in the extreme ultraviolet region from 21.6 to 72.9 eV as a function of the electron energy #betta#, the field parameter K, and the angle of observation THETA in the absolute scale. A series of measurements covering the first and the second harmonic component of undulator radiation was compared with the fundamental formula lambdasub(n)=lambda 0 /2n#betta# 2 (1+K 2 /2+#betta# 2 THETA 2 ), and the effects of finite emittance were studied. The brightness at the first peak was smaller than the theoretical value, while an enhanced second harmonic component was observed. (orig.)

  5. Effects of wigglers and undulators on beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.

    1986-08-01

    Synchrotron light facilities are making ever increasing use of wigglers and undulators, to the extent that these devices are becoming a significant part of the beam optical system of the storage ring itself. This paper presents a theoretical formulation for investigating the effect of wigglers and undulators on beam dynamics in the approximation that the wiggler parameter, K, divided by γ is a small number and that the number of wiggler periods in one device is large. In addition to the linear forces which must be taken into account when tuning and matching the ring, nonlinear stop bends are created, with even orders more serious than odd orders. Some numerical examples are given for devices similar to those proposed for the 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

  6. Optimal propulsion of an undulating slender body with anisotropic friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Ibarra, Alejandro; Melo, Francisco

    2018-01-24

    This study investigates theoretically and numerically the propulsive sliding of a slender body. The body sustains a transverse and propagative wave along its main axis, and undergoes anisotropic friction caused by its surface texture sliding on the floor. A model accounting for the anisotropy of frictional forces acting on the body is implemented. This describes the propulsive force and gives the optimal undulating parameters for efficient forward propulsion. The optimal wave characteristics are effectively compared to the undulating motion of a slithering snakes, as well as with the motion of sandfish lizards swimming through the sand. Furthermore, numerical simulations have indicated the existence of certain specialized segments along the body that are highly efficient for propulsion, explaining why snakes lift parts of their body while slithering. Finally, the inefficiency of slithering as a form of locomotion to ascend a slope is discussed.

  7. Antiaging activity of low molecular weight peptide from Paphia undulate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Cai, Bingna; Chen, Hua; Pan, Jianyu; Chen, Deke; Sun, Huili

    2013-05-01

    Low molecular weight peptide (LMWP) was prepared from clam Paphia undulate and its antiaging effect on D-galactose-induced acute aging in rats, aged Kunming mice, ultraviolet-exposed rats, and thermally injured rats was investigated. P. undulate flesh was homogenized and digested using papain under optimal conditions, then subjected to Sephadex G-25 chromatography to isolate the LMWP. Administration of LMWP significantly reversed D-galactose-induced oxidative stress by increasing the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT), and by decreasing the level of malondialdehyde (MDA). This process was accompanied by increased collagen synthesis. The LMWP prevented photoaging and promoted dermis recovery and remission of elastic fiber hyperplasia. Furthermore, treatment with the LMWP helped to regenerate elastic fibers and the collagen network, increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the serum and significantly decreased MDA. Thermal scald-induced inflammation and edema were also relieved by the LWMP, while wound healing in skin was promoted. These results suggest that the LMWP from P. undulate could serve as a new antiaging substance in cosmetics.

  8. Alignment tools used to locate a wire and a laser beam in the VISA undulator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Z.; Ruland, R.; Dix, B.; Arnett, D. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1999-07-01

    Within the framework of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source), a small experiment VISA (Visual to Infrared SASE (Self Amplified Stimulated Emission) Amplifier) is being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. VISA consists of four wiggler segments, each 0.99 m long. The four segments are required to be aligned to the beam axis with an rms error less than 50 {mu}m. This very demanding alignment is carried out in two steps. First the segments are fiducialized using a pulsed wire system. Then the wiggler segments are placed along a reference laser beam which coincides with the electron beam axis. In the wiggler segment fiducialization, a wire is stretched through a wiggler segment and a current pulse is sent down the wire. The deflection of the wire is monitored. The deflection gives information about the electron beam trajectory. The wire is moved until its x position, the coordinate without wire sag, is on the ideal beam trajectory. (The y position is obtained by rotating the wiggler 90 deg C.) Once the wire is on the ideal beam trajectory, the wire's location is measured relative to tooling balls on the wiggler segment. To locate the wire, a device was constructed which measures the wire position relative to tooling balls on the device. The device is called the wire finder. It will be discussed in this paper. To place the magnets along the reference laser beam, the position of the laser beam must be determined. A device which can locate the laser beam relative to tooling balls was constructed and is also discussed in this paper. This device is called the laser finder. With a total alignment error budget less than 50 {mu}m, both the fiducialization and magnet placement must be performed with errors much smaller than 50 {mu}m. It is desired to keep the errors from the wire finder and laser finder at the few {mu}m level. (authors)

  9. Fresh Slice Self-Seeding and Fresh Slice Harmonic Lasing at LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, J.W. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2018-04-01

    We present results from the successful demonstration of fresh slice self-seeding at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS).* The performance is compared with SASE and regular self-seeding at photon energy of 5.5 keV, resulting in a relative average brightness increase of a factor of 12 and a factor of 2 respectively. Following this proof-of-principle we discuss the forthcoming plans to use the same technique** for fresh slice harmonic lasing in an upcoming experiment. The demonstration of fresh slice harmonic lasing provides an attractive solution for future XFELs aiming to achieve high efficiency, high brightness X-ray pulses at high photon energies (>12 keV).***

  10. Transport of LCLS-II 1.3 Ghz cryomodule to SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, M. W.; Arkan, T.; Peterson, T.; Tang, Z.; Boo, S.; Carrasco, M.; Daly, E.; Huque, N.

    2016-06-30

    In a partnership with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) and Jefferson Lab, Fermilab will assemble and test 17 of the 35 total 1.3 GHz cryomodules for the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Project. These include a prototype built and delivered by each Lab. Another two 3.9 GHz cryomodules will be built, tested and transported by Fermilab to SLAC. Each assembly will be transported over-the-road from Fermilab or Jefferson Lab using specific routes to SLAC. The transport system consists of a base frame, isolation fixture and upper protective truss. The strongback cryomodule lifting fixture is described along with other supporting equipment used for both over-the-road transport and local (on-site) transport at Fermilab. Initially, analysis of fragile components and stability studies will be performed in order to assess the risk associated with over-the-road transport of a fully assembled cryomodule.

  11. Measurements of Compression and Emittance Growth after the First LCLS Bunch Compressor Chicane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emma, P.

    2007-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE xray free-electron laser project presently under construction at SLAC. The injector section from RF photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane was installed during the fall of 2006. The first bunch compressor is located at 250 MeV and nominally compresses a 1-nC electron bunch from an rms length of about 1 mm to 0.2 mm. Transverse phase space and bunch length diagnostics are located immediately after the chicane. We present preliminary measurements and simulations of the longitudinal and transverse phase space after the chicane in various beam conditions, including extreme compression with micron-scale current spikes

  12. General design of the layout for new undulator-only beamline front ends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Deming; Ramanathan, Mohan; Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    2001-01-01

    A great majority of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) users have chosen an undulator as the only source for their insertion device beamline. Compared with a wiggler source, the undulator source has a much smaller horizontal divergence, providing us with an opportunity to optimize the beamline front-end design further. In this paper, the particular designs and specifications, as well as the optical and bremsstrahlung ray-tracing analysis of the new APS front ends for undulator-only operation are presented

  13. A superconducting short period undulator for a harmonic generation FEL experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingold, G.; Solomon, L.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Krinsky, S.; Li, D.; Lynch, D.; Sheehan, J.; Woodle, M.; Qiu, X.Z.; Yu, L.H.

    1993-01-01

    A three stage superconducting (SC) undulator for a high gain harmonic generation (HGE) FEL experiment in the infrared is under construction at the NSLS in collaboration with Grumman Corporation. A novel undulator technology suitable for short period (6-40mm) undulators will be employed for all three stages, the modulator, the dispersive section and the radiator. The undulator triples the frequency of a 10.4μm CO 2 seed laser. So far a 27 period (one third of the final radiator) prototype radiator has been designed, built and tested

  14. Multiple station beamline at an undulator x-ray source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, J.; Freund, A.K.; Grübel, G.

    1994-01-01

    The undulator X-ray source is an ideal source for many applications: the beam is brilliant, highly collimated in all directions, quasi-monochromatic, pulsed and linearly polarized. Such a precious source can feed several independently operated instruments by utilizing a downstream series of X......-ray transparent monochromator crystals. Diamond in particular is an attractive monochromator as it is rather X-ray transparent and can be fabricated to a high degree of crystal perfection. Moreover, it has a very high heat conductivity and a rather small thermal expansion so the beam X-ray heat load problem...

  15. Coherent x-rays and vacuum-ultraviolet radiation from storage-ring-based undulators and free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.J.

    1984-12-01

    High-brightness electron storage rings and permanent-magnet technology provide a basis for the development of coherent radiation in the 10- to 1000-A (xuv) spectral range. The most assured route to the production of coherent x-rays and vuv is the simple interaction between properly constrained relativistic electrons and permanent-magnet undulators, a subject that is already well understood and where technology is well advanced. Other techniques are less well developed, but with increasing degrees of technical challenge they will provide additional coherence properties. Transverse optical klystrons (TOKs) provide an opportunity for additional coherence at certain harmonics of longer-wavelength lasers. Free electron lasers (FELs) extend coherence capabilities substantially through two possible routes: one is the development of suitable mirror coatings. Both FEL techniques would provide vuv radiation and soft x rays with extremely narrow spectral content. Research on all of these techniques (undulators, TOKs, and FELs) is possible in a single facility based on a high-brightness electron storage ring, referred to herein as a Coherent xuv Facility (CXF). Individual items from the report were prepared separately for the data base

  16. Thermal-Mechanical Study of 3.9 GHz CW Coupler and Cavity for LCLS-II Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonin, Ivan [Fermilab; Harms, Elvin [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, Timergali [Fermilab; Solyak, Nikolay [Fermilab; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    Third harmonic system was originally developed by Fermilab for FLASH facility at DESY and then was adopted and modified by INFN for the XFEL project [1-3]. In contrast to XFEL project, all cryomodules in LCLS-II project will operate in CW regime with higher RF average power for 1.3 GHz and 3.9 GHz cavities and couplers. Design of the cavity and fundamental power coupler has been modified to satisfy LCLS-II requirements. In this paper we discuss the results of COMSOL thermal and mechanical analysis of the 3.9 GHz coupler and cavity to verify proposed modifica-tion of the design. For the dressed cavity we present simulations of Lorentz force detuning, helium pressure sensitivity df/dP and major mechanical resonances.

  17. Michelson interferometer design for Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) applications in the 15-1.5 Aa wavelength range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatchyn, Roman

    2000-01-01

    In recent years the continuing development of linac-driven X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XRFEL) designs has significantly expanded the parameter space associated with 3rd and earlier-generation synchrotron radiation sources. In particular, in contrast to the >100 ps pulse durations typical of storage rings, temporal lengths extending down to the <100 fs regime will become available. For example, for the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) a pulse duration of ∼200-300 fs with finer temporal features extending down to ∼1 fs is anticipated. The characterization of the phase space distributions of such pulses poses a significant challenge for instrumentation design both with regard to the brevity of the pulse structure as well as the X-ray (15-1.5 Aa) wavelength range of the FEL line. In this paper we assess a Michelson interferometer design aimed at characterizing the coherence length of the SLAC LCLS and discuss considerations related to its operation

  18. Undulating fins produce off-axis thrust and flow structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveln, Izaak D; Bale, Rahul; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Curet, Oscar M; Patankar, Neelesh A; MacIver, Malcolm A

    2014-01-15

    While wake structures of many forms of swimming and flying are well characterized, the wake generated by a freely swimming undulating fin has not yet been analyzed. These elongated fins allow fish to achieve enhanced agility exemplified by the forward, backward and vertical swimming capabilities of knifefish, and also have potential applications in the design of more maneuverable underwater vehicles. We present the flow structure of an undulating robotic fin model using particle image velocimetry to measure fluid velocity fields in the wake. We supplement the experimental robotic work with high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics, simulating the hydrodynamics of both a virtual fish, whose fin kinematics and fin plus body morphology are measured from a freely swimming knifefish, and a virtual rendering of our robot. Our results indicate that a series of linked vortex tubes is shed off the long edge of the fin as the undulatory wave travels lengthwise along the fin. A jet at an oblique angle to the fin is associated with the successive vortex tubes, propelling the fish forward. The vortex structure bears similarity to the linked vortex ring structure trailing the oscillating caudal fin of a carangiform swimmer, though the vortex rings are distorted because of the undulatory kinematics of the elongated fin.

  19. Research and Development Toward a 4.5-1.5 Angstrom Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatchyn, R.; Arthur, J.; Baltay, M.

    1995-08-01

    In recent years significant studies have been initiated on the feasibility of utilizing a portion of the 3km S-band accelerator at SLAC to drive a short wavelength (4.5-1.5 A) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a Free Electron Laser (FEL) operating in the Self- Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime. Electron beam requirements for single-pass saturation in a minimal time include: (1) a peak current in the 7 kA range, (2) a relative energy spread of <0.05%, and (3) a transverse emittance, ε[r-m], approximating the diffraction limit condition ε = λ / 4π, where lambda(m) is the output wavelength. Requirements on the insertion device include field error levels of 0.02% for keeping the electron bunch centered on and in phase with the amplified photons, and a focusing beta of 8 m/rad for inhibiting the dilution of its transverse density. Although much progress has been made in developing individual components and beam processing techniques necessary for LCLS operation down to approx. 20 A, a substantial amount of research and development is still required in a number of theoretical and experimental areas leading to the construction and operation of a 4.5-1.5 A LCLS. In this paper we report on a research and development program underway and in planning at SLAC for addressing critical questions in these areas

  20. Effect of wavelength of fish-like undulation of a hydrofoil in a free ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thekkethil Namshad

    Abstract. Fish-like undulating body was proposed as an efficient propulsion system, and various mechanisms ... fishes/foil. The present work proposes a unified study for undulating and pitching foil, by varying wavelength k. (from 0.8 to 8.0) of a wave travelling backwards over the ...... and Randall D J (Eds.) Fish physiology.

  1. Second crystal cooling on cryogenically cooled undulator and wiggler double crystal monochromators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, G. S.

    1998-01-01

    Simple methods for the cooling of the second crystals of cryogenically cooled undulator and wiggler double crystal monochromators are described. Copper braids between the first and second crystals are used to cool the second crystals of the double crystal monochromators. The method has proved successful for an undulator monochromator and we describe a design for a wiggler monochromator

  2. Study for a 6 GeV undulator based synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignola, G.; Barton, M.; Blumberg, R.; Galayda, J.; Krinsky, S.; Luccio, A.; Pellegrini, C.; van Steenbergen, A.; Wang, J.

    1985-01-01

    A partial study for a 6 GeV undulator based synchrotron radiation source for production of high brightness undulator radiation, in the A region, is presented. The basic lattice adopted for the storage ring is a hybrid FODO Chasman-Green lattice, making use of gradient in the dipoles. We discuss also the e beam current limits and the injection parameters

  3. Investigation of the polarization state of dual APPLE-II undulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Matthew; Wang, Hongchang; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    The use of an APPLE II undulator is extremely important for providing a high-brilliance X-ray beam with the capability to switch between various photon beam polarization states. A high-precision soft X-ray polarimeter has been used to systematically investigate the polarization characteristics of the two helical APPLE II undulators installed on beamline I06 at Diamond Light Source. A simple data acquisition and processing procedure has been developed to determine the Stokes polarization parameters for light polarized at arbitrary linear angles emitted from a single undulator, and for circularly polarized light emitted from both undulators in conjunction with a single-period undulator phasing unit. The purity of linear polarization is found to deteriorate as the polarization angle moves away from the horizontal and vertical modes. Importantly, a negative correlation between the degree of circular polarization and the photon flux has been found when the phasing unit is used.

  4. Undulator commissioning by characterization of radiation in x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tanaka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs where a long undulator composed of many segments is installed, there exist a number of error sources to reduce the FEL gain such as the trajectory error, K value discrepancy, and phase mismatch, which are related to the segmented-undulator structure. Undulator commissioning, which refers to the tuning and alignment processes to eliminate the possible error sources, is thus an important step toward realization of lasing. In the SPring-8 angstrom compact free electron laser (SACLA facility, the undulator commissioning has been carried out by means of characterization of x-ray radiation, i.e., measurements of the spatial and spectral profiles of monochromatized spontaneous undulator radiation as well as by probing the FEL intensity. The achieved tuning and alignment accuracies estimated from the statistics of actual measurements in SACLA show the effectiveness of this commissioning scheme.

  5. Calculated Performance Of The Variable-Polarization Undulator Upgrade To The Daresbury SRS Soft X-Ray Undulator Beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roper, Mark D.; Bird, Daniel T.

    2004-01-01

    The soft x-ray beamline 5U1 on the Daresbury Laboratory SRS currently uses a planar undulator, producing linearly polarized radiation in the range 100 to 1000 eV. The undulator is soon to be replaced by a variable-polarization device of the Apple II design. The aim is to produce circularly polarized light in the energy range 265 to 1000 eV, covering the K-edges of C, N and O, and the first row transition element L-edges. This will greatly enhance the provision of circularly polarized soft-x-rays on the SRS and open up new opportunities for experimenters. The device will also produce linear polarization with a selectable angle of polarization with respect to the orbit plane, which is currently unavailable on the SRS. In order to provide the coverage over this energy range, we are exploiting the relatively large emittance of the SRS to allow us to use the second and third harmonics even in circular polarization mode. This paper presents the expected beamline output in various polarization modes and the predicted degree of polarization

  6. Exploring the undulating plateau: the future of global oil supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Peter M; Smith, Leta K

    2014-01-13

    In this paper, we analyse the factors that will influence long-term oil supply and describe the future form of the global oil supply profile as an 'undulating plateau' rather than an irreversible, short-term peak or an ever upward trend of increasing production. The ultimate transition from a world of relatively plentiful and cheap oil to one of tight supply and high cost will be slow and challenging. An understanding of the signposts for the future path of supply and the drivers of that profile will be critical to managing the transition. The ultimate form of the global supply curve may well be dictated by demand evolution rather than a limited resource endowment in the longer term. Several factors will probably control future global oil supply. We believe that the scale of global oil resource will not constitute a physical supply limit for at least the next two or three decades. However, all categories of oil resources are already more expensive to develop than in the past, requiring high oil prices to stimulate supply growth. Lower rates of oil demand growth relative to economic growth, combined with more challenging supply growth, will probably lead to an undulating plateau sometime after 2040, with demand from non-Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development states continuing to dominate. Upstream investment requirements and oil price volatility will increase towards and beyond the undulating production plateau. In this new world, high oil prices will induce demand destruction, fuel substitution and ever increasing energy efficiency. As we discuss below, the fundamental differences between the IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates' (IHS CERA) view of the future of oil supply and many peak oil supply models are the timing of the onset of a dramatic slowdown in the rate of growth of supply and the existence or otherwise of a production plateau. We do not dispute that supply will plateau and eventually fall; the question is when, how and at what price

  7. LLRF Control of High Loaded-Q Cavities for the LCLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Carlos [LBNL, Berkeley; Babel, Sandeep [SLAC; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna [Jefferson Lab; Boyes, Matt [SLAC; Chase, Brian [Fermilab; Cullerton, Ed [Fermilab; Doolittle, Lawrence [LBNL, Berkeley; Einstein, Joshua [Fermilab; Hong, Bo [SLAC; Hovater, Curt [Jefferson Lab; Huang, Gang [LBNL, Berkeley; Ratti, Alessandro [LBNL, Berkeley

    2016-06-01

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is planning an upgrade (LCLS-II) to the Linear Coherent Light Source with a 4 GeV CW Superconducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) linac. The nature of the machine places stringent requirements in the Low-Level RF (LLRF) system, expected to control the cavity fields within 0.01 degrees in phase and 0.01% in amplitude, which is equivalent to a longitudinal motion of the cavity structure in the nanometer range. This stability has been achieved in the past but never for hundreds of superconducting cavities in Continuous-Wave (CW) operation. The difficulty resides in providing the ability to reject disturbances from the cryomodule, which is incompletely known as it depends on the cryomodule structure itself (currently under development at JLab and Fermilab) and the harsh accelerator environment. Previous experience in the field and an extrapolation to the cavity design parameters (relatively high Q_{L}c≈ 4×10⁷ , implying a half-bandwidth of around 16 Hz) suggest the use of strong RF feedback to reject the projected noise disturbances, which in turn demands careful engineering of the entire system.

  8. Data Acquisition in a High Harmonic Generation Lab and at LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirokawa, Takako; /U. Colorado, Boulder /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    In this paper, we examine data acquisition in a high harmonic generation (HHG) lab and preliminary data analysis with the Cyclohexadiene Collaboration at the Linac Coherent Lightsource (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. HHG experiments have a large number of parameters that need to be monitored constantly. In particular, the pressure of the target is critical to HHG yield. However, this pressure can fluctuate wildly and without a tool to monitor it, it is difficult to analyze the correlation between HHG yield and the pressure. I used the Arduino microcontroller board and created a complementary MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI), thereby enhancing the ease with which users can acquire time-stamped parameter data. Using the Arduino, it is much easier to match the pressure to the corresponding HHG yield. Collecting data by using the Arduino and the GUI is flexible, user-friendly, and cost-effective. In the future, we hope to be able to control and monitor parts of the lab with the Arduino alone. While more parameter information is needed in the HHG lab, we needed to reduce the amount of data during the cyclohexadiene collaboration. This was achieved by sorting the data into bins and filtering out unnecessary details. This method was highly effective in that it minimized the amount of data without losing any valuable information. This effective preliminary data analysis technique will continue to be used to decrease the size of the collected data.

  9. ePix: a class of architectures for second generation LCLS cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragone, A; Caragiulo, P; Markovic, B; Herbst, R; Reese, B; Herrmann, S C; Hart, P A; Segal, J; Carini, G A; Kenney, C J; Haller, G

    2014-01-01

    ePix is a novel class of ASIC architectures, based on a common platform, optimized to build modular scalable detectors for LCLS. The platform architecture is composed of a random access analog matrix of pixel with global shutter, fast parallel column readout, and dedicated sigma-delta analog-to-digital converters per column. It also implements a dedicated control interface and all the required support electronics to perform configuration, calibration and readout of the matrix. Based on this platform a class of front-end ASICs and several camera modules, meeting different requirements, can be developed by designing specific pixel architectures. This approach reduces development time and expands the possibility of integration of detector modules with different size, shape or functionality in the same camera. The ePix platform is currently under development together with the first two integrating pixel architectures: ePix100 dedicated to ultra low noise applications and ePix10k for high dynamic range applications.

  10. Production of Copper-Plated Beamline Bellows and Spools for LCLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Katherine M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Carpenter, Brian C. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Ed [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Huque, Naeem A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Peshehonoff, Ted [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Arkan, Tug [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lunin, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Premo, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is currently constructing a major upgrade to its accelerator, the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II). Several Department of Energy national laboratories, including the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), are participating in this project. The 1.3-GHz cryomodules for this project consist of eight cavities separated by bellows (expansion joints) and spools (tube sections), which are copper plated for RF conduction. JLab is responsible for procurement of these bellows and spools, which are delivered to JLab and FNAL for assembly into cryomodules. Achieving accelerator-grade copper plating is always a challenge and requires careful specification of requirements and application of quality control processes. Due to the demanding technical requirements of this part, JLab implemented procurement strategies to make the process more efficient as well as provide process redundancy. This paper discusses the manufacturing challenges that were encountered and resolved, as well as the strategies that were employed to minimize the impact of any technical issues.

  11. Data Acquisition in a High Harmonic Generation Lab and at LCLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we examine data acquisition in a high harmonic generation (HHG) lab and preliminary data analysis with the Cyclohexadiene Collaboration at the Linac Coherent Lightsource (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. HHG experiments have a large number of parameters that need to be monitored constantly. In particular, the pressure of the target is critical to HHG yield. However, this pressure can fluctuate wildly and without a tool to monitor it, it is difficult to analyze the correlation between HHG yield and the pressure. I used the Arduino microcontroller board and created a complementary MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI), thereby enhancing the ease with which users can acquire time-stamped parameter data. Using the Arduino, it is much easier to match the pressure to the corresponding HHG yield. Collecting data by using the Arduino and the GUI is flexible, user-friendly, and cost-effective. In the future, we hope to be able to control and monitor parts of the lab with the Arduino alone. While more parameter information is needed in the HHG lab, we needed to reduce the amount of data during the cyclohexadiene collaboration. This was achieved by sorting the data into bins and filtering out unnecessary details. This method was highly effective in that it minimized the amount of data without losing any valuable information. This effective preliminary data analysis technique will continue to be used to decrease the size of the collected data.

  12. Marine Geoid Undulation Assessment Over South China Sea Using Global Geopotential Models and Airborne Gravity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazid, N. M.; Din, A. H. M.; Omar, K. M.; Som, Z. A. M.; Omar, A. H.; Yahaya, N. A. Z.; Tugi, A.

    2016-09-01

    Global geopotential models (GGMs) are vital in computing global geoid undulations heights. Based on the ellipsoidal height by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations, the accurate orthometric height can be calculated by adding precise and accurate geoid undulations model information. However, GGMs also provide data from the satellite gravity missions such as GRACE, GOCE and CHAMP. Thus, this will assist to enhance the global geoid undulations data. A statistical assessment has been made between geoid undulations derived from 4 GGMs and the airborne gravity data provided by Department of Survey and Mapping Malaysia (DSMM). The goal of this study is the selection of the best possible GGM that best matches statistically with the geoid undulations of airborne gravity data under the Marine Geodetic Infrastructures in Malaysian Waters (MAGIC) Project over marine areas in Sabah. The correlation coefficients and the RMS value for the geoid undulations of GGM and airborne gravity data were computed. The correlation coefficients between EGM 2008 and airborne gravity data is 1 while RMS value is 0.1499.In this study, the RMS value of EGM 2008 is the lowest among the others. Regarding to the statistical analysis, it clearly represents that EGM 2008 is the best fit for marine geoid undulations throughout South China Sea.

  13. A Coherent Compton Backscattering High Gain FEL using an X-Band Microwave Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrini, C; Travish, G

    2005-01-01

    We describe a proposed high-gain FEL using an X-band microwave undulator and operating at a wavelength of about 0.5 μm. The FEL electron beam energy is 65 MeV. The beam is produced by the NLCTA X-band linac at SLAC, using an S-band high-brightness photoinjector. The undulator consists of a circular waveguide with an rf wave counter-propagating with respect to the electron beam. The undulator is powered with two high-power X-band klystrons and a dual-moded pulse compressor recently developed at SLAC. This system is capable of delivering flat-top rf pulses of up to 400 ns and a few hundred megawatts. The equivalent undulator period is 1.4 cm, the radius of the circular pipe is 1 cm, and the undulator parameter is about 0.4 for a helical undulator configuration, obtained using two cross-polarized TE modes, or larger for a planar configuration, using one rf polarization. The undulator is about four meters long. The FEL will reach saturation within this distance when operated in a SASE mode. We describe t...

  14. Design of a crystalline undulator based on patterning by tensile Si3N4 strips on a Si crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidi, V.; Lanzoni, L.; Mazzolari, A.; Martinelli, G.; Tralli, A.

    2007-01-01

    A crystalline undulator consists of a crystal with a periodic deformation in which channeled particles undergo oscillations and emit coherent undulator radiation. Patterning by an alternate series of tensile Si 3 N 4 strips on a Si crystal is shown to be a tractable method to construct a crystalline undulator. The method allows periodic deformation of the crystal with the parameters suitable for implementation of a crystalline undulator. The resulting periodic deformation is present in the bulk of the Si crystal with an essentially uniform amplitude, making the entire volume of the crystal available for channeling and in turn for emission of undulator radiation

  15. Observation of an optical vortex beam from a helical undulator in the XUV region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneyasu, Tatsuo; Hikosaka, Yasumasa; Fujimoto, Masaki; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Hosaka, Masahito; Shigemasa, Eiji; Katoh, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    The observation of an optical vortex beam at 60 nm wavelength, produced as the second-harmonic radiation from a helical undulator, is reported. The helical wavefront of the optical vortex beam was verified by measuring the interference pattern between the vortex beam from a helical undulator and a normal beam from another undulator. Although the interference patterns were slightly blurred owing to the relatively large electron beam emittance, it was possible to observe the interference features thanks to the helical wavefront of the vortex beam. The experimental results were well reproduced by simulation.

  16. Developments in Polarization and Energy Control of APPLE-II Undulators at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, E. C.; Bencok, P.; Dobrynin, A.; Rial, E. C. M.; Rose, A.; Steadman, P.; Thompson, C.; Thomson, A.; Wang, H.

    2013-03-01

    A pair of 2m long APPLE-II type undulators have been built for the I10 BLADE beamline at Diamond Light Source. These 48mm period devices have gap as well as four moveable phase axes which provide the possibility to produce the full range of elliptical polarizations as well as linear polarization tilted through a full 180deg. The mechanical layout chosen has a 'master and slave' arrangement of the phase axes on the top and bottom. This arrangement allows the use of symmetries to provide operational ease for both changing energy using only the master phase while keeping fixed linear horizontal or circular polarization, as well as changing linear polarization angle while keeping fixed energy [1]. The design allows very fast motion of the master phase arrays, without sacrifice of accuracy, allowing the possibility of mechanical polarization switching at 1Hz for dichroism experiments. We present the mechanical design features of these devices, as well as the results of magnetic measurements and shimming from before installation. Finally, we present the results of characterization of these devices by the beamline, including polarimetry, which has been done on the various modes of motion to control energy and polarization. These modes of operation have been available to users since 2011.

  17. Theory and experiments on the generation of spontaneous emission using a plasma wave undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.L.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.; Mori, W.B.; Slater, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that, the authors are studying the feasibility of using relativistically moving plasma waves as short wavelength undulators for possible FEL and Compton scattering applications at UCLA. The remarkable property of such waves is that the wiggler parameter a w = eA/mc 2 can be on the order 0.1 while their wavelength λ w can be submillimeter. Such waves can be excited by either an intense electron bunch going through a plasma (plasma wake field) or a short but intense laser pulse going through the plasma (laser wake field). A variation of the laser wake field scheme is the plasm beat wave excitation. Here a moderately intense laser pulse containing two frequencies excites the plasm wave resonantly. Using a laser pulse containing 10.27 μm and 9.6 μm lines of the Co 2 laser that is approximately 400 ps (FWHM) and 200 GW of power, we were able to measure a w times the length product of 0.013 cm in our experiments. If a length of 0.75 cm i assumed, this implies an a w of 0.17 for a λ w ∼156 μm. Injection of an electron beam across such a plasma wave proved not to be feasible in these experiments, because the θ-pinch plasma source contained significant trapped magnetic fields. We are currently developing a field free plasma source which will permit transverse electron injection

  18. Developments in Polarization and Energy Control of APPLE-II Undulators at Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhi, E C; Bencok, P; Dobrynin, A; Rial, E C M; Rose, A; Steadman, P; Thompson, C; Thomson, A; Wang, H

    2013-01-01

    A pair of 2m long APPLE-II type undulators have been built for the I10 BLADE beamline at Diamond Light Source. These 48mm period devices have gap as well as four moveable phase axes which provide the possibility to produce the full range of elliptical polarizations as well as linear polarization tilted through a full 180deg. The mechanical layout chosen has a 'master and slave' arrangement of the phase axes on the top and bottom. This arrangement allows the use of symmetries to provide operational ease for both changing energy using only the master phase while keeping fixed linear horizontal or circular polarization, as well as changing linear polarization angle while keeping fixed energy [1]. The design allows very fast motion of the master phase arrays, without sacrifice of accuracy, allowing the possibility of mechanical polarization switching at 1Hz for dichroism experiments. We present the mechanical design features of these devices, as well as the results of magnetic measurements and shimming from before installation. Finally, we present the results of characterization of these devices by the beamline, including polarimetry, which has been done on the various modes of motion to control energy and polarization. These modes of operation have been available to users since 2011.

  19. Opportunities for two-color experiments at the SASE3 undulator line of the European XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Mazza, Tommaso; Meyer, Michael; Serkez, Svitozar [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) have been proven to generate short and powerful radiation pulses allowing for a wide class of novel experiments. If an XFEL facility supports the generation of two X-ray pulses with different wavelengths and controllable delay, the range of possible experiments is broadened even further to include X-ray-pump/X-ray-probe applications. In this work we discuss the possibility of applying a simple and cost-effective method for producing two-color pulses at the SASE3 soft X-ray beamline of the European XFEL. The technique is based on the installation of a magnetic chicane in the baseline undulator and can be accomplished in several steps. We discuss the scientific interest of this upgrade for the Small Quantum Systems (SQS) instrument, in connection with the high-repetition rate of the European XFEL, and we provide start-to-end simulations up to the radiation focus on the sample, proving the feasibility of our concept.

  20. Development and fabrication of the vacuum systems for an elliptically polarized undulator at Taiwan Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chin-Chun; Chan, Che-Kai; Wu, Ling-Hui; Shueh, Chin; Shen, I.-Ching; Cheng, Chia-Mu; Yang, I.-Chen

    2017-05-01

    Three sets of a vacuum system were developed and fabricated for elliptically polarized undulators (EPU) of a 3-GeV synchrotron facility. These chambers were shaped with low roughness extrusion and oil-free machining; the design combines aluminium and stainless steel. The use of a bimetallic material to connect the EPU to the vacuum system achieves the vacuum sealing and to resolve the leakage issue due to bake process induced thermal expansion difference. The interior of the EPU chamber consists of a non-evaporable-getter strip pump in a narrow space to absorb photon-stimulated desorption and to provide a RF bridge design to decrease impedance effect in the two ends of EPU chamber. To fabricate these chambers and to evaluate the related performance, we performed a computer simulation to optimize the structure. During the machining and welding, the least deformation was achieved, less than 0.1 mm near 4 m. In the installation, the linear slider can provide a stable and precision moved along parallel the electron beam direction smoothly for the EPU chamber to decrease the twist issue during baking process. The pressure of the EPU chamber attained less than 2×10-8 Pa through baking. These vacuum systems of the EPU magnet have been installed in the electron storage ring of Taiwan Photon Source in 2015 May and have normally operated at 300 mA continuously since, and to keep beam life time achieved over than 12 h.

  1. Development and fabrication of the vacuum systems for an elliptically polarized undulator at Taiwan Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chin-Chun, E-mail: chinchun@nsrrc.org.tw; Chan, Che-Kai; Wu, Ling-Hui; Shueh, Chin; Shen, I.-Ching; Cheng, Chia-Mu; Yang, I.-Chen

    2017-05-01

    Three sets of a vacuum system were developed and fabricated for elliptically polarized undulators (EPU) of a 3-GeV synchrotron facility. These chambers were shaped with low roughness extrusion and oil-free machining; the design combines aluminium and stainless steel. The use of a bimetallic material to connect the EPU to the vacuum system achieves the vacuum sealing and to resolve the leakage issue due to bake process induced thermal expansion difference. The interior of the EPU chamber consists of a non-evaporable-getter strip pump in a narrow space to absorb photon-stimulated desorption and to provide a RF bridge design to decrease impedance effect in the two ends of EPU chamber. To fabricate these chambers and to evaluate the related performance, we performed a computer simulation to optimize the structure. During the machining and welding, the least deformation was achieved, less than 0.1 mm near 4 m. In the installation, the linear slider can provide a stable and precision moved along parallel the electron beam direction smoothly for the EPU chamber to decrease the twist issue during baking process. The pressure of the EPU chamber attained less than 2×10{sup −8} Pa through baking. These vacuum systems of the EPU magnet have been installed in the electron storage ring of Taiwan Photon Source in 2015 May and have normally operated at 300 mA continuously since, and to keep beam life time achieved over than 12 h.

  2. EUCARD magnet development

    OpenAIRE

    de Rijk, Gijs

    2011-01-01

    The FP7-EuCARD work package 7 (WP7), "HFM: Superconducting High Field Magnets for higher luminosities and energies" is a collaboration between 12 European institutes and firms with the objective of developing high field magnet technology. WP7 foresees to construct a 13 T dipole with a 100 mm aperture, a B = 6 T high temperature superconductor (HTS) dipole insert, a superconducting HTS link and a superconducting helical undulator.

  3. The APS x-ray undulator photon beam position monitor and tests at CHESS and NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Rodricks, B.; Barraza, J.; Sanchez, T.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The advent of third generation synchrotron radiation sources, like the Advanced Photon Source (APS), will provide significant increases in brilliance over existing synchrotron sources. The APS x-ray undulators will increase the brilliance in the 3-40 KeV range by several orders of magnitude. Thus, the design of the photon beam position monitor is a challenging engineering task. The beam position monitors must withstand the high thermal load, be able to achieve sub-micron spatial resolution while maintaining their stability, and be compatible with both undulators and wigglers. A preliminary APS prototype photon beam position monitor consisting of a CVD-diamond-based, tungsten-coated blade was tested on the APS/CHESS undulator at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Radiation Source (CHESS) and on the NSLS X-13 undulator beamline. Results from these tests, as well as the design of this prototype APS photon beam position monitor, will be discussed in this paper

  4. The APS X-ray undulator photon beam position monitor and tests at CHESS and NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Rodricks, B.; Barraza, J.; Sanchez, T.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The advent of thirs generation synchrotron sources, like the Advanced Photon Source (APS), will provide significant increases in brilliance over existing synchrotron sources. The APS X-ray undulators will increase the brilliance in the 3-40 keV range by several orders of magnitude. Thus, the design of the photon beam position monitor is a challenging engineering task. The beam position monitors must withstand the high thermal load, be able to achieve submicron spatial resolution while maintaining their stability, and be compatible with both undulators and wigglers. A preliminary APS prototype photon beam position monitor consisting of a CVD-diamond-based, tungsten-coated blade was tested on the APS/CHESS undulator at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Radiation Source (CHESS) and on the NSLS X-13 undulator beamline. Results from these tests, as well as the design of this prototype APS photon beam position monitor, will be discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  5. Stimulated bremsstrahlung of soft x-ray in a longitudinal undulating electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that a high-energy electron beam injected into a longitudinal undulating electric field (electric undulator) in the field direction can emit a laser light in the field direction through both stimulated and unstimulated free-electron two-quantum Stark emission. Based on the momentum and energy conservation laws and the time-reversal invariance of the transition probability, a new quantum kinetic equation for the net energy transfer from an electron to the laser wave is derived. By using this equation, the photon concept, and the transition probability calculated by the Dirac equation, the gain spectrum and wavelength of the free-electron laser using the electric undulator are derived. The gain appears to scale as the inverse of the electron beam energy and the cube of the wavelength of the electric undulator

  6. Simulation Study of the Helical Superconducting Undulator Installation at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajaev, V.; Borland, M.; Sun, Y.; Xiao, A.

    2017-06-25

    A helical superconducting undulator is planned for installation at the APS. Such an installation would be first of its kind – helical devices were never installed in synchrotron light sources before. Due to its reduced horizontal aperture, a lattice modification is required to accommodate for large horizontal oscillations during injection. We describe the lattice change details and show the new lattice experimental test results. To understand the effect of the undulator on single-particle dynamics, first, its kick maps were computed using different methods. We have found that often-used Elleaume formula* for kick maps gives wrong results for this undulator. We then used the kick maps obtained by other methods to simulate the effect of the undulator on injection and lifetime.

  7. Empirical optimization of undulator tapering at FLASH2 and comparison with numerical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mak, Alan; Curbis, Francesca; Werin, Sverker [Lund Univ. (Sweden). MAX IV Laboratory; Faatz, Bart [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    In a free-electron laser equipped with variable-gap undulator modules, the technique of undulator tapering opens up the possibility to increase the radiation power beyond the initial saturation point, thus enhancing the efficiency of the laser. The effectiveness of the enhancement relies on the proper optimization of the taper profile. In this work, a multidimensional optimization approach is implemented empirically in the X-ray free-electron laser FLASH2. The empirical results are compared with numerical simulations.

  8. New implementation of an SX700 undulator beamline at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, T.; Andresen, N.; Comins, J.; Kaznacheyev, K.; Kortright, J.B.; McKean, P.J.; Padmore, H.A.; Shuh, D.K.; Stevens, T.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2004-01-01

    A newly engineered implementation of a collimated SX700-style beam line for soft x-rays is described. This facility is operational at the Advanced Light Source and delivers high brightness undulator beams to a scanning zone plate microscope and to an array of end stations for x-ray spectroscopic studies of wet surfaces. Switching between branches is motorized, servo-steering systems maintain throughput and the monochromator works together with the elliptical undulator for a fully automated facility

  9. Beamline front end for in-vacuum short period undulator at the photon factory storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyauchi, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiroshi.miyauchi@kek.jp [Accelerator Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Department of Accelerator Science, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Tahara, Toshihiro, E-mail: ttahara@post.kek.jp; Asaoka, Seiji, E-mail: seiji.asaoka@kek.jp [Accelerator Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    The straight-section upgrade project of the Photon Factory created four new short straight sections capable of housing in-vacuum short period undulators. The first to fourth short period undulators SGU#17, SGU#03, SGU#01 and SGU#15 were installed at the 2.5-GeV Photon Factory storage ring in 2005, 2006, 2009 and 2013, respectively. The beamline front end for SGU#15 is described in this paper.

  10. Electromagnetic design, implementation and test of a superconducting undulator with a transverse gradient field amplitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonso Rodriguez, Veronica

    2015-11-25

    This thesis describes the development of a novel superconducting transversal gradient undulator (TGU) designed to form a compact, highly brilliant laser-wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven radiation source. A TGU in combination with a dispersive beam transport line can be employed to produce undulator radiation with natural bandwidth despite the large energy spread of the LWFA. This thesis documents the construction, first tests and characterization of the full-scale TGU.

  11. Brightness and coherence of radiation from undulators and high-gain free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang-Je.

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the radiation characteristics of undulators and high-gain free electron lasers (FELs). The topics covered are: a phase-space method in wave optics and synchrotron radiation, coherence from the phase-space point of view, discussions of undulator performances in next-generation synchrotron radiation facility and the characteristics of the high-gain FELs and their performances

  12. Geometric Mechanics Reveals Optimal Complex Terrestrial Undulation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chaohui; Astley, Henry; Schiebel, Perrin; Dai, Jin; Travers, Matthew; Goldman, Daniel; Choset, Howie; CMU Team; GT Team

    Geometric mechanics offers useful tools for intuitively analyzing biological and robotic locomotion. However, utility of these tools were previously restricted to systems that have only two internal degrees of freedom and in uniform media. We show kinematics of complex locomotors that make intermittent contacts with substrates can be approximated as a linear combination of two shape bases, and can be represented using two variables. Therefore, the tools of geometric mechanics can be used to analyze motions of locomotors with many degrees of freedom. To demonstrate the proposed technique, we present studies on two different types of snake gaits which utilize combinations of waves in the horizontal and vertical planes: sidewinding (in the sidewinder rattlesnake C. cerastes) and lateral undulation (in the desert specialist snake C. occipitalis). C. cerastes moves by generating posteriorly traveling body waves in the horizontal and vertical directions, with a relative phase offset equal to +/-π/2 while C. occipitalismaintains a π/2 offset of a frequency doubled vertical wave. Geometric analysis reveals these coordination patterns enable optimal movement in the two different styles of undulatory terrestrial locomotion. More broadly, these examples demonstrate the utility of geometric mechanics in analyzing realistic biological and robotic locomotion.

  13. An electromagnetic helical undulator for polarized X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluskin, E.; Vinokurov, N.; Tcheskidov, V.; Medvedko, A.; Evtushenko, Y.; Kolomogorov, V.; Vobly, P.; Antokhin, E.; Ivanov, P.; Vasserman, I. B.; Trakhtenberg, E. M.; Den Hartog, P. K.; Deriy, B.; Erdmann, M.; Makarov, O.; Moog, E. R.

    1999-01-01

    Linearly and circularly polarized x-rays have been very successfully applied to the study of the properties of materials. Many applications can benefit from the availability of energy-turnable, high-brilliance x-ray beams with adjustable polarization properties. A helical undulator that can generate beams of variable (linear to circular) polarization has been designed and built by the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics and the Advanced Photon Source. The first harmonic of this 12.8-cm-period device will cover the energy range from 0.4 keV to 3.5 keV. An important feature of this fully electromagnetic device is that it will allow one to generate 100% horizontally (K x =O)or vertically (K y =O) plane-polarized radiation, which will enable many experiments otherwise not technically feasible. With symmetric deflection parameters (K x =K y ), the on-axis radiation will be circularly polarized, with a user-selectable handedness. The polarization can be changed at rates up to 10 Hz

  14. Beam Diagnostics for Laser Undulator Based on Compton Backward Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, R

    2005-01-01

    A compact soft X-ray source is required in various research fields such as material and biological science. The laser undulator based on Compton backward scattering has been developed as a compact soft X-ray source for the biological observation at Waseda University. It is performed in a water window region (250eV - 500 eV) using the interaction between 1047 nm Nd:YLF laser (10ps FWHM) and about 5 MeV high quality electron beam (10ps FWHM) generated from rf gun system. The range of X-ray energy in the water window region has K-shell absorption edges of Oxygen, Carbon and Nitrogen, which mainly constitute of living body. Since the absorption coefficient of water is much smaller than the protein's coefficient in this range, a dehydration of the specimens is not necessary. To generate the soft X-ray pulse stably, the electron beam diagnostics have been developed such as the emittance measurement using double slit scan technique, the bunch length measurement using two frequency analysis technique. In this confere...

  15. Investigation of the polarization state of dual APPLE-II undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hand, Matthew; Wang, Hongchang; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S.; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    Complete polarization analysis of the photon beam produced by a dual APPLE-II undulator configuration using a multilayer-based soft X-ray polarimeter is given. The use of an APPLE II undulator is extremely important for providing a high-brilliance X-ray beam with the capability to switch between various photon beam polarization states. A high-precision soft X-ray polarimeter has been used to systematically investigate the polarization characteristics of the two helical APPLE II undulators installed on beamline I06 at Diamond Light Source. A simple data acquisition and processing procedure has been developed to determine the Stokes polarization parameters for light polarized at arbitrary linear angles emitted from a single undulator, and for circularly polarized light emitted from both undulators in conjunction with a single-period undulator phasing unit. The purity of linear polarization is found to deteriorate as the polarization angle moves away from the horizontal and vertical modes. Importantly, a negative correlation between the degree of circular polarization and the photon flux has been found when the phasing unit is used

  16. Investigation of the polarization state of dual APPLE-II undulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hand, Matthew; Wang, Hongchang, E-mail: hongchang.wang@diamond.ac.uk; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S.; Sawhney, Kawal [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-01

    Complete polarization analysis of the photon beam produced by a dual APPLE-II undulator configuration using a multilayer-based soft X-ray polarimeter is given. The use of an APPLE II undulator is extremely important for providing a high-brilliance X-ray beam with the capability to switch between various photon beam polarization states. A high-precision soft X-ray polarimeter has been used to systematically investigate the polarization characteristics of the two helical APPLE II undulators installed on beamline I06 at Diamond Light Source. A simple data acquisition and processing procedure has been developed to determine the Stokes polarization parameters for light polarized at arbitrary linear angles emitted from a single undulator, and for circularly polarized light emitted from both undulators in conjunction with a single-period undulator phasing unit. The purity of linear polarization is found to deteriorate as the polarization angle moves away from the horizontal and vertical modes. Importantly, a negative correlation between the degree of circular polarization and the photon flux has been found when the phasing unit is used.

  17. On quantum effects in spontaneous emission by a relativistic electron beam in an undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Robb and Bonifacio (2011) claimed that a previously neglected quantum effect results in noticeable changes in the evolution of the energy distribution associated with spontaneous emission in long undulators. They revisited theoretical models used to describe the emission of radiation by relativistic electrons as a continuous diffusive process, and claimed that in the asymptotic limit for a large number of undulator periods the evolution of the electron energy distribution occurs as discrete energy groups according to Poisson distribution. We show that these novel results have no physical sense, because they are based on a one-dimensional model of spontaneous emission and assume that electrons are sheets of charge. However, electrons are point-like particles and, as is well-known, the bandwidth of the angular-integrated spectrum of undulator radiation is independent of the number of undulator periods. If we determine the evolution of the energy distribution using a three-dimensional theory we find the well-known results consistent with a continuous diffusive process. The additional pedagogical purpose of this paper is to review how quantum diffusion of electron energy in an undulator with small undulator parameter can be simply analyzed using the Thomson cross-section expression, unlike the conventional treatment based on the expression for the Lienard-Wiechert fields. (orig.)

  18. Cryomdoule Test Stand Reduced-Magnetic Support Design at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, Mike [Fermilab; Chandrasekaran, Saravan Kumar [Fermilab; Crawford, Anthony [Fermilab; Harms, Elvin [Fermilab; Leibfritz, Jerry [Fermilab; Wu, Genfa [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    In a partnership with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) and Jefferson Lab, Fermilab will assemble and test 17 of the 35 total 1.3 GHz cryomodules for the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Project. These devices will be tested at Fermilab's Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) within the Cryomodule Test Stand (CMTS-1) cave. The problem of magnetic pollution became one of major issues during design stage of the LCLS-II cryomodule as the average quality factor of the accelerating cavities is specified to be 2.7 x 10¹⁰. One of the possible ways to mitigate the effect of stray magnetic fields and to keep it below the goal of 5 mGauss involves the application of low permeable materials. Initial permeability and magnetic measurement studies regarding the use of 316L stainless steel material indicated that cold work (machining) and heat affected zones from welding would be acceptable.

  19. Design and development of cryo-module test system for 1.3 GHz LCLS-II cryomodule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khunt, A.C.S.; Anupam Kumar Sinha, B.; Aravind, T.C.; Mishra, D.V.K.; Sinha, E.A.K.; Mukesh Goyal, F.; Tejas Rane, G.

    2015-01-01

    Cryomodule Test System (CMTS) is a major cryogenic system designed and developed at Centre for Design and Manufacture (CDM), BARC under Indian Institutions and Fermi Lab Collaboration (IIFC). It is necessary test bed to measure the performance of superconducting RF cavities in Cryomodule. CMTS is required to test 1.3 GHz LCLS-II Cryomodule for Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre (SLAC), USA. Feed Cap and End Cap sub systems of Cryomodule Test System (CMTS) is designed and developed at CDM, BARC. Feed cap and End cap are 2K liquid helium distribution system for LCLS-II RF Cavity Bath and insulated by intermediate radiation shields maintained at 5K and 40K and Multilayer Insulation. The whole distribution system is enclosed in horizontal vacuum shells of approximately 1100 mm in diameter and 3000 mm in total length. This development was very challenging as many design considerations and decisions for 2K cryogenic requirements have been made and implemented. Also intricate mounting of ceramic sensors both internally and externally (surface mounted) for very low temperature measurements, low temperature epoxy bonding and multi-layer insulation wrapping were successfully completed. (author)

  20. Gelatinous fibers and variant secondary growth related to stem undulation and contraction in a monkey ladder vine, Bauhinia glabra (Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jack B; Blanco, Mario A

    2014-04-01

    Some of the most striking stem shapes occur in species of Bauhinia (Fabaceae) known as monkey ladder vines. Their mature stems are flattened and develop regular undulations. Although stems have variant (anomalous) secondary growth, the mechanism causing the undulations is unknown. We measured stem segments over time (20 mo), described stem development using light microscopy, and correlated the changes in stem shape with anatomy. Growing stems are initially straight and bear tendrils on short axillary branches. The inner secondary xylem has narrow vessels and lignified fibers. As stems age, they become flattened and increasingly undulated with the production of two lobes of outer secondary xylem (OX) with wide vessels and only gelatinous fibers (G-fibers). Similar G-fibers are present in the secondary phloem and the cortical sclerified layer. In transverse sections, the concave side of each undulation has a greater area and quantity of G-fibers than the opposite convex side. Some older stems are not undulated and have less lobing of OX. Undulation causes a shortening of the stem segments: up to 28% of the original length. Uneven distribution of G-fibers produces tensions that are involved in the protracted development of undulations. While young extending shoots attach by lateral branch tendrils, older stems may maintain their position in the canopy using undulations and persistent branch bases as gripping devices. Flattened and undulated stems with G-fibers produce flexible woody stems.

  1. Coastline undulations on the West Coast of Denmark: Offshore extent, relation to breaker bars and transported sediment volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kasper Hauberg; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Knudsen, Søren B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with field measurements of undulations of the bottom bathymetry along an otherwise straight coast at the Danish West Coast. Two bathymetric datasets and two time series of wave measurements are used in order to determine the following properties: the offshore extent of shoreline...... with undulations on the depth contours between −5m and +2m relative to mean sea level. In the other data set, only undulations on the depth contours between −1m and +1m are well correlated with the shoreline undulations. The main difference in the wave climate between the two locations is the orientation...

  2. Quantitative investigation of linear arbitrary polarization in an APPLE-II undulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Matthew; Wang, Hongchang; Maccherozzi, Francesco; Apollonio, Marco; Zhu, Jingtao; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S; Sawhney, Kawal

    2018-03-01

    Insertion devices are utilized at synchrotron radiation facilities around the world for their capability to provide a high-brilliance X-ray beam. APPLE-II type undulators are especially important for their capacity to switch between a variety of photon beam polarization states. A high-precision soft X-ray polarimeter has been used to investigate the polarization calibration of an APPLE-II undulator (period length λ u = 64 mm) installed on beamline I06 at Diamond Light Source. Systematic measurement of the beam polarization state at a range of linear arbitrary angles has been compared with the expected result for a given set of undulator gap and row phase parameters calculated from theory. Determination of the corresponding Stokes-Poincaré parameters from the measured data reveals a discrepancy between the two. The limited number of energy/polarization combinations included in the undulator calibration tables necessitates the use of interpolated values for the missing points which is expected to contribute to the discrepancy. However, by modifying the orbit of the electron beam through the undulator by at least 160 µm it has been found that for certain linear polarizations the discrepancies can be corrected. Overall, it is suggested that complete correction of the Stokes-Poincaré parameters for all linear angles would require alteration of both these aspects.

  3. Measurement of position and profile of undulator radiation in Indus-2 using scanning wire monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kant, Chander; Lal, Sohan; Raghuwanshi, V.K.; Prasad, Vijendra

    2015-01-01

    Two planar undulators (U1 and U2) for Atomic Molecular Spectroscopy (AMOS) beamline and Angle Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARPES) beamline have been installed in Indus-2. The U1 undulator is designed to produce photons in the energy range of 6 eV to 250 eV and U2 undulator is designed to produce photons in the energy range of 30 eV to 600 eV. In order to measure the position and vertical profile of photon beams emitted from these undulators, one scanning wire monitor has been installed in each beamline front end. In these scanning wire monitors, a gold coated tungsten wire of 100 μm thickness, stretched between a fork shaped alumina ceramic holder, is scanned vertically perpendicular to the direction of propagation of photon beam by using a precisely controlled stepper motor. The photo-electron current generated in the wire is measured by an electrometer. A graphical user interface has been developed which facilitates the scanning as per the given range, plots the graphs and stores the scanned data in Excel file. This paper describes our experience and usefulness of these wire monitors during commissioning of planar undulators in Indus-2. (author)

  4. Commissioning of the soft x-ray undulator beamline at the Siam Photon Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Hideki, E-mail: hideki@slri.or.th; Chaichuay, Sarunyu; Sudmuang, Porntip; Rattanasuporn, Surachet; Jenpiyapong, Watcharapon; Supruangnet, Ratchadaporn; Chanlek, Narong [Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Muang, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Muang, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand)

    2016-07-27

    The synchrotron radiation from the first undulator at the Siam Photon Laboratory was characterized with the photon beam position monitors (BPMs) and grating monochromator. The soft x-ray undulator beamline employs a varied line-spacing plane grating monochromator with three interchangeable gratings. Since 2010, the beamline has delivered photons with energy of 40-160 and 220-1040 eV at the resolving power of 10,000 for user services at the two end- stations that utilize the photoemission electron spectroscopy and microscopy techniques. The undulator power-density distributions measured by the 0.05-mm wire-scan BPM were in good agreement with those in simulation. The flux-density distributions were evaluated in the red-shift measurements, which identify the central cone of radiation and its distribution. Since 2014, the operation of the other insertion devices in the storage ring has started, and consequently bought about the increases in the emittance from 41 to 61 nm·rad and the coupling constant from 4 to 11%. The local electron-orbit correction greatly improved the alignment of the electron beam in the undulator section resulting in the improvements of the photon flux and harmonics peaks of the undulator radiation.

  5. Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A magnet pole piece for an NMR imaging magnet is made of a plurality of magnetic wires with one end of each wire held in a non-magnetic spacer, the other ends of the wires being brought to a pinch, and connected to a magnetic core. The wires may be embedded in a synthetic resin and the magnetisation and uniformity thereof can be varied by adjusting the density of the wires at the spacer which forms the pole piece. (author)

  6. Elementary excitations of biomembranes: Differential geometry of undulations in elastic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmen, J. Leo van [Physik Department, Technical University of Munich, 85747 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: lvh@tum.de; Leibold, Christian [Physik Department, Technical University of Munich, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    Biomembrane undulations are elementary excitations in the elastic surfaces of cells and vesicles. As such they can provide surprising insights into the mechanical processes that shape and stabilize biomembranes. We explain how naturally these undulations can be described by classical differential geometry. In particular, we apply the analytical formalism of differential-geometric calculus to the surfaces generated by a cell membrane and underlying cytoskeleton. After a short derivation of the energy due to a membrane's elasticity, we show how undulations arise as elementary excitations originating from the second derivative of an energy functional. Furthermore, we expound the efficiency of classical differential-geometric formalism to understand the effect of differential operators that characterize processes involved in membrane physics. As an introduction to concepts the paper is self-contained and rarely exceeds calculus level.

  7. Polarization Property Measurement of the Long Undulator Radiation Using Cr/C Multilayer Polarization Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibe, Masahito; Mukai, Mikihito; Shoji, Yoshihiko; Kimura, Hiroaki

    2004-01-01

    A rotating analyzer ellipsometry (RAE) system was developed with Cr/C multilayers that function as polarization elements for photon energy range of 110 - 280 eV. Polarization properties of a planar undulator change axisymmetrically in off-axial manner, and the second harmonic is more remarkable for the change. By using the RAE system, the polarization property of the second harmonic radiation from the NewSUBARU long undulator at the energy of 180 eV was examined. The degree of linear polarization of the on-axis radiation was over 0.996. The spatial distribution of the polarization azimuth was measured and was in fair agreement with the theoretical calculation. A peculiar behavior of the polarization property near the radiation peak of the second harmonic was observed by changing the height of the undulator gap

  8. Elementary excitations of biomembranes: Differential geometry of undulations in elastic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemmen, J. Leo van; Leibold, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Biomembrane undulations are elementary excitations in the elastic surfaces of cells and vesicles. As such they can provide surprising insights into the mechanical processes that shape and stabilize biomembranes. We explain how naturally these undulations can be described by classical differential geometry. In particular, we apply the analytical formalism of differential-geometric calculus to the surfaces generated by a cell membrane and underlying cytoskeleton. After a short derivation of the energy due to a membrane's elasticity, we show how undulations arise as elementary excitations originating from the second derivative of an energy functional. Furthermore, we expound the efficiency of classical differential-geometric formalism to understand the effect of differential operators that characterize processes involved in membrane physics. As an introduction to concepts the paper is self-contained and rarely exceeds calculus level

  9. Design and Fabrication of Soft Morphing Ray Propulsor: Undulator and Oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Soo; Lee, Jang-Yeob; Chu, Won-Shik; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2017-03-01

    A soft morphing ray propulsor capable of generating an undulating motion in its pectoral fins was designed and fabricated. The propulsor used shape memory alloy for actuation, and the body was made with soft polymers. To determine the effects of undulation in the fins, two models that differed in terms of the presence of undulation were fabricated using different polymer materials. The experimental models were tested with a dynamometer to measure and compare thrust tendencies. Thrust measurements were conducted with various fin beat frequencies. Using the experimental data, the concept of an optimized standalone version of the ray robot was suggested and its prototype was fabricated. The fabricated robot was able to swim as fast as 0.26 body length per second and 38% more efficient than other smart material-based ray-like underwater robots.

  10. Influence of the synchrotron radiation on particle dynamics in a rectangular undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Yong Ho.

    1989-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the synchrotron radiation from an undulating electron beam in a rectangular waveguide. It is shown analytically and numerically that the radiated energy spectrum may differ significantly from the free space result when the undulator length divided by the Lorentz factor of the electron beam is larger than the transverse size of the waveguide. The undulator radiation is identified with the awake field in beam instabilities. The concepts of wake function and impedance are introduced to formulate the present problem in the same manner as the beam instability problem. It is shown that the obtained impedances satisfy the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem and other properties inevitable for wake fields. 5 refs., 2 figs

  11. Nearly copropagating sheared laser pulse FEL undulator for soft x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Bisognano, J; Bosch, R A; Chiang, T C; Green, M A; Jacobs, K; Miller, T; Wehlitz, R; York, R C

    2013-01-01

    A conceptual design for a soft x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) using a short-pulsed, high energy near infrared laser undulator and a low-emittance modest-energy (∼170 MeV) electron beam is described. This low-cost design uses the laser undulator beam in a nearly copropagating fashion with respect to the electron beam, instead of the traditional ‘head-on’ fashion. The nearly copropagating geometry reduces the Doppler shift of scattered radiation to yield soft, rather than hard x-rays. To increase the FEL gain a sheared laser pulse from a Ti : sapphire or other broadband laser is used to extend the otherwise short interaction time of the nearly copropagating laser undulator beam with a relativistic electron beam. (paper)

  12. Light Driven Energy Research at LCLS: Planned Pump-Probe X-ray Spectroscopy Studies on Photosynthetic Water Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2010-02-01

    Arguably the most important chemical reaction on earth is the photosynthetic splitting of water to molecular oxygen by the Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex (Mn-OEC) in the protein known as photosystem II (PSII). It is this reaction which has, over the course of some 3.8 billion years, gradually filled our atmosphere with O2 and consequently enabled and sustained the evolution of complex aerobic life. Coupled to the reduction of carbon dioxide, biological photosynthesis contributes foodstuffs for nutrition while recycling CO2 from the atmosphere and replacing it with O2. By utilizing sunlight to power these energy-requiring reactions, photosynthesis also serves as a model for addressing societal energy needs as we enter an era of diminishing fossil hydrocarbon resources. Understanding, at the molecular level, the dynamics and mechanism of how nature has solved this problem is of fundamental importance and could be critical to aid in the design of manufactured devices to accomplish the conversion of sunlight into useful electrochemical energy and transportable fuel in the foreseeable future. In order to understand the photosynthetic splitting of water by the Mn-OEC we need to be able to follow the reaction in real time at an atomic level. A powerful probe to study the electronic and molecular structure of the Mn-OEC is x-ray spectroscopy. Here, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has two crucial qualities for LCLS based time-dependent pump-probe studies of the Mn-OEC: a) it directly probes the Mn oxidation state and ligation, b) it can be performed with wavelength dispersive optics to avoid the necessity of scanning in pump probe experiments. Recent results and the planned time dependent experiments at LCLS will be discussed. )

  13. A new undulator for the extension of the spectral range of the CLIO FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcouille, O.; Berset, J.M.; Glotin, F. [LURE, Orsay (France)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    We built a new undulator in order to extend the lasing range of the CLIO infrared FEL. Presently, CLIO operates in the wavelength range 2 - 17 {mu}m. Beyond 14 {mu}m, the power decreases rapidly, because of the diffraction losses of the vacuum chamber (7 mm height and 2 m long). Thus, lasing at higher wavelengths implies installing a chamber with a height approximately twice. Then the minimum gap is increased and the maximum deflection parameter, K, is reduced from 2 to 1 : the laser tunability is greatly reduced. This is why a new undulator has been built.

  14. Prototype photon position monitors for undulator beams at the advanced light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, T.; Shu, D.; Rodricks, B.; Johnson, E.D.

    1992-01-01

    Design criteria are described, and test results are presented, for prototype ALS undulator beam position monitors. The design is based on monitors presently in use at NSLS, with modifications to account for the widely varying and large K values of the undulators to be installed at the ALS. In particular, we have modified the design to simplify the thermal engineering and we have explored techniques to suppress the response of the monitors to soft photons, so that the beam position can be determined by measuring the higher energy photons which are better collimated

  15. Comparison of different undulator schemes with superimposed alternating gradients for the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflueger, J.; Nikitina, Y.M. [DESY/HASYLAB, Hamburg (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    For the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility an undulator with a total length of 30 m is needed. In this study three different approaches to realize an undulator with a sinusoidal plus a superimposed quadrupolar field were studied with the 3D code MAFIA.

  16. Effect of the drift gap between the undulator sections on the operation of the Fusion-FEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, C. A. J.; Militsyn, B. L.; Bongers, W. A.; Bratman, V. L.; Denisov, G. G.; Manintveld, P.; Savilov, A. V.; Varfolomeev, A. A.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Urbanus, W. H.

    2000-01-01

    The 'Fusion-FEM' is a free electron MASER based on an electrostatic accelerator. An electron beam of 12 A, 1.35-2 MeV is injected into a step-tapered undulator to generate 1 MW of radiation in the range 130-250 GHz. The undulator is built from two sections with different field strength

  17. The E166 experiment: Development of an undulator-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K-factor is about 0.19 which leads to a parabolic distribution for the first harmonic with a cut-off ... magnetization, an asymmetry in the transmitted photon rate is observed. The ... [1] G Moortgat-Pick and H M Steiner, EPJdirect C, vol. 1, C6 ...

  18. An acoustical research of the undulating wooden ceiling in the Vyborg Library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Bo

    2004-01-01

    Much has been written about the Undulating Ceiling at the lecture hall of the Vyborg Library. Alvar Aalto himself claimed the ceiling to be "ninety-nine per cent acoustically perfect" and the sketches showing the acoustical considerations behind the ceiling-design is often reproduced. But how did...

  19. Design and implementation of VUV-CD and LD measurements using an ac modulated polarizing undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi-Watanabe, K.; Yamada, T.; Tanaka, M.; Kaneko, F.; Kitada, T.; Ohta, Y.; Nakagawa, K.

    2005-01-01

    VUV circular dichroism (CD) and linear dichroism (LD) have been successfully measured at wavelengths beyond the conventional limit by using an ac modulated polarizing undulator. We have developed CD and LD measuring technique by polarization modulation at the source, without using transmission type polarizing modulator, to extend to the coverage to wavelengths shorter than 140-bar nm. AIST developed in 1986 ac polarizing undulator by using a electron storage ring 'TERAS' based on an original concept. The undulator which can produce any desired polarization of vertical- and horizontal-linear polarization (VLP and HLP) and right- and left-handed circular polarization (RCP and LCP) is specially well suited to both measurements of CD and LD. With this undulator, the polarization alternate in the order of VLP-RCP-HLP-RCP-VLP-LCP-HLP-LCP-VLP-, i.e. when circular polarization is modulated in f Hz, linear polarization alters in 2f Hz. This allows us simultaneous measurements of CD and LD. Since the TERAS can produce ac-modulated polarized radiation of wavelength as short as 40-bar nm, it is expected to have CD and LD measurement extended to 40-bar nm

  20. Fabrication of mm-wave undulator cavities using deep x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J.J.; Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.; Lai, B.; Nassiri, A.; Feinerman, A.D.; White, V.; Well, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of fabricating mm-wave radio frequency cavities (100-300 GHz) using deep x-ray lithography (DXRL) is being investigated. The fabrication process includes manufacture of precision x-ray masks, exposure of positive resist by x-ray through the mask, resist development, and electroforming of the final microstructure. Highly precise, two-dimensional features can be machined onto wafers using DXRL. Major challenges are: fabrication of the wafers into three-dimensional rf structures; alignment and overlay accuracy of structures; adhesion of the PMMA on the copper substrate; and selection of a developer to obtain high resolution. Rectangular cavity geometry is best suited to this fabrication technique. A 30- or 84-cell 108-GHz mm-wave structure can serve as an electromagnetic undulator. A mm-wave undulator, which will be discussed later, may have special features compared to the conventional undulator. First harmonic undulator radiation at 5.2 KeV would be possible using the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac system, which provides a low-emittance electron beam by using an rf thermionic gun with an energy as high as 750-MeV. More detailed rf simulation, heat extraction analysis, beam dynamics using a mm-wave structure, and measurements on lOx larger scale models can be found in these proceedings

  1. The full potential of the baseline SASE undulators of the European XFEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapov, Ilya; Geloni, Gianluca; Feng, Guangyao; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Zagorodnov, Igor

    2014-04-01

    The output SASE characteristics of the baseline European XFEL, recently used in the TDRs of scientific instruments and X-ray optics, have been previously optimized assuming uniform undulators without considering the potential of undulator tapering in the SASE regime. Here we demonstrate that the performance of European XFEL sources can be significantly improved without additional hardware. The procedure simply consists in the optimization of the undulator gap configuration for each X-ray beamline. Here we provide a comprehensive description of the soft X-ray photon beam properties as a function of wavelength and bunch charge. Based on nominal parameters for the electron beam, we demonstrate that undulator tapering allows one to achieve up to a tenfold increase in peak power and photon spectral density in the conventional SASE regime. We illustrate this fact for the SASE3 beamline. The FEL code Genesis has been extensively used for these studies. Based on these findings we suggest that the requirements for the SASE3 instrument (SCS, SQS) and for the SASE3 beam transport system be updated.

  2. Blade-type X-ray beam position monitors for SPring-8 undulator beamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Aoyagi, H; Kitamura, H

    2001-01-01

    The X-ray beam position monitors had been designed and installed for SPring-8 insertion device beamlines. These monitors are being utilized for photon beam diagnostics. The beam from the standard undulator in SPring-8 has the total power of 11 kW and the power density of 470 kW/mrad sup 2 , typically. Each monitor has four CVD diamond blades coated with metal for detector heads. We have already introduced three styles of monitors to match various insertion devices in SPring-8. A standard style, or a fixed-blade style, is used mainly for a standard in-vacuum undulator beamlines. A horizontal-blade-drive style and a four-blade-drive style are used for beamlines of a wiggler and a twin helical undulator that have wide power distributions, and for figure-8 undulators that have asymmetric power distributions, respectively. This report describes the design and the structure of these monitors and the beam-tests for the photon beam diagnostics in detail.

  3. Brilliant radiation sources by laser-plasma accelerators and optical undulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debus, Alexander

    2012-09-06

    This thesis investigates the use of high-power lasers for synchrotron radiation sources with high brilliance, from the EUV to the hard X-ray spectral range. Hereby lasers accelerate electrons by laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA), act as optical undulators, or both. Experimental evidence shows for the first time that LWFA electron bunches are shorter than the driving laser and have a length scale comparable to the plasma wavelength. Furthermore, a first proof of principle experiment demonstrates that LWFA electrons can be exploited to generate undulator radiation. Building upon these experimental findings, as well as extensive numerical simulations of Thomson scattering, the theoretical foundations of a novel interaction geometry for laser-matter interaction are developed. This new method is very general and when tailored towards relativistically moving targets not being limited by the focusability (Rayleigh length) of the laser, while it does not require a waveguide. In a theoretical investigation of Thomson scattering, the optical analogue of undulator radiation, the limits of Thomson sources in scaling towards higher peak brilliances are highlighted. This leads to a novel method for generating brilliant, highly tunable X-ray sources, which is highly energy efficient by circumventing the laser Rayleigh limit through a novel traveling-wave Thomson scattering (TWTS) geometry. This new method suggests increases in X-ray photon yields of 2-3 orders of magnitudes using existing lasers and a way towards efficient, optical undulators to drive a free-electron laser. The results presented here extend far beyond the scope of this work. The possibility to use lasers as particle accelerators, as well as optical undulators, leads to very compact and energy efficient synchrotron sources. The resulting monoenergetic radiation of high brilliance in a range from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) to hard X-ray radiation is of fundamental importance for basic research, medical

  4. Brilliant radiation sources by laser-plasma accelerators and optical undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debus, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This thesis investigates the use of high-power lasers for synchrotron radiation sources with high brilliance, from the EUV to the hard X-ray spectral range. Hereby lasers accelerate electrons by laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA), act as optical undulators, or both. Experimental evidence shows for the first time that LWFA electron bunches are shorter than the driving laser and have a length scale comparable to the plasma wavelength. Furthermore, a first proof of principle experiment demonstrates that LWFA electrons can be exploited to generate undulator radiation. Building upon these experimental findings, as well as extensive numerical simulations of Thomson scattering, the theoretical foundations of a novel interaction geometry for laser-matter interaction are developed. This new method is very general and when tailored towards relativistically moving targets not being limited by the focusability (Rayleigh length) of the laser, while it does not require a waveguide. In a theoretical investigation of Thomson scattering, the optical analogue of undulator radiation, the limits of Thomson sources in scaling towards higher peak brilliances are highlighted. This leads to a novel method for generating brilliant, highly tunable X-ray sources, which is highly energy efficient by circumventing the laser Rayleigh limit through a novel traveling-wave Thomson scattering (TWTS) geometry. This new method suggests increases in X-ray photon yields of 2-3 orders of magnitudes using existing lasers and a way towards efficient, optical undulators to drive a free-electron laser. The results presented here extend far beyond the scope of this work. The possibility to use lasers as particle accelerators, as well as optical undulators, leads to very compact and energy efficient synchrotron sources. The resulting monoenergetic radiation of high brilliance in a range from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) to hard X-ray radiation is of fundamental importance for basic research, medical

  5. Performance of the undulator based ultraviolet and soft x-ray beamline for catalysis and surface science at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Liangliang [University of Science and Technology of China, Department of Precision Machinery and Precision Instrumentation, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China); Du, Xuewei, E-mail: xwdu@ustc.edu.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China); Wei, Shen [University of Science and Technology of China, National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China); Li, Chaoyang [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Pan, Congyuan; Ju, Huanxin [University of Science and Technology of China, National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China); Wang, Qiuping, E-mail: qiuping@ustc.edu.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China); Zhu, Junfa [University of Science and Technology of China, National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China)

    2016-12-01

    The undulator based ultraviolet and soft x-ray beamline BL11U for catalysis and surface science at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) has been under opteration for months and the present performance is described. This beamline utilizes radiation from an in-vacuum undulator, which has 30 magnetic periods with the period length of 40 mm. A varied-line-spacing plane grating monochromator is employed tto cover the photon energy region of 20–600 eV by two gratings with nominal groove densities of 400 llmm and 1200 l/mm respectively. The energy resolution power E/ΔE is measured with a gas ionization chamber and the photon flux is measured by a photodiode. Results show that the resolution power is better than 10,000 at a photon energy of 29.2 eV. And the flux is higher than 1×10{sup 10} phs/s under 300 mA ring beam current for most of the covered photon energy.

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  7. Two-temperature equilibration in warm dense hydrogen measured with x-ray scattering from the LCLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Luke; High Energy Density Sciences Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the properties of warm dense hydrogen plasmas is critical for modeling stellar and planetary interiors, as well as for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. Of central importance are the electron-ion collision and equilibration times that determine the microscopic properties in a high energy density state. Spectrally and angularly resolved x-ray scattering measurements from fs-laser heated hydrogen have resolved the picosecond evolution and energy relaxation from a two-temperature plasma towards thermodynamic equilibrium in the warm dense matter regime. The interaction of rapidly heated cryogenic hydrogen irradiated by a 400 nm, 5x1017 W/cm2 , 70 fs-laser is visualized with ultra-bright 5.5 kev x-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light (LCLS) source in 1 Hz repetition rate pump-probe setting. We demonstrate that the energy relaxation is faster than many classical binary collision theories that use ad hoc cutoff parameters used in the Landau-Spitzer determination of the Coulomb logarithm. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under contract No. SF00515 and supported under FWP 100182 and DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  8. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH FAST FIBER-OPTIC BEAM LOSS MONITORS FOR THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE STORAGE RING SUPERCONDUCTING UNDULATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooling, J.; Harkay, K.; Sajaev, V.; Shang, H.

    2017-06-25

    Fast fiber-optic (FFO) beam loss monitors (BLMs) installed with the first two superconducting undulators (SCUs) in the Advanced Photon Source storage ring have proven to be a useful diagnostic for measuring deposited charge (energy) during rapid beam loss events. The first set of FFOBLMs were installed outside the cryostat of the short SCU, a 0.33-m long device, above and below the beam centerline. The second set are mounted with the first 1.1-mlong SCU within the cryostat, on the outboard and inboard sides of the vacuum chamber. The next 1.1-m-long SCU is scheduled to replace the short SCU later in 2016 and will be fitted with FFOBLMs in a manner similar to original 1.1-m device. The FFOBLMs were employed to set timing and voltage for the abort kicker (AK) system. The AK helps to prevent quenching of the SCUs during beam dumps [1] by directing the beam away from the SC magnet windings. The AK is triggered by the Machine Protection System (MPS). In cases when the AK fails to prevent quenching, the FFOBLMs show that losses often begin before detection by the MPS.

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  11. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  12. Magnetic force study for the helical afterburner for the European XFEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Wei, Tao; Li, Yuhui; Pflueger, Joachim

    2017-05-01

    At present the SASE3 undulator line at the European XFEL is using a planar undulator producing linear polarized soft Xray radiation only. In order to satisfy the demand for circular polarized radiation a helical undulator system, the so-called afterburner is in construction. It will be operated as a radiator using the pre-bunched beam of the SASE3 undulator system. Among several options for the magnetic structure the Apple-X geometry was chosen. This is a pure permanent magnet undulator using NdFeB material. Four magnet arrays are arranged symmetrically the beam axis. Polarization can be changed by adjusting the phase shift (PS) between the two orthogonal structures. The field strength can be adjusted either by gap adjustment or alternatively by the amplitude shift (AS) scheme. For an engineering design the maximum values of forces and torques on each of the components under worst case operational conditions are important. The superposition principle is used to reduce calculation time. It is found that the maximum forces Fx, Fy and Fz for a 2m long Apple-X undulator are 1.8*104N, 2.4*104N and 2.3*104N, respectively. More results are presented in this paper.

  13. Ice Velocity Mapping of Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica by Matching Surface Undulations Measured by Icesat Laser Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choon-Ki; Han, Shin-Chan; Yu, Jaehyung; Scambos, Ted A.; Seo, Ki-Weon

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method for estimating the surface horizontal velocity on ice shelves using laser altimetrydata from the Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat; 20032009). The method matches undulations measured at crossover points between successive campaigns.

  14. Peak Fields of Nb$_{3}$Sn Superconducting Undulators and a Scaling Law

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S H

    2005-01-01

    The peak fields on the beam axis and the maximum fields in the conductor of Nb$_{3}$Sn superconducting undulators (SCUs) were calculated for an undulator period length of 16 mm. Using a simple scaling law for SCUs [1], the peak fields, as well as the conductor maximum fields and the current densities, were calculated for a period range of 8 to 32 mm. The critical current densities of commercially available Nb$_{3}$Sn superconducting strands were used for the calculations. The achievable peak fields are limited mainly by the flux-jump instabilities at low fields. The possible or feasible peak field will also be compared with that achieved in prototype development of SCUs.

  15. Tuning and switching of band gap of the periodically undulated beam by the snap through buckling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose highly tuning and switching band gaps of phononic crystals through the snap through buckling by investigating wave propagation in a designed tractable undulated beam with single material and periodically arched shape. A series of numerical analyses are conducted to offer a thorough understanding of the evolution of the band gaps as a function of the vertical applied load. We find out that the interesting snap through buckling induced by the vertical load can alter the width of the band gap of the undulated beam dramatically, even switch them on and off. Our researches show an effective strategy to tune the band gaps of phononic crystals through the snap through buckling behavior.

  16. Use of a mirror as the first optical component for an undulator beamline at the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, W.; Khounsary, A.; Lai, B.; Gluskin, E.

    1992-09-01

    In the design of Sector II of the Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation (SRI) CAT, an x-ray mirror with multiple coatings is chosen as the first optical component of the undulator beamline. Two significant advantages of using the mirror are: A significant reduction in the peak radiation heat flux and total power on the downstream monochromator, and (2) availability of the wide-bandpass undulator spectrum between 0--30 key to experimental stations with substantially reduced radiation shielding requirements. The second advantage also allows us to place the monochromator outside the first optics enclosure (FOE) at a large distance from the source to further reduce the peak heat flux on the monochromator. The combined effect is that the inclined crystal monochromator may not be necessary, and a multilayer monochromator can be used because the expected heat fluxes are less than the value that has been demonstrated for those monochromators

  17. An ultrashort pulse ultra-violet radiation undulator source driven by a laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anania, M. P. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Brunetti, E.; Wiggins, S. M.; Grant, D. W.; Welsh, G. H.; Issac, R. C.; Cipiccia, S.; Shanks, R. P.; Manahan, G. G.; Aniculaesei, C.; Jaroszynski, D. A., E-mail: d.a.jaroszynski@strath.ac.uk [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Geer, S. B. van der; Loos, M. J. de [Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands); Poole, M. W.; Shepherd, B. J. A.; Clarke, J. A. [ASTeC, STFC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Gillespie, W. A. [SUPA, School of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); MacLeod, A. M. [School of Computing and Creative Technologies, University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee DD1 1HG (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-30

    Narrow band undulator radiation tuneable over the wavelength range of 150–260 nm has been produced by short electron bunches from a 2 mm long laser plasma wakefield accelerator based on a 20 TW femtosecond laser system. The number of photons measured is up to 9 × 10{sup 6} per shot for a 100 period undulator, with a mean peak brilliance of 1 × 10{sup 18} photons/s/mrad{sup 2}/mm{sup 2}/0.1% bandwidth. Simulations estimate that the driving electron bunch r.m.s. duration is as short as 3 fs when the electron beam has energy of 120–130 MeV with the radiation pulse duration in the range of 50–100 fs.

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  2. Influence of higher harmonics of the undulator in X-ray polarimetry and crystal monochromator design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx-Glowna, Berit; Schulze, Kai S; Uschmann, Ingo; Kämpfer, Tino; Weber, Günter; Hahn, Christoph; Wille, Hans Christian; Schlage, Kai; Röhlsberger, Ralf; Förster, Eckhart; Stöhlker, Thomas; Paulus, Gerhard G

    2015-09-01

    The spectrum of the undulator radiation of beamline P01 at Petra III has been measured after passing a multiple reflection channel-cut polarimeter. Odd and even harmonics up to the 15th order, as well as Compton peaks which were produced by the high harmonics in the spectrum, could been measured. These additional contributions can have a tremendous influence on the performance of the polarimeter and have to be taken into account for further polarimeter designs.

  3. Beamline 9.0.1 - a high-resolution undulator beamline for gas-phase spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozek, J.D.; Heimann, P.A.; Mossessian, D. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source is an undulator beamline with a Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) which provides very high resolution and flux over the photon energy range 20-320eV. The beamline has been used primarily by the atomic and molecular science community to conduct spectroscopy experiments using electron, ion and fluorescence photon detection. A description of the beamline and its performance will be provided in this abstract.

  4. Undulative induction electron accelerator for the waste and natural water purification systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kulish, Victor V; Gubanov, I V

    2001-01-01

    The project analysis of Undulative Induction Accelerator (EH - accelerator) for the waste and natural water purification systems is accomplished. It is shown that the use of the four-channel design of induction block and the standard set of auxiliary equipment (developed earlier for the Linear Induction Accelerators - LINACs) allow to construct commercially promising purification systems. A quality analysis of the accelerator is done and the optimal parameters are chosen taking into account the specific sphere of its usage.

  5. Pulse propagation in free-electron lasers with a tapered undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.C.; Colson, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    The one-dimensional theory of short pulse propagation in free electron lasers is extended to tapered undulator devices and is used to study the behavior of an oscillator with parameter values close to those expected in forthcoming experiments. It is found that stable laser output is possible only over a small range of optical cavity lengths. Optical pulse characteristics are presented and are found to change considerably over this range

  6. Effects of undulators on the ALS: The early work on the LBL [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, A.

    1988-05-01

    In this paper we describe the early work carried out at LBL on the consequences of installing insertion devices (wigglers and undulators) on the beam dynamics of the ALS. This included analytical and tracking studies, and led to an insight to the reasons behind the predicted reduction in dynamic aperture. For completeness, a description of the unperturbed storage ring characteristics are also given. 3 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Fabrication of mm-wave undulator cavities using deep x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J.; Feinerman, A.; Kang, Y.; Kustom, R.; Lai, B.; Nassiri, A.; White, V.; Well, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    The possibility of fabricating mm-wave radio frequency cavities (100 endash 300 GHz) using deep x-ray lithography (DXRL) is being investigated. The fabrication process includes manufacture of precision x-ray masks, exposure of positive resist by x-ray through the mask, resist development, and electroforming of the final microstructure. Highly precise, two-dimensional features can be machined onto wafers using DXRL. Major challenges are: fabrication of the wafers into three-dimensional rf structures; alignment and overlay accuracy of structures; adhesion of the PMMA on the copper substrate; and selection of a developer to obtain high resolution. Rectangular cavity geometry is best suited to this fabrication technique. A 30- or 84-cell 108-GHz mm-wave structure can serve as an electromagnetic undulator. A mm-wave undulator, which will be discussed later, may have special features compared to the conventional undulator. First harmonic undulator radiation at 5.2 keV would be possible using the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac system, which provides a low-emittance electron beam by using an rf thermionic gun with an energy as high as 750 MeV. More detailed rf simulation, heat extraction analysis, beam dynamics using a mm-wave structure, and measurements on 10x larger scale models can be found in these proceedings [Y.W. Kang et al., open-quote open-quote Design and Construction of Planar mm-wave Accelerating Cavity Structures close-quote close-quote] copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  8. X-ray lithography using wiggler and undulator synchrotron-radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neureuther, A.R.; Kim, K.J.; Thompson, A.C.; Hoyer, E.

    1983-08-01

    A systems design approach is used to identify feasible options for wiggler and undulator beam lines for x-ray lithography in the 0.5 to 0.2 μm linewidth region over 5 cm by 5 cm fields. Typical parameters from the Wiggler and Undulator in the Advanced Light Source designed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are used as examples. Moving from the conventional wavelengths of 4 to 9 A to very soft wavelengths around 15 A is shown to be very promising. The mask absorber thickness can be reduced a factor of three so that 0.2 μm features can be made with a 1:1 mask aspect ratio. The mask heating limited exposure time is also reduced a factor of three to 3 sec/cm 2 . However, extremely thin beam line windows (1/4 mil Be) and mask supports (1 μm Si) must be used. A wiggler beam line design using a small slit window at a scanning mirror appears feasible. A unconventional, windowless differentially pumped beam line with dual deflecting mirrors could be used with an undulator source

  9. A Helical Undulator Wave-guide Inverse Free-Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.; Bodzin, N.; Frigola, P.; Musumeci, P.; Pellegrini, C.; Travish, G.; Joshi, C.; Tochitsky, S.

    2004-01-01

    With recent success in high gradient, high-energy gain IFEL experiments at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory, future experiments are now being contemplated. The Neptune IFEL was designed to use a tightly focused, highly diffracting, near-TW peak power 10 micron laser. This choice of laser focusing, driven by power-handling limitations of the optics near the interaction region, led to design and use of a very complex undulator, and to sensitivity to both laser misalignment and focusing errors. As these effects limited the performance of the IFEL experiment, a next generation experiment at Neptune has been studied which avoids the use of a highly diffractive laser beam through use of a waveguide. We discuss here the choice of low-loss waveguide, guided mode characteristics and likely power limitations. We also examine a preferred undulator design, which is chosen to be helical in order to maximize the acceleration achieved for a given power. With the limitations of these laser and undulator choices in mind, we show the expected performance of the IFEL using 1D simulations. Three-dimensional effects are examined, in the context of use of a solenoid for focusing and acceleration enhancement

  10. Undulations on the surface of elongated bubbles in confined gas-liquid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnini, M.; Ferrari, A.; Thome, J. R.; Stone, H. A.

    2017-08-01

    A systematic analysis is presented of the undulations appearing on the surface of long bubbles in confined gas-liquid flows. CFD simulations of the flow are performed with a self-improved version of the open-source solver ESI OpenFOAM (release 2.3.1), for Ca =0.002 -0.1 and Re =0.1 -1000 , where Ca =μ U /σ and Re =2 ρ U R /μ , with μ and ρ being, respectively, the viscosity and density of the liquid, σ the surface tension, U the bubble velocity, and R the tube radius. A model, based on an extension of the classical axisymmetric Bretherton theory, accounting for inertia and for the curvature of the tube's wall, is adopted to better understand the CFD results. The thickness of the liquid film, and the wavelength and decay rate of the undulations extracted from the CFD simulations, agree well with those obtained with the theoretical model. Inertial effects appear when the Weber number of the flow We =Ca Re =O (10-1) and are manifest by a larger number of undulation crests that become evident on the surface of the rear meniscus of the bubble. This study demonstrates that the necessary bubble length for a flat liquid film region to exist between the rear and front menisci rapidly increases above 10 R when Ca >0.01 and the value of the Reynolds number approaches 1000.

  11. Circular polarization opportunities at the SASE3 undulator line of the European XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkez, Svitozar; Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    XFELs provide X-ray pulses with unprecedented peak brightness and ultrashort duration. They are usually driven by planar undulators, meaning that the output radiation is linearly polarized. For many experimental applications, however, polarization control is critical: besides the ability to produce linearly polarized radiation, one often needs the possibility of generating circularly polarized radiation with a high, stable degree of polarization. This may be achieved by using a first part of the XFEL undulator to produce bunching and then, by propagating the the bunched beam through an ''afterburner'' - a short undulator with tunable polarization, where only limited gain takes place. One of the issues that one needs to consider in this case is the separation of the circularly polarized radiation obtained in the radiator from the linearly polarized background produced in the first part of the FEL. In this article we review several methods to do so, including the inverse tapering technique. In particular, we use the Genesis FEL code to simulate a case study pertaining to the SASE3 FEL line at the European XFEL with up-to-date parameters and we confirm that a high degree of circular polarization is expected. Moreover, we propose to further improve the effectiveness of the inverse tapering technique either via angular separation of the linearly polarized radiation or strongly defocusing it at the sample position. In this way we exploit the unique flexibility of the European XFEL from both the electron beam and the photon beam optics side.

  12. Proposed particle-beam characterizations for the APS undulator test line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Borland, M.; Milton, S.

    1993-09-01

    A research and development effort is underway at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to use an rf gun as a low-emittance electron source for injection into the 100- to 650-MeV linac subsystem and subsequently to an undulator test area. This configuration would combine the acceleration capability of the 200-MeV S-band electron linac and the in-line 450-MeV positron linac that normally provide positrons to the positron accumulator ring (PAR). A transport line that bypasses the PAR will bring the electrons to the undulator test area. Characterization techniques will be discussed for the electron beam with a normalized, rms emittance of <10 {pi} mm mrad (1{sigma}) at micropulse charges of up to 350 pC and micropulse durations of {approximately}5 ps (FWHM). Tests proposed include measurement of particle beam transport effects (at one-tenth the storage ring beam rigidity) caused by small undulator field errors as well as operations intended to produce coherent, short wavelength radiation (<200 nm).

  13. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  14. Propulsion of magnetically levitated trains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wipf, S L

    1976-05-01

    A propulsion system for magnetically levitated trains is proposed. A method of periodically energizing magnetic loops on a train moving over a periodically undulating track allows the net repulsive magnetic force to tilt forward or backward for either propulsion or braking. The principle is explained and a specific example discussed. Approximate calculations show feasibility. Problems requiring technical solutions which cannot be considered present state-of-the-art are AC losses at frequencies up to 20 Hz and mechanical fatigue properties at low temperatures. Suitable primary power could be derived from hydrogen-fueled turbines yet to be developed.

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  1. Working group summary: new technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luccio, A.

    1983-01-01

    The discussion of undulator magnets includes conventional static undulators, gratings as undulators, crystals as undulators, pump wave undulators, magnetic measurements, magnetic fields, trajectories, and matching of an undulator with a storage ring

  2. Multicascade X-Ray Free-Electron Laser with Harmonic Multiplier and Two-Frequency Undulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovsky, K. V.

    2018-06-01

    The feasibility of generation of powerful x-ray radiation by a cascade free-electron laser (FEL) with amplification of higher harmonics using a two-frequency undulator is studied. To analyze the FEL operation, a complex phenomenological single-pass FEL model is developed and used. It describes linear and nonlinear generation of harmonics in the FEL with seed laser that takes into account initial electron beam noise and describes all main losses of each harmonic in each FEL cascade. The model is also calibrated against and approved by the experimental FEL data and available results of three-dimensional numerical simulation. The electron beam in the undulator is assumed to be matched and focused, and the dynamics of power in the singlepass FEL with cascade harmonic multipliers is investigated to obtain x-ray laser radiation in the FEL having the shortest length, beam energy, and frequency of the seed laser as low as possible. In this context, the advantages of the two-frequency undulator used for generation of harmonics are demonstrated. The evolution of harmonics in a multicascade FEL with multiplication of harmonics is investigated. The operation of the cascade FEL at the wavelength λ = 1.14 nm, generating 30 MW already on 38 m with the seed laser operating at a wavelength of 11.43 nm corresponding to the maximal reflectivity of the multilayered mirror MoRu/Be coating is investigated. In addition, the operation of the multicascade FEL with accessible seed UVlaser operating at a wavelength of 157 nm (F2 excimer UV-laser) and electron beam with energy of 0.5 GeV is investigated. X-ray radiation simulated in it at the wavelength λ 3.9 nm reaches power of 50 MW already at 27 m, which is by two orders of magnitude shorter than 3.4 km of the x-ray FEL recently put into operation in Europe.

  3. Simulation and measurement of the electrostatic beam kicker in the low-energy undulator test line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldschmidt, G. J.

    1998-01-01

    An electrostatic kicker has been constructed for use in the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The function of the kicker is to limit the amount of beam current to be accelerated by the APS linac. Two electrodes within the kicker create an electric field that adjusts the trajectory of the beam. This paper will explore the static fields that are set up between the offset electrode plates and determine the reaction of the beam to this field. The kicker was numerically simulated using the electromagnetic solver package MAFIA [1

  4. Ultra-wide-band accumulation of coherent undulator synchrotron radiation in a resonating cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Seo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cavity accumulation of coherent undulator synchrotron radiation emitted by a train of periodic electron bunches is investigated. Phase-matching conditions for accumulation of radiation emitted by successive bunches are analyzed and numerically confirmed. While the coherent emission of a single bunch is optimal at grazing resonance, the accumulated radiation targeted at the upper resonant frequency of the waveguide mode is found to have much broader bandwidth and higher efficiency as the resonance steps away from the grazing condition. Numerical results confirm that stimulated superradiance is responsible for the accumulated radiation.

  5. Coupling impedance of an in-vacuum undulator: Measurement, simulation, and analytical estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Smaluk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the important issues of the in-vacuum undulator design is the coupling impedance of the vacuum chamber, which includes tapered transitions with variable gap size. To get complete and reliable information on the impedance, analytical estimate, numerical simulations and beam-based measurements have been performed at Diamond Light Source, a forthcoming upgrade of which includes introducing additional insertion device (ID straights. The impedance of an already existing ID vessel geometrically similar to the new one has been measured using the orbit bump method. The measurement results in comparison with analytical estimations and numerical simulations are discussed in this paper.

  6. Coupling impedance of an in-vacuum undulator: Measurement, simulation, and analytical estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaluk, Victor; Fielder, Richard; Blednykh, Alexei; Rehm, Guenther; Bartolini, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    One of the important issues of the in-vacuum undulator design is the coupling impedance of the vacuum chamber, which includes tapered transitions with variable gap size. To get complete and reliable information on the impedance, analytical estimate, numerical simulations and beam-based measurements have been performed at Diamond Light Source, a forthcoming upgrade of which includes introducing additional insertion device (ID) straights. The impedance of an already existing ID vessel geometrically similar to the new one has been measured using the orbit bump method. The measurement results in comparison with analytical estimations and numerical simulations are discussed in this paper.

  7. Observation of undulation motion of lipid bilayers by neutron spin echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Norifumi L.; Seto, Hideki; Hishida, Mafumi

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of synthesized phospholipids have been well investigated as model biomembranes. These lipids usually self-assemble into regular stacks of bilayers with a characteristic repeat distance on the order of nm, whereas real biomembrane exist as single bilayers. The key phenomenon in understanding the formation of single isolated bilayers in 'unbinding' of lipid bilayers, in which the inter-bilayer distance of lipid bilayers diverges by the steric interaction due to the membrane undulation. In this paper, we show some results of neutron spin-echo (NSE) experiments to investigate the effect of the steric interaction on unbinding and related phenomena. (author)

  8. Undulating tubular liposomes through incorporation of a synthetic skin ceramide into phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Tan, Grace; Zhou, Jia; He, Jibao; Lawson, Louise B; McPherson, Gary L; John, Vijay T

    2009-09-15

    Nonspherical liposomes were prepared by doping L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (PC) with ceramide VI (a skin lipid). Cryo-transmission electron microscopy shows the liposome shape changing from spherical to an undulating tubular morphology, when the amount of ceramide VI is increased. The formation of tubular liposomes is energetically favorable and is attributed to the association of ceramide VI with PC creating regions of lower curvature. Since ceramides are the major component of skin lipids in the stratum corneum, tubular liposomes containing ceramide may potentially serve as self-enhanced nanocarriers for transdermal delivery.

  9. Magnetic measurements at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.I.; Barale, P.; Callapp, L.; Case-Fortier, M.; Lerner, D.; Nelson, D.; Schermer, R.; Skipper, G.; Van Dyke, D.; Cork, C.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.; Hoyer, E.; Marks, S.; Harten, T.; Luchini, K.; Milburn, J.; Tanabe, J.; Zucca, F.; Keller, R.; Selph, F.; Gilbert, W.; Green, M.A.; O'Neil, J.; Schafer, R.; Taylor, C.; Greiman, W.; Hall, D.; MacFarlane, J.

    1991-08-01

    Recent magnetic measurement activities at LBL have been concentrated in two separate areas, electro-magnets and permanent magnets for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and superconducting magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL). A survey of the many different measurement systems is presented. These include: AC magnetic measurements of an ALS booster dipole engineering model magnet, dipole moment measurements of permanent magnet blocks for ALS wigglers and undulators, permeability measurements of samples destined for wiggler and undulator poles, harmonic error analysis of SSC one meter model dipoles and quadrupoles and five meter long SSC prototype quadrupoles, harmonic error analysis of ALS dipoles, quadrupoles, and sextupoles, precision Hall probe mapping of ALS storage ring combined function magnets, and the design of the ALS insertion device magnets mapping system. We also describe a new UNIX based data acquisition system that is being developed for the SSC. Probes used for magnetic measurements include Helmholtz coils, integral coils, point coils, and bucking harmonic analysis coils, several different types of Hall probes, and nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometers. Both analog and digital integrators are used with the coils. Some problems that occurred and their rectification is described. The mechanisms used include rotating systems with optical encoders, X-Y mapping systems with optical encoders and a laser position measuring device. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. Analysis of insertion device magnet measurements for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, S.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.M.; Schlueter, R.; Wang, C.

    1993-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), which is currently being commissioned at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is a third generation light source designed to produce XUV radiation of unprecedented brightness. To meet the high brightness goal the storage ring has been designed for very small electron beam emittance and the undulators installed in the ALS are built to a high degree of precision. The allowable magnetic field errors are driven by electron beam and radiation requirements. Detailed magnetic measurements and adjustments are performed on each undulator to qualify it for installation in the ALS. The first two ALS undulators, IDA and IDB, have been installed. This paper describes the program of measurements, data analysis, and adjustments carried out for these two devices. Calculations of the radiation spectrum, based upon magnetic measurements, are included. Final field integral distributions are also shown. Good field integral uniformity has been achieved using a novel correction scheme, which is also described

  11. Undulant Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; /Valencia U.; Mena, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    If the equation of state for ''dark energy'' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  12. Conceptual design of an undulator system for a dedicated bio-imaging beamline at the European X-ray FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    We describe a future possible upgrade of the European XFEL consisting in the construction of an undulator beamline dedicated to life science experiments. The availability of free undulator tunnels at the European XFEL facility offers a unique opportunity to build a beamline optimized for coherent diffraction imaging of complex molecules, like proteins and other biologically interesting structures. Crucial parameters for such bio-imaging beamline are photon energy range, peak power, and pulse duration. Key component of the setup is the undulator source. The peak power is maximized in the photon energy range between 3 keV and 13 keV by the use of a very efficient combination of self-seeding, fresh bunch and tapered undulator techniques. The unique combination of ultra-high peak power of 1 TW in the entire energy range, and ultrashort pulse duration tunable from 2 fs to 10 fs, would allow for single shot coherent imaging of protein molecules with size larger than 10 nm. Also, the new beamline would enable imaging of large biological structures in the water window, between 0.3 keV and 0.4 keV. In order to make use of standardized components, at present we favor the use of SASE3-type undulator segments. The number segments, 40, is determined by the tapered length for the design output power of 1 TW. The present plan assumes the use of a nominal electron bunch with charge of 0.1 nC. Experiments will be performed without interference with the other three undulator beamlines. Therefore, the total amount of scheduled beam time per year is expected to be up to 4000 hours.

  13. Design, Implementation and Control of a Fish Robot with Undulating Fins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Siahmansouri

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic robots can potentially perform better than conventional robots in underwater vehicle designing. This paper describes the design of the propulsion system and depth control of a robotic fish. In this study, inspired by knife fish, we have designed and implemented an undulating fin to produce propulsive force. This undulating fin is a segmental anal fin that produces sinusoidal wave to propel the robot. The relationship between the individual fin segment and phase angles with the overall fin trajectory has also been discussed. This propulsive force can be adjusted and directed for fish robot manoeuvre by a mechanical system with two servomotors. These servomotors regulate the direction and depth of swimming. A wireless remote control system is designed to adjust the servomotors which enables us to control revolution, speed and phase differences of neighbor servomotors of fins. Finally, Field trials are conducted in an outdoor pool to demonstrate the relationship between robotic fish speed and fin parameters like phase difference, the number of phase and undulatory amplitude.

  14. Magnetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Document Server

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  18. Spontaneous and stimulated undulator radiation by an ultra-relativistic positron channeling in a periodically bent crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, W.; Korol, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.; Greiner, W.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the radiation generated by positrons channeling in a crystalline undulator. The undulator is produced by periodically bending a single crystal with an amplitude much larger than the interplanar spacing. Different approaches for bending the crystal are described and the restrictions on the parameters of the bending are discussed. We also present numeric calculations of the spontaneous emitted radiation and estimate the conditions for stimulated emission. Our investigations show that the proposed mechanism could be an interesting source for high energy photons and is worth to be studied experimentally

  19. Magnetic measurements at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.I.; Barale, P.; Callapp, L.; Case-Fortier, M.; Lerner, D.; Nelson, D.; Schermer, R.; Skipper, G.; Van Dyke, D.; Cork, C.

    1992-01-01

    Recent magnetic measurement activities at LBL have been concentrated in two separate areas, electro-magnets and permanent magnets for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and superconducting magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL). In this paper a survey of the many different measurement systems is presented. These include: AC magnetic measurements of an ALS booster dipole engineering model magnet, dipole moment measurements of permanent magnet blocks for ALS wigglers and undulators, permeability measurements of samples destined for wiggler and undulator poles, harmonic error analysis of SSC one meter model dipoles and quadrupoles and five meter long SSC prototype quadrupoles, harmonic error analysis of ALS dipoles, quadrupoles, and sextupoles, precision Hall probe mapping of ALS design of the ALS insertion device magnetic mapping system. The authors also describe a new UNIX based data acquisition system that is being developed for the SSC. Probes used for magnetic measurements include Helmholtz coils, integral coils, point coils, and bucking harmonic analysis coils, several different types of Hall probes, and nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometers

  20. LCLS: Ultrafast Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucksbaum, Philip

    2005-01-01

    Everyone knows that lasers can be bright. From Goldfinger to Star Wars, intense lasers carry a 'death ray' reputation in popular culture. But what is intense light, anyway? How can you even make or direct something that will blast to smithereens any material that it encounters? And how can something as ephemeral as a ray of light turn into an irresistible force? Is there an ultimate intensity, a brightest light? We'll answer these questions, and more.

  1. Comparison of Powerlifting Performance in Trained Men Using Traditional and Flexible Daily Undulating Periodization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquhoun, Ryan J; Gai, Christopher M; Walters, Jeoffrey; Brannon, Andrew R; Kilpatrick, Marcus W; DʼAgostino, Dominic P; Campbell, Bill I

    2017-02-01

    Colquhoun, RJ, Gai, CM, Walters, J, Brannon, AR, Kilpatrick, MW, D'Agostino, DP, and Campbell, WI. Comparison of powerlifting performance in trained men using traditional and flexible daily undulating periodization. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 283-291, 2017-Daily undulating periodization (DUP) is a growing trend, both in practice and in the scientific literature. A new form of DUP, flexible daily undulating periodization (FDUP), allows for athletes to have some autonomy by choosing the order of their training. The purpose of this study was to compare an FDUP model to a traditional model of DUP on powerlifting performance in resistance-trained men. Twenty-five resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups: FDUP (N = 14) or DUP (N = 11). All participants possessed a minimum of 6 months of resistance training experience and were required to squat, bench press, and deadlift 125, 100, and 150% of their body mass, respectively. Dependent variables assessed at baseline and after the 9-week training program included bench press 1 repetition maximum (1RM), squat 1RM, deadlift 1RM, powerlifting total, Wilks Coefficient, fat mass, and fat-free mass (FFM). Dependent variables assessed during each individual training session were motivation to train, Session Rating of Perceived Exertion (Session RPE), and satisfaction with training session. After the 9-week training program, no significant differences in intensity or volume were found between groups. Both groups significantly improved bench press 1RM (FDUP: +6.5 kg; DUP: +8.8 kg), squat 1RM (FDUP: +15.6 kg; DUP: +18.0 kg), deadlift 1RM (FDUP: +14.8 kg; DUP: +13.6 kg), powerlifting total (FDUP: +36.8 kg; DUP: +40.4 kg), and Wilks Coefficient (FDUP: +24.8; DUP: +26.0) over the course of study (p = <0.001 for each variable). There was also a significant increase in FFM (FDUP: +0.8 kg; DUP: +0.8 kg) for both groups (p = 0.003). There were no differences in motivation to train, session RPE, or satisfaction with

  2. Observation and analysis of self-amplified spontaneous emission at the APS low-energy undulator test line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, N. D.; Attig, J.; Banks, G.; Bechtold, R.; Beczek, K.; Benson, C.; Berg, S.; Berg, W.; Biedron, S. G.; Biggs, J. A.; Borland, M.; Boerste, K.; Bosek, M.; Brzowski, W. R.; Budz, J.; Carwardine, J. A.; Castro, P.; Chae, Y.-C.; Christensen, S.; Clark, C.; Conde, M.; Crosbie, E. A.; Decker, G. A.; Dejus, R. J.; DeLeon, H.; Den Hartog, P. K.; Deriy, B. N.; Dohan, D.; Dombrowski, P.; Donkers, D.; Doose, C. L.; Dortwegt, R. J.; Edwards, G. A.; Eidelman, Y.; Erdmann, M. J.; Error, J.; Ferry, R.; Flood, R.; Forrestal, J.; Freund, H.; Friedsam, H.; Gagliano, J.; Gai, W.; Galayda, J. N.; Gerig, R.; Gilmore, R. L.; Gluskin, E.; Goeppner, G. A.; Goetzen, J.; Gold, C.; Gorski, A. J.; Grelick, A. E.; Hahne, M. W.; Hanuska, S.; Harkay, K. C.; Harris, G.; Hillman, A. L.; Hogrefe, R.; Hoyt, J.; Huang, Z.; Jagger, J. M.; Jansma, W. G.; Jaski, M.; Jones, S. J.; Keane, R. T.; Kelly, A. L.; Keyser, C.; Kim, K.-J.; Kim, S. H.; Kirshenbaum, M.; Klick, J. H.; Knoerzer, K.; Koldenhoven, R. J.; Knott, M.; Labuda, S.; Laird, R.; Lang, J.; Lenkszus, F.; Lessner, E. S.; Lewellen, J. W.; Li, Y.; Lill, R. M.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Makarov, O. A.; Markovich, G. M.; McDowell, M.; McDowell, W. P.; McNamara, P. E.; Meier, T.; Meyer, D.; Michalek, W.; Milton, S. V.; Moe, H.; Moog, E. R.; Morrison, L.; Nassiri, A.; Noonan, J. R.; Otto, R.; Pace, J.; Pasky, S. J.; Penicka, J. M.; Pietryla, A. F.; Pile, G.; Pitts, C.; Power, J.; Powers, T.; Putnam, C. C.; Puttkammer, A. J.; Reigle, D.; Reigle, L.; Ronzhin, D.; Rotela, E. R.; Russell, E. F.; Sajaev, V.; Sarkar, S.; Scapino, J. C.; Schroeder, K.; Seglem, R. A.; Sereno, N. S.; Sharma, S. K.; Sidarous, J. F.; Singh, O.; Smith, T. L.; Soliday, R.; Sprau, G. A.; Stein, S. J.; Stejskal, B.; Svirtun, V.; Teng, L. C.; Theres, E.; Thompson, K.; Tieman, B. J.; Torres, J. A.; Trakhtenberg, E. M.; Travish, G.; Trento, G. F.; Vacca, J.; Vasserman, I. B.; Vinokurov, N. A.; Walters, D. R.; Wang, J.; Wang, X. J.; Warren, J.; Wesling, S.; Weyer, D. L.; Wiemerslage, G.; Wilhelmi, K.; Wright, R.; Wyncott, D.; Xu, S.; Yang, B.-X.; Yoder, W.; Zabel, R. B.

    2001-12-01

    Exponential growth of self-amplified spontaneous emission at 530 nm was first experimentally observed at the Advanced Photon Source low-energy undulator test line in December 1999. Since then, further detailed measurements and analysis of the results have been made. Here, we present the measurements and compare these with calculations based on measured electron beam properties and theoretical expectations.

  3. Purified SASE undulator configuration to enhance the performance of the soft x-ray beamline at the European XFEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkez, Svitozar; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni; Zagorodnov, Igor; Geloni, Gianluca

    2013-08-01

    The purified SASE (pSASE) undulator configuration recently proposed at SLAC promises an increase in the output spectral density of XFELs. In this article we study a straightforward implementation of this configuration for the soft x-ray beamline at the European XFEL. A few undulator cells, resonant at a subharmonic of the FEL radiation, are used in the middle of the exponential regime to amplify the radiation, while simultaneously reducing the FEL bandwidth. Based on start-to-end simulations, we show that with the proposed configuration the spectral density in the photon energy range between 1.3 keV and 3 keV can be enhanced of an order of magnitude compared to the baseline mode of operation. This option can be implemented into the tunable-gap SASE3 baseline undulator without additional hardware, and it is complementary to the self-seeding option with grating monochromator proposed for the same undulator line, which can cover the photon energy range between about 0.26 keV and 1 keV.

  4. Radiation emission at channeling of electrons in a strained layer Si1-xGex undulator crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backe, H.; Krambrich, D.; Lauth, W.

    2013-01-01

    ML source. Spectra taken at the beam energy of 270 MeV at channeling in the undulating (110) planes exhibit a broad excess yield around the theoretically expected photon energies of 0.069 MeV, as compared with a flat silicon reference crystal. Model calculations on the basis of synchrotron-like radiation...

  5. Observation and analysis of self-amplified spontaneous emission at the APS low-energy undulator test line

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, N D; Banks, G; Bechtold, R; Beczek, K; Benson, C; Berg, S; Berg, W; Biedron, S G; Biggs, J A; Boerste, K; Borland, M; Bosek, M; Brzowski, W R; Budz, J; Carwardine, J A; Castro, P; Chae, Y C; Christensen, S; Clark, C; Conde, M; Crosbie, E A; Decker, G A; Dejus, Roger J; Deleon, H; Den Hartog, P K; Deriy, B N; Dohan, D; Dombrowski, P; Donkers, D; Doose, C L; Dortwegt, R J; Edwards, G A; Eidelman, Y; Erdmann, M J; Error, J J; Ferry, R; Flood, R; Forrestal, J; Freund, H; Friedsam, H; Gagliano, J; Gai, W; Galayda, J N; Gerig, R; Gilmore, R L; Gluskin, E; Goeppner, G A; Goetzen, J; Gold, C; Grelick, A E; Hahne, M W; Hanuska, S; Harkay, K C; Harris, G; Hillman, A L; Hogrefe, R; Hoyt, J; Huang, Z; Jagger, J M; Jansma, W G; Jaski, M; Jones, S J; Keane, R T; Kelly, A L; Keyser, C; Kim, K J; Kim, S H; Kirshenbaum, M; Klick, J H; Knoerzer, K; Knott, M; Koldenhoven, R J; Labuda, S; Laird, R; Lang, J; Lenkszus, F R; Lessner, E S; Lewellen, J W; Li, Y; Lill, R M; Lumpkin, Alex H; Makarov, O A; Markovich, G M; McDowell, M; McDowell, W P; McNamara, P E; Meier, T; Meyer, D; Michalek, W; Milton, S V; Moe, H; Moog, E; Morrison, L; Nassiri, A; Noonan, J R; Otto, R; Pace, J; Pasky, S J; Penicka, J M; Pietryla, A F; Pile, G; Pitts, C; Power, J; Powers, T; Putnam, C C; Puttkammer, A J; Reigle, D; Reigle, L; Ronzhin, D; Rotela, E R; Russell, E F; Sajaev, Vadim; Sarkar, S; Scapino, J C; Schröder, K; Seglem, R A; Sereno, N S; Sharma, S K; Sidarous, J F; Singh, O; Smith, T L; Soliday, R; Sprau, G A; Stein, S J; Stejskal, B; Svirtun, V; Teng, L C; Theres, E; Thompson, K; Tieman, B J; Torres, J A; Trakhtenberg, E; Travish, G; Trento, G F; Vacca, J; Vasserman, I B; Vinokurov, N A; Walters, D R; Wang, J; Wang, X J; Warren, J; Wesling, S; Weyer, D L; Wiemerslage, G; Wilhelmi, K; Wright, R; Wyncott, D; Xu, S; Yang, B X; Yoder, W; Zabel, R B

    2001-01-01

    Exponential growth of self-amplified spontaneous emission at 530 nm was first experimentally observed at the Advanced Photon Source low-energy undulator test line in December 1999. Since then, further detailed measurements and analysis of the results have been made. Here, we present the measurements and compare these with calculations based on measured electron beam properties and theoretical expectations.

  6. Towards an exact relativistic theory of Earth's geoid undulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.; Mazurova, Elena M.; Karpik, Alexander P.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper extends the Newtonian concept of the geoid in classic geodesy towards the realm of general relativity by utilizing the covariant geometric methods of the perturbation theory of curved manifolds. It yields a covariant definition of the anomalous (disturbing) gravity potential and formulates differential equation for it in the form of a covariant Laplace equation. The paper also derives the Bruns equation for calculation of geoid's height with full account for relativistic effects beyond the Newtonian approximation. A brief discussion of the relativistic Bruns formula is provided. - Highlights: • We apply general relativity to define the exact concept of relativistic geoid. • We derive relativistic equation of geoid and the reference level surface. • We employ the manifold perturbation theory to discuss geoid's undulation

  7. Towards an exact relativistic theory of Earth's geoid undulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M., E-mail: kopeikins@missouri.edu [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Siberian State Geodetic Academy, 10 Plakhotny St., Novosibirsk 630108 (Russian Federation); Mazurova, Elena M., E-mail: e_mazurova@mail.ru [Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography, 4 Gorokhovsky Alley, Moscow 105064 (Russian Federation); Siberian State Geodetic Academy, 10 Plakhotny St., Novosibirsk 630108 (Russian Federation); Karpik, Alexander P., E-mail: rector@ssga.ru [Siberian State Geodetic Academy, 10 Plakhotny St., Novosibirsk 630108 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-14

    The present paper extends the Newtonian concept of the geoid in classic geodesy towards the realm of general relativity by utilizing the covariant geometric methods of the perturbation theory of curved manifolds. It yields a covariant definition of the anomalous (disturbing) gravity potential and formulates differential equation for it in the form of a covariant Laplace equation. The paper also derives the Bruns equation for calculation of geoid's height with full account for relativistic effects beyond the Newtonian approximation. A brief discussion of the relativistic Bruns formula is provided. - Highlights: • We apply general relativity to define the exact concept of relativistic geoid. • We derive relativistic equation of geoid and the reference level surface. • We employ the manifold perturbation theory to discuss geoid's undulation.

  8. Soft x-ray spectroscopy undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, K.J.; Xu, Z.; Moore, J.F.; Gluskin, E.

    1997-09-01

    Construction of the high-resolution soft x ray spectroscopy undulator beamline, 2ID-C, at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been completed. The beamline, one of two soft x ray beamlines at the APS, will cover the photon energy range from 500 to 3,000 eV, with a maximum resolving power between 7,000 and 14,000. The optical design is based on a spherical grating monochromator (SGM) giving both high resolution and high flux throughput. Photon flux is calculated to be approximately 10{sup 12}--10{sup 13} photons per second with a beam size of approximately 1 x 1 mm{sup 2} at the sample.

  9. FEL small signal gain reduction due to phase error of undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Qika

    2002-01-01

    The effects of undulator phase errors on the Free Electron Laser small signal gain is analyzed and discussed. The gain reduction factor due to the phase error is given analytically for low-gain regimes, it shows that degradation of the gain is similar to that of the spontaneous radiation, has a simple exponential relation with square of the rms phase error, and the linear variation part of phase error induces the position shift of maximum gain. The result also shows that the Madey's theorem still hold in the presence of phase error. The gain reduction factor due to the phase error for high-gain regimes also can be given in a simple way

  10. Radiative interaction of electrons in a short electron bunch moving in an undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents investigations of the longitudinal radiative force in an electron bunch. The model of the electron bunch assumes line density distribution. General formulas are presented for the calculation of the radiative force in the bunch moving along an arbitrary small-angle trajectory. The case of a motion in an undulator (wiggler) has been studied in detail. Analytical solutions are obtained for a rectangular and for a Gaussian bunch shape. It is shown that the rate of the bunch energy loss due to the radiative interaction is equal to the power of the coherent radiation in the far zone. Numerical estimations presented in the paper show that the effects of induced energy spread due to the radiative interaction can be important for free electron lasers operating in the infrared wavelength range

  11. A water-cooled x-ray monochromator for using off-axis undulator beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.; Maser, J.

    2000-01-01

    Undulator beamlines at third-generation synchrotrons x-ray sources are designed to use the high-brilliance radiation that is contained in the central cone of the generated x-ray beams. The rest of the x-ray beam is often unused. Moreover, in some cases, such as in the zone-plate-based microfocusing beamlines, only a small part of the central radiation cone around the optical axis is used. In this paper, a side-station branch line at the Advanced Photon Source that takes advantage of some of the unused off-axis photons in a microfocusing x-ray beamline is described. Detailed information on the design and analysis of a high-heat-load water-cooled monochromator developed for this beamline is provided

  12. Numeric Simulation on the Performance of an Undulating Fin in the Wake of a Periodic Oscillating Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yong-Hua

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD method using an unstructured, grid-based and unsteady Navier-Stokes solver with automatic adaptive re-meshing to compute the unsteady flow was adopted to study the hydrodynamic interaction between a periodic oscillating plate and a rigid undulating fin in tandem arrangement. The user-defined function (UDF program was compiled to define the undulating and oscillating motion. First, the influence of the distance between the anterior oscillating plate and the posterior undulating fin on the non-dimensional drag coefficient of the fin was investigated. Ten different distances, D=0.2L, 0.4L, 0.6L, 0.8L, 1.0L, 1.2L, 1.4L, 1.6L, 1.8L and 2.0L, were considered. The performance of the fin for different distances (D is different. Second, the plate oscillating angle (5.7°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 40°, 45°, 50° and frequency (0.5 Hz, 1.0 Hz, 1.5 Hz, 2.0 Hz, 2.5 Hz, 3.0 Hz, 3.5 Hz, 4.0 Hz effects on the non-dimensional drag coefficient of the fin were also implemented. The pressure distribution on the fin was computed and integrated to provide fin forces, which were decomposed into lift and thrust. Meanwhile, the flow field was demonstrated and analysed. Based on the flow structures, the reasons for different undulating performances were discussed. It shows that the results largely depend on the distance between the two objects. The plate oscillating angle and frequency also make a certain contribution to the performance of the posterior undulating fin. The results are similar to the interaction between two undulating objects in tandem arrangement and they may provide a physical insight into the understanding of fin interaction in fishes or bio-robotic underwater propulsors that are propelled by multi fins.

  13. An undulator based high flux and high resolution beamline for atomic, molecular and optical science (AMOS) research at INDUS-2 synchrotron radiation source (SRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Asim Kumar; Rajasekhar, B.N.; Sahoo, N.K.

    2014-08-01

    A dedicated UV-VUV and soft X-ray beamline to provide several new research opportunities in Photon induced processes in the energy range of 6-250 eV for Atomic Molecular and Optical Science (AMOS) research, a domain still less explored both at national as well international level, has been proposed by Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, BARC. This beamline will use a planar permanent magnet (PPM) undulator based on Indus-2 Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS), a 2.5 GeV third generation electron storage ring at RRCAT, Indore, India and is expected to offer a variety of opportunities for more advanced and sustained investigations for AMOS research. A plane mirror and a toroidal mirror are used as the pre-focusing optics of the AMOS beamline. A varied line spacing plane grating monochromator (VLSPGM) in a converging beam, constant included angle mode containing one toroidal focusing mirror and four interchangeable gratings is to be used to cover the energy range of 6 to 250 eV and obtain resolving powers ∼10 4 and intensity ∼10 12 ph/s at the sample position. A toroidal mirror is used to focus the diverging monochromatic light from the monochromator at a distance of 150 cm with a 1:1 magnification. As the first step towards the beamline optics design, the evaluation of the PPM undulator radiation characteristics relevant to beamline design has been performed using the Indus-2 SRS parameters in the long straight section of the ring, PPM undulator parameters, and the empirical expressions available in literature. The software resources such as XOPS, ESRF, France and SPECTRA, Photon factory, Japan have been used for detailed modelling and verification of the empirical computations. Beamline layout preparation, optimization, imaging performance evaluation, and resolving power calculations for ideal beamline optics are carried out using SHADOWVUI, an extension of XOPS software resource. A new mounting of the optical components in the monochromator has been proposed

  14. Surface-potential undulation of Alq3 thin films prepared on ITO, Au, and n-Si.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Ito, Hiromi; Maeda, Mizuo; Hara, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    The surface potential (SP) morphology on thin films of tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminum (Alq3) was investigated with Kelvin probe force microscopy. Thin Alq3 films of 100 nm were prepared on ITO/glass substrates, Au/mica substrates, and n-Si substrates. Cloud-like morphologies of the SP undulation with 200-400 nm in lateral size were observed for all three types of the substrates. New larger peaks were observed in the cloud-like morphologies when the surfaces were exposed shortly to a light, while the SP average was reduced monotonically. The nonuniform distribution of charged traps and mobility was deduced from the SP undulation morphology and its photoexposure dependences.

  15. Research on the effects of geometrical and material uncertainties on the band gap of the undulated beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Xu, Yanlong

    2017-09-01

    Considering uncertain geometrical and material parameters, the lower and upper bounds of the band gap of an undulated beam with periodically arched shape are studied by the Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) and interval analysis based on the Taylor series. Given the random variations of the overall uncertain variables, scatter plots from the MCS are used to analyze the qualitative sensitivities of the band gap respect to these uncertainties. We find that the influence of uncertainty of the geometrical parameter on the band gap of the undulated beam is stronger than that of the material parameter. And this conclusion is also proved by the interval analysis based on the Taylor series. Our methodology can give a strategy to reduce the errors between the design and practical values of the band gaps by improving the accuracy of the specially selected uncertain design variables of the periodical structures.

  16. Thermo-mechanical analysis of the white-beam slits for an undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nian, H.L.T.; Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    A set of precision horizontal and vertical white-beam slits has been designed for an undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. Due to the powerful x-ray heat flux emitted by the undulator, it is difficult to control the thermal distortion within the desired range of 1-2 microns. We analyzed many conceptual designs in an attempt to minimize the thermal distortion of the slits. Even with 1-mm-thick, low-Z material (graphite) coated on the heating surface of a traditional slit, the maximum thermal distortion is over 25 microns. A three-piece slit was then designed to satisfy the requirements. It consists of one large block, two tungsten knife edges, and an OFHC cooling tube (filled with copper mesh) brazed inside the large block. The thermal distortion at the knife edges of this three-piece slit has a relative displacement of less than 2 microns

  17. Simulations of X-ray diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal tantalum with synchrotron undulator sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M X; Zhang, Y Y; E, J C; Luo, S N

    2018-05-01

    Polychromatic synchrotron undulator X-ray sources are useful for ultrafast single-crystal diffraction under shock compression. Here, simulations of X-ray diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal tantalum with realistic undulator sources are reported, based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Purely elastic deformation, elastic-plastic two-wave structure, and severe plastic deformation under different impact velocities are explored, as well as an edge release case. Transmission-mode diffraction simulations consider crystallographic orientation, loading direction, incident beam direction, X-ray spectrum bandwidth and realistic detector size. Diffraction patterns and reciprocal space nodes are obtained from atomic configurations for different loading (elastic and plastic) and detection conditions, and interpretation of the diffraction patterns is discussed.

  18. Simulations of X-ray diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal tantalum with synchrotron undulator sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, M. X.; Zhang, Y. Y.; E, J. C.; Luo, S. N.

    2018-04-24

    Polychromatic synchrotron undulator X-ray sources are useful for ultrafast single-crystal diffraction under shock compression. Here, simulations of X-ray diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal tantalum with realistic undulator sources are reported, based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Purely elastic deformation, elastic–plastic two-wave structure, and severe plastic deformation under different impact velocities are explored, as well as an edge release case. Transmission-mode diffraction simulations consider crystallographic orientation, loading direction, incident beam direction, X-ray spectrum bandwidth and realistic detector size. Diffraction patterns and reciprocal space nodes are obtained from atomic configurations for different loading (elastic and plastic) and detection conditions, and interpretation of the diffraction patterns is discussed.

  19. Wiggler magnets at SSRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winick, H.

    1980-01-01

    A wiggler magnet has been installed in SPEAR and has been routinely used as a radiation source for Beam Line IV at SSRL since March, 1979. The magnets is 1.22 m long. It has five full central poles and two end half-poles producing a total of three complete small amplitude (<= 1 mm) oscillations of the electron beam in traversing the magnet. The magnet has been operated with the peak field in the central full poles at 17.2 kG and produces an intense beam of synchrotron radiation extending to 12 keV and beyond even at the lowest operating energies of SPEAR (1.5 GeV). It is compatible with all phases of colliding-beam operation of SPEAR and has improved the colliding-beam luminosity. The results of measurements on the spectrum and intensity of the radiation produced by the Wiggler will be presented. The measured effects of the wiggler on the stored beam tunes, energy spread and emittance will also be presented. Plans will also be described for installing additional high field wiggler magnets in SPEAR and also weak-field, many-period undulator magnets in both SPEAR and PEP. (orig.)

  20. Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Positrons, A Proposal for the 50-GeV Beam in the FFTB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, G

    2004-03-25

    The full exploitation of the physics potential of future linear colliders such as the JLC, NLC, and TESLA will require the development of polarized positron beams. In the proposed scheme of Balakin and Mikhailichenko [1] a helical undulator is employed to generate photons of several MeV with circular polarization which are then converted in a relatively thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons. This experiment, E-166, proposes to test this scheme to determine whether such a technique can produce polarized positron beams of sufficient quality for use in future linear colliders. The experiment will install a meter-long, short-period, pulsed helical undulator in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC. A low-emittance 50-GeV electron beam passing through this undulator will generate circularly polarized photons with energies up to 10 MeV. These polarized photons are then converted to polarized positrons via pair production in thin targets. Titanium and tungsten targets, which are both candidates for use in linear colliders, will be tested. The experiment will measure the flux and polarization of the undulator photons, and the spectrum and polarization of the positrons produced in the conversion target, and compare the measurement results to simulations. Thus the proposed experiment directly tests for the first time the validity of the simulation programs used for the physics of polarized pair production in finite matter, in particular the effects of multiple scattering on polarization. Successful comparison of the experimental results to the simulations will lead to greater confidence in the proposed designs of polarized positrons sources for the next generation of linear colliders. This experiment requests six-weeks of time in the FFTB beam line: three weeks for installation and setup and three weeks of beam for data taking. A 50-GeV beam with about twice the SLC emittance at a repetition rate of 30 Hz is required.

  1. Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Positrons, A Proposal for the 50-GeV Beam in the FFTB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Alexander; P. Anthony; V. Bharadwaj; Yu.K. Batygin; T. Behnke; S. Berridge; G.R. Bower; W. Bugg; R. Carr; E. Chudakov; J.E. Clendenin; F.J. Decker; Yu. Efremenko; T. Fieguth; K. Flottmann; M. Fukuda; V. Gharibyan; T. Handler; T. Hirose; R.H. Iverson; Yu. Kamyshkov; H. Kolanoski; T. Lohse; Chang-guo Lu; K.T. McDonald; N. Meyners; R. Michaels; A.A. Mikhailichenko; K. Monig; G. Moortgat-Pick; M. Olson; T. Omori; D. Onoprienko; N. Pavel; R. Pitthan; M. Purohit; L. Rinolfi; K.P. Schuler; J.C. Sheppard; S. Spanier; A. Stahl; Z.M. Szalata; J. Turner; D. Walz; A. Weidemann; J. Weisend

    2003-06-01

    The full exploitation of the physics potential of future linear colliders such as the JLC, NLC, and TESLA will require the development of polarized positron beams. In the proposed scheme of Balakin and Mikhailichenko [1] a helical undulator is employed to generate photons of several MeV with circular polarization which are then converted in a relatively thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons. This experiment, E-166, proposes to test this scheme to determine whether such a technique can produce polarized positron beams of sufficient quality for use in future linear colliders. The experiment will install a meter-long, short-period, pulsed helical undulator in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC. A low-emittance 50-GeV electron beam passing through this undulator will generate circularly polarized photons with energies up to 10 MeV. These polarized photons are then converted to polarized positrons via pair production in thin targets. Titanium and tungsten targets, which are both candidates for use in linear colliders, will be tested. The experiment will measure the flux and polarization of the undulator photons, and the spectrum and polarization of the positrons produced in the conversion target, and compare the measurement results to simulations. Thus the proposed experiment directly tests for the first time the validity of the simulation programs used for the physics of polarized pair production in finite matter, in particular the effects of multiple scattering on polarization. Successful comparison of the experimental results to the simulations will lead to greater confidence in the proposed designs of polarized positrons sources for the next generation of linear colliders. This experiment requests six-weeks of time in the FFTB beam line: three weeks for installation and setup and three weeks of beam for data taking. A 50-GeV beam with about twice the SLC emittance at a repetition rate of 30 Hz is required.

  2. A variable radius mirror for imaging the exit slit of an SGM undulator beamline at the ALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, T.; Howells, M.

    1994-01-01

    Bendable metal mirrors have been implemented in two SGM undulator beamlines at the ALS. A piezo-electric actuator is employed to deform the mirror to image the SGM exit slit which moves longitudinally in the beamline as the grating rotates. The design and performance of these mirrors is discussed. Computed deformations and slope errors are compared to those found during optical metrology. The soft x-ray spot size produced at the experiment is shown

  3. A variable radius mirror for imaging the exit slit of an SGM undulator beamline at the ALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, T.; Howells, M.

    1994-07-01

    Bendable metal mirrors have been implemented in two SGM undulator beamlines at the ALS. A piezo-electric actuator is employed to deform the mirror to image the SGM exit slit which moves longitudinally in the beamline as the grating rotates. The design and performance of these mirrors is discussed. Computed deformations and slope errors are compared to those found during optical metrology. The soft x-ray spot size produced at the experiment is shown

  4. A fixed angle double mirror filter for preparing a pink undulator beam at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, E.; Sanchez, T.; Nurushev, T.; Clarke, R.; Dierker, S.B.

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS) use the full bandwidth of an undulator harmonic in order to maximize the coherent flux for small angle X-ray scattering experiments. X-ray mirrors and filters are typically used to select a given harmonic of the spectrum. At the University of Michigan/Howard University/Lucent Technologies, Bell Labs, Collaborative Access Team (MHATT-CAT) undulator beamline of the Advanced Photon Source, we have designed a fixed-angle Double Mirror Filter which will provide a 'pink beam' (i.e., 2-3% bandwidth) for XPCS experiments. This device uses two small mirrors which vertically reflect a 0.1 mmx0.1 mm white beam in a symmetric geometry. The doubly reflected beam propagates parallel to the incident white beam, but is offset vertically by 35 mm. Using the standard offset of the APS allows one to stop the white beam with a standard APS beam stop. In this report, we will describe our design considerations for this instrument. We also report the results of preliminary tests of the performance. The mirrors preserve the transverse coherence of the source, and filter the undulator spectrum as expected

  5. Dynamical behaviour of FEL devices operating with two undulators having opposite circular polarizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, G. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy); Ottaviani, P.L. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche, Bologna (Italy); Bucci, L. [ENEA, Guest Rome (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Optical-Klystron FELs operating with undulators having opposite circular polarizations are characterized by a spontaneous emission spectrum which does not exhibit the characteristic interference pattern. The use of the Madey theorem may allow the conclusion that, for such configuration, the dispersive section does not provide any gain enhancement. In this paper it has been analyzed the problem from a dynamical point of view and clarify how the optical field evolve, what is the role of the bunching and how the consequences of the Madey theorem should be correctly understood. [Italian] Klystron ottici operanti con ondulatori aventi polarizzazione elicoidali opposte, sono caratterizzati da uno spettro di emissione spontanea senza il termine interferenziale dovuto alla sezione dispersiva. L'uso del teorema di Madey indurrebbe alla conclusione che, per una tale configurazione, la sezione dispersiva non induce nessun aumento del guadagno. In questo lavoro analizziamo il problema da un punto di vista dinamico che chiarisce l'evoluzione del campo ottico, quale e' il ruolo del bunching e come le conseguenze del teorema di Madey debbano essere interpretate.

  6. X-ray microprobe characterization of materials: the case for undulators on advanced storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, C.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The unique properties of X rays offer many advantages over electrons and other charged particles for the microcharacterization of materials. X rays are more efficient in exciting characteristic X-ray fluorescence and produce higher fluorescent signals to backgrounds than obtained with electrons. Detectable limits for X rays are a few parts per billion and are 10 -3 to 10 -5 less than for electrons. Energy deposition in the sample by X rays is 10 -3 to 10 -4 less than for electrons for the same detectable concentration. High-brightness storage rings, especially in the 6 GeV class with undulators, will be approximately 10 3 brighter in the X-ray energy range from 5 keV to 35 keV than existing storage rings and provide for X-ray microprobes that are as bright as the most advanced electron probes. Such X-ray microprobes will produce unprecedented low levels of detection in diffraction, EXAFS, Auger, and photoelectron spectroscopies for both chemical characterization and elemental identification. These major improvements in microcharacterization capabilities will have wide-ranging ramifications not only in materials science but also in physics, chemistry, geochemistry, biology, and medicine

  7. Development of Compact Soft X-ray Source Based on Laser Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, Ryunosuke; Minamiguchi, S; Saitô, T; Ueyama, D; Washio, Masakazu

    2004-01-01

    A compact soft X-ray source is required in various research fields such as material and biological science. The laser undulator based on backward Compton scattering has been developed as a compact soft X-ray source for the biological observation at Waseda University. It is performed in a water window region (250eV - 500 eV) using the interaction between 1047 nm Nd:YLF laser and 4 MeV high quality electron beam generated from rf gun system. The range of energy in the water window region has K-shell absorption edges of Oxygen, Carbon and Nitrogen, which mainly constitute of living body. Since the absorption coefficient of water is much smaller than the protein’s coefficient in this range, a dehydration of the specimens is not necessary. As a preliminary experiment, about 300 eV X-ray generation was carried out. As next step, soft X-ray optics with zone plate was proposed for Soft X-ray microscopy. In this conference, we will report details and results of the experiment.

  8. Wave trapping by dual porous barriers near a wall in the presence of bottom undulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaligatla, R. B.; Manisha; Sahoo, T.

    2017-09-01

    Trapping of oblique surface gravity waves by dual porous barriers near a wall is studied in the presence of step type varying bottom bed that is connected on both sides by water of uniform depths. The porous barriers are assumed to be fixed at a certain distance in front of a vertical rigid wall. Using linear water wave theory and Darcy's law for flow past porous structure, the physical problem is converted into a boundary value problem. Using eigenfunction expansion in the uniform bottom bed region and modified mild-slope equation in the varying bottom bed region, the mathematical problem is handled for solution. Moreover, certain jump conditions are used to account for mass conservation at slope discontinuities in the bottom bed profile. To understand the effect of dual porous barriers in creating tranquility zone and minimum load on the sea wall, reflection coefficient, wave forces acting on the barrier and the wall, and surface wave elevation are computed and analyzed for different values of depth ratio, porous-effect parameter, incident wave angle, gap between the barriers and wall and slope length of undulated bottom. The study reveals that with moderate porosity and suitable gap between barriers and sea wall, using dual barriers an effective wave trapping system can be developed which will exert less wave force on the barriers and the rigid wall. The proposed wave trapping system is likely to be of immense help for protecting various facilities/ infrastructures in coastal environment.

  9. Wave Trapping by Dual Porous Barriers Near a Wall in the Presence of Bottom Undulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.B. Kaligatla; Manisha; T. Sahoo

    2017-01-01

    Trapping of oblique surface gravity waves by dual porous barriers near a wall is studied in the presence of step type varying bottom bed that is connected on both sides by water of uniform depths. The porous barriers are assumed to be fixed at a certain distance in front of a vertical rigid wall. Using linear water wave theory and Darcy's law for flow past porous structure, the physical problem is converted into a boundary value problem. Using eigenfunction expansion in the uniform bottom bed region and modified mild-slope equation in the varying bottom bed region, the mathematical problem is handled for solution. Moreover, certain jump conditions are used to account for mass conservation at slope discontinuities in the bottom bed profile. To understand the effect of dual porous barriers in creating tranquility zone and minimum load on the sea wall, reflection coefficient, wave forces acting on the barrier and the wall, and surface wave elevation are computed and analyzed for different values of depth ratio, porous-effect parameter, incident wave angle, gap between the barriers and wall and slope length of undulated bottom. The study reveals that with moderate porosity and suitable gap between barriers and sea wall, using dual barriers an effective wave trapping system can be developed which will exert less wave force on the barriers and the rigid wall. The proposed wave trapping system is likely to be of immense help for protecting various facilities/ infrastructures in coastal environment.

  10. Reversible beam heater for suppression of microbunching instability by transverse gradient undulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Qin, Weilun; Wang, Dong; Huang, Zhirong

    2017-08-01

    The microbunching instability driven by beam collective effects in a linear accelerator of a free-electron laser (FEL) facility significantly degrades the electron beam quality and FEL performance. A conventional method to suppress this instability is to introduce an additional uncorrelated energy spread by laser-electron interaction, which has been successfully operated in the Linac Coherent Light Source and Fermi@Elettra, etc. Some other ideas are recently proposed to suppress the instability without increasing energy spread, which could benefit the seeded FEL schemes. In this paper, we propose a reversible electron beam heater using two transverse gradient undulators to suppress the microbunching instability. This scheme introduces both an energy spread increase and a transverse-to-longitudinal phase space coupling, which suppress the microbunching instabilities driven by both longitudinal space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation before and within the system. Finally the induced energy spread increase and emittance growth are reversed. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are presented to verify the feasibility of the scheme and indicate the capability to improve the seeded FEL radiation performance.

  11. Hydraulic Transients Caused by Air Expulsion During Rapid Filling of Undulating Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Apollonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main issues arising during the rapid filling of a pipeline is the pressure transient which originates after the entrapped air has been expelled at the air release valve. Because of the difference in density between water and air, a pressure transient originates at the impact of the water column. Many authors have analyzed the problem, both from the theoretical and the experimental standpoint. Nevertheless, mainly vertical or horizontal pipelines have been analyzed, whereas in real field applications, the pipe profile is a sequence of ascending and descending pipes, with air release/vacuum valves at high points. To overcome lack of knowledge regarding this latter case, laboratory experiments were carried out to simulate the filling of an undulating pipeline, initially empty at atmospheric pressure. The pipe profile has a high point where an orifice is installed for air venting, so as to simulate the air release valve at intermediate high point of a supply pipeline. In the experiments, the diameter of the orifice and the opening degree of both upstream and downstream valves were varied, in order to analyze their effect on the pressure transient. The experiments were also carried out with a longer descending pipe, in order to assess the effects on the pressure surge of the air volume downstream of the orifice.

  12. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH BEAM ABORT SYSTEM FOR SUPERCONDUCTING UNDULATOR QUENCH MITIGATION*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkay, Katherine C.; Dooling, Jeffrey C.; Sajaev, Vadim; Wang, Ju

    2017-06-25

    A beam abort system has been implemented in the Advanced Photon Source storage ring. The abort system works in tandem with the existing machine protection system (MPS), and its purpose is to control the beam loss location and, thereby, minimize beam loss-induced quenches at the two superconducting undulators (SCUs). The abort system consists of a dedicated horizontal kicker designed to kick out all the bunches in a few turns after being triggered by MPS. The abort system concept was developed on the basis of single- and multi-particle tracking simulations using elegant and bench measurements of the kicker pulse. Performance of the abort system—kick amplitudes and loss distributions of all bunches—was analyzed using beam position monitor (BPM) turn histories, and agrees reasonably well with the model. Beam loss locations indicated by the BPMs are consistent with the fast fiber-optic beam loss monitor (BLM) diagnostics described elsewhere [1,2]. Operational experience with the abort system, various issues that were encountered, limitations of the system, and quench statistics are described.

  13. Total-reflection x-ray fluorescence with a brillant undulator x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, K.; Eba, H.; Numako, C.; Suzuki, M.; Inoue, K.; Yagi, N.

    2000-01-01

    Total-reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is a highly sensitive technique for analyzing trace elements, because of the very low background from the sample support. Use of third-generation synchrotron x-ray source could further enhance the detection power. However, while such high sensitivity permits the detection of signals from trace elements of interest, it also means that one can observe weak parasitic x-rays as well. If the sample surface becomes even slightly contaminated, owing to air particulates near the beamline, x-ray fluorescence lines of iron, zinc, copper, nickel, chromium, and titanium can be observed even for a blank sample. Another critical problem is the low-energy-side tail of the scattering x-rays, which ultimately restricts the detection capability of the technique using a TXRF spectrometer based on a Si(Li) detector. The present paper describes our experiments with brilliant undulator x-ray beams at BL39XU and BL40XU, at the SPring-8, Harima, Japan. The emphasis is on the development of instruments to analyze a droplet of 0.1 μl containing trace elements of ppb level. Although the beamline is not a clean room, we have employed equipment for preparing a clean sample and also for avoiding contamination during transferring the sample into the spectrometer. We will report on the successful detection of the peak from 0.8 ppb selenium in a droplet (absolute amount 80 fg). We will also present the results of recent experiments obtained from a Johansson spectrometer rather than a Si(Li) detector. (author)

  14. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  15. Swimming performance of a bio-inspired robotic vessel with undulating fin propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanlin; Curet, Oscar M

    2018-06-18

    Undulatory fin propulsion exhibits high degree of maneuver control -- an ideal for underwater vessels exploring complex environments. In this work, we developed and tested a self-contained, free-swimming robot with a single undulating fin running along the length of the robot, which controls both forward motion and directional maneuvers. We successfully replicated several maneuvers including forward swimming, reversed motion, diving, station-keeping and vertical swimming. For each maneuver, a series of experiments were performed as a function of fin frequency, wavelength and traveling wave direction to measure swimming velocities, orientation angles and mean power consumption. In addition, three-dimensional flow fields were measured during forward swimming and station-keeping using volumetric particle image velocimetry (PIV). The efficiency for forward swimming was compared using three metrics: cost of transport, wave efficiency and Strouhal number. The results indicate that the cost of transport exhibits a V-shape trend with the minimum value at low swimming velocity. The robot can reach optimal wave efficiency and locomotor performance at a range of 0.2 to 0.4 St. Volumetric PIV data reveal the shed of vortex tubes generated by the fin during forward swimming and station keeping. For forward swimming, a series of vortex tubes are shed off the fin edge with a lateral and downward direction with respect to the longitudinal axis of the fin. For station keeping, flow measurements suggest that the vortex tubes are shed at the mid-section of the fin while the posterior and anterior segment of the vortex stay attached to the fin. These results agree with the previous vortex structures based on simulations and 2D PIV. The further development of this vessel with high maneuverability and station keeping performance can be used for oceanography, coastal exploration, defense, oil industry and other marine industries where operations are unsafe or impractical for divers or

  16. Volumetric PIV of multiple free-swimming maneuvers generated by the KnifeBot: a biomimetic vessel propelled by an undulating fin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanlin; Troolin, Daniel; Hortensius, Ruben; Pothos, Stamatios; Curet, Oscar

    2017-11-01

    An undulating fin represents a remarkable propulsion model for underwater vehicles due to its high propulsive efficiency and considerable locomotor capabilities. In this work, we used a bio-inspired vessel, the KnifeBot to demonstrate the maneuverability of undulating fin propulsion, including forward-backward swimming, station keeping and vertical swimming. This self-contained robotic system uses an undulating ventral fin as the propulsor and features a slender 3D-printed hull with 16 motors, 2 batteries and electronic boards encapsulated inside. We tested the robot in a water-filled tank and used volumetric particle image velocimetry (V3V PIV) to investigate the three-dimensional flow features and vortex structures generated by the undulating ribbon fin in free-swimming maneuvers. Our results indicate that in the forward swimming, a series of vortex tubes are shed off the fin edge. A streamwise jet at an oblique angle to the fin is generated in association with the vortex tubes propelling the robot forward as well as pitching it up. For the hovering maneuver with inward counter-propagating waves. The streamlines develop vertically downward with the tip vortex shed from the fin edge. This downward jet provides substantial heave force for the robot to swim upward or perform station keeping. Our findings will be useful for understanding the mechanical basis of undulating fin propulsion and facilitate the development of bio-inspired vehicles using undulatory propellers. Office of Naval Research under Award Number N00014-16-1-2505.

  17. Measurement of X-ray beam emittance using crystal optics at an X-ray undulator beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Kohmura, Y; Awaji, M; Tanaka, T; Hara, T; Goto, S; Ishikawa, T

    2000-01-01

    We present a method of using crystal optics to measure the emittance of the X-ray source. Two perfect crystals set in (++) configuration work as a high-resolution collimator. The phase-space diagram (i.e. beam cross-section and angular distribution) could be determined without any assumptions on the light source. When the measurement is done at short wavelength radiation from undulator, the electron beam emittance is larger than the diffraction limit of the X-rays. Therefore, the electron beam emittance could be estimated. The measurement was done with the hard X-rays of 18.5 and 55 keV from an undulator beamline, BL 47XU, of SPring-8. The horizontal emittance of the X-ray beam was estimated to be about 7.6 nmrad, close to the designed electron beam emittance of the storage ring (7 nmrad). Some portions of the instrumental functions, such as the scattering by filters and windows along the beamline and the slight bent of the crystal planes of the monochromator, could not be precisely evaluated, but an upper li...

  18. Measurement of X-ray beam emittance using crystal optics at an X-ray undulator beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohmura, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Yoshio; Awaji, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru; Goto, Shunji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2000-01-01

    We present a method of using crystal optics to measure the emittance of the X-ray source. Two perfect crystals set in (++) configuration work as a high-resolution collimator. The phase-space diagram (i.e. beam cross-section and angular distribution) could be determined without any assumptions on the light source. When the measurement is done at short wavelength radiation from undulator, the electron beam emittance is larger than the diffraction limit of the X-rays. Therefore, the electron beam emittance could be estimated. The measurement was done with the hard X-rays of 18.5 and 55 keV from an undulator beamline, BL 47XU, of SPring-8. The horizontal emittance of the X-ray beam was estimated to be about 7.6 nmrad, close to the designed electron beam emittance of the storage ring (7 nmrad). Some portions of the instrumental functions, such as the scattering by filters and windows along the beamline and the slight bent of the crystal planes of the monochromator, could not be precisely evaluated, but an upper limit for the vertical emittance of the electron beam could be obtained as 0.14 nmrad

  19. A non-destructive electron beam diagnostic for a SASE FEL using coherent off-axis undulator radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Neuman, C P; Barnett, G A; Madey, J M J; O'Shea, P G

    1999-01-01

    We show that by observing coherent off-axis undulator radiation (COUR) from a short diagnostic wiggler, it may be possible to determine the length and structure of a short electron bunch. Typically the on-axis undulator radiation is incoherent, but at angles of a few degrees, the wavelength of the emitted radiation may be comparable to the length of a short electron bunch, and thus coherence effects emerge. Due to such coherence effects, the intensity of the emitted radiation may change by up to a factor of 10 sup 9 as the angle of observation is increased. The radiation becomes coherent in a way which depends on the length and structure of the electron bunch. Observing COUR disturbs the electron bunch negligibly. Thus, COUR can be used as a non-destructive diagnostic which would allow for optimization of FEL performance while an FEL is operating. Such a diagnostic could be used for proposed SASE FELs, which use short electron bunches. We present two methods to describe the theory for COUR, and we use these m...

  20. Theoretical computation of the polarization characteristics of an X-ray free-electron laser with planar undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2015-02-01

    We show that radiation pulses from an X-ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) with a planar undulator, which are mainly polarized in the horizontal direction, exhibit a suppression of the vertical polarization component of the power at least by a factor λ 2 w /(4πL g ) 2 , where λ w is the length of the undulator period and L g is the FEL field gain length. We illustrate this fact by examining the XFEL operation under the steady state assumption. In our calculations we considered only resonance terms: in fact, non resonance terms are suppressed by a factor λ 3 w /(4πL g ) 3 and can be neglected. While finding a situation for making quantitative comparison between analytical and experimental results may not be straightforward, the qualitative aspects of the suppression of the vertical polarization rate at XFELs should be easy to observe. We remark that our exact results can potentially be useful to developers of new generation FEL codes for cross-checking their results.

  1. A non-destructive electron beam diagnostic for a SASE FEL using coherent off-axis undulator radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuman, C.P.; Ponds, M.L.; Barnett, G.A.; Madey, J.M.J.; O'Shea, P.G.

    1999-01-01

    We show that by observing coherent off-axis undulator radiation (COUR) from a short diagnostic wiggler, it may be possible to determine the length and structure of a short electron bunch. Typically the on-axis undulator radiation is incoherent, but at angles of a few degrees, the wavelength of the emitted radiation may be comparable to the length of a short electron bunch, and thus coherence effects emerge. Due to such coherence effects, the intensity of the emitted radiation may change by up to a factor of 10 9 as the angle of observation is increased. The radiation becomes coherent in a way which depends on the length and structure of the electron bunch. Observing COUR disturbs the electron bunch negligibly. Thus, COUR can be used as a non-destructive diagnostic which would allow for optimization of FEL performance while an FEL is operating. Such a diagnostic could be used for proposed SASE FELs, which use short electron bunches. We present two methods to describe the theory for COUR, and we use these methods to calculate the expected outcome of a COUR experiment. We propose an experiment to demonstrate COUR effects and their applications to SASE FELs

  2. Thermo-mechanical analysis of a user filter assembly for undulator/wiggler operations at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nian, H.L.T.; Kuzay, T.M.; Collins, J.; Shu, D.; Benson, C.; Dejus, R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports a thermo-mechanical study of a beamline filter (user filter) for undulator/wiggler operations. It is deployed in conjunction with the current commissioning window assembly on the APS insertion device (ID) front ends. The beamline filter at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) will eventually be used in windowless operations also. Hence survival and reasonable life expectancy of the filters under intense insertion device (ID) heat flu are crucial to the beamline operations. To accommodate various user requirements, the filter is configured to be a multi-choice type and smart to allow only those filter combinations that will be safe to operate with a given ring current and beamline insertion device gap. However, this paper addresses only the thermo-mechanical analysis of individual filter integrity and safety in all combinations possible. The current filter design is configured to have four filter frames in a cascade with each frame holding five filters. This allows a potential 625 total filter combinations. Thermal analysis for all of these combinations becomes a mammoth task considering the desired choices for filter materials (pyrolitic graphite and metallic filters), filter thicknesses, undulator gaps, and the beam currents. The paper addresses how this difficult task has been reduced to a reasonable effort and computational level. Results from thermo-mechanical analyses of the filter combinations are presented both in tabular and graphical format

  3. Micropole Undulators In Synchrotron Radiation Technology: Design And Construction Of A Submillimeter Period Prototype With A 3 Kilogauss Peak Field At SSRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatchyn, Roman; Csonka, Paul

    1986-01-01

    The availability of undulators with submillimeter periods will profoundly affect the future development of soft x-ray sources and their attendant instrumentation. Outputs comparable to those of present-day conventional undulators, obtainable with much lower energy storage rings, is only one promising aspect of such devices. This paper critically examines some of the future prospects of such devices and describes the design and practical construction of a 1" long prototype consisting of 35 periods. A proposed experiment to test this device on a linac is described.

  4. Micropole undulators in synchrotron radiation technology: Design and construction of a submillimeter period prototype with a 3 kilogauss peak field at SSRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatchyn, R.; Csonka, P.

    1987-01-01

    The availability of undulators with submillimeter periods profoundly affects the future development of soft x-ray sources and their attendant instrumentation. Outputs comparable to those of present-day conventional undulators, obtainable with much lower energy storage rings, is only one promising aspect of such devices. This paper critically examines some of the future prospects of such devices and describes the design and practical construction of a 1'' long prototype consisting of 35 periods. A proposed experiment to test this device on a linac is described

  5. A shimming technique for improvement of the spectral performance of APS Undulator A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasserman, I.

    1996-01-01

    The performance of insertion devices would achieve almost the ultimate level if a proper set of techniques could be developed to correct the magnetic field imperfections. It has been shown experimentally that the measured radiation characteristics of a magnetically fine-tuned insertion device are very close to those calculated for an ideal device. There are different techniques for correction of magnetic field errors. One used most often is a shimming technique capable of correcting both integrated and local field errors. In this note, some specific results of a shimming technique applied to APS insertion devices will be presented. This technique uses two types of shims: one for trajectory corrections and one for phase corrections. It has been demonstrated that trajectory shims could bring the rms phase errors to the level of 5 degrees, and the next shimming step when only phase shims are applied brings the rms phase errors as low as 1.5 degree

  6. Magnetic flux distributions in chiral helimagnet/superconductor bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Masaru, E-mail: kato@ms.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1, Gakuencho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Fukui, Saoto [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1, Gakuencho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Sato, Osamu [Osaka Prefecture University College of Technology, 26-12, Saiwaicho, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8572 (Japan); Togawa, Yoshihiko [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1, Gakuencho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Vortex states in a chiral helimagnet/superconductor bilayer are investigated. • Vortex and anti-vortex appears depending on strength of helimagnet. • Vortex is elongated under a gradient field. • Vortices form a undulated triangular lattice. - Abstarct: Vortex states in a chiral helimagnet/superconductor bilayer are investigated numerically, using the Ginzburg–Landau equations with the finite element method. In this bilayer, effect of the chiral helimagnet on the superconductor is taken as an external field. Magnetic field distribution can be controlled by an applied field to the bilayer. It is shown that a single vortex in a gradient field is elongated along the field gradient. In zero applied field, there are up- and down vortices which are parallel or antiparallel to the z-axis, respectively. But increasing the applied field, down-vortices disappear and up-vortices form undulated triangular lattices.

  7. Nonlinear undulator tapering in conventional SASE regime at baseline electron beam parameters as a way to optimize the radiation characteristics of the European XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkez, Svitozar; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni; Zagorodnov, Igor [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    We demonstrate that the output radiation characteristics of the European XFEL sources at nominal operation point can be easily made significantly better than what is currently reported in the TDRs of scientific instruments and X-ray optics. In fact, the output SASE characteristics of the baseline European XFEL have been previously optimized assuming uniform undulators at a nominal operating point of 5 kA peak current, without considering the potential of undulator tapering in the SASE regime. In order to illustrate this point, we analyze the case of an electron bunch with nominal parameters. Based on start-to-end simulations, we demonstrate that nonlinear undulator tapering allows one to achieve up to a tenfold increase in peak power and photon spectral density in the conventional SASE regime, without modification to the baseline design. The FEL code Genesis has been extensively used for these studies. In order to increase our confidence in simulation results, we cross-checked outcomes by reproducing simulations in the deep nonlinear SASE regime with tapered undulator using the code ALICE.

  8. Precision white-beam slit design for high power density x-ray undulator beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Brite, C.; Nian, T.

    1994-01-01

    A set of precision horizontal and vertical white-beam slits has been designed for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) X-ray undulator beamlines at Argonne National Laboratory. There are several new design concepts applied in this slit set, including: grazing-incidence knife-edge configuration to minimize the scattering of X-rays downstream, enhanced heat transfer tubing to provide water cooling, and a second slit to eliminate the thermal distortion on the slit knife edge. The novel aspect of this design is the use of two L-shaped knife-edge assemblies, which are manipulated by two precision X-Z stepping linear actuators. The principal and structural details of the design for this slit set are presented in this paper

  9. Start-to-end simulation of self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron lasers from the gun through the undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Borland, M M; Emma, P; Lewellen, J W; Bharadwaj, V K; Fawley, W M; Krejcik, P; Limborg, C; Milton, S V; Nuhn, H D; Soliday, R; Woodley, M

    2002-01-01

    It is widely appreciated that the performance of self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron lasers (FELs) depends critically on the properties of the drive beam. In view of this, a multi-laboratory collaboration has explored methods and software tools for integrated simulation of the photoinjector, linear accelerator, bunch compressor, and FEL. Rather than create a single code to handle such a system, our goal has been a robust, generic solution wherein pre-existing simulation codes are used sequentially. We have standardized on the use of Argonne National Laboratory's Self-Describing Data Sets file protocol for transfer of data among codes. The simulation codes used are PARMELA, elegant, and GENESIS. We describe the software methodology and its advantages, then provide examples involving Argonne's Low-Energy Undulator Test Line and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's Linac Coherent Light Source. We also indicate possible future direction of this work.

  10. First experimental results from IBM/TENN/TULANE/LLNL/LBL undulator beamline at the advanced light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, J.J.; Callcott, T.A.; Yurkas, J.; Ellis, A.W.; Himpsel, F.J.; Samant, M.G.; Stoehr, J.; Ederer, D.L.; Carlisle, J.A.; Hudson, E.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Shuh, D.K.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1995-01-01

    The IBM/TENN/TULANE/LLNL/LBL Beamline 8.0 at the advanced light source combining a 5.0 cm, 89 period undulator with a high-throughput, high-resolution spherical grating monochromator, provides a powerful excitation source over a spectral range of 70--1200 eV for surface physics and material science research. The beamline progress and the first experimental results obtained with a fluorescence end station on graphite and titanium oxides are presented here. The dispersive features in K emission spectra of graphite excited near threshold, and found a clear relationship between them and graphite band structure are observed. The monochromator is operated at a resolving power of roughly 2000, while the spectrometer has a resolving power of 400 for these fluorescence experiments

  11. Modular filter design for the white-beam undulator/wiggler beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brite, C.; Shu, D.; Nian, T.; Wang, Z.; Haeffner, D.; Alp, E.; Kuzay, T.

    1994-01-01

    A new filter has been designed at Argonne National Laboratory that is intended for the use in undulator/wiggler beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source. The water-cooled frame allows up to four individual filter foil banks simultaneously in the beam path. Additionally, the bottom of each frame holds two thin (20 μm) uncooled carbon filters in tandem for low-energy filtering. Therefore, a maximum of 625 filter selection combinations is theoretically possible. The design is intelligent, compact and modular, with great flexibility for the users. To prevent accidental movement of the filter, effort has been taken to provide a mechanically locked, fail-safe actuator system. Programming aspects are under development as part of our general personnel and equipment protection system. Aspects of the design and operational principles of the filter are presented in this paper

  12. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of diluted system by undulator photon source and multi-element solid-state detector

    CERN Document Server

    Tanida, H

    2001-01-01

    In order to measure the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum of an ultra-diluted system, an optics and detector control system for a synchrotron radiation beamline is developed. The undulator gap width is continuously tuned to obtain the maximum X-ray photon flux during the energy scan for the EXAFS measurement. A piezoelectric translator optimizes the parallelism of the double crystal in a monochromator at each measurement point to compensate for mechanical errors of the monochromator, resulting in a smooth and intense X-ray photon flux during the measurement. For a detection of a weak fluorescence signal from diluted samples, a 19-element solid-state detector and digital signal processor are used. A K-edge EXAFS spectrum of iron in a myoglobin aqueous solution with a concentration of 5.58 parts per million was obtained by this system.

  13. Elasticity-based patterning of red blood cells on undulated lipid membranes supported on porous topographic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Cherlhyun; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2009-03-26

    We describe elasticity-based patterning of human red blood cells (RBCs) into a microarray form on supported lipid membranes (SLMs) prepared on a solid substrate having two types of topographic patterns, porous and flat regions. The underlying concept is to precisely control the interplay between adhesion and the bending rigidity of the RBCs that interact with the SLMs. Attachment of the RBCs on highly undulated SLMs formed on the porous region is not energetically favorable, since membrane bending of the RBCs costs a high curvature elastic energy which exceeds adhesion. The RBCs are thus selectively confined within relatively flat regions of the SLMs without causing considerable elastic distortions. It was found that the population of the RBCs in a single corral is linearly proportional to the area of one element in our microarray.

  14. Compensating the electron beam energy spread by the natural transverse gradient of laser undulator in all-optical x-ray light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Feng, Chao; Deng, Haixiao; Wang, Dong; Dai, Zhimin; Zhao, Zhentang

    2014-06-02

    All-optical ideas provide a potential to dramatically cut off the size and cost of x-ray light sources to the university-laboratory scale, with the combination of the laser-plasma accelerator and the laser undulator. However, the large longitudinal energy spread of the electron beam from laser-plasma accelerator may hinder the way to high brightness of these all-optical light sources. In this paper, the beam energy spread effect is proposed to be significantly compensated by the natural transverse gradient of a laser undulator when properly transverse-dispersing the electron beam. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations on conventional laser-Compton scattering sources and high-gain all-optical x-ray free-electron lasers with the electron beams from laser-plasma accelerators are presented.

  15. DIELECTRICALLY-LOADED WAVEGUIDE AS A MICROWAVE UNDULATOR FOR HIGH BRILLANCE X-RAYS AT 45 – 90 KeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustom, R. L.; Waldschmidt, G.; Nassiri, A.

    2017-06-01

    The HEM12 mode in a cylindrical, dielectrically-loaded waveguide provides E and H fields on the central axis that are significantly higher than the fields on the conducting walls. This structure, operating near the cutoff frequency of the HEM12 mode, spans a frequency range where the wavelength and phase velocity vary significantly. This property can be exploited to generate undulator action with short periods for the generation of high brightness xrays. The frequency range of interest would be from 18 to 34.5-GHz. The goal would be to generate x-rays on the fundamental mode over a range of 45 to 90-keV.The tunability would be achieved by changing the source frequency while maintaining a constant on-axis equivalent undulator field strength of 0.5-T.

  16. A zone plate soft x-ray microscope using monochromatized undulator radiation at the beamline NE1B of the TRISTAN Accumulation Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Kagoshima, Y.; Miyahara, T.; Ando, M.; Aoki, S.; Anderson, E.; Attwood, D.; Kern, D.

    1995-01-01

    A soft x-ray microscope has been developed at the beamline NE1B of the 6.5-GeV TRISTAN Accumulation Ring (AR). It makes use of undulator radiation as its source and a zone plate with the outermost zone width of 50 nm as its imaging element. It has two main features. First, the undulator radiation is monochromatized by a grazing incidence grating monochromator to match to the monochromaticity requirement of the zone plate. Second, a visible light prefocus unit consisting of two objectives has been designed and installed in the x-ray microscope. The x-ray optical system of the microscope can be adjusted easily, quickly, and precisely by using this unit. The microscope can resolve 55-nm lines and spaces in a zone plate test pattern

  17. Impact of nitrogen doping of niobium superconducting cavities on the sensitivity of surface resistance to trapped magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, Dan; Kaufman, John; Liepe, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Future particle accelerators such as the SLAC "Linac Coherent Light Source-II" (LCLS-II) and the proposed Cornell Energy Recovery Linac require hundreds of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) niobium cavities operating in continuous wave mode. In order to achieve economic feasibility of projects such as these, the cavities must achieve a very high intrinsic quality factor (Q0) to keep cryogenic losses within feasible limits. To reach these high Q0's in the case of LCLS-II, nitrogen-doping of niobium cavities has been selected as the cavity preparation technique. When dealing with Q0's greater than 1 × 1010, the effects of ambient magnetic field on Q0 become significant. Here, we show that the sensitivity to RF losses from trapped magnetic field in a cavity's walls is strongly dependent on the cavity preparation. Specifically, standard electropolished and 120 °C baked cavities show a sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜0.6 and ˜0.8 nΩ/mG trapped, respectively, while nitrogen-doped cavities show a higher sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜1 to 5 nΩ/mG trapped. We show that this difference in sensitivities is directly related to the mean free path of the RF surface layer of the niobium: shorter mean free paths lead to less sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the dirty limit (ℓ ≪ ξ0), while longer mean free paths lead to lower sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the clean limit (ℓ ≫ ξ0). These experimental results are also shown to have good agreement with recent theoretical predictions for pinned vortex lines oscillating in RF fields.

  18. Measurement of the positron polarization at an helical undulator based positron source for the international linear collider ILC. The E-166 experiment at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Laihem

    2008-06-05

    A helical undulator based polarized positron source is forseen at a future International Linear Collider (ILC). The E-166 experiment has tested this scheme using a one meter long, short-period, pulsed helical undulator installed in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC. A low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam passing through this undulator generated circularly polarized photons with energies up to about 8 MeV. The generated photons of several MeV with circular polarization are then converted in a relatively thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at 5 different energies of the positrons. In addition electron polarization has been determined for one energy point. For a comparison of the measured asymmetries with the expectations detailed simulations were necessary. This required upgrading GEANT4 to include the dominant polarization dependent interactions of electrons, positrons and photons in matter. The measured polarization of the positrons agrees with the expectations and is for the energy point with the highest polarization at 6MeV about 80%. (orig.)

  19. High heat load performance of an inclined crystal monochromator with liquid gallium cooling on the CHESS-ANL undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macrander, A.T.; Lee, W.K.; Smither, R.K.; Mills, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Recent results for the performance of a novel double crystal monochromator subjected to high heat loads on an APS prototype undulator at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) are presented. The monochromator was designed to achieve symmetric diffraction from asymmetric planes to spread out the beam footprint thereby lowering the incident power density. Both crystals had (111) oriented surfaces and were arranged such that the beam was diffracted from the (11 bar 1) planes at 5 KeV. Rocking curves with minimal distortion were obtained at a ring electron current of 100 mA. This corresponded to 380 Watts total power and an average power density of 40 Watts/mm 2 normal to the incident beam. These results are compared to data obtained from the same crystals in the standard geometry (diffracting planes parallel to surface). The footprint area in the inclined case was three times that of the standard case. We also obtained rocking curve data for the (333) reflection at 15 KeV for both standard and inclined cases, and these data also showed a minimal distortion only for the inclined case. In addition, thermal data were obtained via infrared pyrometry. Liquid gallium flow rates of up to 2 gallons per minute were investigated. The diffraction data revealed a dramatically improved performance for the inclined crystal case

  20. A method for ultra-short pulse-shape measurements using far infrared coherent radiation from an undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, G.; Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a method for non-destructive measurements of the longitudinal profile of sub-picosecond electron bunches for X-ray free electron lasers. The method is based on the detection of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) produced by a bunch passing through an undulator. Coherent radiation energy within a central cone turns out to be proportional, per pulse, to the square modulus of the bunch form-factor at the resonant frequency of the fundamental harmonic. An attractive feature of the proposed technique is the absence of any apparent limitation which would distort measurements. Indeed, the radiation process takes place in vacuum and is described by analytical formulae. CSR propagates to the detector placed in vacuum. Since CSR energy is in the range up to a fraction of mJ, a simple bolometer is used to measure the energy with a high accuracy. The proposed technique is very sensitive and it is capable of probing the electron bunches with a resolution down to a few microns