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Sample records for laying birds mechanisms

  1. Diet shifts during egg laying: Implications for measuring contaminants in bird eggs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrissey, Christy A. [Catchment Research Group, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AX (United Kingdom); Elliott, John E. [Pacific Wildlife Research Centre, Environment Canada, 5421 Robertson Road, Delta, British Columbia V4K 3N2 (Canada); Ormerod, Stephen J., E-mail: ormerod@cf.ac.u [Catchment Research Group, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AX (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    We combined stable isotope tracers of blood plasma, blood cells and egg contents with faecal analysis during pre-breeding and egg laying phases in two dipper species Cinclus cinclus and Cinclus mexicanus to determine the occurrence of dietary shifts during egg production and to assess consequences for egg contaminant loads. In both species, changes in delta{sup 13}C (C. cinclus) or delta{sup 15}N (C. mexicanus) in female plasma relative to red blood cells indicated a dietary shift during laying that was not observed in males. Eurasian dippers increased prey consumption as breeding approached, shifting from primarily trichopteran insect larvae to ephemeropterans and plecopterans. In American dippers, egg-laying females switched to feeding at a higher trophic level by consuming more fish. Eggs derived from higher trophic level diets contained more mercury (American dipper), polychlorinated biphenyls and some organochlorines, especially DDT metabolites. The results demonstrate how dietary changes during egg laying accompany the demands for egg production with consequences for contaminant deposition in avian eggs. - Changes in laying diet influences contaminant deposition in bird eggs.

  2. Towards understanding of birds magnetoreceptor mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Solovyov, Ilia A

    2007-01-01

    In the present letter we suggest a new theoretical model for a quantitative description of the magnetoreception mechanism in birds. The considered mechanism involves two types of iron minerals (magnetite and maghemite) which were found in subcellular compartments within sensory dendrites of the upper beak of several bird species. The analysis of forces acting between the iron particles shows that the orientation of the external geomagnetic field can significantly change the probability of the mechanosensitive ion channels opening and closing. The performed theoretical analysis shows that the suggested magnetoreceptor system might be a sensitive biological magnetometer providing an essential part of the magnetic map for navigation.

  3. On the magnetoreception mechanism in birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Greiner, Walter

    2008-01-01

    The present paper discusses a mechanism of avian magnetoreception, which is based on the interaction of magnetite and maghemite micro particles, recently found in subcellular compartments within the sensory dendrites of the upper beak of several bird species. The analysis of forces acting between...... the iron particles shows that the orientation of the external geomagnetic field can significantly change the probability of the mechanosensitive ion channels opening and closing inducing a primary receptor potential via strain-sensitive membrane channels leading to a certain bird orientation effect...

  4. Egg laying sequence influences egg mercury concentrations and egg size in three bird species: Implications for contaminant monitoring programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Herzog, Mark P.; Yee, Julie L.; Hartman, C. Alex

    2016-01-01

    Bird eggs are commonly used in contaminant monitoring programs and toxicological risk assessments, but intra-clutch variation and sampling methodology could influence interpretability. We examined the influence of egg laying sequence on egg mercury concentrations and burdens in American avocets, black-necked stilts, and Forster's terns. The average decline in mercury concentrations between the first and last egg laid was 33% for stilts, 22% for terns, and 11% for avocets, and most of this decline occurred between the first and second eggs laid (24% for stilts, 18% for terns, and 9% for avocets). Trends in egg size with egg laying order were inconsistent among species and overall differences in egg volume, mass, length, and width were literature and, among 17 species studied, mercury concentrations generally declined by 16% between the first and second eggs laid. Despite the strong effect of egg laying sequence, most of the variance in egg mercury concentrations still occurred among clutches (75%-91%) rather than within clutches (9%-25%). Using simulations, we determined that to accurately estimate a population's mean egg mercury concentration using only a single random egg from a subset of nests, it would require sampling >60 nests to represent a large population (10% accuracy) or ≥14 nests to represent a small colony that contained <100 nests (20% accuracy).

  5. Interspecific variation in the relationship between clutch size, laying date and intensity of urbanization in four species of hole-nesting birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaugoyeau, Marie; Adriaensen, Frank; Artemyev, Alexandr; Bańbura, Jerzy; Barba, Emilio; Biard, Clotilde; Blondel, Jacques; Bouslama, Zihad; Bouvier, Jean-Charles; Camprodon, Jordi; Cecere, Francesco; Charmantier, Anne; Charter, Motti; Cichoń, Mariusz; Cusimano, Camillo; Czeszczewik, Dorota; Demeyrier, Virginie; Doligez, Blandine; Doutrelant, Claire; Dubiec, Anna; Eens, Marcel; Eeva, Tapio; Faivre, Bruno; Ferns, Peter N; Forsman, Jukka T; García-Del-Rey, Eduardo; Goldshtein, Aya; Goodenough, Anne E; Gosler, Andrew G; Grégoire, Arnaud; Gustafsson, Lars; Harnist, Iga; Hartley, Ian R; Heeb, Philipp; Hinsley, Shelley A; Isenmann, Paul; Jacob, Staffan; Juškaitis, Rimvydas; Korpimäki, Erkki; Krams, Indrikis; Laaksonen, Toni; Lambrechts, Marcel M; Leclercq, Bernard; Lehikoinen, Esa; Loukola, Olli; Lundberg, Arne; Mainwaring, Mark C; Mänd, Raivo; Massa, Bruno; Mazgajski, Tomasz D; Merino, Santiago; Mitrus, Cezary; Mönkkönen, Mikko; Morin, Xavier; Nager, Ruedi G; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Nilsson, Sven G; Norte, Ana C; Orell, Markku; Perret, Philippe; Perrins, Christopher M; Pimentel, Carla S; Pinxten, Rianne; Richner, Heinz; Robles, Hugo; Rytkönen, Seppo; Senar, Juan Carlos; Seppänen, Janne T; Pascoal da Silva, Luis; Slagsvold, Tore; Solonen, Tapio; Sorace, Alberto; Stenning, Martyn J; Tryjanowski, Piotr; von Numers, Mikael; Walankiewicz, Wieslaw; Møller, Anders Pape

    2016-08-01

    The increase in size of human populations in urban and agricultural areas has resulted in considerable habitat conversion globally. Such anthropogenic areas have specific environmental characteristics, which influence the physiology, life history, and population dynamics of plants and animals. For example, the date of bud burst is advanced in urban compared to nearby natural areas. In some birds, breeding success is determined by synchrony between timing of breeding and peak food abundance. Pertinently, caterpillars are an important food source for the nestlings of many bird species, and their abundance is influenced by environmental factors such as temperature and date of bud burst. Higher temperatures and advanced date of bud burst in urban areas could advance peak caterpillar abundance and thus affect breeding phenology of birds. In order to test whether laying date advance and clutch sizes decrease with the intensity of urbanization, we analyzed the timing of breeding and clutch size in relation to intensity of urbanization as a measure of human impact in 199 nest box plots across Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East (i.e., the Western Palearctic) for four species of hole-nesters: blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus), great tits (Parus major), collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis), and pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca). Meanwhile, we estimated the intensity of urbanization as the density of buildings surrounding study plots measured on orthophotographs. For the four study species, the intensity of urbanization was not correlated with laying date. Clutch size in blue and great tits does not seem affected by the intensity of urbanization, while in collared and pied flycatchers it decreased with increasing intensity of urbanization. This is the first large-scale study showing a species-specific major correlation between intensity of urbanization and the ecology of breeding. The underlying mechanisms for the relationships between life history and

  6. Mite fauna (Acari associated to commercial laying hens and bird nests in Vale do Taquari, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Liberato da Silva

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The control of ectoparasites is essential for maintaining biosafety in a poultry farm. This paper aimed to analyze the mite fauna associated to abandoned nests and commercial laying hens in the towns of Lajeado and Teutônia, Vale do Taquari, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Samplings were conducted from December 2010 to July 2011. A total of 11,757 mites belonging to 21 families and 31 species were found. Cheyletidae showed the highest number of species (4, followed by Blattisocidae (3 species. Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer showed the highest number of individuals (5,689, followed by Megninia gynglimura Mégnin (2,175, and Chortoglyphus arcuatus Troupeau (1,488. Blattisocius tarsalis Berlese, C. arcuatus, and D. gallinae were found on traps, feathers, poultry farm nests without cages (free, and abandoned bird nests.

  7. Large-scale geographical variation confirms that climate change causes birds to lay earlier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both, Christiaan; Artemyev, Aleksandr V; Blaauw, Bert; Cowie, Richard J; Dekhuijzen, Aarnoud J; Eeva, Tapio; Enemar, Anders; Gustafsson, Lars; Ivankina, Elena V; Järvinen, Antero; Metcalfe, Neil B; Nyholm, N Erik I; Potti, Jaime; Ravussin, Pierre-Alain; Sanz, Juan Jose; Silverin, Bengt; Slater, Fred M; Sokolov, Leonid V; Török, János; Winkel, Wolfgang; Wright, Jonathan; Zang, Herwig; Visser, Marcel E

    2004-08-22

    Advances in the phenology of organisms are often attributed to climate change, but alternatively, may reflect a publication bias towards advances and may be caused by environmental factors unrelated to climate change. Both factors are investigated using the breeding dates of 25 long-term studied populations of Ficedula flycatchers across Europe. Trends in spring temperature varied markedly between study sites, and across populations the advancement of laying date was stronger in areas where the spring temperatures increased more, giving support to the theory that climate change causally affects breeding date advancement.

  8. Is microevolution the only emergency exit in a warming world? Temperature influences egg laying but not its underlying mechanisms in great tits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Samuel P; Schaper, Sonja V; Dawson, Alistair; Sharp, Peter J; Gienapp, Phillip; Visser, Marcel E

    2013-09-01

    Many bird species have advanced their seasonal timing in response to global warming, but we still know little about the causal effect of temperature. We carried out experiments in climate-controlled aviaries to investigate how temperature affects luteinizing hormone, prolactin, gonadal development, timing of egg laying and onset of moult in male and female great tits. We used both natural and artificial temperature patterns to identify the temperature characteristics that matter for birds. Our results show that temperature has a direct, causal effect on onset of egg-laying, and in particular, that it is the pattern of increase rather than the absolute temperature that birds use. Surprisingly, the pre-breeding increases in plasma LH, prolactin and in gonadal size are not affected by increasing temperature, nor do they correlate with the onset of laying. This suggests that the decision to start breeding and its regulatory mechanisms are fine-tuned by different factors. We also found similarities between siblings in the timing of both the onset of reproduction and associated changes in plasma LH, prolactin and gonadal development. In conclusion, while temperature affects the timing of egg laying, the neuroendocrine system does not seem to be regulated by moderate temperature changes. This lack of responsiveness may restrain the advance in the timing of breeding in response to climate change. But as there is heritable genetic variation on which natural selection can act, microevolution can take place, and may represent the only way to adapt to a warming world.

  9. Long-term trends in first arrival and first egg laying dates of some migrant and resident bird species in northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubolini, Diego; Ambrosini, Roberto; Caffi, Mario; Brichetti, Pierandrea; Armiraglio, Stefano; Saino, Nicola

    2007-08-01

    Climate change is affecting the phenology of seasonal events in Europe and the Northern Hemisphere, as shown by several studies of birds’ timing of migration and reproduction. Here, we analyse the long-term (1982-2006) trends of first arrival dates of four long-distance migratory birds [swift ( Apus apus), nightingale ( Luscinia megarhynchos), barn swallow ( Hirundo rustica), and house martin ( Delichon urbicum)] and first egg laying dates of two migrant (swift, barn swallow) and two resident species [starling ( Sturnus vulgaris), Italian sparrow ( Passer italiae)] at a study site in northern Italy. We also addressed the effects of local weather (temperature and precipitation) and a climate index (the North Atlantic Oscillation, NAO) on the interannual variability of phenological events. We found that the swift and the barn swallow significantly advanced both arrival and laying dates, whereas all other species did not show any significant temporal trend in either arrival or laying date. The earlier arrival of swifts was explained by increasing local temperatures in April, whereas this was not the case for arrival dates of swallows and first egg laying dates of both species. In addition, arrival dates of house martins were earlier following high NAO winters, while nightingale arrival was earlier when local spring rainfall was greater. Finally, Italian sparrow onset of reproduction was anticipated by greater spring rainfall, but delayed by high spring NAO anomalies, and swift’s onset of reproduction was anticipated by abundant rainfall prior to reproduction. There were no significant temporal trends in the interval between onset of laying and arrival in either the swift or the barn swallow. Our findings therefore indicate that birds may show idiosyncratic responses to climate variability at different spatial scales, though some species may be adjusting their calendar to rapidly changing climatic conditions.

  10. Neuroendocrine mechanism of seasonal reproduction in birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Takashi

    2010-08-01

    In temperate zones, animals use changes in day length as a calendar to time their breeding season. However, the photoreceptive and neuroendocrine mechanisms of seasonal reproduction are considered to differ markedly between birds and mammals. This can be understood from the fact that the eye is the only photoreceptive organ, and melatonin mediates the photoperiodic information in mammals, whereas in birds, photoperiodic information is directly received by the deep brain photoreceptors and melatonin is not involved in seasonal reproduction. Recent molecular and functional genomics analysis uncovered the gene cascade regulating seasonal reproduction in birds and mammals. Long day-induced thyroid stimulating hormone in the pars tuberalis of the pituitary gland regulates thyroid hormone catabolism within the mediobasal hypothalamus. Further, this local thyroid hormone catabolism appears to regulate seasonal gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion. These findings suggest that although the light input pathway is different between birds and mammals (i.e. light or melatonin), the core mechanisms are conserved in these vertebrates.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of precipitation gauge bird deterrent mechanisms

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    Cobos, Doug; Taysom, Nathan

    2017-04-01

    "Contamination" from avian activity is a constant contributor to inaccurate measurements and often complete failure in precipitation gauges. Various bird deterrent schemes have been deployed both by rain gauge manufacturers and by individual research groups, but few data exist regarding the effectiveness of the deterrent mechanisms outside of the anecdotal claims that "none of them work well." We have recently re-purposed a commercial trail camera, commonly used to record images of game animals, to quantify the effectiveness of bird deterrent devices on our ATMOS 31 precipitation gauge. Our initial attempts using a 3-D printed ring and spike design actually made the precipitation gauge more attractive to birds, but subsequent iterations have substantially improved bird deterrent effectiveness.

  12. Distribution of bisphenol A and tetrabromobisphenol A in quail eggs, embryos and laying birds and studies on reproduction variables in adults following in ovo exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halldin, K.; Berg, C.; Brandt, I.; Brunstroem, B. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); Bergman, Aa. [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    In this study, uptake and distribution of BPA and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in embryos and laying quail were examined as well as variables related to reproduction in adult quail following administration of the compounds into the yolk of embryonated eggs. The uptake of radiolabelled BPA, TBBPA and the reference compound diethylstilboestrol (DES) was studied in the embryos using ss-spectrometry. Autoradiography was employed to examine distribution in egg and embryo after yolk sac injection of BPA or TBBPA and in laying birds, following intravenous and oral administration. Following embryonic exposure to BPA or TBBPA, sexually mature male birds were examined for reproductive behaviour and testis morphology, and females were examined for egg laying and oviduct morphology. Neither BPA (200 {mu}g/g egg) nor TBBPA (15 {mu}g/g egg) caused any significant oestrogen-like effects on the variables studied, although effects on the female oviducts after BPA exposure were indicated. Embryonic exposure to DES is known to cause profound effects on male sexual behaviour and female oviduct morphology at doses 3-5 orders of magnitude lower than the BPA and TBBPA doses used in the present study. The proportions of BPA and TBBPA taken up by the embryos after yolk sac injection were similar to the proportion of DES taken up. Differences in bioavailability, therefore do not account for any major part of the potency differences between DES and the two bisphenol A compounds. The concentration of radioactivity in the embryo, as revealed by autoradiography, was low compared with that in the yolk at all stages studied (days 6, 10 and 15). Pronounced labelling of the bile and the allantoic fluid was observed, however, indicating that both compounds were readily metabolised and excreted. Radiolabelled BPA and TBBPA administered to laying quail were largely excreted via the bile and 9 days after oral dosing, only small amounts of the labelled compound remained within the body. Maternal

  13. Evolving nonapeptide mechanisms of gregariousness and social diversity in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, James L; Kelly, Aubrey M; Kingsbury, Marcy A

    2012-03-01

    Of the major vertebrate taxa, Class Aves is the most extensively studied in relation to the evolution of social systems and behavior, largely because birds exhibit an incomparable balance of tractability, diversity, and cognitive complexity. In addition, like humans, most bird species are socially monogamous, exhibit biparental care, and conduct most of their social interactions through auditory and visual modalities. These qualities make birds attractive as research subjects, and also make them valuable for comparative studies of neuroendocrine mechanisms. This value has become increasingly apparent as more and more evidence shows that social behavior circuits of the basal forebrain and midbrain are deeply conserved (from an evolutionary perspective), and particularly similar in birds and mammals. Among the strongest similarities are the basic structures and functions of avian and mammalian nonapeptide systems, which include mesotocin (MT) and arginine vasotocin (VT) systems in birds, and the homologous oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) systems, respectively, in mammals. We here summarize these basic properties, and then describe a research program that has leveraged the social diversity of estrildid finches to gain insights into the nonapeptide mechanisms of grouping, a behavioral dimension that is not experimentally tractable in most other taxa. These studies have used five monogamous, biparental finch species that exhibit group sizes ranging from territorial male-female pairs to large flocks containing hundreds or thousands of birds. The results provide novel insights into the history of nonapeptide functions in amniote vertebrates, and yield remarkable clarity on the nonapeptide biology of dinosaurs and ancient mammals. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin, Vasopressin, and Social Behavior. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Behavioural and physiological mechanisms of polarized light sensitivity in birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muheim, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Polarized light (PL) sensitivity is relatively well studied in a large number of invertebrates and some fish species, but in most other vertebrate classes, including birds, the behavioural and physiological mechanism of PL sensitivity remains one of the big mysteries in sensory biology. Many organisms use the skylight polarization pattern as part of a sun compass for orientation, navigation and in spatial orientation tasks. In birds, the available evidence for an involvement of the skylight polarization pattern in sun-compass orientation is very weak. Instead, cue-conflict and cue-calibration experiments have shown that the skylight polarization pattern near the horizon at sunrise and sunset provides birds with a seasonally and latitudinally independent compass calibration reference. Despite convincing evidence that birds use PL cues for orientation, direct experimental evidence for PL sensitivity is still lacking. Avian double cones have been proposed as putative PL receptors, but detailed anatomical and physiological evidence will be needed to conclusively describe the avian PL receptor. Intriguing parallels between the functional and physiological properties of PL reception and light-dependent magnetoreception could point to a common receptor system. PMID:21282180

  15. Behavioural and physiological mechanisms of polarized light sensitivity in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muheim, Rachel

    2011-03-12

    Polarized light (PL) sensitivity is relatively well studied in a large number of invertebrates and some fish species, but in most other vertebrate classes, including birds, the behavioural and physiological mechanism of PL sensitivity remains one of the big mysteries in sensory biology. Many organisms use the skylight polarization pattern as part of a sun compass for orientation, navigation and in spatial orientation tasks. In birds, the available evidence for an involvement of the skylight polarization pattern in sun-compass orientation is very weak. Instead, cue-conflict and cue-calibration experiments have shown that the skylight polarization pattern near the horizon at sunrise and sunset provides birds with a seasonally and latitudinally independent compass calibration reference. Despite convincing evidence that birds use PL cues for orientation, direct experimental evidence for PL sensitivity is still lacking. Avian double cones have been proposed as putative PL receptors, but detailed anatomical and physiological evidence will be needed to conclusively describe the avian PL receptor. Intriguing parallels between the functional and physiological properties of PL reception and light-dependent magnetoreception could point to a common receptor system.

  16. Vocal mechanisms in birds and bats: a comparative view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suthers Roderick A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Vocal signals play a very important role in the life of both birds and echolocating bats, but these two unrelated groups of flying vertebrates have very different vocal systems. They nevertheless must solve many of the same problems in producing sound. This brief review examines avian and microchiropteran motor mechanisms for: 1 coordinating the timing of phonation with the vocal motor pattern that controls its acoustic properties, and 2 achieving respiratory strategies that provide adequate ventilation for pulmonary gas exchange, while also facilitating longer duration songs or trains of sonar pulses.

  17. A Flight Mechanics-Centric Review of Bird-Scale Flapping Flight

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the flight mechanics and control of birds and bird-size aircraft. It is intended to fill a niche in the current survey literature which focuses primarily on the aerodynamics, flight dynamics and control of insect scale flight. We review the flight mechanics from first principles and summarize some recent results on the stability and control of birds and bird-scale aircraft. Birds spend a considerable portion of their flight in the gliding (i.e., non-flapping) phase. Therefo...

  18. Interaction of breeds, years, age of bird and pen effects on hen day lay of three layer breeds and their adaptation in the derived Southern Guinea Savannah of Nigeria

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    Terzungwe Ahemen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Egg production of Haco black, Shaver’s brown, Lohman brown and Olympia black werecollected from production records at Big Bam commercial farm Makurdi from 1997 to 2004. The meanhen day lay of the breeds were estimated in percentages at 49-52, 56-60 and 69-73 weeks. The meanhen day lay of effects of breed by year and breed by pen by age of bird interactions were estimated.The hen day lay of Haco black by year interaction were low varied significantly (P1,L2, and L3, were significantly lower than that at 49-56 weeks. The mean hen day lay due to effects ofinteraction of Shavers brown at 56-60 and 69-73 weeks by pen L1, L2, and L3, were significantly higherthan that at 49-56 weeks. The mean hen day lay of interaction of Lohman brown and Olympia black at69-73 weeks by Pen L1, L2, and L3, were significantly higher than that at 56-60 weeks. This resultindicated that the response to the restrictions of the years and their effects on the strategies of aging ofthe breeds on their hen lay varied across the genetic groups. Haco black was more susceptible to thisstress especially at the advanced age. Lohman brown and Olympia black were better than Haco black.Shaver’s brown was superior in this trait as neither the restrictions of the years nor the strategies ofaging affected its hen day lay. In order of fitness, Shavers brown, Lohman brown and Olympia blackwere most adapted to this region. Thus, Shavers brown which is better adapted to the prevailingenvironmental conditions in the Southern Guinea Savannah is recommended for poultry farmers in thislocality.

  19. Covariance of paternity and sex with laying order explains male bias in extra-pair offspring in a wild bird population

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    Vedder, Oscar; Magrath, Michael J. L.; van der Velde, Marco; Komdeur, Jan

    2013-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that parents increase their fitness by biasing the sex ratio of extra-pair offspring (EPO) towards males. Here, we report a male bias among EPO in a wild population of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus). This resulted from a decline in both the proportion of males and EPO over the laying order of eggs in the clutch. However, previous studies suggest that, unlike the decline in EPO with laying order, the relationship between offspring sex ratio and laying order is not consistent between years and populations in this species. Hence, we caution against treating the decline in proportion of males with laying order, and the resulting male bias among EPO, as support for the above hypothesis. Variable patterns of offspring sex and paternity over the laying order may explain inconsistent associations between offspring sex and paternity, between and within species. PMID:24026349

  20. Terror birds on the run: a mechanical model to estimate its maximum running speed

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    Blanco, R. Ernesto; Jones, Washington W

    2005-01-01

    ‘Terror bird’ is a common name for the family Phorusrhacidae. These large terrestrial birds were probably the dominant carnivores on the South American continent from the Middle Palaeocene to the Pliocene–Pleistocene limit. Here we use a mechanical model based on tibiotarsal strength to estimate maximum running speeds of three species of terror birds: Mesembriornis milneedwardsi, Patagornis marshi and a specimen of Phorusrhacinae gen. The model is proved on three living large terrestrial bird species. On the basis of the tibiotarsal strength we propose that Mesembriornis could have used its legs to break long bones and access their marrow. PMID:16096087

  1. Upgrading offshore pipelines concrete coated by silica fume additive against aggressive mechanical laying

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    M.I. Abdou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies have been carried out to investigate the possibility of utilizing a broad range of micro-silica partial additions with cement in the production of concrete coating. This study investigated the strength properties and permeability of micro-silica concrete to achieve resistance toward concrete cracking and damage during laying. The chemical composition of micro-silica (silica fume was determined, and has been conducted on concrete mixes with additions of 3 up to 25% by weight of cement in concrete. Properties of hardened concrete such as compressive strength, flexural strength, and permeability have been assessed and analyzed. Cubic specimens and beams were produced and cured in a curing tank for 7 and 28 days. Testing results have shown that additions of silica fume to cement between 5% and 7%, which acts as a filler and cementations material, developed high flexural and compressive strength with reduction of permeability.

  2. Universal mechanisms of sound production and control in birds and mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elemans, Coen; Rasmussen, Jeppe Have; Herbst, Christian T.

    2015-01-01

    As animals vocalize, their vocal organ transforms motor commands into vocalizations for social communication. In birds, the physical mechanisms by which vocalizations are produced and controlled remain unresolved because of the extreme difficulty in obtaining in vivo measurements. Here, we introd...

  3. Peripheral Mechanisms for Vocal Production in Birds--Differences and Similarities to Human Speech and Singing

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    Riede, Tobias; Goller, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Song production in songbirds is a model system for studying learned vocal behavior. As in humans, bird phonation involves three main motor systems (respiration, vocal organ and vocal tract). The avian respiratory mechanism uses pressure regulation in air sacs to ventilate a rigid lung. In songbirds sound is generated with two independently…

  4. SIMULATION OF ELECTRICAL FIELD FOR THE FORMATION MECHANISM OF BIRD'S NEST PATTERNED STRUCTURES BY ELECTROSPINNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-yu Ye; Yi-ning Jin; Xiao-jun Huang; Lei Luo; Zhi-kang Xu

    2013-01-01

    In our previous work,it was found that large Bird's Nest patterned nanofibrous membranes can be simply electrospun from chlorinated polypropylene solution doped with an ionic liquid,and a plausible formation mechanism of Bird's Nest patterned architectures was proposed.Here,we use Ansoft Maxwell version 12 software (3D,electrostatic solver) to simulate the electrical field distribution of the electrospirming setup,and to clarify the rationality of proposed formation mechanism.Calculation results clearly show that the introduction of charged nanofibrous bundles would produce a similar patterned electrical field distribution,which definitely confirms the important role of surface residual charges.The proposed mechanism can be well extended to other polymer systems including polystyrene,poly(acrylonitrile-co-acrylic acid) and chitosan/poly(ethvlene oxide).

  5. Do laying hens with keel bone fractures experience pain?

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    Nasr, Mohammed A F; Nicol, Christine J; Murrell, Joanna C

    2012-01-01

    The European ban on battery cages has forced a change towards the use of non-cage or furnished cage systems, but unexpectedly this has been associated with an increased prevalence of keel bone fractures in laying hens. Bone fractures are acutely painful in mammals, but the effect of fractures on bird welfare is unclear. We recently reported that keel bone fractures have an effect on bird mobility. One possible explanation for this is that flying becomes mechanically impaired. However it is also possible that if birds have a capacity to feel pain, then ongoing pain resulting from the fracture could contribute to decreased mobility. The aim was to provide proof of concept that administration of appropriate analgesic drugs improves mobility in birds with keel fracture; thereby contributing to the debate about the capacity of birds to experience pain and whether fractures are associated with pain in laying hens. In hens with keel fractures, butorphanol decreased the latency to land from perches compared with latencies recorded for these hens following saline (mean (SEM) landing time (seconds) birds with keel fractures treated with butorphanol and saline from the 50, 100 and 150 cm perch heights respectively 1.7 (0.3), 2.2 (0.3), p = 0.05, 50 cm; 12.5 (6.6), 16.9 (6.7), p = 0.03, 100 cm; 20.6 (7.4), 26.3 (7.6), p = 0.02 150 cm). Mobility indices were largely unchanged in birds without keel fractures following butorphanol. Critically, butorphanol can be considered analgesic in our study because it improved the ability of birds to perform a complex behaviour that requires both motivation and higher cognitive processing. This is the first study to provide a solid evidential base that birds with keel fractures experience pain, a finding that has significant implications for the welfare of laying hens that are housed in non-cage or furnished caged systems.

  6. Do laying hens with keel bone fractures experience pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A F Nasr

    Full Text Available The European ban on battery cages has forced a change towards the use of non-cage or furnished cage systems, but unexpectedly this has been associated with an increased prevalence of keel bone fractures in laying hens. Bone fractures are acutely painful in mammals, but the effect of fractures on bird welfare is unclear. We recently reported that keel bone fractures have an effect on bird mobility. One possible explanation for this is that flying becomes mechanically impaired. However it is also possible that if birds have a capacity to feel pain, then ongoing pain resulting from the fracture could contribute to decreased mobility. The aim was to provide proof of concept that administration of appropriate analgesic drugs improves mobility in birds with keel fracture; thereby contributing to the debate about the capacity of birds to experience pain and whether fractures are associated with pain in laying hens. In hens with keel fractures, butorphanol decreased the latency to land from perches compared with latencies recorded for these hens following saline (mean (SEM landing time (seconds birds with keel fractures treated with butorphanol and saline from the 50, 100 and 150 cm perch heights respectively 1.7 (0.3, 2.2 (0.3, p = 0.05, 50 cm; 12.5 (6.6, 16.9 (6.7, p = 0.03, 100 cm; 20.6 (7.4, 26.3 (7.6, p = 0.02 150 cm. Mobility indices were largely unchanged in birds without keel fractures following butorphanol. Critically, butorphanol can be considered analgesic in our study because it improved the ability of birds to perform a complex behaviour that requires both motivation and higher cognitive processing. This is the first study to provide a solid evidential base that birds with keel fractures experience pain, a finding that has significant implications for the welfare of laying hens that are housed in non-cage or furnished caged systems.

  7. A mechanical model of wing and theoretical estimate of taper factor for three gliding birds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moosarreza Shamsyeh Zahedi; Mir Yaseen Ali Khan

    2007-03-01

    We tested a mechanical model of wing, which was constructed using the measurements of wingspan and wing area taken from three species of gliding birds. In this model, we estimated the taper factors of the wings for jackdaw (Corrus monedula), Harris’ hawk (Parabuteo unicinctas) and Lagger falcon (Falco jugger) as 1.8, 1.5 and 1.8, respectively. Likewise, by using the data linear regression and curve estimation method, as well as estimating the taper factors and the angle between the humerus and the body, we calculated the relationship between wingspan, wing area and the speed necessary to meet the aerodynamic requirements of sustained flight. In addition, we calculated the relationship between the speed, wing area and wingspan for a specific angle between the humerus and the body over the range of stall speed to maximum speed of gliding flight. We then compared the results for these three species of gliding birds. These comparisons suggest that the aerodynamic characteristics of Harris’ hawk wings are similar to those of the falcon but different from those of the jackdaw. This paper also presents two simple equations to estimate the minimum angle between the humerus and the body as well as the minimum span ratio of a bird in gliding flight.

  8. A mechanical model of wing and theoretical estimate of taper factor for three gliding birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, Moosarreza Shamsyeh; Khan, Mir Yaseen Ali

    2007-03-01

    We tested a mechanical model of wing,which was constructed using the measurements of wingspan and wing area taken from three species of gliding birds.In this model,we estimated the taper factors of the wings for jackdaw (Corrus monedula), Harris' hawk (Parabuteo unicinctas) and Lagger falcon (Falco jugger) as 1.8, 1.5 and 1.8,respectively. Likewise, by using the data linear regression and curve estimation method,as well as estimating the taper factors and the angle between the humerus and the body, we calculated the relationship between wingspan,wing area and the speed necessary to meet the aerodynamic requirements of sustained flight.In addition,we calculated the relationship between the speed,wing area and wingspan for a specific angle between the humerus and the body over the range of stall speed to maximum speed of gliding flight.We then compared the results for these three species of gliding birds. These comparisons suggest that the aerodynamic characteristics of Harris' hawk wings are similar to those of the falcon but different from those of the jackdaw.This paper also presents two simple equations to estimate the minimum angle between the humerus and the body as well as the minimum span ratio of a bird in gliding flight.

  9. Mechanical analysis of feeding behavior in the extinct "terror bird" Andalgalornis steulleti (Gruiformes: Phorusrhacidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrange, Federico J; Tambussi, Claudia P; Moreno, Karen; Witmer, Lawrence M; Wroe, Stephen

    2010-08-18

    The South American phorusrhacid bird radiation comprised at least 18 species of small to gigantic terrestrial predators for which there are no close modern analogs. Here we perform functional analyses of the skull of the medium-sized (approximately 40 kg) patagornithine phorusrhacid Andalgalornis steulleti (upper Miocene-lower Pliocene, Andalgalá Formation, Catamarca, Argentina) to assess its mechanical performance in a comparative context. Based on computed tomographic (CT) scanning and morphological analysis, the skull of Andalgalornis steulleti is interpreted as showing features reflecting loss of intracranial immobility. Discrete anatomical attributes permitting such cranial kinesis are widespread phorusrhacids outgroups, but this is the first clear evidence of loss of cranial kinesis in a gruiform bird and may be among the best documented cases among all birds. This apomorphic loss is interpreted as an adaptation for enhanced craniofacial rigidity, particularly with regard to sagittal loading. We apply a Finite Element approach to a three-dimensional (3D) model of the skull. Based on regression analysis we estimate the bite force of Andalgalornis at the bill tip to be 133 N. Relative to results obtained from Finite Element Analysis of one of its closest living relatives (seriema) and a large predatory bird (eagle), the phorusrhacid's skull shows relatively high stress under lateral loadings, but low stress where force is applied dorsoventrally (sagittally) and in "pullback" simulations. Given the relative weakness of the skull mediolaterally, it seems unlikely that Andalgalornis engaged in potentially risky behaviors that involved subduing large, struggling prey with its beak. We suggest that it either consumed smaller prey that could be killed and consumed more safely (e.g., swallowed whole) or that it used multiple well-targeted sagittal strikes with the beak in a repetitive attack-and-retreat strategy.

  10. Mechanical analysis of feeding behavior in the extinct "terror bird" Andalgalornis steulleti (Gruiformes: Phorusrhacidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico J Degrange

    Full Text Available The South American phorusrhacid bird radiation comprised at least 18 species of small to gigantic terrestrial predators for which there are no close modern analogs. Here we perform functional analyses of the skull of the medium-sized (approximately 40 kg patagornithine phorusrhacid Andalgalornis steulleti (upper Miocene-lower Pliocene, Andalgalá Formation, Catamarca, Argentina to assess its mechanical performance in a comparative context. Based on computed tomographic (CT scanning and morphological analysis, the skull of Andalgalornis steulleti is interpreted as showing features reflecting loss of intracranial immobility. Discrete anatomical attributes permitting such cranial kinesis are widespread phorusrhacids outgroups, but this is the first clear evidence of loss of cranial kinesis in a gruiform bird and may be among the best documented cases among all birds. This apomorphic loss is interpreted as an adaptation for enhanced craniofacial rigidity, particularly with regard to sagittal loading. We apply a Finite Element approach to a three-dimensional (3D model of the skull. Based on regression analysis we estimate the bite force of Andalgalornis at the bill tip to be 133 N. Relative to results obtained from Finite Element Analysis of one of its closest living relatives (seriema and a large predatory bird (eagle, the phorusrhacid's skull shows relatively high stress under lateral loadings, but low stress where force is applied dorsoventrally (sagittally and in "pullback" simulations. Given the relative weakness of the skull mediolaterally, it seems unlikely that Andalgalornis engaged in potentially risky behaviors that involved subduing large, struggling prey with its beak. We suggest that it either consumed smaller prey that could be killed and consumed more safely (e.g., swallowed whole or that it used multiple well-targeted sagittal strikes with the beak in a repetitive attack-and-retreat strategy.

  11. Spatiotemporal variation in mechanisms driving regional-scale population dynamics of a Threatened grassland bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, Danielle M; Koper, Nicola; Nudds, Thomas D

    2017-06-01

    To achieve national population targets for migratory birds, landscape-level conservation approaches are increasingly encouraged. However, knowledge of the mechanisms that drive spatiotemporal patterns in population dynamics are needed to inform scale-variant policy development. Using hierarchical Bayesian models and variable selection, we determined by which mechanism(s), and to what extent, changes in quantity and quality of surrogate grassland habitats contributed to regional variation in population trends of an obligatory grassland bird, Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorous). We used North American Breeding Bird Survey data to develop spatially explicit models of regional population trends over 25 years across 35 agricultural census divisions in Ontario, Canada. We measured the strength of evidence for effects of land-use change on population trends over the entire study period and over five subperiods. Over the entire study period, one region (Perth) displayed strong evidence of population decline (95% CI is entirely below 0); four regions displayed strong evidence of population increase (Bruce, Simcoe, Peterborough, and Northumberland). Population trends shifted spatially among subperiods, with more extreme declines later in time (1986-1990: 28% of 35 census divisions, 1991-1995: 46%, 1996-2000: 40%, 2001-2005: 66%, 2006-2010: 82%). Important predictors of spatial patterns in Bobolink population trends over the entire study period were human development and fragmentation. However, factors inferred to drive patterns in population trends were not consistent over space and time. This result underscores that effective threat identification (both spatially and temporally) and implementation of flexible, regionally tailored policies will be critical to realize efficient conservation of Bobolink and similar at-risk species.

  12. Effects of Divergent Selection Body Weight and the Quail Laying Eggs on some Physical and Mechanical Properties of Japanese Quail Eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mousareza baghani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Breeding quail and quail egg industrial production because of the high nutritional value of these products has been developing these years. Considering the high demand and economical production, further development in the future is predicted. In order to design and effective utilization of the equipment for transportation, separation, packaging and storage, the physical and mechanical properties of quail eggs are needed. It is of great importance to study the factors which are influencing these properties. Strength of the shell is an important factor in determination of quail egg quality. Quail egg shell strength depends on several variables including specific gravity, egg weight and volume, shell thickness, weight and percentage of shell, hardness, breaking force, breaking energy, egg surface, farming conditions, type and species of birds, nutrition and geometric characteristics of eggs. Materials and Methods In this paper, initially in three phases, at 15 weeks, 19 weeks and 23 weeks, shell strength changes and physical properties of quail eggs on 90 quails during their first period of laying eggs were studied. Measured properties were included dimensions, weight, volume, specific gravity, shell thickness, weight and percentage of shell, breaking force, breaking energy, egg surface and some other properties. In the second part the effects of divergent selection for the bird’s body weight at four weeks of age on the quail eggs of fifth generation were studied. Measured properties were included dimensions, weight, volume, breaking force, breaking energy and some factors for direct and indirect measurement of strength of quail eggs. For direct measurement of the strength of eggshell of quail, two methods were employed: The first method was quasi-static compression test between two parallel plates of the universal testing machine and the second method was measuring specific gravity. In the first method, eggs were compressed between

  13. Demographic mechanism of a historical bird population collapse reconstructed using museum specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rhys E

    2008-10-22

    Long-term studies of demographic rates provide clues about the external causes of animal population declines, but systematic monitoring is rarely in place until after the decline has occurred. This study evaluates alternative hypotheses about the demographic mechanisms underlying the historical collapse of corncrake (Crexcrex) populations in Britain and Ireland in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries using characteristics of museum specimens. The proportion of adult corncrakes that are 1-year old was estimated from feather characteristics of birds collected before, during and after the population decline and showed a marked transitory reduction during the decline. This pattern would be expected if the decline was caused by a large reduction in the recruitment of young birds to the breeding population and is the opposite of what would be expected if a change in adult survival had caused the decline. These results are consistent with previous suggestions that the corncrake population decline was caused by adverse effects on breeding productivity caused by the mechanization of the harvesting of hay crops.

  14. Effects of dietary dihydropyridine on laying performance and lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... supplementation on the laying performance and lipid metabolism of broiler breeder hens. ... For 10 weeks the birds were fed a maize-soybean meal diet containing 0, ... Keywords: Abdominal fat, fatty liver syndrome, lipogenesis, lipolysis ...

  15. Detection of bird nests during mechanical weeding by incremental background modeling and visual saliency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Kim Arild; Therkildsen, Ole Roland; Green, Ole; Karstoft, Henrik

    2015-03-02

    Mechanical weeding is an important tool in organic farming. However, the use of mechanical weeding in conventional agriculture is increasing, due to public demands to lower the use of pesticides and an increased number of pesticide-resistant weeds. Ground nesting birds are highly susceptible to farming operations, like mechanical weeding, which may destroy the nests and reduce the survival of chicks and incubating females. This problem has limited focus within agricultural engineering. However, when the number of machines increases, destruction of nests will have an impact on various species. It is therefore necessary to explore and develop new technology in order to avoid these negative ethical consequences. This paper presents a vision-based approach to automated ground nest detection. The algorithm is based on the fusion of visual saliency, which mimics human attention, and incremental background modeling, which enables foreground detection with moving cameras. The algorithm achieves a good detection rate, as it detects 28 of 30 nests at an average distance of 3.8 m, with a true positive rate of 0.75.

  16. An integrated approach on free flight mechanisms in insects and birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao

    2005-11-01

    To provide an overall understanding of aerodynamic and dynamic mechanisms in flying insects and birds we have succeed in establishing a biology-inspired dynamic flight simulator, which is capable to mimic hovering, forward flight and quick-turn on a basis of modeling of realistic geometry and wing kinematics, and modeling of wing-body flight dynamics. Coupling of an in-house CFD solver and a newly developed flapping flight dynamic solver enables the free flight simulation with consideration of both wing-wing interaction and wing-body interaction, and hence a systematic and quantitative evaluation of aerodynamics and flight stability in realistic flying animals. We carried out a systematic computational study on the hovering-and forward-flight of a wing-body moth model and validated the numerical results by comparing with the force-and moment-measurements based on a robotic moth model. Our results indicate that the leading-edge vortex is a universal high-lift/thrust enhancement mechanism in animal flight; and both aerodynamic force and inertial force are important in lift/thrust generation and power requirement, in particular in flight maneuverability.

  17. Mechanisms of Edible Bird's Nest Extract-Induced Proliferation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Baeg Roh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although edible bird's nest (EBN has been shown to potentiate mitogenic responses, scientific evidence of its efficacy is still limited. In addition, human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs are increasingly accepted as a source for stem cell therapy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the EBN extract (EBNE on the proliferation of hADSCs and its action mechanisms. We found that EBNE strongly promoted the proliferation of hADSCs. In addition, EBNE-induced proliferation was found to be mediated through the production of IL-6 and VEGF, which was induced by activation of AP-1 and NF-κB. Specially, we found that production of IL-6 and VEGF was induced by EBNE. In addition, EBNE-induced production of IL-6 and VEGF was inhibited by PD98059 (a p44/42 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor, and PDTC (a NF-κB inhibitor, but not SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor. Similarly, EBNE-induced proliferation of hADSCs was also attenuated by PD98059, SB203580, and PDTC but not SP600125. Taken together, these findings suggest that the EBNE-induced proliferation of hADSCs primarily occurs through increased expression of IL-6 and VEGF genes, which is mediated by the activation of NF-κB and AP-1 through p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK.

  18. A specialized bird pollination system with a bellows mechanism for pollen transfer and staminal food body rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, Agnes S; Penneys, Darin S; Staedler, Yannick M; Fragner, Lena; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2014-07-21

    Bird pollination has evolved repeatedly among flowering plants but is almost exclusively characterized by passive transfer of pollen onto the bird and by nectar as primary reward [1, 2]. Food body rewards are exceedingly rare among eudicot flowering plants and are only known to occur on sterile floral organs [3]. In this study, we report an alternative bird pollination mechanism involving bulbous stamen appendages in the Neotropical genus Axinaea (Melastomataceae). We studied the pollination process by combining pollination experiments, video monitoring, and detailed analyses of stamen structure and metabolomic composition. We show that the bulbous stamen appendages, which are consumed by various species of passerines (Thraupidae, Fringillidae), are bifunctional during the pollination process. First, the appendages work as bellows organs in a unique pollen expulsion mechanism activated by the passerines. As the birds seize an appendage with their beaks in order to remove it from the flower for consumption, air contained in the appendage's aerenchymatous tissue is pressed into the hollow anther. The resulting air flow causes the expulsion of a pollen jet and the deposition of pollen on the bird's head and beak. Second, the stamen appendages provide a hexose-rich, highly nutritious (15,100 J/g) food body reward for the pollinating passerines. This discovery expands our knowledge of flowering plant pollination systems and provides the first report of highly specialized bellows organs for active pollen transfer in flowering plants. In addition, this is the only known case of a food body reward associated with reproductive structures in the eudicot clade of flowering plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Virginia ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, pelagic birds, passerine birds, and gulls...

  20. Magnetoreception mechanisms in birds-towards the discovery of the sixth sense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia

    2008-01-01

    '' in birds may be mediated by the blue light receptor protein- cryptochrome- which is known to be localized in the retinas of migratory birds. Cryptochromes are a class of photoreceptor signaling proteins that are found in a wide variety of organisms and which primarily perform regulatory functions......, such as the entrainment of circadian rhythm in mammals and the inhibition of hypocotyl growth in plants. Recent experiments have shown that the activity of cryptochrome-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana is enhanced by the presence of a weak external magnetic field, confirming the ability of cryptochrome to mediate magnetic field...

  1. Reaction to frustration in high and low feather pecking laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, T.B.; Zimmerman, P.H.; Koene, P.

    2002-01-01

    Reaction to frustration of high (HFP) and low feather pecking (LFP) laying hens was investigated. From a HFP- and a LFP-line five birds with a HFP- and five birds with a LFP-phenotype were selected. Birds from the HFP-line were expected to show more key pecking and covered feeder pecking during frus

  2. Effects and Gene Regulatory Mechanism of Polysavone on Cholesterol Metabolism of Laying Hens%苜草素对蛋鸡胆固醇代谢的影响及其基因调控机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宁; 刘鑫; 曲正祥; 刘通; 杜宇; 高玉鹏; 闵育娜

    2016-01-01

    The experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of dietary different polysavone supplemental level on cholesterol metabolism of laying hens, and discussed its regulation mechanism of gene expression. A total of 540 twenty⁃six⁃week⁃old Nick laying hens were randomly divided into 5 groups with 6 replicates per group and 18 birds per replicate. Laying hens in control group were fed with a basal diet, and other were fed with the basal diets supplemented with 300, 600, 900 and 1 200 mg/kg polysavone, respectively. The pre⁃test lasted for 7 days, and the experiment lasted for 70 days. The results showed as follows:1) on day 35 and day 70, the yolk cholesterol content in 900 mg/kg polysavone group was significantly lower than that in control group (P0.05) . 3) Compared with the control group, the mRNA expression of 3⁃hydroxy⁃3⁃methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase ( HMGCR) in liver of laying hens in 600, 900 and 1 200 mg/kg polysavone groups significantly de⁃creased (P0.05). Our present study indicates that dietary supplemented with polysavone can reduce the whole egg and egg yolk cholesterol content. The possible mechanism of cholesterol lowering effects can result from reducing endogenous synthesis and more cholesterol excretion. The suitable dietary polysavone supplemented level of laying hens aged from 26 to 35 weeks is 900 mg/kg.%本试验旨在研究饲粮中添加不同水平苜草素对蛋鸡胆固醇代谢的影响,并探讨其基因表达调控机制。选取体重和产蛋率相近的26周龄尼克蛋鸡540只,随机分为5组,每组6个重复,每个重复18只。对照组饲喂基础饲粮,试验组分别在基础饲粮中添加300、600、900、1200 mg/kg的苜草素。预试期7 d,正试期70 d。结果表明:1)试验第35天和第70天,900 mg/kg苜草素组的蛋黄胆固醇含量显著低于对照组( P<0.05)。2)与对照组相比,900 mg/kg苜草素组显著升高了蛋鸡血清中

  3. Limestone particle size and artificial light for laying hens in the second laying cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandro Nunes de Oliveira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of limestone particle size and the use of artificial light for laying hens in the second laying cycle. We used 240 Hisex White laying hens at 82 weeks of age in a completely randomized design in a 5 × 2 factorial arrangement, resulting in 10 treatments with 4 replicates of 6 birds. The variables were the five particle sizes obtained by increasing the proportion of thick limestone (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% compared with thin limestone and two lighting programs: with and without artificial light. Limestone particle size and light did not affect performance or egg quality. However, there were changes in bird feeding schedule throughout the day as a response to the lighting program. Bone quality, density and mineral content of the tibia were not affected by the treatments, but limestone particle size had a quadratic effect of on bone deformity and strength, obtaining maximum inclusion points with 63% and 59% of thick limestone, respectively. The use of large particles of limestone in the diet and the use of a lighting program does not influence the performance and quality of the eggs of laying hens in the second production cycle, but the use of a proportion of 63.3 g of average particle size (0.60 mm replacing the fine limestone (0.23 mm per 100 g of total limestone added to the diet improves bone quality in these birds.

  4. Lay Theories of Creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritter, Simone; Rietzschel, Eric; Zedelius, Claire; Müller, Barbara; Schooler, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Creativity is of great appeal and importance to people, and they strive to understand creativity by developing lay theories. Such lay theories about creativity concern, for example, the characteristics of creative persons, such as the ‘mad genius’ idea, or environmental factors that contribute to

  5. Magnetoreception mechanisms in birds-towards the discovery of the sixth sense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia

    2008-01-01

    , such as the entrainment of circadian rhythm in mammals and the inhibition of hypocotyl growth in plants. Recent experiments have shown that the activity of cryptochrome-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana is enhanced by the presence of a weak external magnetic field, confirming the ability of cryptochrome to mediate magnetic field...... iron minerals (magnetite and maghemite) which were only recently found in subcellular compartments within the sensory dendrites of the upper beak of several bird species. The iron minerals in the beak form platelets of crystalline maghemite and assemblies of magnetite nanoparticles (magnetite clusters...

  6. Alabama ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, seabirds, passerine birds, gulls, and terns...

  7. Maryland ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, seabirds, passerine birds, and gulls and...

  8. Relationships between yolk androgens and nest density, laying date, and laying order in Western Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, J.L.; Belthoff, J.R.; Egbert, J.; Schwabl, H.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in yolk androgens within and among avian clutches have been correlated with decreased incubation time, increased aggression within a nest, increased begging behaviour, decreased immune response, and decreased life span. Although the mechanisms that lead to variability in yolk androgens within and between clutches are not completely known, yolk androgens can be a function of both social and environmental conditions. We were interested in if and how nesting density, laying date, and laying order influenced yolk androgens in Western Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea (Bonaparte, 1825)) in which nest density varies considerably. In 2006 and 2007, we used radioimmunoassay to quantify the concentrations of testosterone, 5a-dihydrotestosterone, and androstenedione in the egg yolks from one early and one latelaid egg in 47 nests of Burrowing Owls located in the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area in southern Idaho. Nesting density had no detectable effect on yolk androgens. Yolk androgens varied temporally and peaked in the middle of the laying season while being low before and after this time period. Within nests, late-laid eggs had higher testosterone and dihydrotestosterone than early-laid eggs; adrostendione exhibited a similar pattern in one but not both years of our study. It is possible that the seasonal pattern in yolk androgens that we observed is related to aspects of mate quality for females or declining chances of fledging success for later nesting females, whereas rises in egg androgens between early and late eggs within clutches could reflect a mechanism to assist nestlings from late-laid eggs that hatch one to several days after their siblings to better compete for resources within the nest or promote survival in the presence of larger siblings.

  9. Experimental Evidence for Branch-to-Bird Transfer as a Mechanism for Avian Dispersal of the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Nicholas J; Cheah, Carole A S-J; Tingley, Morgan W

    2016-10-01

    Birds have long been hypothesized as primary dispersal agents of the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand). Although A. tsugae eggs and mobile first instars (crawlers) have been collected from wild birds, key mechanistic elements necessary for avian dispersal have never been examined. To evaluate the mechanisms of bird-mediated A. tsugae dispersal, we conducted both stationary (i.e., where crawlers must actively disperse) and disturbance (i.e., where crawlers may transfer from substrates due to mechanical abrasion) dispersal trials. For stationary trials, we tested the role of perching duration, ovisac density, and seasonal timing on the rate of crawler transfer to immobile preserved bird mounts at a single site in Connecticut. For disturbance trials, we explored if transfer rates were different when branches were actively brushed against birds. Both stationary and disturbance trials resulted in successful transfers of A. tsugae to bird mounts, with disturbance trials having significantly higher rates of transfers. Crawler counts from stationary trials increased significantly with local ovisac density. Additionally, we found a nonlinear relationship between crawler transfer and experimental week, with crawler transfer highest at the beginning of sampling in May, coinciding with avian spring migration in Connecticut and the emergence of progrediens crawlers, and spiking again near 14 June, when sistens generation crawlers began to emerge. While many aspects of potential avian dispersal of A. tsugae remain unknown, these results suggest that crawler transfer to birds may occur most often when peak crawler emergence coincides with the northward migration of many small passerine bird species. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Elevational gradients in bird diversity in the Eastern Himalaya: An evaluation of distribution patterns and their underlying mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acharya, Bhoj Kumar; Sanders, Nathan J.; Vijayan, Lalitha;

    2011-01-01

    richness, shrub density and basal area of trees) accounted for most of the variation in bird species richness. We also observed that ranges of most bird species were narrow along the elevation gradient. We find little evidence to support Rapoport's rule for the birds of Sikkim region of the Himalaya...

  11. Feather pecking and related behavioural characteristics in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, T.B.

    2003-01-01

    Feather pecking is a major welfare and economic problem in laying hens. It is characterised by pecking at- and pulling out of feathers of conspecifics. A bird's propensity to develop feather pecking may be related with other behavioural characteristics, such as reaction to frustration (the omission

  12. Do arctic breeding Red Knots (Calidris canutus) accumulate skeletal calcium before egg laying?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, Theunis; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur A.; Davidson, Nick C.; Morrison, R.I. Guy

    1996-01-01

    Earlier studies have indicated that the diet of egg-laying female birds which eat only terrestrial arthropods has to be supplemented with calcium if they are to produce high-quality eggshells without interruption. During egg laying, females of tundra-breeding shorebird species may supplement their

  13. Heritability of feather pecking and open-field response of laying hens at two different ages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, T.B.; Buitenhuis, A.J.; Ask, B.; Uitdehaag, K.A.; Koene, P.; Poel, van der J.J.; Bovenhuis, H.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to estimate heritabilities. (h(2)) of feather pecking and open-field response of laying hens at two different ages. An F-2 cross, originating from a high and a low feather pecking line of laying hens, was used for the experiment. Each of the 630 birds of the F-

  14. USING RICE BRAN IN LAYING HEN DIETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H ERSIN SAMLI

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice bran is an energy and protein rich ingredient used in poultry feeding. To balance energy and protein requirements. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of rice bran on performance and egg quality during peak production of a commercial White laying strain of 22 week of age. Dietary treatments were consisted by inclusion of rice bran at 0, 5, 10 and 15% levels. Each treatment had 6 reps in which 12 birds were randomly assigned in wired fl oor battery cages equipped with nipple drinkers and through feeders. Layers accessed to feed and water freely. Lighting regimen was adjusted to 16h light/8h dark. The experiment lasted for 10 weeks. Overall results of the present experiment indicated that rice bran could be included up to 10% without any adverse affect on laying performance, egg quality and digestive organs.

  15. Early Onset of Laying and Bumblefoot Favor Keel Bone Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine G. Gebhardt-Henrich

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have demonstrated influences of hybrid, feed, and housing on prevalence of keel bone fractures, but influences of behavior and production on an individual level are less known. In this longitudinal study, 80 white and brown laying hens were regularly checked for keel bone deviations and fractures while egg production was individually monitored using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID from production until depopulation at 65 weeks of age. These focal birds were kept in eight pens with 20 hens per pen in total. About 62% of the hens had broken keel bones at depopulation. The occurrence of new fractures was temporally linked to egg laying: more new fractures occurred during the time when laying rates were highest. Hens with fractured keel bones at depopulation had laid their first egg earlier than hens with intact keel bones. However, the total number of eggs was neither correlated with the onset of egg laying nor with keel bone fractures. All birds with bumblefoot on both feet had a fracture at depopulation. Hens stayed in the nest for a longer time during egg laying during the ten days after the fracture than during the ten days before the fracture. In conclusion, a relationship between laying rates and keel bone fractures seems likely.

  16. Early Onset of Laying and Bumblefoot Favor Keel Bone Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Fröhlich, Ernst K F

    2015-11-27

    Numerous studies have demonstrated influences of hybrid, feed, and housing on prevalence of keel bone fractures, but influences of behavior and production on an individual level are less known. In this longitudinal study, 80 white and brown laying hens were regularly checked for keel bone deviations and fractures while egg production was individually monitored using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) from production until depopulation at 65 weeks of age. These focal birds were kept in eight pens with 20 hens per pen in total. About 62% of the hens had broken keel bones at depopulation. The occurrence of new fractures was temporally linked to egg laying: more new fractures occurred during the time when laying rates were highest. Hens with fractured keel bones at depopulation had laid their first egg earlier than hens with intact keel bones. However, the total number of eggs was neither correlated with the onset of egg laying nor with keel bone fractures. All birds with bumblefoot on both feet had a fracture at depopulation. Hens stayed in the nest for a longer time during egg laying during the ten days after the fracture than during the ten days before the fracture. In conclusion, a relationship between laying rates and keel bone fractures seems likely.

  17. Plant structural complexity and mechanical defenses mediate predator-prey interactions in an odonate-bird system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grof-Tisza, Patrick; LoPresti, Eric; Heath, Sacha K; Karban, Richard

    2017-03-01

    Habitat-forming species provide refuges for a variety of associating species; these refuges may mediate interactions between species differently depending on the functional traits of the habitat-forming species. We investigated refuge provisioning by plants with different functional traits for dragonfly and damselfly (Odonata: Anisoptera and Zygoptera) nymphs emerging from water bodies to molt into their adult stage. During this period, nymphs experience high levels of predation by birds. On the shores of a small pond, plants with mechanical defenses (e.g., thorns and prickles) and high structural complexity had higher abundances of odonate exuviae than nearby plants which lacked mechanical defenses and exhibited low structural complexity. To disentangle the relative effects of these two potentially important functional traits on nymph emergence-site preference and survival, we conducted two fully crossed factorial field experiments using artificial plants. Nymphs showed a strong preference for artificial plants with high structural complexity and to a lesser extent, mechanical defenses. Both functional traits increased nymph survival but through different mechanisms. We suggest that future investigations attempt to experimentally separate the elements contributing to structural complexity to elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of refuge provisioning.

  18. Search for QTL affecting the shape of the egg laying curve of the Japanese quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourichon David

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Egg production is of critical importance in birds not only for their reproduction but also for human consumption as the egg is a highly nutritive and balanced food. Consequently, laying in poultry has been improved through selection to increase the total number of eggs laid per hen. This number is the cumulative result of the oviposition, a cyclic and repeated process which leads to a pattern over time (the egg laying curve which can be modelled and described individually. Unlike the total egg number which compounds all variations, the shape of the curve gives information on the different phases of egg laying, and its genetic analysis using molecular markers might contribute to understand better the underlying mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to perform the first QTL search for traits involved in shaping the egg laying curve, in an F2 experiment with 359 female Japanese quail. Results Eight QTL were found on five autosomes, and six of them could be directly associated with egg production traits, although none was significant at the genome-wide level. One of them (on CJA13 had an effect on the first part of the laying curve, before the production peak. Another one (on CJA06 was related to the central part of the curve when laying is maintained at a high level, and the four others (on CJA05, CJA10 and CJA14 acted on the last part of the curve where persistency is determinant. The QTL for the central part of the curve was mapped at the same position on CJA06 than a genome-wide significant QTL for total egg number detected previously in the same F2. Conclusion Despite its limited scope (number of microsatellites, size of the phenotypic data set, this work has shown that it was possible to use the individual egg laying data collected daily to find new QTL which affect the shape of the egg laying curve. Beyond the present results, this new approach could also be applied to longitudinal traits in other species, like growth

  19. Screamy Bird

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarby, Sara; Cermak, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Sara Tarby, Daniel Cermak-Sassenrath. Screamy Bird. Digital game. Kulturnatten 2016, Danish Science Ministry, Copenhagen, DK, Oct 14, 2016.......Sara Tarby, Daniel Cermak-Sassenrath. Screamy Bird. Digital game. Kulturnatten 2016, Danish Science Ministry, Copenhagen, DK, Oct 14, 2016....

  20. A role for plasma aromatic amino acids in injurious pecking behavior in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkl, Patrick; Franke, Leonora; Bas Rodenburg, T; Ellen, Ester; Harlander-Matauschek, Alexandra

    2017-03-29

    Injurious pecking, including feather pecking (FP), is one of the most prevalent causes of mortality for commercial laying hens. The underlying biological mechanisms of FP are not yet fully understood, but they could be related to alterations in the serotonin (5-HT) and/or dopamine (DA) circuits within the brain. In the past, the central synthesis of 5-HT and DA was found to be influenced by the availability of their precursors, aromatic amino acids (AAA) such as tryptophan (TRP), phenylalanine (PHE), and tyrosine (TYR), in blood plasma, which are transported across the blood-brain-barrier into the brain. Because knowledge about plasma levels of AAA in laying hens is very limited, the present study compared the AAA profiles of a large sample of laying hens from two genetic lines: one selected for low mortality (LM) due to injurious pecking (n=129 birds) and one high production line (HP) selected for high egg-production only (n=132 birds). Head, comb, and feather covering were scored at the end of the experiment. Blood samples were collected at weeks 24 and 29 of age and were analysed for AAA using high performance liquid chromatography. Neither FP nor feather damage was observed in the present study, but aggressive pecking directed at the head/neck area occurred in several groups with an onset of this aberrant behavior between weeks 22 and 29. Eight HP pens and seven LM pens were affected by severe head/comb injuries inflicted via aggressive pecking. Therefore, our exploratory data analysis focused upon the possible interplay between the variability of our outcome measures (absolute levels of AAA in plasma as well as the ratios PHE/TYR and TRP/(PHE+TYR) and the aggressive head/comb pecking as an expression of social stress within the pens. We found significantly lower TRP availability relative to PHE and TYR (TRP/(PHE+TYR) ratio) and higher TYR concentrations at week 24 in pens with an early onset of injurious aggressive behavior at weeks 22-23. This was most

  1. The effects of propolis on antibody production by laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, J A; Vanat, N; Pinheiro, J W; Balarin, M R S; Sforcin, J M; Venancio, E J

    2011-06-01

    Propolis is a honeybee product showing several biological properties that enhance the immune response, depending on the concentration and intake period. Because propolis possesses an immunomodulatory action on mammals, the objective of our study was to investigate the effects of propolis on the humoral immune response of laying hens by evaluating antibody production. Laying hens (ISA Brown) were divided into 5 groups with 7 birds each. Group 1 was a nonimmunized control, whereas birds in group 2 were immunized intravenously with SRBC, and those in groups 3, 4, and 5 were treated intraperitoneally with propolis (2, 10, and 50 mg/kg, respectively) on 3 consecutive days and then inoculated intravenously with SRBC. Hematological and serological analyses were carried out on d 0, 3, and 38. Natural and specific antibody levels were determined by hemagglutination with rabbit red blood cells and SRBC, respectively. Propolis-treated birds (50 mg/kg) showed a significant decline in heterophils and in the heterophil:lymphocyte ratio. After SRBC immunization, significant increases in levels of IgG were observed in groups 4 and 5. Furthermore, higher levels of natural antibodies were observed in propolis-treated laying hens. The administration of propolis to laying hens increased the production of IgG specific to SRBC and natural antibodies, and could be used to increase antigen-specific antibody responses to vaccines.

  2. Effects of comb dubbing on the performance of laying stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfull, R W; Crober, D C; Gowe, R S

    1985-03-01

    Three studies were conducted with birds dubbed at hatch vs. dubbed and dewattled at 118 days or 255 to 260 days of age or with normal hens. In the first, involving 5928 pullets of four strains housed 1 per cage, dubbing and dewattling at 255 to 260 days caused small adverse effects on egg numbers as compared with nondubbed controls. Body size was reduced, and both egg weight (EW) and shell strength were increased slightly. In the second study, involving 8180 pullets of nine strains housed 1 per cage, dubbing and dewattling at 118 days slightly increased survivor egg production (SEP) and laying house mortality, and reduced age at first egg, 240-day EW, and 450-day Haugh units (HU), as compared with dubbing only at hatch. There were significant strain by dubbing treatment interactions for hen-day rate of lay (HDR) and SEP. In the third study, involving 1824 pullets of three strain crosses housed 2 and 3 birds per cage (three different cage sizes), there were no significant differences between birds dubbed at hatch and those not dubbed. Variation in age at 50% production, SEP, and HDR was reduced for the dubbed groups. These studies show that the older the birds are when dubbed, the greater the negative effects of dubbing. Hens dubbed at hatch exhibit no effects with the early dubbing or adverse effects in the laying house.

  3. Meiotic drive and sex determination: molecular and cytological mechanisms of sex ratio adjustment in birds

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Differences in relative fitness of male and female offspring across ecological and social environments should favour the evolution of sex-determining mechanisms that enable adjustment of brood sex ratio to the context of breeding. Despite the expectation that genetic sex determination should not produce consistent bias in primary sex ratios, extensive and adaptive modifications of offspring sex ratio in relation to social and physiological conditions during reproduction are often documented. ...

  4. Effects of stock density on the laying performance, blood parameter, corticosterone, litter quality, gas emission and bone mineral density of laying hens in floor pens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H K; Park, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, C H

    2016-12-01

    The effects of stocking density on the performance, egg quality, leukocyte concentration, blood biochemistry, corticosterone levels, bone mineral density, and noxious gas emission of laying hens were investigated. Eight hundred 34-week-old Hy-Line Brown laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus) were randomly assigned to one of 4 treatments, each of which was replicated 4 times. Four stocking densities, including 5, 6, 7, and 10 birds/m(2), were compared. A commercial-type basal diet was formulated to meet or exceed nutrient recommendations for laying hens from the National Research Council. The diet was fed to the hens ad libitum for 8 wk. Results indicated that hen-day egg production, egg mass, and feed intake were less for (P floor and broken eggs and eggshell strength were greater (P < 0.01) for 10 birds/m(2) stock density than other stock densities. There were no significant differences in the level of leukocytes among densities. However, heterophils and the H/L ratio were greater (P < 0.01) for 10 birds/m(2) than in stock density of 6 or 7 birds/m(2) Serum corticosterone was greater (P < 0.01) 10 birds/m(2) than stock density than other stock densities. Litter moisture and gas emission (CO2 and NH3) were greater (P < 0.01) for 10 birds/m(2) than stock density than 6 and 7 birds/m(2) stock density. Bone mineral content was not influenced by increasing stock density. However, bone mineral density was less (P < 0.05) for 10 m(2) stock density than other stock densities. These results indicate that increasing the density beyond 5 birds/m(2) elicits some negative effects on laying performance of Hy-Line brown laying hens. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  5. Egg-laying rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Manjunatha; Shantala Hari Dass; Vijay Kumar Sharma

    2008-12-01

    Extensive research has been carried out to understand how circadian clocks regulate various physiological processes in organisms. The discovery of clock genes and the molecular clockwork has helped researchers to understand the possible role of these genes in regulating various metabolic processes. In Drosophila melanogaster, many studies have shown that the basic architecture of circadian clocks is multi-oscillatory. In nature, different neuronal subgroups in the brain of D. melanogaster have been demonstrated to control different circadian behavioural rhythms or different aspects of the same circadian rhythm. Among the circadian phenomena that have been studied so far in Drosophila, the egg-laying rhythm is unique, and relatively less explored. Unlike most other circadian rhythms, the egg-laying rhythm is rhythmic under constant light conditions, and the endogenous or free-running period of the rhythm is greater than those of most other rhythms. Although the clock genes and neurons required for the persistence of adult emergence and activity/rest rhythms have been studied extensively, those underlying the circadian egg-laying rhythm still remain largely unknown. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the circadian egg-laying rhythm in D. melanogaster, and the possible molecular and physiological mechanisms that control the rhythmic output of the egg-laying process.

  6. Loss of fat with increased adipose triglyceride lipase-mediated lipolysis in adipose tissue during laying stages in quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shujin; Suh, Yeunsu; Choi, Young Min; Shin, Sangsu; Han, Jae Yong; Lee, Kichoon

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate regulation of key genes involved in lipid metabolism in adipose and liver to relate lipolytic and lipogenic capacities with physiological changes at the pre-laying, onset of laying, and actively laying stages of quail. Followed by a 50 % increase from pre-laying to onset of laying, adipose to body weight ratio was significantly reduced by 60 % from the onset of laying to the actively laying stage (P quail, increased protein expression and phosphorylation of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) together with an elevated mRNA expression of comparative gene identification-58, an activator of ATGL, contributes to increased lipolytic activity, as proved by increased amounts of plasma non-esterified fatty acid (P quail could contribute to the adipocyte hypotrophy (P quail. These results suggest that the laying birds undergo active lipolysis in the adipocyte, and increase VLDL secretion from the liver in order to secure a lipid supply for yolk maturation.

  7. Embryo malposition as a potential mechanism for mercury-induced hatching failure in bird eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, G.; Ackerman, J.T.; Eagles-Smith, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the prevalence of embryo malpositions and deformities in relation to total mercury (THg) and selenium (Se) concentrations in American avocet (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus), and Forster's tern (Sterna forsteri) eggs in San Francisco Bay (CA, USA) during 2005 to 2007. Overall, 11% of embryos were malpositioned in eggs ???18 d of age (n=282) and 2% of embryos were deformed in eggs ???13 d of age (n=470). Considering only those eggs that failed to hatch (n=62), malpositions occurred in 24% of eggs ???18 d of age and deformities occurred in 7% of eggs ???13 d of age. The probability of an embryo being malpositioned increased with egg THg concentrations in Forster's terns, but not in avocets or stilts. The probability of embryo deformity was not related to egg THg concentrations in any species. Using a reduced dataset with both Se and THg concentrations measured in eggs (n=87), we found no interaction between Se and THg on the probability of an embryo being malpositioned or deformed. Results of the present study indicate that embryo malpositions were prevalent in waterbird eggs that failed to hatch and the likelihood of an embryo being malpositioned increased with egg THg concentrations in Forster's terns. We hypothesize that malpositioning of avian embryos may be one reason for mercury-related hatching failure that occurs late in incubation, but further research is needed to elucidate this potential mechanism. ?? 2010 SETAC.

  8. Warmer springs, laying date and clutch size of tree sparrows Passer montanus in Croatia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. DOLENEC; P. DOLENEC; A.P. MΦLER

    2011-01-01

    Global surface air temperatures increased during the past 100 years. Many long-term studies of birds have reported a climatic influence on breeding performance. We analysed long-term changes in first laying date and clutch size for first clutches of sedentary, hole-nesting and socially monogamous tree sparrows Passer montanus during 1980-2009 in northwestern Croatia. Laying date advanced and spring temperature increased significantly during the study. Date of laying was significantly correlated with mean air spring temperature and advanced by 8.6 days during the 30 years period. Laying date was delayed in extremely cold, but not in extremely warm springs compared to years with normal temperatures. These results suggest that current climate change including extreme change does not have negative effects on timing of laying or clutch size. In contrast to laying date, clutch size did not vary systematically during the study period or with mean spring air temperature changes.

  9. Effects of stocking density, flock size and management on the welfare of laying hens in single-tier aviaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, C J; Brown, S N; Glen, E; Pope, S J; Short, F J; Warriss, P D; Zimmerman, P H; Wilkins, L J

    2006-04-01

    Management practices, stocking rate and flock size may affect laying hen welfare but there have been few replicated studies in commercial non-cage systems that investigate this. This study used a broad range of physical and physiological indicators to assess the welfare of hens in 36 commercial flocks. Six laying period treatments were examined with each treatment replicated 6 times. It was not possible to randomly allocate treatments to houses, so treatment and house were largely confounded. Three stocking rates were compared: 7 birds/m(2) (n = 2450), 9 birds/m(2) (n = 3150) and 12 birds/m(2) in either small (n = 2450) or large (n = 4200) flocks. In addition, at 12 birds/m(2), in both small and large flocks, birds were subjected to either standard (SM) or modified (MM) management. MM flocks had nipple drinkers and no nest-box lights. Bone strength, fracture incidence, heterophil:lymphocyte (H:L) ratio, live weight, organ weights, serum creatine, serum osmolality, muscle pH and faecal corticosterone were measured on samples of birds at the end of the rearing period and at the end of lay. During the laying period, mortality, production and integument condition were recorded at regular intervals. Birds housed at 9 birds/m(2) had higher mortality than birds housed at 12 birds/m(2) by the end of lay, but not higher than birds housed at 7 birds/m(2). Birds housed at 7 and 9 birds/m(2) had lower percent liver weight, and worse plumage condition than most of the 12 bird/m(2) treatments. Modified management tended to improve plumage condition. There were no clear effects of flock size on the welfare indicators recorded. At the end of the rearing period fracture incidence was almost negligible and H:L ratio was within a normal range. By the end of lay fracture incidence was 60% and H:L ratio was high, with no treatment effect for either measure. This, together with information on faecal corticosterone, feather loss and mortality, suggests that the welfare of birds in all

  10. Genetic and phenotypic correlations between feather pecking and open-field reponse in laying hens at two different ages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, T.B.; Buitenhuis, A.J.; Ask, B.; Uitdehaag, K.A.; Koene, P.; Poel, van der J.J.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Bovenhuis, H.

    2004-01-01

    The object of this research was to study the relationship between feather pecking and open-field activity in laying hens at two different ages. A population of 550 birds of a laying hen cross was subjected to an open-field test at 5 and 29 weeks of age and to a social feather pecking test at 6 and 3

  11. Laying hen performance and well-being over two flock cycles on different litter substrates in an aviary housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The momentum to move toward aviary housing has continued to increase in the past eight months. The pressure to find consistent bedding sources for meat birds may impact litter substrate for the laying hen industry as the number of cage-free hens increases in the next nine years. Molting laying hens ...

  12. Bird guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Dana M.

    2010-03-02

    The bird guard provides a device to protect electrical insulators comprising a central shaft; a clamp attached to an end of the shaft to secure the device to a transmission tower; a top and bottom cover to shield transmission tower insulators; and bearings to allow the guard to rotate in order to frighten birds away from the insulators.

  13. Bird guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Dana M.

    2010-03-02

    The bird guard provides a device to protect electrical insulators comprising a central shaft; a clamp attached to an end of the shaft to secure the device to a transmission tower; a top and bottom cover to shield transmission tower insulators; and bearings to allow the guard to rotate in order to frighten birds away from the insulators.

  14. Homology and Potential Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms for the Development of Unique Feather Morphologies in Early Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Bottjer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available At least two lineages of Mesozoic birds are known to have possessed a distinct feather morphotype for which there is no neornithine (modern equivalent. The early stepwise evolution of apparently modern feathers occurred within Maniraptora, basal to the avian transition, with asymmetrical pennaceous feathers suited for flight present in the most basal recognized avian, Archaeopteryx lithographica. The number of extinct primitive feather morphotypes recognized among non-avian dinosaurs continues to increase with new discoveries; some of these resemble feathers present in basal birds. As a result, feathers between phylogenetically widely separated taxa have been described as homologous. Here we examine the extinct feather morphotypes recognized within Aves and compare these structures with those found in non-avian dinosaurs. We conclude that the “rachis dominated” tail feathers of Confuciusornis sanctus and some enantiornithines are not equivalent to the “proximally ribbon-like” pennaceous feathers of the juvenile oviraptorosaur Similicaudipteryx yixianensis. Close morphological analysis of these unusual rectrices in basal birds supports the interpretation that they are modified pennaceous feathers. Because this feather morphotype is not seen in living birds, we build on current understanding of modern feather molecular morphogenesis to suggest a hypothetical molecular developmental model for the formation of the rachis dominated feathers of extinct basal birds.

  15. Effects of stock density on the laying performance, blood parameter, corticosterone, litter quality, gas emission and bone mineral density of laying hens in floor pens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H. K.; Park, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, C. H.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stocking density on the performance, egg quality, leukocyte concentration, blood biochemistry, corticosterone levels, bone mineral density, and noxious gas emission of laying hens were investigated. Eight hundred 34-week-old Hy-Line Brown laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus) were randomly assigned to one of 4 treatments, each of which was replicated 4 times. Four stocking densities, including 5, 6, 7, and 10 birds/m2, were compared. A commercial-type basal diet was formulated to meet or exceed nutrient recommendations for laying hens from the National Research Council. The diet was fed to the hens ad libitum for 8 wk. Results indicated that hen-day egg production, egg mass, and feed intake were less for (P laying performance of Hy-Line brown laying hens. PMID:27578881

  16. 吡咯喹啉醌对脂肪肝蛋鸡肝损伤的保护作用机制%Protective Mechanisms of Dietary Pyrroloquinoline Quinine on Fatty Liver Laying Hens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵芹; 张海军; 武书庚; 岳洪源; 王晶; 齐广海; 孙琳琳

    2014-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the protective mechanisms of dietary pyrroloquinoline quinine ( PQQ) on laying hens with fatty liver syndrome. Two hundred and eighty eight Hy-Line brown laying hens aged 29 weeks were randomly divided into 4 groups with 6 replicates per group and 12 hens per replicate. Hens in group Ⅰ (control group) were fed a basal diet (ME 11. 03 MJ/kg; CP 16. 2%), hens in group Ⅱ( pathological model control group ) were fed a high-energy low-protein diet ( ME 12 . 75 MJ/kg; CP 13 . 0%) , and hens in groups Ⅲ and Ⅳ were fed the high-energy low-protein diet ( the same as group Ⅱ) supplemented with 0. 08 or 0. 16 mg/kg PQQ, respectively. The experiment lasted for 4 weeks. The results showed as follows:1) compared with the control group, high-energy low-protein diet in groupⅡsuccessfully induced experimental fatty liver model;there were large quantity of fat degeneration in livers from pathological model control; the contents of triglyceride and total cholesterol in liver, and the plasma alanine aminotrans-ferase activity in groupⅡwere significantly increased ( P0.05)。由此可见,饲粮PQQ可通过改善蛋鸡肝脏线粒体功能、调节脂质代谢和抗氧化功能预防蛋鸡脂肪肝综合征。

  17. Talking Birds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    海文

    2005-01-01

    Many students of Englishthink thatlearning a new languageis very difficult.N ow think howdifficultitis to learn English whenyour brain is only the size of abird's brain。That is what som ebirds can do.M any different kinds of birdscan copy the sounds of lan-guage.A frican gray parrots are thebirds bestknown for this.Every D ecem ber in London,the N ationalCage and A viary BirdShow tries to find the best“talkbird in the world.O ne bird nam edPrudle stood outam ong the“talk-ing birds by winning this prizeevery...

  18. Validation of an automated mite counter for Dermanyssus gallinae in experimental laying hen cages

    OpenAIRE

    Mul, Monique; van Riel, Johan; Meerburg, Bastiaan; Dicke, Marcel; George, David; Groot Koerkamp, Peter

    2015-01-01

    For integrated pest management (IPM) programs to be maximally effective, monitoring of the growth and decline of the pest populations is essential. Here, we present the validation results of a new automated monitoring device for the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae), a serious pest in laying hen facilities world-wide. This monitoring device (called an “automated mite counter”) was validated in experimental laying hen cages with live birds and a growing population of D. gallinae. This va...

  19. Nutritional potassium requirement for laying Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Guilherme Perazzo Costa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the potassium requirement for laying Japanese quails. Two hundred and forty quails were distributed in a randomized block design, with five treatments and six replicates, with eight birds each. The treatments consisted of a basal diet deficient in potassium (K (2.50 g/kg, supplemented with potassium carbonate, to replace the inert, to reach levels of 2.50, 3.50, 4.50, 5.50 and 6.50 (g/kg of K in the diet. There was a quadratic effect of K levels on feed intake, egg production, egg mass and feed conversion per egg mass and per egg dozen, estimating the requirements of 4.26, 4.41, 4.38, 4.43 and 4.48 (g/kg of K diet, respectively. There was no significant effect on the levels of K in the diet on egg weight, albumen weight, percentage of yolk or shell and yolk color. However, yolk and shell weights reduced and the albumen percentage increased linearly with increasing levels of K in the diet. Despite the reduction of shell weight, the increased levels of K did not influence the specific gravity and shell thickness. The use of 4.41 g/kg of potassium is recommended in the diet for laying Japanese quails.

  20. Air quality measurements in laying hens housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Prodanov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring good environmental conditions of the poultry houses can be costly for the farmers, but without it losses due to poor bird health and performance due to poor air quality can be much more detrimental to net returns. The goal of this study was to investigate the variations in air quality in various areas inside the laying hen houses. Ten houses with laying hen conventional battery cages were measured for O2, H2S, CO, NH3, temperature, relative humidity, CO2, airflow and luminance. The results of the physical measures showed that temperatures in the houses were between 15.31–25.6°C, the relative humidity 48.03-81.12%, while the luminance rarely exceeded 8 lux. As for the gasses, the values for NH3 rarely exceeded 8 ppm, although at some measuring points it reached 26 ppm. O2 was generally at 20.9 %, and the levels of CO2 were very low. No presence of H2S and CO was detected. In this study it was concluded that the measurement of the air quality in a house can vary depending of the places this measures are taken. Multiple measurement points are important because they may make the staff aware of the problems connected to low ventilation and culmination of harmful gases. The air quality in different positions in the houses is of great importance not only for the animal welfare, but also for the safety of the staff.

  1. Linking birds, fields and farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swagemakers, P.; Wiskerke, J.S.C.; Ploeg, van der J.D.

    2009-01-01

    The dramatic decline in the presence of farmland birds during recent decades has provoked much attention in agri-environmental policy and ecological research. However, the still limited understanding of the socio-economical mechanisms that govern the decline in bird presence hampers the formulation

  2. Hawaii ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for endangered waterbirds and passerine birds, migratory shorebirds and waterfowl, gulls and terns,...

  3. Avian metapneumovirus excretion in vaccinated and non-vaccinated specified pathogen free laying chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, M; Huggins, M B; Mudzamiri, R; Heincz, U

    2004-02-01

    Vaccinated and non-vaccinated specified pathogen-free White Leghorn laying chickens were challenged at peak of lay by the intravenous or oculonasal route with a virulent avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) subtype B chicken strain. Severe clinical signs and a drop in egg production were induced in the non-vaccinated intravenously challenged birds whereas the vaccinates were not affected. Live virus excretion was demonstrated in the faeces and respiratory tract of non-vaccinated hens for up to 7 days post intravenous challenge. After oculonasal challenge, virus excretion could only be demonstrated in the respiratory tract for up to 5 days. No live virus excretion was found in either the faeces or the respiratory tract of vaccinated birds. Concurrent with live virus isolation, the presence of viral RNA was demonstrated by single reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Nested RT-PCR was more sensitive and viral RNA could be detected in non-vaccinated birds up to 28 days post either intravenous or oculonasal challenge, at which time the experiment was terminated. Viral RNA was detected for up to 12 days in vaccinated birds. This is the first study investigating excretion of aMPV and viral RNA in vaccinated and non-vaccinated laying hens challenged under experimental conditions. The results are of importance with regard to the persistence of aMPV and the appropriate diagnostic detection method in laying birds.

  4. Profit distribution mechanism for VMI mode of upriver lay based on definite demand%基于确定需求的上游层面VMI模式的利益分配机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雷; 杨怀珍

    2012-01-01

    假设外界需求确定,充分考虑供应商管理库存(VMI)对于供应链的影响,通过建立经济效果模型证明了上游层面VMI可使供应链上游整体受益.在此基础上,依据Stackelberg博弈及纳什均衡等理论,构建实施上游层面VMI后3种情境下的利益分配机制.该机制可体现在供应商所供产品价格契约的制定上,此契约既能弥补供应商因管理制造商库存而增加的成本,又可使制造商的利润得到保障,实现供需方的互惠共赢,还可为博弈主方在价格层面制定激励政策提供理论依据.%Supposing the demand definite, and considering the influence of VMI(vender managed inventory) on the parameters of supply chain, economic models are developed to demonstrate that the holistic supply chain of upriver lay can be beneficial in VMI mode of upriver lay. Based on this, profit distribution mechanism in 3 different environments is constructed according to Stackelberg Game and Nash Equilibrium theories. The mechanism is presented in the construction of price contracts of the productions supplied by accessory suppliers, in which the increased cost for accessory suppliers arising from managing manufacturer inventory can be offset, while the profit of manufacturer is ensured, so that win-win goal can be achieved. A theory reference in constituting price inspiriting strategies for game leader is offered.

  5. Lay health advisers: scoping the role and intervention landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carr SM

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Susan M Carr,1–3 Monique Lhussier,1,3 Natalie Forster1,3 1Public Health Research, Department of Social Work, Education, and Community Wellbeing, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK; 2Department of Education and Training, Federation University Australia, Ballarat, VIC, Australia; 3Fuse, Centre for Translational Research in Public Health, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK Abstract: The use of lay health advisers has become an established approach within public health, in particular for impact on health inequalities and engaging socially excluded groups. Evidence on how differences in terms of the multiple role dimensions impact the outcomes of programs is limited. This creates ambiguity for decision makers on which roles should be implemented in different contexts for different needs. This paper applies realist logic to an inquiry to explore the mechanisms that may operate in lay-led intervention models and understand how, why, and in what respect these lead to particular outcomes. It draws on a project focusing on health-related lifestyle advisers and further insights gained from a subsequent related project about outreach with traveler communities. Analysis highlights multiple and potentially interacting aspects of lay health-adviser roles that may influence their success, including characteristics of lay health advisers, characteristics of target populations, purpose or intent of interventions, and how advice is given. A model is proposed from which to examine the contexts and mechanisms of lay health advisers that may impact outcomes, and is subsequently applied to two examples of reported lay health-adviser interventions. The combination of skills and characteristics of lay health advisers must be considered when planning which interventions might be appropriate when targeting specific needs or target populations. Focus only on the peer/layperson distinction may overlook other potentially important skills and mechanisms of action integral

  6. Why do some adult birds skip breeding? A hormonal investigation in a long-lived bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutte, Aurélie; Kriloff, Marion; Weimerskirch, Henri; Chastel, Olivier

    2011-10-23

    Skipping reproduction is often observed in long-lived organisms, but proximate mechanisms remain poorly understood. Since young and/or very old snow petrels (Pagodroma nivea) commonly skip breeding, we tested whether they are physiologically able to breed during the pre-laying stage. To do so, we measured the ability of known-age (11-45 years old) petrels to release luteinizing hormone (LH, a crucial driver for breeding), by injecting exogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Although young petrels exhibited low baseline LH levels, they were able to elevate LH levels after a GnRH challenge. Moreover, young and very old petrels showed a stronger decrease in LH levels after the 10 min post-GnRH injection compared with middle-aged petrels. Birds that skipped breeding were as able as breeders to release LH after a GnRH challenge, indicating that they had functional pituitaries. However, the decision to skip reproduction was linked to a strong LH decrease after the 10 min post-GnRH injection. Our result suggests that the youngest and the oldest petrels fail to maintain elevated baseline LH levels, thereby do not initiate reproductive activities. Skipping reproduction in long-lived birds probably results from age-related changes in the dynamics of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis function.

  7. Birds as predators in tropical agroforestry systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bael, Sunshine A; Philpott, Stacy M; Greenberg, Russell; Bichier, Peter; Barber, Nicholas A; Mooney, Kailen A; Gruner, Daniel S

    2008-04-01

    Insectivorous birds reduce arthropod abundances and their damage to plants in some, but not all, studies where predation by birds has been assessed. The variation in bird effects may be due to characteristics such as plant productivity or quality, habitat complexity, and/or species diversity of predator and prey assemblages. Since agroforestry systems vary in such characteristics, these systems provide a good starting point for understanding when and where we can expect predation by birds to be important. We analyze data from bird exclosure studies in forests and agroforestry systems to ask whether birds consistently reduce their arthropod prey base and whether bird predation differs between forests and agroforestry systems. Further, we focus on agroforestry systems to ask whether the magnitude of bird predation (1) differs between canopy trees and understory plants, (2) differs when migratory birds are present or absent, and (3) correlates with bird abundance and diversity. We found that, across all studies, birds reduce all arthropods, herbivores, carnivores, and plant damage. We observed no difference in the magnitude of bird effects between agroforestry systems and forests despite simplified habitat structure and plant diversity in agroforests. Within agroforestry systems, bird reduction of arthropods was greater in the canopy than the crop layer. Top-down effects of bird predation were especially strong during censuses when migratory birds were present in agroforestry systems. Importantly, the diversity of the predator assemblage correlated with the magnitude of predator effects; where the diversity of birds, especially migratory birds, was greater, birds reduced arthropod densities to a greater extent. We outline potential mechanisms for relationships between bird predator, insect prey, and habitat characteristics, and we suggest future studies using tropical agroforests as a model system to further test these areas of ecological theory.

  8. VQS (vapor-quasiliquid-solid, vapor-quasisolid-solid) mechanism lays down general platform for the syntheses of graphene by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor Mohammad, S.

    2016-12-01

    Graphene is a relatively new material. The current state-of-the-art of the graphene synthesis has been reviewed. Existing mechanism for the graphene synthesis has been examined. The flaws of this mechanism have been described. Attempts have been made to present a new mechanism called the vapor-quasiliquid (quasisolid)-solid mechanism. For this, various physicochemical processes contributing to graphene synthesis have been considered. These processes include the substrate surface morphology, substrate surface energy, carbon solubility in the substrate surface, temperature, and pressure. Surface disturbance and surface amorphicity of the substrate, together with Knudsen diffusion of the carbon species through this surface, are the key elements of the proposed mechanism. This mechanism appears to have a common platform and a number of ground rules. It describes, for the first time, essentially all possible graphene syntheses, including the synthesis of single-layer, bilayer, few-layer, and multilayer graphene films on all possible substrates, such as metal foils, evaporated metal films, semiconductors, ceramics, and dielectrics. It addresses important features of graphene synthesis as well, namely, the role of permeability, substrate surface orientation, edge effects, etc. The results based on the proposed mechanism are in good agreements with the available experiments.

  9. Study of the Bionic Design of Bird Flapping Wing Mechanism%机器鸟扑翼仿生机构研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭光; 崔建昆; 范建华

    2013-01-01

    通过对鸟类翅膀的生理结构和运动特征的分析,分别从扑翼鸟的翅膀骨骼机构和飞行中翅膀运动规律两个仿生学角度设计了鸟类翅膀的驱动平面机构.并利用机构设计软件SAM6.0对其进行了运动学的仿真,仿真效果优异,从而为仿生大型鸟类机体设计提供了参考.%The drive plane mechanism of the birds wing is designed respectively from two bionic perspectives of bone institutions of the bird wing and the motion law of the flapping wing. The simulation effect is excellent on the kinematics simulation by the mechanical design software SAM6.0. The reference for design the body of large bionic flapping wing mechanism in our country is provided.

  10. Aging in Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travin, D Y; Feniouk, B A

    2016-12-01

    Rodents are the most commonly used model organisms in studies of aging in vertebrates. However, there are species that may suit this role much better. Most birds (Aves), having higher rate of metabolism, live two-to-three times longer than mammals of the same size. This mini-review briefly covers several evolutionary, ecological, and physiological aspects that may contribute to the phenomenon of birds' longevity. The role of different molecular mechanisms known to take part in the process of aging according to various existing theories, e.g. telomere shortening, protection against reactive oxygen species, and formation of advanced glycation end-products is discussed. We also address some features of birds' aging that make this group unique and perspective model organisms in longevity studies.

  11. Columbia River ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, diving birds, seabirds, passerine birds, gulls, and terns in...

  12. Western Alaska ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, seabirds, passerine birds, and gulls and...

  13. Feather loss in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristov Slavča

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examined the incidence of different forms of feather loss and cannibalism in laying hens aged 74 weeks following moulting and in laying hens following exploitation for a period of one year. The forms of feather loss were considered in detail through a repeated examination of video recordings and they were sorted according to localization - to feather loss on the ventral part of the neck, on the dorsal part of the neck, and on the back between the wings. Feather loss on the ventral part of the neck was established in 47.9% hens, and in the dorsal part in 16.77% hens of the 167 laying hens aged 74 weeks following moulting. The group of 129 laying hens that were observed following one-year exploitation exhibited considerably more frequent feather loss, in 96.90% hens it was localized on the ventral part of the neck, in 60.47% hens on the dorsal part of the neck, and in 20.16% hens it was localized on the back between the wings. A comparison of the results of the incidence of co localized forms of feather loss in the one and the other group of laying hens using the t-test showed statistically very significant differences. A detailed consideration of the video recordings using the method of sequence analysis did not reveal any cannibalism in either group of laying hens.

  14. Commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullet and laying hen venous blood gas and chemistry profiles utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, T P; Arango, J; Wolc, A; Brady, J V; Fulton, J E; Rubinoff, I; Ehr, I J; Persia, M E; O'Sullivan, N P

    2016-02-01

    Venous blood gas and chemistry reference ranges were determined for commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullets and laying hens utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer and CG8+ cartridges. A total of 632 samples were analyzed from birds between 4 and 110 wk of age. Reference ranges were established for pullets (4 to 15 wk), first cycle laying hens (20 to 68 wk), and second cycle (post molt) laying hens (70 to 110 wk) for the following traits: sodium (Na mmol/L), potassium (K mmol/L), ionized calcium (iCa mmol/L), glucose (Glu mg/dl), hematocrit (Hct% Packed Cell Volume [PCV]), pH, partial pressure carbon dioxide (PCO2 mm Hg), partial pressure oxygen (PO2 mm Hg), total concentration carbon dioxide (TCO2 mmol/L), bicarbonate (HCO3 mmol/L), base excess (BE mmol/L), oxygen saturation (sO2%), and hemoglobin (Hb g/dl). Data were analyzed using ANOVA to investigate the effect of production status as categorized by bird age. Trait relationships were evaluated by linear correlation and their spectral decomposition. All traits differed significantly among pullets and mature laying hens in both first and second lay cycles. Levels for K, iCa, Hct, pH, TCO2, HCO3, BE, sO2, and Hb differed significantly between first cycle and second cycle laying hens. Many venous blood gas and chemistry parameters were significantly correlated. The first 3 eigenvalues explained ∼2/3 of total variation. The first 2 principal components (PC) explained 51% of the total variation and indicated acid-balance and relationship between blood O2 and CO2. The third PC explained 16% of variation and seems to be related to blood iCa. Establishing reference ranges for pullet and laying hen blood gas and chemistry with the i-STAT®1 handheld unit provides a mechanism to further investigate pullet and layer physiology, evaluate metabolic disturbances, and may potentially serve as a means to select breeder candidates with optimal blood gas or chemistry levels on-farm.

  15. The fearful feather pecker : applying the principles to practice to prevent feather pecking in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de E.N.

    2014-01-01

    Billions of laying hens are kept worldwide. Severe feather pecking (SFP) is a behaviour which occurs with a high prevalence on commercial farms. SFP, the pecking and plucking of feathers of another bird, induces pain and stress and can ultimately lead to cannibalism. Moreover, SFP can occur if a

  16. Effect of dietary energy concentration on performance parameters and egg quality of white leghorn laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAP Ribeiro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out with 1200 23-week-old white Dekalb commercial laying hens to investigate production responses, egg quality, and energy utilization of laying hens fed different dietary energy levels at the beginning of lay. Birds were housed and divided in five groups of 240 birds according to dietary apparent metabolizable energy corrected for nitrogen (AMEn: 2700 kcal/kg; 2775 kcal/kg; 2850 kcal/kg; 2925 kcal/kg; and 3000 kcal/kg, with six replicates of 40 birds each. Birds were fed the experimental diets based on corn and soybean meal for 17 weeks. Diets were iso-nutritive, except for energy level. Increasing AMEn levels had a negative effect on egg production and egg mass (p≤0.05. AMEn levels did not influence body weight, egg weight, or livability (p>0.05. Increasing AMEn levels increased (p≤0.05 feed intake and AMEn conversion ratio and feed conversion ratio. AMEn intake remained constant, independently of dietary AMEn level (p>0.05. There were no differences in albumen height, yolk total solids content, or egg component percentages (p>0.05. Egg specific weight improved with increasing AMEn levels (p≤0.05. Therefore, the energy level of 2700 kcal/kg of feed may be fed to young laying hens.

  17. Selection on feather pecking affects response to novelty and foraging behaviour in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de E.N.; Nielsen, B.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Buitenhuis, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Feather pecking (FP) is a major welfare problem in laying hens, influenced by multiple factors. FP is thought to be redirected foraging behaviour, however fearful birds are also known to be more sensitive to develop FP. The relationship between fear-responses, foraging and FP is not well understood,

  18. Effect of Led Lighting Colors for Laying Japanese Quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KC Nunes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Time of exposure and light intensity rearing house may affect the performance and egg quality of laying quails. This research aimed at evaluating the live performance, egg quality, biometry of the reproductive system, and the gastrointestinal tract of Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica exposed to artificial light-emitting diodes (LED of different colors in comparison with fluorescent lamps. A total of 240 Japanese quails were distributed in completely randomized experimental design with four treatments (fluorescent lamp, and green, red, or blue LED lamps with six replicates of 10 birds each. Average egg weight and eggshell thickness were different (p0.05. The oviduct of 64-d-old hens exposed to green LED lighting was shorter (p<0.05 than those exposed to the fluorescent lamp. Red LED can be used to replace the fluorescent lamps, as they promote the same live performance, egg quality, and morphological development of the reproductive tract of laying Japanese quails.

  19. Comparisons of permethrin formulations and application methods for northern fowl mite control on caged laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, F H; Axtell, R C

    1982-05-01

    Formulations of permethrin (Ectiban), a synthetic pyrethroid, as an emulsifiable concentrate (EC), wettable powder (WP), and dust were nearly equally effective for 9 or more weeks for control of the northern fowl mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Canestrini and Fanzago), on caged laying hens under environmentally controlled conditions. The permethrin was applied to the vent area as .05% active ingredient (AI) spray of the diluted EC or WP at 40 ml per bird, .1% AI mist of the diluted EC at 20 ml per bird, and 4.5 g per bird of the .25% AI dust. Dilute sprays of .05% permethrin prepared from the EC and WP and applied at 40 ml per bird were more effective in a commercial caged-laying hen house for northern fowl mite control than were .5% sprays of tetrachlorvinphos (Rabon), Ravap, and carbaryl (Sevin). Satisfactory mite control was obtained with .6% permethrin prepared from the EC and misted at the rate of 2.5 ml per bird. Low volume, high concentration misting of permethrin was a promising method for mite control with satisfactory control achieved with .2% AI at 5 ml per bird and .6% AI at 2.5 ml per bird.

  20. Stress, captivity, and reproduction in a wild bird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Molly J; Bentley, George E

    2014-09-01

    In seasonal species, glucocorticoid concentrations are often highest during the breeding season. However, the role of increased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity in the regulation of reproduction remains poorly understood. Our study is the first, to our knowledge, to document reproductive consequences of a non-pharmacological hindrance to seasonal HPA fluctuations. Using wild-caught male and female European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) housed in an outdoor, semi-natural environment, we divided birds into two mixed-sex groups. One group remained in the outdoor aviary, where starlings breed at the appropriate time of year. The other group was transferred into an indoor flight aviary, where we predicted reproductive suppression to occur. We measured changes in corticosterone (CORT) at baseline and stress-induced concentrations prior to group separation and at the experiment's conclusion. After ten days, the birds showed remarkable differences in breeding behavior and HPA activity. Outdoor birds exhibited increases in baseline and stress-induced CORT and progressed into active breeding (pairing, nest building, egg laying, etc.). In contrast, indoor birds displayed no change in baseline or stress-induced CORT and few signs of active breeding. We found significant sex and treatment effects on expression of HPA and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis elements, suggesting sex-specific regulatory mechanisms. Our data suggest a novel, facilitating role for the HPA axis in the transition between early breeding and active breeding in a wild, seasonal avian species. In addition, understanding how changes in housing condition affect seasonal HPA fluctuations may help alleviate barriers to breeding wild animals in captivity.

  1. BIRD FLU (AVIAN INFLUENZA)

    OpenAIRE

    Ali ACAR; Bulent BESIRBELLIOÐLU

    2005-01-01

    Avian influenza (bird flu) is a contagious disease of animals caused by influenza A viruses. These flu viruses occur naturally among birds. Actually, humans are not infected by bird flu viruses.. However, during an outbreak of bird flu among poultry, there is a possible risk to people who have contact infect birds or surface that have been contaminated with excreations from infected birds. Symptoms of bird flu in humans have ranged from typical flu-like symptoms to eye infections, pneumonia, ...

  2. GENETIC CORRELATIONS BETWEEN BEHAVIOURAL RESPONSES AND PERFORMANCE TRAITS IN LAYING HENS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozempolska-Rucińska, Iwona; Zięba, Grzegorz; Kibała, Lucyna; Próchniak, Tomasz Paweł; Łukaszewicz, Marek

    2017-02-23

    The aim of the study was to evaluate genetic correlations between the behavioural profile and performance in laying hens as an indirect answer to the question whether the observed behavioural responses are associated with increased levels of stress in these birds. The assessment of birds' temperament was carried out using the Novel Objects Test. The behavioural test was conducted in two successive generations comprising 9483 Rhode Island White birds (approx. 4700 individuals per generation) and 4326 Rhode Island Red birds (approx. 2100 individuals per generation). Based on the recorded responses, the birds were divided into two groups: a fearful profile (1418 RIW hens and 580 RIR hens) and a brave/curious profile (8065 RIW hens and 3746 RIR hens). The birds were subjected to standard assessment of their performance traits, including SM- age at sexual maturity, ST - shell thickness, SG - egg specific gravity, EW - mean egg weight, IP - initial egg production, and PW/HC - number of hatched chicks. The lineage comprised a three-generation population of birds. Estimation of the components of variance of the behavioural traits was performed with Gibbs sampling (300000 rounds with 100000 burn-in rounds) based on the multi-trait animal model. The analyses revealed negative correlations between the performance traits of the laying hens and the behavioural profile defined as fearful. In the group of fearful RIW birds, delayed sexual maturation (0,22) as well as a decrease in the initial egg production (-0,30), egg weight (-0,54), egg specific gravity (-0,331), shell thickness (-0,11), and the number of hatched chicks (-0,24) could be expected. These correlations were less pronounced in the RIR breed, in which the fearful birds exhibited a decline in hatchability (-0,37), egg specific gravity (-0,11), and the number of hatched chicks (-0,18). There were no correlations in the case of the other traits or they were positive but exhibited a substantial standard error, as for

  3. Invasive alien birds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Timme; Heldbjerg, Henning; Fox, Anthony David

    Avian Introduced Alien Species (IAS) constitute a threat to the integrity of native biodiversity, the economy and human health, so here we briefly review some of the problems posed by such species around the world in relation to bird species in Denmark. A new European Union Regulation on Invasive...... the importance of mechanisms such as DOFs (Danish Ornithological Society, BirdLife Denmark) Atlas project, Common Bird Monitoring (breeding and wintering species) and DOFbasen to contribute data on the current geographical and numerical distribution of the few serious alien avian species already present...

  4. Invasive alien birds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Anthony David; Heldbjerg, Henning; Nyegaard, Timme

    2015-01-01

    Avian Introduced Alien Species (IAS) constitute a threat to the integrity of native biodiversity, the economy and human health, so here we briefly review some of the problems posed by such species around the world in relation to such bird species in Denmark. A new European Union Regulation...... show the importance of mechanisms such as DOF’s (Dansk Ornitologisk Forening, BirdLife Denmark) Atlas project, Common Bird Census (breeding and wintering species) and DOFbasen to contribute data on the current geographical and numerical distribution of the few serious alien avian species already...

  5. 奥氮平对美国王鸽生产性能的影响及机制研究%Effect of olanzapine on laying performance of Americal king pigeons and approach to the mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文静; 顾林英; 邹晓庭; 张敏; 刘进国

    2011-01-01

    This trial was conducted to investigate the effects and mechanism of olanzapine (a antagonist of DA and 5-HT) on laying performance of Americal king pigeons. One hundred and twenty couples of 720-day laying pigeons were randomly allocated to four groups (one control and three treatment groups), supplied with 0,0. 25, 0. 75 and 1.25 mg. kg-1 olanzapine, respectively. The experiment period was sixty days. Results indicated that: 1) supplement of 0. 75 and 1.25 mg. kg-1 olanzapine in diet increased the laying rate by 20. 24%(P<0. 05) and 23. 41% (P<0. 05), decreased the laying interval by 29. 83% (P<0. 05) and 37. 46% (P<0. 05), respectively; and the serum concentrations of total protein were significantly increased by 7. 33% (P<0. 05) and 11.59% (P<0. 05) and blood urea nitrogen level significantly decreased by 32. 6% (P<0. 05) and 47. 8% (P<0. 05) in the 0. 75 and 1.25 mg. kg-1 olanzapine groups, respectively; 2) different levels of olanzapine had no effect on fecundation and incubation rate of the eggs; compared with the control group, 0. 75 and 1.25 mg·kg-1 olanzapine groups decreased prolactin concentrations by 21.90% (P<0. 05) and 34. 53%(P<0. 05), increased the follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations by 24. 0% (P<0.05) and 28. 5% (P<0. 05), and increased the progestin concentrations by 33. 7% (P<0. 05) and 42.0% (P<0. 05), respectively.It is indicated that olanzapine, as an antagonist of DA and 5-HT, can promote the laying performance of king pigeon by decreasing the prolactin concentration.%采用多巴胺(dopamine,DA)和5-羟色胺(5-hydroxy tryptamine,5-HT)的拮抗剂奥氮平(olanzapine,Ola)作为调控物,研究奥氮平对美国王鸽产蛋性能的影响并探讨其作用机制.选720日龄美国王鸽120对,随机分成4组;对照组饲喂基础日粮,试验组分别添加0.25、0.75和1.25 mg·kg-1臭氮平,试验期60 d.试验结果显示:1)与对照组相比,0.75和1.25 mg·kg-1奥氮平

  6. Digestible lysine levels in diets for laying Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleverson Luís Nascimento Ribeiro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate the digestible lysine requirement of Japanese quails in the egg-laying phase. A total of 336 female Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica of average initial age of 207 days were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design, composed of 6 treatments (lysine levels with 7 replicates and 8 birds per experimental unit, with duration of 84 days. Experimental diets were formulated from a basal diet, with corn and soybean meal, with 2.800 kcal ME/kg and 203.70 g/kg crude protein, showing levels of 9.50; 10.00; 10.50; 11.00; 11.50; and 12.00 g/kg digestible lysine; diets remained isoprotein and isocaloric. The following variables were studied: feed intake (FI; lysine intake (LI; egg production per bird per day (EPBD; egg production per bird housed (EPBH; production of marketable eggs (PME; egg weight (EW; egg mass (EM; utilization efficiency of lysine for egg mass production (UELEM; feed conversion per mass (FCEM; feed conversion per dozen eggs (FCDZ; bird availability (BA; percentages of yolk (Y, albumen (A and shell (S; specific egg weight (SW; nitrogen ingested (NI; nitrogen excreted (NE; and nitrogen balance (NB. Significant effect was only observed for LI, EW, EM, UELEM, FCEM, Y, A and SW. The digestible lysine level estimated in diets for laying Japanese quails is 11.20 g digestible lysine/kg diet, corresponding to an average daily intake of 272.23 mg lysine.

  7. Validation of an automated mite counter for Dermanyssus gallinae in experimental laying hen cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mul, Monique F; van Riel, Johan W; Meerburg, Bastiaan G; Dicke, Marcel; George, David R; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W G

    2015-08-01

    For integrated pest management (IPM) programs to be maximally effective, monitoring of the growth and decline of the pest populations is essential. Here, we present the validation results of a new automated monitoring device for the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae), a serious pest in laying hen facilities world-wide. This monitoring device (called an "automated mite counter") was validated in experimental laying hen cages with live birds and a growing population of D. gallinae. This validation study resulted in 17 data points of 'number of mites counted' by the automated mite counter and the 'number of mites present' in the experimental laying hen cages. The study demonstrated that the automated mite counter was able to track the D. gallinae population effectively. A wider evaluation showed that this automated mite counter can become a useful tool in IPM of D. gallinae in laying hen facilities.

  8. Game Birds of Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado State Div. of Wildlife, Denver.

    This booklet is intended to familiarize the reader with game birds typical of Colorado. Discussions in English and Spanish are presented. Discussions cover the management of game birds, individual game bird species, and endangered species of birds related to game birds. (RE)

  9. Diving birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanet, Christophe; Masson, Lucien; McKinley, Gareth; Cohen, Robert; Ecole polytechnique Collaboration; MIT Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Many seabirds (gannets, pelicans, gulls, albatrosses) dive into water at high speeds (25 m/s) in order to capture underwater preys. Diving depths of 20 body lengths are reported in the literature. This value is much larger than the one achieved by men, which is of the order of 5. We study this difference by comparing the impact of slender vs bluff bodies. We show that, contrary to bluff bodies, the penetration depth of slender bodies presents a maximum value for a specific impact velocity that we connect to the velocity of diving birds.

  10. Does corticosterone regulate the onset of breeding in free-living birds?: The CORT-Flexibility Hypothesis and six potential mechanisms for priming corticosteroid function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattin, Christine R; Breuner, Creagh W; Michael Romero, L

    2016-02-01

    For many avian species, the decision to initiate breeding is based on information from a variety of environmental cues, including photoperiod, temperature, food availability, and social interactions. There is evidence that the hormone corticosterone may be involved in delaying the onset of breeding in cases where supplemental cues, such as low food availability and inclement weather, indicate that the environment is not suitable. However, not all studies have found the expected relationships between breeding delays and corticosterone titers. In this review, we present the hypothesis that corticosterone physiology mediates flexibility in breeding initiation (the "CORT-Flexibility Hypothesis"), and propose six possible corticosterone-driven mechanisms in pre-breeding birds that may delay breeding initiation: altering hormone titers, negative feedback regulation, plasma binding globulin concentrations, intracellular receptor concentrations, enzyme activity and interacting hormone systems. Based on the length of the breeding season and species-specific natural history, we also predict variation in corticosterone-regulated pre-breeding flexibility. Although few studies thus far have examined mechanisms beyond plasma hormone titers, the CORT-Flexibility Hypothesis is grounded on a solid foundation of research showing seasonal variation in the physiological stress response and knowledge of physiological mechanisms modulating corticosteroid effects. We propose six possible mechanisms as testable and falsifiable predictions to help clarify the extent of HPA axis regulation of the initiation of breeding.

  11. Calcium, snails, and birds: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mänd

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that wild birds breeding in acidified areas have difficulties with obtaining sufficient calcium for their eggshells, and that the cause of it is the shortage of land snails. Many birds have to search for Ca-rich snail shells on a daily basis during egg production. Molluscs depend on litter calcium, which has decreased due to acidification of the environment. Calcium limitation may be a widespread phenomenon also in non-acidified, naturally Ca-poor areas. The problem is that while in the latter areas the time for development of specific adaptations may have been sufficient, then in acidified areas, on the contrary, calcium shortage is a recent phenomenon. Therefore, since the extent of calcium limitation in non-acidified areas is hard to derive from observational data, experimental approach is needed. We provide experimental evidence that specific calcium deficit does affect reproductive traits also in the birds breeding in naturally base-poor habitats. Our study was conducted in a heterogeneous woodland area in Estonia containing deciduous forest patches as well as base-poor pine forest with low snail abundance. Ca supplementation, using snail shell and chicken eggshell fragments, was carried out for pied flycatchers and great tits. Extra calcium affected positively several reproductive traits like egg volume and eggshell thickness, start of breeding, and fledglings’ parameters. The negative relationship between calcium availability and lay-date suggests that birds adjust their breeding tactics to conditions of Ca deficiency, for example, by postponing laying.

  12. Bird Flu (Avian Influenza)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the treatment of H7N9 bird flu. Bird flu vaccine The Food and Drug Administration has approved one ... continue to work on other types of bird flu vaccines. Recommendations for travelers If you're traveling to ...

  13. Migration of birds

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the migration of birds. Topics covered include why birds migrate, when birds migrate, speed, altitude, courses, distance, major flyways and...

  14. Egg-laying substrate selection for optimal camouflage by quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, P George; Ruxton, Graeme D; Langridge, Keri V; Spencer, Karen A

    2013-02-04

    Camouflage is conferred by background matching and disruption, which are both affected by microhabitat. However, microhabitat selection that enhances camouflage has only been demonstrated in species with discrete phenotypic morphs. For most animals, phenotypic variation is continuous; here we explore whether such individuals can select microhabitats to best exploit camouflage. We use substrate selection in a ground-nesting bird (Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica). For such species, threat from visual predators is high and egg appearance shows strong between-female variation. In quail, variation in appearance is particularly obvious in the amount of dark maculation on the light-colored shell. When given a choice, birds consistently selected laying substrates that made visual detection of their egg outline most challenging. However, the strategy for maximizing camouflage varied with the degree of egg maculation. Females laying heavily maculated eggs selected the substrate that more closely matched egg maculation color properties, leading to camouflage through disruptive coloration. For lightly maculated eggs, females chose a substrate that best matched their egg background coloration, suggesting background matching. Our results show that quail "know" their individual egg patterning and seek out a nest position that provides most effective camouflage for their individual phenotype.

  15. Effect of dietary protein sources on production performance, egg quality, and plasma parameters of laying hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaocui; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Hao; Wang, Jing; Wu, Shugeng; Qi, Guanghai

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary protein sources (soybean meal, SBM; low-gossypol cottonseed meal, LCSM; double-zero rapeseed meal, DRM) on laying performance, egg quality, and plasma parameters of laying hens. Methods A total of 432 32-wk-old laying hens were randomly divided into 6 treatments with 6 replicates of 12 birds each. The birds were fed diets containing SBM, LCSM100, or DRM100 individually or in combination with an equal amount of crude protein (CP) (LCSM50, DRM50, and LCSM50-DRM50). The experimental diets, which were isocaloric (metabolizable energy, 11.11 MJ/kg) and isonitrogenous (CP, 16.5%), had similar digestible amino acid profile. The feeding trial lasted 12 weeks. Results The daily egg mass was decreased in the LCSM100 and LCSM50-DRM50 groups (p0.05) and showed increased yolk color at the end of the trial (p0.05). Conclusion Together, our results suggest that the LCSM100 or DRM100 diets may produce the adverse effects on laying performance and egg quality after feeding for 8 more weeks. The 100.0 g/kg LCSM diet or the148.7 g/kg DRM diet has no adverse effects on laying performance and egg quality. PMID:27608634

  16. CASHEW NUT MEAL IN THE FEEDING OF BROWN LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Braga Cruz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of alternative foods to replace conventional foods is becoming a source of research for many researchers. The cashew nut meal (CNM has high energy and protein value, may be a partial substitute for corn and soybean meal for poultry feed. In this context, this research was conducted to evaluate the effect of inclusion of CNM on the utilization of nutrients in the ration for laying hens, as well as the performance and characteristics of the eggs. The study used 180 Dekalb Brown laying hens 27 weeks of age, distributed in a completely randomized design with six treatments and five replicates of six birds. Treatments consisted of a control diet without CNM and others with the inclusion of this food at levels of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25%. Upon regression analysis, a linear increase in nitrogen metabolism, crude energy and apparently metabolizable energy was seen. The dry matter digestibility and metabolizable energy corrected for rations were not affected by the inclusion of the CNM. Feed intake and egg weight were not affected by the inclusion of the CNM; however, egg production, egg mass, feed conversion, and yolk color worsened linearly with inclusion of CNM. Compared to control diet, the inclusion of CNM worsened the egg mass and feed conversion from 15%, and yolk color from 20%. As a result, it is recommended the inclusion of the CNM in the diet of laying hens at a maximum level of 10%.

  17. Natural antibody isotypes as predictors of survival in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Parmentier, H K; Frankena, K; van der Poel, J J

    2011-10-01

    To identify possible relationships between survival and titers of natural antibody (NAb) isotypes in serum of laying hens, birds from 12 purebred layer lines of 2 commercial breeds, Rhode Island Red (n = 524) and White Leghorn (n = 538), were monitored for survival during one laying period (from 20 until 70 wk of age). Titers of NAb isotype IgM- and IgG-binding keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) in serum were measured at 20, 40, and 65 wk of age, respectively. Overall, the titers of IgM and IgG binding KLH decreased with aging. At the same age, lines within breed showed significantly different titers of isotypes (P < 0.0001). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that NAb isotype IgM and IgG titers at 20 wk of age were associated with survival at 20 to 40 wk of age. In the R breed, odds ratios of 0.56 (P < 0.0001) for IgM and 0.72 (P = 0.02) for IgG were estimated; in the W breed, these were 0.74 (P < 0.01) and 0.99 (P = 0.95) for IgM and IgG, respectively. We conclude that titers of Nab isotypes, especially the IgM-binding KLH at 20 wk of age, are indicative for survival during the laying period. The higher the titers of NAb isotypes, the higher the probability of layers to survive.

  18. Utilization of sunflower seed in laying hen rations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuzuki ET

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this trial was to evaluate the effect of sunflower seed inclusion (0, 1.4, 2.8, 4.2 and 5.6% in a laying hen diet containing corn, soybean meal, wheat meal and soybean oil as main ingredients on performance and egg quality. The evaluated variables were daily feed intake, average egg weight, feed conversion (kg.kg-1 and kg.dz-1, eggshell percentage, yolk color and Haugh unit. One hundred and sixty 25 week-old Lohmann laying hens were used in a completely randomized design with five treatments and four replications of eight birds per experimental unit. Four periods of 28 days were evaluated during 112 days. The inclusion of sunflower seed in the diet had no effect on production parameters during the experimental period. Thus, can be concluded that sunflower seed might be used at concentrations up to 5.6% in laying hen diets without affecting performance and egg quality.

  19. Fiber level for laying hens during the growing phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ednardo Rodrigues Freitas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Feeding management of laying hens has been focused on the direct influence of nutrient intake on weight gain, especially at growing phase. This study evaluates nutrient digestibility, performance, development of the digestive tract, body composition, and bone quality of two strains of laying hens fed with different levels of neutral detergent fiber (NDF during the growing phase from the 7th to the 12th week of age. A total of 1,296 birds were distributed in a completely randomized design in a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement (two strains x three levels of NDF with four replicates of 54 birds per treatment. Semi-heavy (Hy Line Brown and light-strain (Lohman LSL pullets were allotted to dietary treatments consisting of 14.50, 16.50, and 18.50% NDF. An interaction between strains and NDF levels was observed only for feed/gain ratio and light-strain pullets had lower performance with 18.50% NDF. The increasing levels of NDF in the diet reduced the coefficients of digestibility of dry matter, nitrogen and gross energy, and the values of metabolizable energy. Higher levels of NDF in the diet increased the relative weight of liver and intestines and reduced gizzard weight. It was also observed differences between bone quality and composition of the femur and tibia of light and semi-heavy hens. The increase in NDF level in ration for growing phase laying hens above 14.50% decreases the nutrient digestibility and the metabolizable energy of the diet; however, it does not affect the carcass composition, bone quality, feed intake, and weight gain, although it may impair feed conversion of light-strain pullets.

  20. Fearfulness and feather damage in laying hens divergently selected for high and low feather pecking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodenburg, T Bas; de Haas, Elske N; Nielsen, Birte Lindstrøm

    2010-01-01

    Feather pecking (FP) remains a major welfare and economic problem in laying hens. FP has been found to be related to other behavioural characteristics, such as fearfulness. There are indications that fearful birds are more likely to develop FP. Furthermore, FP can lead to increased fearfulness...... in the victims. To investigate further the relationship between FP and fearfulness, feather damage and behavioural fear responses were recorded in three White Leghorn lines of laying hens: a line selected for high FP (HFP line), a line selected for low FP (LFP line) and an unselected control line (10th...

  1. The role of mechanical forces on the patterning of the avian feather-bearing skin: A biomechanical analysis of the integumentary musculature in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homberger, Dominique G; de Silva, Kumudini N

    2003-08-15

    The integumentary musculature of birds consists of three distinct components. The smooth musculature comprises feather and apterial muscles, which form a continuous musculo-elastic layer within the dermis. The feather muscles, which consistently include at least erectors and depressors, interconnect contour feathers within pterylae (i.e., feather tracts) along gridlines that are oriented diagonally to the longitudinal and transverse axes of the body. The apterial muscles interconnect pterylae by attaching to the contour feathers along their peripheries. The striated musculature is composed of individual subcutaneous muscles, most of which attach to contour feathers along the caudal periphery of pterylae A new integrative functional analysis of the integumentary musculature proposes how apterial muscles stabilize the pterylae and modulate the tension of the musculo-elastic layer, and how subcutaneous muscles provide the initial stimulus for erector muscles being able to ruffle the contour feathers within pterylae. It also shows how the arrangement of the contour feathers and integumentary muscles reflects the stresses and strains that act on the avian skin. These mechanical forces are in effect not only in the adult, especially during flight, but may also be active during feather morphogenesis. The avian integument with its complex structural organization may, therefore, represent an excellent model for analyzing the nature of interactions between the environment and genetic material. The predictions of our model are testable, and our study demonstrates the relevance of integrated analyses of complex organs as mechanically coherent systems for evolutionary and developmental biology. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Sexual selection and natural selection in bird speciation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trevor Price

    1998-01-01

    .... I evaluate premating isolating mechanisms in one group, the birds. In this group premating isolation is often a consequence of sexual imprinting, whereby young birds learn features of their parents and use these features in mate choice...

  3. Causes of mortality in laying hens in different housing systems in 2001 to 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etterlin Pernille

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The husbandry systems for laying hens were changed in Sweden during the years 2001 – 2004, and an increase in the number of submissions for necropsy from laying hen farms was noted. Hence, this study was initiated to compare causes of mortality in different housing systems for commercial laying hens during this change. Methods Based on results from routine necropsies of 914 laying hens performed at the National Veterinary Institute (SVA in Uppsala, Sweden between 2001 and 2004, a retrospective study on the occurrence of diseases and cannibalism, i.e., pecking leading to mortality, in different housing systems was carried out. Using the number of disease outbreaks in caged flocks as the baseline, the expected number of flocks with a certain category of disease in the other housing systems was estimated having regard to the total number of birds in the population. Whether the actual number of flocks significantly exceeded the expected number was determined using a Poisson distribution for the variance of the baseline number, a continuity correction and the exact value for the Poisson distribution function in Excel 2000. Results Common causes of mortality in necropsied laying hens included colibacillosis, erysipelas, coccidiosis, red mite infestation, lymphoid leukosis and cannibalism. Less common diagnoses were Newcastle Disease, pasteurellosis and botulism. Considering the size of the populations in the different housing systems, a larger proportion of laying hens than expected was submitted for necropsy from litter-based systems and free range production compared to hens in cages (P P P Conclusion The results of the present study indicated that during 2001–2004 laying hens housed in litter-based housing systems, with or without access to outdoor areas, were at higher risk of infectious diseases and cannibalistic behaviour compared to laying hens in cages. Future research should focus on finding suitable prophylactic

  4. Profit Distribution Mechanism for VMI Mode of Upriver Lay under Definite Demand%确定需求时上游层面VMI利益分配机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨怀珍; 李雷

    2011-01-01

    假设外界需求确定,充分考虑实施VMI后,订货主动权的转移导致订货策略的变化,以及制造商对各零部件需求速率的不同导致订货周期也不一致的现象,建立供需方在传统库存模式与VMI模式下的经济效果模型,得出VMI可使供应链上游层面整体受益的结论.在此基础上,区分供应商与制造商在合作中经常出现的3种情境--平等、供应商占优、制造商占优,利用Stackellberg博弈、纳什均衡等理论,构建上游层面VMI模式下各情境的利益分配机制,该机制最终体现在供应商所售产品的重新定价上,此定价既能弥补供应商因管理制造商库存而增加的成本,又可使制造商的利润得到保障,达到共赢的目标,同时,还可为如何在价格层面制定激励策略提供理论参考.%Definite demand is supposed. Considering the transformation of ordering strategy and the different ordering cycle of every accessory, economic models in traditional mode and VMI are developed to demonstrate that the supply chain of upriver lay could be beneficial in VMI mode. Then, profit distribution mechanisms in 3 different environments, which are equality and supplier or manufacturer predominating, are set up. The mechanisms are finally presented in modifying a new price of the accessory,in which it is found that the suppliers can increase prices in some extent to get more profit, while the manufacturer can reduce inventory cost so it can get more profit without increasing its product prices. Thus,win-win goal can be achieved and a theory reference for constituting inspiriting strategies in the aspect of price is offered.

  5. Affective cognition: Exploring lay theories of emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Desmond C; Zaki, Jamil; Goodman, Noah D

    2015-10-01

    Humans skillfully reason about others' emotions, a phenomenon we term affective cognition. Despite its importance, few formal, quantitative theories have described the mechanisms supporting this phenomenon. We propose that affective cognition involves applying domain-general reasoning processes to domain-specific content knowledge. Observers' knowledge about emotions is represented in rich and coherent lay theories, which comprise consistent relationships between situations, emotions, and behaviors. Observers utilize this knowledge in deciphering social agents' behavior and signals (e.g., facial expressions), in a manner similar to rational inference in other domains. We construct a computational model of a lay theory of emotion, drawing on tools from Bayesian statistics, and test this model across four experiments in which observers drew inferences about others' emotions in a simple gambling paradigm. This work makes two main contributions. First, the model accurately captures observers' flexible but consistent reasoning about the ways that events and others' emotional responses to those events relate to each other. Second, our work models the problem of emotional cue integration-reasoning about others' emotion from multiple emotional cues-as rational inference via Bayes' rule, and we show that this model tightly tracks human observers' empirical judgments. Our results reveal a deep structural relationship between affective cognition and other forms of inference, and suggest wide-ranging applications to basic psychological theory and psychiatry.

  6. A Thankful Bird

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜巧玲

    2002-01-01

    One day, I was playing in the woods when I saw a bird standing on a tree branch in the rain. “Poor bird, I thought, ”He has no home. “When I got home, I set down to make a house for the bird so that the bird would not catch rain any longer.

  7. Birds Kept as Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bird Importation website . Choosing a bird Match a bird's attitude, temperament, size, and activity level with your family, ... 2009;135:68-77 Compendium of Measures To Control Chlamydophila psittaci ... Pet Birds (Avian Chlamydiosis), 2010 [PDF – 17 pages] National Association ...

  8. Occurrence of Salmonella sp in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gama NMSQ

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the presence of Salmonella sp in flocks of white laying hens. In different farms, the transport boxes of twelve flocks were inspected at arrival for the presence of Salmonella. Four positive (A, B, L and M and one negative (I flocks were monitored at each four weeks using bacteriological examination of cecal fresh feces up to 52 weeks. Birds were also evaluated at 52 weeks, when 500 eggs were taken randomly, and at 76 weeks, after forced molt. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and S. enterica rough strain were isolated from the transport boxes of the four positive flocks (flocks A, B, L and M. Salmonella sp was not isolated from the transport boxes or from the feces after 76 weeks-old in flock I. Salmonella sp was isolated in the 1st, 11th, 34th, 42nd and 76th weeks from flock A; in the 1st, 4th, 11th and 76th weeks from flock B; in the first week and in the 17th to 52nd weeks from flock L; and in the 1st and 76th weeks from flock M. S. Enteritidis, S. enterica rough strain and Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis were isolated from the four positive flocks. Besides, Salmonella enterica serovar Javiana was isolated from flocks B and L, and Salmonella enterica serovar Mbandaka was isolated from flock L. Eggs produced by flock A and by flock L were contaminated with S. Enteritidis and S. enterica rough strain. According to these results, Salmonella-infected flocks may produce contaminated eggs.

  9. The welfare evaluation of laying hens reared with alternative housing systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bertuzzi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hens housed in battery cages are more concentrated per surface unit (450 cm2/bird. Associated to this breeding system are economic, hygienic and healthy advantages. However, the battery cage housing of laying hens is strongly criticised for the poor bird’s “quality of life”. For this reason EU regulations will exclude the use of battery cages in the near future. Several papers have emphasised that in any particular system there are certain specific aspects, which are critical to the welfare of birds housed in it (Appleby and Hughes, 1991....

  10. Effects of Immunization Against Inhibin on Egg-Laying Performance in Magang and Landaise Geese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yun-mao; LI Min-yi; SHI Zhen-dan; BAN Jin; QIN Yi-ping

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to improve egg-laying performance in incubating Magang geese of Guangdong origin and Landaise geese of French origin. In experiment 1, 50 adults, egg-laying Magang geese were inoculated intramuscularly (i.m.) on days 0, 22, and 45 with 1 mL of immunogen containing 1 mg of recombinant chicken inhibin fusion protein. Immunization significantly increased blood antibody titers against inhibin fusion protein, but did not affect the egg-laying performance within 10 days after the first inoculation. From day 15, the egg-laying rate in inhibin-immunized group increased and was significantly higher than the values of control geese from day 40 to 55. However, the reverse was true from day 55 to 75 when more immunized geese developed incubation. In the entire 120 days of the experiment, the immunized geese laid 17.3 eggs in contrast to 16.4 eggs laid by the control geese. From day 30 till the end of the experiment, weight of eggs in the control geese was significantly greater than that in inhibin-immunized birds. In experiment 2, 40 Landaise geese were immunized against inhibin, as described in experiment 1. These geese laid 9.0 eggs on average in contrast to 7.3 eggs laid by nonimmunized control geese over 90 days of egg laying. The above results demonstrated that immunization against recombinant chicken inhibin fusion protein improved egg-laying performance in geese, and the increment was higher in nonincubating geese.

  11. Internal incubation and early hatching in brood parasitic birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkhead, T R; Hemmings, N; Spottiswoode, C N; Mikulica, O; Moskát, C; Bán, M; Schulze-Hagen, K

    2011-04-07

    The offspring of brood parasitic birds benefit from hatching earlier than host young. A proposed but little-known strategy to achieve this is 'internal incubation', by retaining the egg in the oviduct for an additional 24 h. To test this, we quantified the stage of embryo development at laying in four brood parasitic birds (European cuckoo, Cuculus canorus; African cuckoo, Cuculus gularis; greater honeyguide, Indicator indicator; and the cuckoo finch, Anomalospiza imberbis). For the two cuckoos and the honeyguide, all of which lay at 48 h intervals, embryos were at a relatively advanced stage at laying; but for the cuckoo finch (laying interval: 24 h) embryo stage was similar to all other passerines laying at 24 h intervals. The stage of embryo development in the two cuckoos and honeyguide was similar to that of a non-parasitic species that lay at an interval of 44-46 h, but also to the eggs of the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata incubated artificially at body temperature immediately after laying, for a further 24 h. Comparison with the zebra finch shows that internal incubation in the two cuckoos and honeyguide advances hatching by 31 h, a figure consistent with the difference between the expected and the observed duration of incubation in the European cuckoo predicted from egg mass. Rather than being a specific adaptation to brood parasitism, internal incubation is a direct consequence of a protracted interval between ovulation (and fertilization) and laying, but because it results in early hatching may have predisposed certain species to become brood parasitic.

  12. Differences in intestinal microbial metabolites in laying hens with high and low levels of repetitive feather-pecking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Beatrice; Zentek, Jürgen; Harlander-Matauschek, Alexandra

    2013-02-17

    Feather pecking in laying hens is a serious behavioral problem and is often associated with feather eating. There is some evidence that ingested feathers affect gut function. The aim of the present study was to explore whether differences in intestinal microbial metabolites in laying hens with high and low levels of repetitive feather-pecking behavior exist. Sixty high feather-pecking birds (H) and sixty low feather-pecking birds (L) of the White Leghorn breed were used for behavioral recordings of feather pecking. Feather pecking activity was observed for 5 weeks, after which 22 H birds with the highest and 22 L birds with the lowest feather pecking activity were chosen. The number of whole feathers and feather parts in the gizzard and intestinal microbial metabolites in the ileum and ceca of these laying hens was examined. Biogenic amines, short-chain fatty acids, ammonia and lactate were measured as microbial metabolites. A higher number of feather parts and particles were found in H than in L birds. Putrescine and cadaverine concentrations were higher in the ileum of the hens with low pecking activity (P<0.001 and P=0.012). In the cecum the amounts of l-lactate, d-lactate and total lactate and SCFA were higher in H birds (P=0.007, P=0.005, P=0.006, and P<0.001). Acetate, i-butyrate, i-valeriate and n-valeriate all displayed significantly higher molar ratios in the cecal contents of L birds (P=0.001, P=0.003, P=0.001, and P<0.001). Propionate and n-butyrate showed higher molar ratios in H birds (P<0.001 and P=0.034). Ammonia was higher in the ileum and cecum of the L birds (P<0.001 and P=0.004). For the first time, this study shows that birds with high and low numbers of repetitive pecking movements to the plumage of other birds differ in their intestinal microbial metabolism. Further experiments should be conducted to investigate whether these differences alter behavior in H and L feather pecking birds. The present results, however, open new avenues of research

  13. A single long day triggers follicle growth in captive female great tits (Parus major) in winter but does not affect laying dates in the wild in spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Marvelde, Luc; Schaper, Sonja V; Visser, Marcel E

    2012-01-01

    In many forest passerine bird species, rapid climate warming has led to a phenological mismatch between the period of maximum nestlings' food requirements and the period of maximum food availability (seasonal caterpillar biomass peak) due to an insufficient advancement of the birds' laying dates. The initiation of laying is preceded by the development of the gonads, which in birds are regressed outside the breeding season. Increasing day length in late winter and early spring triggers a cascade of hormones which induces gonadal development. Since day length is not altered by climate change, one potential restriction to advancing laying date is the seasonal timing of gonadal development. To assess the importance of gonadal growth for timing of reproduction we experimentally manipulated the timing of gonadal development. We show that the growth of the largest follicle of captive female great tits (Parus major) increased after being exposed to just a single long day in winter (20 hours of light followed by 4 hours darkness). We then photostimulated wild female great tits from two study areas in a field experiment in spring for a single day and determined their laying date. These populations differed in the availability of food allowing us to test if food availability in combination with photostimulation affected egg laying dates. Despite an expected difference in the onset of gonadal growth, laying dates of photostimulated females did not differ from control females in both populations. These results suggest that wild great tits are not restricted in the advancement of their laying date by limited gonadal development.

  14. Feed Supplementation with Red Seaweeds, Chondrus crispus and Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii, Reduce Salmonella Enteritidis in Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Garima; Rathgeber, Bruce; MacIsaac, Janice; Boulianne, Martine; Brigitte, Lehoux; Stratton, Glenn; Thomas, Nikhil A.; Critchley, Alan T.; Hafting, Jeff; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is vertically transmitted to eggs from laying hens through infected ovaries and oviducts. S. Enteritidis can also penetrate the eggshell from contaminated feces. Reducing S. Enteritidis in laying hens is vital to provide safer eggs and minimize the spread of salmonellosis to humans. Antibiotics have been widely used to control bacterial diseases in broilers and laying hens. However, there is a major concern that the use of antibiotics leads to the development of antibiotic resistance and adverse effects on microbiota of the treated birds. Thus, there is an interest in developing alternatives to antibiotics, such as dietary prebiotics. In the present study, feed supplemented with the red seaweeds: Chondrus crispus (CC) or Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii (SG), was offered to laying hens late in production to control S. Enteritidis. Diets contained one of the following; 2% or 4% Chondrus crispus (CC2, and CC4, respectively) or Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii (SG2 and SG4, respectively). Chlortetracycline was used in the positive control diet. During week-4, 48 birds were orally challenged with 2 × 109 CFU/mL of S. Enteritidis. Eggs and fecal samples were collected 1, 3, 5, and 7 days’ post inoculation. Birds were euthanized and organs (ceca, ovary, liver, and spleen) were sampled and analyzed for the presence of S. Enteritidis, 7 days’ post inoculation. Results showed that seaweed reduced the negative effect on body weight and egg production in S. Enteritidis-challenged laying hens. Analysis of fecal samples showed that the antibiotic (CTC) reduced S. Enteritidis in the intestinal tract and fecal samples, 3 days’ post inoculation. Fecal samples from Chlortetracycline and CC4 supplemented birds tested negative for S. Enteritidis on days 5 and 7 post inoculation (lowest detection limit = 10-1). S. Enteritidis colonization in the ceca was also significantly reduced in birds fed CC (4%) and Chlortetracycline. Blood serum profiles revealed that there

  15. Analysis on differential expressed genes of ovarian tissue between high- and low-yield laying hen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Song, Ling-Jun; Zeng, Yong-Qing; Yang, Yun; Wang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    In order to elucidate molecular genetic mechanism of laying hen reproduction at the transcriptional level and the structure of significantly differential genes, the mRNA differential display and reverse northern dot-blot were used to detect the differential expression of genes in the ovary tissue of low-yield laying hens and high-yield laying hens in the present study. Sixteen 32-week-old CAU-pink laying hens divided into two groups were used and the laying performance was measured. The results showed that only the egg numbers were significantly different between the two groups; and from 15 primer pairs, a total of 336 bands were displayed of which 59 cDNA bands were found to be differentially expressed in both high-yield and low-yield laying hen. The sequence analysis indicated that the expression of such bands as H-AP5, H-P5, and H-P4 was significantly potentiated in high-yield laying hen using primer pairs AP5/HT11G, P5/HT11G and P4/HT11G and these transcripts had high homology (98%) to HoxDb, HoxCa, and HoxBa, respectively. The differentially expressed gene fragments may be relevant to the progression of the high-yield hens to the egg-laying stage. And further study is required to elucidate the molecular function to improve the productivity of laying hens.

  16. Growing and laying performance of Japanese quail fed diet supplemented with different concentrations of acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef A. Attia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the effect of acetic acid on growing and laying performance of Japanese Quail (JQ, 180 15-day-old JQ were divided into 4 groups. During the growing (15-42 days of age and laying (43-84 days of age periods, the groups fed the same basal diets supplemented with 0, 1.5, 3 and 6% of acetic acid. Each diet was fed to five replicates of 9 JQ (3 males:6 females during the growing period. During the laying period, 128 birds were housed in 32 cages (4 birds per cage, 1 male and 3 females, 8 replicates per treatment. Birds were housed in wire cages (46L×43W×20H cm in an open room. Acetic acid supplementation at 3% in the diets significantly increased the growth and laying rate and the Haugh unit score. The liver percentage significantly decreased with acetic acid at 6%. Acetic acid at 3% significantly increased hemoglobin concentrations at 6 weeks of age and increased weight of day old chicks hatched. Acetic acid affected the immune system as manifested by an excess of cellular reactions in the intestine as well as lymphoid hyperplasia in the spleen tissue. Degenerative changes in the covering epithelium of the intestinal villi were noted at the 6% concentration of acetic acid. Hepatocyte vacuolation and fatty changes were also observed at this concentration of treatment. In conclusion, 3% acetic acid may be used as a feed supplement for JQ during the growing and laying period to improve the productive performance.

  17. What Are Lay Theories of Social Class?

    OpenAIRE

    Michael E. W. Varnum

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the effects of social class on psychological and behavioral variables. However, lay beliefs about how social class affects these dimensions have not been systematically tested. Studies 1 and 2 assessed lay beliefs about the association between social class and 8 variables (including psychological and behavioral tendencies and cognitive ability). Study 3 assessed lay beliefs about the Big five personality traits and social class, and study 4 reframed the 8 vari...

  18. Rearing Laying Hens in Aviaries Reduces Fearfulness Following Transfer to Furnished Cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margrethe eBrantsæter

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate rearing is essential for ensuring the welfare and productivity of laying hens. Early experience has the potential to affect the development of fearfulness. This study tested whether rearing in aviaries, as opposed to cages, reduces the fearfulness of laying hens after transfer to furnished cages. Fear responses were recorded as avoidance of a novel object in the home cage. Lohmann Selected Leghorns were reared in an aviary system or conventional rearing cages and then transported to furnished cages at 16 weeks, before the onset of lay. Observations of a selection of birds were conducted at 19 (N = 50 and 21 (N = 48 weeks of age selected from 50 and 48 independent cages. At 19 and 21 weeks, cage-reared birds showed higher levels of fearfulness indicated by spending more time away from the novel object compared to aviary-reared birds. These results suggest that rearing in an enriched aviary environment reduces fearfulness up to the fifth week after transfer to a new housing system, compared to rearing in cages.

  19. Chemical compass for bird navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Hore, Peter J.; Ritz, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Migratory birds travel spectacular distances each year, navigating and orienting by a variety of means, most of which are poorly understood. Among them is a remarkable ability to perceive the intensity and direction of the Earth's magnetic field. Biologically credible mechanisms for the detection...... increased interest following the proposal in 2000 that free radical chemistry could occur in the bird's retina initiated by photoexcitation of cryptochrome, a specialized photoreceptor protein. In the present paper we review the important physical and chemical constraints on a possible radical...

  20. Chemical compass for bird navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Hore, Peter J.; Ritz, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Migratory birds travel spectacular distances each year, navigating and orienting by a variety of means, most of which are poorly understood. Among them is a remarkable ability to perceive the intensity and direction of the Earth's magnetic field. Biologically credible mechanisms for the detection...... increased interest following the proposal in 2000 that free radical chemistry could occur in the bird's retina initiated by photoexcitation of cryptochrome, a specialized photoreceptor protein. In the present paper we review the important physical and chemical constraints on a possible radical...

  1. Hepatic lipid characteristics and histopathology of laying hens fed CLA or n-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Gita; Goeger, Mary P

    2004-01-01

    The effect of dietary CLA and n-3 PUFA on hepatic TAG accumulation, histopathology, and FA incorporation in lipid classes by laying chickens was investigated. One hundred twenty 30-wk-old single comb white leghorn laying hens were distributed randomly to four treatments (3 replications of 10 birds) and were fed diets containing CLA and animal fat (Diet I), 18:3n-3 (Diet II), or long-chain n-3 FA (Diet III). A sunflower oil (n-6 FA)-based diet vvas the control. Feeding Diet I resulted in an increase in hepatic total lipids (P < 0.05). The liver TAG content was 32.2, 18.9, 29.4, and 18.7 mg/g for hens fed Diet I, Diet II, Diet III, and the control diet, respectively (P< 0.05). The serum TAG was lowest in birds fed Diet II (P < 0.05). Diet I resulted in an increase in the total number of fat vacuoles and lipid infiltration in hepatocytes (P < 0.05). The number of cells with 75% or higher lipid vacuolation was observed only in birds fed Diet I. Feeding diets containing CLA resulted in an increase in the content of the c9,t11 CLA isomer in liver TAG and PC (P < 0.05). No difference was observed in the CLA concentration of hepatic PE fractions. The content of DHA (22:6n-3) was higher in the TAG, PC, and PE of hens fed Diet II and Diet III than Diet I and the control (P < 0.05). Feeding CLA resulted in an increase in total saturated FA in the TAG and PC fractions (P < 0.05). Long-term feeding of CLA in laying birds leads to an increase in liver TAG and may predispose birds to fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome.

  2. Invasive alien birds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Anthony David; Heldbjerg, Henning; Nyegaard, Timme

    2015-01-01

    on Invasive Alien Species implemented in January 2015 establishes a framework for actions to combat alien species, which requires Member States to prevent the spread of alien species, provide early warning and rapid responses to their presence and management of established alien species where they occur. We......Avian Introduced Alien Species (IAS) constitute a threat to the integrity of native biodiversity, the economy and human health, so here we briefly review some of the problems posed by such species around the world in relation to such bird species in Denmark. A new European Union Regulation...... show the importance of mechanisms such as DOF’s (Dansk Ornitologisk Forening, BirdLife Denmark) Atlas project, Common Bird Census (breeding and wintering species) and DOFbasen to contribute data on the current geographical and numerical distribution of the few serious alien avian species already...

  3. Invasive alien birds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Anthony David; Heldbjerg, Henning; Nyegaard, Timme

    2015-01-01

    Avian Introduced Alien Species (IAS) constitute a threat to the integrity of native biodiversity, the economy and human health, so here we briefly review some of the problems posed by such species around the world in relation to such bird species in Denmark. A new European Union Regulation...... on Invasive Alien Species implemented in January 2015 establishes a framework for actions to combat alien species, which requires Member States to prevent the spread of alien species, provide early warning and rapid responses to their presence and management of established alien species where they occur. We...... show the importance of mechanisms such as DOF’s (Dansk Ornitologisk Forening, BirdLife Denmark) Atlas project, Common Bird Census (breeding and wintering species) and DOFbasen to contribute data on the current geographical and numerical distribution of the few serious alien avian species already...

  4. Puente sobre el rio Lay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1959-11-01

    Full Text Available El puente sobre el río Lay, salva el río formando un ángulo de 69° con la dirección de éste. Situado en el término municipal de la Reorthe (Francia, sus características principales se concentran en sus tres vigas pretensadas, de 30 m de longitud, prefabricadas, siguiendo los procedimientos Preyssinet, proyectadas por la Société Technique pour l'Utilisation de la Précontrainte, que también se encargó de la redacción del proyecto general de ejecución, cuya realización se encomendó a la empresa constructora Dodin, y de los métodos empleados para la colocación de las vigas en obra.

  5. Birds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, P.H.

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are present throughout the global environment and are produced naturally and by activities of humans. Effects of PAH on birds have been determined by studies employing egg injection, egg immersion, egg shell application, single and multiple oral doses, subcutaneous injection, and chemical analysis of field-collected eggs and tissue. The four-to six-ring aromatic compounds are the most toxic to embryos, young birds, and adult birds. For embryos, effects include death, developmental abnormalities, and a variety of cellular and biochemical responses. For adult and young birds, effects include reduced egg production and hatching, increased clutch or brood abandonment, reduced growth, increased organweights, and a variety of biochemical responses. Trophic level accumulation is unlikely. Environmental exposure to PAH in areas of high human population or habitats affected by recent petroleum spills might be sufficient to adversely affect reproduction. Evidence of long-term effects of elevated concentrations of environmental PAH on bird populations is very limited and the mechanisms of effect are unclear.

  6. Parboiled rice whole bran in laying diets for Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Bezerra Quevedo Filho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of parboiled rice whole bran (PRWB inclusion in laying diets for Japanese quails, on their performance, egg quality, and economic viability. A total of 448 17-week-old quails were weighed and distributed in a completely randomized design with seven treatments and eight replicates of eight birds each. A control diet (no PRWB and six diets, containing 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30% of PRWB, were tested. The increasing levels of PRWB did not affected nutrient digestibility coefficient, dietary energy use, feed intake, egg production, egg weight, egg mass, and the economic viability indices. However, there was a linear decrease in egg shell percentage, specific weight, and yolk color. The inclusion of up to 30% PRWB in the diet allows nutrient utilization and performance similar to those obtained by the control group, and it is economically viable.

  7. Bird Avoidance Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is an unpublished report on the bird avoidance model to predict bird strike hazards with low flying aircraft. Included is peak periods for different species of...

  8. BIRD FLU (AVIAN INFLUENZA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali ACAR

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza (bird flu is a contagious disease of animals caused by influenza A viruses. These flu viruses occur naturally among birds. Actually, humans are not infected by bird flu viruses.. However, during an outbreak of bird flu among poultry, there is a possible risk to people who have contact infect birds or surface that have been contaminated with excreations from infected birds. Symptoms of bird flu in humans have ranged from typical flu-like symptoms to eye infections, pneumonia, severe respiratory diseases and other severe and life-threatening complications. In such situation, people should avoid contact with infected birds or contaminated surface, and should be careful when handling and cooking poultry. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(6.000: 345-353

  9. Reduced parental effort in relation to laying date in house sparrows (Passer domesticus): a study under controlled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Rueda, Gregorio

    2004-09-30

    It is known that breeding success in birds declines with an advance in the laying date. In this paper, breeding success diminished with laying date in a house sparrow (Passer domesticus) population breeding in captivity. The principal cause of the cline in breeding success with date was a decrease in the female feeding rate. The parental effort in females decreased with the advance of the laying date, although food access was ad libitum throughout the breeding season. Consequently, this cline in breeding success may be due to a reduced parental investment with the advance of the laying date or to exhaustion due to previous reproductive events in the season. Hypotheses usually used to explain the cline in breeding success with date can not explain results in this study.

  10. Veterinary Aspects of Bird of Prey Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Tom A; Lierz, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Captive breeding has contributed to successful restoration of many species of birds of prey. Avicultural techniques pioneered by raptor breeders include double clutching, direct fostering, cross-fostering, hatch and switch, hacking, imprinting male and female falcons for semen collection, and artificial insemination techniques. However, reproductive failure occurs related to management problems, including hygiene measures, food quality issues, breeding flock structure, or individual health issues of breeding birds. These may result in non-egg laying females, low-quality eggs, or infertile eggs caused by male infertility. Veterinary care of breeding collections is extremely important. This article provides an overview of veterinary involvement in raptor breeding projects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Audubon Bird Study Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    Included are a student reader, "The Story of Birds," a leaders' guide, a large colored Audubon bird chart, and a separate guide for the chart. The student reader is divided into eleven sections which relate to the various physical and behavioral features of birds such as feathers, feeding habits as related to the shape of bills and feet, nests,…

  12. A Clever Bird

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张仰清

    2000-01-01

    A man in Australia had a wonderful bird. There was no other bird like it . It was very,very clever. The bird could say any word --except one. It could not say the name of the town where it was born. The name of that town was Catano.

  13. Anatomy of a Bird

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, an international team of astronomers [1] has discovered a stunning rare case of a triple merger of galaxies. This system, which astronomers have dubbed 'The Bird' - albeit it also bears resemblance with a cosmic Tinker Bell - is composed of two massive spiral galaxies and a third irregular galaxy. ESO PR Photo 55a/07 ESO PR Photo 55a/07 The Tinker Bell Triplet The galaxy ESO 593-IG 008, or IRAS 19115-2124, was previously merely known as an interacting pair of galaxies at a distance of 650 million light-years. But surprises were revealed by observations made with the NACO instrument attached to ESO's VLT, which peered through the all-pervasive dust clouds, using adaptive optics to resolve the finest details [2]. Underneath the chaotic appearance of the optical Hubble images - retrieved from the Hubble Space Telescope archive - the NACO images show two unmistakable galaxies, one a barred spiral while the other is more irregular. The surprise lay in the clear identification of a third, clearly separate component, an irregular, yet fairly massive galaxy that seems to be forming stars at a frantic rate. "Examples of mergers of three galaxies of roughly similar sizes are rare," says Petri Väisänen, lead author of the paper reporting the results. "Only the near-infrared VLT observations made it possible to identify the triple merger nature of the system in this case." Because of the resemblance of the system to a bird, the object was dubbed as such, with the 'head' being the third component, and the 'heart' and 'body' making the two major galaxy nuclei in-between of tidal tails, the 'wings'. The latter extend more than 100,000 light-years, or the size of our own Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 55b/07 ESO PR Photo 55b/07 Anatomy of a Bird Subsequent optical spectroscopy with the new Southern African Large Telescope, and archive mid-infrared data from the NASA Spitzer space observatory, confirmed the separate nature of the 'head', but also added

  14. An Overview of Deepwater Pipeline Laying Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-gang; WANG Cong; HE Ning; ZHAO Dong-yan

    2008-01-01

    The technology and methods involved in pipeline laying in shallow water have evolved to the level of routine and commonplace. However, regarding the unexpected deepwater complexity, the traditional pipeline laying techniques have to confront many new challenges arisen from the increase of the water depth, diameter of the pipe and the welding difficulty, all of which should be modified and/or innovated based on the existed mature experiences. The purpose of this investigation is to outline the existing and new engineering laying techniques and the associated facilities, which can provide some significant information to the related research. In the context, the latest deepwater pipeline laying technology and pipe laying barges of the renowned companies from Switzerland, Norway, Italy etc., are introduced and the corresponding comparison and discussion are presented as well.

  15. The development of imitation crab sticks by substituting spent laying hen meat for Alaska pollack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S K; Hur, I C; Jeong, J Y; Choi, Y J; Choi, B D; Kim, B G; Hur, S J

    2011-08-01

    Imitation crab stick (ICS) samples were divided into 5 treatments, a control composed of commercial ICS containing no breast meat from spent laying hens, and treatments 1, 2, 3, and 4, in which 5, 10, 15, and 20% batter from breast meat of whole spent laying hens was substituted for Alaska pollack surimi, respectively. Imitation crab stick samples containing spent laying hen breast meat batter showed significantly (P 0.05) among ICS samples. During storage, whiteness was greater in the control sample than in the ICS samples containing spent laying hen breast meat batter. The saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids increased, whereas the polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased in response to substituting surimi with spent laying hen breast meat batter. The moisture content and pH were increased as the amount of spent laying hen breast meat batter increased. The lipid oxidation value (TBA-reactive substances) and protein degradation value (volatile basic nitrogen) tended to increase during storage as the amount of spent laying hen breast meat batter increased. None of the sensory evaluation items differed among ICS samples during storage, although the color of the final products, mechanical color (by colorimeter), and textural properties did differ among samples. These results indicate that substituting laying hen breast meat batter for Alaska pollack surimi is a very useful method for the production of ICS because it enables the use of a simple production process that does not require steps, such as washing or pH adjustment, for myofibrillar protein recovery.

  16. Archaeopteryx: Dinosaur or Bird?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jianlan

    2011-01-01

    @@ An Archaeopteryx-like theropod dinosaur newly found from western Liaoning Province in northeastern China would make an unusual, if not unwelcome, gift for the 150th birthday of Archaeopteryx, the oldest bird as long-believed by paleontologists: Named as Xiaotingia zhengiis, the new species carries some critical traits suggesting that Archaeopteryx might have actually been a dinosaur.Naturally this breaking news stirred intense controversies.Was "The Oldest Bird" a bird? If not, what makes a bird? With these questions in mind, the author joined an exploration in search of "the real first bird" along with the paleontologists at the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) under CAS.

  17. Response of laying hens to methionine + cystine intake by dilution technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Cristina Palma Bendezu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to measure the response of Dekalb White laying hens to different intakes of digestible methionine + cystine (met+cys to optimise their performance. Two hundred eighty-eight Dekalb White laying hens, ranging in age from 33 to 48 weeks, were used in the study. The birds were randomly allocated into eight treatment (levels of met+cys and the control treatment groups with six replicates of six hens per unit. The experimental diets consisted of seven increasing levels of met+cys (1.37, 2.75, 4.14, 5.51, 6.89, 7.92 and 8.95 g kg−1 and were prepared using a dilution technique. A control treatment was used to confirm that the limiting response was due to met+cys intake. Egg production, feed intake, egg weight, egg mass and feed conversion per mass were measured. The data were analysed with repeated measures and regression analyses using Broken Line and Quadratic models, as well as using the combination of both models. The different met+cys intakes influenced the studied variables; all the variables except feed conversion per mass were significantly different between the periods and levels. The digestible met+cys intakes based on the association of the Broken Line and Quadratic models to optimise the birds' response to egg mass are 671 mg/bird d for 33 to 36 weeks, 728 mg/bird d for 37 to 40 weeks, 743 mg/bird d for 41 to 44 weeks, and 770 mg/bird d for 45 to 48 weeks.

  18. Temperature-dependent sex ratio in a bird

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ann Göth; David T Booth

    2005-01-01

    ... smaller. Megapodes possess heteromorphic sex chromosomes like other birds, which eliminates temperature-dependent sex determination, as described for reptiles, as the mechanism behind the skewed sex ratios...

  19. Commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullet and laying hen venous blood gas and chemistry profiles utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer

    OpenAIRE

    Schaal, TP; Arango, J; Wolc, A.; Brady, JV; Fulton, JE; Rubinoff, I; Ehr, IJ; Persia, ME; O'Sullivan, NP

    2015-01-01

    Venous blood gas and chemistry reference ranges were determined for commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullets and laying hens utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer and CG8+ cartridges. A total of 632 samples were analyzed from birds between 4 and 110 wk of age. Reference ranges were established for pullets (4 to 15 wk), first cycle laying hens (20 to 68 wk), and second cycle (post molt) laying hens (70 to 110 wk) for the following traits: sodium (Na mmol/L), potassium (K mmol/L), ionized calcium (iC...

  20. American Samoa ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for seabirds, wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, and gulls and terns in American Samoa. Vector polygons...

  1. Parboiled rice bran in japanese quail diets at growing phase and residual effect at laying period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ednardo Rodrigues Freitas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Rice is the second largest cereal crop in the world and the by-products resulting from rice processing for human consumption are potential feedstuffs to compose poultry diets. In this sense, it was evaluated the influence of parboiled rice bran (PRB in diets for Japanese quails in growing phase on the performance and digestibility, besides of residual effects and characteristics of egg quality in laying phase. A total of 324 Japanese quails with 7 days of age were distributed in a completely randomized design, with 6 treatments and 6 replicates of 9 birds. The treatments consisted of 6 isonutritives diets, being a control diet without PRB and the others containing 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25%. At the end of growing phase the birds were allotted in cages and fed the same diet without PRB at laying phase. At growing phase, the inclusion of PRB up to 5% promoted linear reduction in dry matter and gross energy digestibilities of diet; however a linear increase in metabolizable energy was noted. Feed intake, weight gain and final weight were reduced but not altering feed:gain ratio and body composition. At laying phase, the inclusion of PRB increased the age at first egg production but no influence was verified at age to reach 50% of egg production. No effect was verified at laying percentage, feed intake, weight and egg mass and feed:gain ratio. In economical evaluation, the inclusion of up to 25% of parboiled rice bran provided best economical indexes. The inclusion of PRB Japanese quails diets at growing phase can be recommended in levels up to 25%, without incurring future losses at laying phase.

  2. Standardized ileal amino acid digestibility of meat and bone meal and soybean meal in laying hens and broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedokun, S A; Jaynes, P; Abd El-Hack, M E; Payne, R L; Applegate, T J

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the standardized ileal amino acid digestibility (SIAAD) of 7 meat and bone meal (MBM) and 3 soybean meal (SBM) samples in broilers (Ross 708) and laying hens (Hy-line W36). All 10 feed ingredients were evaluated in 21-d-old broiler chickens and 30- or 50-wk-old laying hens. Standardization was accomplished by correcting for basal ileal endogenous amino acid losses using a nitrogen-free diet. Broilers were reared in cages from d 0 to 16 on a standard broiler starter diet adequate in all nutrients and energy; thereafter, they were allotted to treatments using a randomized complete design with 6 replicate cages of 8 birds each. For the laying hens, 6 replicate cages of 6 birds each (542 cm(2)/bird) were used. Each treatment diet, which was fed for 5 d, was semipurified, with MBM or SBM being the sole source of amino acids in each diet. Ileal endogenous amino acid losses were not different between broilers and the 2 groups of laying hens. Meat and bone meal from different locations varied widely in digestibility. Broilers had higher (P < 0.05) SIAAD in 4 of the 7 MBM samples. In 2 of the 3 SBM samples, broilers had higher (P < 0.05) SIAAD for most of the nonessential amino acids. Generally, hens had 6.4 and 7.7% units less Met and Lys digestibility of all MBM samples after standardization. Dry matter digestibility values of the SBM samples were higher (P < 0.05) in broilers. Likewise, broilers had 4.1 and 1.5% units more Met and Lys digestibility of all the SBM samples evaluated compared with those from laying hens. The results of these experiments suggest that differences exist in the digestive capabilities of laying hens and broilers, which indicates that species-specific nutrient digestibility values or adjustments may be needed.

  3. Gene Expression Profiling in the Pituitary Gland of Laying Period and Ceased Period Huoyan Geese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhong Luan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Huoyan goose is a Chinese local breed famous for its higher laying performance, but the problems of variety degeneration have emerged recently, especially a decrease in the number of eggs laid. In order to better understand the molecular mechanism that underlies egg laying in Huoyan geese, gene profiles in the pituitary gland of Huoyan geese taken during the laying period and ceased period were investigated using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH method. Total RNA was extracted from pituitary glands of ceased period and laying period geese. The cDNA in the pituitary glands of ceased geese was subtracted from the cDNA in the pituitary glands of laying geese (forward subtraction; the reverse subtraction was also performed. After sequencing and annotation, a total of 30 and 24 up and down-regulated genes were obtained from the forward and reverse SSH libraries, respectively. These genes mostly related to biosynthetic process, cellular nitrogen compound metabolic process, transport, cell differentiation, cellular protein modification process, signal transduction, small molecule metabolic process. Furthermore, eleven genes were selected for further analyses by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. The qRT-PCR results for the most part were consistent with the SSH results. Among these genes, Synaptotagmin-1 (SYT1 and Stathmin-2 (STMN2 were substantially over-expressed in laying period compared to ceased period. These results could serve as an important reference for elucidating the molecular mechanism of higher laying performance in Huoyan geese.

  4. Infection of commercial laying hens with Salmonella Gallinarum: clinical, anatomopathological and haematological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OC Freitas Neto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the susceptibility of commercial laying hens to Salmonella Gallinarum (SG. Two experiments were carried using a mutant strain of Salmonella Gallinarum resistant to nalidix acid (SGNALr. In the first trial, the resistance of birds was evaluated based on clinical signs, faecal shedding, and mortality. It was carried out with six lines of commercial layers being three light white layers, considered to be resistant to SG (W1, W2, W3, and three semi-heavy brown varieties (B1, B2, B3, considered susceptible to SG. Each group contained 15 one-day-old birds. Hens were inoculated in the crop at 5 days of age with 0.2 mL of SGNALr neat culture. In addition, to each brown variety, a new group of 15 birds was challenged with 0.2mL of the same SGNALr culture diluted at 10-3. At the end of the first experiment, the surviving birds were sacrificed, and microbiological culture of liver and spleen was performed. In the second experiment, white and brown birds were inoculated with neat culture at five days of age. Samples were collected for evaluation of blood parameters and histopathology assessment at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, and 14 days post-infection. The results of the first experiment showed higher resistance of white birds (p<0.05, although there was no uniformity in the responses against fowl typhoid among the birds within these groups. In the second experiment, there were differences between white and brown birds both in blood parameters and in organ lesion intensity.

  5. Effects of repeated injection of kisspeptin-10 on the initiation of egg-laying in juvenile quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yingdong; Huang, Yanbing; Xiao, Yunqi; Wu, Jing; Qian, Fuyu; Grossmann, Roland; Zhao, Ruqian

    2012-10-01

    The kisspeptin (Kp) signaling pathway plays an essential role in the onset of reproduction in mammals. To investigate the effects of Kp on the initiation of egg laying in birds, juvenile female quail were given daily intraperitoneal injections of 300μl saline (control, Con), or 10nmol (low dosage, L) or 100nmol (high dosage, H) kisspeptin-10 (Kp-10) dissolved in 300μl saline for 3 weeks. The ratio of egg laying of quail in the L and H groups was notably increased compared to that of the Con group (Pquail by regulating the activities of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  6. Pharmaceutical policy and the lay public

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine M; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna

    2005-01-01

    research which includes studies that look at: lay attitudes towards pharmaceutical policy; lay experiences of drug therapy and how it affects their daily lives; the problem of identifying lay representatives; the relationship between industry and the consumers; the effect of the media on medicine users...... organisations, industry and, most recently, the media. Although the overall aim of health and pharmaceutical policy is to address the needs of all citizens, there are only a few, well organised groups who are actually consulted and involved in the policymaking process, often with the support of the industry....... The reasons for this lack of citizen involvement in health and pharmaceutical policymaking are many, for example: there is no consensus about what public involvement means; there is a predominance of special interest groups with narrow, specific agendas; not all decision makers welcome lay participation...

  7. Biological and economic optimum level of calcium in White Leghorn laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, C; Cuca, M; Pro, A; González, M; Morales, E

    2004-06-01

    Calcium is important in eggshell formation; inadequate levels in the diet of laying hens may affect shell quality and egg production. An experiment with 250 Leghorn Hy-Line W-98 hens was conducted to evaluate 5 dietary Ca levels (2.96, 3.22, 3.83, 4.31, and 4.82%) in 3 laying periods. The evaluated variables were egg production (EP), egg mass (EM), average daily feed intake (ADFI), feed conversion (FC), and specific gravity (SG). The biological optimum level (BOL) of Ca for maximum egg production and specific gravity, and the economic optimum level (EOL) to maximize profits were calculated. There was no interaction between Ca level and laying period. The results show that the Ca level of the diet (P < 0.05) affected the intake of this nutrient (3.34, 3.68, 4.26, 4.89, and 5.39 g bird/day), ADFI (113, 114, 111, 113, and 111 g bird/day), and SG (1.080, 1.081, 1.082, 1.083, and 1.083). As the hens aged, EP and SG diminished (P < 0.05). BOL for maximum EP and SG were 4.34 and 4.62%, and EOL was 4.38%.

  8. Reduced productivity among confined laying hens infested by Allopsoroptoides galli (Mironov, 2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, N M; Tucci, E C; Freitas, E R; Fernandes, D P B

    2016-04-01

    The mite Allopsoroptoides galli has recently been identified parasitizing commercial chickens, São Paulo State/Brasil, causing severe dermatitis on all parts of the animal's body and a significant decline in productivity, particularly in egg production. The aim of the present study in A. galli infestation was to investigate the impact on laying hens' performance and egg quality. A total of 100 56-week-old Hy-line white laying hens were used. The birds were divided into 2 groups, with 10 replicates of 5 birds in each group. The experimental groups consisted of a non-infested group (hens free of theA. galli) and an infested group (hens presenting A. galli). The infestation with A. galli did not significantly influence feed intake but caused a significant reduction in the body weight of the hens and caused a decrease in egg production, therefore promoting worse feed conversion. The egg weight was reduced; however, the infestation did not significantly affect the internal quality of the eggs, which was measured according to the yolk color, albumen height, and Haugh units, or the quality of the shell, based on its percentage, thickness, and strength. It can be concluded that anA. galli infestation promotes a reduction in body weight, egg production, and egg weight in laying hens, therefore worsening feed conversion.

  9. Digestible threonine to lysine ratio in diets for laying hens aged 24-40 weeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Cristina da Rocha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two-hundred sixteen white laying hens were used to assess the ideal ratio of digestible threonine:lysine in diets for laying hens at 24 to 40 weeks of age. Birds were assigned to a randomized block design, with six treatments, six replicates per treatment and six birds per experimental unit. The cage was used as the blocking criterion. Experimental diets contained different digestible threonine:digestible lysine ratios (65, 70, 75, 80, 85 and 90% with 142 g/kg of crude protein. Experimental diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous and isocaloric with different contents of L-glutamic acid. Feed intake (g/hen/d, egg production (%, egg weight (g, egg mass (g/hen/d, feed conversion ratio (kg/dozen and kg/kg egg, eggshell weight (g, albumen weight (g, yolk weight (g and body weight gain (g were assessed. The maximum egg production was observed at 78% digestible threonine:digestible lysine ratio, while the best values of feed conversion ratio (kg/dozen egg and feed conversion ratio (kg/kg of egg were observed at 77.6% and 75%, respectively. Feed intake, egg mass and egg contents (yolk, albumen and eggshell were not affected by treatments. The estimated digestible threonine:digestible lysine ratio of Hy-Line W36 laying hens at 24 to 40 weeks of age is 78%, corresponding to 5.70 g/kg of dietary digestible threonine.

  10. Dosage compensation in birds

    OpenAIRE

    McQueen, H A; McBride, D; Miele, G; Bird, A.P.; Clinton, M

    2001-01-01

    The Z and W sex chromosomes of birds have evolved independently from the mammalian X and Y chromosomes [1]. Unlike mammals, female birds are heterogametic (ZW), while males are homogametic (ZZ). Therefore male birds, like female mammals, carry a double dose of sex-linked genes relative to the other sex. Other animals with nonhomologous sex chromosomes possess "dosage compensation" systems to equalize the expression of sex-linked genes. Dosage compensation occurs in animals as diverse as mamma...

  11. Differential expression of heat shock transcription factors and heat shock proteins after acute and chronic heat stress in laying chickens (Gallus gallus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingjing; Tang, Li; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Liyang; Xi, Lin; Liu, Hsiao-Ching; Odle, Jack; Luo, Xugang

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress due to high environmental temperature negatively influences animal performances. To better understand the biological impact of heat stress, laying broiler breeder chickens were subjected either to acute (step-wisely increasing temperature from 21 to 35°C within 24 hours) or chronic (32°C for 8 weeks) high temperature exposure. High temperature challenges significantly elevated body temperature of experimental birds (Pheat shock transcription factors (HSFs) and heat shock proteins (HSPs) 70 and 90 were differently affected by acute and chronic treatment. Tissue-specific responses to thermal challenge were also found among heart, liver and muscle. In the heart, acute heat challenge affected lipid oxidation (P = 0.05) and gene expression of all 4 HSF gene expression was upregulated (Pheat treatment, the HSP 70 mRNA level was increased (Pheat challenge (Pheat stress increased protein oxidation, but HSFs and HSPs gene expression remained unaltered. Only tendencies to increase were observed in HSP 70 (P = 0.052) and 90 (P = 0.054) gene expression after acute heat stress. The differential expressions of HSF and HSP genes in different tissues of laying broiler breeder chickens suggested that anti-heat stress mechanisms might be provoked more profoundly in the heart, by which the muscle was least protected during heat stress. In addition to HSP, HSFs gene expression could be used as a marker during acute heat stress.

  12. Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for pelagic birds, shorebirds, wading birds, waterfowl, gulls, terns, and passerine birds in Guam and the...

  13. Coastal Resources Atlas: Long Island: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, seabirds, passerine birds, and gulls and...

  14. Airborne bacterial reduction by spraying slightly acidic electrolyzed water in a laying-hen house.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weichao; Kang, Runmin; Wang, Hongning; Li, Baoming; Xu, Changwen; Wang, Shuang

    2013-10-01

    Spraying slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) has been considered as a potential approach to reduce airborne bacteria in laying-hen houses. In this study, the effects of spraying SAEW on airborne bacterial reduction were investigated in a laying-hen house as compared with using diluted didecyl dimethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB). Averaged air temperature reduced by approximate 1 degrees C and average relative humidity increased by 3% at a stable ventilation rate (about 2.5 m3 hr(-1) per bird) in the laying-hen house 30 min after spraying (120 mL m(-2)). Compared with the control without spraying, the airborne bacterial concentration was reduced by about 0.70 and 0.37 log10 colony-forming units (CFU) m(-3) in the 4 hr after spraying 120 mL m(-2) SAEW (available chlorine concentration [ACC] of 156 mg L(-1)) and diluted DDAB (active compound concentration of 167 mg L(-1)), respectively. Compared with spraying diluted DDAB, spraying SAEW was determined to be more effective for reducing airborne bacterial in laying-hen houses. The effects of spraying SAEW and diluted DDAB on airborne bacterial reduction in the laying-hen house increased with the increasing available chlorine concentrations for SAEW (156, 206, 262 mg L(-1)) and increasing active compound concentrations for diluted DDAB (167, 333, 500 mg L(-1)), respectively. Spraying SAEW and diluted DDAB with two levels of spraying volumes (120 and 90 mL m(-2)) both showed significant differences on airborne bacterial reduction in the laying-hen house (P < 0.05).

  15. Corticosterone and fear behaviour in white and brown caged laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisse, F; Cockrem, J F

    2006-04-01

    Physiological and behavioural measures of stress in caged hens on a commercial farm were compared between White Leghorn and brown Hyline strains, and between three tiers of cages. Blood and faecal samples were collected from undisturbed birds for corticosterone measurements. Plasma corticosterone responses to a stressor were measured by the collection of blood samples after 15, 30, and 60 min of a handling stressor. Tonic immobility and novel object tests were used to measure fear behaviour. Plasma corticosterone in undisturbed hens and faecal corticosterone did not differ between White Leghorn and brown Hyline hens, whereas the plasma corticosterone response to a handling stressor was greater in White Leghorns. The duration of tonic immobility, latency to first head movement and number of head movements in tonic immobility tests were greater in white than brown birds, whereas the number of inductions was less for tonic immobility tests. There were no differences between the strains in their responses to a novel object. There were no differences between tiers in plasma corticosterone or corticosterone responses or tonic immobility responses, and no consistent differences in responses of birds to a novel object. This is the first study in which plasma and faecal corticosterone concentrations and fear behaviour have been measured together in laying hens, and the first description of plasma corticosterone responses to handling over 60 min for caged laying hens on a commercial farm. The study has shown the value of measuring endocrine and behavioural variables together to provide objective data on characteristics of different strains of hens.

  16. Overseas seed dispersal by migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Duarte S; Gangoso, Laura; Bouten, Willem; Figuerola, Jordi

    2016-01-13

    Long-distance dispersal (LDD) promotes the colonization of isolated and remote habitats, and thus it has been proposed as a mechanism for explaining the distributions of many species. Birds are key LDD vectors for many sessile organisms such as plants, yet LDD beyond local and regional scales has never been directly observed nor quantified. By sampling birds caught while in migratory flight by GPS-tracked wild falcons, we show that migratory birds transport seeds over hundreds of kilometres and mediate dispersal from mainland to oceanic islands. Up to 1.2% of birds that reached a small island of the Canary Archipelago (Alegranza) during their migration from Europe to Sub-Saharan Africa carried seeds in their guts. The billions of birds making seasonal migrations each year may then transport millions of seeds. None of the plant species transported by the birds occurs in Alegranza and most do not occur on nearby Canary Islands, providing a direct example of the importance of environmental filters in hampering successful colonization by immigrant species. The constant propagule pressure generated by these LDD events might, nevertheless, explain the colonization of some islands. Hence, migratory birds can mediate rapid range expansion or shifts of many plant taxa and determine their distribution.

  17. Evaluation of jojoba meal as a potential supplement in the diet of broiler breeder females during laying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaut, S; De Coninck, K; Bruggeman, V; Onagbesan, O; Flo, G; Cokelaere, M; Decuypere, E

    1999-05-01

    1. This study was undertaken to investigate whether jojoba meal can be used as a food supplement during the laying period of chickens. 2. The size of eggs laid were smaller and the overall production rate was lower compared to control birds on food without jojoba meal supplementation. Furthermore, both ovary and oviduct weights were lower in jojoba fed birds. 3. This lowering of egg size and production rate was caused by factors present in jojoba which interfere with follicle growth, yolk deposition, progesterone production and the follicular maturation processes, resulting in the ovulation of smaller follicles and a lower ovulation rate.

  18. The design and function of birds' nests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainwaring, Mark C; Hartley, Ian R; Lambrechts, Marcel M; Deeming, D Charles

    2014-10-01

    All birds construct nests in which to lay eggs and/or raise offspring. Traditionally, it was thought that natural selection and the requirement to minimize the risk of predation determined the design of completed nests. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that sexual selection also influences nest design. This is an important development as while species such as bowerbirds build structures that are extended phenotypic signals whose sole purpose is to attract a mate, nests contain eggs and/or offspring, thereby suggesting a direct trade-off between the conflicting requirements of natural and sexual selection. Nest design also varies adaptively in order to both minimize the detrimental effects of parasites and to create a suitable microclimate for parents and developing offspring in relation to predictable variation in environmental conditions. Our understanding of the design and function of birds' nests has increased considerably in recent years, and the evidence suggests that nests have four nonmutually exclusive functions. Consequently, we conclude that the design of birds' nests is far more sophisticated than previously realized and that nests are multifunctional structures that have important fitness consequences for the builder/s.

  19. Serotonin release in the caudal nidopallium of adult laying hens genetically selected for high and low feather pecking behavior: An in vivo microdialysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kops, M.S.; Kjaer, J.B.; Güntürkün, O.; Westphal, K.C.G.; Korte-Bouws, G.A.H.; Olivier, B.; Bolhuis, J.E.; Korte, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Severe feather pecking (FP) is a detrimental behavior causing welfare problems in laying hens. Divergent genetic selection for FP in White Leghorns resulted in strong differences in FP incidences between lines. More recently, it was shown that the high FP (HFP) birds have increased locomotor activit

  20. Performance, qualitative and microbiogy characteristics of laying hens fed with different levels of enzyme complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Oba

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the performance of laying hens fed different levels of the enzyme complex (phytase, cellulase, pectinase, protease, amylase, beta-glucanase e xylanase. 328 laying hens were used Shaver White strain at 60 weeks of age. The birds were distributed into five treatments, involving different levels of enzyme complex (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 ppm. We evaluated the performance of laying hens, egg shell quality, internal egg quality, pH and viscosity of the intestinal contents, dry matter and mineral in the excreta and microbiology of the contents in the small intestine. The results showed that the addition of the enzyme complex in diets based on corn and soybean meal for laying hens old did not improve on broiler performance, eggshell and internal egg quality, dry matter and mineral content in the excreta and microbiology of the contents in the small intestine. However there was a significant linear response when increased levels of the enzyme complex, where it caused an increase in pH and a lower viscosity of digesta within the small intestine.

  1. Understanding how birds navigate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Schulten, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    A proposed model for migrating birds' magnetic sense can withstand moderate orientational disorder of a key protein in the eye.......A proposed model for migrating birds' magnetic sense can withstand moderate orientational disorder of a key protein in the eye....

  2. Urban bird conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snep, Robbert P.H.; Kooijmans, Jip Louwe; Kwak, Robert G.M.; Foppen, Ruud P.B.; Parsons, Holly; Awasthy, Monica; Sierdsema, Henk L.K.; Marzluff, John M.; Fernandez-Juricic, Esteban; Laet, de Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Following the call from the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity “Cities & Biodiversity Outlook” project to better preserve urban biodiversity, this paper presents stakeholder-specific statements for bird conservation in city environments. Based upon the current urban bird

  3. What Is Bird Flu?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢连香

    2004-01-01

    What is bird flu? It's a form of influenza believed to strike all birds. Though poultry (家禽)are believed to be especially prone to (倾向于)humans, no human-to-human transmission(传播) has been reported.

  4. Nanoscale magnetoreceptors in birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Greiner, Walter

    2012-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field provides an important source of directional information for many living organisms, especially birds, but the sensory receptor responsible for magnetic field detection still has to be identified. Recently, magnetic iron oxide particles were detected in dendritic endings...... field, by a bird....

  5. Use of GnRH-agonists for medical management of reproductive disorders in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Christoph; Pilny, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Pet birds suffer from a wide range of reproductive conditions and diseases. Chronic egg laying, egg binding, and excessive reproductive activities are common problems. Veterinarians may prescribe behavior modification, changes in captive care, and medical therapy to curb these behaviors. Surgical removal of the oviduct is effective at stopping egg production; however, it is a specialized surgery that carries surgical and anesthetic-related risks. The inability to surgically remove the ovary in birds may result in persistent ovarian activity and secondary complications. Therefore, hormone therapy as an adjunct or main therapeutic approach, using sustained-release GnRH agonists, shows promise in pet birds.

  6. Effect of feeding hemp seed and hemp seed oil on laying hen performance and egg yolk fatty acid content: evidence of their safety and efficacy for laying hen diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakhar, N; Goldberg, E; Jing, M; Gibson, R; House, J D

    2012-03-01

    Forty-eight 19-wk-old Bovan White laying hens were fed 1 of 5 diets containing either hemp seed (HS) or hemp seed oil (HO). The level of HO was 4, 8, or 12%, whereas the level was 10 or 20% for the HS. A set of 8 birds fed wheat-, barley-, and corn oil-based diets served as the control. Performance was monitored over 12 wk. Average hen-day egg production was not affected upon feeding of either HS or HO diets. Egg weight was higher than that of the controls for hens consuming the 20% HS diet (P hens consuming the 12% HO diet. The total egg yolk n-3 fatty acid content increased linearly (P laying hens up to a maximum level of 20 and 12%, respectively, does not adversely effect the performance of laying hens and leads to the enrichment of the n-3 fatty acid content of eggs.

  7. Birds as biodiversity surrogates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Frank Wugt; Bladt, Jesper Stentoft; Balmford, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    1. Most biodiversity is still unknown, and therefore, priority areas for conservation typically are identified based on the presence of surrogates, or indicator groups. Birds are commonly used as surrogates of biodiversity owing to the wide availability of relevant data and their broad popular...... appeal. However, some studies have found birds to perform relatively poorly as indicators. We therefore ask how the effectiveness of this approach can be improved by supplementing data on birds with information on other taxa. 2. Here, we explore two strategies using (i) species data for other taxa...... areas identified on the basis of birds alone performed well in representing overall species diversity where birds were relatively speciose compared to the other taxa in the data sets. Adding species data for one taxon increased surrogate effectiveness better than adding genus- and family-level data...

  8. Use of nicarbazin, salinomycin and zinc oxide as alternative molting methods for commercial laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C H de F Domingues

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out to evaluate the performance, egg quality and morphometry of the reproductive tract, liver, pancreas and tongue of laying hens submitted to different molting methods. Two hundred and eighty eight 72-week-old Isa brown layers were distributed according to a completely randomized design with six treatments (molting methods and six replicates of eight birds each. Layers were fed diets containing 3000 ppm zinc oxide, 60 ppm or 120 ppm nicarbazin, 30 ppm or 60 ppm salinomycin, or were submitted to feed fasting. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and means were compared by the test of Tukey at 5% probability level. Molting methods alternative to feed fasting were effective to induce molting in layer and provided good performance results in the second laying cycle.

  9. Detection and molecular characterization of infectious laryngotracheitis virus in laying hens in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LYB Villarreal

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Avian Infectious Laryngotracheitis, caused by Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus (ILTV, has been reported for decades in Brazilian laying and broiler flocks. More recently, outbreaks have occurred in São Paulo State. This study reports the application of PCR and DNA sequencing targeted to the p32 gene of ILTV using laying chicken samples from Bastos, São Paulo, Brazil. Three out of four field samples were positive by PCR. DNA sequencing of two samples evidenced homology of the amplified fragments with the p32 gene of ILTV. The results definitely confirmed the presence of ILTV in the birds during the outbreak. Further studies are needed to establish the sources of infection and to determine whether the detected virus was originated from vaccine or field virus strains.

  10. Variation in clutch size in relation to nest size in birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Møller, Anders P.; Adriaensen, Frank; Artemyev, Alexandr; Bańbura, Jerzy; Barba, Emilio; Biard, Clotilde; Blondel, Jacques; Bouslama, Zihad; Bouvier, Jean-Charles; Camprodon, Jordi; Cecere, Francesco; Charmantier, Anne; Charter, Motti; Cichoń, Mariusz; Cusimano, Camillo; Czeszczewik, Dorota; Demeyrier, Virginie; Doligez, Blandine; Doutrelant, Claire; Dubiec, Anna; Eens, Marcel; Eeva, Tapio; Faivre, Bruno; Ferns, Peter N.; Forsman, Jukka T.; García-Del-Rey, Eduardo; Goldshtein, Aya; Goodenough, Anne E.; Gosler, Andrew G.; Góźdź, Iga; Grégoire, Arnaud; Gustafsson, Lars; Hartley, Ian R.; Heeb, Philipp; Hinsley, Shelley A.; Isenmann, Paul; Jacob, Staffan; Järvinen, Antero; Juškaitis, Rimvydas; Korpimäki, Erkki; Krams, Indrikis; Laaksonen, Toni; Leclercq, Bernard; Lehikoinen, Esa; Loukola, Olli; Lundberg, Arne; Mainwaring, Mark C.; Mänd, Raivo; Massa, Bruno; Mazgajski, Tomasz D.; Merino, Santiago; Mitrus, Cezary; Mönkkönen, Mikko; Morales-Fernaz, Judith; Morin, Xavier; Nager, Ruedi G.; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Nilsson, Sven G.; Norte, Ana C.; Orell, Markku; Perret, Philippe; Pimentel, Carla S.; Pinxten, Rianne; Priedniece, Ilze; Quidoz, Marie-Claude; Remeš, Vladimir; Richner, Heinz; Robles, Hugo; Rytkönen, Seppo; Senar, Juan Carlos; Seppänen, Janne T.; da Silva, Luís P.; Slagsvold, Tore; Solonen, Tapio; Sorace, Alberto; Stenning, Martyn J.; Török, János; Tryjanowski, Piotr; van Noordwijk, Arie J.; von Numers, Mikael; Walankiewicz, Wiesław; Lambrechts, Marcel M.

    2014-01-01

    Nests are structures built to support and protect eggs and/or offspring from predators, parasites, and adverse weather conditions. Nests are mainly constructed prior to egg laying, meaning that parent birds must make decisions about nest site choice and nest building behavior before the start of

  11. Magnetoreception and baroreception in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The world as we know it is defined by our senses, although as humans we are equipped to receive and interpret only a fraction of the potential sensory information available. Birds have evolved with different sensory priorities to our own; they can use the Earth's magnetic field as a navigational aid, and are sensitive to slight changes in barometric pressure. These abilities help explain the impressive ability of many bird species to orientate, navigate, and maintain steady altitude during flight over long distances, even in the absence of clear visual cues. This review will explore the history of research into these "avian" senses, highlighting their likely mechanisms of action, underlying neuronal circuitry and evolutionary origins.

  12. Trading up: the fitness consequences of divorce in monogamous birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culina, Antica; Radersma, Reinder; Sheldon, Ben C

    2015-11-01

    Social and genetic mating systems play an important role in natural and sexual selection, as well as in the dynamics of populations. In socially monogamous species different genetic mating patterns appear when individuals mate outside the breeding pair within a breeding season (extra-pair mating) or when they change partners between two breeding seasons (widowing or divorce). Divorce can be defined as having occurred when two previously paired individuals are alive during the next breeding season and at least one of them has re-mated with a new partner. In socially monogamous birds divorce is widespread, but it is not clear whether it is a behavioural adaptation to improve the quality of a mating decision or whether, alternatively, it results as a non-selected consequence of other processes: existing studies suggest a heterogeneous set of results with respect to this central question. This heterogeneity could result from a number of factors, ranging from the methodological approaches used, to population- or species-specific characters. In this review we use phylogenetic meta-analyses to assess the evidence that divorce is adaptive (in terms of breeding success) across 64 species of socially monogamous birds. Second, we explore biological and methodological reasons for the heterogeneity in the results of previous studies. Results of our analyses supported the hypothesis that divorce is, in general, an adaptive behavioural strategy as: (1) divorce is triggered by relatively low breeding success; (2) there is a positive change in breeding success as a result of divorce. More specifically, while controlling for methodological moderators, we show that: (i) earlier stages of breeding are better predictors of divorce than later stages (r = 0.231; 95% CI: 0.061-0.391 for clutch size; similar for laying date); (ii) females benefited from divorce more than males in terms of increasing breeding success between successive breeding attempts, with different stages of the

  13. What are lay theories of social class?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnum, Michael E W

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the effects of social class on psychological and behavioral variables. However, lay beliefs about how social class affects these dimensions have not been systematically tested. Studies 1 and 2 assessed lay beliefs about the association between social class and 8 variables (including psychological and behavioral tendencies and cognitive ability). Study 3 assessed lay beliefs about the Big five personality traits and social class, and study 4 reframed the 8 variables from study 1 in opposite terms and yielded similar results. Study 5 contained the variables framed as in both studies 1 and 4, and replicated those results suggesting that framing effects were not responsible for the effects observed. Interestingly, for the most part lay beliefs about social class did not differ as a function of participants' own social class. In general people held relatively accurate and consistent stereotypes about the relationship between social class and well-being, health, intelligence, and neuroticism. In contrast lay beliefs regarding social class and reasoning styles, as well as relational, social, and emotional tendencies were less consistent and coherent. This work suggests that on the whole people's beliefs about social class are not particularly accurate, and further that in some domains there are contradictory stereotypes about the consequences of social class.

  14. Effect of snack food by-product inclusion on production of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wyhe, R C; Fraley, S E; Szybisty, C A; Karcher, D M; Karcher, E L

    2012-06-01

    The increased interest in becoming green for consumers and companies is driving groups to develop innovative ways to become more efficient and reduce their waste. Foods past their expiration dates are large sources of waste and are causing food-manufacturing companies to develop waste disposal strategies. Integrating by-products from these companies into animal diets, specifically that of laying hens, could be significantly more cost effective for both the human food manufacturers and the agricultural producers. The study's objective is to evaluate laying hen diets containing snack food by-product, consisting mostly of expired potato chips, and the effect on hen performance. In total, 192 White Leghorn laying hens (45 wk old) were selected from the Michigan State University Poultry Farm. Hens were housed in conventional cages (3 birds/cage) and received 1 of 4 diets for 5 wk: 1) industry control corn-soybean meal, 2) control with 3% by-product, 3) control with 6% by-product, and 4) control with 9% by-product. Diets were formulated to be isocaloric, isonitrogenous, and balanced for sodium. Feed intake was measured for 3 consecutive days each week, and no overall differences between treatments were observed. However, during the first week, feed intake was significantly higher in birds fed the 6% and 9% diets compared with those fed control (P snack food by-products to the diet. In conclusion, the addition of expired snack food by-product into poultry diets does not significantly affect laying hen egg production and has the potential to be used as an alternative feed stuff in the future.

  15. Performance and welfare of laying hens in conventional and enriched cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tactacan, G B; Guenter, W; Lewis, N J; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; House, J D

    2009-04-01

    Concerns regarding the welfare of laying hens raised in battery cages have led to the development of enriched cages that allow hens to perform natural behaviors including nesting, roosting, and scratching. This study was conducted to compare indices of production and welfare in birds housed in 2 different caging systems. Shaver White hens were housed from 21 to 61 wk in either conventional battery cages (n = 500; 10 cages; 5 hens/cage; floor space = 561.9 cm(2)/hen) or enriched cages (n = 480; 2 cages; 24 hens/cage; floor space = 642.6 cm(2)/hen) and were replicated 10 times. Enriched cages provided hens with a curtained nesting area, scratch pad, and perches. Production parameters and egg quality measures were recorded throughout the experiment. Plumage condition was evaluated at 37 and 61 wk. Bone quality traits and immunological response parameters were measured at 61 wk, and 59 and 61 wk, respectively. Hen-day egg production, feed consumption, egg weight, and percentage of cumulative mortality of laying hens were not affected by the cage designs. Specific gravity and the percentage of cracked and soft-shelled eggs were also similar between the 2 housing systems. The incidence of dirty eggs was, however, significantly higher (P cages than in conventional cages. Feather scores were similar between birds except for the wing region, which was higher (P cages. Bone quality measures tended to be higher for hens housed in enriched cages compared with hens in conventional cages. However, the increase was significant only for bone mineral density. Immunological response parameters did not reveal statistically significant differences. Overall, laying performance, exterior egg quality measures, plumage condition, and immunological response parameters appear to be similar for hens housed in the 2 cage systems tested. Enrichment of laying hen cages resulted in better bone quality, which could have resulted from increased activity.

  16. The mechanisms underlying sexual differentiation of behavior and physiology in mammals and birds: relative contributions of sex steroids and sex chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiko eMaekawa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available From a classical viewpoint, sex-specific behavior and physiological functions as well as the brain structures of mammals such as rats and mice, have been thought to be influenced by perinatal sex steroids secreted by the gonads. Sex steroids have also been thought to affect the differentiation of the sex-typical behavior of a few members of the avian order Galliformes, including the Japanese quail and chickens, during their development in ovo. However, recent mammalian studies that focused on the artificial shuffling or knockout of the sex-determining gene, Sry, have revealed that sex chromosomal effects may be associated with particular types of sex-linked differences such as aggression levels, social interaction, and autoimmune diseases, independently of sex steroid-mediated effects. In addition, studies on naturally occurring, rare phenomena such as gynandromorphic birds and experimentally constructed chimeras in which the composition of sex chromosomes in the brain differs from that in the other parts of the body, indicated that sex chromosomes play certain direct roles in the sex-specific differentiation of the gonads and the brain. In this article, we review the relative contributions of sex steroids and sex chromosomes in the determination of brain functions related to sexual behavior and reproductive physiology in mammals and birds.

  17. Phytate phosphorus utilization and intestinal phytase activity in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaeldein M. Abudabos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The first aim of this study was to examine the effects of strain and age on phytate phosphorus (PP utilization and intestinal phytase activity (IPA in two strains of laying hens, Hy-line Brown (HB and Hy-line White W-36 (HW at 32, 52 and 72 weeks of age. A digestion trial was conducted using the indicator method and birds were sampled to measure IPA. The second aim was to examine the effect of feed grade exogenous phytase enzyme on total (TP, water soluble (WSP and phytate phosphorus (PP excretion in the HW strain fed varying levels of phosphorus. Hens were fed three concentrations of available P (AP: 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4%. Each level of P was supplemented with three levels of commercial feed grade exogenous phytase enzyme (0, 300, and 600 FTU/kg and the amount of TP, WSP and PP in excreta per 100 g of feed consumed was calculated. The HB retained more PP as compared to HW. Intestinal phytase activity showed a significant (P<0.01 age effect with the highest activity occurring at 32 weeks. There were significant differences in the amount of TP and SP excreted between birds receiving the 3 levels of phosphorus with 300 units phytase (P<0.01. The results of this study showed that layers are capable of utilizing PP, and that utilization is regulated by IPA and varies with age. Exogenous phytase improved PP utilization but it increased the amount of TP and WSP in excreta.

  18. Relationships between range access as monitored by radio frequency identification technology, fearfulness, and plumage damage in free-range laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartcher, K M; Hickey, K A; Hemsworth, P H; Cronin, G M; Wilkinson, S J; Singh, M

    2016-05-01

    Severe feather-pecking (SFP), a particularly injurious behaviour in laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus), is thought to be negatively correlated with range use in free-range systems. In turn, range use is thought to be inversely associated with fearfulness, where fearful birds may be less likely to venture outside. However, very few experiments have investigated the proposed association between range use and fearfulness. This experiment investigated associations between range use (time spent outside), fearfulness, plumage damage, and BW. Two pens of 50 ISA Brown laying hens (n=100) were fitted with radio frequency identification (RFID) transponders (contained within silicone leg rings) at 26 weeks of age. Data were then collected over 13 days. A total of 95% of birds accessed the outdoor run more than once per day. Birds spent an average duration of 6.1 h outside each day over 11 visits per bird per day (51.5 min per visit). The top 15 and bottom 15 range users (n=30), as determined by the total time spent on the range over 13 days, were selected for study. These birds were tonic immobility (TI) tested at the end of the trial and were feather-scored and weighed after TI testing. Birds with longer TI durations spent less time outside (P=0.01). Plumage damage was not associated with range use (P=0.68). The small group sizes used in this experiment may have been conducive to the high numbers of birds utilising the outdoor range area. The RFID technology collected a large amount of data on range access in the tagged birds, and provides a potential means for quantitatively assessing range access in laying hens. The present findings indicate a negative association between fearfulness and range use. However, the proposed negative association between plumage damage and range use was not supported. The relationships between range use, fearfulness, and SFP warrant further research.

  19. A single long day triggers follicle growth in captive female great tits (Parus major in winter but does not affect laying dates in the wild in spring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc te Marvelde

    Full Text Available In many forest passerine bird species, rapid climate warming has led to a phenological mismatch between the period of maximum nestlings' food requirements and the period of maximum food availability (seasonal caterpillar biomass peak due to an insufficient advancement of the birds' laying dates. The initiation of laying is preceded by the development of the gonads, which in birds are regressed outside the breeding season. Increasing day length in late winter and early spring triggers a cascade of hormones which induces gonadal development. Since day length is not altered by climate change, one potential restriction to advancing laying date is the seasonal timing of gonadal development. To assess the importance of gonadal growth for timing of reproduction we experimentally manipulated the timing of gonadal development. We show that the growth of the largest follicle of captive female great tits (Parus major increased after being exposed to just a single long day in winter (20 hours of light followed by 4 hours darkness. We then photostimulated wild female great tits from two study areas in a field experiment in spring for a single day and determined their laying date. These populations differed in the availability of food allowing us to test if food availability in combination with photostimulation affected egg laying dates. Despite an expected difference in the onset of gonadal growth, laying dates of photostimulated females did not differ from control females in both populations. These results suggest that wild great tits are not restricted in the advancement of their laying date by limited gonadal development.

  20. Christian lay understandings of preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolin, Bill; Motion, Judy

    2010-11-01

    Focus groups were used to analyse Christian lay public understanding of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), a relatively new biomedical practice. The paper explores how this often controversial genetic technology was contextualised and interpreted through the intersection of religious values and beliefs, secular and cultural knowledges, and lived experience and emotion. For the lay people in our study, PGD often created moral dilemmas that could not necessarily be resolved through Christian beliefs and teaching, but which required the expression of empathy and compassion. The findings emphasise the heterogeneity in individuals' interpretations of scientific issues and reinforce the need to consider public understanding of science and technology in terms of public concerns and meaning.

  1. Oxyspiruriasis in zoo birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellayan, S; Jeffery, J; Oothuman, P; Zahedi, M; Krishnasamy, M; Paramaswaran, S; Rohela, M; Abdul-Aziz, N M

    2012-06-01

    Oxyspiruriasis caused by the bird eyeworm, Oxyspirura mansoni, a thelaziid nematode, in three species of pheasants, 3 Chrysolophus pictus (golden pheasant), 7 Lophura nycthemera (silver pheasant) and 9 Phasianus colchicus (common pheasant) in Zoo Negara Malaysia are reported. Birds with the disease were treated with a solution of 0.5% iodine or 0.5% lysol. Antistress powder for 4 days in water and non-strep vitamin powder in water was also provided. Control measures included removal of the cockroach intermediate host, Pycnoscelus surinamensis (Surinam cockroach) from the vicinity of the birds. The golden pheasant is a new host for O. mansoni in peninsular Malaysia.

  2. [Birds' sense of direction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohtola, Esa

    2016-01-01

    Birds utilize several distinct sensory systems in a flexible manner in their navigation. When navigating with the help of landmarks, location of the sun and stars, or polarization image of the dome of the sky, they resort to vision. The significance of olfaction in long-range navigation has been under debate, even though its significance in local orientation is well documented. The hearing in birds extends to the infrasound region. It has been assumed that they are able to hear the infrasounds generated in the mountains and seaside and navigate by using them. Of the senses of birds, the most exotic one is the ability to sense magnetic fields of the earth.

  3. Unzipping bird feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, Alexander; Filippov, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-01-01

    The bird feather vane can be separated into two parts by pulling the barbs apart. The original state can be re-established easily by lightly stroking through the feather. Hooklets responsible for holding vane barbs together are not damaged by multiple zipping and unzipping cycles. Because numerous microhooks keep the integrity of the feather, their properties are of great interest for understanding mechanics of the entire feather structure. This study was undertaken to estimate the separation force of single hooklets and their arrays using force measurement of an unzipping feather vane. The hooklets usually separate in some number synchronously (20 on average) with the highest observed separation force of 1.74 mN (average force 0.27 mN), whereas the single hooklet separation force was 14 μN. A simple numerical model was suggested for a better understanding of zipping and unzipping behaviour in feathers. The model demonstrates features similar to those observed in experiments. PMID:24352674

  4. Comparing aerodynamic efficiency in birds and bats suggests better flight performance in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian T Muijres

    Full Text Available Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed bat species. Using time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the wake of the animals flying in a wind tunnel, we derived the span efficiency, a metric for the efficiency of generating lift, and the lift-to-drag ratio, a metric for mechanical energetic flight efficiency. We show that the birds significantly outperform the bats in both metrics, which we ascribe to variation in aerodynamic function of body and wing upstroke: Bird bodies generated relatively more lift than bat bodies, resulting in a more uniform spanwise lift distribution and higher span efficiency. A likely explanation would be that the bat ears and nose leaf, associated with echolocation, disturb the flow over the body. During the upstroke, the birds retract their wings to make them aerodynamically inactive, while the membranous bat wings generate thrust and negative lift. Despite the differences in performance, the wake morphology of both birds and bats resemble the optimal wake for their respective lift-to-drag ratio regimes. This suggests that evolution has optimized performance relative to the respective conditions of birds and bats, but that maximum performance is possibly limited by phylogenetic constraints. Although ecological differences between birds and bats are subjected to many conspiring variables, the different aerodynamic flight efficiency for the bird and bat species studied here may help explain why birds typically fly faster, migrate more frequently and migrate

  5. Comparing aerodynamic efficiency in birds and bats suggests better flight performance in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muijres, Florian T; Johansson, L Christoffer; Bowlin, Melissa S; Winter, York; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed bat species. Using time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the wake of the animals flying in a wind tunnel, we derived the span efficiency, a metric for the efficiency of generating lift, and the lift-to-drag ratio, a metric for mechanical energetic flight efficiency. We show that the birds significantly outperform the bats in both metrics, which we ascribe to variation in aerodynamic function of body and wing upstroke: Bird bodies generated relatively more lift than bat bodies, resulting in a more uniform spanwise lift distribution and higher span efficiency. A likely explanation would be that the bat ears and nose leaf, associated with echolocation, disturb the flow over the body. During the upstroke, the birds retract their wings to make them aerodynamically inactive, while the membranous bat wings generate thrust and negative lift. Despite the differences in performance, the wake morphology of both birds and bats resemble the optimal wake for their respective lift-to-drag ratio regimes. This suggests that evolution has optimized performance relative to the respective conditions of birds and bats, but that maximum performance is possibly limited by phylogenetic constraints. Although ecological differences between birds and bats are subjected to many conspiring variables, the different aerodynamic flight efficiency for the bird and bat species studied here may help explain why birds typically fly faster, migrate more frequently and migrate longer distances

  6. Recurrent DCC gene losses during bird evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friocourt, François; Lafont, Anne-Gaelle; Kress, Clémence; Pain, Bertrand; Manceau, Marie; Dufour, Sylvie; Chédotal, Alain

    2017-01-01

    During development, midline crossing by axons brings into play highly conserved families of receptors and ligands. The interaction between the secreted ligand Netrin-1 and its receptor Deleted in Colorectal Carcinoma (DCC) is thought to control midline attraction of crossing axons. Here, we studied the evolution of this ligand/receptor couple in birds taking advantage of a wealth of newly sequenced genomes. From phylogeny and synteny analyses we can infer that the DCC gene has been conserved in most extant bird species, while two independent events have led to its loss in two avian groups, passeriformes and galliformes. These convergent accidental gene loss events are likely related to chromosome Z rearrangement. We show, using whole-mount immunostaining and 3Disco clearing, that in the nervous system of all birds that have a DCC gene, DCC protein expression pattern is similar to other vertebrates. Surprisingly, we show that the early developmental pattern of commissural tracts is comparable in all birds, whether or not they have a DCC receptor. Interestingly, only 4 of the 5 genes encoding secreted netrins, the DCC ligands in vertebrates, were found in birds, but Netrin-5 was absent. Together, these results support a remarkable plasticity of commissural axon guidance mechanisms in birds. PMID:28240285

  7. Breeding bird survey data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data are maintained by the USGS (https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/RawData/) and provides information on the trends and status of North American bird populations...

  8. Awesome Audubon Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Laura

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a watercolor art lesson on Audubon birds. She also discusses how science, technology, writing skills, and the elements and principles of art can be incorporated into the lesson.

  9. Birds - Breeding [ds60

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This data set provides access to information gathered on annual breeding bird surveys in California using a map layer developed by the Department. This data layer...

  10. Recent Shift in Climate Relationship Enables Prediction of the Timing of Bird Breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsley, Shelley A; Bellamy, Paul E; Hill, Ross A; Ferns, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale climate processes influence many aspects of ecology including breeding phenology, reproductive success and survival across a wide range of taxa. Some effects are direct, for example, in temperate-zone birds, ambient temperature is an important cue enabling breeding effort to coincide with maximum food availability, and earlier breeding in response to warmer springs has been documented in many species. In other cases, time-lags of up to several years in ecological responses have been reported, with effects mediated through biotic mechanisms such as growth rates or abundance of food supplies. Here we use 23 years of data for a temperate woodland bird species, the great tit (Parus major), breeding in deciduous woodland in eastern England to demonstrate a time-lagged linear relationship between the on-set of egg laying and the winter index of the North Atlantic Oscillation such that timing can be predicted from the winter index for the previous year. Thus the timing of bird breeding (and, by inference, the timing of spring events in general) can be predicted one year in advance. We also show that the relationship with the winter index appears to arise through an abiotic time-lag with local spring warmth in our study area. Examining this link between local conditions and larger-scale processes in the longer-term showed that, in the past, significant relationships with the immediately preceding winter index were more common than those with the time-lagged index, and especially so from the late 1930s to the early 1970s. However, from the mid 1970s onwards, the time-lagged relationship has become the most significant, suggesting a recent change in climate patterns. The strength of the current time-lagged relationship suggests that it might have relevance for other temperature-dependent ecological relationships.

  11. Hormonal regulation of medullary bone metabolism in the laying hen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A new organ culture system for the study of bone formation has been developed using medullary bone, a non-structural, metabolically active form of bone which is found in the marrow cavities of egg-laying birds. In the presence of fetal calf serum, bone explants were viable in culture by morphological criteria, and retained large numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-proline into collagenase-digestible protein (CDP) and non-collagen protein (NCP) was determined using purified bacterial collagenase. Collagen accounted for over 10% of the total protein labeled. The calcium-regulating hormones, parathyroid hormone and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), caused a dose-dependent inhibition of /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into CDP. The effective dose range of 1,25(OH)2D3 was 0.1 nM to 100 nM, while that of PTH was 1.0 nM to 100 nM. The effect of both hormones was specific for collagen, since /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into NCP was unaffected. Hydroxyproline analysis of bone explants and culture medium revealed that both hormones decreased the total hydroxyroline content of the cultures, suggesting that the inhibition of /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into DCP is due to inhibition of collagen synthesis.

  12. Bird Vision System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Bird Vision system is a multicamera photogrammerty software application that runs on a Microsoft Windows XP platform and was developed at Kennedy Space Center by ASRC Aerospace. This software system collects data about the locations of birds within a volume centered on the Space Shuttle and transmits it in real time to the laptop computer of a test director in the Launch Control Center (LCC) Firing Room.

  13. A Clever Bird

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐芳; 孙菊

    2008-01-01

    @@ 一、故事内容 It is getting hotter and hotter day by day.So the birds don't often fly in the sky in daytime.They usually fly in the evening to look for food.But a bird named Polly is very naughty.He just knows how to fly,so he wants to fly every day.One day,when he is flying in the forest,he feels very thirsty.

  14. Post-insemination sexual selection in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzari, Tommaso

    2007-01-01

    In many avian species females obtain sperm from multiple males during a single reproductive event, setting the scene for post-insemination sexual selection through the competition of the ejaculates of different males over fertilisation (sperm competition) and female biased utilisation of sperm (cryptic female choice). The use of poultry techniques in combination with molecular tools is catalysing an interest in birds as vertebrate model systems to study the mechanisms of post-insemination sexual selection. This chapter: (i) outlines the main mechanisms of avian sperm competition, (ii) introduces methodological approaches to study post-insemination sexual selection in birds, (iii) reviews recent evidence of multiple mechanisms of strategic sperm allocation by males, and (iv) discusses mechanisms of cryptic female choice. Post-insemination variance in paternity in birds, appears to be determined by the interactions between complex male and female strategies of differential sperm utilisation. It is argued that a better understanding of the operation of post-insemination sexual selection in birds may be achieved through a two-pronged approach which, on the one hand, investigates behavioural and physiological mechanisms applying poultry techniques and molecular tools to domestic model species, and on the other, verifies these mechanisms and tests their adaptive significance in more natural populations.

  15. Lay belief in biopolitics and political prejudice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suhay, E; Brandt, M.J.; Proulx, T.

    2017-01-01

    Building on psychological research linking essentialist beliefs about human differences with prejudice, we test whether lay belief in the biological basis of political ideology is associated with political intolerance and social avoidance. In two studies of American adults (Study 1: N = 288, Study

  16. Teaching Special Relativity to Lay Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egdall, Ira Mark

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I describe a lay course in special relativity (SR) given at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes (OLLI's) at Florida International University and the University of Miami. Courses are also offered in general relativity quantum theory cosmology the nature of time, and the fine-tuned universe. Each course is presented in six…

  17. Teaching Special Relativity to Lay Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egdall, Ira Mark

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I describe a lay course in special relativity (SR) given at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes (OLLI's) at Florida International University and the University of Miami. Courses are also offered in general relativity quantum theory cosmology the nature of time, and the fine-tuned universe. Each course is presented in six…

  18. Social Skills: Laying the Foundation for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Sharon A.; Simpson, Cynthia G.

    2010-01-01

    Well-informed teachers of young children recognize the importance of children's social development. The development of social skills lays a critical foundation for later academic achievement as well as work-related skills. Social development is such a key issue with young children that a number of methods to address social skills have been…

  19. GRM Laying Stress on Product Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, Guilin Rubber Machinery Factory (GRM) has been putting product quality first, persisting in the improvement of product quality as the lifeline for the corporate sustainable development, and laying stress on "three cores" by surrounding the improvement of product quality.

  20. Lay Pipeline Abandonment Head during Some

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-12-01

    Dec 1, 2016 ... It is not often planned that an S-lay installation barge will stop ... The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate the .... wave theory [7]. ..... discrete values of stress range on the behavior of damage and lifetime of structures.

  1. The Lay Concept of Childhood Mental Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giummarra, Melita J.; Haslam, Nick

    2005-01-01

    The structure of lay people's concepts of childhood mental disorder was investigated in a questionnaire study and examined for convergence with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV). Eighty-four undergraduates who had no formal education in abnormal psychology rated 54 conditions--36 DSM-IV childhood disorders and 18 non-disorders--on…

  2. Teaching Special Relativity to Lay Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egdall, Ira Mark

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I describe a lay course in special relativity (SR) given at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes (OLLI's) at Florida International University and the University of Miami. Courses are also offered in general relativity quantum theory cosmology the nature of time, and the fine-tuned universe. Each course is presented in six…

  3. Lay and expert perceptions of zoonotic risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Klint; Lassen, Jesper; Robinson, P.

    2005-01-01

    As in many other areas, there is a divide between lay and expert perceptions of risk within the food sector, and this can lead to disagreement over priorities in food risk management. The risk perception literature tends to stress that the parties involved in this disagreement have different...

  4. ESTIMATION OF BIOCHEMICAL AND HAEMA TOLOGICAL PARAMETERS AFTER TREATMENT WITH BIOVET IN DIFFERENT STRAINS OF LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Mahmood Bhatti, Tanzeela Talat, Rozina Sardar and Ghazala Naheed

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to study 'effect of Biovet (E.M. Technology on biochemical and haematological parameters of four genetically 'different strains of laying hens including cross, Desj, Fayoumi and Nick Chick. A total of 60 laying hens were involved in the trial giving 15 birds under each strain. Prior to administration of Biovet (2 ml/litre} birds were maintained in,controlled environment for 2 weeks, five blood samples were taken from each strain, and analysed for bichemical and haematological parameters, The same birds were then administered Biovet in drinking water and after 2 weeks of treatment, five blood samples from each strain of chickens were collected and teste4:as was done before treatment. Serum glucose was markedly (P<0.05 increased due to treatment and there was also significant (P<0.05 inter strain variation. Serum protein levels were only affected (P<0.05 due to treatment but there was no inter strain variation, Serum albumin and cholesterol were not affected by treatment, The haematological parameters such as Hb, WBC, Eosinophils, Lymphocytes,PCV , MCH, MCHC; and Heterophils were not affected. by treatment. There was significant (P<0.05 difference in RBCs concentration in serum which also; caused an -increase (P<0.05 in MCV values. The Biovet supplementation presumably stimulated haemopoietic system to improve performance of birds.

  5. Evaluation of microbial contamination of feces and soil on a laying-hen farm depending on sampling site and season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Trawińska

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of the present study was to evaluate soil collected from a laying-hen farm and bird manure according to the season of the year and sampling site. Soil samples were taken at the poultry facility wall and at the distances of 15 m and 45 m from the building. Bird feces samples were collected inside the poultry house at the entrance and at 1/4 and 1/2 length of the building. Soil and bird feces samples were evaluated by bacteriological qualitative and quantitative analyses. The largest bacterial load was determined in the samples taken at the poultry facility wall in December/January. Soil microbial contamination degree was low. The highest bacterial count in bird manure was found in the samples collected at 1/2 length of the hen house at the end of December/January. The qualitative study of bird feces showed the presence of E. coli bacteria all through the research period and Enterobacter spp. in the samples taken from July until September. Microbial contamination of soil environment and bird feces is most likely to be affected by winter period as at that time the highest microbial population can be determined. This fact may be linked to the prevailing climatic and microclimatic conditions.

  6. The dynamics of Salmonella occurrence in commercial laying hen flocks throughout a laying period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, J.; Van Hoorebeke, S.; Hald, Birthe

    2011-01-01

    of a laying period. The total of 41 laying hen flocks*18 in Belgium, six in Denmark and 17 in Germany*were followed during an entire laying period. Samples taken from the empty cleaned and disinfected poultry houses were all negative for Salmonella. After hens arrived on the farms, five pooled faecal samples......, one pooled dust sample and 40 cloacal swabs (Belgium and Germany) or 40 swabs from fresh droppings (Denmark) were taken four times from 18 flocks, three times from 21 flocks and two times from two flocks in the course of the laying period. Ten flocks (two Belgian and eight German flocks) tested up...... to three times positive for Salmonella. Forty-three out of 50 positive samples contained Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 (29 isolates) or phage type 8 (14 isolates). The probability of subsequent Salmonella-positive findings increased significantly in Salmonella-positive flocks (PB0.05, odds ratio6...

  7. Evaluation of Hand Lay-Up and Resin Transfer Molding in Composite Wind Turbine Blade Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAIRNS,DOUGLAS S.; SHRAMSTAD,JON D.

    2000-06-01

    The majority of the wind turbine blade industry currently uses low cost hand lay-up manufacturing techniques to process composite blades. While there are benefits to the hand lay-up process, drawbacks inherent to this process along with advantages of other techniques suggest that better manufacturing alternatives may be available. Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) was identified as a processing alternative and shows promise in addressing the shortcomings of hand lay-up. This report details a comparison of the RTM process to hand lay-up of composite wind turbine blade structures. Several lay-up schedules and critical turbine blade structures were chosen for comparison of their properties resulting from RTM and hand lay-up processing. The geometries investigated were flat plate, thin and thick flanged T-stiffener, I-beam, and root connection joint. It was found that the manufacturing process played an important role in laminate thickness, fiber volume, and weight for the geometries investigated. RTM was found to reduce thickness and weight and increase fiber volumes for all substructures. RTM resulted in tighter material transition radii and eliminated the need for most secondary bonding operations. These results would significantly reduce the weight of wind turbine blades. Hand lay-up was consistently slower in fabrication times for the structures investigated. A comparison of mechanical properties showed no significant differences after employing fiber volume normalization techniques to account for geometry differences resulting from varying fiber volumes. The current root specimen design does not show significant mechanical property differences according to process and exceeds all static and fatigue requirements.

  8. EFFECT OF MASH DIETARY FIBER ON PERFORMANCE AND CANNIBALISM IN LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hartini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to observe the effect of dietary fiber given in mash form onperformance and cannibalism mortality in laying hens. Three different diets: a wheat-based diet, a guargum diet (a wheat-based diet + 20 g/kg guar gum and a lucerne meal diet (a wheat-based diet + 40 g/kglucerne meal in mash form were offered for 12 weeks. The results showed that birds fed guar gum diethad the lowest intake (p<0.01, egg weight (p<0.05, body weight (p<0.05 and the lowest eggproduction (p<0.01 compared to those fed other diets. Diets did not have a significant effect (p>0.05on feed to egg ratio and cannibalism mortality, but numerically the birds fed the guar gum diet had thehighest mortality (11.3% and the lucerne diet had the lowest (6.9%. The lack of profound differenceswas probably due to the diets were given in mash form. In conclusion, diets containing high soluble NSPreduced the performance and increased the mortality due to cannibalism in laying hens. The use of mashform may have a potential in reducing the negative effect of soluble NSP on cannibalism.

  9. EFFECT OF MASH DIETARY FIBER ON PERFORMANCE AND CANNIBALISM IN LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hartini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to observe the effect of dietary fiber given in mash form on performance and cannibalism mortality in laying hens. Three different diets: a wheat-based diet, a guar gum diet (a wheat-based diet + 20 g/kg guar gum and a lucerne meal diet (a wheat-based diet + 40 g/kg lucerne meal in mash form were offered for 12 weeks. The results showed that birds fed guar gum diet had the lowest intake (p0.05 on feed to egg ratio and cannibalism mortality, but numerically the birds fed the guar gum diet had the highest mortality (11.3% and the lucerne diet had the lowest (6.9%. The lack of profound differences was probably due to the diets were given in mash form. In conclusion, diets containing high soluble NSP reduced the performance and increased the mortality due to cannibalism in laying hens. The use of mash form may have a potential in reducing the negative effect of soluble NSP on cannibalism.

  10. Commercial laying hen diets formulated according to different recommendations of total and digestible amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EM Casartelli

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to evaluate different commercial laying hen diets formulated based on recommendations for total and digestible amino acids. One hundred and twenty Lohmann LSL commercial laying hens aged 25 weeks were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design involving five replications of six birds in four treatments. Diet formulation on a total amino acid basis followed the recommendations of NRC (1994 and Rostagno et al. (2000, whereas formulation on digestible amino acids basis was according to Rostagno et al. (2000 and Degussa (1997 recommendations. The experimental period was divided into five periods of fourteen days. Performance parameters (egg production, feed intake, feed conversion, egg mass were evaluated for each period, and on the last two days of each period, three eggs per replication were collected to evaluate egg quality parameters (Haugh unit, egg specific gravity, egg weight, eggshell thickness and percentage. Means were compared by orthogonal contrasts. Results on feed intake, egg production, egg mass, feed conversion and egg specific gravity showed that total amino acid recommendations promoted better bird responses than digestible amino acid recommendations.

  11. Feather-pecking response of laying hens to feather and cellulose-based rations fed during rearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegseis, I; Bessei, W; Meyer, B; Zentek, J; Würbel, H; Harlander-Matauschek, A

    2012-07-01

    Recent studies in laying hens have shown that feather peckers eat more feathers than nonpeckers. We hypothesized that food pellets containing feathers would decrease the birds' appetite for feathers and thereby also decrease feather pecking. To separate the effect of feathers from that of insoluble fiber per se, additional control groups were fed pellets containing similar amounts of cellulose. Sixty (experiment 1) and 180 (experiment 2) 1-d-old Lohmann-Selected Leghorn birds were divided into 12 groups of 5 (experiment 1) and 15 (experiment 2) birds, respectively, and kept on slatted floors. During the rearing period, 4 groups each had ad libitum access to either a commercial pelleted diet, a pelleted diet containing 5% (experiment 1) or 10% (experiment 2) of chopped feathers, respectively, or a pelleted diet containing 5% (experiment 1) or 10% (experiment 2) of cellulose, respectively. In the consecutive laying period, all groups received a commercial pelleted diet. In experiment 1, feather pecking was recorded weekly from wk 5 to wk 16. In the laying period, observations were made in wk 18, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, and 30. In experiment 2, feather pecking was recorded weekly from wk 5 to 11, in wk 16 to wk 18, and in wk 20 and 21. At the end of the rearing period, plumage condition per individual hen was scored. Scores from 1 (denuded) to 4 (intact) were given for each of 6 body parts. The addition of 10% of feathers to the diet reduced the number of severe feather-pecking bouts (P < 0.0129) and improved plumage condition of the back area (P < 0.001) significantly compared with control diets. The relationship between feather pecking/eating and the gastrointestinal consequences thereof, which alter feather pecking-behavior, are unclear. Understanding this relationship might be crucial for understanding the causation of feather pecking in laying hens.

  12. Rearing system affects prevalence of keel-bone damage in laying hens: a longitudinal study of four consecutive flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey-Trott, T M; Guerin, M T; Sandilands, V; Torrey, S; Widowski, T M

    2017-07-01

    High flock-level prevalence of keel-bone fractures and deviations in laying hens are commonly reported across various housing systems; however, few longitudinal studies exist, especially for furnished and conventional cage systems. Load-bearing exercise improves bone strength and mineral composition in laying hens and has the potential to reduce keel-bone damage, especially if exercise is allowed during critical periods of bone growth throughout the pullet rearing phase. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of keel-bone damage in laying hens housed in furnished and conventional cages, and assess whether opportunities for exercise during the pullet rearing phase influenced the prevalence of keel-bone damage throughout the laying period. Four flock replicates of 588 Lohmann Selected Leghorn-Lite pullets/flock were reared in either conventional cages (Conv) or an aviary rearing system (Avi) and placed into conventional cages (CC), 30-bird furnished cages (FC-S) or 60-bird furnished cages (FC-L) for adult housing. Keel-bone status was determined by palpation at 30, 50, and 70 wk of age. Age (P system (P system had a lower percentage of fractures (41.6% ± 2.8 SE) compared to hens reared in the Conv system (60.3% ± 2.9 SE). Adult housing system did not have an effect on the percentage of keel fractures (P = 0.223). Age had an effect on the presence of deviations (P system (P = 0.218) and adult housing system (P = 0.539) did not affect the presence of deviations. Keel fractures and deviations were strongly associated with each other at all ages: 30 wk: (P system reduced the prevalence of keel-bone fractures through the end-of-lay. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  13. Performance and morphometry of the intestinal mucosa of laying hens fed diets containing xylanase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KMR de Souza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary energy level reduction and xylanase inclusion on the performance and on intestinal mucosa morphometry of two- to six-week-old laying hens. In total, 400 Hy-line W36 laying hens were distributed according to a completely randomized design in 2 x 2 factorial arrangement (energy level x inclusion of xylanase, totaling four treatments with 10 replicates of 10 birds per experimental unit. The following treatments were evaluated: positive control (balanced diet; positive control + xylanase; negative control (diet with of 100 kcal ME reduction /kg; negative control + xylanase. Body weight, weight gain, feed conversion ratio, uniformity and livability were not influenced by diets with metabolizable energy reduction and xylanase inclusion; however, the addition of xylanase to the diets resulted in shallower crypts depth and greater villus:crypt ratio in the ileum. The energy reduction of the diet associated with the supplementation of xylanase did not influence performance, but increased the feed intake of 2- to 6-week-old laying hens and increased villus height in the ileum of 6-wk-old hens. Xylanase reduces crypt depth in the ileum of 6-week-old hens.

  14. Lay and expert perceptions of zoonotic risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Klint; Lassen, Jesper; Robinson, P.;

    2005-01-01

    concepts of risk and hence are bound more or less to talk at cross-purposes. This paper suggests an alternative analysis: In the light of moral theory, the conflicting perspectives can be understood as a genuine moral conflict. When this conflict is conceptualised, a rational dialogue becomes possible....... The paper reports a series of qualitative interviews with lay people and experts on zoonotic food risks. The interviews are used to reconstruct the values underlying some of the dominant perspectives. The conflict between these stylised perspectives is then analysed with the help of moral theory. Finally......As in many other areas, there is a divide between lay and expert perceptions of risk within the food sector, and this can lead to disagreement over priorities in food risk management. The risk perception literature tends to stress that the parties involved in this disagreement have different...

  15. Flight mode affects allometry of migration range in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yuuki Y

    2016-08-01

    Billions of birds migrate to exploit seasonally available resources. The ranges of migration vary greatly among species, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. I hypothesise that flight mode (flapping or soaring) and body mass affect migration range through their influence on flight energetics. Here, I compiled the tracks of migratory birds (196 species, weighing 12-10 350 g) recorded by electronic tags in the last few decades. In flapping birds, migration ranges decreased with body mass, as predicted from rapidly increasing flight cost with increasing body mass. The species with higher aspect ratio and lower wing loading had larger migration ranges. In soaring birds, migration ranges were mass-independent and larger than those of flapping birds, reflecting their low flight costs irrespective of body mass. This study demonstrates that many animal-tracking studies are now available to explore the general patterns and the underlying mechanisms of animal migration.

  16. Kinematics of Laying an Automated Weapon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-19

    NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHORS Joshua Stapp 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...Coordinate Systems 6 Transformation of Earth Referenced Lay to Platform Reference Frame 6 Results and Discussions 7 Conclusions 8 Bibliography 9...Distribution List 11 FIGURES 1 Earth reference frame 1 2 Platform reference frame 2 3 Cartesian coordinate system 3 4 Spherical

  17. Tryptophan, threonine and isoleucine supplementation in low-protein diets for commercial laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Camilo Ospina Rojas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Isoleucine (Ile, threonine (Thr and tryptophan (Trp are most likely candidates for becoming third limiting amino acids (AA in layer diets. This work studied the effect of supplementing Ile, Thr and Trp in low-protein diets on the productive performance, egg quality and serum parameters of Hy-Line W36 laying hens. A total of 360 30-week-old laying hens were distributed in a completely randomized design into 9 treatments with 5 replications of 8 birds each. Treatments consisted of a control diet that was based on corn and soybean meal formulated with 15.5% CP. A second diet with 13% CP was formulated to meet the requirements for all essential AA of the control diet, except for Ile, Thr and Trp. The other treatments consisted of individual and combined supplementation of the aforementioned AA in the 13% CP diet. The reduction of the dietary protein level negatively influenced (p<0.05 the productivity of the hens, impairing egg production, feed conversion (kg kg-1 and kg dz-1, and egg mass. However, these variables were restored with individual and combined supplementation of the three AA in the 13% CP diet. Individually-supplemented diets with Ile, or combined with Thr and/or Trp, resulted in hens with lower (p<0.05 serum uric acid and ammonia concentrations as compared to birds receiving diets with 15.5% (control and 13% CP. The protein levels can be reduced (13% CP in the diet of commercial laying hens without compromising performance, egg quality or serum parameters with individual Ile, Thr or Trp supplementation.

  18. Tracking migrating birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoes, Mikkel

    Migratory movements of birds has always fascinated man and led to many questions concerning the ecological drivers behind, the necessary adaptations and the navigational abilities required. However, especially for the long-distance migrants, basic descriptions of their movements are still lacking...... and a forest reserve. In the degraded habitat all species used more space, although the consequence on bird density is less clear. Two manuscripts relate the migratory movements of a long-distance migrant with models of navigation. One compares model predictions obtained by simulation with actual movements...... in when and where the bird compensated for the displacement. The last paper investigates effects of habitat shading on the performance of light-level based geolocation and compares experimental data with data from real tracking studies. This illustrates some of the potential problems and limitations...

  19. Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for alcids, shorebirds, waterfowl, diving birds, pelagic birds, gulls and terns in Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula,...

  20. Chlorinated drinking water for lightweight laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Schneider

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The study aimed to evaluate the effect of different levels of chlorine in drinking water of laying hens on zootechnical performance, eggs shell quality, hemogasometry levels and calcium content in tibia. 144 Hy-Line laying hens, 61 weeks old, were used distributed in 24 metabolism cages. They were subjected to water diets, for a period of 28 days, using sodium hypochlorite as a chlorine source in order to obtain the following concentrations: 5ppm (control, 20ppm, 50ppm, and 100ppm. Their performance was evaluated through water consumption, feed intake, egg production and weight, egg mass, feed conversion. Shell quality was measured by specific gravity. At the end of the experiment, arterial blood was collected for blood gas level assessment and a poultry of each replicate was sacrificed to obtain tibia and calcium content measurement. There was a water consumption reduction from 20ppm of chlorine and feed intake reduction in poultry receiving water with 100ppm of chlorine. The regression analysis showed that the higher the level of chlorine in water, the higher the reduction in consumption. There were no differences in egg production and weight, egg mass, feed conversion, specific gravity, tibia calcium content, and hemogasometry levels (hydrogenionic potential, carbon dioxide partial pressure, oxygen partial pressure, sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, carbon dioxide total concentration, anion gap and oxygen saturation. The use of levels above 5ppm of chlorine is not recommended in the water of lightweight laying hens.

  1. Shrimp cephalothorax meal in laying hen diets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Salas-Durán

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to meassure the effect of shrimp meal (SM in commercial laying hen diets. From April to September 2013, in Costa Rica, Pleuroncodes planipes was used to obtain a meal (SM with a yield of 15%, particle size of 256 μg and negative for Salmonella sp. Proximate analysis was performed to the SM: crude protein (40.67%, ether extract (11.05%, crude fiber (7.12%, ash (27.48%, calcium (9.03%, phosphorus (2.66%, amino acid profile, pepsin digestibility (84% and acidity (8.34. Subsequently, a trial was performed with 140 40-week-old Hy-Line Brown laying hens, fed with four different diets containing increasing levels of inclusion of SM (0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% during four weeks; and formulated according to the ideal protein and digestible amino acids concepts; being isocaloric and isoproteic. The variables experimentally evaluated were: production percentage, feed intake, body weight, mortality, egg weight and feed conversion ratio. Only egg weight changed significantly between treatments in the third week (p<0.05. The hens fed with 5% SM laid heavier eggs. It is suggested to evaluate a level of SM inclusion up to 15% in laying hens diets.

  2. Infectious Bronchitis Vaccination Protocols for Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sulaiman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A research was conducted to investigate the effects of vaccination protocols for Infectious Bronchitis (IB on egg production, egg quality, and IB antibody titres of laying hens. Different initial vaccination (Control, VicS eye, VicS spray, VicS water, A3 eye, A3 spray, and A3 water for IB were administered to day-old Isa Brown hens. Half the hens were revaccinated regularly during lay whereas the other hens were not vaccinated. Results showed that initial vaccination treatment had significant effects on hen day egg production and egg quality of egg weight, shell reflectivity, shell breaking strength, shell thickness, albumen height, Haugh Units, and IB antibody titre levels, but had no effect on percentage of shell and yolk colour. Egg weight and shell reflectivity were less favourable in the control hens. In contrast, shell breaking strength and shell thickness were highest for the group that initially received A3 vaccine in water. However, regular revaccination had some deleterious effects on egg production and egg quality. There were no significant effects of revaccination on IB antibody titres. It is concluded that there was little advantage in regularly revaccinating laying hens for IB virus, since they had received appropriate initial vaccination.

  3. Light dulls and darkens bird eggs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Y Navarro

    Full Text Available Although egg color is generally consistent within individual birds and robust to environmental variation, recent evidence suggests a degree of susceptibility to environmental perturbation or modulation of egg color. Most of this variation manifests via the physiology of the laying female, but some direct impacts of the environment on laid eggs have also been discovered. Here we test whether light changes bird egg color and we quantify its effect, by subjecting variable blue-green eggs of Rüppell's weaver (Ploceus galbula to a broad-spectrum light source under laboratory conditions, and measuring egg reflectance every few hours. Eggshells gradually decreased in reflectance across the entire measured wavelength spectrum of 250-800 nm. Reflectance peaks were disproportionately affected, such that the height decreased of both the blue-green peak and the smaller UV peak typical of blue-green eggs. The reflectance of lighter eggs was affected slightly more than that of darker eggs. These changes are similar to previous results for changes over long periods of time in darkness, suggesting that light might hasten the same process of pigment degradation that proceeds even without light. Comparison between the experimental light source and both sunlight and typical artificial lighting situations raises the possibility that significant color change might occur during incubation in some birds, but indicates that eggshell illumination in museums for short periods of study is unlikely to affect their color to a detectable extent. Additional research should be performed on eggs of other species and in other light environments, with an eye to an eventual generalized model of the effect of light on eggshell color.

  4. Chinese and Foreign Bird Lovers Watch Birds in Deyang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>Invited by the Sichuan Provincial People’s Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries (SIFA) and the Chengdu Bird Watching Society, 60 Chinese and foreign bird lovers went to Deyang, a city in Sichuan Province that had suffered grave damages in the Wenchuan earthquake, to watch birds,

  5. 分体膜盘铺设机构的设计—自走式水稻育秧联合作业机配套机构%Design of Split Membranous Disc Laying Institutions—Supporting Mechanism of Self-propelled Rice Seedling Raising Integrated Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国银; 古荣华; 冯伟东; 佘永卫; 丁文捷

    2016-01-01

    针对原槽盘铺膜机构在实际中的应用情况,设计了分体槽盘铺膜机构. 首先,采用三维模型与功能设计逐步演进的方法实现了槽盘铺膜机构折叠成型部分秧盘单元结构的功能,由秧盘单元结构演进为包含9 个秧盘单体槽膜成型的上架与底架结构;然后,对主要杆件进行了受力分析,并采用有限元方法进行了应力、应变、变形位移和安全系数分析;最后,采用1:1 试验机模型验证了铺膜成型功能. 研究表明:所设计的铺膜结构能够实现预定功能,成膜达到预定参数要求,结构设计参数校核达标.%According to the original disc slot mechanism in practical application , split trough tray laying membrane in-stitution is designed.Firstly, three-dimensional model of gradual evolution and functional design have approached to achieve a functional part of fold forming part ' s seedling tray unit structure about disc slot mechanism .Seedling tray unit structure evolves into nine seedling tray units and included shelves and chassis structure with bars structure .Then , the main bars are analyzed by stress analysis , and also analyzed by stress , strain , displacement , deformation and safety fac-tor using finite element method .Finally , the function of laying membrane forming is verified by a 1:1 model , it shown that: designed filming structure has achieved the intended function; and the film parameter has reached predetermined requirements , and structural design parameters were checked and passed .

  6. Orientation in birds. Olfactory navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, F

    1991-01-01

    Research work on the olfactory navigation of birds, which has only recently attracted attention, has shown that many wild species rely on an osmotactic mechanism to find food sources, even at a considerable distance. The homing pigeon, the only bird to have been thoroughly investigated with respect to olfactory navigation, has been found to rely on local odours for homeward orientation, and to integrate olfactory cues perceived during passive transportation with those picked up at the release site. It is possible to design experiments in which birds are given false olfactory information, and predictions about the effects of this can be made and tested. Pigeons are able to home from unfamiliar sites because they acquire an olfactory map extending beyond the area they have flown over. The olfactory map is built up by associating wind-borne odours with the direction from which they come; this was shown by experiments which aimed to prevent, limit or alter this association. One aim of the research work has been to test whether pigeons flying over unfamiliar areas also rely or can learn to rely on non-olfactory cues, depending on their local availability, and/or on the methods of rearing and training applied to them. Various evaluations have been made of the results; the most recent experiments, however, confirm that pigeons do derive directional information from atmospheric odours. A neurobiological approach is also in progress; its results show that some telencephalic areas are involved in orientation and olfactory navigation. The lack of any knowledge about the distribution and chemical nature of the odorants which allow pigeons to navigate hinders progress in this area of research.

  7. Mechanosensitive neurons on the internal reproductive tract contribute to egg-laying-induced acetic acid attraction in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Bin; Liu, Ying; Guntur, Ananya R; Stern, Ulrich; Yang, Chung-Hui

    2014-10-23

    Selecting a suitable site to deposit their eggs is an important reproductive need of Drosophila females. Although their choosiness toward egg-laying sites is well documented, the specific neural mechanism that activates females' search for attractive egg-laying sites is not known. Here, we show that distention and contraction of females' internal reproductive tract triggered by egg delivery through the tract plays a critical role in activating such search. We found that females start to exhibit acetic acid (AA) attraction prior to depositing each egg but no attraction when they are not laying eggs. Artificially distending the reproductive tract triggers AA attraction in non-egg-laying females, whereas silencing the mechanosensitive neurons we identified that can sense the contractile status of the tract eliminates such attraction. Our work uncovers the circuit basis of an important reproductive need of Drosophila females and provides a simple model for dissecting the neural mechanism that underlies a reproductive need-induced behavioral modification.

  8. Large–scale geographical variation confirms that climate change causes birds to lay earlier

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christiaan Both; Aleksandr V. Artemyev; Bert Blaauw; Richard J. Cowie; Aarnoud J. Dekhuijzen; Tapio Eeva; Anders Enemar; Lars Gustafsson; Elena V. Ivankina; Antero Järvinen; Neil B. Metcalfe; N. Erik I. Nyholm; Jaime Potti; Pierre-Alain Ravussin; Juan Jose Sanz; Bengt Silverin; Fred M. Slater; Leonid V. Sokolov; János Török; Wolfgang Winkel; Jonathan Wright; Herwig Zang; Marcel E. Visser

    2004-01-01

    Advances in the phenology of organisms are often attributed to climate change, but alternatively, may reflect a publication bias towards advances and may be caused by environmental factors unrelated to climate change...

  9. Large-scale geographical variation confirms that climate change causes birds to lay earlier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, C; Artemyev, AV; Blaauw, B; Cowie, RJ; Dekhuijzen, AJ; Eeva, T; Enemar, A; Gustafsson, L; Ivankina, EV; Jarvinen, A; Metcalfe, NB; Nyholm, NEI; Potti, J; Ravussin, PA; Sanz, JJ; Silverin, B; Slater, FM; Sokolov, LV; Torok, J; Winkel, W; Wright, J; Zang, H; Visser, ME

    2004-01-01

    Advances in the phenology of organisms are often attributed to climate change, but alternatively, may reflect a publication bias towards advances and may be caused by environmental factors unrelated to climate change. Both factors are investigated using the breeding dates of 25 long-term studied

  10. Epigenetics and phenotypic variability: some interesting insights from birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frésard, Laure; Morisson, Mireille; Brun, Jean-Michel; Collin, Anne; Pain, Bertrand; Minvielle, Francis; Pitel, Frédérique

    2013-06-11

    Little is known about epigenetic mechanisms in birds with the exception of the phenomenon of dosage compensation of sex chromosomes, although such mechanisms could be involved in the phenotypic variability of birds, as in several livestock species. This paper reviews the literature on epigenetic mechanisms that could contribute significantly to trait variability in birds, and compares the results to the existing knowledge of epigenetic mechanisms in mammals. The main issues addressed in this paper are: (1) Does genomic imprinting exist in birds? (2) How does the embryonic environment influence the adult phenotype in avian species? (3) Does the embryonic environment have an impact on phenotypic variability across several successive generations? The potential for epigenetic studies to improve the performance of individual animals through the implementation of limited changes in breeding conditions or the addition of new parameters in selection models is still an open question.

  11. Lay-Offs in The Name of Love

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerstrøm Andersen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    A number of articles have shown that the relationship between organisation and employee has become an intimate relationship. This is indeed the case in Denmark. This article shows how the problem of lay-off is discursively rearticulated in the context of passion as a problem of intimate breaks. Lay-off...... becomes a tricky problem of breaking up in a loving way. This article is a semantic analysis of the lay-off semantics in Denmark after the financial crisis, comparing lay-off semantics with the semantics of divorces. Handbooks on lay-offs use divorce metaphors, and particular strategies for divorces can...... be found in advisory tools on the termination of employees. Lay-offs are split in two: a formal lay-off and an intimate break. This creates a number of interesting discursive paradoxes for both managers and employees....

  12. [Anesthesia in birds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, F

    1987-01-01

    Anaesthesia in birds is ordered by law and is also necessary for various operations and manipulations. Anaesthesia by injection of Ketamin, which in special cases may be combined with Diazepam, has been found useful. Anaesthesia by inhalation with Halothan, Methoxyfluran or Isofluran is the most careful method. Local anaesthesia has few indications.

  13. Synanthropic birds and parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipineto, Ludovico; Borrelli, Luca; Pepe, Paola; Fioretti, Alessandro; Caputo, Vincenzo; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Rinaldi, Laura

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the parasitologic findings for 60 synanthropic bird carcasses recovered in the Campania region of southern Italy. Birds consisted of 20 yellow-legged gulls (Larus michahellis), 15 rock pigeons (Columba livia), 15 common kestrels (Falco tinnunculus), and 10 carrion crows (Corvus corone). Each carcass was examined to detect the presence of ectoparasites and then necropsied to detect helminths. Ectoparasites occurred in 100% of the birds examined. In particular, chewing lice were recovered with a prevalence of 100%, whereas Pseudolynchia canariensis (Hippoboscidae) were found only in pigeons with a prevalence of 80%. Regarding endoparasites, a total of seven helminth species were identified: three nematodes (Ascaridia columbae, Capillaria columbae, Physaloptera alata), one cestoda (Raillietina tetragona), one trematoda (Cardiocephalus longicollis), and two acanthocephalans (Centrorhynchus globocaudatus and Centrorhynchus buteonis). The findings of the present study add data to the parasitologic scenario of synanthropic birds. This is important because parasitic infection can lead to serious health problems when combined with other factors and may affect flying performance and predatory effectiveness.

  14. The Umbrella Bird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crandall, Lee S.

    1949-01-01

    When CHARLES CORDIER arrived from Costa Rica on October 9, 1942, bringing with him, among other great rarities, three Bare-necked Umbrella Birds (Cephalopterus ornatus glabricollis), it seemed to us that the mere possession of such fabulous creatures was satisfaction enough. True, they were not

  15. Effects of wheat cultivar, metabolizable energy level, and xylanase supplementation to laying hens diet on performance, egg quality traits, and selected blood parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Mirzaee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A 2 x 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was conducted to evaluate the effects of two dietary apparent metabolizable energy (AME levels (2,720 and 2,580 kcal kg-1 diet and enzyme (0 and 0.3 g kg-1 diet, Grindazym® GP 15,000 with mostly xylanase activity supplementation on the performance of laying hens fed diets based on two wheat cultivars (Marvdasht and Sardari. Experimental diets were formulated to have a constant energy to protein ratio and were fed to 65-wk-old Lohmann LSL-Lite laying hens for 7 wk. The lower level of AME reduced egg production and egg mass (p<0.05 and increased feed conversion ratio (p<0.05. Enzyme addition increased feed intake of the birds fed a diet with Sardari cultivar (p<0.05 but had no effect on feed intake of the birds fed a diet with Marvdasht cultivar (p>0.05. Nevertheless, birds receiving diets based on Marvdasht cultivar had higher feed intake and egg mass than that of those receiving diets based on Sardari cultivar (p<0.05. The birds fed diets based on Marvdasht cultivar produced less undesired eggs and had better yolk color as compared with the birds fed diets based on Sardari cultivar (p<0.05. The serum concentration of glucose increased by enzyme supplementation when birds receiving lower AME level (p<0.05. These results indicate that enzyme supplementation may have a positive effect on the feed intake of laying hens when fed on wheat-based diets; however, this effect is cultivar dependent and does not necessarily mean that enzyme supplementation always benefit production.

  16. Attracting Birds to Your Backyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Brian

    1994-01-01

    Discusses methods for drawing birds to outdoor education areas, including the use of wild and native vegetation. Lists specific garden plants suitable for attracting birds in each season. Includes a guide to commercial bird seed and instructions for building homemade birdfeeders and nestboxes. (LZ)

  17. Birds of Prey of Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerstrom, Frances

    This copiously illustrated document is designed to be a field quide to birds of prey that are common to Wisconsin, as well as to some that enter the state occasionally. An introduction discusses birds of prey with regard to migration patterns, the relationship between common names and the attitudes of people toward certain birds, and natural signs…

  18. Air Quality in Alternative Housing Systems May Have an Impact on Laying Hen Welfare. Part I-Dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Bruce; Moe, Randi Oppermann; Michel, Virginie; Lund, Vonne; Mejdell, Cecilie

    2015-07-09

    The new legislation for laying hens in the European Union put a ban on conventional cages. Production systems must now provide the hens with access to a nest, a perch, and material for dust bathing. These requirements will improve the behavioral aspects of animal welfare. However, when hens are kept with access to litter, it is a concern that polluted air may become an increased threat to health and therefore also a welfare problem. This article reviews the literature regarding the health and welfare effects birds experience when exposed to barn dust. Dust is composed of inorganic and organic compounds, from the birds themselves as well as from feed, litter, and building materials. Dust may be a vector for microorganisms and toxins. In general, studies indicate that housing systems where laying hens have access to litter as aviaries and floor systems consistently have higher concentrations of suspended dust than caged hens with little (furnished cages) or no access to litter (conventional cages). The higher dust levels in aviaries and floor housing are also caused by increased bird activity in the non-cage systems. There are gaps in both the basic and applied knowledge of how birds react to dust and aerosol contaminants, i.e., what levels they find aversive and/or impair health. Nevertheless, high dust levels may compromise the health and welfare of both birds and their caretakers and the poor air quality often found in new poultry housing systems needs to be addressed. It is necessary to develop prophylactic measures and to refine the production systems in order to achieve the full welfare benefits of the cage ban.

  19. Air Quality in Alternative Housing Systems May Have an Impact on Laying Hen Welfare. Part I—Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce David

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The new legislation for laying hens in the European Union put a ban on conventional cages. Production systems must now provide the hens with access to a nest, a perch, and material for dust bathing. These requirements will improve the behavioral aspects of animal welfare. However, when hens are kept with access to litter, it is a concern that polluted air may become an increased threat to health and therefore also a welfare problem. This article reviews the literature regarding the health and welfare effects birds experience when exposed to barn dust. Dust is composed of inorganic and organic compounds, from the birds themselves as well as from feed, litter, and building materials. Dust may be a vector for microorganisms and toxins. In general, studies indicate that housing systems where laying hens have access to litter as aviaries and floor systems consistently have higher concentrations of suspended dust than caged hens with little (furnished cages or no access to litter (conventional cages. The higher dust levels in aviaries and floor housing are also caused by increased bird activity in the non-cage systems. There are gaps in both the basic and applied knowledge of how birds react to dust and aerosol contaminants, i.e., what levels they find aversive and/or impair health. Nevertheless, high dust levels may compromise the health and welfare of both birds and their caretakers and the poor air quality often found in new poultry housing systems needs to be addressed. It is necessary to develop prophylactic measures and to refine the production systems in order to achieve the full welfare benefits of the cage ban.

  20. Birds and wind energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langston, Rowena

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Climate change, perhaps more accurately described as climate disruption, is considered to be a major long-term threat to biodiversity, with a high probability that the underlying cause is due to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Renewable energy is an important component of a programme of measures to combat further climate change, to include improved energy efficiency and demand management. Wind energy is the most advanced renewable energy source and is a global industry onshore and, increasingly, offshore. However, as with any form of energy generation, wind energy also has potential environmental costs which have to be balanced against benefits. The environmental impacts on birds derive from the following: collision risk, in particular from the moving rotor blades; displacement arising from disturbance during construction, operation or decommissioning; habitat loss or change leading to alteration of food availability; barrier effects leading to deviation of long distance migratory flights or disruption of local flights between feeding, nesting, and roosting/loafing locations. Not all species of birds, or individuals within a species, are equally susceptible to negative interactions with wind turbines, and neither are the population consequences of impacts equivalent. Of greatest concern are bird species of conservation concern that exhibit behaviours that place them at risk of an adverse impact, notably when that impact leads to a reduction in population size that is unlikely to be compensated for. In particular, cumulative impacts arising from multiple wind farms or wind farms in combination with other developments are of concern. There has been a welcome increase in research effort and peer-reviewed publications on the subject of birds and wind energy in recent years. Increasing our understanding of impacts is essential to delivering possible solutions and this paper reviews current knowledge for birds. (Author)

  1. Lysine requirements of pre-lay broiler breeder pullets: determination by indicator amino acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Russell A; Bertolo, Robert F; Moehn, Soenke; Leslie, Michael A; Ball, Ronald O; Korver, Doug R

    2003-09-01

    The indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) method allows the determination of amino acid requirements under conditions of low growth rate as found in pre-laying broiler breeder pullets. Cobb 500 breeder pullets (20 wk old; 2290 +/- 280 g, n = 4) were adapted (6 d) to a pelleted, purified control diet containing all nutrients at >or=110% of NRC recommendations. After recovery from surgery for implantation of a jugular catheter, each bird was fed, in random order, test diets containing one of nine levels of lysine (0.48, 0.96, 1.92, 2.88, 3.84, 4.80, 7.68, 9.60 and 14.40 g/kg of diet). Indicator oxidation was determined during 4-h primed (74 kBq/kg body), constant infusions (44 kBq x h(-1). kg body(-1)) of L-[1-(14)C]phenylalanine. Using the breakpoint of a one-slope broken-line model, the lysine requirement was determined to be 4.88 +/- 0.96 g/kg of diet or 366 +/- 72 mg x hen(-1) x d(-1) with an upper 95% CI of 6.40 g/kg of diet or 480 mg x hen(-1) x d(-1). IAAO allows determination of individual bird amino acid requirements for specific ages and types of birds over short periods of time and enables more accurate broiler breeder pullet diet formulation.

  2. Impact of commercial housing systems and nutrient and energy intake on laying hen performance and egg quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, D M; Jones, D R; Abdo, Z; Zhao, Y; Shepherd, T A; Xin, H

    2015-03-01

    The US egg industry is exploring alternative housing systems for laying hens. However, limited published research related to cage-free aviary systems and enriched colony cages exists related to production, egg quality, and hen nutrition. The laying hen's nutritional requirements and resulting productivity are well established with the conventional cage system, but diminutive research is available in regards to alternative housing systems. The restrictions exist with limited availability of alternative housing systems in research settings and the considerable expense for increased bird numbers in a replicate due to alternative housing system design. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to evaluate the impact of nutrient and energy intake on production and egg quality parameters from laying hens housed at a commercial facility. Lohmann LSL laying hens were housed in three systems: enriched colony cage, cage-free aviary, and conventional cage at a single commercial facility. Daily production records were collected along with dietary changes during 15 production periods (28-d each). Eggs were analyzed for shell strength, shell thickness, Haugh unit, vitelline membrane properties, and egg solids each period. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) coupled with a principal components analysis (PCA) approach was utilized to assess the impact of nutritional changes on production parameters and monitored egg quality factors. The traits of hen-day production and mortality had a response only in the PCA 2 direction. This finds that as house temperature and Met intake increases, there is an inflection point at which hen-day egg production is negatively effected. Dietary changes more directly influenced shell parameters, vitelline membrane parameters, and egg total solids as opposed to laying hen housing system. Therefore, further research needs to be conducted in controlled research settings on laying hen nutrient and energy intake in the alternative housing systems

  3. Differential expression of heat shock transcription factors and heat shock proteins after acute and chronic heat stress in laying chickens (Gallus gallus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Xie

    Full Text Available Heat stress due to high environmental temperature negatively influences animal performances. To better understand the biological impact of heat stress, laying broiler breeder chickens were subjected either to acute (step-wisely increasing temperature from 21 to 35°C within 24 hours or chronic (32°C for 8 weeks high temperature exposure. High temperature challenges significantly elevated body temperature of experimental birds (P<0.05. However, oxidation status of lipid and protein and expression of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs and heat shock proteins (HSPs 70 and 90 were differently affected by acute and chronic treatment. Tissue-specific responses to thermal challenge were also found among heart, liver and muscle. In the heart, acute heat challenge affected lipid oxidation (P = 0.05 and gene expression of all 4 HSF gene expression was upregulated (P<0.05. During chronic heat treatment, the HSP 70 mRNA level was increased (P<0.05 and HSP 90 mRNA (P<0.05 was decreased. In the liver, oxidation of protein was alleviated during acute heat challenge (P<0.05, however, gene expression HSF2, 3 and 4 and HSP 70 were highly induced (P<0.05. HSP90 expression was increased by chronic thermal treatment (P<0.05. In the muscle, both types of heat stress increased protein oxidation, but HSFs and HSPs gene expression remained unaltered. Only tendencies to increase were observed in HSP 70 (P = 0.052 and 90 (P = 0.054 gene expression after acute heat stress. The differential expressions of HSF and HSP genes in different tissues of laying broiler breeder chickens suggested that anti-heat stress mechanisms might be provoked more profoundly in the heart, by which the muscle was least protected during heat stress. In addition to HSP, HSFs gene expression could be used as a marker during acute heat stress.

  4. Alienation in As I lay Dying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪倩

    2013-01-01

    The enormous change of the earlier 20th century has not only brought false prosperity to the society but also pushed people into spiritual wasteland. Indifference and alienation have replaced communication and trust among people or between one and self. By analyzing the alienation among people, the self-split of oneself and the reasons resulting these in William Faulkner ’s As I lay Dying, the concern of Faulkner about the social phenomenon and his pursuit of transcending the personal to a universal level will be better presented to us.

  5. The ancient art of laying rope

    CERN Document Server

    Bohr, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We describe a hitherto overlooked geometrical property of helical structures and show how it accounts for the early art of ropemaking. Helices have a maximum number of rotations that can be added to them - and we show that it is a geometrical feature, not a material property. This geometrical insight explains why nearly identically appearing rope can be made from very different materials and it is also the reason behind the unyielding nature of ropes. The necessity for the rope to be stretched while being laid, known from Egyptian tomb scenes, follows straightforwardly, as does the function of the top, an old tool for laying ropes.

  6. Performance of commercial laying hen genotypes on free range and organic farms in Switzerland, France and The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenstra, F; Maurer, V; Bestman, M; van Sambeek, F; Zeltner, E; Reuvekamp, B; Galea, F; van Niekerk, T

    2012-01-01

    1. A total of 257 farmers with free ranging laying hens (organic and conventional) in Switzerland, France and The Netherlands with 273 flocks were interviewed to determine the relationships between the genotype of the hens, management conditions and performance. 2. Almost 20 different genotypes (brands) were present on the farms. In France, all birds were brown feathered hens laying brown eggs. In Switzerland and The Netherlands, there were brown, white (white feathered hens laying white eggs) and silver (white feathered hens laying brown eggs) hens. In Switzerland, mixed flocks were also present. 3. The overall effect of system (organic vs. conventional free range) on egg production and mortality was significant, with higher mortality and lower egg production among organic hens. In pair wise comparisons within country, the difference was highly significant in The Netherlands, and showed a non-significant tendency in the same direction in Switzerland and France. 4. White hens tended to perform better than brown hens. Silver hens appeared to have a higher mortality and lower production per hen housed at 60 weeks of age. 5. There were no significant relationships between production, mortality, feather condition and use of outside run or with flock size. 6. There was more variation in mortality and egg production among farms with a small flock size than among farms with a large flock size.

  7. Effects of age and dietary soybean oil level on eggshell quality, bone strength and blood biochemistry in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S; Cui, L Y; Hou, J F; Shi, C; Ke, X; Yang, L C; Ma, X P

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the differences in eggshell quality, bone quality and serum bone biochemistry markers associated with changes in age and dietary soybean oil levels in laying hens. A total of 54, 19-week-old Hy-Line Brown laying hens were housed in 18 battery cages (3 birds/cage) and randomly divided into three diet treatments for 90 d: control-fat (CF, 1.9% soybean oil), moderate-fat (MF, 7% soybean oil) and high-fat (HF, 10% soybean oil). The hens' body weights (BW), egg production, egg weights, eggshell thickness and femoral diameter were higher at d 90 than at d 60 or d 30. Meanwhile, feed intake, relative bone weights, all bone strength parameters and serum Ca were lower at d 90 or 60 than at d 30. Compared to the CF hens, the feed intake, BW, abdominal fat pad weights and serum alkaline phosphatase activity were elevated in MF or HF hens. The eggshell thickness, relative femoral and tibial weight, femoral stiffness, femoral modulus, tibial mixed force and serum calcium and phosphorus levels were lower in MF or HF hens than CF hens. These findings suggest that bone loss in caged hens starts from an early stage of the laying period, and dietary oil (particularly with diets over 10% soybean oil) has harmful effects on eggshell quality, bone strength and bone mineralisation from an early stage of the laying period.

  8. The Study on Coexistence Mechanism of Wintering Water Birds at Poyang Lake,Jiangxi Province,China%鄱阳湖越冬水鸟共存机制的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋剑虹; 陈斌; 邵明勤

    2015-01-01

    In order to explain the coexistence mechanism of common water birds at Poyang Lake from morphological perspective,the body weight,body length,culmen length and tarsus-metatarsus length of 24 waterfowls and 36 wa-ding birds were analyzed. The result indicated that,the ratio of body weight and culmen length of waterfowls were relatively high(1. 22 ± 0. 06 and 1. 22 ± 0. 14,respectively)while the ratio of body length and tarsus-metatarsus length were relatively low(1. 09 ± 0. 03 and 1. 07 ± 0. 02,respectively). For wading birds,the ratio of body weight was relatively high(1. 18 ± 0. 03)while the ratio of body length,culmen length and tarsus-metatarsus length were relatively low(1. 07 ± 0. 01,1. 09 ± 0. 01 and 1. 08 ± 0. 2,respectively). The morphological ratio of common water birds were approximate to 1 . 1~1 . 2 ,which showed that these birds mainly depend on the separation of ecological habits to live together. The closely related species really had analogously physical features,such as Common crane Grus grus and White-naped crane Grus vipio,Lesser white-fronted goose Anser erythropus and Greylag goose Anser anser,Falcated duck Anas falcata and Northern pintail Anas acuta,Spot-billed duck Anas poecilorhyncha and Eura-sian wigeon Anas penelope. But the similarity of Black-winged stilt Himantopus himantopus,Pied avocet Recurvirostra avosetta,Eurasian spoonbill Platalea leucorodia and Grey heron Ardea cinerea were relatively low compared to other birds. On the basis of competitive exclusion principle,the relationship among morphological differentiation,coexis-tence and their population size were analyzed.%为从形态学阐述水鸟共存机制,对鄱阳湖越冬的常见水鸟(24种游禽和36种涉禽)的体质量、体长、嘴峰、跗蹠长进行统计分析.结果显示,游禽间体质量比值(1.22±0.06)和嘴峰比值(1.22±0.14)略高,体长比值(1.09±0.03)和跗蹠长比值(1.07±0.02)略低.涉禽间体质量比值(1

  9. Comparative power curves in bird flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobalske, B W; Hedrick, T L; Dial, K P; Biewener, A A

    2003-01-23

    The relationship between mechanical power output and forward velocity in bird flight is controversial, bearing on the comparative physiology and ecology of locomotion. Applied to flying birds, aerodynamic theory predicts that mechanical power should vary as a function of forward velocity in a U-shaped curve. The only empirical test of this theory, using the black-billed magpie (Pica pica), suggests that the mechanical power curve is relatively flat over intermediate velocities. Here, by integrating in vivo measurements of pectoralis force and length change with quasi-steady aerodynamic models developed using data on wing and body movement, we present mechanical power curves for cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and ringed turtle-doves (Streptopelia risoria). In contrast to the curve reported for magpies, the power curve for cockatiels is acutely concave, whereas that for doves is intermediate in shape and shows higher mass-specific power output at most speeds. We also find that wing-beat frequency and mechanical power output do not necessarily share minima in flying birds. Thus, aspects of morphology, wing kinematics and overall style of flight can greatly affect the magnitude and shape of a species' power curve.

  10. Residues of stirofos (rabon) in eggs of laying hens treated for northern fowl mite control by dipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, M C; Devaney, J A; Ivie, G W; Beerwinkle, K R

    1982-03-01

    Laying hens were treated with a wettable powder formulation of stirofos [Rabon, 2-chloro-1-(2,4,5-trichlorophenyl) vinyl dimethylphosphate] by dipping in a .5 or 1.0% actual ingredient (AI) water suspension of a 50% wettable powder (WP) stirfos formulation. Stirofos residues were detected in eggs within 1 day after treatment and reached maximum levels 3 days after dipping (.021 and .035 ppm in the low- and high-dose birds, respectively). After that time, levels of residues in eggs declined rapidly and no sample contained detectable quantities (less than .004 ppm) of stirofos after 21 days. Dipping may be a practical control method for the northern fowl mite on chickens, because stirofos dips effectively control this mite on laying hens for at least 6 weeks and because resulting residues in eggs are well below established tolerances.

  11. The dynamics of Salmonella occurrence in commercial laying hen flocks throughout a laying period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, J; Van Hoorebeke, S; Hald, B; Hartung, J; Van Immerseel, F; Radtke, I; Kabell, S; Dewulf, J

    2011-06-01

    Contaminated eggs and egg products have been recognized for many years as an important source of Salmonella infections in humans in the European Union and in the United States. Longitudinal studies can help to increase our knowledge about the dynamics of the occurrence of Salmonella in the course of a laying period. The total of 41 laying hen flocks-18 in Belgium, six in Denmark and 17 in Germany-were followed during an entire laying period. Samples taken from the empty cleaned and disinfected poultry houses were all negative for Salmonella. After hens arrived on the farms, five pooled faecal samples, one pooled dust sample and 40 cloacal swabs (Belgium and Germany) or 40 swabs from fresh droppings (Denmark) were taken four times from 18 flocks, three times from 21 flocks and two times from two flocks in the course of the laying period. Ten flocks (two Belgian and eight German flocks) tested up to three times positive for Salmonella. Forty-three out of 50 positive samples contained Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 (29 isolates) or phage type 8 (14 isolates). The probability of subsequent Salmonella-positive findings increased significantly in Salmonella-positive flocks (Playing period or the season.

  12. NetB-producing and beta2-producing Clostridium perfringens associated with subclinical necrotic enteritis in laying hens in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaart, Janneke G; de Bruijn, Naomi D; van Asten, Alphons J A M; Fabri, Teun H F; Gröne, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Since 2006 increasing numbers of laying hen flocks with decreased production have been reported in the Netherlands. At necropsy, birds from affected flocks showed multifocal areas of necrosis in the duodenum. Histologically the duodenum had moderate to marked villus atrophy and fusion with crypt hyperplasia and a mixed inflammatory infiltrate within the lamina propria underlying focal areas of degenerative epithelium. Multifocally, free within the intestinal lumen and associated with epithelial necrosis, were marked numbers of large rod-shaped bacteria. Anaerobic culturing and subsequent toxin typing revealed, in 19 out of 73 affected birds, the presence of Clostridium perfringens strains, either type A or type C harbouring the atypical allele of cpb2 and netB. Eighteen out of these 19 birds carried C. perfringens strains capable of producing beta2 toxin in vitro and all of these birds harboured C. perfringens strains capable of producing NetB toxin in vitro. In contrast, specific pathogen free (SPF) birds lacked gross or histological lesions in their duodenum, and C. perfringens type C was isolated from four out of 15 SPF birds tested. One of these isolates harboured the consensus three allele of cpb2 that produced beta2 toxin in vitro. None of the C. perfringens isolates originating from SPF birds harboured netB. These findings might indicate that the NetB toxin produced by C. perfringens is associated with subclinical necrotic enteritis in layers, whereas the involvement of beta2 toxin in subclinical necrotic enteritis, if any, might be variant dependent.

  13. Welfare issues of modern laying hen farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Ferrante

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review starts with a brief outline of poultry behaviour and biology and a description of the present laying hen farming situation in Italy. Moreover, it points out the situation of EU legislation currently in effect for laying hen welfare. It then reviews the main welfare issues of layer farming. The following aspects are considered: rearing system (e.g. stocking density, light intensity and photoperiod, equipment and facilities and some health aspects. All these aspects represent important issues for farmed species, but special attention should be paid when we deal with intensively farmed species like poultry, where a lot of potential stressors may impair the welfare with consequences on health and production. The adoption of suitable housing systems and of adequate management techniques, as well as the presence of well trained stockpersons with a sound knowledge of poultry physiology and behaviour, are particularly important in guaranteeing a sufficient welfare level to poultry. Therefore, the adoption of specific codes of recommendations is highly desirable.

  14. The Effects of Rhodobacter capsulatus KCTC-2583 on Cholesterol Metabolism, Egg Production and Quality Parameters during the Late Laying Periods in Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhande, Anushka; Ingale, S L; Lee, S H; Kim, J S; Lohakare, J D; Chae, B J; Kwon, I K

    2013-06-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation of Rhodobacter capsulatus KCTC-2583 on egg-yolk and serum cholesterol, egg production and quality parameters during the late laying periods in hens. A total of 160 Hy-Line Brown layers (54 wk-old) were randomly allotted to 4 treatment groups on the basis of laying performance. Each treatment had 4 replicates with 10 birds each (40 birds per treatment). Two hens were confined individually with cage size 35×35×40 cm and each 10 birds (5 cages) shared a common feed trough between them forming one experimental unit. Dietary treatments were; basal diet supplemented with 0 (control), 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15% R. capsulatus KCTC-2583. Experimental diets were fed in meal form for 56 d. Dietary supplementation of increasing levels of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583 reduced (linear, phens fed a diet supplemented with increasing levels of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583 had increased (linear; p0.05) on feed intake of laying hens. At d 28 and 56, breaking strength and yolk colour of eggs were linearly improved (phens fed dietary increasing levels of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583. Dietary treatment had no effects (linear or quadratic; p>0.05) on albumin height, shell thickness and shell weight at any period of experiment. These results indicate that dietary supplementation of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583 has the potential to improve the laying hen performance and lead to the development of low cholesterol eggs during late laying period in Hy-Line Brown hens.

  15. 3. Bird conservation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Expert assessors Tatsuya Amano, Cambridge University, UK Andy Brown, Natural England, UK Fiona Burns, Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, UK Yohay Carmel, Israel Institute of Technology, Israel Mick Clout, University of Auckland, New Zealand Geoff Hilton, Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, UK Nancy Ockendon, Cambridge University, UK James Pearce-Higgins, British Trust for Ornithology, UK Sugoto Roy, Food and Environment Research Agency, DEFRA, UK Rebecca Smith, Cambridge University, UK William...

  16. Bird Watching in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHRIS; DEVONSHIRE-ELLIS

    2006-01-01

    Being based in, and conducting business in, some of China's largest cities is an exciting, yet stressful occupation and 1 like to relax by taking a pair of binoculars, getting out into the open air of China's huge countryside, and spending time seeing what birds I can identify. I'm not really a twitcher (one who relentlessly pursues sightings of as many different species as possible)-just happy to get into nature. In my travels around the country, I listed

  17. Age-related mercury contamination and relationship with luteinizing hormone in a long-lived Antarctic bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Tartu

    Full Text Available Seabirds, as long-lived top predators, accumulate contaminants such as mercury (Hg, an established endocrine disruptor. In long lived species hormonal secretion varies with age; therefore, Hg-induced endocrine disruption may be exacerbated in some age classes. Here we investigated relationships between blood total Hg and luteinizing hormone (LH, a key pituitary hormone for the onset of breeding, in pre-laying known-age (11-45 years old snow petrels (Pagodroma nivea from Adélie Land, Antarctica. We predicted that 1 blood Hg would increase with advancing age as a consequence of bio-accumulation; and that 2 increasing blood Hg would be related to decreased concentrations of LH in the most Hg-contaminated individuals. Hg concentrations were higher in females than in males (p<0.001, and contrary to our prediction, decreased with advancing age in males (p = 0.009 and tended to do so in females (p = 0.06. The analysis of stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N suggested that this unexpected pattern could originate from age and sex-related variations in trophic niche, and hence Hg exposure. Regarding LH, our prediction was only supported in young birds (≤23 years where baseline LH was inversely correlated with Hg concentrations (p = 0.04. Hg burden did not predict baseline LH or GnRH-induced LH in birds that were more than 23 years old. These results show that age and contaminants may interfere with major endocrine mechanisms and, together with other recent studies, support the view that Hg could be connected to LH secretion and could then impair the fitness of long-lived birds.

  18. Effect of different levels of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) on performance, intestinal Escherichia coli colonization and jejunal morphology in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boka, J; Mahdavi, A H; Samie, A H; Jahanian, R

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different levels of black cumin seeds (Nigella sativa L.) on performance, intestinal Escherichia coli count and morphology of jejunal epithelial cells in laying hens. A total of 100 Leghorn laying hens (Hy-Line W-36) of 49 weeks old were randomly distributed among five cage replicates of five birds each. Experimental diets consisted of different levels (0%, 1%, 2% and 3% of diet) of dietary black cumin inclusion. The experimental period lasted for a total of 10 weeks, and egg quality indexes and laying hens' performance were measured as two 35-day trial periods. At the final day, two hens per replicate were slaughtered to investigate the influence of dietary treatments on intestinal E. coli colonization and morphology of jejunal cells. Although dietary black cumin in all supplementation levels decreased (p hens' performance were obtained by at least 2% black cumin seeds.

  19. Serum biochemical profile, enzymatic activity and lipid peroxidation in organs of laying hens fed diets containing cashew nut shell liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, N M; Freitas, E R; Trevisan, M T S; do Nascimento, G A J; Salles, R P R; Cruz, C E B; Farias, N N P; da Silva, I N G; Watanabe, P H

    2017-03-16

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of feeding laying hens diets containing cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) as a source of anacardic acid on the blood biochemical parameters as well as the enzymatic activity and lipid peroxidation of liver and tissues of the reproductive system (ovary, magnum, and uterus). A total of 216 Hisex White commercial laying hens were distributed randomly into six treatments, with six replicates of six birds. Treatments consisted of a diet without growth promoter (GP); a diet with GP; and diets without GP, with addition of increasing levels of CNSL (0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0%). Addition of CNSL to the diet did not affect the blood biochemical parameters (uric acid, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total cholesterol, high density lipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins and triglycerides), the enzymatic activity (superoxide dismutase and nonprotein sulphydryl groups) in the organs (liver, ovary, magnum and uterus) or the peroxidation of lipids from the blood serum, liver, magnum and uterus (p > 0.05). However, the addition of 0.75% and 1.00% CNSL provided a lower thiobarbituric acid reactive substances content in the birds' ovary (p < 0.001) compared to birds of other treatments, whereas the treatment without the GP provided a higher value. Addition of up to 1% of the CNSL as a source of anacardic acid in the laying hens' diets does not influence blood biochemical parameters or the endogenous enzymatic activity in the liver, ovary, magnum and uterus, but affects the lipid peroxidation in the ovary, although the problem is reduced from the inclusion of 0.75% CNSL. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Effect of monochromatic and combined light colour on performance, blood parameters, ovarian morphology and reproductive hormones in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rakibul Hassan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effect of monochromatic and combined light emitting diode (LED light colour on performance, ovarian morphology, and reproductive hormone and biochemical blood parameters in laying hens. A total of 600 Hy-line Brown pullets, 12 weeks of age, were divided (25×4×6 = birds × replications × treatments as follows: red (R, green (G, blue (B, and combinations of R→G and R→G→B treatments. Fluorescent white light (W was the control. The results showed that higher egg production was found under the monochromatic R and combination R→G treatments, and that heavier eggs were laid by the B and G treatments (P<0.05. Consequently, better feed conversion ratio was attained in the R→G treatment. Serum follicle stimulating hormone and 17β-estradiol levels were significantly higher in the R and R→G treatments. B treated birds came into production 15 days later than those treated with R light. Organ weight (ovary and stroma and ovarian follicle numbers (1-3 and 4-6 mm were significantly higher in R treated birds, as well as serum glucose and triglyceride contents. Serum IgG concentrations and the heterophil to lymphocyte ratio were not influenced by light colour. In these laying hens, 14 h R with 2 h G light in the later part of the day increased reproductive hormone levels, ovarian weight, and follicle number and hence increased egg production. Thus, these results suggest that a combination of R→G light may be comparable with monochromatic R light to enhance egg production in laying hens.

  1. Relation between social order and use of resources in small and large furnished cages for laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimmura, T; Azuma, T; Hirahara, S; Eguchi, Y; Uetake, K; Tanaka, T

    2008-09-01

    1. The objective was to determine the relation between social rank and use of resources in a small furnished cage with sufficient resources per hen (SF) and a commercial large one with less adequate allowance of facilities per hen (LF). 2. Ninety-two cross layers were used. At the age of 16 weeks, the hens were divided at random into two groups. There were 4 furnished cages with 5 birds per cage and 4 large furnished cages with 18 birds per cage. The dominance hierarchy was determined, in which highest, medium and lowest ranking hens in each cage were identified. Behaviour, use of facilities and physical conditions of these hens were measured (one in each rank category in SF, two in each in LF). 3. Dustbathing and litter scratching were more frequent in the high ranking hens than the medium and low ranked hens in LF, while no significant difference was found between them in SF. 4. No significant difference between SF and LF was found in use of nest boxes. However, pre-laying sitting tended to be less frequent in low ranking than medium and high ranking hens in LF (Social order x Cage design). In the nest box most of time was spent in pre-laying sitting by SF hens, LF high and medium ranked hens (average 94.9%). However, LF low ranking hens spent their time escaping (33.1%), pre-laying sitting (27.7%) standing (25.7%) and moving (13.5%) in the nest. 5. In the large furnished cages with less facilities per hen, high ranking hens may be expected to have priority using the dust bath. In contrast, low ranking hens rarely performed nesting behaviour fully, and spend more time using the nest box as a refuge than for laying.

  2. Blood protozoa of free-living birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, C.M.; McDiarmid, Archibald

    1969-01-01

    Blood protozoa were first reported from wild birds in 1884. Since then numerous surveys throughout the world have demonstrated their presence in a wide variety of hosts and localities with continuing designations of new species. Taxonomic determinations include parasites in the genera Plasmodium, Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon, Babesia, Lankesterella and Trypanosoma. Transmission of Plasmodium by mosquitoes was demonstrated with a bird parasite before these insects were proven as vectors of human malaria. All the genera under consideration require an insect vector to complete their life-cycles and susceptible vectors have been demonstrated. Most experimental work on the blood protozoa of birds has been carried on with captive birds. An extensive volume of research has been conducted on Plasmodium because of its close similarity to malaria in man. Field studies that would provide information on the epizootiology of occurrence of these parasites in wild populations have been very limited, mainly confined to single blood film surveys. Such data are inadequate to provide an understanding of true prevalence or incidence or of factual knowledge of their impact on the wild population. Mechanisms for procuring such information are available in some cases and can be developed to fit other situations. Isodiagnosis, inoculation of blood from wild birds into susceptible captive hosts, has revealed a prevalence of over 60 % for Plasmodium in situations where microscope examination of single peripheral blood preparations yielded less than 1 %. Culture of bone marrow collected by biopsy demonstrates high prevalence of trypanosomes even when none are evident from microscopic examination of blood. Often preparations of tissues collected at necropsy reveal Leucocytozoon and Lankesterella when examination of peripheral blood gave no indication of infection. Methods developed by bird ringers provide techniques for obtaining repeat examinations of free-living birds that can yield further

  3. One-step synthesis of bird cage-like ZnO and other controlled morphologies: Structural, growth mechanism and photocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuo [Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Jian [Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Physics and Chemistry (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education, Siping 136000 (China); Li, Xiuyan; Zhai, Hongju [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Physics and Chemistry (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education, Siping 136000 (China); Han, Donglai [Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Physics and Chemistry (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education, Siping 136000 (China); Wei, Bing [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Physics and Chemistry (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education, Siping 136000 (China); Wang, Dandan [Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Physics and Chemistry (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education, Siping 136000 (China); Yang, Jinghai, E-mail: jhyang1@jlnu.edu.cn [Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Physics and Chemistry (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education, Siping 136000 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanocage arrays were synthesized by a one-step etching route. • ZnO nanocage exhibit higher photocatalytic activity than other samples. • The different photocatalytic activities of different samples were analyzed. • The formation mechanism of ZnO nanocages was proposed. - Abstract: ZnO nanocages and other nanostructures have been synthesized via a simple one-pot hydrothermal method with different reaction times. It is worth mentioning that this is a completely green method which does not require any other chemicals except that Zn foil served as Zn source in the experiment. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL) and UV–Vis diffuse reflection spectra were used to characterize the crystallinity, morphology and optical property of ZnO structures. Growth mechanisms of ZnO were proposed based on these results. Furthermore, ZnO films with different morphologies and crystal growth habits exhibited different activities to rhodamine B degradation. The influence of the reaction time on the morphology of ZnO films and the effect of the morphologies on the photocatalytic activity are discussed.

  4. Early Onset of Laying and Bumblefoot Favor Keel Bone Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G.; Ernst K F Fröhlich

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Numerous studies have documented a high prevalence of keel bone fractures in laying hens. In this longitudinal study, 80 white and brown laying hens were regularly checked for keel bone deviations and fractures while egg production was individually monitored. About 62% of the hens had broken keel bones at depopulation. More new fractures occurred during the time when laying rates were highest. Hens with broken keel bones at depopulation had laid their first egg earlier than hen...

  5. Threatened bird valuation in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Kerstin K; Ainsworth, Gillian B; Meyerhoff, Jürgen; Garnett, Stephen T

    2014-01-01

    Threatened species programs need a social license to justify public funding. A contingent valuation survey of a broadly representative sample of the Australian public found that almost two thirds (63%) supported funding of threatened bird conservation. These included 45% of a sample of 645 respondents willing to pay into a fund for threatened bird conservation, 3% who already supported bird conservation in another form, and 15% who could not afford to pay into a conservation fund but who nevertheless thought that humans have a moral obligation to protect threatened birds. Only 6% explicitly opposed such payments. Respondents were willing to pay about AUD 11 annually into a conservation fund (median value), including those who would pay nothing. Highest values were offered by young or middle aged men, and those with knowledge of birds and those with an emotional response to encountering an endangered bird. However, the prospect of a bird going extinct alarmed almost everybody, even most of those inclined to put the interests of people ahead of birds and those who resent the way threatened species sometimes hold up development. The results suggest that funding for threatened birds has widespread popular support among the Australian population. Conservatively they would be willing to pay about AUD 14 million per year, and realistically about AUD 70 million, which is substantially more than the AUD 10 million currently thought to be required to prevent Australian bird extinctions.

  6. Effects of parenteral gibberellic acid and dietary supplementaion of vitamin D3 on egg quality and physiological characteristics in aged laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed M. Razuki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of parenteral gibberellic acid (GA3 and/or vitamin D3 supplementation in diet on egg quality and blood physiological characteristics in aged laying hens. A total of 270 Lohmann Brown Classic laying hens aging 73-week were randomly assigned to equal three treatment groups (T1, T2 and T3 with equal 3 replicas in each group. The birds of group T1 (control group were injected subcutaneously (SC with sesame oil at 0.2 mL/kg body weight. The birds of group T2 were given with GA3 at 400 µg/kg b.wt., SC, whereas group T3 had diet containing vitamin D3 at 500 IU/kg feed. Relative weight of albumen and egg shell, Haugh unit, shell thickness, serum glucose, serum calcium, serum phosphorous, serum estradiol, and bone calcium absorption were significantly increased in the birds of group T2 and T3. On the other hand, relative weight of yolk, yolk cholesterol, and serum cholesterol were significantly decreased in group T2 and T3 as compared to group T1. However, serum protein and albumen were unaffected in the treatments. In conclusion, the parenteral GA3 and vitamin D3 supplementation in diet could improve egg quality traits and serum blood biochemical perperties in agend laying hens.

  7. Metal-related oxidative stress in birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivula, Miia J., E-mail: miikoi@utu.f [Department of Biology, Section of Ecology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Eeva, Tapio, E-mail: teeva@utu.f [Department of Biology, Section of Ecology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland)

    2010-07-15

    Metals can cause oxidative stress by increasing the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which render antioxidants incapable of defence against growing amounts of free radicals. Metal toxicity is related to their oxidative state and reactivity with other compounds. Our aim is to review the mechanisms on how metals cause oxidative stress and what is known about metal-induced oxidative stress in wildlife. Taking birds as model organisms, we summarize the mechanisms responsible for antioxidant depletion and give a view of how to detect metal-induced oxidative stress in birds by using different biomarkers. The mechanisms producing the harmful effects of oxidative stress are complex with different biomolecular mechanisms associated with ecotoxicological and ecological aspects. The majority of the studies concerning metals and ROS related to oxidative stress have focused on the biomolecular level, but little is known about the effects at the cellular level or at the level of individuals or populations. - Free-living birds can be used as effective indicators of metal-induced oxidative stress.

  8. The effect of aloe vera bioactive level as feed additive on the egg performances of laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    I.A.K Bintang; A.P Sinurat; T Purwadaria

    2005-01-01

    A study on the use of aloe vera bioactives as feed additive in layer ration was conducted. One hundred and twenty pullets strain Isa Brown were allocated into 5 treatments with 6 replicates and 4 birds/replicate. The treatments were: control,control+antibiotic (50 ppm zinc bacitracin), and control+ aloe vera at three levels (0.25; 0.50 and 1.00 g/kg). The treatments were conducted in a completely randomized design. Parameter measured were first initial body weight, age at 1st lay, feed intake...

  9. One-step synthesis of bird cage-like ZnO and other controlled morphologies: Structural, growth mechanism and photocatalytic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuo; Wang, Jian; Li, Xiuyan; Zhai, Hongju; Han, Donglai; Wei, Bing; Wang, Dandan; Yang, Jinghai

    2014-11-01

    ZnO nanocages and other nanostructures have been synthesized via a simple one-pot hydrothermal method with different reaction times. It is worth mentioning that this is a completely green method which does not require any other chemicals except that Zn foil served as Zn source in the experiment. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL) and UV-Vis diffuse reflection spectra were used to characterize the crystallinity, morphology and optical property of ZnO structures. Growth mechanisms of ZnO were proposed based on these results. Furthermore, ZnO films with different morphologies and crystal growth habits exhibited different activities to rhodamine B degradation. The influence of the reaction time on the morphology of ZnO films and the effect of the morphologies on the photocatalytic activity are discussed.

  10. Physical Health Problems and Environmental Challenges Influence Balancing Behaviour in Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Stephanie; Tobalske, Bret; Quinton, Margaret; Springthorpe, Dwight; Szkotnicki, Bill; Wuerbel, Hanno; Harlander-Matauschek, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    With rising public concern for animal welfare, many major food chains and restaurants are changing their policies, strictly buying their eggs from non-cage producers. However, with the additional space in these cage-free systems to perform natural behaviours and movements comes the risk of injury. We evaluated the ability to maintain balance in adult laying hens with health problems (footpad dermatitis, keel damage, poor wing feather cover; n = 15) using a series of environmental challenges and compared such abilities with those of healthy birds (n = 5). Environmental challenges consisted of visual and spatial constraints, created using a head mask, perch obstacles, and static and swaying perch states. We hypothesized that perch movement, environmental challenges, and diminished physical health would negatively impact perching performance demonstrated as balance (as measured by time spent on perch and by number of falls of the perch) and would require more exaggerated correctional movements. We measured perching stability whereby each bird underwent eight 30-second trials on a static and swaying perch: with and without disrupted vision (head mask), with and without space limitations (obstacles) and combinations thereof. Video recordings (600 Hz) and a three-axis accelerometer/gyroscope (100 Hz) were used to measure the number of jumps/falls, latencies to leave the perch, as well as magnitude and direction of both linear and rotational balance-correcting movements. Laying hens with and without physical health problems, in both challenged and unchallenged environments, managed to perch and remain off the ground. We attribute this capacity to our training of the birds. Environmental challenges and physical state had an effect on the use of accelerations and rotations to stabilize themselves on a perch. Birds with physical health problems performed a higher frequency of rotational corrections to keep the body centered over the perch, whereas, for both health categories

  11. Developmental changes of lymphoid tissue in Harderian gland of the laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Bejdić

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Harderian gland of 110 laying hens was histologically investigated from the time of hatching to the period of 10 months of age. Tissue sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-schiff (PAS and methyl green-pyronin technique. The research shows that lymphoid tissue is colonised by three types of cells: heterophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells. The number of these cells is directly dependent on bird’s age. During the lifetime of the hens there gradually comes a shift in dominance of these three cell types. Lymphoid nodules are detected only in 40-day-old chickens, while later in adult birds Harderian gland is the organ which contain the largest number of mature plasma cells. Some plasma cells contain the Russell bodies with different size and shape.

  12. A Comprehensive Quantitative Assessment of Bird Extinction Risk in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Nathália Machado; Rafael Dias Loyola

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to avoid species loss, scientists have focused their efforts on the mechanisms making some species more prone to extinction than others. However, species show different responses to threats given their evolutionary history, behavior, and intrinsic biological features. We used bird biological features and external threats to (1) understand the multiple pathways driving Brazilian bird species to extinction, (2) to investigate if and how extinction risk is geographically structured,...

  13. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for alcids, diving birds, gulls, terns, passerine birds, pelagic birds, raptors, shorebirds, wading birds,...

  14. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: South Florida: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for diving birds, gulls, terns, passerine birds, pelagic birds, raptors, shorebirds, wading birds, and...

  15. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Upper Coast of Texas: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for diving birds, gulls, terns, passerine birds, pelagic birds, raptors, shorebirds, wading birds,...

  16. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, pelagic birds, passerine birds, gulls and...

  17. Pretty Bird by Bob Sinclair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Recently I was reminded of a story which my mother swears is trus (though she doesn t call me Bobby muchanymore):Back in 1958,when I was just past four years old,my parents gave me a young parakeet.My mother determinedthat our parakeet would learn to talk,and to this end sat at the microphone of a borrowed tape recorder for a full 1/2hour,saying over and over again:“Pretty bird!Pretty bird!Pretty bird!Pretty bird!...”and so on.The resultingtaped message was played for our parakeet at least once pe...

  18. Comparative evaluation of dietary oregano, anise and olive leaves in laying Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EV Christaki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the present study was the comparative evaluation of the effect of ground oregano, anise and olive leaves as feed additives on performance and some egg quality characteristics of laying Japanese quails. A total of 189 Coturnix japonica quails (126 females and 63 males, 149 days old, were randomly allocated into seven equal groups with three subgroups of 9 birds each (6 females and 3 males. A commercial laying diet was fed to the control group. The remaining six groups were fed the same diet supplemented with oregano at 10 g/kg or 20 g/kg, anise at 10 g/kg or 20 g/kg and olive leaves at 10 g/kg or at 20 g/kg. The birds were offered feed and water ad libitum for a period of 29 days, while being kept under commercial conditions. During the experiment, egg production, feed intake and mortality were recorded daily. At the end of the feeding period egg weight, egg yolk, albumen and eggshell weight percentages, egg yolk color (using the L*a*b* color space and blood serum triglycerides were determined. The diets supplemented with olive leaves (10 g/kg or 20 g/kg resulted in a tendency (p = 0.054 for higher egg production percentage. Also, the color parameter a* was significantly (p = 0.001 higher in the eggs of quails that consumed oregano (10g/kg or 20 g/kg or olive leaves (10g/kg or 20 g/kg.

  19. Seroprevalence of Mycoplasma gallisepticum antibody by ELISA and serum plate agglutination test of laying chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Zulfekar Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG is important avian pathogen responsible for chronic respiratory disease of chicken and turkeys, which result in large economic loss for the poultry industry. The objectives of this study were determination of seroprevalence of MG antibody of commercial layer chicken at laying period in selected areas of Bangladesh. Materials and Methods: A total of 563 blood samples were collected randomly from selected commercial layer chickens at laying period during the period from July to December, 2013. Indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA and serum plate agglutination (SPA test were performed to detect the presence of antibodies against MG. Results: Of 563 samples, 64.47% and 56.13% showed an overall prevalence of MG antibodies in iELISA and SPA test respectively. Prevalence of MG was recorded the highest (69.63% at 50-55 weeks of age compared with lowest (53.26% at 56-61 weeks of age (p<0.05. Significant (p<0.05 effect of breed were observed in the seroprevalence of MG infection in layer birds in the present study. The overall, 68.77%, 63.74% and 59.37% prevalence were found respectively in sonali, ISA Brown and White leg horn. The prevalence of MG antibodies was the highest (70.13% in December followed by November (68%, October (65.67%, August (63.46%, September (58.54% and July (51.78% month. The seroprevalence of MG antibodies was higher (69.63% in most of the large flocks and lower (56.82% in small flocks. Conclusion: Therefore, might be suggested that the commercial layer farms should be routinely checked to monitor MG infection and the reactor birds should be culled since MG organism has the potential to transmit vertically. The correlation between MG antibody in month and flock size was not significant (p=0.359 and p=0.868, respectively.

  20. Physiological Response and Postmolt Performance of Laying Hens Molted by Non-Feed Removal Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Khajali

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available One experiment was conducted to evaluate the physiological response and postmolt performance of laying hens subjected to non-feed removal molting programs. One hundred and eighty 78-week-old Hy-line W36 laying hens were distributed among 45 groups of four birds and located in cages so that mean body weight of each cage was very similar. Three adjacent cages were considered as a replicate and 3 such replicates were assigned to each treatment. There were five treatments (molting procedures: Treatment 1 was continuous feed removal (CFR and considered as the control. Hens on treatment 2 (T2 fed ground corn as sole feed ingredient and dietary vitamin and macro and microelement levels were maintained as Hy-line W36 guideline specifications. Treatment 3 was similar to T2 except that salt was removed from diet. Treatment 4 was similar to T2 except that corn was replaced with wheat. Treatment 5 was similar to treatment 4 except that salt was removed from diet. Birds on T2 to T5 were fed at the rate of 50 g day-1. The results indicated that hens subjected to CFR went out of production by Day 5 while those on corn or wheat diets with or without salt ceased egg production from Day 7 to Day 13. Nevertheless, postmolt egg production did not significantly differed among the treatments. Body weight loss in feed-deprived hens during molt was significantly (p<0.05 greater than non-feed removal treatments when measured on Day 7 and Day 12. Starvation during continuous feed removal resulted in increased heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L ratio (p<0.05, hematocrit and plasma T4 whereas decreased plasma T3 level (p<0.05.

  1. Nutrients and Cholesterol of Eggs Affected by Dried Tomato Meal in Laying Hens Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jein R. Leke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred MB 402 laying hens (36 weeks of age were used for the study. The birds were divided into five experimental diets and each was divided into four replicate groups of five birds per replicate. The control diet (based diet was formulated to contain 51% corn, 14% rice bran, 7% fish meal, 6% CaCO3, and 22% commercial diet. Tomato meal was included in four experimental diets at levels of 2, 4, 6, 8% to substitute based diet. The treatments were: R0 = 100% based diet (BD + 0% tomato meal (TM; R1 = 98% BD + 2% TM; R2 = 96% BD + 4% TM; R3 = 94% BD + 6% TM; and R4 = 92% BD + 8% TM. Chemical composition of tomato meal were: 16.73% crude protein, 1.53% fat, 30.94% crude fiber, 0.98% Ca, 1.20% P, and 2416 Kcal/kg ME. Feed and water were provided for ad libitum. The study was conducted over a period of 8 weeks, and data were collected on nutrients of eggs: crude protein, fat, carbohydrate, and cholesterol of eggs. Proximate analysis eggs was determined by the methods of AOAC (1990, and cholesterol was determined by Libermann and Burchad method. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. The treatment means were compared using Duncan’s multiple range test. The results showedthat no differences in hen egg nutrients and cholesterol between treatments R1, R2, R3, and R4 compared to treatment R0 (control. It can be concluded that tomato meal can be used as an alternative feedstuff in laying hen diets to substitute based diet, at inclusion levels up to 8% without negative effects on egg quality.

  2. Fish and Bird

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛秀波

    2010-01-01

    人物:B——Bird L——Little Fish M——Mother Fish N——Narracor(旁白)道具:角色头饰 N:一条生活在河里的Little Fish对天空充满了好奇,一心想飞到天空去看看。此时,Little Fish正依偎在Mother Fish身边,好奇地望着天空。

  3. The effect of perch availability during pullet rearing and egg laying on the behavior of caged White Leghorn hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, P Y; Garner, J P; Enneking, S A; Cheng, H W; Einstein, M E

    2014-10-01

    Enriched cages, compared with conventional cages, allow egg laying strains of chickens to meet some behavioral needs, including a high motivation to perch. The objective of this study was to determine if perch availability during rearing affected perch use as adults and if perch presence affected eating and drinking in caged White Leghorn hens. Chickens were assigned to 14 cages each with and without 2 round metal perches from hatch to 16.9 wk of age. At 17 wk of age, pullets were assigned to laying cages consisting of 1 of 4 treatments. Treatment 1 chickens never had access to perches (controls). Treatment 2 chickens only had access to 2 round metal perches during the laying phase (17 to 71 wk of age). Treatment 3 chickens only had access to 2 round perches during the pullet phase (0 to 16.9 wk of age). Treatment 4 chickens had access to the perches during both the pullet and laying phase. Each treatment during the adult phase consisted of 9 cages with 9 birds/cage for a total of 36 cages. Automatic infrared cameras were used to monitor behavior of hens in each cage for a 24-h period at 19, 24, 29, 34, 39, 44, 49, 54, 59, 64, and 69 wk of age. Behavior was also recorded twice weekly by an observer in the room where the hens were housed during photophase from 25 to 68 wk of age. Behavioral data were analyzed using ANOVA with repeated measures and the MIXED model procedure. A greater proportion of hens without perches as pullets used the rear perch more during both photophase and scotophase than hens with prior pullet perching experience. Eating and drinking activities of caged adult Leghorns were not impaired by their prior experience to perches as pullets or by the presence of perches in laying cages. It is concluded that providing perches in cages to White Leghorns during pullet rearing did not facilitate use of perches as adults.

  4. Early life in a barren environment adversely affects spatial cognition in laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Machado Tahamtani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial cognition in vertebrates is adversely affected by a lack of environmental complexity during early life. However, to our knowledge no previous studies have tested the effect of early exposure to varying degrees of environmental complexity on specific components of spatial cognition in chickens. There are two main rearing systems for laying hens in the EU: aviaries and cages. These two systems differ from one another in environmental complexity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that rearing in a barren cage environment relative to a complex aviary environment causes long-lasting deficits in the ability to perform spatial tasks. For this purpose, 24 white Dekalb laying hens, half of which had been reared in an aviary system and the other half in a conventional cage system, were tested in a holeboard task. Birds from both treatment groups learnt the task, however the cage-reared hens required more time to locate rewards and had poorer levels of working memory. The latter finding supports the hypothesis that rearing in a barren environment causes long-term impairment of short-term memory in chickens.

  5. Genetic variations alter physiological responses following heat stress in 2 strains of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felver-Gant, J N; Mack, L A; Dennis, R L; Eicher, S D; Cheng, H W

    2012-07-01

    Heat stress (HS) is a major problem experienced by the poultry industry during high-temperature conditions. The ability to manage the detrimental effects of HS can be attributed to multiple factors, including genetic background of flocks. The objective of the present study was to determine the genetic variation in HS effects on laying hens' physiological homeostasis. Ninety 28-wk-old White Leghorn hens of 2 strains were used: a commercial line of individually selected hens for high egg production, DeKalb XL (DXL), and a line of group-selected hens for high productivity and survivability, named kind gentle bird (KGB). Hens were randomly paired by strain and assigned to hot or control treatment for 14 d. Physical and physiological parameters were analyzed at d 8 and 14 posttreatment. Compared with controls, HS increased hen's core body temperature (P hens exposed to HS (P hens, KGB hens had higher heat shock protein 70 concentrations (P hens' liver weight decreased following HS, with less of a response in the KGB line (P hens due to genetic variations. These data provide evidence that is valuable for determining genetic interventions for laying hens under HS.

  6. INFLUENCE OF TRIBULUS TERRESTRIS EXTRACT SUPPLEMENTATION ON LAYING PRODUCTIVITY AND EGGS QUALITY IN JAPANESE QUAILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Nickolova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current work was to examine the influence of Bulgarian phytoproduct VemoHerb T (dry extract of Tribulus terrestris –TT on laying productivity of Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica and their egg morphological and sensor properties. A trial was organized with 52 female and 16 male Japanese quails from the breed Faraon at the age of 44 days randomly divided in four groups – control and three experimental groups, 13 female and 4 male each. All birds were fed ad libitum the same compound feed for Japanese quails. The trial lasted 10 weeks. The experimental groups received with the drink water the tested product in following daily doses: 4mg/kg body weight (10weeks; 10mg/kg body weight (the first 5 weeks of the trial; 10mg/kg body weight (10 weeks for Ist, IInd , IIInd experimental groups respectively. The addition of TT-extract improved significantly the laying productivity. It was found significant higher values of egg weight, albumen - and yolk weight in quails from IInd and IIIrd experimental groups. There was a tendency to increase the egg shell weight and egg shell thickness in all treated groups in comparison to the control group. The usе of VemoHerb T did not aggravate the sensor properties of the quails’ eggs.

  7. Effects of different lighting programs on semi-heavy laying hens reared in open shelters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Jorge de Freitas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of of lighting programs on the zootechnic performance and egg quality of semi-heavy laying hens were evaluated. Three light programs were tested: continuous lighting of 15h (artificial+natural, intermittent lighting (two photophases of 15s between the natural light and natural increased lighting. 192 birds were used, accommodated in a shed divided into three environments in such a way that the lighting of any given one did not interfere with the others. The experimental period lasted 112 days, during which the zootechnic performance was evaluated through the egg production, feed intake, weight and mass of eggs. The quality of the eggs was valued through their specific gravity, weight and shell thickness, and Haugh unit measurement. The design was entirely randomized, with eight repetitions, and the averages of the treatments were compared by the SNK test (5%. In the results of performance, the feed intake and egg weight were similar (P0.05 under the natural light program. The quality of the eggs was not altered (P<0.05 by any of the programs. It was concluded that the intermittent lighting program could be use in open sheds, maintaining the zootechnic performance of semi-heavy laying hens and without altering the quality of their eggs. In contrast, the program of natural increased light reduces egg production.

  8. Utilisation of Giant African snail (Achatina fulica meal as protein source for laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siaka Seriba Diarra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A 12-week experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of substituting Giant African snail meal for fish meal in laying hens diet. Four diets were formulated to contain snail meal as replacement for fish meal at 0 (control, 33, 67 and 100 %. A total of 120 Shaver Brown pullets aged 18 weeks were allocated to the dietary treatments in a randomised design. Each treatment consisted of three replicates and ten birds per replicate. Feed intake increased only for the 33% treatment as compared to the 67% replacement diet but did not differ from the other treatments. There were no significant treatment effects on egg performance parameters observed (egg production, egg weight, total egg mass, feed conversion ratio and percent shell. The overall feed cost of egg production reduced on the snail mealbased diets. The organoleptic evaluation of boiled eggs revealed no difference between the treatments. Based on these results it was concluded that total replacement of fish meal with cooked snail meat meal does not compromise laying performance or egg quality. The substitution is beneficial in terms of production cost reduction and the reduction of snails will have a beneficial impact especially where these snails are a serious agricultural pest. The manual collection and processing of snails can also become a source of rural income.

  9. Effect of dietary supplementation with Morinda citrifolia on productivity and egg quality of laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dairon Más-Toro

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the dietary supplementation of powdered leaves of Morinda citrifolia on productivity and egg quality of laying hens, a total of 160 White Leghorn birds (Hybrid L-33 of 27 weeks of age were allotted during 70 days, according to completely randomized design. Dietary treatments consisted of a control diet fed without or with 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% of powdered leaves of M. citrifolia. Supplementation of 1.0 and 1.5% of M. citrifolia powder increased the egg weight (P0.05 among treatments. Also, supplementation of 0.5 and 1.0% of M. citrifolia increased the shell thickness and the yolk color was pigmented by this medicinal plant. It recommended the dietary supplementation of 1.0% of powdered leaves of M. citrifolia on laying hen diets to improve the egg weight, shell thickness and yolk color.

  10. Determination of digestible isoleucine: lysine ratio in diets for laying hens aged 42-58 weeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Helena de Carvalho Mello

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and fifty-two Hy-Line W36 laying hens were allotted in a completely randomized design with 6 treatments, 7 replicates and 6 hens per experimental unit in order to determine the ideal ratio of isoleucine (Ile in relation to lysine (Lys to laying hens aged 42-58 weeks. Experimental diets contained digestible Ile at different levels, resulting in different Ile:Lys ratios (0.73:1; 0.78:1; 0.83:1; 0.88:1; 0.93:1 and 0.98:1. A basal diet was formulated to provide Isoleucine in levels below recommendations. This diet was supplemented with L-isoleucine to make up the 6 diets. Each diet was made isonitrogenous by varying the dietary contents of glutamic acid and isocaloric by adjusting the contents of cornstarch. All essential amino acids were provided proportionally to lysine. Egg production, egg weight, egg mass, feed conversion ratio, albumen, yolk and eggshell contents were recorded and compiled at every 28-day period. No differences were observed in the performance over a wide range of dietary isoleucine concentrations from 5.76 to 7.73 g/kg corresponding to 0.73:1 to 0.98:1 Ile:Lys ratios. The lowest Ile:Lys ratio (0.73:1 was sufficient to ensure satisfactory performance of birds, corresponding to the consumption of 534 mg of isoleucine and 731 mg of lysine/day.

  11. 10 CFR 904.11 - Lay off of energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lay off of energy. 904.11 Section 904.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.11 Lay off of energy. (a) If any Contractor determines that it is temporarily...

  12. Narratives of Mastery and Resistance: Lay Ethics of Nanotechnology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael; Macnaghten, Phil

    2010-01-01

    This paper contributes towards a lay ethics of nanotechnology through an analysis of talk from focus groups designed to examine how laypeople grapple with the meaning of a technology ‘in-the- making’. We describe the content of lay ethical concerns before suggesting that this content can...

  13. A new method of laying of district heating pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claesson, C.; Persson, C.; Jarfelt, U. [Department of Building Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Ramnaes, O. [Department of Chemical Environmental Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    A new method of laying of district heating pipes is described with its advantages and disadvantages. The method has earlier been applied to installation of gas pipes and broadband, but has to our knowledge never been used in connection to district heating. The method aims at shortening the laying time and minimising the impact on the asphalt layer, thus reducing the laying costs. The idea is to cold install the pipes into a milled, narrow and shallow trench that is refilled with foam concrete. Environmental impacts caused by the new laying method are studied in comparison with the traditional laying method. Emissions of carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides and sulphur dioxide to air from activities differing between the two laying methods during construction of DN40 twin pipe networks are considered as well as emissions related to distribution heat losses from the networks. There is no environmental objective against using the new method considering the studied emissions. Laying according to the new and the traditional method cause emissions of the same order of magnitude. Calculated temperature of the casing does not indicate any problem with accelerated thermal oxidation of the casing pipe due to laying in the thermally insulating foam concrete. (orig.)

  14. 48 CFR 1352.271-86 - Lay days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... additional day on dry dock or marine railway caused by a Government-issued change. Reimbursement for lay days... unless all dry dock work included in the contract line items is complete. (c) Days of hauling out and... been in dry dock. (d) Payment of lay day time shall constitute complete compensation for all costs...

  15. Use of infrared thermography to assess laying-hen feather coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Xin, H; Dong, B

    2013-02-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) was compared with the traditional 4-scale feather scoring (FS, with 1 representing the worst feather coverage and 4 the best) method for assessing feather coverage of laying hens. The feather coverage of 6 body parts (head, dorsal neck, front neck and crop, back, breast, and belly), body surface temperature distribution, and relative change in sensible heat loss of 60 laying hens (Lohmann SL white breed) at 28, 56, or 73 wk of age (20 hens per age group) were compared by using IRT. For all the 6 body parts and the area-weighted overall, the area of excellent feather (EF) determined by IRT was positively correlated with the 4-scale scores determined by FS (P hens at all body parts. Feather coverage of the hens was classified as 98.7% EF, 1.3% FF, and 0% NF at 28 wk of age; 70.2% EF, 20.6% FF, and 9.2% NF at 56 wk of age; and 35.4% EF, 17.1% FF, and 49.5% NF at 73 wk of age. As a result of less feather coverage and higher surface temperature, sensible heat loss was speculated to be higher for 56- and 73-wk-old hens than for 28-wk-old hens, potentially leading to higher feed-to-egg conversion for the elder hens. It was concluded that IRT is a promising technique or tool that may provide a more objective and quantitative evaluation of laying-hen feather conditions and delineation of bird thermoregulation.

  16. Do pairing systems improve welfare of captive Red-Legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) in laying cages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, R; Sánchez-García, C; Alonso, M E; Rodríguez, P L; Gaudioso, V R

    2012-08-01

    Although animal welfare has become an important premise in poultry, little attention has been paid to the effects of present-day rearing methods on the welfare of game birds, species released for hunting and re-establishment purposes. This work studied the effect of pairing methods on the welfare of the Red-Legged partridge kept in laying cages (4,500 cm2), a commonly hunted game species in Western Europe. Agonistic behavior and possible injuries caused by aggression were studied during the pairing and laying period in 2 types of couples: the forced type (n=24), 1 male and 1 female randomly chosen and placed in the same cage, and the free type (n=24), where the female had the opportunity to chose between 4 males, using the time spent by the female near each male as female choice parameter. Welfare of partridges was affected by pairing system, as aggressive behavior, divorces and injuries were observed in a higher rate in forced pairs (25% of pairs did not finish the productive cycle) than in free pairs (16.6%). In addition, more females were attacked in forced pairs, whereas in free pairs, the number of attacked males and mutual aggression was increased. Males tended to display more aggressive behavior than females, pecking mainly on the head and back of females. Although injuries were observed in a minor rate in free pairs, a higher mortality was reported in females compared with males from both free and forced pairs (6 females died in total). The poor welfare in a high percentage of laying pairs hampers the development of sustainable rearing methods for the species. Thus, farmers should consider avoiding forced pairing.

  17. Effect of dietary NPP level and phytase supplementation on the laying performance over one year period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Tischler

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Our trial was aimed to study the effect of different dietary non-phytin phosphorus (NPP levels with and without phytase enzyme supplementation on laying performance and eggshell quality of Tetra SL-LL in the last 25 weeks of the long-term (17 months egg production. A total of 69 Tetra SL-LL layers were allocated into 3 dietary treatments. Two diets with different levels of NPP (2.45 or 2.15 g/kg, HP and LP, respectively were formulated, and 0 or 300 FTU/kg phytase enzyme was added to low NPP feed (LP and LP+E, respectively. Dietary Ca was uniformly adjusted (38.2 g/kg to feed in each treatment. In the course of the trial, intensity of egg production (%, egg weight (g/egg, number of the broken eggs and feed intake (g/d/bird were recorded. Every 2 weeks 20 eggs per treatment were broken to determine the shell strength and thickness. Our results show that low NPP diet had detrimental effect on the intensity of egg production (P<0.05 and phytase added to the LP diet resulted the lowest number of broken eggs (P<0.05. In conclusion, NPP content of the layer diet can be reduced from 2.45 to 2.15 g/kg in the last 25 weeks of the elongated laying term (12-17 month of laying, if supplemented with 300 FTU/kg phytase enzyme without compromising the egg production, and in the same time it can improve eggshell quality and reduce the number of broken eggs.

  18. Abnormal behavior in caged birds kept as pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, C S; ten Cate, C

    1998-01-01

    There are a limited number of studies dealing with abnormal behavior in caged birds kept as pets. However, these studies demonstrate the presence of abnormal behavior in both songbirds and parrots. Ethological studies on these birds, as well as studies on domestic and zoo birds, indicate that inappropriate rearing and housing conditions may lead to behavioral abnormalities. Together these data indicate that behavioral abnormalities occur among both wild-caught and domesticated pet birds. The severity and magnitude of these abnormalities is probably underestimated, and there is a need for systematic studies on the nature, origin, variability, species-specificity, and reversibility of behavioral problems in pet birds. Abnormal behavior in caged birds may to some extent be prevented and reduced by environmental enrichment. However, most enrichment studies are anecdotal and not based on a thorough analysis of the behavioral abnormalities, which may lead to measures resulting in a reduction of symptoms rather than the underlying causes. Although it is likely that several of these problems could be reduced by modifying rearing and housing conditions, the current insights into the causal mechanisms underlying abnormal behavior of domesticated and wild-caught pet birds are limited, as are the insights into the possibilities of preventing or curing abnormal behavior.

  19. Boiler system lay-up; Avstaellning och konservering av pannanlaeggningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Mats

    2007-04-15

    Corrosion in power plant equipment is to a large extent a result of poor lay-up procedures. This applies for all equipment on the water and steam side e.g. condensers, boilers, turbines, heat exchangers etc. In theory, lay-up procedures are quite straightforward. The main objective is to avoid a combination of water and oxygen on the steel surfaces within the system. When using dry lay-up procedure, a totally dry environment is essential. The corrosion of steel cannot take place if there is no humidity; in spite of the abundance of oxygen i.e. air. As an alternative the steam side system can be purged with nitrogen so that no air ingress can take place. When using wet lay-up procedures it is important to achieve an oxygen free environment. Creating a slight over-pressure thus avoiding air in leakage can achieve this. Oxygen scavengers might be used as an alternative. Usually problems of maintaining the above mentioned conditions are rarely of technical art. More likely it is due to a lack of knowledge and commitment or short sighted economical considerations. This report summarises the experiences gathered at several visits at plants and discussions with vendors, users and consultants in the power industry. In addition to that, guidelines from well-reputed organisations, international and domestic, have been studied. In many cases the power plant managers believe they have proper lay-up routines but often the routines just regard long time lay-up. This may be regarded as the most important case. However, a number of shorter plant outages in combination with poor lay-up routines can result in severe damages. There is a consensus that a proper lay-up can only be achieved by plant specific lay-up procedures. Each unit is unique in terms of needs and requirements. In order to have as low corrosion as possible a systematic review to evaluate and revise lay-up procedures is preferred. A high in-house knowledge of the power plant enhances the possibility to maintain the

  20. BIRD FLU MASKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YASAR KESKIN

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza (bird flu is a disease of birds caused by influenza viruses closely related to human influenza viruses. The potential for transformation of avian influenza into a form that both causes severe disease in humans and spreads easily from person to person is a great concern for world health. The main purpose of a mask is to help prevent particles (droplets being expelled into the environment by the wearer. Masks are also resistant to fluids, and help protect the wearer from splashes of blood or other potentially infectious substances. They are not necessarily designed for filtration efficiency, or to seal tightly to the face. Masks and respirators are components of a number of infection control measures intended to protect healthcare workers, and prevent the spread of diseases. All healthcare workers who come into contact with a possible or probable case of any respiratory track infections should wear a respirator conforming to at least EN149:2001 FFP3. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(4.000: 296-306

  1. Protein turnover in the breast muscle of broiler chicks and studies addressing chlorine dioxide sanitation of hatching eggs, poultry leg problems and wheat middling diets for laying hens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    Developmental changes occurred in breast muscle Ks measured by {sup 14}C-tyrosine incorporation at 10, 16, 22 and 34 days of age. Protein synthesis rates decreased as the birds matures: 30 to 11.2%/d between 10 and 34 days of age. In a second study birds fed diets low in lysine or protein-energy had reduced fractional rates of protein synthesis and free tyrosine, branched chain and large neutral amino acid concentrations as compared to control birds the same body weight. Artificial weight loading and reduced dietary protein levels were used to study the effects of body weight on the severity of leg deformities in chicks and poults. Experiments investigating the practicality of wheat middlings as an alternate feedstuff for laying hens suggested that high levels in the diet will reduce egg production, feed conversion, hen livability and egg yolk color. Lastly, chlorine dioxide foam and dipping solutions were compared with formaldehyde fumigation for sanitizing hatching eggs.

  2. Changes in the expression of estrogen receptor mRNA in the utero-vaginal junction containing sperm storage tubules in laying hens after repeated artificial insemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shubash Chandra; Nagasaka, Naohiro; Yoshimura, Yukinori

    2006-03-01

    The objective was to determine whether expression of estrogen receptor (ER) mRNA in the utero-vaginal junction (UVJ) of laying hens was altered after repeated artificial insemination (AI). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine the expression of mRNA of the two types of receptor, ERalpha and ERbeta. Only ERalpha mRNA was expressed in all segments of the oviducts of both virgin and artificially inseminated birds, whereas ERbeta mRNA was expressed in ovarian follicles but not in the oviduct. The expression of ERalpha mRNA in the UVJ was significantly decreased after repeated AI, whereas that in the uterus was not significantly different between virgin and inseminated birds. Since estrogen may be involved in maintaining the sperm storage function of sperm storage tubules, the decreased expression of ERalpha mRNA in the UVJ after repeated AI may contribute to reduced fertility in these birds.

  3. The effect of replacing soya bean oil with glycerol in diets on performance, egg quality and egg fatty acid composition in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cufadar, Y; Göçmen, R; Kanbur, G

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to replace soya bean oil with glycerol in laying hen diets and assess the change's effect on performance, parameters of egg quality and the egg fatty acid profile. A total of 60 44-week-old Hy-Line W36 laying hens were distributed according to a completely randomised experimental design into four treatments consisting of glycerol substitutions for soya bean oil dietary at varying inclusion levels (0%, 25%, 50% and 75%), with five replicates of three birds each. Dietary treatments had no significant effect on BW change, egg production, feed intake, feed conversion ratio, egg weight and egg mass of laying hens. The inclusion of glycerol in the diet of laying hens had no significant effect on egg specific gravity, eggshell breaking strength, eggshell weight, eggshell thickness, egg shape index, albumen index, yolk index, haugh unit, albumen pH, yolk pH and egg yolk colour values. The inclusion of glycerol in the diet of laying hens had no significant effect on palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic, oleic and linolenic acid contents of the egg yolk. The linoleic acid and polyunsaturated fatty acid contents of the egg yolk significantly decreased with the higher levels of dietary glycerol supplementation (Pbean oil (4.5% in diet) with glycerol.

  4. Tuberculosis in wild birds: implications for captive birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converse, K. A.; Dein, F. J.

    1990-01-01

    The geographic distribution of avian tuberculosis is widespread but the lack of visible epizootics makes assessment of its impact on wild birds difficult. Generally a low prevalence, widely-scattered, individual animal disease, avian tuberculosis is caused by the same agent in wild and domestic birds. Thus there exists the potential for disease transfer between these two groups in situations that result in direct contact such as wild animals newly captured or transferred from rehabilitation centers, and wild and captive animals intermingling in exhibit areas. During the past 7 yr, tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium avium, was diagnosed in 64 birds submitted to the National Wildlife Health Research Center from 16 states; avian tuberculosis was the primary diagnosis in 52 of the 64 birds, while the remaining 12 isolates were incidental findings. Twenty-eight of these birds were picked up during epizootics caused by other disease agents including avian cholera, botulism type C, and lead, organophosphorus compound, and cyanide poisoning. Twelve birds were found incidental to birds collected during disease monitoring programs and research projects, and 10 birds were collected by hunters or found sick and euthanatized. Tuberculosis lesions occurred (in order of decreasing frequency) in the liver, intestine, spleen, lung, and air sacs. Several unusual morphological presentations were observed in the gizzard, shoulder joint, jugular vein, face, nares and bill, ureter and bone marrow. Infected birds were collected during all 12 mo of the yr from a variety of species in the Anseriformes, Podicipediformes, Gruiformes, and Falconiformes. Nine of the 46 known age birds were immature indicating that lesions can develop during the first year.

  5. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Vivek V; Devon, Rebecca L; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R; Chousalkar, Kapil K

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  6. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-04-26

    In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources). These were: apron (0-10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments); enriched belt (10-50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided); and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture). Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND) of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range areas tend to be

  7. FAQ: West Nile Virus and Dead Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Public Service Videos West Nile Virus & Dead Birds Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On This ... dead bird sightings to local authorities. How do birds get infected with West Nile virus? West Nile ...

  8. Migration Helps Spread Bird Flu Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161473.html Migration Helps Spread Bird Flu Worldwide Scientists recommend keeping ... birds can spread bird flu worldwide and monitoring migration routes could provide early warning of outbreaks, researchers ...

  9. Effects of faba beans with different concentrations of vicine and convicine on egg production, egg quality and red blood cells in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessire, M; Gallo, V; Prato, M; Akide-Ndunge, O; Mandili, G; Marget, P; Arese, P; Duc, G

    2016-12-29

    The faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is a potential source of proteins for poultry, mainly for laying hens whose protein requirements are lower than those of other birds such as growing broilers and turkeys. However, this feedstuff contains anti-nutritional factors, that is, vicine (V) and convicine (C) that are already known to reduce laying hen performance. The aim of the experiment reported here was to evaluate the effects of a wide range of dietary V and C concentrations in laying hens. Two trials were performed with laying hens fed diets including 20% or 25% of faba bean genotypes highly contrasting in V+C content. In Trial 1, faba beans from two tannin-containing cultivars, but with high or low V+C content were dehulled in order to eliminate the tannin effect. In addition to the contrasting levels of V+C in the two cultivars, two intermediate levels of V+C were obtained by mixing the two cultivars (70/30 and 30/70). In Trial 2, two isogenic zero-tannin faba bean genotypes with high or low V+C content were used. In both trials, a classical corn-soybean diet was also offered to control hens. Each experimental diet was given to 48 laying hens for 140 (Trial 1) or 89 (Trial 2) days. Laying performance and egg quality were measured. The redox sensitivity of red blood cells (RBCs) was assessed by measuring hemolysis and reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration in these cells. Egg weight was significantly reduced by the diets containing the highest concentrations of V+C (Phens fed high V+C diets. A decrease in GSH concentration in RBCs of hens fed the highest levels of V+C was observed. Faba bean genotypes with low concentrations of V+C can therefore be used in laying hen diets up to 25% without any detrimental effects on performance levels or egg characteristics, without any risk of hemolysis of RBCs.

  10. Effect of age of release from light or food restriction on age at sexual maturity and egg production of laying pullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gous, R M; Bradford, G D; Johnson, S A; Morris, T R

    2000-07-01

    1. Lohmann Brown pullets, in one trial, and Hyline Brown pullets in another, were reared from day 2 on short daylengths, and from week 8 in trial 1 (week 16 in trial 2) on food restriction. These restrictions were lifted at various times during the rearing period as a means of determining the relative importance of the day length and food restriction stimuli on the attainment of sexual maturity and subsequent laying performance. 2. A total of 2304 pullets were used in each trial. The birds were reared in light proof rooms, and subjected to 8L:16D until they were moved to a laying facility where a light stimulus of 16L:8D was applied. In trial 1 the six ages at which light stimulation was applied were 115, 122, 129, 136, 143 and 171 d. Within each light treatment, food restriction of pullets, which consisted of feeding 72 g of food/bird d, was lifted at six different ages, namely, 115, 129, 143, 157, 171 and 185 d. In trial 2 both the light stimulation and the lifting of food restriction occured at 111, 125, 139, 153, 167 and 181 d of age, producing 6x6=36 treatments in both trials. 3. The first trial was terminated when the pullets were 28 weeks old, soon after all the birds had commenced laying, because of an outbreak of Egg Drop Syndrome. However, because age at maturity was the variable of major interest, data from this experiment could be used in the analysis. The second trial ended when the birds reached 40 weeks of age. Variables measured were age at maturity, food intake and body weight gain subsequent to the lifting of restrictions and, in the second experiment, rate of lay, peak rate of lay and egg weight at various ages. 4. The mean age at sexual maturity was influenced by the date of release from light restriction (Pexperiments. These effects were not independent: the effect of the interaction of light and food restriction on this increase in food intake was also highly significant. The longer the birds were subjected to light restriction, the less

  11. Breeding bird populations and habitat associations within the Savannah River Site (SRS).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthreaux, Sidney, A.; Steven J. Wagner.

    2005-06-29

    Gauthreaux, Sidney, A., and Steven J. Wagner. 2005. Breeding bird populations and habitat associations within the Savannah River Site (SRS). Final Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 48 pp. Abstract: During the 1970's and 1980's a dramatic decline occurred in the populations of Neotropical migratory birds, species that breed in North America and winter south of the border in Central and South America and in the Caribbean. In 1991 an international initiative was mounted by U. S. governmental land management agencies, nongovernmental conservation agencies, and the academic and lay ornithological communities to understand the decline of Neotropical migratory birds in the Americas. In cooperation with the USDA Forest Service - Savannah River (FS - SR) we began 1992 a project directed to monitoring population densities of breeding birds using the Breeding Bird Census (BBC) methodology in selected habitats within the Savannah River Site SRS. In addition we related point count data on the occurrence of breeding Neotropical migrants and other bird species to the habitat data gathered by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the USDA Forest Service and data on habitat treatments within forest stands.

  12. WT-BIRD. Bird collision monitoring system for multi-megawatt wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggelinkhuizen, E.J.; Rademakers, L.W.M.M.; Barhorst, S.A.M. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Den Boon, H.J. [E-Connection Project, Bunnik (Netherlands); Dirksen, S. [Bureau Waardenburg, Culemborg (Netherlands)

    2007-05-15

    A new method for detection and registration of bird collisions has been developed that is suitable for continuous remote operation in both onshore and offshore wind farms. The characteristic sound of a collision is detected by sensors in the blades, which triggers the storage of video registrations and sends an alert message to the operator. A prototype has been tested successfully on a Nordex N80/2.5MW turbine at ECN's Wind turbine Test park Wieringermeer. Compared to other methods employed so far this monitoring system will reduce the uncertainty in the number of birds killed by collisions with wind turbines. Further, the system enables the operator to identify species and to study the collision mechanisms. It has been found that this system can also be used for monitoring of other events in order to save costs for inspection and repair after incidents. For offshore wind farms, the WT-Bird system is currently the only alternative to count the number of bird collisions. Functional tests with tennis balls that were shot against rotating blades showed that the majority of the impacts were detected. The flight track of these dummies and the collision events were clearly visible on the video registrations. During the monitoring period of about one year two bird collisions were detected. The video recordings confirmed that a collision took place and showed that the location of both collisions was near the blade root, which resulted that in both cases the bird was not (immediately) killed. Therefore no corpses could be found beneath the turbine after these events. Also during the rest of the monitoring period no corpses were found beneath the turbine.

  13. Adding value to the meat of spent laying hens manufacturing sausages with a healthy appeal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KMR de Souza

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the viability of the use of spent laying hens' meat in the manufacturing of mortadella-type sausages with healthy appeal by using vegetable oil instead of animal fat. 120 Hy-line® layer hens were distributed in a completely randomized design into two treatments of six replicates with ten birds each. The treatments were birds from light Hy-line® W36 and semi-heavy Hy-line® Brown lines. Cold carcass, wing, breast and leg fillets yields were determined. Dry matter, protein, and lipid contents were determined in breast and leg fillets. The breast and legg fillets of three replicates per treatment were used to manufacture mortadella. After processing, sausages were evaluated for proximal composition, objective color, microbiological parameters, fatty acid profile and sensory acceptance. The meat of light and semi-heavy spent hens presented good yield and composition, allowing it to be used as raw material for the manufacture of processed products. Mortadellas were safe from microbiological point of view, and those made with semi-heavy hens fillets were redder and better accepted by consumers. Values for all sensory attributes were evaluated over score 5 (neither liked nor disliked. Both products presented high polyunsaturated fatty acid contents and good polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio. The excellent potential for the use of meat from spent layer hens of both varieties in the manufacturing of healthier mortadella-type sausage was demonstrated.

  14. Psychotherapy. Sublimation and the psychodynamics of birding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Norman A

    2012-07-01

    An adventure in extreme birding prompted the psychoanalyst author to reflect on "why do people do this?" Like myriad human interests, vocations, and avocations, the activity of bird watching is a socially acceptable activity that is the final pathway for multiple motivations that are likely to have a long history in the individual's development. It may have origins in basic survival skills. Various psychological defense mechanisms may be involved, the most mature and successful one being sublimation. Success of a defense-like sublimation may be viewed in terms of freedom from anxiety or from obsessive extremes that interfere with the individual's wellbeing, important relationships, or physical or financial health. The author considers whether the characters in the film The Big Year exemplify such success or the lack of it.

  15. Lay beliefs about smoking in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Alison A; Manan, Wan A; Gani, Abdullah S; Carter, Yvonne H

    2004-09-01

    Studies have shown that smokers rationalize smoking by self-exempting beliefs. This study explored lay beliefs about smoking in Kelantan, Malaysia, using focus groups among outpatients, medical students and staff, and a questionnaire survey of 193 male smokers. In focus groups, patients said they could do something to make smoking safe. When asked, 'Do you think there are any safe ways to smoke?' 132/193 (68%) male smokers described at least one way. The commonest were 'drink water' (69/193, 36%), 'use a filter' (60/193, 31%), 'smoke after food' (27/193, 14%), and 'take sour fruit' (21/193, 11%). At three- or six-month follow-up, numbers agreeing with these beliefs were: for 'drink water' 67/115 (58%), for 'take sour fruit' 61/115 (53%), and for 'smoke after food' 38/115 (33%), with 88/115 (77%) supporting at least one. The main explanations for water were that it cleaned or moistened the lungs or throat. Sour fruit was described as cleaning, and sometimes as 'sharp', able to scrape out the essence of cigarettes. The conclusion is that self-exempting false beliefs about smoking are widespread, and here they probably represent an extension of the traditional humoral system. Anti-smoking campaigns and health workers in smoking cessation services should address these beliefs.

  16. The conspiratorial style in lay economic thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiser, David; Duani, Nofar; Wagner-Egger, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates patterns of lay perception of economics, and in particular the place of conspiratorial thinking regarding the economic domain. We devised four types of accounts in the economic domain, over a range of questions regarding different aspects of the economy: the classical neo-liberal economic view (which we labeled Econ101), and the Conspiracy view (the destructive outcomes of economy are due to small and powerful groups who are manipulating the markets), to which we added the Government malfunction view (failures in the economy are due to the authorities), and the Bad Invisible Hand view (the invisible hand may go wrong, and the equilibrium reached by its doings may be undesirable). The last two views are the ones most strongly endorsed by our respondents, in the US, Israel and Switzerland. The pattern of inter-correlations between the four accounts, and that between each and the psycho-social variables we examined, exhibits two clusters, Econ101 vs. the other three views of economy. This corresponds to a general opposition between people who trust the neoliberal economic system, and those opposed to it. What sets economic conspiratorial thinking apart are its links with other conspirational beliefs and with paranormal beliefs.

  17. ZECOMIX: Performance of alternative lay-outs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeno, G.; Spazzafumo, G. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Cassino, Via G. Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    ZECOMIX is a plant for hydrogen production and power generation using coal as a primary energy source and with nearly zero emissions. The global lay-out can be divided in 5 sectors: coal gasification, O{sub 2} production, CO{sub 2} capture, CO{sub 2} sequestration, power generation. Coal is hydro gasified using a stream of hydrogen internally recycled. The syngas, mainly methane, is then reformed with steam and CaO in such a way to obtain a gaseous stream of hydrogen and steam separated from CaCO{sub 3} which is solid. CaO is then regenerated inside a calciner which produce also a gaseous stream of CO{sub 2} which has to be stored. The stream of hydrogen is burned with stoichiometric O{sub 2} and the resulting steam is expanded in a steam power plant. After having focused our efforts on the coal gasification and CO{sub 2} capture, we selected a layout for these sections and analysed the possibility to cogenerate hydrogen and power. The results confirmed that cogeneration is the most efficient solution and ZECOMIX seems to be an interesting option. (author)

  18. Corporate personhood: Lay perceptions and ethical consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Arthur S; Laurin, Kristin

    2017-03-01

    Modern conceptions of corporate personhood have spurred considerable debate about the rights that society should afford business organizations. Across eight experiments, we compare lay perceptions of how corporations and people use rights, and also explore the consequences of these judgments. We find that people believe corporations, compared to humans, are similarly likely to use rights in protective ways that prevent harm but more likely to use rights in nonprotective ways that appear independent from-or even create-harm (Experiments 1a through 1c and Experiment 2). Because of these beliefs, people support corporate rights to a lesser extent than human rights (Experiment 3). However, people are more supportive of specific corporate rights when we framed them as serving protective functions (Experiment 4). Also as a result of these beliefs, people attribute greater ethical responsibility to corporations, but not to humans, that gain access to rights (Experiments 5a and 5b). Despite their equitability in many domains, people believe corporations and humans use rights in different ways, ultimately producing different reactions to their behaviors as well as asymmetric moral evaluations. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. The conspiratorial style in lay economic thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates patterns of lay perception of economics, and in particular the place of conspiratorial thinking regarding the economic domain. We devised four types of accounts in the economic domain, over a range of questions regarding different aspects of the economy: the classical neo-liberal economic view (which we labeled Econ101), and the Conspiracy view (the destructive outcomes of economy are due to small and powerful groups who are manipulating the markets), to which we added the Government malfunction view (failures in the economy are due to the authorities), and the Bad Invisible Hand view (the invisible hand may go wrong, and the equilibrium reached by its doings may be undesirable). The last two views are the ones most strongly endorsed by our respondents, in the US, Israel and Switzerland. The pattern of inter-correlations between the four accounts, and that between each and the psycho-social variables we examined, exhibits two clusters, Econ101 vs. the other three views of economy. This corresponds to a general opposition between people who trust the neoliberal economic system, and those opposed to it. What sets economic conspiratorial thinking apart are its links with other conspirational beliefs and with paranormal beliefs. PMID:28257506

  20. THE EFFECTS OF DIETS CONTAINING DIFFERENT LEVEL OF NON-STARCH POLYSACCHARIDES ON PERFORMANCE AND CANNIBALISM IN LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hartini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to observe the effect of different diets containing different level ofnon-starch polysaccharides (NSP on performance and cannibalism of laying hens. Six diets (wheatbased,rice hull-based, plant protein-based, millrun-based, MOS, and bentonite were used and wererandomly given to 6 groups of ISA Brown hens, with 18 replicates per group and 5 birds per replicatefor 8 weeks. The results showed that diets did not have a significant effect (P>0.05 on cannibalismmortality, but numerically the rice hull diet gave the lowest effect, the millrun gave the intermediateeffect, whereas the plant protein diet gave the largest negative effect. Diet significantly affected feedintake (P<0.01, egg production (P<0.01, feed to egg ratio (P<0.01 and egg weight (P<0.05. Birds onmillrun diet had the lowest intake, but the feed to egg ratio was superior and egg production was thehighest compared to those fed other diets. In contrast, the feed to egg ratio in rice hull diet was inferior,and egg weight was also lighter than those fed other diets. In conclusion, fibre sources have beenverified as contributing factors involved in the outbreak of cannibalism in laying hens. Diets containinghigh insoluble NSP had a potential to decrease the mortality due to cannibalism.

  1. The effect of foeniculum vulgare essence on production performance, egg quality and reproductive parameters of laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasem Taki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of fennel essence on performance, egg quality and ovarian morphology of commercial laying eggs for ten weeks. In this experiment, one hundred and forty 30-wk-old commercial egg laying type Hy-Line (W36 were randomly assigned into 4 treatments with 5 replicates and 8 birds per each. Treatments were a control (0.0% essence and diets containing 200, 400 and 600 ppm fennel essence. Performance parameters include egg weight and egg production was recorded daily and feed intake, FCR and egg quality parameters were measured weekly. At the end of the experiment, 2 birds of each replicate was randomly selected and slaughtered for analysis of ovarian morphology. Different levels of fennel essence no significant effect on egg production. Different levels of fennel essence no significant effect on egg production. Levels of 200 and 400 ppm of fennel essence showed a significant increase in egg weight. Levels of fennel essence had no significant effect on feed intake and FCR but it caused significant increase in yolk color and had significant effect on the properties of egg shell. Levels of essence had no significant effect on the relative weight of the ovary, oviduct and stroma but 200 ppm of fennel essence had significant effect on weight of large yellow follicles. The results showed that the addition of fennel essence improved egg weight, egg shell and yolk color and had a significant effect on the large yellow follicles.

  2. Effects of landscape corridors on seed dispersal by birds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levey, Douglas, J.; Bolker, Benjamin M.; Tewksbury, Joshua J.; Sargent, Sarah; Haddad, Nick M.

    2005-07-01

    Levey, Douglas, J., Benjamin M. Bolker, Joshua J. Tewksbury, Sarah Sargent, and Nick M. Haddad. 2005. Effects of landscape corridors on seed dispersal by birds. Science 309:146-148. Abstract: Habitat fragmentation threatens biodiversity by disrupting dispersal. The mechanisms and consequences of this disruption are controversial, primarily because most organisms are difficult to track. We examined the effect of habitat corridors on long-distance dispersal of seeds by birds, and tested whether small-scale (G20 meters) movements of birds could be scaled up to predict dispersal of seeds across hundreds of meters in eight experimentally fragmented landscapes. A simulation model accurately predicted the observed pattern of seed rain and revealed that corridors functioned through edge following behavior of birds. Our study shows how models based on easily observed behaviors can be scaled up to predict landscape-level processes.

  3. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Guard, Jean; Anderson, Kenneth E; Karcher, Darrin M

    2017-05-01

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs is a consequence of the colonization of reproductive tissues in systemically infected hens. In recent years, the animal welfare implications of diverse poultry housing and management systems have been vigorously debated, but the food safety significance of laying hen housing remains uncertain. The present study evaluated the effects of 2 different bird stocking densities on the invasion of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in groups of experimentally infected laying hens housed in colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas. Laying hens were distributed at 2 different stocking densities (648 and 973 cm2/bird) into colony cages and (along with a group housed in conventional cages at 648 cm2/bird) orally inoculated with doses of 107 cfu of 2-strain cocktails of either Salmonella Heidelberg or Salmonella Typhimurium. At 5 to 6 d post-inoculation, hens were euthanized and samples of internal organs (cecum, liver, spleen, ovary, and oviduct) were removed for bacteriologic culturing. The overall frequency of Salmonella isolation from ceca after inoculation with strains of serovar Heidelberg (83.3%) was significantly (P  0.05) between stocking densities or cage systems in the frequencies of isolation of either Salmonella serovar from any of the five sampled tissues. These results contrast with prior studies, which reported increased susceptibility to internal organ invasion by Salmonella Enteritidis among hens in conventional cages at higher stocking densities. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  4. Variation in clutch size in relation to nest size in birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders P; Adriaensen, Frank; Artemyev, Alexandr; Bańbura, Jerzy; Barba, Emilio; Biard, Clotilde; Blondel, Jacques; Bouslama, Zihad; Bouvier, Jean-Charles; Camprodon, Jordi; Cecere, Francesco; Charmantier, Anne; Charter, Motti; Cichoń, Mariusz; Cusimano, Camillo; Czeszczewik, Dorota; Demeyrier, Virginie; Doligez, Blandine; Doutrelant, Claire; Dubiec, Anna; Eens, Marcel; Eeva, Tapio; Faivre, Bruno; Ferns, Peter N; Forsman, Jukka T; García-Del-Rey, Eduardo; Goldshtein, Aya; Goodenough, Anne E; Gosler, Andrew G; Góźdź, Iga; Grégoire, Arnaud; Gustafsson, Lars; Hartley, Ian R; Heeb, Philipp; Hinsley, Shelley A; Isenmann, Paul; Jacob, Staffan; Järvinen, Antero; Juškaitis, Rimvydas; Korpimäki, Erkki; Krams, Indrikis; Laaksonen, Toni; Leclercq, Bernard; Lehikoinen, Esa; Loukola, Olli; Lundberg, Arne; Mainwaring, Mark C; Mänd, Raivo; Massa, Bruno; Mazgajski, Tomasz D; Merino, Santiago; Mitrus, Cezary; Mönkkönen, Mikko; Morales-Fernaz, Judith; Morin, Xavier; Nager, Ruedi G; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Nilsson, Sven G; Norte, Ana C; Orell, Markku; Perret, Philippe; Pimentel, Carla S; Pinxten, Rianne; Priedniece, Ilze; Quidoz, Marie-Claude; Remeš, Vladimir; Richner, Heinz; Robles, Hugo; Rytkönen, Seppo; Senar, Juan Carlos; Seppänen, Janne T; da Silva, Luís P; Slagsvold, Tore; Solonen, Tapio; Sorace, Alberto; Stenning, Martyn J; Török, János; Tryjanowski, Piotr; van Noordwijk, Arie J; von Numers, Mikael; Walankiewicz, Wiesław; Lambrechts, Marcel M

    2014-01-01

    Nests are structures built to support and protect eggs and/or offspring from predators, parasites, and adverse weather conditions. Nests are mainly constructed prior to egg laying, meaning that parent birds must make decisions about nest site choice and nest building behavior before the start of egg-laying. Parent birds should be selected to choose nest sites and to build optimally sized nests, yet our current understanding of clutch size-nest size relationships is limited to small-scale studies performed over short time periods. Here, we quantified the relationship between clutch size and nest size, using an exhaustive database of 116 slope estimates based on 17,472 nests of 21 species of hole and non-hole-nesting birds. There was a significant, positive relationship between clutch size and the base area of the nest box or the nest, and this relationship did not differ significantly between open nesting and hole-nesting species. The slope of the relationship showed significant intraspecific and interspecific heterogeneity among four species of secondary hole-nesting species, but also among all 116 slope estimates. The estimated relationship between clutch size and nest box base area in study sites with more than a single size of nest box was not significantly different from the relationship using studies with only a single size of nest box. The slope of the relationship between clutch size and nest base area in different species of birds was significantly negatively related to minimum base area, and less so to maximum base area in a given study. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that bird species have a general reaction norm reflecting the relationship between nest size and clutch size. Further, they suggest that scientists may influence the clutch size decisions of hole-nesting birds through the provisioning of nest boxes of varying sizes. PMID:25478150

  5. Lay understanding of forensic statistics: Evaluation of random match probabilities, likelihood ratios, and verbal equivalents.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, WC; Newman, EJ

    2015-01-01

    Forensic scientists have come under increasing pressure to quantify the strength of their evidence, but it is not clear which of several possible formats for presenting quantitative conclusions will be easiest for lay people, such as jurors, to understand. This experiment examined the way that people recruited from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (n = 541) responded to 2 types of forensic evidence—a DNA comparison and a shoeprint comparison—when an expert explained the strength of this evidence 3 di...

  6. 益生菌对载鸭水体和产蛋性能的影响及其分子机制%Effects of Pro-Biotic Microbes on Living Water and Laying Performance in Layer Ducks and Molecular Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应诗家; 许爱红; 戴子淳; 郗正林; 何宗亮; 匡伟; 赵伟; 吴云良; 施振旦

    2015-01-01

    .01)内毒素浓度、粪便大肠杆菌数(P<0.001)、空肠TLR4(P<0.05)和回肠Caspase-3(P<0.05)mRNA表达水平。采食量、产蛋率、料蛋比、水体大肠杆菌、沙门+志贺氏菌和内毒素水平存在显著的时间效应(P<0.001)。与芽孢组和联合组相比,对照组和光合组血液内毒素和粪便沙门+志贺氏菌数量显著提高,对照组空肠黏膜内毒素水平、载鸭水体沙门+志贺氏菌数量以及脾脏TNF-αmRNA表达水平显著提高。联合组水体大肠杆菌数量显著低于对照组、光合组和芽孢组。仅联合组回肠TLR4 mRNA表达水平显著低于对照组,脾脏IL-10 mRNA表达水平显著高于对照组。【结论】芽孢杆菌和光合细菌可能通过降低载鸭水体革兰氏阴性菌数量和内毒素水平、降低肠道和血液内毒素浓度、降低炎症反应和肠道细胞凋亡,提高蛋鸭产蛋性能。%[Objective] This study aims to investigate the effects of supplementation ofBacillus subtilis spores in the feed and addition of photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) on living water and laying performance of laying ducks and their mechanisms.[Method]A total of 240 laying ducks were randomly and equally allocated into 24 “slate floor bed + water pool” individual pens using a 2×2 factorial design with 6 replications per treatment. After 7-d pre-feeding, the ducks were received 2 main treatments: supplementation ofBacillus subtilis (viable count 8 × 107 cfu/kg) in the feed, and addition of PSB (viable count 1.8 × 1012 cfu/kg) to the living water. Neither supplementation ofB.subtilisnor addition of PSB into living water was used as the control group (C group), supplementation ofB.subtiliswas used as the B.subtilis group (B group), addition of PSB into living water was used as the PSB group (P group), and both supplementation ofB. subtilisand addition of PSB into living water was used as the combined group (BP group). In the 120-d experimental period

  7. Tracking migrating birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoes, Mikkel

    and many experiments are only becoming possible with the current development of tracking technologies. During this thesis work I have been tracking the poorly known movements of several species of long-distance migrants and document highly complex migration patterns. In three manuscripts these movements......Migratory movements of birds has always fascinated man and led to many questions concerning the ecological drivers behind, the necessary adaptations and the navigational abilities required. However, especially for the long-distance migrants, basic descriptions of their movements are still lacking...... habitats with those in rural habitats. Some species have decreased the frequency of migrants and migration distance in urban environments, and others have not. The other manuscript describes the small scale movements of three different Palaearctic migrants during winter in Africa in a farmland habitat...

  8. Performance, serum biochemical responses, and gene expression of intestinal folate transporters of young and older laying hens in response to dietary folic acid supplementation and challenge with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, M; Munyaka, P M; Tactacan, G B; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; O, K; House, J D

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary folic acid (FA) supplementation on performance, serum biochemical indices, and mRNA abundance of intestinal folate transporters in young and older laying hens after acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Two experiments were conducted separately involving 48 Shaver White young laying hens (24 wk of age) in experiment 1 and 48 Shaver White older laying hens (58 wk of age) in experiment 2. Birds were fed 2 diets in a complete randomized design. The diets were wheat-soybean meal based, with or without supplemental 4 mg of FA/kg of diet. Birds were fed for 8 wk, during which time feed consumption and egg production were monitored. At the end of each feeding experiment, 6 hens from each dietary treatment were injected intravenously with 8 mg/kg of BW of either Escherichia coli LPS or sterile saline. Four hours after injection, blood and intestinal samples were collected for further analysis. Compared with the control, dietary FA supplementation increased egg weight and egg mass and decreased serum glucose levels in the young laying hens, and reduced serum uric acid in the older laying hens (P supplementation and its interaction with LPS challenge on biochemical constituents, and age played a role in the development of responses to diet and bacterial LPS infections.

  9. Limits on the evolution of tail ornamentation in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M R

    2004-03-01

    In birds, elongated tails are one of the most common and most studied ornaments. However, the tail also has an aerodynamic function, playing a role in turning and slow flight. If a tail is to function as an ornament, then there will be an inevitable conflict between the aerodynamic role and the signaling role. Aerodynamic theory has developed to the point where it is possible to predict the aerodynamic and mechanical consequences of ornamental tails of different sizes and shapes. Tail elongation will influence many different mechanical and aerodynamic parameters. For at least some and possibly all of these parameters, there will be limits that are placed by the bird's anatomy, morphology, or physiology on the extent to which the effect of tail elongation could be tolerated. For example, if a particular tail morphology meant that the power required to fly exceeded the power available from the flight muscles, then the bird would obviously be unable to fly with such a tail. To examine whether these considerations could limit the development of ornamental tails, the effect of long tails of different shapes was examined on three parameters: static balance, lift-to-drag ratio, and the cost of flight. All three of these parameters were found to limit the range of possible tail morphologies that could be developed by birds. These limits were most acute for small birds, which may not be able to operate with a long tail of any shape. Slightly larger birds would be able to develop elongated streamers and forked tails but not pintails or wedge-shaped tails. Medium to large birds are less constrained and could develop a much wider range of tails than small birds, but there will always be limits to the sizes of tail ornament that could be developed. Thus the physical consequences of ornamentation on ecology and behavior are likely to be responsible for some of the patterns of ornamentation observed in nature.

  10. Survey of the prevalence of Salmonella species on laying hen farms in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulaj, B; Çabeli, P; Goga, I; Taylor, N; Hess, C; Hess, M L

    2016-09-01

    A survey on the prevalence of Salmonella (S) species was carried out on 39 layer farms in Kosovo between April and September 2012. In total 367 samples, comprising feces, dust, eggs, and internal organs from dead birds, were investigated using bacteriological culture methods. Additionally, data on the location of the farm, the total number of birds on the farm, age of birds, and laying performance were collected. Salmonella were isolated from 38 samples obtained from 19 (49%) farms. The most common serovar identified was Salmonella enteritidis, found on 18 farms. The most common S. enteritidis phage type was PT29 followed by PT6, PT7, PT21, PT13a, PT8, PT14b, and PT4. One S. enteritidis isolate was not typable. Six farms had more than one phage type. Furthermore, serovar S. Bovismorbificans also was found in samples from 3 farms. Flock size or production stage was not associated with the probability of isolating Salmonella. The only flock factor found to be significantly associated was percent hen/day production: It was 2.8 times more likely to isolate Salmonella from flocks with production above 80% hen/day production compared to flocks producing at a lower level. Analysis of antimicrobial resistance patterns of 30 isolates revealed that all isolates were sensitive to gentamicin, ampicillin, sulphamethoxazole trimethoprim, and oxytetracycline, and 29 (97%) were sensitive to ciprofloxacin. All isolates showed intermediate resistance or were resistant to minocycline and cloxacillin. Twenty-six isolates (86%) had intermediate resistance to amoxicillin and 27 isolates (90%) were fully resistant to streptomycin. The present survey revealed a high prevalence of Salmonella enteritidis in layer flocks in Kosovo, indicating that table eggs have to be suspected as an important source of human salmone-llosis. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  11. Supplementation of Mangosteen Pericarp Meal and Vitamin E on Egg Quality and Blood Profile of Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Rusli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to study the supplementation effects of mangosteen pericarp meal (MPM and vitamin E (VE in the diets on the egg quality and blood profile of laying hens. This research used 160 laying hens of Lohman strains 24 weeks of age. The observation was conducted for 11 weeks. A completely randomized design with four treatments and four replications (10 birds each was used in this experiment. The treatments consisted of R0 (control diet, R1 (R0 + 1 g MPM/kg ration, R2 (R0 + 2 g MPM/kg ration and R3 (R0 + 200 mg VE/kg ration. Variables measured were egg quality, yolk cholesterol, and blood profiles. The data were analyzed by using analysis of variance (ANOVA and any significant difference between the treatment means were further tested by Duncan’s Multiple Range Test. The results showed that supplementation of 1 g MPM/kg ration in the diet significantly (P0.05 egg quality (except shell thickness, blood cholesterol, and HDL, respectively. In conclusion, supplementation of 1 g MPM/kg in the diet of laying hens could decrease blood triglycerides.

  12. Effect of dietary vicine and vitamin E supplementation on the productive performance of growing and laying chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muduuli, D S; Marquardt, R R; Guenter, W

    1982-01-01

    1. Experiments were conducted to study the effects of dietary vicine (2, 6-diamino-4, 5 dihydroxy pyrimidine-5 (beta-D-glucopyranoside)) and supplemental vitamin E on the performance of laying hens and growing chicks, haemolysis of erythrocytes than birds fed on a control diet. 3. Vicine when fed to laying hens had a very dramatic effect. It depressed food consumption, egg weight, fertility and hatchability of eggs. Packed cell volume and erythrocyte haemoglobin levels and led to increased liver weights, liver glutathione levels, liver and plasma lipid levels, plasma lipid peroxide levels and erythrocyte haemolysis in vitro. Liver protein and plasma vitamin E:lipid levels were not altered. Vitamin E supplementation slightly increased egg weights, markedly improved fertility and hatchability of eggs and lowered liver weights and lipid levels but did not affect the other factors examined. 4. It is concluded that vicine which was isolated from faba beans (Vicia faba L.) has a marked influence on the metabolism of the laying hen and only a slight effect on growing chick. Vicine or its metabolites or both cause peroxidation of cellular components which result in abnormal lipid transport of synthesis or both, increased fragility of erythrocytes, and reduced fertility. These effects are overcome to varying extents by supplemental vitamin E.

  13. Changes in some blood parameters and production performance of old laying hens due to growth hormone and testosterone injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, H; Ansari-Pirsaraei, Z

    2014-06-01

    The experiment was designed to study the changes in some blood parameters and production performance of old laying hens after injection of different doses of growth hormone (GH) and testosterone (Ts). A total of 160 old laying hens (HyLine W-36) at 73 weeks of age were weighed individually and randomly allocated to four treatments with four replicates and 10 birds in each replicate in a completely randomized design. Growth hormone and Ts hormones were injected subcutaneously. Treatment groups were as follows: treatment 1: injection of 100 μl distiled water (control group), treatment 2: injection of 500 μg Ts/kg live-weight + 50 μgGH/kg live-weight, treatment 3: injection of 500 μgTs/kg live-weight + 100 μgGH/kg live-weight and treatment 4: injection of 500 μgTs/kg live-weight + 150 μgGH/kg live-weight. Plasma levels of oestradiol, T4 , LDL, HDL and cholesterol significantly increased in treatment 3 in relation to the control group. All injected hens showed significantly higher levels of glucose in relation to control group. The results showed the positive effects of GH and Ts administration on production performance and blood parameters which are associated with egg production potentiality and in turn may improve reproductivity (egg production) in old laying hens. The positive results of the study may be useful in animal selection and breeding programmes.

  14. Effects of Various Levels of Oxidized Oil on Performance, Egg Quality and Some Blood Metabolites in Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Saki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of dietary oxidized oil was studied on laying hen performance, egg quality and blood metabolites.  Experiment was conducted on 160 laying hens (Hy-Line W-36, 54-61 wk of age in a completely randomized design with five treatments and four replicated cages containing eight birds per cage. Dietary treatments replaced fresh soybean oil in the control diet (3% fresh soybean oil, 15.25% crude protein, and 2858 Kcal/kg metabolizable energy with 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% oxidized oil. Egg production and egg weight were recorded daily and feed intake, feed conversion ratio, and egg mass were calculated weekly. Egg quality traits were recorded on a biweekly basis. Hen’s body weight was measured individually at the beginning and end of the experiment. Serum metabolites were determined at the end of the experiment. There was a significant difference between diets with different oxidized oil levels in egg weight, egg mass, Egg production, and feed conversion ratio (P < 0.05. Feed intake was not affected by dietary treatments. There was no significant difference between oxidized oil levels on blood serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein and very low-density lipoprotein. Malondialdehyde of the liver was not affected by oxidized oils. The results of this study have clearly demonstrated that maximum 25% oxidized oil could be replaced by fresh oil in the diets without any adverse effect on the performance of laying hens.

  15. Digestible tryptophan:digestible lysine ratio in diets for laying hens from 24 to 40 weeks of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arele Arlindo Calderano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the ideal digestible tryptophan:digestible lysine ratio in diets for laying hens from 24 to 40 weeks of age. Two hundred and forty Hy-Line W-36 laying hens at 24 weeks of age were distributed in a completely randomized design, with five treatments, eight replicates and six birds per experimental unit. The digestible tryptophan levels in the experimental diets were 1.57; 1.68; 1.79; 1.90 and 2.01 g/kg, providing ratios of digestible tryptophan:digestible lysine of 0.215; 0.230; 0.245; 0.260 and 0.275. The increase in the levels of digestible tryptophan in the diet linearly improved the feed intake, digestible tryptophan intake, digestible lysine intake, egg production, egg mass, feed conversion per egg mass and utilization efficiency of digestible lysine for eggs mass. There were quadratic effects from the digestible tryptophan levels on egg weight. For the efficiency of utilization of digestible lysine for egg mass, there was better adjustment of the data to the LRP model. The level of digestible tryptophan in the diet from which the plateau occurred was 0.184%. This level corresponded to the intake of 142 mg/bird/day of digestible tryptophan and digestible tryptophan:digestible lysine ratio of 0.252. The ideal digestible tryptophan:digestible lysine ratio recommended in diets for laying hens from 24 to 40 weeks of age is 0.252 (25.2%.

  16. Bird on a (live) wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farr, M.

    2003-09-30

    Bird mortality as a result of contact with power lines is discussed. U. S. statistics are cited, according to which 174 million birds annually die as a result of contact with power lines, specifically when birds touch two phases of current at the same time. Raptors are particularly vulnerable to power-line electrocution due to their habit of perching on the highest vantage point available as they survey the ground for prey. Hydro lines located in agricultural areas, with bodies of water on one side and fields on the other, also obstruct flight of waterfowl as dusk and dawn when visibility is low. Various solutions designed to minimize the danger to birds are discussed. Among these are: changing the configuration of wires and cross arms to make them more visible to birds in flight and less tempting as perches, and adding simple wire markers such as flags, balloons, and coloured luminescent clips that flap and twirl in the wind. There is no evidence of any coordinated effort to deal with this problem in Ontario. However, a report is being prepared for submission to Environment Canada outlining risks to birds associated with the growing number of wind turbine power generators (negligible compared with power lines and communications towers), and offering suggestions on remedial measures. The Fatal Light Awareness Program (FLAP) also plans to lobby the Canadian Wildlife Service to discuss the possibility of coordinating efforts to monitor, educate about and ultimately reduce this form of bird mortality.

  17. Maternal condition but not corticosterone is linked to offspring sex ratio in a passerine bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay J Henderson

    Full Text Available There is evidence of offspring sex ratio adjustment in a range of species, but the potential mechanisms remain largely unknown. Elevated maternal corticosterone (CORT is associated with factors that can favour brood sex ratio adjustment, such as reduced maternal condition, food availability and partner attractiveness. Therefore, the steroid hormone has been suggested to play a key role in sex ratio manipulation. However, despite correlative and causal evidence CORT is linked to sex ratio manipulation in some avian species, the timing of adjustment varies between studies. Consequently, whether CORT is consistently involved in sex-ratio adjustment, and how the hormone acts as a mechanism for this adjustment remains unclear. Here we measured maternal baseline CORT and body condition in free-living blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus over three years and related these factors to brood sex ratio and nestling quality. In addition, a non-invasive technique was employed to experimentally elevate maternal CORT during egg laying, and its effects upon sex ratio and nestling quality were measured. We found that maternal CORT was not correlated with brood sex ratio, but mothers with elevated CORT fledged lighter offspring. Also, experimental elevation of maternal CORT did not influence brood sex ratio or nestling quality. In one year, mothers in superior body condition produced male biased broods, and maternal condition was positively correlated with both nestling mass and growth rate in all years. Unlike previous studies maternal condition was not correlated with maternal CORT. This study provides evidence that maternal condition is linked to brood sex ratio manipulation in blue tits. However, maternal baseline CORT may not be the mechanistic link between the maternal condition and sex ratio adjustment. Overall, this study serves to highlight the complexity of sex ratio adjustment in birds and the difficulties associated with identifying sex biasing mechanisms.

  18. Bristol Bay, Alaska Subarea ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, and seabirds in the Bristol Bay Subarea. The Subarea...

  19. Mechanisms and evolutionary patterns of mammalian and avian dosage compensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Julien

    Full Text Available As a result of sex chromosome differentiation from ancestral autosomes, male mammalian cells only contain one X chromosome. It has long been hypothesized that X-linked gene expression levels have become doubled in males to restore the original transcriptional output, and that the resulting X overexpression in females then drove the evolution of X inactivation (XCI. However, this model has never been directly tested and patterns and mechanisms of dosage compensation across different mammals and birds generally remain little understood. Here we trace the evolution of dosage compensation using extensive transcriptome data from males and females representing all major mammalian lineages and birds. Our analyses suggest that the X has become globally upregulated in marsupials, whereas we do not detect a global upregulation of this chromosome in placental mammals. However, we find that a subset of autosomal genes interacting with X-linked genes have become downregulated in placentals upon the emergence of sex chromosomes. Thus, different driving forces may underlie the evolution of XCI and the highly efficient equilibration of X expression levels between the sexes observed for both of these lineages. In the egg-laying monotremes and birds, which have partially homologous sex chromosome systems, partial upregulation of the X (Z in birds evolved but is largely restricted to the heterogametic sex, which provides an explanation for the partially sex-biased X (Z expression and lack of global inactivation mechanisms in these lineages. Our findings suggest that dosage reductions imposed by sex chromosome differentiation events in amniotes were resolved in strikingly different ways.

  20. Birds of the Mongol Empire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene N. Anderson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Mongol Empire, the largest contiguous empire the world has ever known, had, among other things, a goodly number of falconers, poultry raisers, birdcatchers, cooks, and other experts on various aspects of birding. We have records of this, largely in the Yinshan Zhengyao, the court nutrition manual of the Mongol empire in China (the Yuan Dynasty. It discusses in some detail 22 bird taxa, from swans to chickens. The Huihui Yaofang, a medical encyclopedia, lists ten taxa used medicinally. Marco Polo also made notes on Mongol bird use. There are a few other records. This allows us to draw conclusions about Mongol ornithology, which apparently was sophisticated and detailed.

  1. Angels, Demons, Birds and Dinosaurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ries, Christopher Jacob

    2010-01-01

    of birds, setting the international agenda for research in bird evolution for the next 40 years. In Denmark, however, Heilmann's highly original work was generally ignored or even ridiculed by zoologists. This article demonstrates how Heilmann's artistic abilities played an important role in securing him...... international renown as a palaeontologist, while at the same time his lack of scientific credentials led to his complete isolation from the Danish zoological establishment. And it suggests that Heilmann's unyielding efforts to solve the riddle of bird evolution in the borderland between art and science...

  2. Science and the lay perspective: lay people's involvement in assessing tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoeller, Katharina

    2014-10-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) is a scientific field that will have an influence on our daily lives. It has the potential to revolutionize medical treatments, but it has also an impact on our human image and is associated with potential risks and ethical aspects. Among the publicly controversial issues are embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, cloning, uncertainties regarding risks and informed consent issues. To maintain public confidence in the science of TE, a good solution is public dialogues with patients and other interested lay people that gives the public the chance to independently evaluate TE issues and build their own opinion based on information from different perspectives. The article describes public participation projects in TE on stem cell research and gene therapy and presents the case study of the EU-Gene Activated Matrices for Bone and Cartilage Regeneration on Arthritis (GAMBA) panels, a dialogue with patient and citizen panels in three European countries. In the GAMBA panels, lay participants assessed the basic research project aimed at finding ways of healing osteoarthritis through a matrix composed of adult stem cells, gene vectors, nanoparticles, and biomaterials. The results of the dialogues in different countries, such as Denmark, Japan, Ireland, Switzerland, and Germany, are compared and the evaluation criteria for high quality dialogues are presented, including multiperspectivity, openness of results, a clear mandate, impartial facilitation of the panels, and transparency.

  3. Method for Force Analysis of Spatial Four Bar Linkage Bird-like Flapping-wing Mechanism Based on ProE%基于 ProE 的空间四连杆仿鸟扑翼机构的受力分析方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁俊杰; 黄文恺; 伍冯洁; 朱静

    2016-01-01

    According to the strict requirements of air drag and the strength of mechanical parts of the design of bird -like flapping-wing mechanism , we propose a method for Force Analysis of spatial four bar linkage flapping-wing mechanism based on ProE.Firstly, make a necessary simplification for the bird-like flapping-wing mechanism and the bird-like.Next, analyze the move-ment of the mechanism and the moment of resistance caused by air drag , and find out the moment function of follower motion speed . Finally, set parameter values in ProE to realize the force analysis , and then obtain the data which can be helpful to checking the strength of mechanical parts .The results show that this method for force analysis of spatial four bar linkage bird-like flapping-wing mechanism can simplify the design process and improve the design efficiency .%针对仿鸟扑翼机构设计中对空气阻力以及机构零件强度的严格要求,提出了一种基于ProE的对空间四连杆扑翼机构的受力分析方法。首先,对仿鸟扑翼机构及翅翼进行必要的简化;其次,将机构运动情况和空气阻力引起的阻力矩进行耦合,得出阻力矩关于从动件运动速度的函数;最后在ProE中设置参数,实现受力分析,并得出可用于校核零件强度的受力分析数据。结果表明,该方法应用于仿鸟扑翼机构的受力分析可以简化设计流程,提高设计效率。

  4. Egg Qualities and Performance Characteristics of Laying Chicken in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Characteristics of Laying Chicken in Different Intensive Housing Systems. ... initial and final body weights, hen – day production, mortality rate, feed conversion ... although extended battery cage may be adopted to meet some of the welfare ...

  5. Efficacy of a lay health worker led group antiretroviral medication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficacy of a lay health worker led group antiretroviral medication adherence ... SAHARA-J: Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS ... of care, while adherence motivation and skills did not significantly change among the conditions over time.

  6. Productive performance of naked neck, frizzle and dwarf laying hens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    various natural climates and two nutritional treatments ... improved egg production or feed efficiency, although the naked neck (Na) ... pullets were moved to a tiered system of individual cages in a laying house with ..... nutrients for production.

  7. Laying performances and egg quality of local barred hens under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-02-28

    Feb 28, 2014 ... Key words: egg quality, laying performances, local barred hens. ... nutritional status, income of many small-scale ... particular information associated with different ... hens and 1 cock per unit, house in battery cages made of.

  8. Lay-friendliness in translated Patient Information Leaflets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Matilde Nisbeth; Zethsen, Karen Korning

    to make informed decisions concerning their health. For this purpose, many new genres have been created, one such genre being the PIL, a mandatory text which in an EU context has to accompany all medication informing patients about dosage, side effects etc. Legally, the PIL genre is required to ensure lay......-friendly information as it must be “written and designed to be clear and understandable, enabling the users to act appropriately” (Article 63(2) of EU Directive 2001/83/EC). Despite the legal requirements and the intensified focus on lay-friendly health communication, many studies have shown that PILs are often......This paper seeks to empirically explore the claim that translated Danish Patient Information Leaflets (PILs) are less lay-friendly than their English source texts. The last two decades have seen an increased focus on providing patients with lay-friendly, easily understood information, enabling them...

  9. Hovering and intermittent flight in birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobalske, Bret W, E-mail: bret.tobalske@mso.umt.ed [Field Research Station at Fort Missoula, Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Two styles of bird locomotion, hovering and intermittent flight, have great potential to inform future development of autonomous flying vehicles. Hummingbirds are the smallest flying vertebrates, and they are the only birds that can sustain hovering. Their ability to hover is due to their small size, high wingbeat frequency, relatively large margin of mass-specific power available for flight and a suite of anatomical features that include proportionally massive major flight muscles (pectoralis and supracoracoideus) and wing anatomy that enables them to leave their wings extended yet turned over (supinated) during upstroke so that they can generate lift to support their weight. Hummingbirds generate three times more lift during downstroke compared with upstroke, with the disparity due to wing twist during upstroke. Much like insects, hummingbirds exploit unsteady mechanisms during hovering including delayed stall during wing translation that is manifest as a leading-edge vortex (LEV) on the wing and rotational circulation at the end of each half stroke. Intermittent flight is common in small- and medium-sized birds and consists of pauses during which the wings are flexed (bound) or extended (glide). Flap-bounding appears to be an energy-saving style when flying relatively fast, with the production of lift by the body and tail critical to this saving. Flap-gliding is thought to be less costly than continuous flapping during flight at most speeds. Some species are known to shift from flap-gliding at slow speeds to flap-bounding at fast speeds, but there is an upper size limit for the ability to bound ({approx}0.3 kg) and small birds with rounded wings do not use intermittent glides.

  10. 21 CFR 1240.65 - Psittacine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DISEASES Specific Administrative Decisions Regarding Interstate Shipments § 1240.65 Psittacine birds. (a) The term psittacine birds shall include all birds commonly known as parrots, Amazons, Mexican double... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Psittacine birds. 1240.65 Section 1240.65 Food...

  11. Ten years of International Migratory Bird Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Wheeler; Susan Bonfield

    2005-01-01

    Public awareness and concern are crucial components of migratory bird conservation. Citizens who are enthusiastic about birds, informed about threats, and empowered to become involved in addressing those threats can make a tremendous contribution to maintaining healthy bird populations. One of the most successful vehicles for public education on migratory birds is...

  12. The role of cranial kinesis in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bout, R G; Zweers, G A

    2001-12-01

    In birds, the ability to move the upper beak relative to the braincase has been the subject of many functional morphological investigations, but in many instances the adaptive significance of cranial kinesis remains unclear. Alternatively, cranial kinesis may be considered a consequence of the general design of the skull, rather than an adaptive trait as such. The present study reviews some results related to the mechanism and functional significance of cranial kinesis in birds. Quantitative three-dimensional X-ray has shown that in skulls morphologically as divers as paleognaths and neognaths the mechanism for elevation of the upper beak is very similar. One of the mechanisms proposed for avian jaw movement is a mechanical coupling of the upper and the lower jaw movement by the postorbital ligament. Such a mechanical coupling would necessitate upper beak elevation. However, independent control of upper and lower jaw has been shown to occur during beak movements in birds. Moreover, kinematic modeling and force measurements suggests that the maximum extensibility of collagen, in combination with the short distance of the insertion of the postorbital ligament to the quadrato-mandibular articulation do not constitute a block to lower jaw depression. The lower jaw ligaments serve to limit the maximal extension of the mandibula. It is suggested here that cranial kinesis in avian feeding may have evolved as a consequence of an increase in eye size. This increase in size led to a reduction of bony bars in the lateral aspect of the skull enabling the transfer of quadrate movement to the upper jaw. The selective forces favoring the development of a kinetic upper beak in birds may be subtle and act in different ecological contexts. Simultaneous movement of the upper and lower jaw not only increases the velocity of beak movements, but with elevated upper beak also less force is required to open the lower jaw. However, the penalty of increased mobility of elements in a

  13. Poisonous birds: A timely review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligabue-Braun, Rodrigo; Carlini, Célia Regina

    2015-06-01

    Until very recently, toxicity was not considered a trait observed in birds, but works published in the last two decades started to shed light on this subject. Poisonous birds are rare (or little studied), and comprise Pitohui and Ifrita birds from Papua New Guinea, the European quail, the Spoor-winged goose, the Hoopees, the North American Ruffed grouse, the Bronzewings, and the Red warbler. A hundred more species are considered unpalatable or malodorous to humans and other animals. The present review intends to present the current understanding of bird toxicity, possibly pointing to an ignored research field. Whenever possible, biochemical characteristics of these poisons and their effects on humans and other animals are discussed, along with historical aspects of poison discovery and evolutionary hypothesis regarding their function.

  14. North American Breeding Bird Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This protocol framework provides guidance for conducting surveys of North American bird populations at multiple stations within two or more regions. The BBS is a...

  15. Barrier Infrared Detector (BIRD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JPL will design, fabricate, and fully characterize a 640x512 format HOT-BIRD FPA with increased quantum efficiency and extended spectral coverage. Unlike the small...

  16. Effect of corticosterone and hen body mass on primary sex ratio in laying hen (Gallus gallus), using unincubated eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad Aamir; Groothuis, Ton G G; Smits, Mari A; Woelders, Henri

    2014-04-01

    In various studies, chronic elevation of corticosterone levels in female birds under natural or experimental conditions resulted in female biased offspring sex ratios. In chicken, one study with injected corticosterone resulted in a male sex ratio bias. In the current study, we chronically elevated blood plasma corticosterone levels through corticosterone feeding (20 mg/kg feed) for 14 days using 30 chicken hens in each of treatment and control groups and studied the primary offspring sex ratio (here defined as the proportion of male fertile eggs determined in freshly laid eggs, i.e., without egg incubation). Mean plasma corticosterone concentrations were significantly higher in the treatment group but were not associated with sex ratio, laying rate, and fertility rate. Corticosterone treatment by itself did not affect egg sex but affected sex ratio as well as laying rate and fertility rate in interaction with hen body mass. Body mass had a negative association with sex ratio, laying rate, and fertility rate per hen in the corticosterone group, but a positive association with sex ratio in untreated hens. These interactions were already seen when taking the body mass at the beginning of the experiment, indicating intrinsic differences between light and heavy hens with regard to their reaction to corticosterone treatment. The effects on laying rate, fertility rate, and sex ratio suggest that some factor related to body mass act together with corticosterone to modulate ovarian functions. We propose that corticosterone treatment in conjunction with hen body mass can interfere with meiosis, which can lead to meiotic drive and to chromosomal aberrations resulting in postponed ovulation or infertile ova.

  17. 76 FR 32224 - Migratory Birds; Take of Migratory Birds by the Armed Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory Birds; Take of Migratory Birds by the Armed Forces AGENCY: Fish and... birds during approved military readiness activities without violating the Migratory Bird Treaty Act... the Armed Forces to incidentally take migratory birds. The Authorization Act also stated that...

  18. 75 FR 53774 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 20 Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain...-1231-9BPP-L2] RIN 1018-AX06 Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain..., Interior. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule prescribes special early-season migratory bird...

  19. 77 FR 29515 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Supplemental Proposals for Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... Bird Hunting; Supplemental Proposals for Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations for the 2012-13... RIN 1018-AX97 Migratory Bird Hunting; Supplemental Proposals for Migratory Game Bird Hunting... in an earlier document to establish annual hunting regulations for certain migratory game birds...

  20. Birds and bornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Susan L; Delnatte, Pauline; Guo, Jianhua; Heatley, J Jill; Tizard, Ian; Smith, Dale A

    2012-12-01

    In 2008, avian bornaviruses (ABV) were identified as the cause of proventricular dilatation disease (PDD). PDD is a significant condition of captive parrots first identified in the late 1970s. ABV infection has subsequently been shown to be widespread in wild waterfowl across the United States and Canada where the virus infects 10-20% of some populations of ducks, geese and swans. In most cases birds appear to be healthy and unaffected by the presence of the virus; however, infection can also result in severe non-suppurative encephalitis and lesions similar to those seen in parrots with PDD. ABVs are genetically diverse with seven identified genotypes in parrots and one in canaries. A unique goose genotype (ABV-CG) predominates in waterfowl in Canada and the northern United States. ABV appears to be endemic in North American waterfowl, in comparison to what appears to be an emerging disease in parrots. It is not known whether ABV can spread between waterfowl and parrots. The discovery of ABV infection in North American waterfowl suggests that European waterfowl should be evaluated for the presence of ABV, and also as a possible reservoir species for Borna disease virus (BDV), a related neurotropic virus affecting horses and sheep in central Europe. Although investigations have suggested that BDV is likely derived from a wildlife reservoir, for which the shrew and water vole are currently prime candidates, we suggest that the existence of other mammalian and avian reservoirs should not be discounted.

  1. Trypanosomes of some Fennoscandian birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon F. Bennett

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Linear measurements and derived indices of trypanosomes from species of Fennoscandian birds were compared to those reported form Trypanosoma avium, T. everetti, T. ontarioensis and T. paddae. The trypanosomes encountered in the Fennoscandian birds were identified as T. avium from Tengmalm's owl Aegolius funereus and the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca, T. everetti from the great tit Parus major and collared flycatcher F. albicollis and T. ontarioensis from the collared flycatcher; T. paddae was not seen.

  2. Orientation and navigation in birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bouwman

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available How birds orientate and navigate over long distances, remains one of the subjects of ornithology eliciting much interest. Birds use combinations of different sources of information to find direction and position. Some of these are the geomagnetic field, celestial bodies, mosaic and gradient maps, sound, smell, idiotetic information and others. Different species use different combinations of sources. This ability is partially inherent and partially learned.

  3. Hepatic cholinesterase of laying hens naturally infected by Salmonella Gallinarum (fowl typhoid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Boiago, Marcel M; Bottari, Nathieli B; do Carmo, Guilherme M; Alves, Mariana Sauzen; Boscato, Carla; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Casagrande, Renata A; Stefani, Lenita M

    2016-09-01

    Salmonella is a facultative intracellular pathogen that may cause foodborne gastroenteritis in humans and animals consisting of over 2000 serovars. The serovar Salmonella Gallinarum is an important worldwide pathogen of poultry. However, little is known on the mechanisms of pathogenesis of Salmonella in chickens. The aim of this study was to evaluate cholinesterase and myeloperoxidase activities in hepatic tissue of laying hens naturally infected by S. Gallinarum. Twenty positive liver samples for S. Gallinarum were collected, in addition to seven liver samples from healthy uninfected laying hens (control group). The right liver lobe was homogenized for analysis of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and myeloperoxidase (MPO), and the left lobe was divided into two fragments, one for histopathology and the other for Salmonella isolation. The results showed changes in AChE and BchE activity in the liver of infected laying hens compared to the control group (P liver samples. Infected animals showed increased MPO activity compared to healthy animals (P cells, macrophages,heterophils in the liver of infected hens. These findings suggest that the inflammatory process was attenuated providing a pro-inflammatory action of both enzyme analyzed in order to reduce the free ACh, a molecule which has an anti-inflammatory action. Therefore, our results lead to the hypothesis that cholinesterase plays an important role on the modulation of immune response against S. Gallinarum with an inflammatory effect, contributing to the response against this bacterium. This study should contribute to a better understanding on the pathogenic mechanisms involved in laying hens infected by S. Gallinarum.

  4. Experimental infection of laying hens with Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum Infecção experimental com Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum em poedeiras comerciais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Helaine de Oliveira

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Experimental infections were set up in commercial laying birds, comprising a white relatively resistant line and a red susceptible line infecting with Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum. The major findings were that in susceptible birds clinical disease occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Faecal excretion occurred in susceptible birds almost up to death but also occurred in the more resistant line and in birds, which were convalescing. Removal of birds, which had died from the disease, from the environment, reduced the resultant mortality/morbidity and may be regarded as a useful measure for control.Infecções experimentais por Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum foram realizadas em aves de postura comercial, incluindo uma linhagem branca resistente e uma linhagem vermelha susceptível ao desenvolvimento da enfermidade clínica. As aves de linhagem susceptível apresentaram doença clínica dependente da dose administrada. Excreção fecal foi observada em aves da linhagem susceptível próximo ao momento da morte e, eventualmente, em aves da linhagem resistente e aves convalescentes. A remoção das aves mortas do meio ambiente reduziu a taxa de mortalidade/morbidade, procedimento este que pode ser utilizado como medida de controle.

  5. Identification and differential expression of microRNAs in ovaries of laying and Broody geese (Anser cygnoides by Solexa sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent functional studies have demonstrated that the microRNAs (miRNAs play critical roles in ovarian gonadal development, steroidogenesis, apoptosis, and ovulation in mammals. However, little is known about the involvement of miRNAs in the ovarian function of fowl. The goose (Anas cygnoides is a commercially important food that is cultivated widely in China but the goose industry has been hampered by high broodiness and poor egg laying performance, which are influenced by ovarian function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, the miRNA transcriptomes of ovaries from laying and broody geese were profiled using Solexa deep sequencing and bioinformatics was used to determine differential expression of the miRNAs. As a result, 11,350,396 and 9,890,887 clean reads were obtained in laying and broodiness goose, respectively, and 1,328 conserved known miRNAs and 22 novel potential miRNA candidates were identified. A total of 353 conserved microRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between laying and broody ovaries. Compared with miRNA expression in the laying ovary, 127 miRNAs were up-regulated and 126 miRNAs were down-regulated in the ovary of broody birds. A subset of the differentially expressed miRNAs (G-miR-320, G-miR-202, G-miR-146, and G-miR-143* were validated using real-time quantitative PCR. In addition, 130,458 annotated mRNA transcripts were identified as putative target genes. Gene ontology annotation and KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis suggested that the differentially expressed miRNAs are involved in ovarian function, including hormone secretion, reproduction processes and so on. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides the first global miRNA transcriptome data in A. cygnoides and identifies novel and known miRNAs that are differentially expressed between the ovaries of laying and broody geese. These findings contribute to our understanding of the functional involvement of mi

  6. Epidemiological aspects of lice (Menacanthus species) infections in laying hen flocks from the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, L Do Carmo; Martins, N R Da Silva; Teixeira, C M; Oliveira, P R De; Cunha, L M

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of chicken lice species such as Menacanthus stramineus, M. cornutus and M. pallidulus were studied during an observational, analytical and sectional survey, to determine predisposing factors for their occurrence in laying hen farms in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. A total of 431 houses on 43 farms were visited in 2012. M. cornutus, M. stramineus and M. pallidulus occurred in 20.9%, 11.6% and 11.6% of farms, respectively. The frequencies of occurrence of M. cornutus, M. stramineus and M.pallidulus in poultry houses were 10.4%, 8.8% and 3.7%, respectively. The epidemiological determinants for the occurrence of these species were investigated using Poisson or logistic regression models. The region of the farm, the recent use of acaricides and the presence of birds, such as saffron finch (Sicalis flaveola), feral pigeon (Columba livia) and Guira cuckoo (Guira guira) around the farms were related to the epidemiology of M. cornutus. Infestation by M. stramineus was associated with age of birds, number of birds per cage and the presence of Guira cuckoo and Chopi blackbird (Gnorimopsar chopi) near the poultry houses. The occurrence of M. pallidulus was influenced by the type of facilities, presence of cattle egret (Bubulcus ibis) and free-range domestic hens around the farm. The use of wire mesh nets in the houses and of forced moulting did not influence lice infestation.

  7. Nutritional levels of digestible methionine + cystine to brown-egg laying hens from 50 to 66 weeks of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clauber Polese

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the requirement of digestible methionine + cystine of brown-eggs laying hens from 50 to 66 weeks age at the end of the first production cycle. The design was completely randomized, with 150 Brown Shaver hens, which were distributed in five treatments with six replications of five birds each. Birds received a basal diet with 2857 kcal/kg metabolizable energy and 15.97% crude protein, supplemented with 0.132; 0.174, 0.215, 0.256 and 0.298% DL-methionine (98%, in order to provide 0.572, 0.613, 0.653, 0.693 and 0.734% digestible methionine + cystine. The levels of digestible methionine + digestible cystine followed, respectively, the relations of 67, 72, 77, 81 and 86% with lysine fixed at 0.851%. Feed intake, methionine + cystine intake, feed conversion per dozen eggs, egg weigth and mass, percentage of egg components, internal egg quality and weight gain were evaluated. Methionine + cystine levels showed a quadratic effect on feed conversion per dozen eggs and egg weight, a linear effect on feed conversion per kilogram of eggs and percentage of albumen. There was also a positive linear effect on yolk percentage. The methionine + cystine requirement was estimated at 0.572%, corresponding to 682 mg of digestible methionine + cystine/bird/day.

  8. The Chromosomes of Birds during Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigozzi, María I

    2016-01-01

    The cytological analysis of meiotic chromosomes is an exceptional tool to approach complex processes such as synapsis and recombination during the division. Chromosome studies of meiosis have been especially valuable in birds, where naturally occurring mutants or experimental knock-out animals are not available to fully investigate the basic mechanisms of major meiotic events. This review highlights the main contributions of synaptonemal complex and lampbrush chromosome research to the current knowledge of avian meiosis, with special emphasis on the organization of chromosomes during prophase I, the impact of chromosome rearrangements during meiosis, and distinctive features of the ZW pair.

  9. Effects of Octacosanol Extracted from Rice Bran on the Laying Performance, Egg Quality and Blood Metabolites of Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Peng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 42-d study with 384 Hy-line brown laying hens was conducted to assess the effects of dietary octacosanol supplementation on laying performance, egg quality and blood metabolites of laying hens. Hens were randomly allocated into 4 dietary groups of 8 cages each, which were fed basal diet supplemented with 0 (Control, 9 (OCT9, 18 (OCT18, and 27 (OCT27 mg/kg diet of octacosanol isolated from rice bran, respectively. The experiment was conducted in an environmental controlled house and hens were fed twice daily for ad libitum intake. Laying performance was determined over the 42-d period, and egg quality as well as blood metabolites were estimated on d 21 and d 42. Diets in OCT18 and OCT27 increased (p0.05 among treatments. Results demonstrate that supplementing 18 to 27 mg/kg diet of rice bran octacosanol can improve laying rate and egg quality and reduce blood lipid of laying hens.

  10. Effects of Chinese Medicinal Herb on Growth and Immunization of Laying Chicks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA De-ying; SHAN An-shan; LI Qun-dao; DU Juan

    2003-01-01

    In order to evaluate effects of Chinese medicinal herb (CMH) on growth and immunization of laying male chicks,eleven CMHs were used in this study,which are Astragalus membranacens (AM),Schisandra chinensis (SC),Ligustrum Lucidum(LL), Codonopsis, Scutellaria baicalensis (SB),Atractylodes macrocephala(AMA),Haw,Ginger,Acanthopanax scenticosns (AS),Angelica and Lycium, added to basal diet as 1%,respectively,with the basal diet supplemented with 50 mg*kg-1 bacitracin zinc(BZ) as the control.The body weight (BW) of birds were recorded at 1,21 and 42 days after birth,individually.The birds were vaccinated 0.50 mL against Newcastle disease (ND) with La sota vaccinel (containing mineral oil as adjuvant) by I.m.inoculation at 21 d of age.All of birds was vaccinated with F48E9 NDV by I.m.inoculation at 49 day of age.Blood samples were taken via wing vein from each bird on the day receiving the vaccination (Day-1) and on 14,21,28,30 and 34 d after vaccination (Days 14,21,28,30 and 34).Results showed that bodyweight (BW) and bodyweight gain(BWG) of the trial groups are similar to the control group.No significant differences of relative weight (RW) of bursa and spleen were observed among trial groups except for AS (P<0.05).Serum antibody titers of SC,LL,Codonopsis,SB,AMA and Lycium groups were significantly increased (P<0.05) in contrast to these control group on day-21 or 28 after immunized ND La sota vaccinel,which suggested that SC,LL,Codonopsis,SB,AMA and Lycium could augment antibody formulation.Furthermore,Compared with the control,antibody titers in SC,Codonopsis,AS,Lycium,SB and AMA group were higher (P<0.05) after vaccinated with F48E9 NDV,which suggested that SC,Codonopsis,AS,Lycium,SB and AMA have activity of antivirus.In conclusion,CMH used in the present study have similar effect on BW and BWG of chicks compared with the control.Moreover,these eleven CMH have little influence on RW of immunized organ except AS.However,SC,Codonopsis,LL,Lycium,SB and AMA could

  11. Civil Justice: Lay Judges in the EU Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Machura

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lay judges fulfill important functions for the justice system of a country. In the European Union member states, scholars have analysed the use of lay judges in criminal cases. However, little is known about lay participation in civil justice. The paper introduces commonly cited reasons to have lay judges as well as the principal forms of lay participation and then surveys the EU countries for its implementation in civil cases. Mixed tribunals, involving lay judges under the leadership of a professional judge, are relatively frequent. Several countries have special labour courts or commercial courts with lay members and others have single lay judges, or all-lay judge panels. Roughly a third of the 28 EU member states have no lay participation in civil justice but only three of those have no lay judges in any branch of the courts. Almost all the reasons for including lay decision makers are served somehow by the existing forms, including providing different experiences and perhaps expert knowledge. The article concludes, citing non-EU states and lay participation in criminal and administrative courts as further evidence, that lay judges in one form or another are an element of European legal systems. Los jueces legos cumplen funciones importantes para el sistema de justicia de un país. En los Estados miembro de la Unión Europea, académicos han analizado el uso de jueces legos en casos criminales. Sin embargo, se sabe poco acerca de la participación de los legos en la justicia civil. El artículo presenta las razones que habitualmente se citan para tener jueces legos, así como las formas principales de la participación de legos, para a continuación medir su implementación en casos civiles en los países de la Unión Europea. Son relativamente frecuentes los tribunales mixtos, en los que participan jueces legos, bajo la dirección de un juez profesional. Varios países tienen tribunales laborales especiales o tribunales comerciales con

  12. Phenological differences among selected residents and long-distance migrant bird species in central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartošová, Lenka; Trnka, Miroslav; Bauer, Zdeněk; Možný, Martin; Štěpánek, Petr; Žalud, Zdeněk

    2014-07-01

    The phenological responses to climate of residents and migrants (short- and long-distance) differ. Although few previous studies have focussed on this topic, the agree that changes in phenology are more apparent for residents than for long-distance migrants. We analysed the breeding times of two selected residents ( Sitta europaea, Parus major) and one long-distance migrant ( Ficedula albicollis) from 1961 to 2007 in central Europe. The timing of the phenophases of all three bird species showed a significant advance to earlier times. Nevertheless, the most marked shift was observed for the long-distance migrant (1.9 days per decade on average in mean laying date with linearity at the 99.9 % confidence level). In contrast, the shifts shown by the residents were smaller (1.6 days for S. europaea and 1.5 days for P. major also on average in mean laying date for both, with linearity at the 95 % confidence level). Spearman rank correlation coefficients calculated for pairs of phenophases of given bird species in 20-year subsamples (e.g. 1961-1980, 1962-1981) showed higher phenological separation between the residents and the migrant. This separation is most apparent after the 1980s. Thus, our results indicate that the interconnections between the studied phenological stages of the three bird species are becoming weaker.

  13. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Florida Panhandle: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, seabirds, passerine birds, and gulls and...

  14. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Southern California: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, seabirds, passerine birds, and gulls and...

  15. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northwest Arctic, Alaska: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, pelagic birds, and gulls/terns in Northwest...

  16. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: North Carolina: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, seabirds, passerine birds, and gulls and...

  17. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Mississippi: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, seabirds, passerine birds, and gulls and...

  18. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, passerine birds, and gulls and terns in the...

  19. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northern California: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for alcids, diving birds, gulls, terns, passerines, pelagic birds, raptors, shorebirds, wading birds, and...

  20. Lab-on-a-bird: biophysical monitoring of flying birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Lee, Seoho; Ahsan, Syed S; Karlsson, Kolbeinn; Gabrielson, Richard; Guglielmo, Christopher G; Winkler, David W; Erickson, David

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of birds is finely tuned to their activities and environments, and thus research on avian systems can play an important role in understanding organismal responses to environmental changes. At present, however, the physiological monitoring of bird metabolism is limited by the inability to take real-time measurements of key metabolites during flight. In this study, we present an implantable biosensor system that can be used for continuous monitoring of uric acid levels of birds during various activities including flight. The system consists of a needle-type enzymatic biosensor for the amperometric detection of uric acid in interstitial fluids. A lightweight two-electrode potentiostat system drives the biosensor, reads the corresponding output current and wirelessly transfers the data or records to flash memory. We show how the device can be used to monitor, in real time, the effects of short-term flight and rest cycles on the uric acid levels of pigeons. In addition, we demonstrate that our device has the ability to measure uric acid level increase in homing pigeons while they fly freely. Successful application of the sensor in migratory birds could open up a new way of studying birds in flight which would lead to a better understanding of the ecology and biology of avian movements.

  1. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E; Karcher, Darrin M

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiologic analyses have linked the frequency of human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis to the consumption of contaminated eggs and thus to the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-laying flocks. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis is a consequence of the colonization of reproductive tissues in systemically infected hens. The animal welfare implications of laying hen housing systems have been widely debated, but no definitive consensus has yet emerged about the food safety significance of poultry housing options. The present study sought to determine the effects of two different bird stocking densities on the invasion of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in groups of experimentally infected laying hens housed in colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas. In two trials, groups of laying hens were distributed at two different stocking densities into colony cages and (along with a group housed in conventional cages) orally inoculated with doses of 1.0 × 10(7) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. At 5 to 6 d post-inoculation, hens were euthanized and samples of internal organs were removed for bacteriologic culturing. For both trials combined, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered at a significantly (P Salmonella Enteritidis than from hens in conventional cages at that same density (90.3% vs. 68.1%). These results suggest that stocking density can influence the susceptibility of hens to Salmonella Enteritidis, but other housing systems parameters may also contribute to the outcome of infections.

  2. Effect of dietary energy and protein on the performance, egg quality, bone mineral density, blood properties and yolk fatty acid composition of organic laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rakibul Hassan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary metabolizable energy (ME and crude protein (CP on the performance, egg quality, blood properties, bone characteristics and yolk fatty acid composition of organic laying hens. At 23 weeks, a total of 600 Brown nick laying hens were randomly distributed into 24 outdoor pens (4 replicate pens/treatment; 25 birds/pen and were given (2750, 2775 and 2800 kcal of ME/kg and CP (16 and 17% resulting in a 3×2 factorial arrangement of organic dietary treatments. The experiment lasted 23 weeks. The performance of laying hens were not affected by the dietary treatment while the egg weight was increased with energy and CP levels in the diet (P<0.05. Serum total protein was not affected by dietary energy and protein level. Total cholesterol and triglyceride tend to reduce with the increasing amount of CP in the diet. Thereafter, bone and egg quality characteristics were numerically increased in dietary 2775 kcal of ME/kg and 16% CP treatment. On the other hand, docosahexanoic acid content in egg yolk was higher (P<0.01 in 2750 kcal of ME/kg and 17% CP treatment. As a result, the performance, blood and fatty acid composition were maximized in 2750 kcal of ME/kg and 16% CP treatment. Thus, dietary 2750-2775 kcal of ME/kg and 16% CP may enhance performance, blood and fatty acid composition of organic laying hens.

  3. Blood protozoa of imported birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwell, R D; Rossi, G S

    1975-02-01

    Large numbers of birds, until recently, were brought into the United States each year. Countries of origin were varied, and included those of Australasia, Africa, South America, and the Caribbean islands, as well as other places. With them of course come their parasites, some of which may be potential pathogens to domestic avifauna. In part for this reason, a survey was undertaken of blood parasites of birds from pet shops and importers. So far a total of 1234 birds belonging to 186 species has been examined. Several new species and subspecies of avian Plasmodium have been found in the course of this study, including P. octamerium Manwell, 1968 in a Pintail Whydah, Vidua macoura, from Africa; P paranucleophilum Manwell & Sessler, 1971 in a South American tanager, Tachyphonus sp; and P. nucleophilum toucani Manwell & Sessler 1971 in a Swainson's Toucan, Ramphastos s. swainsonii. Plasmodium huffi Muniz, Soares & Battista is undoubtedly a synonym pro parte for the last. Plasmodium tenue Laveran & Maruliaz, long thought to be a synonym of Plasmodium vaughani Novy & MacNeal, was rediscovered and found to be a valid species. Plasmodium nucleophilum, infrequently seen in the New World, occurred in many Asian and African birds, and especially in starlings. Infections with other species of Plasmodium were common. Haemoproteus was the commonest blood parasite; Leucocytozoon was very rare as was Atoxoplasma (Lankesterella). The 2 families of birds best represented were the Fringillidae and the Psittacidae, but no blood parasites were seen in the latter. It is clear that imported birds are often infected with blood protozoa, some of which are unknown from native birds.

  4. Why cuckoos should parasitize parrotbills by laying eggs randomly rather than laying eggs matching the egg appearance of parrotbill hosts?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Canchao; Yang; Fugo; Takasu; Wei; Liang; Anders; P; M?ller

    2015-01-01

    The coevolutionary interaction between cuckoos and their hosts has been studied for a long time, but to date some puzzles still remain unsolved. Whether cuckoos parasitize their hosts by laying eggs randomly or matching the egg morphs of their hosts is one of the mysteries of the cuckoo problem. Scientists tend to believe that cuckoos lay eggs matching the appearance of host eggs due to selection caused by the ability of the hosts to recognize their own eggs.In this paper, we first review previous empirical studies to test this mystery and found no studies have provided direct evidence of cuckoos choosing to parasitize host nests where egg color and pattern match. We then present examples of unmatched cuckoo eggs in host nests and key life history traits of cuckoos, e.g. secretive behavior and rapid egg-laying and link them to cuckoo egg laying behavior. Finally we develop a conceptual model to demonstrate the egg laying behaviour of cuckoos and propose an empirical test that can provide direct evidence of the egg-laying properties of female cuckoos. We speculate that the degree of egg matching between cuckoo eggs and those of the host as detected by humans is caused by the ability of the hosts to recognize their own eggs, rather than the selection of matching host eggs by cuckoos. The case of Common Cuckoos(Cuculus canorus) and their parrotbill hosts(Paradoxornis alphonsianus), where it has been shown that both have evolved polymorphic eggs(mainly blue and white), was used to develop a conceptual model to demonstrate why cuckoos should utilize parrotbill hosts by laying eggs randomly rather than laying eggs matching the appearance of host eggs.In conclusion, we found no evidence for the hypothesis that cuckoos lay eggs based on own egg color matching that of the parrotbill-cuckoo system. We argue theoretically that laying eggs matching those of the hosts in this system violates a key trait of the life history of cuckoos and therefore should be maladaptive.

  5. Why cuckoos should parasitize parrotbills by laying eggs randomly rather than laying eggs matching the egg appearance of parrotbill hosts?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Canchao Yang; Fugo Takasu; Wei Liang; Anders P Mller

    2015-01-01

    The coevolutionary interaction between cuckoos and their hosts has been studied for a long time, but to date some puzzles stil remain unsolved. Whether cuckoos parasitize their hosts by laying eggs randomly or matching the egg morphs of their hosts is one of the mysteries of the cuckoo problem. Scientists tend to believe that cuckoos lay eggs matching the appearance of host eggs due to selection caused by the ability of the hosts to recognize their own eggs. In this paper, we first review previous empirical studies to test this mystery and found no studies have provided direct evidence of cuckoos choosing to parasitize host nests where egg color and pattern match. We then present examples of unmatched cuckoo eggs in host nests and key life history traits of cuckoos, e.g. secretive behavior and rapid egg-laying and link them to cuckoo egg laying behavior. Finally we develop a conceptual model to demonstrate the egg laying behaviour of cuckoos and propose an empirical test that can provide direct evidence of the egg-laying properties of female cuckoos. We speculate that the degree of egg matching between cuckoo eggs and those of the host as detected by humans is caused by the ability of the hosts to recognize their own eggs, rather than the selection of matching host eggs by cuckoos. The case of Common Cuckoos (Cuculus canorus) and their parrotbill hosts (Paradoxornis alphonsianus), where it has been shown that both have evolved polymorphic eggs (mainly blue and white), was used to develop a conceptual model to demonstrate why cuckoos should utilize parrotbill hosts by laying eggs randomly rather than laying eggs matching the appearance of host eggs. In conclusion, we found no evidence for the hypothesis that cuckoos lay eggs based on own egg color matching that of the parrotbill-cuckoo system. We argue theoretically that laying eggs matching those of the hosts in this system violates a key trait of the life history of cuckoos and therefore should be maladaptive.

  6. Mucosal Mast Cells Response in the Jejunum of Ascaridia galli-Infected Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmawi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal defense mechanism against helminthes parasitic nematode to be associated with mucosal mast cells reaction. The aim of this research was to examine the effect of infection by Ascaridia galli parasite to trigger mucosal defense based on mucosal mast cells response in laying hens. Amount of ten head laying hens 12-wk old were divided into two groups containing five chickens of each. The first group, chickens were left as un-infected controls. The second group, chickens were infected orally with 1,000 embryonated eggs of A. galli. Mucosal mast cell responses were assayed by in situ jejunal mast cell counts in stained serial histological sections with Alcian blue (pH 0.3 and Safranin-O (pH 0.1 of the jejunum. Mucosal mast cells response were observed and counted on days 14 post infection. The result showed that A. galli infection was able to increase significantly (P<0.05 mast cells response. This research concluded that the A. galli infection can trigger the involment of mucosal mast cells response in jejunal defense of laying hens against parasitic diseases caused by A. galli.

  7. Effects of Strand Lay Direction and Crossing Angle on Tribological Behavior of Winding Hoist Rope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-dong Chang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction and wear behavior exists between hoisting ropes that are wound around the drums of a multi-layer winding hoist. It decreases the service life of ropes and threatens mine safety. In this research, a series of experiments were conducted using a self-made test rig to study the effects of the strand lay direction and crossing angle on the winding rope’s tribological behavior. Results show that the friction coefficient in the steady-state period shows a decreasing tendency with an increase of the crossing angle in both cross directions, but the variation range is different under different cross directions. Using thermal imaging, the high temperature regions always distribute along the strand lay direction in the gap between adjacent strands, as the cross direction is the same with the strand lay direction (right cross contact. Additionally, the temperature rise in the steady-state increases with the increase of the crossing angle in both cross directions. The differences of the wear scar morphology are obvious under different cross directions, especially for the large crossing angle tests. In the case of right cross, the variation range of wear mass loss is larger than that in left cross. The damage that forms on the wear surface is mainly ploughing, pits, plastic deformation, and fatigue fracture. The major wear mechanisms are adhesive wear, and abrasive and fatigue wear.

  8. Effects of Strand Lay Direction and Crossing Angle on Tribological Behavior of Winding Hoist Rope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiang-Dong; Peng, Yu-Xing; Zhu, Zhen-Cai; Gong, Xian-Sheng; Yu, Zhang-Fa; Mi, Zhen-Tao; Xu, Chun-Ming

    2017-06-09

    Friction and wear behavior exists between hoisting ropes that are wound around the drums of a multi-layer winding hoist. It decreases the service life of ropes and threatens mine safety. In this research, a series of experiments were conducted using a self-made test rig to study the effects of the strand lay direction and crossing angle on the winding rope's tribological behavior. Results show that the friction coefficient in the steady-state period shows a decreasing tendency with an increase of the crossing angle in both cross directions, but the variation range is different under different cross directions. Using thermal imaging, the high temperature regions always distribute along the strand lay direction in the gap between adjacent strands, as the cross direction is the same with the strand lay direction (right cross contact). Additionally, the temperature rise in the steady-state increases with the increase of the crossing angle in both cross directions. The differences of the wear scar morphology are obvious under different cross directions, especially for the large crossing angle tests. In the case of right cross, the variation range of wear mass loss is larger than that in left cross. The damage that forms on the wear surface is mainly ploughing, pits, plastic deformation, and fatigue fracture. The major wear mechanisms are adhesive wear, and abrasive and fatigue wear.

  9. Acaricide residues in laying hens naturally infested by red mite Dermanyssus gallinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Marangi

    Full Text Available In the poultry industry, control of the red mite D. gallinae primarily relies worldwide on acaricides registered for use in agriculture or for livestock, and those most widely used are carbamates, followed by amidines, pyrethroids and organophosphates. Due to the repeated use of acaricides--sometimes in high concentrations--to control infestation, red mites may become resistant, and acaricides may accumulate in chicken organs and tissues, and also in eggs. To highlight some situations of misuse/abuse of chemicals and of risk to human health, we investigated laying hens, destined to the slaughterhouse, for the presence of acaricide residues in their organs and tissues. We used 45 hens from which we collected a total of 225 samples from the following tissues and organs: skin, fat, liver, muscle, hearth, and kidney. In these samples we analyzed the residual contents of carbaryl and permethrin by LC-MS/MS.Ninety-one (40.4% samples were positive to carbaryl and four samples (1.7% were positive to permethrin. Concentrations of carbaryl exceeding the detection limit (0.005 ppm were registered in the skin and fat of birds from two farms (p<0.01, although these concentrations remained below the maximum residue limit (MRLs (0.05 ppm (p<0.01. All organs/tissues of hens from a third farm were significantly more contaminated, with skin and muscle samples exceeding the MRL (0.05 ppm (p<0.01 of carbaryl in force before its use was banned. Out of 45 chickens tested, 37 (82.2% were found to be contaminated by carbaryl, and 4 (8.8% by permethrin. The present study is the first report on the presence of pesticides banned by the EU (carbaryl or not licensed for use (permethrin in the organs and tissues of laying hens, which have been treated against red mites, and then slaughtered for human consumption at the end of their life cycle.

  10. Acaricide residues in laying hens naturally infested by red mite Dermanyssus gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangi, Marianna; Morelli, Vincenzo; Pati, Sandra; Camarda, Antonio; Cafiero, Maria Assunta; Giangaspero, Annunziata

    2012-01-01

    In the poultry industry, control of the red mite D. gallinae primarily relies worldwide on acaricides registered for use in agriculture or for livestock, and those most widely used are carbamates, followed by amidines, pyrethroids and organophosphates. Due to the repeated use of acaricides--sometimes in high concentrations--to control infestation, red mites may become resistant, and acaricides may accumulate in chicken organs and tissues, and also in eggs. To highlight some situations of misuse/abuse of chemicals and of risk to human health, we investigated laying hens, destined to the slaughterhouse, for the presence of acaricide residues in their organs and tissues. We used 45 hens from which we collected a total of 225 samples from the following tissues and organs: skin, fat, liver, muscle, hearth, and kidney. In these samples we analyzed the residual contents of carbaryl and permethrin by LC-MS/MS.Ninety-one (40.4%) samples were positive to carbaryl and four samples (1.7%) were positive to permethrin. Concentrations of carbaryl exceeding the detection limit (0.005 ppm) were registered in the skin and fat of birds from two farms (p<0.01), although these concentrations remained below the maximum residue limit (MRLs) (0.05 ppm) (p<0.01). All organs/tissues of hens from a third farm were significantly more contaminated, with skin and muscle samples exceeding the MRL (0.05 ppm) (p<0.01) of carbaryl in force before its use was banned. Out of 45 chickens tested, 37 (82.2%) were found to be contaminated by carbaryl, and 4 (8.8%) by permethrin. The present study is the first report on the presence of pesticides banned by the EU (carbaryl) or not licensed for use (permethrin) in the organs and tissues of laying hens, which have been treated against red mites, and then slaughtered for human consumption at the end of their life cycle.

  11. The effect of dietary supplementation of salts of organic acid on production performance of laying hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Ravinder; Berwal, Raj Singh; Sihag, Sajjan; Patil, Chandrashekhar Santosh; Lalit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of supplementing different levels of salts of organic acid in the laying hen’s diet on their production performance and egg quality parameters during a period of 16-week. Materials and Methods: A total of 140 white leghorn laying hens at 24 weeks of age were randomly distributed to seven dietary treatment groups, i.e. T1 (control), T2 (0.5% sodium-butyrate), T3 (1.0% sodium-butyrate), T4 (1.5% sodium-butyrate), T5 (0.5% calcium-propionate), T6 (1.0% calcium-propionate) and T7 (1.5% calcium-propionate) consisting of 5 replications of 4 birds each in each treatment and housed in individual cages from 24 to 40 weeks of age. Feed intake, percent hen-day egg production, egg weight, egg mass production, feed conversion ratio (FCR), and economics of supplementation of salts of organic acids in layers’ ration were evaluated. Results: The dietary supplementation of salts of organic acids did not significantly affect the feed intake (g/day/hen) and body weight gain (g). Different levels of supplementation significantly (phen-day egg production and egg mass production) as compared to control group. FCR in terms of feed intake (kg) per dozen eggs was lowest (1.83±0.05) in T4 and feed intake (kg) per kg egg mass was lowest (2.87±0.05) in T5 as comparison to control (T1) group. Salts of organic acids supplementation resulted in significant (play, egg weight, and FCR. From economical point of view, egg production was more profitable at 0.5% level of sodium butyrate and 0.5% level of calcium propionate which reduced the feed cost per dozen eggs and per kg egg mass production without affecting the egg quality. PMID:28096625

  12. Microbial community composition of the crop and ceca contents of laying hens fed diets supplemented with Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczyk, P; Halle, B; Souffrant, W B

    2009-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the intestinal microbiota plays an important role in sustaining health and productivity of animals. Chlorella vulgaris, a naturally occurring green microalga, is believed to influence performance and health, including bird reproduction and egg quality. The nutritive value of open or indoor cultured C. vulgaris depends upon the technological process used to treat the algal mass. In the present paper, it is presented and discussed how 2 differentially processed C. vulgaris powders (spray-dried: SD-CV; bullet-milled and spray-dried: BMSD-CV) affected crop and cecal microbiota in laying hens. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments was applied. The diversity of the crop universal bacterial DGGE fingerprints was not affected (6.4 +/- 1.65, 5.4 +/- 1.19, and 5.5 +/- 1.35 in the control, SD-CV, and BMSD-CV, respectively). Most of the bands from the corresponding positions in the gels were closely related to Lactobacillus sp. The DGGE fingerprints of V2-V3 fragments of 16S rRNA of crop lactobacilli had lower diversity in the control hens (8.7 +/- 1.22) than in the SD-CV (9.2 +/- 1.77) and BMSD-CV (9.9 +/- 1.88); thus, feeding C. vulgaris resulted in increased lactobacilli diversity in crop. A band closely related to Lactobacillus ingluviei was present in 9 out of 12 hens in the control group but in only 1 bird in the SD-CV and in 5 out of 11 birds in the BMSD-CV, suggesting a negative effect of C. vulgaris on this lactobacillus. Feeding C. vulgaris to laying hens also resulted in increased bacterial community diversity in the ceca. No effect of the technological processing of the microalgae on the microbial diversity could be observed. The diversity of the ceca universal bacterial DGGE fingerprints was lower in the control group than in the SD-CV and BMSD-CV (5.6 +/- 1.72 vs. 9.16 +/- 2.64 and 9.31 +/- 2.41, respectively). Most of the sequences retrieved from the DGGE bands

  13. Feed consumption of egg strain pullets at onset of lay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y S; Sunde, M L

    1991-04-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the performance of four strains of commercial egg type pullets (A, B, C, and D) from 19 to 30 wk of age. The feed consumption differences during this period as well as feed consumption patterns 10 days prior to and after the first oviposition were of special interest. Two hundred and sixty-four birds (66 birds per strain) were fed a diet formulated to contain 2,750 kcal/kg ME, 17% CP, and 3.4% calcium. Results show that the average age to the first egg and percentage of hen-day egg production were not significantly different among the four strains of birds. However, egg weights of Strain A and C birds were significantly heavier than those of the Strain B and D birds. The birds from Strains B and D had significantly lower body weight than Strain A birds at the end of 18 wk, but body weights were not significantly different at the end of 30 wk. Feed intake per bird per day of pullets from Strains A and C was generally higher than that of those from Strains B and D in the first and second 4-wk period. Some of the consumption differences were significant. Feed intake in the third period (27 to 30 wk) was similar for the four strains of birds. Although different strains showed different feed consumption patterns around the first oviposition, all strains showed a drop on the day of the first oviposition. When the strains were combined, feed consumption was lower on that day than during the 8 days prior to the first oviposition.

  14. Effects of Curcuma longa rhizome powder on egg quality, performance and some physiological indices of laying hens fed different levels of metabolizable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbod, Mahsa; Mahdavi, Amir Hossein; Samie, Abdol-Hossein; Mehri, Mehran

    2017-03-01

    High-energy diets of laying hens may improve roductive performance, although some negative effects may also appear with respect to egg quality and physiological parameters. Curcuma longa rhizome powder (CRP) has beneficial effects on health indices of the birds through antioxidant and antimicrobial properties, especially when the birds experience nutritional stress. Increasing dietary CRP enhanced egg quality by improving eggshell thickness and hardness but decreasing yolk cholesterol content (P < 0.05). The best feed conversion ratio was obtained in birds fed high-apparent metabolizable energy (AME) diets supplemented with 2.0 g kg(-1) CRP (P < 0.05). Although increasing dietary AME elevated the serum concentration of triglycerides (P < 0.05) and enzymatic activities of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (P < 0.05), dietary inclusion of CRP alleviates the blood levels of these enzymes (P < 0.01). Low level of dietary CRP boosted the immune responses to Newcastle virus (P < 0.01) and sheep red blood cells (P < 0.05) antigens but decreased the heterophil to lymphocyte ratio (P < 0.05). Inclusion of at least 2.0 g kg(-1) CRP in the diet of laying decreased Escherichia coli enumerations in the ileal content (P < 0.01) and improved villus height, crypt depth and goblet cell numbers (P < 0.05). An improvement in the productive performance of laying hens fed high-energy diets might be associated with decreasing health indices and product quality, which could potentially be amended by nutritional modifications such as incorporating medicinal herbs in the feed. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Fear, stress, and feather pecking in commercial white and brown laying hen parent-stock flocks and their relationships with production parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas, E N; Kemp, B; Bolhuis, J E; Groothuis, T; Rodenburg, T B

    2013-09-01

    Little is known about the relationship between welfare traits and production in laying hen parent stock (PS). In commercial laying hens and pure lines, it is known that aspects associated with reduced welfare such as high fear, stress, and feather pecking can have negative effects on production. Because PS hens are housed under different conditions than commercial laying hens, the relationship between welfare traits and production may differ. We therefore studied the fear response to a stationary person (SP) and novel object (NO), basal plasma corticosterone (CORT) and whole-blood serotonin levels (5-HT), and feather damage as a proxy for feather pecking in 10 Dekalb White (DW) and 10 ISA Brown (ISA) commercial PS flocks and related these to production data. Because the relationship between welfare traits and production may differ by genetic origin and group size, we also assessed genotype and group size effects. Dekalb White birds were more fearful of a SP, and had more feather damage and lower 5-HT levels than ISA birds. Genotypes did not differ in CORT. A large group size (n > 5,000) was associated with low feed intake and better feed conversion for ISA flocks. For DW flocks, high fear of the NO was associated with low BW, low egg weight, and low feed intake. For ISA flocks, high fear of the SP was associated with high mortality. For both lines, high CORT was related to low egg weight. This is the first study to associate levels of fear and CORT to production in commercial PS flocks. Management of PS flocks should take into account breed differences, group size effects, and effects of human-bird interactions. Further research is needed to determine the effects of fear, CORT, 5-HT, and feather damage in commercial PS flocks on the development of their offspring.

  16. Long-term effects of dietary supplementation with an essential oil mixture on the growth and laying performance of two layer strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah U. Çatli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One thousand two hundred 1-day-old Lohmann LSL white and Lohmann Brown layer chickens were fed diets supplemented with either an antibiotic growth promoter (AGP or an herbal essential oil mixture (EOM till 58 wk of age to reveal the long-term effects of those additives on growth, performance and wholesome egg quality parameters. The study was arranged in a 2x3 factorial design with two layer strains and three feed additive regimens. Thus, the layer birds of both strains were randomly assigned to the three dietary treatments, i.e., standard basal diet (control, control with AGP (specifically, avilamycin, 10 mg/kg diet and control with EOM (24 mg/kg diet. The data regarding egg production were recorded between 22 to 58 weeks of age. Neither the dietary treatments nor the bird strain influenced the body weight and mortality of the birds in both the growing and laying period. AGP or EOM supplementation to the laying hen diet significantly increased the egg production rate and egg weight as compared to the control  diet alone, but egg mass output, feed consumption, and feed conversion ratio were not effected  by the dietary treatments. Neither dietary treatment created any statistically significantly differences in egg quality parameters with the exception of Haugh unit. The research findings have confirmed the beneficial effects of supplementation with feed-grade EOM on the laying rate and egg weight of both white and brown layers. Indeed, EOM, being a novel feed additive natural origin, proved to be as efficacious as AGP in promoting egg yield.

  17. Ecological and evolutionary physiology of desert birds : A progress report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, JB; Tieleman, BI

    The adaptive significance of mechanisms of energy and water conservation among species of desert rodents, which avoid temperature extremes by remaining within a burrow during the day, is well established. Conventional wisdom holds that arid-zone birds, diurnal organisms that endure the brunt of

  18. Ecological and evolutionary physiology of desert birds : A progress report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, JB; Tieleman, BI

    2002-01-01

    The adaptive significance of mechanisms of energy and water conservation among species of desert rodents, which avoid temperature extremes by remaining within a burrow during the day, is well established. Conventional wisdom holds that arid-zone birds, diurnal organisms that endure the brunt of thei

  19. The influence of dietary taurine and reduced housing density on hepatic functions in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zili; Zhang, Jinqiu; Ma, Haitian; Dai, Bin; Zheng, Liuhai; Miao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Yuanshu

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the influence of dietary taurine and reduced housing density on hepatic functions in laying hens, green-shell laying hens were randomly assigned to 3 groups: a free-range group, a caged group with low-density, and a caged group with high-density. Each group was further divided into the control (C) and taurine-treatment (T) groups. All the test birds were fed the same basic diet, except that the T groups were supplemented with 0.1% taurine. After 15 d, sera and liver were aseptically collected. The results show that dietary taurine supplementation and reduced housing density significantly attenuated physiopathological changes in the liver. When compared with the free-range group, serum alanine aminotransterase and aspartate aminotransterase in the caged hens were significantly higher and were deceased by taurine (P caged hens was higher than that in free-range hens, and taurine reduced serum inducible nitric oxide synthase activities in the low-density group (P < 0.05). Nuclear factor-κB DNA-binding activity increased significantly in the high-density housing group when compared with the other 2 housing patterns and was decreased by taurine (P < 0.05). Taurine reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA in all 3 rearing patterns, IL-4 mRNA expression in the high-density group, and IL-10 in the low-density group (P < 0.05). Malondialdehyde levels decreased in serum and liver from T groups and serum total antioxidation capability levels increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the low-density group. Dietary taurine supplementation decreased acetyl-CoA and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c mRNA expression in the high-density groups (P < 0.05). Taurine significantly increased lipoprotein lipase mRNA expression in the high-density group and peroxisome proliferator receptor mRNA expression both in the low- and high-density groups (P < 0.05). Taurine supplementation reduced total cholesterol levels in the low- and high-density groups

  20. THE BIRD PATICA IN BULGARIAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Belova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper observes some words for waterfowls (aquatic birds occurring exclusively in South Slavic languages: пат, патка, пате, патица 'duck, goose' and some of their derivatives. The root in these words is generally attributed to common Slavic pъt'bird', but the origin of the vowel timbre (a instead of ъ is unclear. Furthermore, this root could also be found in Eastern and rarely Western Slavic names for another bird 'куропатка' ('Perdix'.  Here all of the attempts for explaining the root vowel are summarized; also I propose a new convergence with the turkish root pat-/pač-, which could have had strong influence on the root vowel in a number of derivatives in Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian and Croatian.

  1. Lay abstracts and summaries: writing advice for scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Catherine E; Lapane, Kate L

    2014-09-01

    Scientific journals, institutional review boards, and funding sources often require abstracts or research summaries written specifically for the lay public. Making research findings understandable to the public helps raise awareness and speed adoption of practices that may lead to improved health. We provide advice on writing lay abstracts and summaries which includes the following: (1) make reasonable assumptions about grade-level, vocabulary, prior experience, and interests of the audience; (2) practice a verbal explanation with someone from your audience; (3) start writing by using a simple headline followed by a brief and relevant synopsis in common language then expand; (4) read your draft aloud and revise; (5) check readability statistics and simplify as needed; and (6) have both lay audience and peer scientists read your summary to assure that it is accessible to the public while remaining true to the science.

  2. Nest sharing under semi-natural conditions in laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Anja Brinch

    2012-01-01

    problems to laying hens, and egg production may also be negatively affected. Understanding what causes this difference in nest location selection may provide solutions to the problems associated with simultaneous nest sharing. The aims were to investigate whether a commercial strain of laying hens normally...... daily of each nest with regard to number of eggs, position, and materials used. On five mornings nesting behaviour was observed. Nest sharing occurred on all but the first 5 days of egg-laying. The majority of hens (n = 14) chose to visit an occupied nest at least once, but no hens exclusively used......Under natural conditions, the feral hen (Gallus gallus domesticus) will choose a nest location away from the flock, whereas under commercial conditions, the domestic hen will often choose the same nest as other hens have used or are still using. Simultaneous nest sharing causes several welfare...

  3. Gregarious nesting - An anti-predator response in laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Anja Brinch

    2012-01-01

    Gregarious nesting can be defined as a behaviour that occurs when a laying hen (Gallus gallus domesticus) given the choice between an occupied and an unoccupied nest site chooses the occupied nest site. It occurs frequently in flocks of laying hens kept under commercial conditions, contrasting...... the behaviour displayed by feral hens that isolate themselves from the flock during nesting activities. What motivates laying hens to perform gregarious nesting is unknown. One possibility is that gregarious nesting is an anti-predator response to the risk of nest predation emerging from behavioural flexibility...... in nesting strategy. The aim of the present experiment was to investigate whether gregarious nesting due to behavioural flexibility in nesting strategy is an anti-predator response. Twelve groups of 14–15 Isa Warren hens age 44 weeks were housed in pens each containing three adjacent roll-out nest boxes...

  4. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegford, Janice M.; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K.; Daigle, Courtney L.; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G.; Hernandez, Carlos E.; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Tracking of individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. We describe several tracking systems that are currently in use for laying hens and review each, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suited, and relevant issues to fit the best technology for the intended purpose. Abstract Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns

  5. Infection dynamics of Ascaridia galli in non-caged laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, Johan; Jansson, Désirée S

    2011-08-25

    The infection dynamics of Ascaridia galli in laying hens was investigated in six commercial non-caged flocks. Three flocks were managed in accordance with the regulations for organic production and had outdoor access, whereas three flocks were housed indoors in aviaries or traditional floor systems. Faecal egg counts and total worm burdens were determined at specified intervals during the first 50 weeks of the production period. In two conventional flocks the efficacy of flubendazole on lumenal stages was investigated. All flocks became infected following the arrival of the birds (post placement) with residual infective eggs derived from the previous flock. In four flocks (two organic and two conventional) parasite eggs were first detected in faeces 6-7 weeks post placement, whereas parasite eggs were not detected until after 17-18 weeks in two flocks. This delay was observed in two of three flocks that were housed in barns that had been thoroughly cleaned and disinfected by chlorocresol. In three flocks (two conventional and one organic) flubendazole was administered to the birds in the drinking water for approximately one week. Both conventional flocks were dewormed twice approximately 20 weeks apart, whereas the organic flock was dewormed only once about 40 weeks post placement. Parasite eggs reappeared after deworming in all flocks, often within 2-4 weeks, followed by a rapid increase in parasite egg expulsion. Our results suggested impairment of host immunity post treatment, as the egg counts exceeded pre-treatment levels after 7-8 weeks on both conventional farms. Accordingly, the way by which anthelmintics and/or disinfectants are used in non-caged chicken flocks must be refined.

  6. Reactions of laying hens and broilers to different gases used for stunning poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, A B; Fletcher, D L

    2001-09-01

    Observations of the behavioral reactions of laying hens and broilers to different gas stunning atmospheres were made. Sixty Hy-Line W-36 hens and 60 market-weight commercial broilers were placed individually into a plexiglass gas stunning unit and exposed to one of six gas atmospheres: air, concentrations of 30, 45, or 60% CO2 in air, a mixture of 70% argon and 30% CO2, and 100% argon. Video records were made during each test, which lasted until the subject became unconscious or for 2 min in the air treatment. Behavior in the 100% argon atmosphere resembled that in air, until birds became impaired by anoxia. All treatments involving CO2, including 70% argon/30% CO2, caused deep breathing and head shaking. The concentration of CO2 in air in the range tested did not affect the tendency to perform different actions, except that birds in 60% CO2 were more likely to exhibit a convulsive flip at the point of collapse. Chickens in 70% argon/30% CO2 tended to demonstrate less sedation and performed more sudden efforts to regain balance during tests than did chickens in CO2 mixtures in air and were more likely to perform a convulsive flip. Deep breathing and head shaking have been suggested as being indicative of respiratory distress and aversive reaction to CO2. The data in this study are consistent with the possibility that head shaking is an alerting response functioning to promote arousal in the face of reduced sensibility during exposure to CO2-enriched atmospheres. Nonetheless, if the view is correct that deep breathing and head shaking indicate distress, the 70% argon/30% CO2 gas mixture was at least as distressing as even 60% CO2 in air. The relative prevalence of sudden efforts to regain balance in 70% argon/30% CO2 suggest that this gas mixture might cause even more distress than up to 60% CO2 in air.

  7. Energy values of traditional ingredients and sugarcane yeast for laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAT da Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to determine the chemical composition and apparent metabolizable energy (AME and apparent metabolizable energy corrected for nitrogen balance (AMEn values of corn, soybean meal (SBM, soybean oil (SO and sugarcane yeast (SY (Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A metabolism trial was performed with 120 Dekalb White laying hens at 65 weeks of age, using the method of total excreta collection. Birds were housed in metabolism cages and distributed according to a completely randomized design into five treatments with, six replicates of four birds each. The experimental period consisted of four days of adaptation and four days of excreta collection. The experimental diets included: a reference diet based on corn and SBM and four test diets containing 40% corn, 30% SBM, 10% SO or 30 % SY. The chemical compositions of the tested ingredients, expressed on "as-is" basis were: 86.9, 87.29, 87.32 and 99.5% dry matter; and 3.51, 2.08, 99.31 and 0.03 ether extract for corn, SBM, SO and SY, respectively. Corn, SBM, and SO presented 7.33, 43.61 and 24.64% crude protein, and 0.58, 5.07 and 6.77% ash, respectively; and crude fiber contents of corn and SBM were, respectively, 2.24% and 3.56%. The following AME and AMEn (kcal/kg dry matter values were obtained: 3,801 and 3,760 kcal/kg for corn, 2,640 and 2,557 kcal/kg for SBM, 8,952 and 8,866 kcal/kg for SO, and 1,023 and 925 kcal/kg for sugarcane yeast, respectively.

  8. Fuglene. Audubon: Birds of America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichtkrull, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The Royal Library owns one of the most exceptional works in book history, an original edition of John James Audubon Birds of America. This edition, in a format called “double elephant folio” was published from 1827 to 1838. On basis of existing literature, this article briefly describes the work...... the Royal Library and the University Library, joined the library cooperation of the 1800’s on an equal standing with the other two libraries. The Classen’s Library and the library’s founder, industrialist JF Classen are described briefly in this article. Due to two library mergers the Birds of America...

  9. Fuglene. Audubon: Birds of America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichtkrull, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The Royal Library owns one of the most exceptional works in book history, an original edition of John James Audubon Birds of America. This edition, in a format called “double elephant folio” was published from 1827 to 1838. On basis of existing literature, this article briefly describes the work...... the Royal Library and the University Library, joined the library cooperation of the 1800’s on an equal standing with the other two libraries. The Classen’s Library and the library’s founder, industrialist JF Classen are described briefly in this article. Due to two library mergers the Birds of America...

  10. The effects of long (C20/22) and short (C18) chain omega-3 fatty acids on keel bone fractures, bone biomechanics, behavior, and egg production in free-range laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, M J; Booth, F; Wilkins, L J; Avery, N C; Brown, S B; Richards, G; Tarlton, J F

    2015-05-01

    Keel fractures in the laying hen are the most critical animal welfare issue facing the egg production industry, particularly with the increased use of extensive systems in response to the 2012 EU directive banning conventional battery cages. The current study is aimed at assessing the effects of 2 omega-3 (n3) enhanced diets on bone health, production endpoints, and behavior in free-range laying hens. Data was collected from 2 experiments over 2 laying cycles, each of which compared a (n3) supplemented diet with a control diet. Experiment 1 employed a diet supplemented with a 60:40 fish oil-linseed mixture (n3:n6 to 1.35) compared with a control diet (n3:n6 to 0.11), whereas the n3 diet in Experiment 2 was supplemented with a 40:60 fish oil-linseed (n3:n6 to 0.77) compared to the control diet (n3:n6 to 0.11). The n3 enhanced diet of Experiment 1 had a higher n3:n6 ratio, and a greater proportion of n3 in the long chain (C20/22) form (0.41 LC:SC) than that of Experiment 2 (0.12 LC:SC). Although dietary treatment was successful in reducing the frequency of fractures by approximately 27% in Experiment 2, data from Experiment 1 indicated the diet actually induced a greater likelihood of fracture (odds ratio: 1.2) and had substantial production detriment. Reduced keel breakage during Experiment 2 could be related to changes in bone health as n3-supplemented birds demonstrated greater load at failure of the keel, and tibiae and humeri that were more flexible. These results support previous findings that n3-supplemented diets can reduce fracture likely by increasing bone strength, and that this can be achieved without detriment to production. However, our findings suggest diets with excessive quantities of n3, or very high levels of C20/22, may experience health and production detriments. Further research is needed to optimize the quantity and type of n3 in terms of bone health and production variables and investigate the potential associated mechanisms. © 2015

  11. Bird populations as sentinels of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Carere

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs is a widespread phenomenon in nature. Although the mechanisms of action of EDCs are actively studied, the consequences of endocrine disruption (ED at the population level and the adaptations evolved to cope with chronic EDC exposure have been overlooked. Birds probably represent the animal taxon most successfully adapted to synanthropic life. Hence, birds share with humans a similar pattern of exposure to xenobiotics. In this article, we review case studies on patterns of behaviour that deviate from the expectation in bird species exposed to EDCs. We provide behavioural and ecological parameters to be used as endpoints of ED; methodological requirements and caveats based on species-specific life-history traits, behavioural repertoires, developmental styles, and possibility of captive breeding; a list of species that could be used as sentinels to assess the quality of man-made environment.

  12. Atmospheric Scintillations: A Clue for Bird Orientation and Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Charles; Bowden, Andrew; Benard, Andre

    2014-11-01

    The index-of-refraction of the troposphere is anisotropic at all scales even if the local turbulent velocity field is statistically homogeneous. This anisotropy is partly due to the coupling between the fluctuating velocity field with the Coriolis field and the Lorentz field. Thus, the redistribution of turbulent kinetic energy and the concomitant anisotropy in the index-of-refraction may provide a practical means for birds (and other animals and insects) to orient and navigate. Consequently, if birds migrate between two points on the Earth by following a great circle path, then local anisotropic scintillation phenomena may provide a means to determine the latitude, the longitude, and the bearing along an orthodromic migration path. Thus, scintillation phenomena may be an important fundamental component in the underlying mechanics that support bird orientation and navigation.

  13. CASHEW NUT MEAL IN THE FEEDING OF BROWN LAYING HENS

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Eduardo Braga Cruz; Ednardo Rodrigues Freitas; Regina Patrícia de Souza Xavier; Danilo Rodrigues Fernandes; Germano Augusto Gerônimo Nascimento; Pedro Henrique Watanabe

    2015-01-01

    The use of alternative foods to replace conventional foods is becoming a source of research for many researchers. The cashew nut meal (CNM) has high energy and protein value, may be a partial substitute for corn and soybean meal for poultry feed. In this context, this research was conducted to evaluate the effect of inclusion of CNM on the utilization of nutrients in the ration for laying hens, as well as the performance and characteristics of the eggs. The study used 180 Dekalb Brown laying ...

  14. Additional information about a mange outbreak by Allopsoroptoides galli (Acari: Psoroptoididae in commercial laying hens in the state of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna C. Tucci

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports additional information about a mange outbreak by the mite Allopsoroptoides galli in a commercial egg-laying hen facility in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. About half of the 76,000 multi-age birds of the flock were affected. Experimental infestations carried out on naive hens resulted in clinical signs similar to those diagnosed in naturally infested hens, such as generalized scaly dermatitis, presence of mucus-like material and yellowish crusts on the skin and around the calami, feather loss and strong unpleasant odor. About 30% drop of egg production was estimated. The possible source of infestation were wild birds identified on the ground and roofs of the sheds.

  15. Birds observed at Shemya Island, Aleutian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers Shemya Island bird surveys. The reports outline migrant bird activity during August 31 to October 3, 1977. The purpose of the study was to survey...

  16. Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge Bird List

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This bird list includes 293 species of birds which have been recorded on the refuge, principally on Bulls Island, and is based on observations by refuge personnel...

  17. Do 'Early Birds' Get the Healthier Worm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163902.html Do 'Early Birds' Get the Healthier Worm? Late-to-bed types ... 2017 FRIDAY, March 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Early birds may have a leg up over night owls ...

  18. Sex differences in the response to environmental cues regulating seasonal reproduction in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Gregory F; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2008-01-27

    Although it is axiomatic that males and females differ in relation to many aspects of reproduction related to physiology, morphology and behaviour, relatively little is known about possible sex differences in the response to cues from the environment that control the timing of seasonal breeding. This review concerns the environmental regulation of seasonal reproduction in birds and how this process might differ between males and females. From an evolutionary perspective, the sexes can be expected to differ in the cues they use to time reproduction. Female reproductive fitness typically varies more as a function of fecundity selection, while male reproductive fitness varies more as a function sexual selection. Consequently, variation in the precision of the timing of egg laying is likely to have more serious fitness consequences for females than for males, while variation in the timing of recrudescence of the male testes and accompanying territory establishment and courtship are likely to have more serious fitness consequences for males. From the proximate perspective, sex differences in the control of reproduction could be regulated via the response to photoperiod or in the relative importance and action of supplementary factors (such as temperature, food supply, nesting sites and behavioural interactions) that adjust the timing of reproduction so that it is in step with local conditions. For example, there is clear evidence in several temperate zone avian species that females require both supplementary factors and long photoperiods in order for follicles to develop, while males can attain full gonadal size based on photoperiodic stimulation alone. The neuroendocrine basis of these sex differences is not well understood, though there are many candidate mechanisms in the brain as well as throughout the entire hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis that might be important.

  19. Cage hygiene, laying location, and egg quality: the effects of linings and litter provision in furnished cages for laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinebretière, M; Huneau-Salaün, A; Huonnic, D; Michel, V

    2012-04-01

    This study investigates the influence of litter provision and linings used for nests and pecking and scratching areas on cage hygiene, laying location, and egg quality. Research was carried out in furnished cages, each housing 60 beak-trimmed ISA Brown hens. Four different treatments were compared in a factorial arrangement, including 2 different nest linings (artificial turf vs. plastic mesh), either used alone or combined with the use of litter (wheat bran) spread over the rubber mat in the pecking and scratching area (PSA). An additional treatment, using artificial turf mat in the PSA and nests (as commonly used in commercial flocks), was used to compare the effect of PSA lining in the other treatments. We observed laying location, the number of dirty and broken eggs, the microbiological contamination of eggshells according to laying location, and general cage hygiene. The use of nests for laying decreased when they were lined with plastic mesh. Eggs laid outside the nest were of lower quality than those laid inside it, and this was particularly true for eggs laid in the PSA. Although hygiene was low on artificial turf mats, eggs laid on PSA covered with a rubber mat were dirtier and had a higher count of mesophilic bacteria on the eggshell than those laid on PSA covered with an artificial turf mat. Rubber mats in PSA were rapidly destroyed and proved to be unsuitable. The provision of litter had no effect on cage hygiene but substantially increased wear on mats. This study shows nest lining and litter provision methods to be key factors that need to be taken into account to encourage the use of nest boxes for laying, and hence, to ensure good egg quality. Further research into new linings for PSA is needed for the future improvement of egg-laying conditions.

  20. Ovulation order mediates a trade-off between pre-hatching and post-hatching viability in an altricial bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith W Sockman

    Full Text Available Simultaneously dependent siblings often compete for parentally provided resources. This competition may lead to mortality, the probability of which may be a function, in part, of the individual offspring's production order. In birds, serial ovulation followed by hatching asynchrony of simultaneous dependents leads to differences in post-hatching survival that largely depend on ovulation (laying order. This has led to the widespread assumption that early-laid eggs are of greater value and therefore should possess different maternally manipulated characteristics than later-laid eggs. However, this perspective ignores the potential effect of laying order on pre-hatching viability, an effect which some studies suggest should offset the effect of laying order on post-hatching viability. I examined the relationship between laying order and hatching and fledging probability in wild, free-living Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii. In broods with complete hatching success, first-laid and therefore first-hatched offspring had the highest probability of fledging, and fledging probability declined with increasing laying order. However, first-laid eggs were less likely than later-laid eggs to hatch. This effect of laying order on pre-hatching viability seemed to offset that on post-hatching viability, and, consistently, maternal investment in egg size varied little if at all with respect to laying order. These results suggest that ovulation order mediates a trade-off between pre-hatching and post-hatching viability and should encourage a re-evaluation of the solitary role post-embryonic survival often plays when researchers make assumptions about the value of propagules based on the order in which they are produced.

  1. Trade Promotion Organizations (TPOs Role in Laying the Groundwork for an Export Promotion Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OCTAVIAN-LIVIU OLARU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most countries focus on strategies for export development and promotion, given the importance of national goals and, in many cases, limited resources. A TPO has a significant role in laying the groundwork for an export promotion program. TPOs should pay close attention to the trade information needs of exporters and have appropriate mechanisms for acquiring such information systematically and disseminating it in a timely way. Moreover, a TPO provides basic and useful support to the export community if it can facilitate contacts between foreign buyers and exporters. Developing the export promotion program is one of the basic requirements when the TPO formulates its support program for the export sector.

  2. Bat predation on nocturnally migrating birds

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez, Carlos; Juste, Javier; García-Mudarra, Juan L.; Agirre-Mendi, Pablo T.

    2001-01-01

    Bat predation on birds is a very rare phenomenon in nature. Most documented reports of bird-eating bats refer to tropical bats that occasionally capture resting birds. Millions of small birds concen- trate and cross over the world’s temperate regions during migra- tion, mainly at night, but no nocturnal predators are known to benefit from this enormous food resource. An analysis of 14,000 fecal pellets of the greater noctule bat (Nyctalus lasiopterus) reveals that this species captures a...

  3. Handbook on Bird Management and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    Burgess Publishing Co., Minneapolis, MN. Pough , R. H. 1949. Audubon Land Bird Guide. Doubleday and Co., Garden City, NY. Pough , R. H. 1951. Audubon...Water Bird Guide. Doubleday and Co., Garden City, NY. Pough , R. H. 1957. Audubon Western Bird Guide. Doubleday and Co., Garden City, NY. Robbins, C. S...Guide to Western Birds. Houghton Mifflin, Boston, MA. This field guide is the counterpart to the eastern guide listed above Pough , R. H. 1949. Audubon

  4. Birds and Bird Habitat: What Are the Risks from Industrial Wind Turbine Exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Terry; Harrington, M. Elizabeth; Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Bird kill rate and disruption of habitat has been reported when industrial wind turbines are introduced into migratory bird paths or other environments. While the literature could be more complete regarding the documentation of negative effects on birds and bird habitats during the planning, construction, and operation of wind power projects,…

  5. 76 FR 48693 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... August 8, 2011 Part V Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 20 Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations and Ceded... RIN 1018-AX34 Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain...

  6. 76 FR 54051 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Final Frameworks for Early-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... Bird Hunting; Final Frameworks for Early-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations; Final Rule #0;#0... OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 20 RIN 1018-AX34 Migratory Bird Hunting; Final Frameworks for Early-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service,...

  7. 75 FR 47681 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... Interior Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 20 Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting... INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 20 RIN 1018-AX06 Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations and Ceded Lands for the 2010-11...

  8. 78 FR 52657 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Final Frameworks for Early-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... Bird Hunting; Final Frameworks for Early Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations; Final Rule #0;#0... OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 20 RIN 1018-AY87 Migratory Bird Hunting; Final Frameworks for Early-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service,...

  9. Birds and Bird Habitat: What Are the Risks from Industrial Wind Turbine Exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Terry; Harrington, M. Elizabeth; Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Bird kill rate and disruption of habitat has been reported when industrial wind turbines are introduced into migratory bird paths or other environments. While the literature could be more complete regarding the documentation of negative effects on birds and bird habitats during the planning, construction, and operation of wind power projects,…

  10. Influence of age of breeding laying quails in reproduction, egg quality and morphology of the genital organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Cristina Carneiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The sperm-egg interaction was investigated during their reproductive life, in laying quails mated with males of different ages (Coturnix coturnix sp.. The experimental design was completely randomized in factorial scheme 4 x 4 (age of the females of age x male quail, 80,160,240 and 390 days, with 10 replicates and six birds each, in proportion to two females for a male. The results showed that there was a quadratic effect (P <0.05 the amount of sperm trapped in the vitelline membrane of the germinal disc, depending on the age of the females, with a reduction of this number over the old. The age of the females had no effect on egg weight, shell thickness, the percentage of shell and yolk and Haugh unit. As for the egg production was a quadratic effect. The incubation parameters evaluated chick weight, fertility, hatchability and mortality did not differ when analyzed in relation to age of males and females, as well as egg quality and performance of the of the resulting progenies. The chick weight, fertility, hatchability and mortality did not differ when analyzed in relation to age of males and females, as well as egg quality and performance of the of the resulting progenies. The morphology of the genital organs of males and females showed no difference in the age of the birds. Males and females of laying quails maintain reproductive ability up to 56 weeks. The age of the males had no effect on the reproductive performance and the use of younger males to older females did not result in improved reproductive health.

  11. The Breeding Bird Survey, 1966

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, C.S.; Van Velzen, W.T.

    1967-01-01

    A Breeding Bird Survey of a large section on North America was conducted during June 1966. Cooperators ran a total of 585 Survey routes in 26 eastern States and 4 Canadian Provinces. Future coverage of established routes will enable changes in the abundance of North American breeding birds to be measured. Routes are selected at random on the basis of one-degree blocks of latitude and longitude. Each 241/2-mile route, with 3-minute stops spaced one-half mile apart, is driven by automobile. All birds heard or seen at the stops are recorded on special forms and the data are then transferred to machine punch cards. The average number of birds per route is tabulated by State, along with the total number of each species and the percent of routes and stops upon which they were recorded. Maps are presented showing the range and abundance of selected species. Also, a year-to-year comparison is made of populations of selected species on Maryland routes in 1965 and 1966.

  12. Notes on some Sumatran birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junge, G.C.A.

    1948-01-01

    During the war I was able to identify some collections of birds from Sumatra, present in the Leiden Museum. These collections were brought together by E. Jacobson and W. C. van Heurn in the Padang Highlands in 1013; by W. Groeneveldt in the same area in 1914 and 1915; bij L. P. Cosquino de Bussy and

  13. Using birds to guide management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob Budd

    2005-01-01

    Most years, bluebirds come home to Wyoming on the 23rd day of March. I know this date because I have watched the birds for decades. It is not a date of great ornithological importance. The 23rd of March is my mother's birthday, and my mother loves bluebirds. As a son, you tend to remember things like mothers and bluebirds.

  14. The Bird Box Survey Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    When high school students are asked what's the best part of science class, many will say it's the field trips. Students enjoy engaging in authentic, community-based science outside the classroom. To capitalize on this, Patrick Willis created the Bird Box Survey Project for his introductory field biology class. The project takes students…

  15. Physiological adaptation in desert birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, JB; Tieleman, BI; Williams, Joseph B.

    2005-01-01

    We call into question the idea that birds have not evolved unique physiological adaptations to desert environments. The rate at which desert larks metabolize energy is lower than in mesic species within the same family, and this lower rate of living translates into a lower overall energy requirement

  16. The Bird Box Survey Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    When high school students are asked what's the best part of science class, many will say it's the field trips. Students enjoy engaging in authentic, community-based science outside the classroom. To capitalize on this, Patrick Willis created the Bird Box Survey Project for his introductory field biology class. The project takes students…

  17. Palaearctic-African Bird Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwajomo, Soladoye Babatola

    Bird migration has attracted a lot of interests over past centuries and the methods used for studying this phenomenon has greatly improved in terms of availability, dimension, scale and precision. In spite of the advancements, relatively more is known about the spring migration of trans-Saharan m......Bird migration has attracted a lot of interests over past centuries and the methods used for studying this phenomenon has greatly improved in terms of availability, dimension, scale and precision. In spite of the advancements, relatively more is known about the spring migration of trans...... of birds from Europe to Africa and opens up the possibility of studying intra-African migration. I have used long-term, standardized autumn ringing data from southeast Sweden to investigate patterns in biometrics, phenology and population trends as inferred from annual trapping totals. In addition, I...... in the population of the species. The papers show that adult and juvenile birds can use different migration strategies depending on time of season and prevailing conditions. Also, the fuel loads of some individuals were theoretically sufficient for a direct flight to important goal area, but whether they do so...

  18. Managing a Bird Flu Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Del

    2006-01-01

    Concern about a possible bird flu pandemic has grown in the medical community with the spread of the avian flu virus around the globe. Health officials say there is no immediate threat but add that an influenza pandemic occurs every 30 to 40 years, and prudence demands planning now. That planning will increasingly involve local school officials,…

  19. PEMBELAJARAN LAY UP SHOOT MENGGUNAKAN MEDIA AUDIO VISUAL BASIC LAY UP SHOOT UNTUK MENINGKATKAN HASILBELAJAR LAY UP SHOOT PADA SISWA KELAS VIIIA SMP KANISIUS PATI TAHUN 2013/2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frendy Nurochwan Febryanto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the learning lay up shoot using basic audiovisual media shoot lay ups can improve learning outcomes shoot lay ups in class VIIIA Starch Canisius junior year 2013/2014 . This study uses Classroom Action Research ( CAR. The technique of collecting data through observation and assessment of learning outcomes shoot basketball lay up. Data analysis techniques used in this research is descriptive . At the end of the first cycle activity of teachers in teaching basic techniques lay up shoot using audio-visual media reaches 76.19%, whereas at the end of the first cycle of student activity during the learning process lay up shoot using audio-visualmediareaches78.57%. At the end of the second cycle of activity of teachers in teaching basic techniques lay up shoot using audio-visual media reaches 85.71%, whereas at the end of the second cycle of activity of students during the learning process lay up shoot using audio-visual media reaches 92.86%. Based on the results of the study it can be concluded that learning the lay-up shoot using basic audiovisual media shoot lay ups can improve student learning outcomes at Canisius junior class VIIIA Pati year 2013/2014.

  20. Towards a mechanistic interpretation of bird migration in South America

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Research to date has demonstrated that bird migration is comprised of highly diverse and plastic behavioural patterns. Our objective is to highlight the importance of studying mechanisms underlying these patterns in austral migrants. We focus on the high incidence of overlap in breeding and non-breeding ranges as a particularly thought-provoking pattern. We then explore the opportunities afforded by partial migration theory to elucidate the mechanisms underlying seasonal range overlap. We pro...

  1. I LIKE LISTENING TO BIRDS SINGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘向勤; 廖明娟

    2002-01-01

    Every early morning, birds' happy singing wakes me up. I get dressed quickly and have a wash and brush up, then watch birds and listen to them singing happily in the trees. The singing of different kinds of birds sounds like a piece of beautiful symphonic music. Birds’singing makes me relaxed and happy and it also recalls me something of the Past.

  2. Velogenic Newcastle disease in imported caged birds.

    OpenAIRE

    Clavijo, A.; Robinson, Y; Booth, T.; Munroe, F

    2000-01-01

    Velogenic Newcastle disease was diagnosed in pet birds intended for importation into Canada. Virological and histopathological examination confirmed the presence of the disease. The group of birds was denied entry into Canada. Similar birds illegally imported are a potential source of velogenic Newcastle disease virus and are a threat to domestic poultry.

  3. Velogenic Newcastle disease in imported caged birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo, A; Robinson, Y; Booth, T; Munroe, F

    2000-05-01

    Velogenic Newcastle disease was diagnosed in pet birds intended for importation into Canada. Virological and histopathological examination confirmed the presence of the disease. The group of birds was denied entry into Canada. Similar birds illegally imported are a potential source of velogenic Newcastle disease virus and are a threat to domestic poultry.

  4. The Physics of Bird Flight: An Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Michael D.; George, Thomas F.; Feldman, Bernard J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an experiment that measures the forces acting on a flying bird during takeoff. The experiment uses a minimum of equipment and only an elementary knowledge of kinematics and Newton's second law. The experiment involves first digitally videotaping a bird during takeoff, analyzing the video to determine the bird's position as a…

  5. Epidemiologic characterization of Colorado backyard bird flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emily I; Reif, John S; Hill, Ashley E; Slota, Katharine E; Miller, Ryan S; Bjork, Kathe E; Pabilonia, Kristy L

    2012-06-01

    Backyard gallinaceous bird flocks may play an important role in the spread of infectious diseases within poultry populations as well as the transmission of zoonotic diseases to humans. An epidemiologic characterization was conducted of Colorado backyard flocks to gather information on general flock characteristics, human movement of birds, human-bird interaction, biosecurity practices, and flock health. Our results suggest that backyard poultry flocks in Colorado are small-sized flocks (68.6% of flocks had backyard flock environment may promote bird-to-bird transmission as well as bird-to-human transmission of infectious disease. Birds are primarily housed with free access to the outside (96.85%), and many are moved from the home premises (46.06% within 1 yr). Human contact with backyard flocks is high, biosecurity practices are minimal, and bird health is negatively impacted by increased movement events. Increased knowledge of backyard bird characteristics and associated management practices can provide guidelines for the development of measures to decrease disease transmission between bird populations, decrease disease transmission from birds to humans, and increase the overall health of backyard birds.

  6. 14 CFR 29.631 - Bird strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bird strike. 29.631 Section 29.631... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.631 Bird strike. The... safe landing (for Category B) after impact with a 2.2-lb (1.0 kg) bird when the velocity of...

  7. 14 CFR 35.36 - Bird impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bird impact. 35.36 Section 35.36... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.36 Bird impact. The applicant must demonstrate, by tests or... 4-pound bird at the critical location(s) and critical flight condition(s) of a typical installation...

  8. BIRD STRIKE INCIDENCE AT ADDIS ABABA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Red eyed doves together), Black kites and Eurasian bee—eaters were ... Many airports in different parts of the world have employed various techniqnes to scare ... human bird-»scarers chasing away birds during take off and landing of aircraft. .... birds were killed by the engine blast only, without any visible damage to the.

  9. Evaluation of the microclimate in poultry transport module drawers during the marketing process of end-of-lay hens from farm to slaughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, G J; Wilkins, L J; Weeks, C A; Knowles, T G; Brown, S N

    2012-11-10

    Changes in module drawer temperature and relative humidity were monitored for 24 commercial loads of hens. Mathematical models revealed significant differences in predicted drawer temperature depending on their location and the outside environmental temperature. Higher predicted temperatures were found in uppermost drawers of the top modules at the front of the lorry, and lower temperatures in drawers on the outer sides of modules and in those drawers in modules next to the back of the lorry in both the upper and lower modules during transport. In the lairage, drawer temperature generally decreased, except in drawers at the top of modules where temperatures increased. Temperature increases were most often recorded in modules which had been located at the rear of the lorry, which were generally cooler during transport. End-of-lay hens would appear to be exposed to a greater risk of cold stress rather than heat stress in the UK. Inspection of birds during transport, or upon arrival, should be directed to the bottom and side drawers of a load when looking for cold stress, and the top row of drawers (centre) of the top modules when looking for heat stress. The frequency of inspections should increase at times of high ambient temperature while the birds are being held in lairages. Adjusting the numbers of birds loaded per drawer according to bird condition and weather appears to be an effective mitigation strategy which is already in use commercially.

  10. Fish by-product meal in diets for commercial laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Ferreira Silva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the increasing levels (0, 1, 2, 3 e 4% of fish by-product meal in diets for laying hens on performance, egg quality and economic analysis. A total of 160 Dekalb White hens with 52-wk old were distributed in a completely randomized design with five treatments and four replicates of eight birds each. The experiment lasted 84 days divided into four periods of 21 days. Estimates of fish by-product meal levels were determined by polynomial regression. Differences (p < 0.05 were detected for all variables of performance, in egg weight, yolk and albumen percentage, yolk and albumen height, feed cost and production cost, in which the inclusion of fish by-product meal in the diets showed better results. It can be concluded that fish by-product meal can be used in diets for hens as alternative feed, with better results in egg production, feed conversion, egg weight, yolk-albumen ratio and a reduction in feed cost and production cost.

  11. The development of seasonal emission factors from a Canadian commercial laying hen facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Robert J.; Wood, David J.; Van Heyst, Bill J.

    2014-04-01

    Pollutants emitted from poultry housing facilities are a concern from a human health, bird welfare, and environmental perspective. Development of emission factors for these aerial pollutants is difficult due to variable climatic conditions, the number and type of poultry, and the wide range of management practices used. To address these concerns, a study was conducted to develop emission factors for ammonia and particulate matter over a period of one year from a commercial poultry laying hen facility in Wellington County, Ontario, Canada. Instruments housed inside an on-site mobile trailer were used to monitor in-house concentrations of ammonia and size fractionated particulate matter via a heated sample line. Along with a ventilation profile, emission factors were developed for the facility. Average emissions of 19.53 ± 19.97, 2.55 ± 2.10, and 1.10 ± 1.52 g day-1 AU-1 (where AU is defined as an animal unit equivalent to 500 kg live mass) for ammonia, PM10, PM2.5, respectively, were observed. All emissions peaked during the winter months, with the exception of PM2.5 which increased in the summer.

  12. INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL QUALITY OF COMMERCIAL LAYING HENS EGGS WITH NORMAL AND VITREOUS EGGSHELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Reis Vilela

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the internal and external quality of eggs classified as eggs with normal eggshell and eggs with vitreous eggshell, produced by hens at three different ages. Forty-five eggs of each eggshell type, normal and vitreous, were sampled at the ages of 30, 50, and 70 weeks. The weight of the egg, in both types of eggshell, increased with the advancing age of the hen. Higher concentration of calcium was found in eggs with normal eggshells comparing to eggs with vitreous eggshells. The eggshell type did not affect phosphorus percentage. The mineral deposition of the eggshell was constant. The skin thickness increased irrespective of the shell along the reproductive life of the chicken and decreased when the bird became older. The percentage of albumen increased, while the percentage of albumen protein and pH decreased throughout the ages. Percentage of egg yolk, humidity, and pH decreased with increase of age of the laying hen, whereas crude protein and lipid increased. Eggs with vitreous eggshell showed eggshell with lower quality compared to those with normal eggshell, without, however, compromising the internal quality of albumen and yolk. Keywords: egg quality; eggshell types; physical analysis.

  13. Ability of non-linear mixed models to predict growth in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Galeano-Vasco

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the Von Bertalanffy, Richards, Gompertz, Brody, and Logistics non-linear mixed regression models were compared for their ability to estimate the growth curve in commercial laying hens. Data were obtained from 100 Lohmann LSL layers. The animals were identified and then weighed weekly from day 20 after hatch until they were 553 days of age. All the nonlinear models used were transformed into mixed models by the inclusion of random parameters. Accuracy of the models was determined by the Akaike and Bayesian information criteria (AIC and BIC, respectively, and the correlation values. According to AIC, BIC, and correlation values, the best fit for modeling the growth curve of the birds was obtained with Gompertz, followed by Richards, and then by Von Bertalanffy models. The Brody and Logistic models did not fit the data. The Gompertz nonlinear mixed model showed the best goodness of fit for the data set, and is considered the model of choice to describe and predict the growth curve of Lohmann LSL commercial layers at the production system of University of Antioquia.

  14. Possible effects of delivering methionine to laying hens in drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahin Cadirci

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were conducted to study the effects of water-soluble DL-methionine supplied through water on the performance of laying hens. Two diet formulations were used in both experiments. For diet 1, nutrient specifications were set to meet or exceed requirements, whereas diet 2 was essentially diet 1 without supplemental methionine. Birds were divided into four groups of equal number. In experiment I, group 1 received diet 1 and normal water. Group 2, 3 and 4 received diet 2 and methionine treated water (0.050% for group 2; 0.075% for group 3; 0.100% for group 4. In experiment II, group 1 received diet 1 and normal water. Groups 2, 3 and 4 received diet 2 and methionine treated water (0.025% for group 2; 0.050% for group 3; 0.075% for group 4. In both experiments there were significant differences in egg weight and methionine intake between the groups, whereas no significant differences were observed in feed intake, water intake, egg production and feed conversation ratio. In the case of egg mass, significant differences between the treatment groups were found in experiment II but not in experiment I. The results suggest that the source of methionine does not influence its metabolic effect. Thus, it seems that methionine from the water is as good as when supplied wholly from the feed.

  15. Pedigree and genomic analyses of feed consumption and residual feed intake in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolc, Anna; Arango, Jesus; Jankowski, Tomasz; Settar, Petek; Fulton, Janet E; O'Sullivan, Neil P; Fernando, Rohan; Garrick, Dorian J; Dekkers, Jack C M

    2013-09-01

    Efficiency of production is increasingly important with the current escalation of feed costs and demands to minimize the environmental footprint. The objectives of this study were 1) to estimate heritabilities for daily feed consumption and residual feed intake and their genetic correlations with production and egg-quality traits; 2) to evaluate accuracies of estimated breeding values from pedigree- and marker-based prediction models; and 3) to localize genomic regions associated with feed efficiency in a brown egg layer line. Individual feed intake data collected over 2-wk trial periods were available for approximately 6,000 birds from 8 generations. Genetic parameters were estimated with a multitrait animal model; methods BayesB and BayesCπ were used to estimate marker effects and find genomic regions associated with feed efficiency. Using pedigree information, feed efficiency was found to be moderately heritable (h(2) = 0.46 for daily feed consumption and 0.47 for residual feed intake). Hens that consumed more feed and had greater residual feed intake (lower efficiency) had a genetic tendency to lay slightly more eggs with greater yolk weights and albumen heights. Regions on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 7, 13, and Z were found to be associated with feed intake and efficiency. The accuracy from genomic prediction was higher and more persistent (better maintained across generations) than that from pedigree-based prediction. These results indicate that genomic selection can be used to improve feed efficiency in layers.

  16. DNA barcoding of Dutch birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Aliabadian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase subunit I (COI can serve as a fast and accurate marker for the identification of animal species, and has been applied in a number of studies on birds. We here sequenced the COI gene for 387 individuals of 147 species of birds from the Netherlands, with 83 species being represented by >2 sequences. The Netherlands occupies a small geographic area and 95% of all samples were collected within a 50 km radius from one another. The intraspecific divergences averaged 0.29% among this assemblage, but most values were lower; the interspecific divergences averaged 9.54%. In all, 95% of species were represented by a unique barcode, with 6 species of gulls and skua (Larus and Stercorariusat least one shared barcode. This is best explained by these species representing recent radiations with ongoing hybridization. In contrast, one species, the Lesser Whitethroat Sylvia curruca showed deep divergences, averaging 5.76% and up to 8.68% between individuals. These possibly represent two distinct taxa, S. curruca and S. blythi, both clearly separated in a haplotype network analysis. Our study adds to a growing body of DNA barcodes that have become available for birds, and shows that a DNA barcoding approach enables to identify known Dutch bird species with a very high resolution. In addition some species were flagged up for further detailed taxonomic investigation, illustrating that even in ornithologically well-known areas such as the Netherlands, more is to be learned about the birds that are present.

  17. Müügimehest koputajaks / Kevin Laye ; tekst Kreet Rosin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laye, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Intervjuu Kevin Laye'ga, kes on olnud ka kahekordne Euroopa meistrist karatees ja eriüksuse SAS liige, Roger Callahani loodud mõtteväljaravist (TFT, Thought Field Theraphy) ning teistest tehnikatest, mida ta on õppinud ning kasutab igapäevaselt

  18. The assessment of writing ability: Expert readers versus lay readers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonen, R.; Vergeer, M.; Eiting, M.

    1997-01-01

    This article reports on three studies about the reading reliability of lay and expert readers in rating three kinds of writing assignments. Readers had to rate the Con tent and Language Usage of students' writing performances. The studies show that expert readers are more reliable in rating Usage, w

  19. Metabolizable energy value of crude glycerin for laying hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    An experiment with laying hens was conducted to determine the apparent metabolizable energy-nitrogen corrected (AMEn) value of crude glycerin, a coproduct of biodiesel production. Crude glycerin (86.95% glycerol, 9.22% water, 0.03% methanol, 1.26% sodium, 3625 kcal/kg gross energy) was obtained from...

  20. The effect of feeding clinoptilolite (zeolite) to laying hens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    housed in individual cages in a naturally ventilated laying house and fed the four ... noticed in the days to f irst egg, number of eggs laid per hen, egg size ... of feed nitrogen in animal nutrition, to reduce intestinal disease in pigs and .... Table 3 Mean performance data of hens fed diets with and without clinoptilolite. 109. Diet.

  1. Müügimehest koputajaks / Kevin Laye ; tekst Kreet Rosin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laye, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Intervjuu Kevin Laye'ga, kes on olnud ka kahekordne Euroopa meistrist karatees ja eriüksuse SAS liige, Roger Callahani loodud mõtteväljaravist (TFT, Thought Field Theraphy) ning teistest tehnikatest, mida ta on õppinud ning kasutab igapäevaselt

  2. Effects of oregano (Oregano Onites on performance, hatchability and egg quality parameters of laying quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cangir Uyarlar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effects of different inclusion levels of oregano into the diet on daily feed consumption, feed conversion ratio, egg production, hatchability, egg palatability, egg weight, external and internal egg quality, live weight increase, serum cholesterol and yolk cholesterol level in laying quails. A total of 216 laying quails at 42 days of age were divided into 36 cages, 6 birds in each (4 females and 2 males, 6 cages per thesis. The 1st group was left as control (OR0 without any supplementation of oregano. The other five experimental groups were OR10, OR20, OR30, OR40, and OR50 which were fed with the diets supplemented with 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 g/kg of oregano, respectively. The experiment lasted for 63 days until the quails reached 105 days of age. As a result of this study, 50 g/kg oregano supplementation appeared to be the best as respects taste (P<0.002. The inclusion level of 20 g/kg increased fertility (P<0.02 however, above that level fertility was reduced. This peculiarity of oregano may be taken into account by the poultry breeder companies. For the other segments of the poultry industry, the usage of oregano up to 50 g/kg seemed to be appropriate.

  3. Digestibility and physico-chemical characteristics of acid silage meal made of pirarucu waste in diets for commercial laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscarina de Souza Batalha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of acid silage meal made of pirarucu waste in diets for commercial laying hens on apparent digestibility and energy metabolism. Seventy-two Hisex White hens with 71 weeks of age were assigned to a completely randomized with two treatments (control diet and diet with 3% pirarucu waste acid silage with six replicates of six birds each. The ensiled biomass was light brown in color, showing acidified aroma; creamy consistency; 4.38±0.11 pH; 84.16% dry matter; 40.06% crude protein; 26.82% ether extract; 9.31% mineral matter, 65.16 g kg-1 calcium and 22.90 g kg-1 phosphorus. Differences (p > 0.05 were detected in digestibility of crude protein, non-fiber carbohydrates (soluble carbohydrates, etherextract, mineral matter, metabolizable energy and metabolizable energy coefficient. Our results indicate that the acid silage mealmade of pirarucu waste can be included up to 3% in diets for laying hens, showing satisfactory nutrient digestibility and potential to be used as an energy source.

  4. Effects of dietary supplementation with Gynura procumbens (Merr.) on egg yolk cholesterol, excreta microflora and laying hen performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhande, A; Ingale, S L; Lee, S H; Sen, S; Khong, C; Chae, B J; Kwon, I K

    2014-01-01

    Abstract 1. The present study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with Gynura procumbens on egg yolk and serum cholesterol and triglycerides, excreta microflora, laying performance and egg quality. 2. A total of 160 Hy-Line Brown layers (45 weeks old) were randomly assigned into 4 treatments on the basis of laying performance. Each treatment had 4 replicates with 10 birds each. 3. Dietary treatments were basal diet supplemented with 0 (control), 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 g/kg diet G. procumbens during 56-d feeding period. 4. Serum (d 21, 42 and 56) and egg yolk (d 28, 42 and 56) cholesterol and triglycerides concentrations were linearly reduced with increasing dietary concentrations of G. procumbens. 5. Increasing dietary concentrations of G. procumbens linearly reduced the excreta total anaerobic bacteria (d 28), Clostridium sp. and Escherichia coli (d 28 and 56) populations. 6. Overall egg production and egg mass were linearly increased, and overall feed efficiency was linearly improved with increase in dietary G. procumbens. 7. Dietary increasing concentrations of G. procumbens linearly improved egg yolk colour (d 28 and 56) and breaking strength of eggs (d 56). 8. The results obtained in the present experiment indicate that dietary supplementation with G. procumbens could reduce the egg yolk cholesterol, suppresses harmful excreta microflora and improves layers performance.

  5. Integrated plumage colour variation in relation to body condition, reproductive investment and laying date in the collared flycatcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laczi, Miklós; Hegyi, Gergely; Herényi, Márton; Kiss, Dorottya; Markó, Gábor; Nagy, Gergely; Rosivall, Balázs; Szöllősi, Eszter; Török, János

    2013-10-01

    The possible integration of different sexual ornaments into a composite system, and especially the information content of such ornament complexes, is poorly investigated. Many bird species display complex plumage coloration, but whether this represents one integrated or several independent sexual traits can be unclear. Collared flycatchers ( Ficedula albicollis) display melanised and depigmented plumage areas, and the spectral features (brightness and UV chroma) of these are correlated with each other across the plumage. In a 5-year dataset of male and female plumage reflectance, we examined some of the potential information content of integrated, plumage-level colour attributes by estimating their relationships to previous and current year body condition, laying date and clutch size. Females were in better condition the year before they became darker pigmented, and males in better current year condition were also darker pigmented. Female pigment-based brightness was positively, while male structurally based brightness was negatively related to current laying date. Finally, the overall UV chroma of white plumage areas in males was positively associated with current clutch size. Our results show that higher degree of pigmentation is related to better condition, while the structural colour component is associated with some aspects of reproductive investment. These results highlight the possibility that correlated aspects of a multiple plumage ornamentation system may reflect together some aspects of individual quality, thereby functioning as a composite signal.

  6. Turkey hen fertility and egg production after artificial insemination and multiple oviduct eversion during the pre-laying period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakst, M R

    1988-07-01

    The onset of egg production (mean 18.3 days after the onset of photostimulation) and the rate of egg production (flock averaged 4.9 eggs per bird per week for the first 8 weeks of egg production) were not affected by 5 days of twice daily oviduct eversion ('venting') in the pre-laying period when compared to unvented controls. After the onset of photostimulation, pre-laying hens were inseminated twice daily on Days 12 to 16 with 3 microliter semen containing 15 x 10(6) spermatozoa, and compared with groups of hens inseminated once daily on Days 15 and 16 with 15 microliters semen containing 75 x 10(6) spermatozoa or 41 microliter semen containing 200 x 10(6) spermatozoa. Fertility remained high for the first 5 weeks of egg production. However, by Week 6 the fertility of the hens receiving frequent low doses of semen dropped significantly below that of the others, which suggests that multiple inseminations with a low semen volume containing relatively low numbers of spermatozoa does not lead to an increase in the efficacy of sperm transport and storage in the oviduct.

  7. Black pepper (Piper nigrum in diets for laying hens on performance, egg quality and blood biochemical parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Duque Melo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the increasing levels (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6% of black pepper in diets for laying hens on performance, egg quality and blood biochemical parameters. Hissex White hens (n=168 at 30 weeks of age were used. The experimental method was completely randomized with seven treatments with four replicates of six birds each. Estimates of black pepper levels were determined by polynomial regression. The performance showed no significant differences (p > 0.05. The eggshell percentage was significantly influenced (p < 0.05, in which the level of 0.30% inclusion impaired eggshell quality. Triglycerides level increased significantly (p < 0.05, according to increasing levels of black pepper in the diet. It can be concluded that black pepper can be used in diets for laying hens as phytogenic additive without harming the performance. However, this inclusion causes a reduction in eggshell percentage and an increase in the level of triglycerides in the bloodstream.

  8. Forty years of olfactory navigation in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardo, Anna

    2013-06-15

    Forty years ago, Papi and colleagues discovered that anosmic pigeons cannot find their way home when released at unfamiliar locations. They explained this phenomenon by developing the olfactory navigation hypothesis: pigeons at the home loft learn the odours carried by the winds in association with wind direction; once at the release site, they determine the direction of displacement on the basis of the odours perceived locally and orient homeward. In addition to the old classical experiments, new GPS tracking data and observations on the activation of the olfactory system in displaced pigeons have provided further evidence for the specific role of olfactory cues in pigeon navigation. Although it is not known which odours the birds might rely on for navigation, it has been shown that volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere are distributed as fairly stable gradients to allow environmental odour-based navigation. The investigation of the potential role of olfactory cues for navigation in wild birds is still at an early stage; however, the evidence collected so far suggests that olfactory navigation might be a widespread mechanism in avian species.

  9. Effects of different dietary vitamin combinations on the egg quality and vitamin deposition in the whole egg of laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Zang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of different dietary vitamin combinations on the egg quality and vitamin concentrations in the eggs of commercial laying hens. A total of 1,800 25-week-old Lohman pink-shell hens were randomly assigned to four dietary vitamin treatments as follows: NRC(1994 level, NRC (1994 level with Hy.D® (25-hydroxy-cholecalciferol, Local level (current average industry level in China and OVN® level (optimum vitamin nutrition level, with 10 replicates per treatment and 45 layers per replicate. Hens were housed in commercial laying cages with three birds per cage and given ad libitum access to feed. Results showed the hens that received the fortified vitamin levels in the OVN® treatment had a significantly (p<0.05 lower number of cracked (.47% and dirty eggs (.27%, and increased egg deposition of vitamin B12, folic acid, vitamin A, vitamin D, 25-OH-D3, vitamin E, vitamin B1, biotin and pantothenate (p<0.05. Treatments had no significant effect on egg-shape index, egg specific gravity, Haugh units and eggshell thickness. Hens fed the NRC-Hy.D® combination also experienced a significant decrease in cracked and dirty eggs (.70% and .44%, respectively and an increased deposition of 25-OH-D3 in comparison with the NRC treatment. Results of the present study suggest that that the Local treatment was able to improve egg quality parameters of laying hens, but resulted in more cracked and dirty eggs. OVN® reduced the number of cracked eggs and dirty eggs, and improved the deposition of several vitamins in eggs. With the addition of Hy.D®, eggshell strength and 25-OH-D3 deposition in eggs were also improved, and cracked and dirty egg rates declined.

  10. The influence of load carrying on the energetics and kinematics of terrestrial locomotion in a diving bird

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Summary The application of artificial loads to mammals and birds has been used to provide insight into the mechanics and energetic cost of terrestrial locomotion. However, only two species of bird have previously been used in loading experiments, the cursorial guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) and the locomotor-generalist barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis). Here, using respirometry and treadmill locomotion, we investigate the energetic cost of carrying trunk loads in a diving bird, the tufted ...

  11. eBird: Curating Citizen Science Data for Use by Diverse Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Lagoze

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe eBird, a highly successful citizen science project. With over 150,000 participants worldwide and an accumulation of over 140,000,000 bird observations globally in the last decade, eBird has evolved into a major tool for scientific investigations in diverse fields such as ornithology, computer science, statistics, ecology and climate change. eBird’s impact in scientific research is grounded in careful data curation practices that pay attention to all stages of the data lifecycle, and attend to the needs of stakeholders engaged in that data lifecycle. We describe the important aspects of eBird, paying particular attention to the mechanisms to improve data quality; describe the data products that are available to the global community; investigate some aspects of the downloading community; and demonstrate significant results that derive from the use of openly-available eBird data.

  12. Seasonal neuroplasticity of the song control system in tropical, flexibly, and opportunistically breeding birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Thomas W; Moore, Ignacio T

    2009-09-01

    The avian song control system is one of the primary models used to study neuroplasticity and neurogenesis in the adult vertebrate brain. A great deal of progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms controlling seasonal neuroplasticity of the song control system. However, relatively little work has been done to identify how prevalent this phenomenon is and if a diversity of environmental cues can regulate it. Photoperiod is the primary environmental cue used by mid- to high-latitude seasonally breeding birds to time growth of the song control system but many birds display flexible or opportunistic breeding patterns that are less reliant on photoperiodic cues. In addition, approximately 75% of birds are tropical and in only one such species has neuroplasticity of the song control system been studied. Our goal is to outline some of what is known and expand on the ways that studying tropical, flexibly, and opportunistically breeding birds can advance our understanding of plasticity in the song bird brain.

  13. The Strategy to Survive Primary Malaria Infection: An Experimental Study on Behavioural Changes in Parasitized Birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Mukhin

    understand the mechanisms of pathogenicity of avian malaria parasites and their influence on bird populations.

  14. Dosage compensation is less effective in birds than in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itoh Yuichiro

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In animals with heteromorphic sex chromosomes, dosage compensation of sex-chromosome genes is thought to be critical for species survival. Diverse molecular mechanisms have evolved to effectively balance the expressed dose of X-linked genes between XX and XY animals, and to balance expression of X and autosomal genes. Dosage compensation is not understood in birds, in which females (ZW and males (ZZ differ in the number of Z chromosomes. Results Using microarray analysis, we compared the male:female ratio of expression of sets of Z-linked and autosomal genes in two bird species, zebra finch and chicken, and in two mammalian species, mouse and human. Male:female ratios of expression were significantly higher for Z genes than for autosomal genes in several finch and chicken tissues. In contrast, in mouse and human the male:female ratio of expression of X-linked genes is quite similar to that of autosomal genes, indicating effective dosage compensation even in humans, in which a significant percentage of genes escape X-inactivation. Conclusion Birds represent an unprecedented case in which genes on one sex chromosome are expressed on average at constitutively higher levels in one sex compared with the other. Sex-chromosome dosage compensation is surprisingly ineffective in birds, suggesting that some genomes can do without effective sex-specific sex-chromosome dosage compensation mechanisms.

  15. Melatonin implantation improved the egg-laying rate and quality in hens past their peak egg-laying age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yaxiong; Yang, Minghui; Zhu, Kuanfeng; Wang, Liang; Song, Yukun; Wang, Jing; Qin, Wenxiang; Xu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Yu; Liu, Guoshi

    2016-01-01

    The egg-laying rates of hens approximately 470 days of age exhibited a positive correlation to blood melatonin levels. The hens with an egg-laying rate hens at 300, 360, 470 and 550 days of age, the egg-laying rates increased 4.63 ± 0.46%, 8.38 ± 1.45%, 4.93 ± 0.85% and 7.93 ± 0.91%, respectively, compared to that of the controls. Melatonin implantation in hens at 300–470 days of age was observed to enhance egg production and reduce the rate of appearance of sharpei eggs. Melatonin (10 mg) implanted in hens 360 days of age did not influence the blood levels of progesterone (P4) or the gene expression levels of ovarian follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR), oestradiol receptor alpha (ERα), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) or melatonin receptor 1 (MT1). In contrast, melatonin significantly elevated the serum oestradiol-17β (E2) content, down-regulated the gene expression of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor (GnIHR), and enhanced the expression of melatonin receptor 2 (MT2). This result indicates that the improved egg-laying rate by melatonin was the result of increased serum oestradiol and decreased ovarian GnIHR. These alterations may be mediated by MT2 activation. PMID:28008984

  16. The development of egg-laying behaviour and nest-site selection in a strain of white laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld - Piepers, B.

    1987-01-01

    Since World War II livestock husbandry has been highly intensificated. This trend was most obvious in the poultry industry. Laying hens used to be housed outdoors in free-range systems, but nowadays these systems have almost entirely been replaced by the battery-cage. In the early sixties

  17. Mapping global diversity patterns for migratory birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Somveille

    Full Text Available Nearly one in five bird species has separate breeding and overwintering distributions, and the regular migrations of these species cause a substantial seasonal redistribution of avian diversity across the world. However, despite its ecological importance, bird migration has been largely ignored in studies of global avian biodiversity, with few studies having addressed it from a macroecological perspective. Here, we analyse a dataset on the global distribution of the world's birds in order to examine global spatial patterns in the diversity of migratory species, including: the seasonal variation in overall species diversity due to migration; the contribution of migratory birds to local bird diversity; and the distribution of narrow-range and threatened migratory birds. Our analyses reveal a striking asymmetry between the Northern and Southern hemispheres, evident in all of the patterns investigated. The highest migratory bird diversity was found in the Northern Hemisphere, with high inter-continental turnover in species composition between breeding and non-breeding seasons, and extensive regions (at high latitudes where migratory birds constitute the majority of the local avifauna. Threatened migratory birds are concentrated mainly in Central and Southern Asia, whereas narrow-range migratory species are mainly found in Central America, the Himalayas and Patagonia. Overall, global patterns in the diversity of migratory birds indicate that bird migration is mainly a Northern Hemisphere phenomenon. The asymmetry between the Northern and Southern hemispheres could not have easily been predicted from the combined results of regional scale studies, highlighting the importance of a global perspective.

  18. Mapping global diversity patterns for migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somveille, Marius; Manica, Andrea; Butchart, Stuart H M; Rodrigues, Ana S L

    2013-01-01

    Nearly one in five bird species has separate breeding and overwintering distributions, and the regular migrations of these species cause a substantial seasonal redistribution of avian diversity across the world. However, despite its ecological importance, bird migration has been largely ignored in studies of global avian biodiversity, with few studies having addressed it from a macroecological perspective. Here, we analyse a dataset on the global distribution of the world's birds in order to examine global spatial patterns in the diversity of migratory species, including: the seasonal variation in overall species diversity due to migration; the contribution of migratory birds to local bird diversity; and the distribution of narrow-range and threatened migratory birds. Our analyses reveal a striking asymmetry between the Northern and Southern hemispheres, evident in all of the patterns investigated. The highest migratory bird diversity was found in the Northern Hemisphere, with high inter-continental turnover in species composition between breeding and non-breeding seasons, and extensive regions (at high latitudes) where migratory birds constitute the majority of the local avifauna. Threatened migratory birds are concentrated mainly in Central and Southern Asia, whereas narrow-range migratory species are mainly found in Central America, the Himalayas and Patagonia. Overall, global patterns in the diversity of migratory birds indicate that bird migration is mainly a Northern Hemisphere phenomenon. The asymmetry between the Northern and Southern hemispheres could not have easily been predicted from the combined results of regional scale studies, highlighting the importance of a global perspective.

  19. Urban Bird Feeding: Connecting People with Nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T C Cox

    Full Text Available At a time of unprecedented biodiversity loss, researchers are increasingly recognizing the broad range of benefits provided to humankind by nature. However, as people live more urbanized lifestyles there is a progressive disengagement with the natural world that diminishes these benefits and discourages positive environmental behaviour. The provision of food for garden birds is an increasing global phenomenon, and provides a readily accessible way for people to counter this trend. Yet despite its popularity, quite why people feed birds remains poorly understood. We explore three loosely defined motivations behind bird feeding: that it provides psychological benefits, is due to a concern about bird welfare, and/or is due to a more general orientation towards nature. We quantitatively surveyed households from urban towns in southern England to explore attitudes and actions towards garden bird feeding. Each household scored three Likert statements relating to each of the three motivations. We found that people who fed birds regularly felt more relaxed and connected to nature when they watched garden birds, and perceived that bird feeding is beneficial for bird welfare while investing time in minimising associated risks. Finally, feeding birds may be an expression of a wider orientation towards nature. Overall, we found that the feelings of being relaxed and connected to nature were the strongest drivers. As urban expansion continues both to threaten species conservation and to change peoples' relationship with the natural world, feeding birds may provide an important tool for engaging people with nature to the benefit of both people and conservation.

  20. Green Light for Nocturnally Migrating Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanneke Poot

    2008-12-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown the magnetic compass to be wavelength dependent: migratory birds require light from the blue-green part of the spectrum for magnetic compass orientation, whereas red light (visible long-wavelength disrupts magnetic orientation. We designed a field study to test if and how changing light color influenced migrating birds under field conditions. We found that nocturnally migrating birds were disoriented and attracted by red and white light (containing visible long-wavelength radiation, whereas they were clearly less disoriented by blue and green light (containing less or no visible long-wavelength radiation. This was especially the case on overcast nights. Our results clearly open perspective for the development of bird-friendly artificial lighting by manipulating wavelength characteristics. Preliminary results with an experimentally developed bird-friendly light source on an offshore platform are promising. What needs to be investigated is the impact of bird-friendly light on other organisms than birds.