WorldWideScience

Sample records for laser raman technique

  1. Determination of Salinity in Fluid Inclusions with Laser Raman Spectroscopy Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to outline the laser Raman spectroscopy technique for determination of salinity in the aqueous phase in fluid inclusions. The skewing parameters of the Raman profiles of the calibration solutions determined were used to derive a calibration curve for the estimation of the equivalent mass fraction NaCl in aqueous solutions. This technique was also verified in the analysis of the natural fluid inclusions from Tongshankou porphyry Cu (Mo) deposit, Hubei Province, China. Although the analyses on the natural fluid inclusions are limited, an acceptable agreement has been reached on the salinities, for most fluid inclusions, determined by the Raman spectroscopy and microthermometry techniques, indicating the reliability of the Raman technique for determination of salinity in fluid inclusion studies.

  2. Planetary Surface Analysis Using Fast Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Combined Microscopic Raman, LIBS, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman, G. R.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ exploration of planetary surfaces has to date required multiple techniques that, when used together, yield important information about their formation histories and evolution. We present a time-resolved laser spectroscopic technique that could potentially collect complementary sets of data providing information on mineral structure, composition, and hydration state. Using a picosecond-scale pulsed laser and a fast time-resolved detector we can simultaneously collect spectra from Raman, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and fluorescence emissions that are separated in time due to the unique decay times of each process. The use of a laser with high rep rate (40 KHz) and low pulse energy (1 μJ/pulse) allows us to rapidly collect high signal to noise Raman spectra while minimizing sample damage. Increasing the pulse energy by about an order of magnitude creates a microscopic plasma near the surface and enables the collection of LIBS spectra at an unusually high rep rate and low pulse energy. Simultaneously, broader fluorescence peaks can be detected with lifetimes varying from nanosecond to microsecond. We will present Raman, LIBS, and fluorescence spectra obtained on natural mineral samples such as sulfates, clays, pyroxenes and carbonates that are of interest for Mars mineralogy. We demonstrate this technique using a photocathode-based streak camera detector as well as a newly-developed solid state Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) sensor array based on Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. We will discuss the impact of system design and detector choice on science return of a potential planetary surface mission, with a specific focus on size, weight, power, and complexity. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  3. Characterization of Air Plane Soot Surrogates using Raman spectroscopy and laser ablation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazallon, Bertrand; Ortega, Ismael Kenneth; Ikhenazene, Raouf; Pirim, Claire; Carpentier, Yvain; Irimiea, Cornelia; Focsa, Cristian; Ouf, François-Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Aviation alters the composition of the atmosphere globally and can thus drive climate change and ozone depletion [1]. Aircraft exhaust plumes contain species (gases and soot particles) produced by the combustion of kerosene with ambient air in the combustion chamber of the engine. Soot particles emitted by air-planes produce persistent contrails in the upper troposphere in ice-supersaturated air masses that contribute to cloudiness and impact the radiative properties of the atmosphere. These aerosol-cloud interactions represent one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global climate models [2]. Though the formation of atmospheric ice particles has been studied for many years [3], there are still numerous opened questions on nucleation properties of soot particles [4], as the ice nucleation experiments showed a large spread in results depending on the nucleation mode chosen and origin of the soot produced. The reasons behind these discrepancies reside in the different physico-chemical properties (composition, structure) of soot particles produced in different conditions, e.g., with respect to fuel or combustion techniques. In this work, we use Raman microscopy (514 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths) and ablation techniques (Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, and Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry) to characterize soot particle surrogates produced from a CAST generator (propane fuel, four different global equivalence ratios). They are produced as analogues of air-plane soot collected at different engine regimes (PowerJet SaM-146 turbofan) simulating a landing and take-off (LTO) cycle (MERMOSE project (http://mermose.onera.fr/)) [6]. The spectral parameters of the first-order Raman bands of these soot samples are analyzed using a de-convolution approach described by Sadezky et al. (2005) [5]. A systematic Raman analysis is carried out to select a number of parameters (laser wavelength, irradiance at sample, exposure time) that will alter the sample and the

  4. Raman fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supradeepa, V. R.; Feng, Yan; Nicholson, Jeffrey W.

    2017-02-01

    High-power fiber lasers have seen tremendous development in the last decade, with output powers exceeding multiple kilowatts from a single fiber. Ytterbium has been at the forefront as the primary rare-earth-doped gain medium owing to its inherent material advantages. However, for this reason, the lasers are largely confined to the narrow emission wavelength region of ytterbium. Power scaling at other wavelength regions has lagged significantly, and a large number of applications rely upon the diversity of emission wavelengths. Currently, Raman fiber lasers are the only known wavelength agile, scalable, high-power fiber laser technology that can span the wavelength spectrum. In this review, we address the technology of Raman fiber lasers, specifically focused on the most recent developments. We will also discuss several applications of Raman fiber lasers in laser pumping, frequency conversion, optical communications and biology.

  5. Raman spectroscopic studies on bismuth nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onari, Seinosuke; Miura, Masaaki; Matsuishi, Kiyoto

    2002-09-01

    Bi nanoparticles are prepared by means of laser ablation in Ar atmosphere (0.2-10 Torr) with KrF (248 nm) excimer laser of the power 200 mJ. The size of the Bi particles estimated by TEM measurements is in the range 3-10 nm. Raman active E g mode shifts to a higher frequency and becomes broader for a sample prepared in a lower pressure of Ar atmosphere. However, the peak frequency and the bandwidth of A 1g mode show almost no change with the change of the particle size. These experimental results can be well explained by a phonon confinement model of Campbell and Fauchet by taking the phonon dispersion properties that the E g mode of the crystal has a large dependence on the wave numbers near the Γ point, but the A 1g mode is rather independent of the phonon wave numbers.

  6. Application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy techniques to the monitoring of single cell response to stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, James W.; Liu, Rui; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2012-06-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combines optical trapping with micro-Raman spectroscopy to enable label-free biochemical analysis of individual cells and small biological particles in suspension. The integration of the two technologies greatly simplifies the sample preparation and handling of suspension cells for spectroscopic analysis in physiologically meaningful conditions. In our group, LTRS has been used to study the effects of external perturbations, both chemical and mechanical, on the biochemistry of the cell. Single cell dynamics can be studied by performing longitudinal studies to continuously monitor the response of the cell as it interacts with its environment. The ability to carry out these measurements in-vitro makes LTRS an attractive tool for many biomedical applications. Here, we discuss the use of LTRS to study the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics and bacteria cells to antibiotics and show that the life cycle and apoptosis of the cells can be detected. These results show the promise of LTRS for drug discovery/screening, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and chemotherapy response monitoring applications. In separate experiments, we study the response of red blood cells to the mechanical forces imposed on the cell by the optical tweezers. A laser power dependent deoxygenation of the red blood cell in the single beam trap is reported. Normal, sickle cell, and fetal red blood cells have a different behavior that enables the discrimination of the cell types based on this mechanochemical response. These results show the potential utility of LTRS for diagnosing and studying red blood cell diseases.

  7. A novel contactless technique for thermal field mapping and thermal conductivity determination: two-laser Raman thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reparaz, J S; Chavez-Angel, E; Wagner, M R; Graczykowski, B; Gomis-Bresco, J; Alzina, F; Sotomayor Torres, C M

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel contactless technique for thermal conductivity determination and thermal field mapping based on creating a thermal distribution of phonons using a heating laser, while a second laser probes the local temperature through the spectral position of a Raman active mode. The spatial resolution can be as small as 300 nm, whereas its temperature accuracy is ±2 K. We validate this technique investigating the thermal properties of three free-standing single crystalline Si membranes with thickness of 250, 1000, and 2000 nm. We show that for two-dimensional materials such as free-standing membranes or thin films, and for small temperature gradients, the thermal field decays as T(r) ∝ ln(r) in the diffusive limit. The case of large temperature gradients within the membranes leads to an exponential decay of the thermal field, T ∝ exp[ - A·ln(r)]. The results demonstrate the full potential of this new contactless method for quantitative determination of thermal properties. The range of materials to which this method is applicable reaches far beyond the here demonstrated case of Si, as the only requirement is the presence of a Raman active mode.

  8. Non-destructive Analysis of the Nuclei of Transgenic Living Cells Using Laser Tweezers and Near-infrared Raman Spectroscopic Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Tang; Ronald J. Newton; Chang-An Xie; Yong-Qing Li; Nicki Whitley

    2005-01-01

    Transgenic cell lines of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) were analyzed by a compact laser-tweezers-Raman-spectroscopy (LTRS) system in this investigation. A low power diode laser at 785 nm was used for both laser optical trapping of single transgenic cells and excitation for near-infrared Raman spectroscopy of the nuclei of synchronized cells, which were treated as single organic particles, at the S-phase of the cell cycle. Transgenic living cells with gfp and uidA genes were used as biological samples to test this LTRS technique. As expected, different Raman spectra were observed from the tested biological samples. This technique provides a high sensitivity and enables real-time spectroscopic measurements of transgenic cell lines. It could be a valuable tool for the study of the fundamental cell and molecular biological process by trapping single nucleus and by providing a wealth of molecular information about the nuclei of cells.

  9. Efficiencies of Rotational Raman, and Rayleigh Techniques for Laser Remote Sensing of the Atmospheric Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, I. D.; Gurdev, L. L.; Mitev, V. M.

    1992-01-01

    Various lidar methods have been developed for measuring the atmospheric temperature, making use of the temperature dependant characteristics of rotational Raman scattering (RRS) from nitrogen and oxygen, and Rayleigh or Rayleigh-Brillowin scattering (RS or RBS). These methods have various advantages and disadvantages as compared to each other but their potential accuracies are principal characteristics of their efficiency. No systematic attempt has been undertaken so far to compare the efficiences, in the above meaning, of different temperature lidar methods. Two RRS techniques have been compared. Here, we do such a comparison using two methods based on the detection and analysis of RS (RBS) spectra. Four methods are considered here for measuring the atmospheric temperature. One of them (Schwiesow and Lading, 1981) is based on an analysis of the RS linewidth with two Michelson interferometers (MI) in parallel. The second method (Shimisu et al., 1986) employs a high-resolution analysis of the RBS line shape. The third method (Cooney, 1972) employs the temperature dependance of the RRS spectrum envelope. The fourth method (Armstrong, 1974) makes use of a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) as a comb filter for processing the periodic RRS spectrum of the nitrogen. Let us denote the corresponding errors in measuring the temperature by sigma(sub MI), sigma(sub HR), sigma(sub ENV), and sigma(sub FPI). Let us also define the ratios chi(sub 1) = sigma(sub MI)/sigma(sub ENV), chi(sub 2) = sigma(sub HR)/sigma(sub ENV), and chi(sub 3) = sigma(sub FPI)/sigma(sub ENV) interpreted as relative errors with respect to sigma(sub ENV).

  10. Raman Imaging Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Raman imaging has long been used to probe the chemical nature of a sample, providing information on molecular orientation, symmetry and structure with sub-micron spatial resolution. Recent technical developments have pushed the limits of micro-Raman microscopy, enabling the acquisition of Raman spectra with unprecedented speed, and opening a pathway to fast chemical imaging for many applications from material science and semiconductors to pharmaceutical drug development and cell biology, and even art and forensic science. The promise of tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy (TERS) and near-field techniques is pushing the envelope even further by breaking the limit of diffraction and enabling nano-Raman microscopy.

  11. TECHNIQUE OF ESTIMATE OF ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT LASER RADIATION IN BORON DOPED DIAMONDS BY INTENSITY OF RAMAN SCATTERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Poklonskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of measurements of Raman scattering at the room temperature in air in boron doped synthetic diamonds (five with boron concentrations 2·1017; 6·1017; 2·1018; 1,7·1019; 1·1020 cm–3 and one intentionally undoped are presented. The laser with wavelength 532 nm was used for Raman scattering excitation. Dependences of integral intensity and halfwidth of diamond Raman line with respect to the doping level are presented. In the geometrical optics approximation an expression for doped to undoped integral intensity ratio is obtained. Qualitative estimates of conductivity of the studied samples are conducted. The obtained results can be applied for mapping of near-surface laser radiation absorption coefficient of synthetic single crystal diamonds and for their quality control.

  12. Semiconductors Investigated by Time Resolved Raman Absorption and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy Using Femtosecond and Picosecond Laser Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-05

    This report summarizes the research progress achieved in the period 1979-1982 in the research effort supported by AFOSR 80-0079. Two main areas of research are: picosecond and subpicosecond laser development and application and time-resolved studies of semiconductors. In the subpicosecond laser development program we investigated a variety of cavities of different physical parameters. A stable and reliable oscillator, which produces 200 fsec pulses, has been developed using

  13. Non-destructive analysis of the nuclei of transgenic living cells using laser tweezers and near-infrared raman spectroscopic technique

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tang, Wei; Newton, Ronald J; Xie, Chang An; Li, Yong Qing; Whitley, Nicki

    2005-01-01

    ...) system in this investigation. A low power diode laser at 785 nm was used for both laser optical trapping of single transgenic cells and excitation for near-infrared Raman spectroscopy of the nuclei of synchronized cells, which...

  14. PM Raman fiber laser at 1679 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth.......We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth....

  15. Analysis of dissolved C2H2 in transformer oils using laser Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somekawa, Toshihiro; Kasaoka, Makoto; Kawachi, Fumio; Nagano, Yoshitomo; Fujita, Masayuki; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2013-04-01

    We have developed a laser Raman spectroscopy technique for assessing the working conditions of transformers by measuring dissolved C2H2 gas concentrations present in transformer oils. A frequency doubled Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) was used as a laser source, and Raman signals at ~1972 cm(-1) originating from C2H2 gas dissolved in oil were detected. The results show that laser Raman spectroscopy is a useful alternative method for detecting transformer faults.

  16. Laser Raman Spectroscopy with Different Excitation Sources and Extension to Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Wahadoszamen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dispersive Raman spectrometer was used with three different excitation sources (Argon-ion, He-Ne, and Diode lasers operating at 514.5 nm, 633 nm, and 782 nm, resp.. The system was employed to a variety of Raman active compounds. Many of the compounds exhibit very strong fluorescence while being excited with a laser emitting at UV-VIS region, hereby imposing severe limitation to the detection efficiency of the particular Raman system. The Raman system with variable excitation laser sources provided us with a desired flexibility toward the suppression of unwanted fluorescence signal. With this Raman system, we could detect and specify the different vibrational modes of various hazardous organic compounds and some typical dyes (both fluorescent and nonfluorescent. We then compared those results with the ones reported in literature and found the deviation within the range of ±2 cm−1, which indicates reasonable accuracy and usability of the Raman system. Then, the surface enhancement technique of Raman spectrum was employed to the present system. To this end, we used chemically prepared colloidal suspension of silver nanoparticles as substrate and Rhodamine 6G as probe. We could observe significant enhancement of Raman signal from Rhodamine 6G using the colloidal solution of silver nanoparticles the average magnitude of which is estimated to be 103.

  17. Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, De

    Raman scattering is an inelastic collision between the vibrating molecules inside the sample and the incident photons. During this process, energy exchange takes place between the photon and the scattering molecule. By measuring the energy change of the photon, the molecular vibration mode can be probed. The vibrational spectrum contains valuable information about the disposition of atomic nuclei and chemical bonds within a molecule, the chemical compositions and the interactions between the molecule and its surroundings. In this dissertation, laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) technique is applied for the analysis of biological cells and human cells at single cell level. In LTRS, an individual cell is trapped in aqueous medium with laser tweezers, and Raman scattering spectra from the trapped cell are recorded in real-time. The Raman spectra of these cells can be used to reveal the dynamical processes of cell growth, cell response to environment changes, and can be used as the finger print for the identification of a bacterial cell species. Several biophysical experiments were carried out using LTRS: (1) the dynamic germination process of individual spores of Bacillus thuringiensis was detected via Ca-DPA, a spore-specific biomarker molecule; (2) inactivation and killing of Bacillus subtilis spores by microwave irradiation and wet heat were studied at single cell level; (3) the heat shock activation process of single B. subtilis spores were analyzed, in which the reversible transition from glass-like state at low temperature to liquid-like state at high temperature in spore was revealed at the molecular level; (4) the kinetic processes of bacterial cell lysis of E. coli by lysozyme and by temperature induction of lambda phage were detected real-time; (5) the fixation and rehydration of human platelets were quantitatively evaluated and characterized with Raman spectroscopy method, which provided a rapid way to quantify the quality of freeze-dried therapeutic

  18. Raman Spectroscopy and Related Techniques in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair Elfick

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this review we describe label-free optical spectroscopy techniques which are able to non-invasively measure the (biochemistry in biological systems. Raman spectroscopy uses visible or near-infrared light to measure a spectrum of vibrational bonds in seconds. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS microscopy and stimulated Raman loss (SRL microscopy are orders of magnitude more efficient than Raman spectroscopy, and are able to acquire high quality chemically-specific images in seconds. We discuss the benefits and limitations of all techniques, with particular emphasis on applications in biomedicine—both in vivo (using fiber endoscopes and in vitro (in optical microscopes.

  19. Passively mode locked Raman laser

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, W; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2010-01-01

    We report on the observation of a novel mode locked optical comb generated at the Raman offset (Raman comb) in an optically pumped crystalline whispering gallery mode resonator. Mode locking is confirmed via measurement of the radio-frequency beat note produced by the optical comb on a fast photodiode. Neither the conventional Kerr comb nor hyper-parametric oscillation is observed when the Raman comb is present.

  20. Laser-Raman remote temperature sensing in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.; Faw, R. E.; Lester, T. W.

    1984-06-01

    A feasibility study has been conducted on the use of laser-Raman spectroscopy as a remote temperature sensing technique for liquids. Empirical relations between the temperature and parameters describing Raman band intensities were determined over a temperature range of 15 to 65 °C in carbon tetrachloride, benzene, ethylene glycol, aqueous sodium nitrate (5 M), and water. Using a 2-W argon ion laser and two 0.25-m monochromators in tandem, it was possible to measure temperatures in water to within 2 °C and, in ethylene glycol, to within 4 °C.

  1. Raman Spectroscopic Measurements of Co2 Dissolved in Seawater for Laser Remote Sensing in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somekawa Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the applicability of Raman lidar technique as a laser remote sensing tool in water. The Raman technique has already been used successfully for measurements of CO2 gas dissolved in water and bubbles. Here, the effect of seawater on CO2 Raman spectra has been evaluated. A frequency doubled Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm was irradiated to CO2 gas dissolved in a standard seawater. In seawater, the Raman signals at 984 and 1060-1180 cm-1 from SO42- were detected, which shows no spectral interference caused by Raman signals derived from CO2.

  2. Stimulated Raman backscattering at high laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoric, M.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Tajima, Toshiki; Sasaki, Akira; Maluckov, A.; Jovanovic, M.

    1998-03-01

    Signatures of Stimulated Raman backscattering of a short-pulse high-intensity laser interacting with an underdense plasma are discussed. We introduce a nonlinear three-wave interaction model that accounts for laser pump depletion and relativistic detuning. A mechanism is revealed based on a generic route to chaos, that predicts a progressive increase of the backscatter complexity with a growing laser intensity. Importance of kinetic effects is outlined and demonstrated in fluid-hybrid and particle simulations. As an application, we show that spectral anomalies of the backscatter, predicted by the above model, are consistent with recent sub-picosecond, high-intensity laser gas-target measurements at Livermore and elsewhere. Finally, a recently proposed scheme for generation of ultra-short, low-prepulse laser pulses by Raman backscattering in a thin foil target, is shown. (author)

  3. Backward Raman Amplifier for Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Joshua; Masson-Laborde, Paul-Edouard; Huller, Stefan; Rozmus, Wojciech; Wilks, Scott C.

    2016-10-01

    Particle in cell simulations via SCPIC and theoretical work on Raman amplification and laser wake field acceleration will be presented. Laser energy depletion has been shown to be a limiting factor during wake field acceleration. This work focuses on optimizing parameters for Raman amplification to work in conjunction with wake field acceleration in order in order to sustain an accelerating laser pulse as it generates plasma waves. It has been shown that laser pulses undergo red shifting during wake generation. Our work demonstrates that this red shifting results in a detuning between pump and seed in the backward Raman Amplifier. This detuning limits the amount of energy that can be transferred from the pump to the seed, and places new limits on backward Raman amplification. To overcome this limiting factor, this study makes use of a chirped pump allowing for extended coupling to the accelerating pulse. Three wave coupling model of Raman amplifier with a frequency shift term due to wake field will also be discussed and compared with PIC simulations.

  4. On-Chip Diamond Raman Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Latawiec, Pawel; Burek, Michael J; Hausmann, Birgit J M; Bulu, Irfan; Loncar, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic single-crystal diamond has recently emerged as a promising platform for Raman lasers at exotic wavelengths due to its giant Raman shift, large transparency window and excellent thermal properties yielding a greatly enhanced figure-of-merit compared to conventional materials. To date, diamond Raman lasers have been realized using bulk plates placed inside macroscopic cavities, requiring careful alignment and resulting in high threshold powers (~W-kW). Here we demonstrate an on-chip Raman laser based on fully-integrated, high quality-factor, diamond racetrack micro-resonators embedded in silica. Pumping at telecom wavelengths, we show Stokes output discretely tunable over a ~100nm bandwidth around 2-{\\mu}m with output powers >250 {\\mu}W, extending the functionality of diamond Raman lasers to an interesting wavelength range at the edge of the mid-infrared spectrum. Continuous-wave operation with only ~85 mW pump threshold power in the feeding waveguide is demonstrated along with continuous, mode-hop-fr...

  5. High Power Photonic Crystal Fibre Raman Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Pei-Guang; RUAN Shuang-Chen; YU Yong-Qin; GUO Chun-Yu; GUO Yuan; LIU Cheng-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    A cw Raman laser based on a 100-m photonic crystal fibre is demonstrated with up to 3.8 W output power at the incident pump power of 12 W, corresponding to an optical-to-optical efficiency of about 31.6%. The second order Stokes light, which is firstly reported in a cw photonic crystal fibre Raman laser, is obtained at 1183nm with an output power of 1.6 W and a slope efficiency of about 45.7%.

  6. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Matthew W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  7. Coherent Raman spectro-imaging with laser frequency combs

    CERN Document Server

    Ideguchi, Takuro; Bernhardt, Birgitta; Guelachvili, Guy; Picqué, Nathalie; Hänsch, Theodor W

    2013-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy and imaging of microscopic samples have opened up a wide range of applications throughout the physical, chemical, and biological sciences. High chemical specificity may be achieved by directly interrogating the fundamental or low-lying vibrational energy levels of the compound molecules. Amongst the available prevailing label-free techniques, coherent Raman scattering has the distinguishing features of high spatial resolution down to 200 nm and three-dimensional sectioning. However, combining fast imaging speed and identification of multiple - and possibly unexpected- compounds remains challenging: existing high spectral resolution schemes require long measurement times to achieve broad spectral spans. Here we overcome this difficulty and introduce a novel concept of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectro-imaging with two laser frequency combs. We illustrate the power of our technique with high resolution (4 cm-1) Raman spectra spanning more than 1200 cm-1 recorded within le...

  8. Laser Raman Spectroscopy in studies of corrosion and electrocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendres, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser Raman Spectroscopy (LRS) has become an important tool for the in-situ structural study of electrochemical systems and processes in recent years. Following a brief introduction of the experimental techniques involved in applying LRS to electrochemical systems, we survey the literature for examples of studies in the inhibition of electrode reactions by surface films (e.g., corrosion and passivation phenomena) as well as the acceleration of reactions by electro-sorbates (electrocatalysis). We deal mostly with both normal and resonance Raman effects on fairly thick surface films in contrast to surface-enhanced Raman investigations of monolayer adsorbates, which is covered in another lecture. Laser Raman spectroelectrochemical studies of corrosion and film formation on such metals as Pb, Ag, Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, Au, stainless steel, etc. in various solution conditions are discussed. Further extension of the technique to studies in high-temperature and high-pressure aqueous environments is demonstrated. Results of studies of the structure of corrosion inhibitors are also presented. As applications of the LRS technique in the area of electrocatalysis, we cite studies of the structure of transition metal macrocyclic compounds, i.e., phthalocyanines and porphyrins, used for catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. 104 refs., 20 figs.

  9. Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Characterizing a CW Raman Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    .A relatively simple technique for characterizing an all-resonant intracavity continuous-wave (CW) solid-state Raman laser involves the use of ring-down spectroscopy. As used here, characterizing signifies determining such parameters as threshold pump power, Raman gain, conversion efficiency, and quality factors (Q values) of the pump and Stokes cavity modes. Heretofore, in order to characterize resonant-cavity-based Raman lasers, it has usually been necessary to manipulate the frequencies and power levels of pump lasers and, in each case, to take several sets of measurements. In cases involving ultra-high-Q resonators, it also has been desirable to lock pump lasers to resonator modes to ensure the quality of measurement data. Simpler techniques could be useful. In the present ring-down spectroscopic technique, one infers the parameters of interest from the decay of the laser out of its steady state. This technique does not require changing the power or frequency of the pump laser or locking the pump laser to the resonator mode. The technique is based on a theoretical analysis of what happens when the pump laser is abruptly switched off after the Raman generation reaches the steady state. The analysis starts with differential equations for the evolution of the amplitudes of the pump and Stokes electric fields, leading to solutions for the power levels of the pump and Stokes fields as functions of time and of the aforementioned parameters. Among other things, these solutions show how the ring-down time depends, to some extent, on the electromagnetic energy accumulated in the cavity. The solutions are readily converted to relatively simple equations for the parameters as functions of quantities that can be determined from measurements of the time-dependent power levels. For example, the steady-state intracavity conversion efficiency is given by G1/G2 1 and the threshold power is given by Pin(G2/G1)2, where Pin is the steady-state input pump power immediately prior to

  10. Pulsed Raman fiber laser and multispectral imaging in three dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Joachim F.; Busck, Jens; Heiselberg, Henning

    2006-01-01

    Raman scattering in single-mode optical fibers is exploited to generate multispectral light from a green nanolaser with high pulse repetition rate. Each pulse triggers a picosecond camera and measures the distance by time-of-flight in each of the 0.5 Mpixels. Three-dimensional images are then con......Raman scattering in single-mode optical fibers is exploited to generate multispectral light from a green nanolaser with high pulse repetition rate. Each pulse triggers a picosecond camera and measures the distance by time-of-flight in each of the 0.5 Mpixels. Three-dimensional images...... are then constructed with submillimeter accuracy for all visible colors. The generation of a series of Stokes peaks by Raman scattering in a Si fiber is discussed in detail and the laser radar technique is demonstrated. The data recording takes only a few seconds, and the high accuracy 3D color imaging works at ranges...

  11. Increased wavelength options in the visible and ultraviolet for Raman lasers operating on dual Raman modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildren, R P; Piper, J A

    2008-03-01

    We report increased wavelength options from Raman lasers for Raman media having two Raman modes of similar gain coefficient. For an external-cavity potassium gadolinium tungstate Raman laser pumped at 532 nm, we show that two sets of Stokes orders are generated simultaneously by appropriate orientation of the Raman crystal, and also wavelengths that correspond to sums of the two Raman modes. Up to 14 visible Stokes lines were observed in the wavelength range 555-675 nm. The increase in Stokes wavelengths also enables a much greater selection of wavelengths to be accessed via intracavity nonlinear sum frequency and difference frequency mixing. For example, we demonstrate 30 output wavelength options for a wavelength-selectable 271-321 nm Raman laser with intracavity sum frequency mixing in BBO. We also present a theoretical analysis that enables prediction of wavelength options for dual Raman mode systems.

  12. Barium Nitrate Raman Laser Development for Remote Sensing of Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCray, Christopher L.; Chyba, Thomas H.

    1997-01-01

    In order to understand the impact of anthropogenic emissions upon the earth's environment, scientists require remote sensing techniques which are capable of providing range-resolved measurements of clouds, aerosols, and the concentrations of several chemical constituents of the atmosphere. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is a very promising method to measure concentration profiles of chemical species such as ozone and water vapor as well as detect the presence of aerosols and clouds. If a suitable DIAL system could be deployed in space, it would provide a global data set of tremendous value. Such systems, however, need to be compact, reliable, and very efficient. In order to measure atmospheric gases with the DIAL technique, the laser transmitter must generate suitable on-line and off-line wavelength pulse pairs. The on-line pulse is resonant with an absorption feature of the species of interest. The off-line pulse is tuned so that it encounters significantly less absorption. The relative backscattered power for the two pulses enables the range-resolved concentration to be computed. Preliminary experiments at NASA LaRC suggested that the solid state Raman shifting material, Ba(NO3)2, could be utilized to produce these pulse pairs. A Raman oscillator pumped at 532 nm by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser can create first Stokes laser output at 563 nm and second Stokes output at 599 nm. With frequency doublers, UV output at 281 nm and 299 nm can be subsequently obtained. This all-solid state system has the potential to be very efficient, compact, and reliable. Raman shifting in Ba(NO3)2, has previously been performed in both the visible and the infrared. The first Raman oscillator in the visible region was investigated in 1986 with the configurations of plane-plane and unstable telescopic resonators. However, most of the recent research has focused on the development of infrared sources for eye-safe lidar applications.

  13. Highly Stable PM Raman Fiber Laser at 1680 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Liu, Xiaomin; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate thermal stabilization of a Raman fiber laser. At 1680 nm the laser emission exceeds 500 mW with a power variation below 0.5 %, both linewidth and wavelength variations are under 1 pm.......We demonstrate thermal stabilization of a Raman fiber laser. At 1680 nm the laser emission exceeds 500 mW with a power variation below 0.5 %, both linewidth and wavelength variations are under 1 pm....

  14. Ultrashort mode-locked lasers with additional Raman active elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunov, V. I.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.; Pestryakov, Efim V.; Petrov, V. V.; Komarov, A. K.; Komarov, Konstantin P.

    2002-05-01

    Numerical simulation of ultrashort pulse generation in the laser with a composite active medium and additional Raman active element in a cavity has been done. It was created that for some laser parameters the optimization of a Raman gain and a frequency shift values was resulted in additional shortening of pulse duration.

  15. Terahertz Raman laser based on silicon doped with phosphorus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlov, S. G.; Hubers, H. W.; Bottger, U.; Zhukavin, R. K.; Shastin, V. N.; Hovenier, J. N.; Redlich, B.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Riemann, H.

    2008-01-01

    Raman-type stimulated emission at frequencies between 5.0 and 5.2 THz as well as between 6.1 and 6.4 THz has been realized in silicon crystals doped by phosphorus donors. The Raman laser operates at around 5 K under optical excitation by a pulsed, frequency-tunable infrared free electron laser. The

  16. Investigation of pre-pulse pumping laser for preserving temporal waveform of stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junchi; Su, Hongpeng; Peng, Yujie; Guo, Xiaoyang; Wang, Zhanshan; Leng, Yuxin

    2017-01-01

    A modified polarized beam combination technique is proposed for preserving the temporal waveforms of stimulated Raman scattering. 1064 nm pre-pulse pumping lasers prior to the main pumping laser with a delay time are generated and injected into a Ba(NO3)2 Raman medium to excite the crystal firstly. The influences of pre-pulse lasers with various energy levels on the temporal shapes of Raman lasers are investigated, and it is demonstrated that the temporal waveforms of the Raman laser are distorted once the energies of the pre-pulse are below and above the required energy for preserving the temporal shapes of Stokes radiation. It is also discovered that the temporal shape of the 1197 nm Raman laser cannot be perfectly preserved if the energy of the 1064 nm main laser is too low or the relative delay time is too large. Moreover, the optical conversion efficiency and Stokes laser energy obtained under pumping lasers with single and double intensity peaks are compared.

  17. Noninvasive laser Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellermann, Werner; Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; McClane, Robert W.

    2001-05-01

    We have used resonance Raman scattering as a novel non- invasive optical technology to measure carotenoid antioxidants in human skin of healthy volunteers. Using blue-green laser excitation, clearly distinguishable carotenoid Raman spectra are obtained which are superimposed on a large skin autofluorescence background. The Raman spectra are obtained rapidly, i.e. within about 30 seconds, and the required laser light exposure levels are well within safety standards. Our technique can be used for rapid screening of carotenoid antioxidant levels in large populations and may have applications for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  18. Raman Laser Polymerization of C60 Nanowhiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoei Kato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photopolymerization of C60 nanowhiskers (C60NWs was investigated by using a Raman spectrometer in air at room temperature, since the polymerized C60NWs are expected to exhibit a high mechanical strength and a thermal stability. Short C60NWs with a mean length of 4.4 μm were synthesized by LLIP method (liquid-liquid interfacial precipitation method. The Ag(2 peak of C60NWs shifted to the lower wavenumbers with increasing the laser beam energy dose, and an energy dose more than about 1520 J/mm2 was found necessary to obtain the photopolymerized C60NWs. However, excessive energy doses at high-power densities increased the sample temperature and lead to the thermal decomposition of polymerized C60 molecules.

  19. A Novel Technique for Raman Analysis of Highly Radioactive Samples Using Any Standard Micro-Raman Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Jean-Yves; Naji, Mohamed; Sierig, Mark; Manara, Dario

    2017-04-12

    A novel approach for the Raman measurement of nuclear materials is reported in this paper. It consists of the enclosure of the radioactive sample in a tight capsule that isolates the material from the atmosphere. The capsule can optionally be filled with a chosen gas pressurized up to 20 bars. The micro-Raman measurement is performed through an optical-grade quartz window. This technique permits accurate Raman measurements with no need for the spectrometer to be enclosed in an alpha-tight containment. It therefore allows the use of all options of the Raman spectrometer, like multi-wavelength laser excitation, different polarizations, and single or triple spectrometer modes. Some examples of measurements are shown and discussed. First, some spectral features of a highly radioactive americium oxide sample (AmO2) are presented. Then, we report the Raman spectra of neptunium oxide (NpO2) samples, the interpretation of which is greatly improved by employing three different excitation wavelengths, (17)O doping, and a triple mode configuration to measure the anti-stokes Raman lines. This last feature also allows the estimation of the sample surface temperature. Finally, data that were measured on a sample from Chernobyl lava, where phases are identified by Raman mapping, are shown.

  20. Detection of diamond in ore using pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lamprecht, GH

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The viability of using pulsed laser excited Raman spectroscopy as a method for diamond detection from ore, has been investigated. In this method the spontaneous Stokes Raman signal is used as indicator of diamond, and a dual channel system...

  1. Multivariate reference technique for quantitative analysis of fiber-optic tissue Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-12-03

    We report a novel method making use of multivariate reference signals of fused silica and sapphire Raman signals generated from a ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe for quantitative analysis of in vivo tissue Raman measurements in real time. Partial least-squares (PLS) regression modeling is applied to extract the characteristic internal reference Raman signals (e.g., shoulder of the prominent fused silica boson peak (~130 cm(-1)); distinct sapphire ball-lens peaks (380, 417, 646, and 751 cm(-1))) from the ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe for quantitative analysis of fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy. To evaluate the analytical value of this novel multivariate reference technique, a rapid Raman spectroscopy system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe is used for in vivo oral tissue Raman measurements (n = 25 subjects) under 785 nm laser excitation powers ranging from 5 to 65 mW. An accurate linear relationship (R(2) = 0.981) with a root-mean-square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 2.5 mW can be obtained for predicting the laser excitation power changes based on a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation, which is superior to the normal univariate reference method (RMSE = 6.2 mW). A root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 2.4 mW (R(2) = 0.985) can also be achieved for laser power prediction in real time when we applied the multivariate method independently on the five new subjects (n = 166 spectra). We further apply the multivariate reference technique for quantitative analysis of gelatin tissue phantoms that gives rise to an RMSEP of ~2.0% (R(2) = 0.998) independent of laser excitation power variations. This work demonstrates that multivariate reference technique can be advantageously used to monitor and correct the variations of laser excitation power and fiber coupling efficiency in situ for standardizing the tissue Raman intensity to realize quantitative analysis of tissue Raman measurements in vivo, which is particularly appealing in

  2. High Average Power Raman Conversion in Diamond: ’Eyesafe’ Output and Fiber Laser Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-19

    power. The efficiencies and brightness achieved are found to be higher than expected by current theories for thermal effects in diamond. The project...understand the importance of other cavity parameters on laser behaviour in order to assist with future optimization of designs. We thus developed a model...three areas not originally planned in the proposal. 1) Raman beam combination The technique of Raman beam combination, which has been investigated

  3. Laser techniques in high-pressure geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Mao, H. K.

    1987-01-01

    Laser techniques in conjunction with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study high-pressure properties of materials important to a wide range of problems in earth and planetary science. Spontaneous Raman scattering of crystalline and amorphous solids at high pressure demonstrates that dramatic changes in structure and bonding occur on compression. High-pressure Brillouin scattering is sensitive to the pressure variations of single-crystal elastic moduli and acoustic velocities. Laser heating techniques with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study phase transitions, including melting, under deep-earth conditions. Finally, laser-induced ruby fluorescence has been essential for the development of techniques for generating the maximum pressures now possible with the diamond-anvil cell, and currently provides a calibrated in situ measure of pressure well above 100 gigapascals.

  4. Laser techniques in high-pressure geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Mao, H. K.

    1987-01-01

    Laser techniques in conjunction with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study high-pressure properties of materials important to a wide range of problems in earth and planetary science. Spontaneous Raman scattering of crystalline and amorphous solids at high pressure demonstrates that dramatic changes in structure and bonding occur on compression. High-pressure Brillouin scattering is sensitive to the pressure variations of single-crystal elastic moduli and acoustic velocities. Laser heating techniques with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study phase transitions, including melting, under deep-earth conditions. Finally, laser-induced ruby fluorescence has been essential for the development of techniques for generating the maximum pressures now possible with the diamond-anvil cell, and currently provides a calibrated in situ measure of pressure well above 100 gigapascals.

  5. Laser Physics and Laser Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    Other types of laser-assisted materials process- Planck Institute for Quantum Optics. Garching . West ing and machining, including laser cutting, welding...detectors with microstructured electrodes, 134[ G. N. Maracas. G. L. Harrs, C. A. Lee. and R. A. McFarlane. Opt. Le’tt., vol. 7, pp. 575-577, Dcc . 1982...A. E. Siegman Max-Planck Institut f’r Quantenoptik, D-8046 Garching , West Germany and E. L. Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford

  6. Raman crystal lasers in the visible and near-infrared

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EICHLERH.J.; GADG.M.A.; KAMINSKIIA.A.; RHEEH.

    2003-01-01

    Raman lasers based on potassium gadolinium tungstate and lead tungstate crystals pumped by a≈120 ps Nd: YAG laser at 1.064/μm were developed. High reflection mirrors for the Stokes wavelength have been used to generate near-infrared and eye safe spectral region of 1.15 - 1.32/μm. Second harmonic generation of the generated Raman lasers was observed. Eifficient multiple Stokes and anti-Stokes picosecond generation in 64 crystals have been shown to exhibit stimulated Raman scattering on about 700 lines covering the whole visible and near-infrared spectrum. All stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared spectrum are identified and attributed to the SRS-active vibration modes of these crystals.

  7. Raman crystal lasers in the visible and near-infrared

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Raman lasers based on potassium gadolinium tungstate and lead tungstate crystals pumped by a≈120 ps Nd: YAG laser at 1.064 μm were developed. High reflection mirrors for the Stokes wavelength have been used to generate near-infrared and eye safe spectral region of 1.15-1.32 μm. Second harmonic generation of the generated Raman lasers was observed. Eifficient multiple Stokes and anti-Stokes picosecond generation in 64 crystals have been shown to exhibit stimulated Raman scattering on about 700 lines covering the whole visible and near-infrared spectrum. All stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared spectrum are identified and attributed to the SRS-active vibration modes of these crystals.

  8. Dual-Comb Coherent Raman Spectroscopy with Lasers of 1-GHz Pulse Repetition Frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Mohler, Kathrin J; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    We extend the technique of multiplex coherent Raman spectroscopy with two femtosecond mode-locked lasers to oscillators of a pulse repetition frequency of 1 GHz. We demonstrate spectra of liquids, which span 1100 cm$^{-1}$ of Raman shifts. At a resolution of 6 cm$^{-1}$, their measurement time may be as short as 5 microseconds for a refresh rate of 2 kHz. The waiting period between acquisitions is improved ten-fold compared to previous experiments with two lasers of 100-MHz repetition frequencies.

  9. Efficient Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering substrates from femtosecond laser based fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Vinod; Kanaujia, Pawan K.; Bommali, Ravi Kumar; Vijaya Prakash, G.

    2017-10-01

    A fast and simple femtosecond laser based methodology for efficient Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate fabrication has been proposed. Both nano scaffold silicon (black silicon) and gold nanoparticles (Au-NP) are fabricated by femtosecond laser based technique for mass production. Nano rough silicon scaffold enables large electromagnetic fields for the localized surface plasmons from decorated metallic nanoparticles. Thus giant enhancement (approximately in the order of 104) of Raman signal arises from the mixed effects of electron-photon-phonon coupling, even at nanomolar concentrations of test organic species (Rhodamine 6G). Proposed process demonstrates the low-cost and label-less application ability from these large-area SERS substrates.

  10. Raman study on single-walled carbon nanotubes with different laser excitation energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Islam; Khurshed Ahmad Shah; H S Mavi; A K Shaukla; S Rath; Harsh

    2007-06-01

    The industrial use of carbon nanotubes is increasing day by day; therefore, it is very important to identify the nature of carbon nanotubes in a bundle. In this study, we have used the Raman spectroscopic analysis on vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) grown by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique. The grown sample is excited with two laser excitation wavelengths, 633 nm from He–Ne laser and 514.5 nm from Ar+ laser. Raman spectrum in the backscattering geometry provides the characteristic spectra of SWCNTs with its radial breathing mode (RBM), defect-induced disorder mode (D band), and highenergy modes (G and M bands). The Raman signal positions of the spectra in RBM, G and M bands confirm the grown sample to be of semiconducting type in nature.

  11. The application of Raman and anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy for in situ monitoring of structural changes in laser irradiated titanium dioxide materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigby, Stephanie J. [Centre for Research in Energy and Environment, School of Engineering, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen AB10 1FR (United Kingdom); Al-Obaidi, Ala H.R. [Smart Light Devices, Unit 13, Tyseal Base, Craigshaw Crescent Aberdeen, West Tullos Industrial Estate, Aberdeen AB12 3AW (United Kingdom); Lee, Soo-Keun [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, POSTECH, San 31 Hyoja Dong Nam-Gu, Pohang, Kyungpook 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); McStay, Daniel [Discovery Technologies Ltd., Redshank House, Alness Point Business Park, Alness IV17 0IJ (United Kingdom); Robertson, Peter K.J. [Centre for Research in Energy and Environment, School of Engineering, The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen AB10 1FR (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: peter.robertson@rgu.ac.uk

    2006-09-15

    The use of Raman and anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy to investigate the effect of exposure to high power laser radiation on the crystalline phases of TiO{sub 2} has been investigated. Measurement of the changes, over several time integrals, in the Raman and anti-stokes Raman of TiO{sub 2} spectra with exposure to laser radiation is reported. Raman and anti-stokes Raman provide detail on both the structure and the kinetic process of changes in crystalline phases in the titania material. The effect of laser exposure resulted in the generation of increasing amounts of the rutile crystalline phase from the anatase crystalline phase during exposure. The Raman spectra displayed bands at 144 cm{sup -1} (A1g), 197 cm{sup -1} (Eg), 398 cm{sup -1} (B1g), 515 cm{sup -1} (A1g), and 640 cm{sup -1} (Eg) assigned to anatase which were replaced by bands at 143 cm{sup -1} (B1g), 235 cm{sup -1} (2 phonon process), 448 cm{sup -1} (Eg) and 612 cm{sup -1} (A1g) which were assigned to rutile. This indicated that laser irradiation of TiO{sub 2} changes the crystalline phase from anatase to rutile. Raman and anti-stokes Raman are highly sensitive to the crystalline forms of TiO{sub 2} and allow characterisation of the effect of laser irradiation upon TiO{sub 2}. This technique would also be applicable as an in situ method for monitoring changes during the laser irradiation process.

  12. Nanoparticle detection in aqueous solutions using Raman and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sovago, M.; Buis, E.-J.; Sandtke, M.

    2013-01-01

    We show the chemical identification and quantification of the concentration and size of nanoparticle (NP) dispersions in aqueous solutions by using a combination of Raman Spectroscopy and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). The two spectroscopic techniques are applied to demonstrate the NP

  13. Nanoparticle detection in aqueous solutions using Raman and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sovago, M.; Buis, E.-J.; Sandtke, M.

    2013-01-01

    We show the chemical identification and quantification of the concentration and size of nanoparticle (NP) dispersions in aqueous solutions by using a combination of Raman Spectroscopy and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). The two spectroscopic techniques are applied to demonstrate the NP

  14. Raman thermometry: Effective temperature of the nonuniform temperature field induced by a Gaussian laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Očenášek, Jan, E-mail: ocenasek@ntc.zcu.cz; Voldřich, Josef [New Technologies Research Centre, University of West Bohemia in Pilsen, Plzeň 30614 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-21

    Raman spectroscopy is a widely applied analytical technique with numerous applications that is based on inelastic scattering of monochromatic light, which is typically provided by a laser. Irradiation of a sample by a laser beam is always accompanied by an increase in the sample temperature, which may be unwanted or may be beneficial for studying temperature-related effects and determining thermal parameters. This work reports analyses of the temperature field induced by a Gaussian laser to calculate the Raman scattered intensity related to each temperature value of the nonuniform field present on the sample. The effective temperature of the probed field, calculated as an average weighted by the laser intensity, is demonstrated to be about 70% of the maximum temperature irrespective of the absorption coefficient or the laser focus. Finally, using crystalline silicon as a model material, it is shown that this effective value closely approximates the temperature value identified from the thermally related peak shift.

  15. A fiber-laser-based stimulated Raman scattering spectral microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nose, Keisuke; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Kishi, Tatsuya; Sumimura, Kazuhiko; Kanematsu, Yasuo; Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2013-02-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectral microscopy is a powerful technique for label-free biological imaging because it allows us to distinguish chemical species with overlapping Raman bands. Here we present an SRS spectral microscope based only on fiber lasers (FL's), which offer the possibilities of downsizing and simplification of the system. A femtosecond figure-8 Er-FL at a repetition rate of 54.4 MHz is used to generate pump pulses. After amplified by an Er doped fiber amplifier, Er-FL pulses are spectrally compressed to 2-ps second harmonic pulses. For generating Stokes pulses, a femtosecond Yb-FL pulses at a repetition rate of 27.2 MHz is used. Then these lasers are synchronized by a phase locked loop, which consists of a two-photon absorption photodetector, a loop filter, a phase modulator in the Er- FL cavity, and a piezo electric transducer in the Yb-FL cavity. The intensity noise of pump pulses is reduced by the collinear balanced detection (CBD) technique based on delay-and-add fiber lines. Experimentally, we confirmed that the intensity noise level of probe pulses was close to the shot noise limit. The Stokes pulses are introduced to a wavelength tunable band pass filter (BPF), which consists of a galvanomirror scanner, a 4-f optical system, a reflection grating, and a collimator. This system is able to scan the wavenumber from 2850 cm-1 to 3100 cm-1 by tuning the BPF. We succeeded in the spectral imaging of a mixture of polystyrene beads and poly(methyl methacrylate) beads.

  16. PULSED KGd(WO42 RAMAN LASER: TOWARDS EMISSION LINEWIDTH NARROWING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Savitski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The linewidth of a KGd(WO42 pulsed Raman laser is analysed experimentally for different configurations of the Raman and pump resonators: with narrow and broadband pump emission profiles, with and without linewidth narrowing elements in the Raman laser resonator, with and without injection seeding into the Raman cavity. The benefits of a narrow linewidth pump source in combination with linewidth narrowing elements in the Raman laser cavity for the efficient linewidth narrowing of the Raman emission are explained. 20 kW peak-power pulses at 1156 nm with 0,43 cm -1 emission linewidth are demonstrated from an injection seeded KGW Raman laser

  17. Continuous-wave Raman laser pumped within a semiconductor disk laser cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrotta, Daniele C; Lubeigt, Walter; Kemp, Alan J; Burns, David; Dawson, Martin D; Hastie, Jennifer E

    2011-04-01

    A KGd(WO₄)₂ Raman laser was pumped within the cavity of a cw diode-pumped InGaAs semiconductor disk laser (SDL). The Raman laser threshold was reached for 5.6 W of absorbed diode pump power, and output power up to 0.8 W at 1143 nm, with optical conversion efficiency of 7.5% with respect to the absorbed diode pump power, was demonstrated. Tuning the SDL resulted in tuning of the Raman laser output between 1133 and 1157 nm.

  18. A Fourier transform Raman spectrometer with visible laser excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Dzsaber, S; Bernáth, B; Gyüre, B; Fehér, T; Kramberger, C; Pichler, T; Simon, F

    2014-01-01

    We present the development and performance of a Fourier transformation (FT) based Raman spectrometer working with visible laser (532 nm) excitation. It is generally thought that FT-Raman spectrometers are not viable in the visible range where shot-noise limits the detector performance and therein they are outperformed by grating based, dispersive ones. We show that contrary to this common belief, the recent advances of high-performance interference filters makes the FT-Raman design a valid alternative to dispersive Raman spectrometers for samples which do not luminesce. We critically compare the performance of our spectrometer to two dispersive ones: a home-built single channel and a state-of-the-art CCD based instruments. We demonstrate a similar or even better sensitivity than the CCD based dispersive spectrometer particularly when the laser power density is considered. The instrument possesses all the known advantages of the FT principle of spectral accuracy, high throughput, and economic design. We also d...

  19. Optical pulses, lasers, measuring techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Früngel, Frank B A

    1965-01-01

    High Speed Pulse Technology: Volume II: Optical Pulses - Lasers - Measuring Techniques focuses on the theoretical and engineering problems that result from the capacitor discharge technique.This book is organized into three main topics: light flash production from a capacitive energy storage; signal transmission and ranging systems by capacitor discharges and lasers; and impulse measuring technique. This text specifically discusses the air spark under atmospheric conditions, industrial equipment for laser flashing, and claims for light transmitting system. The application of light impulse sign

  20. Development of fiber lasers and devices for coherent Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Erin Stranford

    As ultrafast laser technology has found expanding application in machining, spectroscopy, microscopy, surgery, and numerous other areas, the desire for inexpensive and robust laser sources has grown. Until recently, nonlinear effects in fiber systems due to the tight confinement of the light in the core have limited their performance. However, with advances in managing nonlinearity through pulse propagation physics and the use of large core fibers, the performance of fiber lasers can compete with that of their solid-state counterparts. As specific applications, such as coherent Raman scattering microscopy, emerge that stand to benefit from fiber technology, new performance challenges in areas such as laser noise are anticipated. This thesis studies nonlinear pulse propagation in fiber lasers and fiber parametric devices. Applications of dissipative solitons and self-similar pulse propagation to low-repetition rate oscillators that have the potential to simplify short-pulse amplification schemes will be examined. The rest of this thesis focuses on topics relevant to fiber laser development for coherent Raman scattering microscopy sources. Coherent pulse division and recombination inside the laser cavity will be introduced as an energy-scaling mechanism and demonstrated for a fiber soliton laser. The relative intensity noise properties of mode-locked fiber lasers, with a particular emphasis on normal dispersion lasers, will be explored in simulation and experiment. A fiber optical parametric oscillator will be studied in detail for low noise frequency conversion of picosecond pulses, and its utility for coherent Raman imaging will be demonstrated. Spectral compression of femtosecond pulses is used to generate picosecond pulses to pump this device, and this technique provides a route to future noise reduction in the system. Furthermore, this device forms a multimodal source capable of providing the picosecond pulses for coherent Raman scattering microscopy and the

  1. Red emitting monolithic dual wavelength DBR diode lasers for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumpf, B.; Maiwald, M.; Müller, A.; Bugge, F.; Fricke, J.; Ressel, P.; Pohl, J.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2014-02-01

    Raman lines are often obscured by background light or fluorescence especially when investigating biological samples or samples containing impurities. Shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) is a technique to overcome this. By exciting the sample with two slightly shifted wavelengths, it is possible to separate the Raman lines and distortions. In this paper, monolithic dual wavelength DBR diode lasers meeting the demands of Raman spectroscopy and SERDS will be presented. The wavelengths are stabilized and selected by using deeply-etched 10th order surface gratings with different periods manufactured using i-line wafer stepper lithography. Two possible resonator concepts, i.e. a mini-array of two parallel DBR RW-lasers and a Y-branch DBR laser, will be compared. Established excitation wavelengths for Raman spectroscopy at 671 nm and 785 nm are chosen. The total laser length is 3 mm; the ridge width is 2.2 μm for the 785 nm devices and 5 μm for the 671 nm lasers. The length of the DBR gratings is 500 μm. The devices at 671 nm reach output powers up to 100 mW having an emission width smaller than 12 pm (FWHM). The 785 nm lasers show output powers up to 200 mW and a narrow emission below 22 pm. For the dual wavelength lasers the spectral distance between the two excitation lines is about 0.5 nm as targeted. The power consumption at both wavelengths is below 1 W. These data proof that the devices are well suited for their application in portable Raman measurement systems such as handheld devices using SERDS.

  2. Sum-Frequency-Generation-Based Laser Sidebands for Tunable Femtosecond Raman Spectroscopy in the Ultraviolet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangdong Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS is an emerging molecular structural dynamics technique for functional materials characterization typically in the visible to near-IR range. To expand its applications we have developed a versatile FSRS setup in the ultraviolet region. We use the combination of a narrowband, ~400 nm Raman pump from a home-built second harmonic bandwidth compressor and a tunable broadband probe pulse from sum-frequency-generation-based cascaded four-wave mixing (SFG-CFWM laser sidebands in a thin BBO crystal. The ground state Raman spectrum of a laser dye Quinolon 390 in methanol that strongly absorbs at ~355 nm is systematically studied as a standard sample to provide previously unavailable spectroscopic characterization in the vibrational domain. Both the Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra can be collected by selecting different orders of SFG-CFWM sidebands as the probe pulse. The stimulated Raman gain with the 402 nm Raman pump is >21 times larger than that with the 550 nm Raman pump when measured at the 1317 cm−1 peak for the aromatic ring deformation and ring-H rocking mode of the dye molecule, demonstrating that pre-resonance enhancement is effectively achieved in the unique UV-FSRS setup. This added tunability in the versatile and compact optical setup enables FSRS to better capture transient conformational snapshots of photosensitive molecules that absorb in the UV range.

  3. Emerging Raman Applications and Techniques in Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    The book presents the latest technological advances in Raman spectroscopy that are presently redrawing the landscape of many fields of biomedical and pharmaceutical R&D. Numerous examples are given to illustrate the application of the new methods and compared with established and related techniques. The book is suitable for both new researchers and practitioners in this area as well as for those familiar with the Raman technique but seeking to keep abreast of the latest dramatic advances in this field.

  4. Low noise Raman lasers for yellow-orange spectrum coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landru, Nicolas; Rouvillain, Julien; Le Bail, Guy; Georges, Thierry

    2011-02-01

    Diode lasers have been demonstrated to operate over a great part of the visible spectrum: InGaN diodes cover the violet-blue- green part (635 nm). Some fluorophorus in biotechnology applications are excited by intermediate wavelengths, from 540 to 630 nm. Optically pumped InGaAs lasers were demonstrated from 460 nm up to 580 nm. Standard frequency doubled diode pumped solid state (DPSS) lasers lack of suitable transition to cover the 565-650nm region. It is possible to modify the semiconductor composition to extend the frequency range or to frequency mix DPSS laser wavelengths, but it comes either with a significant R&D effort or with a complexity in the design. Raman scattering can red-shift the strong transitions of Nd or Yb lasers so that many wavelengths lying in the 1080-1300 nm range can be achieved. Recently several CW diode pumped Raman lasers were demonstrated, some of them including intra-cavity frequency doubling or mixing. The problems with these Raman lasers are the high pump threshold and the high noise. Based on monolithic cavities, we have built several visible Raman lasers with a reduced loss presenting a low pump threshold (<1W) and a high slope efficiency. Output powers in excess of 100 mW were achieved at 588 nm with a 2.5W 808 nm pump. Laser emissions from 556 nm up to more than 610 nm were demonstrated. Noise of these lasers was analyzed and means to reach low noise operation will be discussed at the conference.

  5. Laser-induced gratings in the gas phase excited via Raman-active transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, D.N. [General Physics Inst., Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bombach, R.; Hemmerling, B.; Hubschmid, W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    We report on a new time resolved coherent Raman technique that is based on the generation of thermal gratings following a population change among molecular levels induced by stimulated Raman pumping. This is achieved by spatially and temporally overlapping intensity interference patterns generated independently by two lasers. When this technique is used in carbon dioxide, employing transitions which belong to the Q-branches of the {nu}{sub 1}/2{nu}{sub 2} Fermi dyad, it is possible to investigate molecular energy transfer processes. (author) 2 figs., 10 refs.

  6. Monolithic PM Raman fiber laser at 1679 nm for Raman amplification at 1810 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) has been subject to much attention within the field of fiber lasers and amplifiers as it provides an extended wavelength coverage in comparison to rare-earth based devices. Motivated by the projected capacity crunch [1], different approaches are being explored...... demonstrate a monolithic RM Raman fiber laser (RFL), which acts as a pump for a Raman amplifier (RA) at 1810 nm. The lasing wavelength of a RFL, thus also for a RA, can in principle be designed arbitrarily within the entire wavelength range from the Erbium band up to the Thulium/Holmium band...... of OFS PM Raman fiber, with an estimated propagation loss of 0.42/0.46/1.3 dB/km at 1564/1679/1810 nm. The Raman gain coefficient was measured to be gR=2.66/2.35 W-1km-1 at 1679/1810 nm. The laser curve of the RFL is depicted in Fig. 1b, with a slope efficiency of 67 %. The high slope efficiency...

  7. Impulsive rotational Raman scattering of N2 by a remote "air laser" in femtosecond laser filament

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Zeng, Bin; Yao, Jinping; Li, Guihua; Jing, Chenrui; Xie, Hongqiang; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-01-01

    We report on experimental realization of impulsive rotational Raman scattering from neutral nitrogen molecules in a femtosecond laser filament using an intense self-induced white-light seeding "air laser" generated during the filamentation of an 800 nm Ti: Sapphire laser in nitrogen gas. The impulsive rotational Raman fingerprint signals are observed with a maximum conversion efficiency of ~0.8%. Our observation provides a promising way of remote identification and location of chemical species in atmosphere by rotational Raman scattering of molecules.

  8. DURIP-97 Sodium Guide Star Raman Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    now been transferred from our laser development laboratory to the astronomical adaptive optics group where it is being modified for practical applications as a guide star laser. This is a project funded by the Air Force.

  9. Application of laser Raman spectroscopy to dental diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Takahiro; Wakaki, Moriaki

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this research is related with the diagnosis of caries by use of a laser. We study the fundamental characterization of the diagnosis method using both fluorescence and Raman scattering spectroscopy. We try to evaluate the possibility of the caries diagnosis using Raman spectroscopy and its clinical application. We focus on the PO34- ion that flows out with the dissolution of hydroxyapatite (HAp), and the fluorescence that increases in connection with caries. The Raman line of P-O vibration is overlapped on the continuous, background spectrum by fluorescence. Consequently, we try to find out the correlation between a healthy part and a carious part by analyzing both fluorescence and Raman spectra. It was found that Raman intensity of HAp at carious lesion was weaker than those of healthy parts and the florescence intensity at the same portions was stronger. We have obtained the feasibility to estimate the degree of caries and health condition by deriving the ratio between Raman and florescence intensity. And the trial measurements in vivo were carried out to verify the availability of the method by using a fiber probe type multi channel Raman spectrometer. The process of remineralization is under researching for the development of preventive medicine.

  10. Development of laser decontamination technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Ryuichiro; Fukui, Yasutaka; Tanimoto, Kenichi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2002-06-01

    For decommissioning of nuclear fuel facilities, a laser decontamination technique has been developed. The technique was expected to decontaminate high-level radioactive waste to back ground levels, keep the amount of secondary waste low, and be operated by remote control. In the development, a decontamination experiment was executed. Type and operation mode of the laser oscillator, Type and flow rate of the assist gas, repetition rate of the laser pulse, moving velocity of the laser nozzle and irradiation energy were parameters in the experiment. Hot radioactive waste could be decontaminated to background levels uniformly with optimized parameters, which were determined by comparative evaluation. (author)

  11. Laser assisted forming techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratky, Alexander

    2007-05-01

    During forming processes high deformations rates can lead to cracks and rupture very easily. Especially brittle materials like titanium or magnesium make difficulties in forming. Due to the dependence of the yield strength on temperature, forming at elevated temperatures eases processing of such materials. Since forming takes place only at localized areas of the work piece selective heating is suffcient and advantageous in most cases. Selective Laser heating offers a possibility to heat only the areas of the work piece where strongest deformations are required. For this purpose several laser sources have been tested like CO II, Diode and Nd:YAG Lasers and their advantages and disadvantages in localized heating of the work pieces will be discussed. The work presented here summarizes research activities at the Institute for Forming and High Power Laser Technology, Vienna University of Technology, on laser assisted deep drawing, laser assisted bending, wire drawing and so on during the last decade. Recent developments like roll profiling, incremental forming processes and hydro forming are discussed briefly.

  12. The Raman Laser Spectrometer for the ExoMars Rover Mission to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rull, Fernando; Maurice, Sylvestre; Hutchinson, Ian; Moral, Andoni; Perez, Carlos; Diaz, Carlos; Colombo, Maria; Belenguer, Tomas; Lopez-Reyes, Guillermo; Sansano, Antonio; Forni, Olivier; Parot, Yann; Striebig, Nicolas; Woodward, Simon; Howe, Chris; Tarcea, Nicolau; Rodriguez, Pablo; Seoane, Laura; Santiago, Amaia; Rodriguez-Prieto, Jose A.; Medina, Jesús; Gallego, Paloma; Canchal, Rosario; Santamaría, Pilar; Ramos, Gonzalo; Vago, Jorge L.; RLS Team

    2017-07-01

    The Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) on board the ESA/Roscosmos ExoMars 2020 mission will provide precise identification of the mineral phases and the possibility to detect organics on the Red Planet. The RLS will work on the powdered samples prepared inside the Pasteur analytical suite and collected on the surface and subsurface by a drill system. Raman spectroscopy is a well-known analytical technique based on the inelastic scattering by matter of incident monochromatic light (the Raman effect) that has many applications in laboratory and industry, yet to be used in space applications. Raman spectrometers will be included in two Mars rovers scheduled to be launched in 2020. The Raman instrument for ExoMars 2020 consists of three main units: (1) a transmission spectrograph coupled to a CCD detector; (2) an electronics box, including the excitation laser that controls the instrument functions; and (3) an optical head with an autofocus mechanism illuminating and collecting the scattered light from the spot under investigation. The optical head is connected to the excitation laser and the spectrometer by optical fibers. The instrument also has two targets positioned inside the rover analytical laboratory for onboard Raman spectral calibration. The aim of this article was to present a detailed description of the RLS instrument, including its operation on Mars. To verify RLS operation before launch and to prepare science scenarios for the mission, a simulator of the sample analysis chain has been developed by the team. The results obtained are also discussed. Finally, the potential of the Raman instrument for use in field conditions is addressed. By using a ruggedized prototype, also developed by our team, a wide range of terrestrial analog sites across the world have been studied. These investigations allowed preparing a large collection of real, in situ spectra of samples from different geological processes and periods of Earth evolution. On this basis, we are working

  13. Raman Studies Of Laser Damaged Single- And Multi-Layer Optical Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarhos, G. J.; Morse, P. L.

    1985-11-01

    Structural changes in dielectric optical coatings induced thermally or by high energy pulsed laser irradiation have been studied by the non-destructive technique of Raman Spectroscopy. A two laser (damage, probe) arrangement was used to characterize the damage process in crystalline and amorphous TiO2 and Zr02 coatings on silica during irradiation and at longer times following the onset of damage. Raman measurements were also undertaken to assess the effects of coating phase and microcrystalline grain orientation on laser induced damage in Ti02. Results suggest that certain phases have higher damage thresholds for comparable coating thicknesses and that thermal and electronic excitation effects are important considerations for modeling the damage process.

  14. Laser radar studies: A study of the feasibility of remote measurement of atmospheric density and turbidity by means of rotational Raman scattering of laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, N.; Schotland, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A remote sensing technique is described which utilizes elastic scattering and rotational Raman scattering of laser light in the atmosphere to obtain soundings of turbidity, transmissivity and density. A scheme is devised whereby, through selective weighting of the rotational Raman lines, the effect of atmospheric temperature structure may be eliminated. The close spectral proximity of the elastic and Raman-scattered signals, combined with the fact that the Raman scattering is quite weak, produces special requirements for the spectroscopic and light-gathering components of a rotational Raman laser radar system. These requirements are investigated. A computation of typical signal-to-noise ratios is made. It is shown that daytime signal-to-noise ratios greater than 10 db are to be expected for observation heights of 5 km and below. For nighttime work, 10 db signal-to-noise ratios are achievable to altitudes as high as 15 km.

  15. Albedo and laser threshold of a diffusive Raman gain medium

    CERN Document Server

    Selden, Adrian C

    2010-01-01

    The diffuse reflectance (albedo) and transmittance of a Raman random gain medium are calculated via semi-analytic two-stream equations with power-dependent coefficients. The results show good qualitative agreement with the experimental data for barium nitrate powder. A divergence in reflectance at a critical gain is interpreted as the threshold for diffusive Raman laser generation. The dependence of the generation threshold on the scattering parameters is analysed and the feedback effect of Fresnel reflection at the gain boundaries evaluated. The addition of external mirrors, particularly at the pumped surface, significantly reduces the threshold gain.

  16. Feasibility study for electron beam and laser Raman non-intrusive diagnostic measurements in hypersonic blowdown wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Homer M.; Ventrice, Carl A.; Yanta, William; Hedlund, Eric; Moyers, Richard L.

    Calculations based upon density measurements are presented for assessing the feasibility of electron beam and laser Raman flow diagnostic techniques for hypersonic blowdown wind tunnels of the Naval-Surface-Weapons-Center class. It is concluded that the electron beam technique is applicable only for flow visualization purposes, even at the low end of the test envelope.

  17. Accuracy of the Laser Raman system for KATRIN

    CERN Document Server

    Schlösser, M; Hötzel, M; Käfer, W

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is the direct (model-independent) measurement of the neutrino mass. For that purpose a windowless gaseous tritium source is used, with a tritium throughput of 40 g/day. In order to reach the design sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c^{2} (90% C.L.) the key parameters of the tritium source, i.e. the gas inlet rate and the gas composition, have to be stabilized and monitored at the 0.1% level (1 sigma). Any small change of the tritium gas composition will manifest itself in non-negligible effects on the KATRIN measurements; therefore, Laser Raman spectroscopy (LARA) is the method of choice for the monitoring of the gas composition because it is a non-invasive and fast in-line measurement technique. In these proceedings, the requirements of KATRIN for statistical and systematical uncertainties of this method are discussed. An overview of the current performance of the LARA system in regard to precision will be given. In addition, two complementary approaches of i...

  18. Stimulated Raman hyperspectral imaging based on spectral filtering of broadband fiber laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Umemura, Wataru; Sumimura, Kazuhiko; Nishizawa, Norihiko; Fukui, Kiichi; Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate a technique of hyperspectral imaging in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy using a tunable optical filter, whose transmission wavelength can be varied quickly by a galvanometer mirror. Experimentally, broadband Yb fiber laser pulses are synchronized with picosecond Ti:sapphire pulses, and then spectrally filtered out by the filter. After amplification by fiber amplifiers, we obtain narrowband pulses with a spectral width of 225 cm(-1). By using these pulses, we accomplish SRS imaging of polymer beads with spectral information.

  19. Raman shifting of KrF laser radiation for tropospheric ozone measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Ismail, Syed

    1991-01-01

    The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurement of tropospheric ozone requires use of high average power UV lasers operating at two appropriate DIAL wavelengths. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that a KrF excimer laser can be used to generate several wavelengths with good energy conversion efficiencies by stimulated Raman shifting using hydrogen (H2) and deuterium (D2). Computer simulations for an airborne lidar have shown that these laser emissions can be used for the less than 5 percent random error, high resolution measuremment of ozone across the troposphere using the DIAL technique. In the region of strong ozone absorption, laser wavelengths of 277.0 and 291.7 nm were generated using H2 and D2, respectively. In addition, a laser wavelength at 302.0 nm was generated using two cells in series, with the first containing D2 and the second containing H2. The energy conversion efficiency for each wavelength was between 14 and 27 percent.

  20. Laser annealing effects of the Raman laser on nitrogen implanted glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara, D.; Prawer, S.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Raman analysis is a popular method of investigating crystallite sizes, ordering and the types of bonds that exist in ion irradiated carbon materials, namely graphite, diamond and glassy carbon (G.C.). In particular Raman spectroscopy is used in determining the tetrahedral bonding required for the elusive and potentially important new material called carbon nitride. Carbon nitride, {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, is predicted to exist in several forms. Forming the tetrahedral bond between C and N has proved troublesome bain of many experimenters. A proven method for synthesizing novel materials is ion implantation. Thus G.C. was implanted with N at low temperatures so that diffusion of the implanted N would be hindered. G.C. is a relatively hard, chemically inert, graphitic material. The opaque property of G.C. means that Raman spectroscopy will only give information about the structures that exist at the surface and near surface layers. It was decided, after observing conflicting Raman spectra at different laser powers, that an investigation of the laser annealing effects of the Raman laser on the N implanted G.C. was warranted. The results of the preliminary investigation of the effects of increasing the Raman laser power and determining a power density threshold for high dose N implanted G.C. are discussed. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  1. The Central Raman Laser Facility at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    medina, C.; Mayotte, E.; Wiencke, L. R.; Rizi, V.; Grillo, A.

    2013-12-01

    We describe the newly upgraded Central Raman Laser Facility (CRLF) located close to the center of the Piere Auger observatory (PAO) in Argentina. The CRLF features a Raman Lidar receiver, a 335 nm wavelength solid state laser, a robotic beam energy calibration system, and a weather station, all powered by solar energy and operated autonomously using a single board computer. The system optics are arranged to direct the laser beam into the atmosphere in steered and vertical modes with adjustable polarization settings,and it is measured in a bi-static configuration by the 4 fluorescence stations of the Pierre Auger observatory. Additionally the system optics can be easily switched to provide a fixed vertical beam that is measured by a Raman Lidar receiver in mono-static configuration,allowing an independent measurement of the aerosol optical depth τ(z,t) and other properties of the atmosphere. A description of the CLRF's installation, hardware and software integration, initial operations and examples of data collected, will also be presented.

  2. Compact KGd(WO4)2 picosecond pulse-train synchronously pumped broadband Raman laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao Qiang; Long, Ming Liang; Meng, Chen

    2016-08-20

    We demonstrate an efficient approach to realizing an extra-cavity, synchronously pumped, stimulated Raman cascaded process under low repetition frequency (1 kHz) pump conditions. We also construct a compact KGd(WO4)2 (KGW) crystal picosecond Raman laser that has been configured as the developed method. A pulse-train green laser pumped the corresponding 70 mm long KGW crystal Raman cavity. The pulse train contains six pulses, about 800 ps separated, for every millisecond; thus, it can realize synchronous pumping between pump pulse and the pumped Raman cavity. The investigated system produced a collinear Raman laser output that includes six laser lines covering the 532 to 800 nm spectra. This is the first report on an all-solid-state, high-average-power picosecond collinear multi-wavelength (more than three laser components) laser to our knowledge. This method has never been reported on before in the synchronously pumped stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) realm.

  3. 共聚焦激光拉曼光谱技术鉴定三份激光打印机墨迹%Identifying Three Ink Marks from Laser Printers with Confocal Raman Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤伟; 陆俭洁

    2011-01-01

    使用共聚焦激光拉曼光谱仪对送检的三份激光打印机墨迹进行鉴定。在高倍显微镜下,发现各检材的细节特征有明显区别;使用785 nm波长激光光源,对各检材进行测定,发现不同检材的激光拉曼光谱图中拉曼峰型,峰个数及峰位移有明显区别。通过上述检测,可以得出鉴定结论。%This paper is to introduce the experiment of identifying three ink marks from laser printers with confocal Raman spectrometer.Under the high-power microscope,the details of characteristics of the samples are obviously different.The parameters(e.g.type,number,shift) of Raman peaks of the samples,being determined by using 785nm laser light source,are also obviously different.It's easy to obtain the result of appraisal from the determination above.

  4. ExoMars Raman laser spectrometer for Exomars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rull, F.; Sansano, A.; Díaz, E.; Canora, C. P.; Moral, A. G.; Tato, C.; Colombo, M.; Belenguer, T.; Fernández, M.; Manfredi, J. A. R.; Canchal, R.; Dávila, B.; Jiménez, A.; Gallego, P.; Ibarmia, S.; Prieto, J. A. R.; Santiago, A.; Pla, J.; Ramos, G.; Díaz, C.; González, C.

    2011-10-01

    The Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) is one of the Pasteur Payload instruments, within the ESA's Aurora Exploration Programme, ExoMars mission. ExoMars 2018 main Scientific objective is "Searching for evidence of past and present life on Mars". Raman Spectroscopy is used to analyze the vibrational modes of a substance either in the solid, liquid or gas state. It relies on the inelastic scattering (Raman Scattering) of monochromatic light produced by atoms and molecules. The radiation-matter interaction results in the energy of the exciting photons to be shifted up or down. The shift in energy appears as a spectral distribution and therefore provides an unique fingerprint by which the substances can be identified and structurally analyzed. The RLS is being developed by an European Consortium composed by Spanish, French, German and UK partners. It will perform Raman spectroscopy on crushed powdered samples inside the Rover's Analytical Laboratory Drawer. Instrument performances are being evaluated by means of simulation tools and development of an instrument prototype.

  5. Raman Laser Spectrometer for 2020 ExoMars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moral, Andoni G.; Pérez, Carlos; INTA, University of Valladolid, INSA, Leicester University, IRAP, RAL, OHB

    2016-10-01

    The Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) is one of the Pasteur Payload instruments, within the ESA's Aurora Exploration Programme, ExoMars mission.ExoMars 2020 main scientific objective is "Searching for evidence of past and present life on Mars".Raman Spectroscopy is used to analyze the vibrational modes of a substance either in the solid, liquid or gas state. It relies on the inelastic scattering (Raman Scattering) of monochromatic light produced by atoms and molecules. The radiation-matter interaction results in the energy of the exciting photons to be shifted up or down. The shift in energy appears as a spectral distribution and therefore provides an unique fingerprint by which the substances can be identified and structurally analyzed.The RLS is being developed by an European Consortium composed by Spanish, UK, French and German partners. It will perform Raman spectroscopy on crushed powdered samples, obtained from 2 meters depth under Mars surface, inside the Rover's Analytical Laboratory Drawer.After a wide campaign for evaluating Instrument performances by means of simulation tools and development of an instrument prototype, Instrument Structural and Thermal Model was successfully delivered on February 2015, and the Engineering and Qualification Model has been manufactured and is expected to be delivered by November 2016, after a testing campaign developed during Q2 & Q3 of 2016.A summary of main Instrument performances obtained during the last months, achieving high levels of spectral resolution and accuracy in the obtained spectra.

  6. [Rapid detection of chlorinated organic mixture by laser Raman spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing

    2014-07-01

    In order to realize the rapid, nondestructive detection of organic compounds, a two-dimensional analysis method based on technology of laser Raman spectroscopy was proposed. The results show that using 532 nm laser as excitation light source, the observation of 236.2, 348.9, 449.4 and 513.6 cm(-1), the four vibrational Raman spectra, and the intensity ratio of 6.4 : 1.7: 9.4 : 1.0 can determine the existence of tetrachloroethylene. The observation of 707.5, 1 087.9, 1 175.8 and 3 078.6 cm(-1), the four vibrational Raman spectra, and the intensity ratio of 9.6 : 6.4 : 1.0 : 3.9 can determine the existence of chlorobenzene. In other words, that through the comprehensive study of spectral lines and intensity ratio of some spectral lines, the presence of organic compounds in the mixed solution can be determined quickly. In the aspect of quantitative analysis, using multi-spectral analysis combined with least square fitting method can improve the reliability of the measurement, The accuracy of sample concentration was 98.4%. This spectral measurement method is a potential tool for organic component identification and concentration analysis which has a prosperous application prospects.

  7. Raman forward scattering of high-intensity chirped laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Shadwick, B.A.; Leemans, W.P.

    2002-06-23

    Raman forward scattering of a high-intensity, short-duration, frequency-chirped laser pulse propagating in an underdense plasma is examined. The growth of the direct forward scattered light is calculated for a laser pulse with a linear frequency chirp in various spatio-temporal regimes. This includes a previously undescribed regime of strongly-coupled four-wave nonresonant interaction, which is important for relativistic laser intensities. In all regimes of forward scattering, it is shown that the growth rate increases (decreases) for positive (negative) frequency chirp. The effect of chirp on the growth rate is relatively minor, i.e., a few percent chirp yields few percent changes in the growth rates. Relation of these results to recent experiments is discussed.

  8. Wavelength Selection For Laser Raman Spectroscopy of Putative Martian Habitats and Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn-Williams, D. D.; Newton, E. M. G.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    Pigments are key potential biomarkers for any former life on Mars because of the selective pressure of solar radiation on any biological system that could have evolved at its surface. We have found that the near -Infrared laser Raman spectrometer available to use was eminently suitable for diagnostic analysis of pigments because of their minimal autofluorescence at its 1064 nm excitation wav elength. However, we have now evaluated a diverse range of excitation wavelengths to confirm this choice, to ensure that we have the best technique to seek for pigments and their derivatives from any former surface life on Mars. The Raman is weak relative to fluorescence, which results in elevated baseline and concurrent swamping of Raman bands. We confirm the molecular information available from near-IR FT Raman spectra for two highly pigmented UV-tolerant epilithic Antarctic lichens (Acarospora chlorop hana and Caloplaca saxicola) from Victoria Land, a whole endolithic microbial community and endolithic cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis from within translucent sandstone of the Trans -Antarctic Mountains, and the free- living cyanobacterium Nostoc commune from Alexander Island, Antarctic Peninsula region. We also show that much of the information we require on biomolecules is not evident from lasers of shorter wavelengths. A miniature 1064 nm Raman spectrometer with an In-Ga-As detector sensitive to IR is being developed by Montana State University (now existing as a prototype) as the prime instrument for a proposed UK-led Mars rover mission (Vanguard). Preliminary spectra from this system confirm the suitability of the near-IR laser.

  9. [Application of Raman spectroscopic technique to the identification and investigation of Chinese ancient jades and jade artifacts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Xia; Gan, Fu-Xi

    2009-11-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopic technique is one of the essential methods in scientific archaeological research, which belongs to the nondestructive analysis. As a very good nondestructive analysis approach, it has not been widely applied in the research of the Chinese ancient jade artifacts. First of all in the present paper the fundamentals of laser Raman spectroscopic technique and the new research progress in this field were reviewed. Secondly, the Raman spectra of five familiar jades including nephrite (mainly composed of tremolite), Xiuyan Jade (mainly composed of serpentine), Dushan Jade (mainly composed of anorthite and Zoisite), turquoise and lapis lazuli were summarized respectively. As for an example, the Raman spectra of the four Chinese ancient jade artifacts excavated from Liangzhu Site of Zhejiang Province and Yinxu Site of Anyang in Henan Province were compared with that of the nephrite sample in Hetian of Xinjiang Province. It was shown that the Raman spectroscopic technique is a good nondestructive approach to the identification and investigation of the structures and mineral composition of Chinese ancient jade artifacts. Finally, the limitations and the foreground of this technique were discussed.

  10. Parametric second Stokes Raman laser output pulse shortening to 300 ps due to depletion of pumping of intracavity Raman conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetanin, S. N.; Jelínek, M.; Kubeček, V.; Jelínková, H.; Ivleva, L. I.

    2016-10-01

    A new effect of the pulse shortening of the parametrically generated radiation down to hundreds of picosecond via depletion of pumping of intracavity Raman conversion in the miniature passively Q-switched Nd: SrMoO4 parametric self-Raman laser with the increasing energy of the shortened pulse under pulsed pumping by a high-power laser diode bar is demonstrated. The theoretical estimation of the depletion stage duration of the convertible fundamental laser radiation via intracavity Raman conversion is in agreement with the experimentally demonstrated duration of the parametrically generated pulse. Using the mathematical modeling of the pulse shortening quality and quantity deterioration is disclosed, and the solution ways are found by the optimization of the laser parameters.

  11. Synchronously pumped picosecond all-fibre Raman laser based on phosphorus-doped silica fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobtsev, Sergey; Kukarin, Sergey; Kokhanovskiy, Alexey

    2015-07-13

    Reported for the first time is picosecond-range pulse generation in an all-fibre Raman laser based on P₂O₅-doped silica fibre. Employment of phosphor-silicate fibre made possible single-cascade spectral transformation of pumping pulses at 1084 nm into 270-ps long Raman laser pulses at 1270 nm. The highest observed fraction of the Stokes component radiation at 1270 nm in the total output of the Raman laser amounted to 30%. The identified optimal duration of the input pulses at which the amount of Stokes component radiation in a ~16-m long phosphorus-based Raman fibre converter reaches its maximum was 140-180 ps.

  12. Laser amplifier based on Raman amplification in plasma (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieux, Gregory; Cipiccia, Silvia; Lemos, Nuno R. C.; Ciocarlan, Cristian; Grant, Peter A.; Grant, David W.; Ersfeld, Bernhard; Hur, MinSup; Lepipas, Panagiotis; Manahan, Grace; Reboredo Gil, David; Subiel, Anna; Welsh, Gregor H.; Wiggins, S. Mark; Yoffe, Samuel R.; Farmer, John P.; Aniculaesei, Constantin; Brunetti, Enrico; Yang, Xue; Heathcote, Robert; Nersisyan, Gagik; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Pukhov, Alexander; Dias, João. Mendanha; Jaroszynski, Dino A.

    2017-05-01

    The increasing demand for high laser powers is placing huge demands on current laser technology. This is now reaching a limit, and to realise the existing new areas of research promised at high intensities, new cost-effective and technically feasible ways of scaling up the laser power will be required. Plasma-based laser amplifiers may represent the required breakthrough to reach powers of tens of petawatt to exawatt, because of the fundamental advantage that amplification and compression can be realised simultaneously in a plasma medium, which is also robust and resistant to damage, unlike conventional amplifying media. Raman amplification is a promising method, where a long pump pulse transfers energy to a lower frequency, short duration counter-propagating seed pulse through resonant excitation of a plasma wave that creates a transient plasma echelon that backscatters the pump into the probe. Here we present the results of an experimental campaign conducted at the Central Laser Facility. Pump pulses with energies up to 100 J have been used to amplify sub-nanojoule seed pulses to near-joule level. An unprecedented gain of eight orders of magnitude, with a gain coefficient of 180 cm-1 has been measured, which exceeds high-power solid-state amplifying media by orders of magnitude. High gain leads to strong competing amplification from noise, which reaches similar levels to the amplified seed. The observation of 640 Jsr-1 directly backscattered from noise, implies potential overall efficiencies greater than 10%.

  13. Revealing silent vibration modes of nanomaterials by detecting anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianhua; Chen, Lei; Dai, Qiaofeng; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shaolong

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into ``coffee'' rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly revealed in the anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering. Apart from the strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering, Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with small Raman shifts was detected during the ablation process of thick MoS2 layers. It was also observed by slightly defocusing the excitation light. The detection of anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering may serve as a new technique for studying the Raman inactive vibration modes in nanomaterials.We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into ``coffee'' rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly

  14. Laser-induced synthesis of metal-carbon materials for implementing surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherik, A.; Arakelian, S.; Vartanyan, T.; Kutrovskaya, S.; Osipov, A.; Povolotskaya, A.; Povolotskii, A.; Man'shina, A.

    2016-08-01

    Metal-carbon materials exhibiting surface-enhanced Raman scattering have been synthesized by laser irradiation of colloidal systems consisting of carbon and noble metal nanoparticles. The dependence of the Raman scattering intensity on the material composition and laser irradiation conditions has been investigated. The possibility of recording the Raman spectrum of organic dye rhodamine 6G, deposited in amount of 10-6 M on the substrate obtained from a colloidal solution is demonstrated.

  15. Acquisition of a Modular, Multi-laser, Raman-AFM Instrument for Multdisciplinary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Acquisition of a Modular, Multi-laser, Raman- AFM Instrument for Multdisciplinary Research A four-laser, confocal Raman/Atomic Force Scanning...microscope (Raman- AFM ) (priced at ~ $496,000) has been acquired From Horiba Scientific. Acquisition of this instrument has enhanced the research and...capabilities as well as provides high resolution topographical and depth imaging capabilities through the AFM . The views, opinions and/or findings

  16. Study of thymidylate synthetase-function by laser Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R K; Kisliuk, R L; Verma, S P; Wallach, D F

    1975-05-23

    The Laser-Raman spectra of thymidylate synthetase have been obtained with 488 nm excitation from an argon ion laser. Raman bands observed in the range 600-800 cm-minus-1 have been assigned to functional groups of constituent amino acids. The band positions and intensities in the Amide I (1600-1700 cm-minus-1) and Amide III (1200-1300 cm-minus-1) regions, suggest that the enzyme is a mixture of alpha-helical and unordered conformations. Low levels of beta-structure cannot be excluded. The spectra of the ternary complex formed by reacting thymidylate synthetase with (+)-L-methylenetetrahydrofolate and fluorodeoxyuridylate reveals a new band at 1618 cm-minus-1 assigned to the C=N stretching vibration. This band may be due to formation of dihydrofolate or an iminium ion. The overall secondary structure of thymidylate synthetase does not change on formation of the ternary complex. However, the spectrum of the complex indicates local changes in groups such as ionized carboxyl (1400 cm-minus-1), tryptophan (1003 cm-minus-1) and CH-3, CH-2 deformation modes (1440-1470 cm-minus-1).

  17. Ultra-long fiber Raman lasers: design considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltchanov, I.; Kroushkov, D. I.; Richter, A.

    2015-03-01

    In frame of the European Marie Currie project GRIFFON [http://astonishgriffon.net/] the usage of a green approach in terms of reduced power consumption and maintenance costs is envisioned for long-span fiber networks. This shall be accomplished by coherent transmission in unrepeatered links (100 km - 350 km) utilizing ultra-long Raman fiber laser (URFL)-based distributed amplification, multi-level modulation formats, and adapted Digital Signal Processing (DSP) algorithms. The URFL uses a cascaded 2-order pumping scheme where two (co- and counter-) ˜ 1365 nm pumps illuminate the fiber. The URFL oscillates at ˜ 1450 nm whereas amplification is provided by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of the ˜ 1365 nm pumps and the optical feedback is realized by two Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) at the fiber ends reflecting at 1450 nm. The light field at 1450 nm provides amplification for signal waves in the 1550 nm range due to SRS. In this work we present URFL design studies intended to characterize and optimize the power and noise characteristics of the fiber links. We use a bidirectional fiber model describing propagation of the signal, pump and noise powers along the fiber length. From the numerical solution we evaluate the on/off Raman gain and its bandwidth, the signal excursion over the fiber length, OSNR spectra, and the accumulated nonlinearities. To achieve best performance for these characteristics the laser design is optimized with respect to the forward/backward pump powers and wavelengths, input/output signal powers, reflectivity profile of the FBGs and other parameters.

  18. Combined laser ultrasonics, laser heating, and Raman scattering in diamond anvil cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Burgess, Katherine; Odake, Shoko; Chigarev, Nikolay; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2016-12-01

    We developed a multi-functional in situ measurement system under high pressure equipped with a laser ultrasonics (LU) system, Raman device, and laser heating system (LU-LH) in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The system consists of four components: (1) a LU-DAC system (probe and pump lasers, photodetector, and oscilloscope) and DAC; (2) a fiber laser, which is designed to allow precise control of the total power in the range from 2 to 100 W by changing the diode current, for heating samples; (3) a spectrometer for measuring the temperature of the sample (using black body radiation), fluorescence spectrum (spectrum of the ruby for pressure measurement), and Raman scattering measurements inside a DAC under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions; and (4) an optical system to focus laser beams on the sample and image it in the DAC. The system is unique and allows us to do the following: (a) measure the shear and longitudinal velocities of non-transparent materials under HPHT; (b) measure temperature in a DAC under HPHT conditions using Planck's law; (c) measure pressure in a DAC using a Raman signal; and (d) measure acoustical properties of small flat specimens removed from the DAC after HPHT treatment. In this report, we demonstrate that the LU-LH-DAC system allows measurements of velocities of the skimming waves in iron at 2580 K and 22 GPa.

  19. Combined laser ultrasonics, laser heating, and Raman scattering in diamond anvil cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinin, Pavel V; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Burgess, Katherine; Odake, Shoko; Chigarev, Nikolay; Sharma, Shiv K

    2016-12-01

    We developed a multi-functional in situ measurement system under high pressure equipped with a laser ultrasonics (LU) system, Raman device, and laser heating system (LU-LH) in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The system consists of four components: (1) a LU-DAC system (probe and pump lasers, photodetector, and oscilloscope) and DAC; (2) a fiber laser, which is designed to allow precise control of the total power in the range from 2 to 100 W by changing the diode current, for heating samples; (3) a spectrometer for measuring the temperature of the sample (using black body radiation), fluorescence spectrum (spectrum of the ruby for pressure measurement), and Raman scattering measurements inside a DAC under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions; and (4) an optical system to focus laser beams on the sample and image it in the DAC. The system is unique and allows us to do the following: (a) measure the shear and longitudinal velocities of non-transparent materials under HPHT; (b) measure temperature in a DAC under HPHT conditions using Planck's law; (c) measure pressure in a DAC using a Raman signal; and (d) measure acoustical properties of small flat specimens removed from the DAC after HPHT treatment. In this report, we demonstrate that the LU-LH-DAC system allows measurements of velocities of the skimming waves in iron at 2580 K and 22 GPa.

  20. Multi-wavelength hybrid gain fiber ring laser based on Raman and erbium-doped fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Qin; Yongbo Tang; Daru Chen

    2006-01-01

    A stable and uniform multi-wavelength fiber laser based on the hybrid gain of a dispersion compensating fiber as the Raman gain medium and an erbium-doped fiber (EDF) is introduced. The gain competition effects in the fiber Raman amplification (FRA) and EDF amplification are analyzed and compared experimentaUy. The FRA gain mechanism can suppress the gain competition effectively and make the present multi-wavelength laser stable at room temperature. The hybrid gain medium can also increase the lasing bandwidth compared with a pure EDF laser, and improve the power conversion efficiency compared with a pure fiber Raman laser.

  1. Structural changes in nanostructured catalytic oxides monitored by Raman spectroscopy: Effect of the laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alcemira C.; da Silva, Antonio N.; Junior, Jose Alves L.; Freire, Paulo T. C.; Oliveira, Alcineia C.; Filho, Josué M.

    2017-03-01

    The laser power effects on the structural properties of nanostructured oxides were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The nanostructured CeO2, ZrO2, SnO2, TiO2 and MnOx oxides were prepared by a nanocasting route and characterized through various physicochemical techniques. The structural features of the solids were accompanied by varying the incident laser power from 2.0 to 9.1 mW. The laser caused local heating on the surface of the nanostructured solids and influenced on their particle sizes. The CeO2, TiO2 and MnOx spectra exhibited particle size changes due to thermal effects. Elevated laser power up to 9.1 mW accelerated the sintering of CeO2, TiO2 and MnOx particles in contrast to SnO2 counterparts. Simultaneously, the creation of defects in the aforesaid oxide structures was suggested upon increasing the laser power from 2.0 to 9.1 mW. The phase transformation from MnOx-related phases to α-Mn2O3 and the oxidation of these phases were observed. Tetragonal ZrO2 showed a very stable structure under laser heating, envisaging further catalytic applications upon using mild laser power.

  2. Water Raman normalization of airborne laser fluorosensor measurements - A computer model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, L. R.; Esaias, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    The technique for normalizing airborne lidar measurements of chlorophyll fluoresence by the water Raman scattering signal is investigated for laser-excitation wavelengths of 480 and 532 nm using a semianalytic Monte Carlo methodology (SALMON). The signal-integration depth for chlorophyll fluorescence Z(90,F), is found to be insensitive to excitation wavelength and ranges from a maximum of 4.5 m in clearest waters to less than 1 m at a chlorophyll concentration of 20 microgram/liter. For excitation at 532 nm, the signal-integration depth for Raman scattering, Z(90,R), is comparable to Z(90,F). For excitation at 480 nm, Z(90,R) is four times as large as Z(90,F) in clearest waters but nearly equivalent at chlorophyll concentrations greater than 2-3 microgram/liter. Absolute signal levels are stronger with excitation at 480 nm than with excitation at 532 nm, but this advantage must be weighed against potential ambiguities resulting from different integration depths for the fluorescence and Raman scattering signals in clearer waters. To the precision of the simulations, Raman normalization produces effectively linear response to chlorophyll concentration for both excitation wavelengths.

  3. Differential laser-induced perturbation Raman spectroscopy: a comparison with Raman spectroscopy for analysis and classification of amino acids and dipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztekin, Erman K; Smith, Sarah E; Hahn, David W

    2015-04-01

    Differential-laser induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS) is a new spectral analysis technique for classification and identification, with key potential applications for analysis of complex biomolecular systems. DLIPS takes advantage of the complex ultraviolet (UV) laser–material interactions based on difference spectroscopy by coupling low intensity UV laser perturbation with a traditional spectroscopy probe. Here, we quantify the DLIPS performance using a Raman scattering probe in classification of basic constituents of collagenous tissues, namely, the amino acids glycine, L-proline, and L-alanine, and the dipeptides glycine–glycine, glycine–alanine and glycine–proline and compare the performance to a traditional Raman spectroscopy probe via several multivariate analyses. We find that the DLIPS approach yields an ~40% improvement in discrimination among these tissue building blocks. The effects of the 193-nm perturbation laser are further examined by assessing the photodestruction of targeted material molecular bonds. The DLIPS method with a Raman probe holds promise for future tissue diagnosis, either as a stand-alone technique or as part of an orthogonal biosensing scheme.

  4. Non-invasive laser Raman detection of lycopene and ž-carotene antioxidants in skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2003-07-01

    The predominant long-chain carotenoids found in the human skin are lycopene and β-carotene. They are powerful antioxidants and thought to act as scavengers for free radicals and single oxygen that are formed by excessive exposure of skin to sunlight. However the role of the particular representatives of the carotenoid antioxidants family in the skin defense mechanism is still unclear and has to be clarified. We demonstrate the opportunity for fast non-invasive selective quantitative detection of β-carotene and lycopene in human skin employing Raman spectroscopy. Analyzing Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the molecules under blue and green laser excitation we were able to characterize quantitativly the concentrations of each carotenoid in alive human skin. In this method we take an advantage of different Raman cross-section spectral profile for β-carotene and lycopene molecules. This novel technique allows the quantitative assessment of individual carotenoid species in the skin rather then the cumulative level of long-chain carotenoids mixture as we could measure in our previous works. The required laser light exposure levels are well within safety standards. Prelimininary dichoromatic Raman measurements reveal significant differences in the carotenoid composition of different volunteer's skin: even in statistically small group of seven subjects the ratio of β-carotene-to-lycopene in their skin vary from 0.5 to 1.6. This technique holds promise as a method of rapid screening of carotenoids composition of human skin in large populations and suitable in clinical studies for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  5. Efficient evaluation of impairment induced by distributed fiber Raman amplifier using error vector magnitude techniques in unrepeated coherent communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Yuanyuan; Sun, Junqiang

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the impairment induced by relative intensity noise (RIN) of Raman pump in an ultra-long unrepeated multi-level modulated coherent optical communication system. By adopting error vector magnitude (EVM) techniques, we proposed a simple and high efficient numerical method to calculate and analyze the impact of Raman pump RIN on the coherent receiver system. Both intensity and phase noise are taken into consideration in our numerical simulations when choosing Raman pump lasers with different RIN and using different signals. Our simulation result shows that higher-order phase-modulated signal is more sensitive to RIN of the Raman pump. Comparing to the phase noise, intensity noise induced by RIN of the Raman pump can generally be ignored. Apart from the well-known walk-off parameter, nonlinear parameters and Raman-gain coefficient also play important roles in the complex noise transfer process. Our calculation makes it possible to quickly and accurately evaluate the hybrid distributed fiber Raman amplification (DFRA) along with remotely-pumped erbium-doped fiber amplification (EDFA) in ultra-long unrepeated transmission systems.

  6. Laser-induced alteration of Raman spectra for micron-sized solid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, U.; Pavlov, S. G.; Deßmann, N.; Hanke, F.; Weber, I.; Fritz, J.; Hübers, H.-W.

    2017-04-01

    The Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) instrument on board of the future ESAs ExoMars mission will analyze micron-sized powder samples in a low pressure atmosphere. Such micron-sized polycrystalline solid particles might be heated by the laser during the Raman measurements. Here, we report on the temperature-induced alteration of Raman spectra from micron-sized polycrystalline solid particles by comparing Raman spectra on silicon and the rock forming minerals olivine and pyroxene taken at different laser intensities and different ambient temperatures. Our analyses indicate that laser-induced heating results in both broadening and shifting of characteristic Raman lines in the Stokes and anti-Stokes spectral regions. For elementary crystalline silicon a significant local temperature increase and relevant changes in Raman spectra have been observed in particles with median sizes below 250 μm. In comparison, significantly weaker laser-induced Raman spectral changes were observed in more complex rock-forming silicate minerals; even for lower grain sizes. Laser power densities realized in the RLS ExoMars instrument should cause only low local heating effects and, thus, negligible frequency shifts of the major Raman lines in common silicate minerals such as olivine and pyroxene.

  7. Techniques for laser welding polymeric devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, I A

    2003-04-01

    Recent advances in laser techniques mean that lasers are now being considered as an alternative to vibration, ultrasonic, dielectric, hot plate or hot bar welding, and adhesive bonding of plastics. The techniques required to put laser welding methods into practice are described for medical devices, tubular systems, films and synthetic fabrics.

  8. FAST CARS Developing a Laser Spectroscopic Technique for Rapid Identification of Bacterial Spores

    CERN Document Server

    Scully, M O; Lucht, R P; Opatrny, T; Pilloff, H; Rebane, A; Sokolov, A V; Zubairy, M S

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time consuming microscopic, chemical and biological assays. Current research into real time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g. resonant Raman spectroscopy. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. The connection with previous studies based on "Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy" (CARS) is to be noted. However generating and utilizing maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is much more challenging. This extension of the CARS technique is called FAST CARS (Femtosecond Adaptive Spectroscopic Techniques for Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy), and the present paper proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify pre-selected molecules in real time.

  9. FT-Raman spectroscopic characterization of enamel surfaces irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Sima; Fekrazad, Reza; Johari, Maryam; Chiniforoush, Nasim; Rezaei, Yashar

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite recent advances in dental caries prevention, caries is common and remains a serious health problem. Laser irradiation is one of the most common methods in preventive measures in recent years. Raman spectroscopy technique is utilized to study the microcrystalline structure of dental enamel. In this study, FT-Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate chemical changes in enamel structure irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers. Methods. We used 15 freshly-extracted, non-carious, human molars that were treated as follows: No treatment was carried out in group A (control group); Group B was irradiated with Er:YAG laser for 10 seconds under air and water spray; and Group C was irradiated with Nd:YAG laser for 10 seconds under air and water spray. After treatment, the samples were analyzed by FT-Raman spectroscopy. Results. The carbonate content evaluation with regard to the integrated area under the curve (1065/960 cm–1) exhibited a significant reduction in its ratio in groups B and C. The organic content (2935/960 cm-1) area exhibited a significant decrease after laser irradiation in group B and C. Conclusion. The results showed that the mineral and organic matrices of enamel structure were affected by laser irradiation; therefore, it might be a suitable method for caries prevention. PMID:28096945

  10. FT-Raman spectroscopic characterization of enamel surfaces irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Shahabi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite recent advances in dental caries prevention, caries is common and remains a serious health problem. Laser irradiation is one of the most common methods in preventive measures in recent years. Raman spectroscopy technique is utilized to study the microcrystalline structure of dental enamel. In this study, FT-Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate chemical changes in enamel structure irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers. Methods. We used 15 freshly-extracted, non-carious, human molars that were treated as follows: No treatment was carried out in group A (control group; Group B was irradiated with Er:YAG laser for 10 seconds under air and water spray; and Group C was irradiated with Nd:YAG laser for 10 seconds under air and water spray. After treatment, the samples were analyzed by FT-Raman spectroscopy. Results. The carbonate content evaluation with regard to the integrated area under the curve (1065/960 cm–1 exhibited a significant reduction in its ratio in groups B and C. The organic content (2935/960 cm-1 area exhibited a significant decrease after laser irradiation in group B and C. Conclusion. The results showed that the mineral and organic matrices of enamel structure were affected by laser irradiation; therefore, it might be a suitable method for caries prevention.

  11. Raman free-electron laser with a coaxial wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhi, B.; Maraghechi, B.; Willett, J. E.

    2000-10-01

    A one-dimensional theory of the stimulated Raman scattering mechanism for a coaxial free-electron laser (FEL) is developed. The beam-frame FEL dispersion relation and a formula for the lab-frame spatial growth rate are derived. A numerical study of the growth rate for the coaxial wiggler is made and compared with that for the helical wiggler. Except for a part of the group II orbits, the growth rate is found to be less than the helical wiggler. Relativistic effects due to the transverse oscillation of electrons in the wiggler field prevent the FEL operation from approaching magnetoresonance. In the absence of these relativistic mass effects, the calculations show a magnetoresonance associated with the first spatial harmonic and a much narrower resonance at the third spatial harmonic.

  12. Confocal volume in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Kanematsu, Wataru [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimo-Shidami, Moryama-ku, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    To clarify the degradation of confocality in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling (optical sectioning) and the influence of pinhole filtering on it, we investigate the confocal volume in detail based on Gaussian beam optics and scalar wave optics. Theoretical depth profiles of a homogeneous transparent sample for four different pinhole sizes, which are computed using the measured incident beam waist radius w{sub 0} and only a few optical system specific parameters such as a numerical aperture (NA) and a focal length, show a good agreement with the corresponding measured depth profiles. The computed confocal volume demonstrates that the pinhole size affects the actual probe depth as well as the axial resolution and the total intensity loss.

  13. A double-interferometer laser system for cold 87Rb atom gyroscopes based on stimulated Raman transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Ningfang; Li, Wei; Li, Yang; Liu, Jixun; Xu, Xiaobin; Pan, Xiong

    2014-01-01

    We proposed and implemented a double-interferometer laser system to manipulate cold 87Rb atoms to interfere. A frequency-modulated continuous-wave technique was applied to determine and compensate the optical path difference between the two Raman beams. With a coherent self-heterodyne method, the beat signal's FWHM linewidth was measured and the obtained linewidth of ~1Hz mainly limited by the resolution bandwidth of the spectrum analyzer indicates a good coherence degree of the two Raman beams, paving the way to realize a highly sensitive atom gyroscope.

  14. The ExoMars Raman Laser Spectrometer: Performance and Optimisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Ian; EDWARDS, Howell G. M.; Ingley, Richard; Waltham, Nick; ExoMars RLS Team

    2016-10-01

    The ExoMars rover, which is due for launch in 2020, will incorporate an analytical laboratory for interrogating the composition of drill cores retrieved from the near sub-surface of the planet. The laboratory includes a Raman spectrometer with a green laser (532 nm) that will be used to investigate the molecular and structural properties of the material within the samples. The ExoMars, Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) is expected to be the first instrument of its kind to be used on another planet.In preparation for the deployment and operation of the RLS instrument, a broad range of laboratory and fieldwork activities are currently being performed in order to ensure optimum scientific return from the mission. These studies include: science operations and data exploitation, terrestrial analogue studies (and laboratory simulations) and lessons learned from previous planetary mission experiences.Here we report on the status of the RLS science team activities related to studies of terrestrial analogues. This work includes the recovery and characterisation of appropriate samples from various field-site locations (e.g. clay based samples and materials recovered from dry deserts) that reflect the nature of the materials that are expected to be present in the landing site locations currently anticipated for the ExoMars rover mission. Other work includes the detailed analysis of such analogue samples using flight-like prototype instruments, both in-situ and in the laboratory.A summary of the results obtained from all of these studies is presented along with an overview of the anticipated performance capabilities of the instrument. Particular emphasis is placed on the design and performance of the camera system (including both the detector and data processing sub-systems).

  15. Raman-Shifted XeCl Laser Development for a Spaceborne Blue-Green Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    RAMAN-SHIFTED XeCI LASER DEVELOPMENT FOR A SPACEBORNE BLUE-GREEN SOURCE E. A. Stappaerts, M. J. Plummer, W. H. Long, Jr., S. J. Brosnan, H. Komine, and J...TITLE (and S.britJ S. TYPE OF REPORT 6 PEPIOD COVEPED Raman-Shifted XeCl Laser Development for a Technical Report Spaceborne Blue-Green Source: Interim...0.7% cm𔃻 312 nm I0 A 50 ns/DIV. FIGURE 5.3-1 MEASURED GAIN AND LOSS IN XeC1 87 81-34 AD-A133 078 RAMAN-SHIFED XEC LASER DEVELOPMENT FOR A

  16. Power scaling of high efficiency 1.5micron cascaded Raman fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Supradeepa, V R

    2013-01-01

    High power fiber lasers operating at the 1.5micron wavelength region have attractive features like eye-safety and atmospheric transparency, and cascaded Raman fiber lasers offer a convenient method to obtain high power sources at these wavelengths. A limitation to power scaling however has been the lower conversion efficiency of these lasers. We recently introduced a high efficiency architecture for high power cascaded Raman fiber lasers applicable for 1.5micron fiber lasers. Here we demonstrate further power scaling using this new architecture. Using numerical simulations we identify the ideal operating conditions for the new architecture. We demonstrate a high efficiency 1480nm cascaded Raman fiber laser with an output power of 301 W, comparable to record power levels achieved with rare-earth doped fiber lasers in the 1.5 micron wavelength region.

  17. Nd: YAG Laser-Pumped Raman-Shifted Methane Laser as an Eye-safe Laser Rangefmder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Paul Dudeja

    1989-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a feasibility study of the design and performance of a laser rangefinder emitting at an eye-safe wavelength of 1.54 micron, is reported. It is a Raman-shifted laser where an Nd:YAG laser emitting at a wavelength of 1.06 micron is used as pumping source that is incident on a Raman cell containing methane gas at a very high pressure, rsulting in the Stokes radiation at 1.54 micron. Conversion efficiencies as higb as 40 per cent have been reported so far by some workers and continued efforts are on to increase this value close tothe theoretical Qmits. A comparative performance of this laser, proposed as a futuristic military rangefinder, is studied vis-a-vis commonly used Nd:YAG lasers as well as more recent rangefinders using CO2 lasers. A comparison of this laser emitting at 1.54 micron,with Er : glass laser emitting at the same wavelength, is also discussed.

  18. Towards ten-watt-level 3-5 µm Raman lasers using tellurite fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gongwen; Geng, Lixiang; Zhu, Xiushan; Li, Li; Chen, Qian; Norwood, R A; Manzur, T; Peyghambarian, N

    2015-03-23

    Raman lasers based on mid-infrared fibers operating at 3-5 µm atmospheric transparency window are attractive sources for several applications. Compared to fluoride and chalcogenide fibers, tellurite fibers are more advantageous for high power Raman fiber laser sources at 3-5 µm because of their broader Raman gain bandwidth, much larger Raman shift and better physical and chemical properties. Here we report on our simulations for the development of 10-watt-level 3-5 µm Raman lasers using tellurite fibers as the nonlinear gain medium and readily available continuous-wave (cw) and Q-switched erbium-doped fluoride fiber lasers at 2.8 µm as the pump sources. Our results show that a watt-level or even ten-watt-level fiber laser source in the 3-5 µm atmospheric transparency window can be achieved by utilizing the 1st- and 2nd-order Raman scattering in the tellurite fiber. The presented numerical study provides valuable guidance for future 3-5 um Raman fiber laser development.

  19. Remote Raman - laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) geochemical investigation under Venus atmospheric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clegg, Sanuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Humphries, Seth D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vaniman, D. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sharma, S. K. [UNIV OF HAWAII; Misra, A. K. [UNIV OF HAWAII; Dyar, M. D. [MT. HOLYOKE COLLEGE; Smrekar, S. E. [JET PROPULSION LAB.

    2010-12-13

    The extreme Venus surface temperatures ({approx}740 K) and atmospheric pressures ({approx}93 atm) create a challenging environment for surface missions. Scientific investigations capable of Venus geochemical observations must be completed within hours of landing before the lander will be overcome by the harsh atmosphere. A combined remote Raman - LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) instrument is capable of accomplishing the geochemical science goals without the risks associated with collecting samples and bringing them into the lander. Wiens et al. and Sharma et al. demonstrated that both analytical techniques can be integrated into a single instrument capable of planetary missions. The focus of this paper is to explore the capability to probe geologic samples with Raman - LIBS and demonstrate quantitative analysis under Venus surface conditions. Raman and LIBS are highly complementary analytical techniques capable of detecting both the mineralogical and geochemical composition of Venus surface materials. These techniques have the potential to profoundly increase our knowledge of the Venus surface composition, which is currently limited to geochemical data from Soviet Venera and VEGA landers that collectively suggest a surface composition that is primarily tholeiitic basaltic with some potentially more evolved compositions and, in some locations, K-rich trachyandesite. These landers were not equipped to probe the surface mineralogy as can be accomplished with Raman spectroscopy. Based on the observed compositional differences and recognizing the imprecise nature of the existing data, 15 samples were chosen to constitute a Venus-analog suite for this study, including five basalts, two each of andesites, dacites, and sulfates, and single samples of a foidite, trachyandesite, rhyolite, and basaltic trachyandesite under Venus conditions. LIBS data reduction involved generating a partial least squares (PLS) model with a subset of the rock powder standards to

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering study of organic pigments using silver and gold nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, E.; Trusso, S.; Ponterio, R. C.

    2013-05-01

    The identification of pigments used in ancient times represents an interesting task in order to discriminate a production of a precise geographic area or to trace out the ancient commercial networks. Conventional micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS), being a non-destructiveness technique, has been largely used for the analysis of dyes. Nevertheless several pigments, especially of organic origin, show weak Raman activity beside a strong a fluorescence that prevents their identification. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can address such difficulties. The presence of noble metal nanoparticles induces a giant amplification of the Raman signal beside the fluorescence quenching. In this work we present the use of gold and silver nanoparticles to enhance the Raman signal of some commercial red organic dyes: bazilwood, dragon's blood, carmine and madder lake. The nanoparticles were prepared adopting two approaches: (1) ablating metallic targets in water using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm and (2) depositing the nanoparticles on glass substrates by means of a KrF excimer laser ablation process, performed in a controlled argon atmosphere.

  1. Fast single-photon avalanche diode arrays for laser Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blacksberg, J.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.; Rossman, G.R.

    2011-01-01

    We incorporate newly developed solid-state detector technology into time-resolved laser Raman spectroscopy, demonstrating the ability to distinguish spectra from Raman and fluorescence processes. As a proof of concept, we show fluorescence rejection on highly fluorescent mineral samples willemite an

  2. Fast single-photon avalanche diode arrays for laser Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blacksberg, J.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.; Rossman, G.R.

    2011-01-01

    We incorporate newly developed solid-state detector technology into time-resolved laser Raman spectroscopy, demonstrating the ability to distinguish spectra from Raman and fluorescence processes. As a proof of concept, we show fluorescence rejection on highly fluorescent mineral samples willemite an

  3. Detecting Molecular Properties by Various Laser-Based Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsin, Tse-Ming [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Four different laser-based techniques were applied to study physical and chemical characteristics of biomolecules and dye molecules. These techniques are liole burning spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy. Results from hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy suggested that two antenna states (C708 & C714) of photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 are connected by effective energy transfer and the corresponding energy transfer time is ~6 ps. In addition, results from hole burning spectroscopy indicated that the chlorophyll dimer of the C714 state has a large distribution of the dimer geometry. Direct observation of vibrational peaks and evolution of coumarin 153 in the electronic excited state was demonstrated by using the fs/ps CARS, a variation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In three different solvents, methanol, acetonitrile, and butanol, a vibration peak related to the stretch of the carbonyl group exhibits different relaxation dynamics. Laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, along with the biomimetic containers-liposomes, allows the measurement of the enzymatic activity of individual alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa without potential interferences from glass surfaces. The result showed a wide distribution of the enzyme reactivity. Protein structural variation is one of the major reasons that are responsible for this highly heterogeneous behavior.

  4. Continuous-wave Raman generation in a diode-pumped Nd3+:KGd(WO4)2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidovich, A A; Grabtchikov, A S; Lisinetskii, V A; Burakevich, V N; Orlovich, V A; Kiefer, W

    2005-07-01

    Continuous-wave Raman generation in a compact solid-state laser system pumped by a multimode diode laser is demonstrated. The Stokes radiation of stimulated Raman scattering at 1.181 microm is generated as a result of self-frequency conversion of the 1.067 microm laser radiation in Nd3+:KGd(WO4)2 crystal placed in the cavity. The Raman threshold was measured at 1.15 W of laser diode power. The highest output power obtained at the Stokes wavelength was 54 mW. The anomalous delay of Raman generation relative to the start of laser generation (the oscillation buildup) due to slow accumulation of Stokes photons in the cavity at low Raman gain and Raman threshold dependence not only on the laser intensity but also on the time of laser action are observed.

  5. High-Power Continuous-Wave Directly-Diode-Pumped Fiber Raman Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianfu Yao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe novel fiber Raman lasers pumped directly by spectrally combined high power multimode laser diodes at 975 nm and emitting at 1019 nm. With a commercial multimode graded-index fiber, we reached 20 W of laser output power with a record slope efficiency of 80%. With an in-house double-clad fiber, the beam quality improved to M2 = 1.9, albeit with lower output power and slope efficiency due to higher fiber loss. We believe this is the first publication of a fiber Raman laser cladding-pumped directly by diodes.

  6. Automatic Whole-Spectrum Matching Techniques for Identification of Pure and Mixed Minerals using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyar, M. D.; Carey, C. J.; Breitenfeld, L.; Tague, T.; Wang, P.

    2015-12-01

    with a standard reference (diamond); the ratios of their peak areas are independent of laser energy and normalization techniques and are analogous to molar absorptivities. With these test data and our advanced algorithms, quantitative estimates of mineral modes can be accurately derived from Raman spectra of mixtures.

  7. Dual-wavelength Raman spectroscopy approach for studying fluid-phase equilibria using a single laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Johannes

    2010-06-01

    A novel Raman spectroscopy setup for the investigation of multiphase fluid mixtures is proposed. The total output of a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser is separated into a strong 532 nm beam for generating Raman signals in the vapor phase and the weak residual of the fundamental 1064 nm radiation to be utilized as laser source for Raman scattering in the liquid phase. This approach will provide sufficient signal intensity from the gas (despite low density) for determination of mixture composition and at the same time it facilitates recording high-resolution spectra from the liquid in order to allow studying molecular physics phenomena together with concentration measurements.

  8. Mode decoupling in solid state ring laser based on stimulated Raman effect in polar crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Zhang; Yuan Xiao-Dong; Ye Wei-Min; Zeng Chun; Ji Jia-Rong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the gain saturation induced mode-coupling control in solid state ring laser devices based on the stimulated Raman effect of the polar crystals in order to realize solid state ring laser gyroscopes. We theoretically investigate the mode coupling induced by gain saturation between clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) propagating laser modes. Because the CW and CCW running waves are pumped with counter-propagating lasers respectively, the independent coexistence can be ensured.

  9. High Efficiency Pulse Acetone Liquid Raman Laser Using DCM Fluorescent Dye as the Enhancement Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Andrew Yuk-Sun; YANG Jing-Guo; CHAN Mau-Hing

    2006-01-01

    Pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser, 10-Hz repetition rate, 320-mJ pump energy, and 5.1-ns pulse width, a liquid Raman laser using acetone as the Raman shifting medium has been established. The residual pump laser pulse and the generated Stokes pulse are directed to a DCM dye cell for energy enhancement of the Stokes pulse. The Raman laser system is capable to produce a laser pulse at wavelength 630 nm, with single pulse energy of 120 mJ, peak power of 70 MW and an average power of 1200 mW. The energy conversion efficiency is 37.5%, or equivalently a quantum efficiency of 44.5%.

  10. Raman study of TiO2 coatings modified by UV pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belka, Radosław; Keczkowska, Justyna; Sek, Piotr

    2016-12-01

    The TiO2 coatings were prepared by simple sol-gel method and modified by UV pulsed laser. TiO2, also know as titania, is a ceramic compound, existing in numerous polymorphic forms, mainly as tetragonal rutile and anatase, and rhomboidal brookite. Rutile is the most stable form of titanium dioxide, whereas anatase is a metastable form, created in lower temperatures than rutile. Anatase is marked with higher specific surface area, porosity and a higher number of surface hydroxyl groups as compared to rutile. The unique optical and electronic properties of TiO2 results in its use as semiconductors dielectric mirrors, sunscreen and UV-blocking pigments and especially as photocatalyst. In this paper, the tetraisopropoxide was used as Ti precursor according to sol-gel method. An organic base was applied during sol preparation. Prepared gel was coated on glass substrates and calcined in low temperature to obtain amorphous phase of titania. Prepared coatings were modified by UV picosecond pulse laser with different pulse repetition rate and pulse power. Physical modification of the coatings using laser pulses was intended in order change the phase content of the produced material. Raman spectroscopy (RS) method was applied to studies of modified coatings as it is one of the basic analytical techniques, supporting the identification of compounds and obtaining information about the structure. Especially, RS is a useful method for distinguishing the anatase and rutile phases. In these studies, anatase to rutile transformation was observed, depending on laser parameters.

  11. Raman spectral imaging technique on detection of melamine in skim milk powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    A point-scan Raman spectral imaging system was used for quantitative detection of melamine in milk powder. A sample depth of 2 mm and corresponding laser intensity of 200 mW were selected after evaluating the penetration of a 785 nm laser through milk powder. Horizontal and vertical spatial resoluti...

  12. Gluing for Raman lidar systems using the lamp mapping technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Monique; Venable, Demetrius; Whiteman, David N

    2014-12-20

    In the context of combined analog and photon counting (PC) data acquisition in a Lidar system, glue coefficients are defined as constants used for converting an analog signal into a virtual PC signal. The coefficients are typically calculated using Lidar profile data taken under clear, nighttime conditions since, in the presence of clouds or high solar background, it is difficult to obtain accurate glue coefficients from Lidar backscattered data. Here we introduce a new method in which we use the lamp mapping technique (LMT) to determine glue coefficients in a manner that does not require atmospheric profiles to be acquired and permits accurate glue coefficients to be calculated when adequate Lidar profile data are not available. The LMT involves scanning a halogen lamp over the aperture of a Lidar receiver telescope such that the optical efficiency of the entire detection system is characterized. The studies shown here involve two Raman lidar systems; the first from Howard University and the second from NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. The glue coefficients determined using the LMT and the Lidar backscattered method agreed within 1.2% for the water vapor channel and within 2.5% for the nitrogen channel for both Lidar systems. We believe this to be the first instance of the use of laboratory techniques for determining the glue coefficients for Lidar data analysis.

  13. Development and Application of Raman Microspectroscopic and Raman Imaging Techniques for Cell Biological Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PUPPELS, G J; SCHUT, T C B; SIJTSEMA, N M; GROND, M; MARABOEUF, F; DEGRAUW, C G; FIGDOR, C G; GREVE, J

    1995-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is being used to study biological molecules for some three decades now. Thanks to continuing advances in instrumentation more and more applications have become feasible in which molecules are studied in situ, and this has enabled Raman spectroscopy to enter the realms of

  14. Results obtained with the Tropospheric Ozone DIAL System Using a YAG Laser and Raman Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.

    2012-12-01

    This poster will detail the findings of the ground based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system built and operated at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (Beltsville, MD 38.99° N, 76.84° W) in 2012. Current atmospheric satellites cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, NASA has funded the ground based Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNET) which currently consists of five stations across the US. The Goddard instrument is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, and has initially transmitted two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm, and the DIAL technique exploits this difference between the two returned signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman Cells, filled with high pressure Hydrogen and Deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering within the focus shifts the pump wavelength, and the first Stokes shift in each cell produces the required wavelengths. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the vertical number density can then be derived. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make long term ozone profile measurements in the Washington, DC - Baltimore area.

  15. Single Brillouin frequency shifted S-band multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber laser utilizing fiber Bragg grating and Raman amplifier in ring cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshak, A. H.; Hambali, N. A. M. Ahmad; Shahimin, M. M.; Wahid, M. H. A.; Anwar, Nur Elina; Alahmed, Zeyad A.; Chyský, J.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is focusing on simulation and analyzing of S-band multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber laser performance utilizing fiber Bragg grating and Raman amplifier in ring cavity. Raman amplifier-average power model is employed for signal amplification. This laser system is operates in S-band wavelength region due to vast demanding on transmitting the information. Multi-wavelength fiber lasers based on hybrid Brillouin-Raman gain configuration supported by Raman scattering effect have attracted significant research interest due to its ability to produced multi-wavelength signals from a single light source. In multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber, single mode fiber is utilized as the nonlinear gain medium. From output results, 90% output coupling ratio has ability to provide the maximum average output power of 43 dBm at Brillouin pump power of 20 dBm and Raman pump power of 14 dBm. Furthermore, multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber laser utilizing fiber Bragg grating and Raman amplifier is capable of generated 7 Brillouin Stokes signals at 1480 nm, 1510 nm and 1530 nm.

  16. QUANTITATIVE DETECTION OF ENVIRONMENTALLY IMPORTANT DYES USING DIODE LASER/FIBER-OPTIC RAMAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compact diode laser/fiber-optic Raman spectrometer is used for quantitative detection of environmentally important dyes. This system is based on diode laser excitation at 782 mm, fiber optic probe technology, an imaging spectrometer, and state-of-the-art scientific CCD camera. ...

  17. Blue Up-Conversion Fibre Laser Pumped by a 1120-nm Raman Fibre Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Guan-Shi; HUANG Sheng-Hong; FENG Yan; SHIRAKAWA A.; MUSHA M.; UEDA Ken-ichi

    2005-01-01

    @@ A Tm3+-doped ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN) fibre up-conversion laser pumped by a 1120-nm Raman fibre laser is demonstrated with blue output power levels up to 116mW. For the output mirror with 80% reflectivity, the slope efficiency is about 15%, the optical-to-optical conversion efficiency is 11%, and the maximum un-saturated output power is 116mW. For 60% reflectivity, the slope efficiency is about 18% and the opticalto-optical conversion efficiency is 12%, whilst the maximum saturated output power is about 80mW due to the existence of photo-degradation effect in Tm3+ doped ZBLAN glass fibre.

  18. Knife-edge technique for laser cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhanshan; MA Shanshan; MA Yan; ZHAO Min; LIU Hengbiao

    2007-01-01

    The transfer characteristics of an atomic beam and the effect of laser were investigated in this paper. In the application of knife-edge technique, the temperature of atoms through laser cooling was measured. Results indicate that,after atoms are emitted from an atomic oven, the longer the atoms move, the worse the distribution of the atomic beam shows, regardless the laser cooling is taken or not. Laser cooling can reduce the transverse velocity of the atomic beam to several orders of magnitude and also increase the uniformity of an atomic beam. Knife-edge technique can measure the temperature of an atomic beam through laser cooling. The measurement accuracy depends on the pixel size of the charge coupled device (CCD), which is used for the fluorescent imaging of the atomic beam. The results are very important for the future experiments of laser cooling.

  19. Electron Raman scattering in a double quantum well tuned by an external nonresonant intense laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiutiunnyk, A.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Morales, A. L.; Duque, C. M.; Restrepo, R. L.; Ungan, F.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Kasapoglu, E.; Duque, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we shall present a study of inelastic light scattering involving inter-subband electron transitions in coupled GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum wells. Calculations include the electron related Raman differential cross section and Raman gain. The effects of an external nonresonant intense laser field are used in order to tune these output properties. The confined electron states will be described by means of a diagonalization procedure within the effective mass and parabolic band approximations. It is shown that the application of the intense laser field can produce values of the intersubband electron Raman gain above 400 cm-1. The system proposed here is an alternative choice for the development of AlxGa1-xAs semiconductor laser diodes that can be tuned via an external nonresonant intense laser field.

  20. Laser Raman spectrometric determination of oxy-anions in nuclear waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A.G.

    1977-03-01

    Oxy-anions in complex nuclear process-waste materials are being determined by laser Raman spectrometry (LRS). The double internal-standard technique developed by Marston is applied to the simultaneous determination of up to x anions in alkaline solutions. The method of Marston has been extended to solutions prepared from the solids formed in nuclear waste storage tanks. As many as six anions, aluminate, chromate, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, and sulfate, are simultaneously determined in about one hour. Carbonate may also be determined, but in the presence of the prevalent nitrate, a chemical separation is required. Individual methods have been relegated to a secondary status due to the many advantages of LRS. Advantages such as small sample size, speed of analysis, accuracy, and specificity will be discussed. The typical precision obtained for analyses in high concentration is around five percent relative standard deviation.

  1. Laser beam shaping theory and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Dickey, Fred M

    2000-01-01

    The mathematical and physical theory of lossless beam shaping; Gaussian beam shaping - diffraction theory and design; geometrical methods; optimization-based techniques for laser shaping optics; beam shaping with diffractive diffusers; multi-aperture beam integration systems; classical (non-laser) methods; current technology of beam profile measurements.

  2. Identification of minerals and meteoritic materials via Raman techniques after capture in hypervelocity impacts on aerogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, M J; Mann, J; Creighton, J A; Kearsley, A; Graham, G A; Esposito, A P; Franchi, I A; Westphal, A J; Snead, C

    2004-10-04

    For this study, an extensive suite of mineral particles analogous to components of cosmic dust were tested to determine if their Raman signatures can be recognized after hypervelocity capture in aerogel. The mineral particles were mainly of greater than 20 micrometers in size and were accelerated onto the silica aerogel by light gas gun shots. It was found that all the individual minerals captured in aerogel could be subsequently identified using Raman (or fluorescent) spectra. The beam spot size used for the laser illumination was of the order of 5 micrometers, and in some cases the captured particles were of a similar small size. In some samples fired into aerogel there was observed a shift in the wavenumbers of some of the Raman bands, a result of the trapped particles being at quite high temperatures due to heating by the laser. Temperatures of samples under laser illumination were estimated from the relative intensities of Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman bands, or, in the case of ruby particles, from the wavenumber of fluorescence bands excited by the laser. It was found that the temperature of particles in aerogel varied greatly, dependent upon laser power and the nature of the particle. In the worst case, some particles were shown to have temperatures in the 500-700 C range at a laser power of about 3 mW at the sample. However most of the mineral particles examined at this laser power had temperatures below 200 C. This is sufficiently low a temperature not to damage most materials expected to be found captured in aerogel in space. In addition, selected meteorite samples were examined to obtain Raman signatures of their constituent minerals and were then shot into aerogel. It was possible to find several Raman signatures after capture in aerogel and obtain a Raman map of a whole grain in situ in the aerogel. Finally, a Raman analysis was carried out of a particle captured in aerogel in space and carbonaceous material identified. In general therefore it is

  3. Development of laser materials processing and laser metrology techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Chung, Chin Man; Kim, Jeong Mook; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Kwang Suk; Baik, Sung Hoon; Kim, Seong Ouk; Park, Seung Kyu

    1997-09-01

    The applications of remote laser materials processing and metrology have been investigated in nuclear industry from the beginning of laser invention because they can reduce the risks of workers in the hostile environment by remote operation. The objective of this project is the development of laser material processing and metrology techniques for repairing and inspection to improve the safety of nuclear power plants. As to repairing, we developed our own laser sleeve welding head and innovative optical laser weld monitoring techniques to control the sleeve welding process. Furthermore, we designedand fabricated a 800 W Nd:YAG and a 150 W Excimer laser systems for high power laser materials processing in nuclear industry such as cladding and decontamination. As to inspection, we developed an ESPI and a laser triangulation 3-D profile measurement system for defect detection which can complement ECT and UT inspections. We also developed a scanning laser vibrometer for remote vibration measurement of large structures and tested its performance. (author). 58 refs., 16 tabs., 137 figs.

  4. Laser techniques in conservation in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimbeni, Renzo

    2005-06-01

    The state of the art of laser techniques employed in conservation of cultural heritage is continuously growing in Europe. Many research projects organised at the European level have contributed to this achievement, being complementary to the development carried out at national level. The COST Action G7 is playing its unique role since the year 2000 in promoting the experimentation, comparing the experiences and disseminating best practices. This role has been particularly effective for monitoring of the results of many short-term research projects completed along the G7 Action lifetime. After that several laser cleaning techniques have been followed and evaluated it appears now clear an evolution of the systems, a specialization of the cleaning task, the achievement of side-effect free procedures. The validation of these advanced cleaning techniques has been extensive and diffused in many European countries, especially for stone and metals. Laser-based diagnostics have also specialised their tasks toward material analysis, defects detection and multidimensional documentation. Laser and optical methods successfully monitor deterioration effects. In many European countries interdisciplinary networks are managing the experimentation of these techniques giving them a sound scientific approach, but also a technology transfer to end-users. So doing the appreciation for these techniques is growing in all the conservation institutions involved at national level, disseminating a positive evaluation about the benefits provided by laser techniques in conservation. Several laser systems became products for the activity of professional restorers and their increasing sales demonstrate a growing utilisation throughout all Europe.

  5. Preparations for the Launch of the EXOMARS Raman Laser Spectrometer — A Review of Recent Studies Which Highlight the Astrobiological and Geological Capabilities of Portable Raman Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, I. B.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Ingley, R.; Harris, L.; McHugh, M.; Malherbe, C.; Jehlicka, J.; Marshall, C.; Parnell, J.

    2014-06-01

    A review of experiments performed on natural and analogue samples with prototype/portable instrumentation in preparation for the launch of the Raman Laser Spectrometer instrument on the ExoMars rover.

  6. Spectroscopic ellipsometric and Raman spectroscopic investigations of pulsed laser treated glassy carbon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csontos, J., E-mail: jcsontos@titan.physx.u-szeged.hu [University of Szeged, Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Pápa, Z.; Gárdián, A. [University of Szeged, Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Füle, M. [University of Szeged, Department of Experimental Physics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Budai, J. [University of Szeged, Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Toth, Z. [University of Szeged, Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); University of Szeged, Department of Oral Biology and Experimental Dental Research, Tisza Lajos krt. 64, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Laser treatment modifies the top layer of glassy carbon as shown by ellipsometry. • Raman signal is composed from signals of the layer and the glassy carbon substrate. • Using volumetric fluence allows to compare the effects of different lasers. • Melting effects of glassy carbon was observed in case of Nd:YAG laser treatment. - Abstract: In this study spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and Raman spectroscopy are applied to study structural modification of glassy carbon, due to high intensity laser ablation. Two KrF lasers with different pulse durations (480 fs and 18 ns), an ArF (20 ns), and a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (8 ns) were applied to irradiate the surface of glassy carbon targets. The main characteristics of the different laser treatments are compared by introducing the volumetric fluence which takes into account the different absorption values at different wavelengths. SE showed the appearance of a modified layer on the ablated surfaces. In the case of the ns lasers the thickness of this layer was in the range of 10–60 nm, while in the case of fs laser it was less than 20 nm. In all cases the average refractive index (n) of the modified layers slightly decreased compared to the refractive index of glassy carbon. Increase in extinction coefficient (k) was observed in the cases of ArF and fs KrF laser treatment, while the k values decreased significantly in the cases of nanosecond pulse duration KrF and Nd:YAG laser treatments. In the Raman spectra of the ablated areas the characteristic D and G peaks were widened due to appearance of an amorphous phase. Both Raman spectroscopy and SE indicate that the irradiated areas show carbon nanoparticle formation in all cases.

  7. Polarized multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using a picosecond laser and a fiber supercontinuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Sébastien; Courjaud, Antoine; Mottay, Eric; Finot, Christophe; Dudley, John; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-02-01

    We perform multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) micro-spectroscopy with a picosecond pulsed laser and a broadband supercontinuum (SC) generated in photonic crystal fiber. CARS signal stability is achieved using an active fiber coupler that avoids thermal and mechanical drifts. We obtain multiplex CARS spectra for test liquids in the 600-2000 cm(-1) spectral range. In addition we investigate the polarization dependence of the CARS spectra when rotating the pump beam linear polarization state relative to the linearly polarized broad stokes SC. From these polarization measurements we deduce the Raman depolarization ratio, the resonant versus nonresonant contribution, the Raman resonance frequency, and the linewidth.

  8. Advanced Laser-Based Techniques for Gas-Phase Diagnostics in Combustion and Aerospace Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehn, Andreas; Zhu, Jiajian; Li, Xuesong; Kiefer, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Gaining information of species, temperature, and velocity distributions in turbulent combustion and high-speed reactive flows is challenging, particularly for conducting measurements without influencing the experimental object itself. The use of optical and spectroscopic techniques, and in particular laser-based diagnostics, has shown outstanding abilities for performing non-intrusive in situ diagnostics. The development of instrumentation, such as robust lasers with high pulse energy, ultra-short pulse duration, and high repetition rate along with digitized cameras exhibiting high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and frame rates on the order of MHz, has opened up for temporally and spatially resolved volumetric measurements of extreme dynamics and complexities. The aim of this article is to present selected important laser-based techniques for gas-phase diagnostics focusing on their applications in combustion and aerospace engineering. Applicable laser-based techniques for investigations of turbulent flows and combustion such as planar laser-induced fluorescence, Raman and Rayleigh scattering, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, laser-induced grating scattering, particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler anemometry, and tomographic imaging are reviewed and described with some background physics. In addition, demands on instrumentation are further discussed to give insight in the possibilities that are offered by laser flow diagnostics.

  9. Detection Techniques of Femtosecond Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Li-peng; ZHOU Ming; DAI Qi-xun; CAI Lan

    2004-01-01

    The measurement techniques of femtosecond spectroscopy are effective method to investigate ultrafast dynamics, they are widely used in the fields of physics, chemistry and biology. In this paper, the principle, experiment setup and the approaches to deal with the experiment data were presented. Then different measurement techniques such as transient absorption spectroscopy, photon echoes, optical Kerr effect and degenerate four-wave mixing were explained with special examples. At last, the application prospect of measurement techniques of femtosecond spectroscopy was forecasted.

  10. Investigation of SOI Raman Lasers for Mid-Infrared Gas Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Vittorio M.N.; De Leonardis, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the investigation and detailed modeling of a cascaded Raman laser, operating in the midwave infrared region, is described. The device is based on silicon-on-insulator optical waveguides and a coupled resonant microcavity. Theoretical results are compared with recent experiments, demonstrating a very good agreement. Design criteria are derived for cascaded Raman lasers working as continuous wave light sources to simultaneously sense two types of gases, namely C2H6 and CO2, at a moderate power level of 130 mW. PMID:22408481

  11. Stimulated Raman scattering of light absorbing media excited by ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchevskiy, F. N.; Strizhevskiy, V. L.; Feshchenko, V. P.

    1985-01-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theory of spontaneous and stimulated vibration Raman scattering is worked out taking into account the dissipation losses at frequencies of laser pump and scattering radiation. General expressions are found, which describe the absolute intensities and shape, energy and duration of scattered pulses in terms of the parameters of the medium and the the input laser pulses. The general regularities are analyzed in detail. Conditions are found for the realization of spontaneous or stimulated Raman scattering and its dependence on absorption, pulse duration and other parameters of the problem.

  12. New techniques in antibiotic discovery and resistance: Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Paul R; Heidari-Torkabadi, Hossein

    2015-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy can play a role in both antibiotic discovery and understanding the molecular basis of resistance. A major challenge in drug development is to measure the population of the drug molecules inside a cell line and to follow the chemistry of their reactions with intracellular targets. Recently, a protocol based on Raman microscopy has been developed that achieves these goals. Drug candidates are soaked into live bacterial cells and subsequently the cells are frozen and freeze-dried. The samples yield exemplary (nonresonance) Raman data that provide a measure of the number of drug molecules within each cell, as well as details of drug-target interactions. Results are discussed for two classes of compounds inhibiting either β-lactamase or dihydrofolate reductase enzymes in a number of Gram-positive or Gram-negative cell lines. The advantages of the present protocol are that it does not use labels and it can measure the kinetics of cell-compound uptake on the time scale of minutes. Spectroscopic interpretation is supported by in vitro Raman experiments. Studying drug-target interactions in aqueous solution and in single crystals can provide molecular level insights into drug-target interactions, which, in turn, provide the underpinnings of our understanding of data from bacterial cells. Thus, the applicability of X-ray crystallographic-derived data to in-cell chemistry can be tested. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. Development and deployment of a precision underwater positioning system for in situ laser Raman spectroscopy in the deep ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sheri N.; Kirkwood, William; Sherman, Alana; Brown, Mark; Henthorn, Richard; Salamy, Karen; Walz, Peter; Peltzer, Edward T.; Brewer, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    The field of ocean geochemistry has recently been expanded to include in situ laser Raman spectroscopic measurements in the deep ocean. While this technique has proved to be successful for transparent targets, such as fluids and gases, difficulty exists in using deep submergence vehicle manipulators to position and control the very small laser spot with respect to opaque samples of interest, such as many rocks, minerals, bacterial mats, and seafloor gas hydrates. We have developed, tested, and successfully deployed by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) a precision underwater positioner (PUP) which provides the stability and precision movement required to perform spectroscopic measurements using the Deep Ocean Raman In situ Spectrometer (DORISS) instrument on opaque targets in the deep ocean for geochemical research. The positioner is also adaptable to other sensors, such as electrodes, which require precise control and positioning on the seafloor. PUP is capable of translating the DORISS optical head with a precision of 0.1 mm in three dimensions over a range of at least 15 cm, at depths up to 4000 m, and under the normal range of oceanic conditions (T, P, current velocity). The positioner is controlled, and spectra are obtained, in real time via Ethernet by scientists aboard the surface vessel. This capability has allowed us to acquire high quality Raman spectra of targets such as rocks, shells, and gas hydrates on the seafloor, including the ability to scan the laser spot across a rock surface in sub-millimeter increments to identify the constituent mineral grains. These developments have greatly enhanced the ability to obtain in situ Raman spectra on the seafloor from an enormous range of specimens.

  14. Tailored surface-enhanced Raman nanopillar arrays fabricated by laser-assisted replication for biomolecular detection using organic semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Lebedkin, Sergei; Besser, Heino; Pfleging, Wilhelm; Prinz, Stephan; Wissmann, Markus; Schwab, Patrick M; Nazarenko, Irina; Guttmann, Markus; Kappes, Manfred M; Lemmer, Uli

    2015-01-27

    Organic semiconductor distributed feedback (DFB) lasers are of interest as external or chip-integrated excitation sources in the visible spectral range for miniaturized Raman-on-chip biomolecular detection systems. However, the inherently limited excitation power of such lasers as well as oftentimes low analyte concentrations requires efficient Raman detection schemes. We present an approach using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates, which has the potential to significantly improve the sensitivity of on-chip Raman detection systems. Instead of lithographically fabricated Au/Ag-coated periodic nanostructures on Si/SiO2 wafers, which can provide large SERS enhancements but are expensive and time-consuming to fabricate, we use low-cost and large-area SERS substrates made via laser-assisted nanoreplication. These substrates comprise gold-coated cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) nanopillar arrays, which show an estimated SERS enhancement factor of up to ∼ 10(7). The effect of the nanopillar diameter (60-260 nm) and interpillar spacing (10-190 nm) on the local electromagnetic field enhancement is studied by finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) modeling. The favorable SERS detection capability of this setup is verified by using rhodamine 6G and adenosine as analytes and an organic semiconductor DFB laser with an emission wavelength of 631.4 nm as the external fiber-coupled excitation source.

  15. PLIF thermometry in shock tunnel flows using a Raman-shifted tunable excimer laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, P. C.; McIntyre, T. J.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence is performed in a free-piston shock tunnel by using a Raman-shifted tunable excimer laser to excite nitric oxide molecules in the flow. Two different flowfields are examined to test the difficulties associated with applying the technique to shock tunnels: the bluff body flow produced by a 25 mm diameter cylinder; and the oblique shock and expansion fan produced by a 35° half-angle wedge. For the cylinder, the maximum flow enthalpy was limited to 4.1 MJ kg -1 due to high flow luminosity which is produced by metallic contaminants in the flow. A reflective filter is used to reduce the influence of flow luminosity making these measurements feasible. Freestream temperature measurements are in excellent agreement with those predicted from numerical flow calculations. Large uncertainties were observed for the high-temperature post-shock results. Several higher enthalpy shots (14 MJ kg -1) were also performed with the wedge and showed an insignificant amount of contaminant emission.

  16. [Analysis of astaxanthin in Phaffia rhodozyma using laser tweezers raman spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Sun, Mei-Juan; Liu, Jun-Xian; Deng, Yang-Ge; Mo, Yu-Xiang; Tao, Zhan-Hua

    2012-09-01

    In the present paper, a method was established based on laser tweezer Raman spectroscopy for rapid quantification of astaxanthin in Phaffia rhodozyma cells. First, the Raman spectra of astaxanthin standard solution with different concentrations were determined and the standard curve for astaxanthin with the peak intensity at 1 520 cm- was plotted; And then the Phaffia yeast cells cultivated in different nitrogen source and carbon source medium were divided into two parts, one for the detection of Raman spectra, and the other for the determination of ultraviolet visible spectrophotometry; Finally the relationship between the two methods was analyzed. The correlation coefficient of standard curve for astaxanthin is 0.998 3. Comparing laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy method with traditional ultraviolet visible spectrophotometry in analyzing the content of astaxanthin in unit mass Phaffia rhodozyma and the yield of astaxanthin in unit volume fermentation broth of Phaffia rhodozyma, the authors found that the data obtained have good linear relationship. And the correlation coefficients are 0.917 7 and 0.905 4, respectively. Therefore, both methods have almost the same effect of measuement. But laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy method is more efficient in the quantitative analysis of astaxanthin in Phaffia rhodozyma cells.

  17. Laminar-Turbulent Transition in Raman Fiber Lasers: A First Passage Statistics Based Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, Amit K; Sugavanam, Srikanth; Tarasov, Nikita; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Loss of coherence with increasing excitation amplitudes and spatial size modulation is a fundamental problem in designing Raman fiber lasers. While it is known that ramping up laser pump power increases the amplitude of stochastic excitations, such higher energy inputs can also lead to a transition from a linearly stable coherent laminar regime to a non-desirable disordered turbulent state. This report presents a new statistical methodology, based on first passage statistics, that classifies lasing regimes in Raman fiber lasers, thereby leading to a fast and highly accurate identification of a strong instability leading to a laminar-turbulent phase transition through a self-consistently defined order parameter. The results have been consistent across a wide range of pump power values, heralding a breakthrough in the non-invasive analysis of fiber laser dynamics.

  18. Recent Advances in Deep-Sea in situ Geochemical Measurements by ROV Deployed Laser Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Henthorn, R.; Hester, K. C.; Kirkwood, W. J.; Rosal, J.; Salamy, K. A.; Scholfield, J.; Shane, F. F.; Sherman, A. D.; Walz, P. M.; Brewer, P. G.

    2007-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a valuable analytical technique for making in situ geochemical measurements. It is applicable to liquids, solids and gases; requires little or no sample preparation; and is rapid with typical analysis times of several minutes or less. These features combine to make it an ideal technique for deployment and use on remotely operated vehicles in a variety of applications. We report results from our second generation laser Raman spectrometer (DORISS2), developed in conjunction with Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc., which is both lighter and more robust than the original design. Packaged within a single titanium pressure housing rated to 4000m, DORISS2 has a floating optical bench which minimizes misalignments and preserves instrument calibration both during and between dives. The pressure compensated fiber optic cables have improved signal strength from 8% to 88% at 1024 m greatly reducing the time required to acquire a sample spectrum and allowing the detection of lower concentrations of trace components. Development of the precision underwater positioner (PUP) has enabled the spectroscopic analysis of opaque targets where a focusing precision of +/- 0.1 mm is required. This has allowed us to investigate the composition of authigenic minerals (such as hydrothermal vent precipitates) and gas hydrates in their native and undisturbed condition, such as the massive outcrops on the seafloor at Barkley Canyon, or to inspect the fine-scale inhomogeneities that occur in seafloor synthesis experiments conducted in Monterey Bay. The recent development of a single axis positioner (SAP) has allowed us to use DORISS2 when payload weight is an issue, in places where the seafloor is too steep to safely deploy PUP, or where operational conditions (such as an overhanging ledge) are too restrictive and where PUP does not fit. The SAP adds a new degree of flexibility we have not previously had and has even permitted the analysis of scale carotenoids in a live rock fish

  19. Advancing the experimental design for simultaneous acquisition of laser induced plasma and Raman signals using a single pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Jin; Choi, Jae-Jun; Yoh, Jack J.

    2016-09-01

    Simultaneous acquisition was performed of combined signals that show highly resolved and identifiable peaks of both LIBS and Raman signals. A LIBS-Raman combination using a single light source is a daunting task, because the energy required for Raman shift is relatively low, compared to the energy required for laser ablation. Here, we utilize an expanded-focused beam that allows simultaneous detection of the signals of laser induced plasma and Raman shift. A beam expander obtains the Raman signal with minimized interference from the plasma, and a focusing lens of small diameter generates strong laser induced plasma for LIBS. The position of the focusing lens can be adjusted to control the area of Raman scattering to ensure a strong Raman signal. In the proposed design, the key to minimized interference is to generate the Raman scattering apart from the plasma, which allows for sufficiently long gate width and wide area for Raman detection. Furthermore, axial relocation of the end of the optical fiber can easily optimize the Raman, LIBS, or combined Raman-LIBS signal.

  20. Effect of Laser-Induced Heating on Raman Measurement within a Silicon Microfluidic Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Lin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When Raman microscopy is adopted to detect the chemical and biological processes in the silicon microfluidic channel, the laser-induced heating effect will cause a temperature rise in the sample liquid. This undesired temperature rise will mislead the Raman measurement during the temperature-influencing processes. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics simulations were conducted to evaluate the maximum local temperature-rise (MLT. Through the orthogonal analysis, the sensitivity of potential influencing parameters to the MLT was determined. In addition, it was found from transient simulations that it is reasonable to assume the actual measurement to be steady-state. Simulation results were qualitatively validated by experimental data from the Raman measurement of diffusion, a temperature-dependent process. A correlation was proposed for the first time to estimate the MLT. Simple in form and convenient for calculation, this correlation can be efficiently applied to Raman measurement in a silicon microfluidic channel.

  1. Two-Photon Raman Gain in a Laser Driven Potassium Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Stokes wave. With powerful laser beams, Raman scattering involving multiple pump and probe photons can appear, producing light at the subharmonics of the...laser fre- quency drifts. High-speed cavity length variations are corrected using a piezo - electrically driven mirror, while a rotating Brewsters...emergence of resonances at subharmonics of the ground-state splitting. I attribute these intensity dependent spectral features 8Recall that working with small

  2. Operating Regime for a Backward Raman Laser Amplifier in Preformed Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel S. Clark; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2003-02-06

    A critical issue in the generation of ultra-intense, ultra-short laser pulses by backward Raman scattering in plasma is the stability of the pumping pulse to premature backscatter from thermal fluctuations in the preformed plasma. Malkin et al. [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (6):1208-1211, 2000] demonstrated that density gradients may be used to detune the Raman resonance in such a way that backscatter of the pump from thermal noise can be stabilized while useful Raman amplification persists. Here plasma conditions for which the pump is stable to thermal Raman backscatter in a homogeneous plasma and the density gradients necessary to stabilize the pump for other plasma conditions are quantified. Other ancillary constraints on a Raman amplifier are also considered to determine a specific region in the Te-he plane where Raman amplification is feasible. By determining an operability region, the degree of uncertainty in density or temperature tolerable for an experimental Raman amplifier is thus also identified. The fluid code F3D, which includes the effects of thermal fluctuations, is used to verify these analytic estimates.

  3. Raman Laser Spectrometer internal Optical Head current status: opto-mechanical redesign to minimize the excitation laser trace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Miguel; Ramos, Gonzalo; Moral, Andoni; Pérez, Carlos; Belenguer, Tomás; del Rosario Canchal, María; Zuluaga, Pablo; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Santiago, Amaia; Rull, Fernando; Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA), Universidad de Valladolid (UVa), Ingeniería de Sistemas para la Defesa de España S.A. (ISDEFE)

    2016-10-01

    Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) is the Pasteur Payload instruments of the ExoMars mission, within the ESA's Aurora Exploration Programme, that will perform for the first time in an out planetary mission Raman spectroscopy. RLS is composed by SPU (Spectrometer Unit), iOH (Internal Optical Head), and ICEU (Instrument Control and Excitation Unit). iOH focuses the excitation laser on the samples (excitation path), and collects the Raman emission from the sample (collection path, composed on collimation system and filtering system). The original design presented a high laser trace reaching to the detector, and although a certain level of laser trace was required for calibration purposes, the high level degrades the Signal to Noise Ratio confounding some Raman peaks.The investigation revealing that the laser trace was not properly filtered as well as the iOH opto-mechanical redesign are reported on. After the study of the Long Pass Filters Optical Density (OD) as a function of the filtering stage to the detector distance, a new set of filters (Notch filters) was decided to be evaluated. Finally, and in order to minimize the laser trace, a new collection path design (mainly consisting on that the collimation and filtering stages are now separated in two barrels, and on the kind of filters to be used) was required. Distance between filters and collimation stage first lens was increased, increasing the OD. With this new design and using two Notch filters, the laser trace was reduced to assumable values, as can be observed in the functional test comparison also reported on this paper.

  4. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS Studies of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles Prepared by Laser Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel P. Hernandez-Rivera

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gold and silver nanoparticles (NPs were prepared in water, acetonitrile and isopropanol by laser ablation methodologies. The average characteristic (longer size of the NPs obtained ranged from 3 to 70 nm. 4-Aminobenzebethiol (4-ABT was chosen as the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS probe molecule to determine the optimum irradiation time and the pH of aqueous synthesis of the laser ablation-based synthesis of metallic NPs. The synthesized NPs were used to evaluate their capacity as substrates for developing more analytical applications based on SERS measurements. A highly energetic material, TNT, was used as the target compound in the SERS experiments. The Raman spectra were measured with a Raman microspectrometer. The results demonstrate that gold and silver NP substrates fabricated by the methods developed show promising results for SERS-based studies and could lead to the development of micro sensors.

  5. Combined raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrometer: space and non-space applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandtke, M.; Laan, E.C.; Ahlers, B.

    2010-01-01

    TNO has developed the combination of two spectroscopic analysis methods in one instrument. Raman spectroscopy and Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) were brought together for an instrument to be flown on the ExoMars mission from the European Space Agency (ESA) to investigate the Martian (su

  6. Combined raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrometer: space and non-space applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandtke, M.; Laan, E.C.; Ahlers, B.

    2010-01-01

    TNO has developed the combination of two spectroscopic analysis methods in one instrument. Raman spectroscopy and Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) were brought together for an instrument to be flown on the ExoMars mission from the European Space Agency (ESA) to investigate the Martian

  7. Laser versus dissection technique of tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishlah, L Wan; Fahmi, A M; Srinovianti, N

    2005-03-01

    Tonsillectomy is the single most common operation performed in Ear Nose and Throat Department. Various methods of tonsillectomy have been practiced over the century aimed at reducing or eliminating intraoperative and postoperative morbidity. Due to various blood supplies received, intraoperative bleeding is the most difficult problem and securing it is time-consuming. The time taken to control the bleeding would invariably determine the length of operation. Common postoperative complications are bleeding and pain. This study evaluated the operative time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative pain and other postoperative complications of tonsillectomy performed by laser as compared to conventional dissection technique. This is a prospective randomized study whereby sixty patients were divided into two groups of equal number. In one group, the tonsillectomy performed by laser and in the other group the tonsillectomy performed by conventional dissection technique. Operative time and amount of blood loss is significantly reduced in the laser group. Total postoperative pain and post operative complications were not significantly different between the two groups. Tonsillectomy by using laser have shown less intraoperative bleeding and shortened the operative time. In the hospital where laser machine and expertise are available, it is justifiable to use this technique as effective method of performing tonsillectomy.

  8. Hybrid micro/nano-structure formation by angular laser texturing of Si surface for surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaichen; Zhang, Chentao; Zhou, Rui; Ji, Rong; Hong, Minghui

    2016-05-16

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has drawn much research interest in the past decades as an efficient technique to detect low-concentration molecules. Among many technologies, which can be used to fabricate SERS substrates, laser ablation is a simple and high-speed method to produce large-area SERS substrates. This work investigates the angular texturing effect by dynamic laser ablation and its influence on SERS signals. By tuning the angle between the Si surface and laser irradiation, the distributions and sizes of laser induced hybrid micro/nano-structures are studied. By decorating with a silver film, plenty of hot spots can be created among these structures for SERS. It is found that when the incident laser angle is 15° at the laser fluence of 16.0 J/cm2, the SERS performance is well optimized. This work realizes antisymmetric distribution of nanoparticles deposited on Si surface, which provides a flexible tuning of the hybrid micro/nano-structures' fabrication with high controllability for practical applications.

  9. Relaxation oscillations, stability, and cavity feedback in a superradiant Raman laser

    CERN Document Server

    Bohnet, Justin G; Weiner, Joshua M; Cox, Kevin C; Thompson, James K

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally study the relaxation oscillations and amplitude stability properties of an optical laser operating deep into the bad-cavity regime using a laser-cooled $^{87}$Rb Raman laser. By combining measurements of the laser light field with non-demolition measurements of the atomic populations, we infer the response of the the gain medium represented by a collective atomic Bloch vector. The results are qualitatively explained with a simple model. Measurements and theory are extended to include the effect of intermediate repumping states on the closed-loop stability of the oscillator and the role of cavity-feedback on stabilizing or enhancing relaxation oscillations. This experimental study of the stability of an optical laser operating deep into the bad-cavity regime will guide future development of superradiant lasers with ultranarrow linewidths.

  10. Relaxation oscillations, stability, and cavity feedback in a superradiant Raman laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnet, Justin G; Chen, Zilong; Weiner, Joshua M; Cox, Kevin C; Thompson, James K

    2012-12-21

    We experimentally study the relaxation oscillations and amplitude stability properties of an optical laser operating deep into the bad-cavity regime using a laser-cooled ^{87}Rb Raman laser. By combining measurements of the laser light field with nondemolition measurements of the atomic populations, we infer the response of the gain medium represented by a collective atomic Bloch vector. The results are qualitatively explained with a simple model. Measurements and theory are extended to include the effect of intermediate repumping states on the closed-loop stability of the oscillator and the role of cavity feedback on stabilizing or enhancing relaxation oscillations. This experimental study of the stability of an optical laser operating deep into the bad-cavity regime will guide future development of superradiant lasers with ultranarrow linewidths.

  11. A quasi-continuous superradiant Raman laser with < 1 intracavity photon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohnet Justin G.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state collective emission from ensembles of laser cooled atoms has been proposed as a method for generating sub-millihertz linewidth optical lasers, with potential for broad impacts across science and technology. We have built a model system that tests key predictions for such active oscillators using a Raman laser with laser cooled atoms as the gain medium. The laser operates deep in the bad-cavity, or superradiant, regime of laser physics, where the cavity decay rate is much greater than the atomic coherence decay rate. Specifically, we demonstrate that a system of 106 87Rb atoms trapped in a 1D standing wave optical lattice can spontaneously synchronize and collectively emit a quasi-continuous coherent optical output, even when the intracavity field contains on average < 1 photon.

  12. Solid State Raman Materials Characterization for High Average Power 1.3 micrometer Laser Frequency Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    reflectivity at 1067 rim wavelength. Solid state phototrop filter based on gallium -scandium- gadolinium garnet doped with chromium was used as a passive Q-switch... gadolinium tungstate, KGd(W0 4)2 exhibited efficient Raman properties . In spite of the fact that its Raman gain coefficient at 1064 nm (6 cm/GW) is twice less...studied by high- temperature Raman scattering (HTRS) technique. According to [1], the lattice cell of KGd(W04) 2 low - temperature modification is a base

  13. Parametric Raman anti-Stokes laser at 503 nm with phase-matched collinear beam interaction of orthogonally polarized Raman components in calcite under 532 nm 20 ps laser pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetanin, Sergei; Jelínek, Michal; Kubeček, Václav

    2017-05-01

    Lasers based on stimulated-Raman-scattering process can be used for the frequency-conversion to the wavelengths that are not readily available from solid-state lasers. Parametric Raman lasers allow generation of not only Stokes, but also anti-Stokes components. However, practically all the known crystalline parametric Raman anti-Stokes lasers have very low conversion efficiencies of about 1 % at theoretically predicted values of up to 40 % because of relatively narrow angular tolerance of phase matching in comparison with angular divergence of the interacting beams. In our investigation, to widen the angular tolerance of four-wave mixing and to obtain high conversion efficiency into the antiStokes wave we propose and study a new scheme of the parametric Raman anti-Stokes laser at 503 nm with phasematched collinear beam interaction of orthogonally polarized Raman components in calcite under 532 nm 20 ps laser pumping. We use only one 532-nm laser source to pump the Raman-active calcite crystal oriented at the phase matched angle for orthogonally polarized Raman components four-wave mixing. Additionally, we split the 532-nm laser radiation into the orthogonally polarized components entering to the Raman-active calcite crystal at the certain incidence angles to fulfill the tangential phase matching compensating walk-off of extraordinary waves for collinear beam interaction in the crystal with the widest angular tolerance of four-wave mixing. For the first time the highest 503-nm anti-Stokes conversion efficiency of 30 % close to the theoretical limit of about 40 % at overall optical efficiency of the parametric Raman anti-Stokes generation of up to 3.5 % in calcite is obtained due to realization of tangential phase matching insensitive to the angular mismatch.

  14. Wideband multiwavelength output generation based on cascaded four-wave mixing in distributed Raman amplifier utilizing a Fabry-Pérot laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alimi, A. W.; Cholan, N. A.; Yaacob, M. H.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    Multiwavelength output generation based on cascaded four-wave mixing in a distributed Raman amplifier is demonstrated experimentally. The technique consists of launching a probe signal and Fabry-Pérot pump source in a co-propagating setup into a 2 km length of highly nonlinear fiber. In this configuration, the Fabry-Pérot laser diode plays two roles; as a Raman pump and as a source for multiple wavelengths generation. The output of multiple wavelengths with 27.8 GHz spacing centered around the probe signal is generated over 43 nm operation bandwidth. Besides, the bandwidth of the multiwavelength spectrum is also investigated at different wavelength ranges.

  15. 1.5-μm low threshold, high efficiency Erbium-Raman random fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.; Wang, Z. N.; Sun, W.; He, Q. H.; Rao, Y. J.

    2017-04-01

    We report a low threshold, high efficiency random fiber laser with hybrid Erbium-Raman gain. The numerical analysis is made to describe the power performance of the proposed Erbium-Raman random fiber laser and reveal the high efficiency generation in this simple configuration. Thanks to the hybrid gain, the experimentally achieved laser threshold has been reduced to 60 mW. The optical conversion efficiency is of record high in the 1.5 μm regime, reaching 61.5% when pump power is 2 W. This work provides an effective way to generate high efficiency stable 1.5 μm random lasing, which could have important applications in optical fiber sensing and communication.

  16. Compact and portable multiline UV and visible Raman lasers in hydrogen-filled HC-PCF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Y; Couny, F; Light, P S; Mangan, B J; Benabid, F

    2010-04-15

    We report on the realization of compact UV visible multiline Raman lasers based on two types of hydrogen-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The first, with a large pitch Kagome lattice structure, offers a broad spectral coverage from near IR through to the much sought after yellow, deep-blue and UV, whereas the other, based on photonic bandgap guidance, presents a pump conversion concentrated in the visible region. The high Raman efficiency achieved through these fibers allows for compact, portable diode-pumped solid-state lasers to be used as pumps. Each discrete component of this laser system exhibits a spectral density several orders of magnitude larger than what is achieved with supercontinuum sources and a narrow linewidth, making it an ideal candidate for forensics and biomedical applications.

  17. Generation of energetic, picosecond seed pulses for CO2 laser using Raman shifter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Eric; Tochitsky, Sergei; Joshi, Chan

    2017-03-01

    We present a new concept for generating 3 ps seed pulses for a high-power CO2 laser amplifier that are multiple orders more energetic than seed pulses generated by slicing from a nanosecond CO2 laser pulse. We propose to send a 1 µm picosecond laser through a C6D6 Raman shifter and mix both the pump and shifted components in a DFG crystal to produce pulses at 10.6 µm. Preliminary results of a proof-of-principle experiment are presented.

  18. Coherence of a squeezed sodium atom laser generated from Raman output coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiyong He; Chunjia Huang

    2009-01-01

    The coherence of a squeezed sodium atom laser generated from a Raman output coupler,in which the sodium atoms in Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) intcract with two light beams consisting of a weaker squeezed coherent probe light and a stronger classical coupling light,is investigated.The results show that in the case of a large mean number of BEC atoms and a weaker probe light field,the atom laser is antibunching,and this atom laser is second-order coherent if the number of BEC atoms in traps is large enough.

  19. Micro spatial analysis of seashell surface using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yuan; Li, Yuandong; Li, Ying [Optics and Optoelectronics Lab, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Wang, Yangfan; Wang, Shi; Bao, Zhenmin [Life Science College, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China); Zheng, Ronger, E-mail: rzheng@ouc.edu.cn [Optics and Optoelectronics Lab, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2015-08-01

    The seashell has been studied as a proxy for the marine researches since it is the biomineralization product recording the growth development and the ocean ecosystem evolution. In this work a hybrid of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy was introduced to the composition analysis of seashell (scallop, bivalve, Zhikong). Without any sample treatment, the compositional distribution of the shell was obtained using LIBS for the element detection and Raman for the molecule recognition respectively. The elements Ca, K, Li, Mg, Mn and Sr were recognized by LIBS; the molecule carotene and carbonate were identified with Raman. It was found that the LIBS detection result was more related to the shell growth than the detection result of Raman. The obtained result suggested the shell growth might be developing in both horizontal and vertical directions. It was indicated that the LIBS–Raman combination could be an alternative way for the shell researches. - Highlights: • A LIBS–Raman hybrid system was developed. • A seashell has been analyzed for the elementary and molecular distribution with a system. • The shell growth development was studied on the surface and in the depth.

  20. STUDY ON THE MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROPERTY OF PET FIBER BY LASER RAMAN MICROSCOPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Xiuli

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the microstructure change of one step-draw PET fiber has been studied by various methods, such as, Laser Raman Microscope, Wide-angle X-ray, Density-gradient and Polarizing Microscope. The computer has been used to resolve overlapped bands in the Raman spectra. Then the band changes have been correlated with trans, gauche and stressed transconformations indicated by a conformational index. Based on these indices, the relationship between the conformation change of glycol units in the fiber structure and the macromechanical properties of fiber is expounded.

  1. Application of Finite Difference Technique to Raman Lidar Signals to Derive the Altitude Profiles of Atmospheric Aerosol Extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PURUSOTHAM S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lidars (Laser radars are the best suitable instruments to derive the range resolved parameters of atmosphere. Single wavelength and simple backscatter lidars have been widely used to study the height profiles of particle scattering and extinction in the atmosphere. However, atmospheric extinction derived using these lidars data undergo several assumptions and hence involve a significant amount of error in estimation of extinction. The Raman lidar methodology of deriving particle extinction in the atmosphere is a simplified straight-forward method that does not involve any assumptions. The Raman lidar method of atmospheric extinction computation employs derivative of logarithm of normalized range corrected Raman backscattered signal. Usually this causes gaps in the height profiles wherever there is a gradient in the signal under examination. In the present study, a new method is proposed to derive the particle extinction in the atmospheric boundary layer. In this new method, a scheme of alternative solution methodology has been proposed using “Finite Difference Technique”. The method has an advantage that, it does not involve the gradient as compared to conventional technique and hence reduces the error. Using this method, the height profiles of particle extinction has been derived. A code in MATLAB is developed to derive the altitude distribution of aerosol extinction. In this connection, the NOAA-REDY site data has been used as the reference data for calculating the molecular extinction in the lower atmosphere.

  2. Onset of stimulated Raman scattering of a laser in a plasma in the presence of hot drifting electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D. N.; Yadav, Pinki; Jang, D. G.; Hur, M. S.; Suk, H.; Avinash, K.

    2015-05-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering of a laser in plasmas with energetic drifting electrons was investigated by analyzing the growth of interacting waves during the Raman scattering process. The Langmuir wave and scattered electromagnetic sideband wave grow initially and are dampened after attaining a maximum level that indicates a periodic exchange of energy between the pump wave and the daughter waves. The presence of energetic drifting electrons in the laser-produced plasma influences the stimulated Raman scattering process. The plasma wave generated by Raman scattering may be influenced by the energetic electrons, which enhance the growth rate of the instability. Our results show that the presence of energetic (hot) drifting electrons in a plasma has an important effect on the evolution of the interacting waves. This phenomenon is modeled via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the propagation and interaction of the laser under Raman instability.

  3. Investigations of a Dual Seeded 1178 nm Raman Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-14

    constructed using slab1-3 or fiber laser technology4-15. Slab technology generally involves sum-frequency mixing of 1064 and 1319 nm in a lithium...triborate crystal to obtain 589 nm. Another way of achieving the desired output wavelength of 589 nm for sodium guidestar laser applications is through...been obtained from an ytterbium-doped photonic band gap fiber laser with a 320 kHz linewidth13. Finally, 85 W of single frequency (1 MHz) 1178 nm was

  4. Laser Feedback Technique for Precise Retardation Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FEI Li-Gang; ZHANG Shu-Lian

    2006-01-01

    @@ A simple and precise retardation measurement based on laser feedback is demonstrated. The measurement principle is based on polarization flipping induced by optical feedback from an external birefringence cavity.The measured wave plate is located in the external cavity. When the length of the external cavity is tuned,the polarization states of laser will flip between two eigenstates, and the position of polarization flipping in one period of intensity modulation will vary with retardation of the wave plate. The duty ratio of two eigenstates is used to determine the retardation. Main advantages of the technique are that it is compact, low cost, fast and flexible. Especially, it is insensitive to a fluctuation of laser intensity and is suitable for on-line measurement. The experimental results have shown that the measurement uncertainty is better than 0.03° in the range 30°-150°.

  5. Raman and Luminescence Investigation of Rare Earth Doped Laser-Induced Crystals-in-Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Brian; Stone, Adam; Jain, Himanshu; Dierolf, Volkmar

    2015-03-01

    Laser induced crystallization of glasses is a highly spatially selective process which has the potential to produce compact, integrated optics within a glass matrix. In LaBGeO5 low temperature Combined Excitation Emission Spectroscopy (CEES) revealed that erbium incorporates into both glass-ceramics and laser-induced crystals-in-glass in predominantly one type of environment (site). The energy levels of this site were quantified. The fluorescence characteristics of the erbium ions in any site in the laser-induced crystals were found to be only weakly influenced by the irradiation conditions during growth. On the other hand, a hidden parameter, potentially boron deficiency-related defects, resulted in a significant change in the incorporation behavior of the erbium ions. Scanning confocal Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the energies of the Raman modes are shifted and the erbium fluorescence intensity is inhomgeneously distributed, despite the host glass being homogeneously doped, across the cross-sections of laser-induced crystals in glass. These fluctuations within the Raman and fluorescence are spatially correlated, implying that different erbium sites form preferentially at different locations in the crystal cross-section.

  6. Laser Raman spectroscopic analysis of polymorphic forms in microliter fluid volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anquetil, Patrick A; Brenan, Colin J H; Marcolli, Claudia; Hunter, Ian W

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge and control of the polymorphic phase of chemical compounds are important aspects of drug development in the pharmaceutical industry. We report herein in situ and real-time Raman spectroscopic polymorphic analysis of optically trapped microcrystals in a microliter volume format. The system studied in particular was the recrystallization of carbamazepine (CBZ) in methanol. Raman spectrometry enabled noninvasive measurement of the amount of dissolved CBZ in a sample as well as polymorphic characterization, whereas exclusive recrystallization of either CBZ form I or CBZ form III from saturated solutions was achieved by specific selection of sample cell cooling profiles. Additionally, using a microcell versus a macroscopic volume gives the advantage of reaching equilibrium much faster while using little compound quantity. We demonstrate that laser Raman spectral polymorphic analysis in a microliter cell is a potentially viable screening platform for polymorphic analysis and could lead to a new high throughput method for polymorph screening.

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence and FT-Raman spectroscopy for characterizing patinas on stone substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oujja, M; Vázquez-Calvo, C; Sanz, M; Álvarez de Buergo, M; Fort, R; Castillejo, M

    2012-02-01

    This article reports on a compositional investigation of stone patinas: thin colored layers applied for protective and/or aesthetic purposes on architectural or sculptural substrates of cultural heritage. The analysis and classification of patinas provide important information of historic and artistic interest, as their composition reflects local practices, the availabilities of different materials, and the development of technological knowledge during specific historical periods. Model patinas fabricated according to traditional procedures and applied onto limestone, and a historic patina sample from the main façade of the San Blas Monastery in Lerma (a village in the province of Burgos, Spain), were analyzed by laser-induced fluorescence and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained demonstrate the ability of these two analytical techniques to identify the key components of each formulation and those of the reaction products which result from the chemical and mineralogical transformations that occur during aging, as well as to provide information that can aid the classification of different types of patinas.

  8. Raman Spectroscopy for Homeland Security Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Mogilevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique with vast applications in the homeland security and defense arenas. The Raman effect is defined by the inelastic interaction of the incident laser with the analyte molecule’s vibrational modes, which can be exploited to detect and identify chemicals in various environments and for the detection of hazards in the field, at checkpoints, or in a forensic laboratory with no contact with the substance. A major source of error that overwhelms the Raman signal is fluorescence caused by the background and the sample matrix. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the Raman signal’s sensitivity and to reduce the effects of fluorescence by altering how the hazard material interacts with its environment and the incident laser. Basic Raman techniques applicable to homeland security applications include conventional (off-resonance Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and spatially or temporally offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS and TORS. Additional emerging Raman techniques, including remote Raman detection, Raman imaging, and Heterodyne imaging, are being developed to further enhance the Raman signal, mitigate fluorescence effects, and monitor hazards at a distance for use in homeland security and defense applications.

  9. 1.3 µm Raman-bismuth fiber amplifier pumped by semiconductor disk laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorovskiy, A; Rautiainen, J; Rantamäki, A; Golant, K M; Okhotnikov, O G

    2011-03-28

    A hybrid Raman-bismuth fiber amplifier pumped in co-propagation configuration by a single 1.22 µm semiconductor disk laser is presented. The unique attribute of this dual-gain system is that both amplifiers require the pump source with the same wavelength because pump-Stokes spectral shift in 1.3 µm Raman amplifier and pump-gain bandwidth separation in 1.3 µm bismuth fiber amplifier have the same value. Residual pump power at the output of Raman amplifier in this scheme is efficiently consumed by bismuth-doped fiber thus increasing the overall conversion efficiency. The small-signal gain of 18 dB at 1.3 W of pump power has been achieved for hybrid scheme which is by 9 dB higher as compared with isolated Raman amplifier without bismuth fiber. Low noise performance of pump semiconductor disk laser with RIN of -150 dB/Hz combined with nearly diffraction-limited beam quality and Watt-level output powers allows for efficient core-pumping of a single-mode fiber amplifier systems and opens up new opportunities for amplification in O-band spectral range.

  10. Raman spectroscopic differentiation of beef and horse meat using a 671 nm microsystem diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Halah Al; Sowoidnich, Kay; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2013-11-01

    A non-invasive Raman spectroscopic approach for meat species identification and quality detection was successfully demonstrated for the two closely related species beef and horse. Fresh beef and horse muscles were cut and ice-stored at 5 °C, and time-dependent Raman measurements were performed daily up to 12 days postmortem. Applying a 671 nm microsystem diode laser and a laser power of 50 mW, spectra were recorded with integration times of 1-4 s. A pronounced offset of the Raman spectra was observed between horse and beef, with high fluorescence background for horse compared to beef for all days of storage. Principal components analysis was applied for data evaluation revealing a clear distinction between beef and horse meat which can be attributed to differences in the myoglobin content of both species. Furthermore, separations according to aging and spoilage for the two species could be identified simultaneously. Therefore, Raman spectroscopy might be an efficient test method for meat species identification in combination with spoilage detection.

  11. Investigation of germanium implanted with aluminum by multi-laser micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanson, A., E-mail: andrea.sanson@unipd.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Napolitani, E. [MATIS IMM-CNR at Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Impellizzeri, G. [MATIS IMM-CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Giarola, M. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Università di Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, I-37134 Verona (Italy); De Salvador, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Privitera, V.; Priolo, F. [MATIS IMM-CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Mariotto, G. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Università di Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, I-37134 Verona (Italy); Carnera, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2013-08-31

    Germanium samples, implanted with aluminum and annealed, have been investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy using different excitation lines with the aim of gaining insights about the Al distribution at different depths beneath the sample surface and to correlate the Raman spectra with the electrical and chemical profiles, obtained by Spreading Resistance Profiling (SRP) and Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements, respectively. The intensity of the Al–Ge Raman peak at about 370 cm{sup −1}, due to the local vibrational mode of the substitutional Al atoms in the Ge matrix, has been directly related to the SRP behavior, while no correlation has been observed with SIMS profiles. These findings show that the electrically active content is entirely due to the substitutional Al atoms. Finally, a clear down shift is observed for the Ge–Ge Raman peak at ∼ 300 cm{sup −1}, which also seems to be directly related to the active content of Al dopant atoms. This work shows that micro-Raman spectroscopy can be a suitable tool for the study of doping profiles in Ge. - Highlights: ► Al-implanted Ge and annealed were studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. ► Using different laser lines we have investigated the implants at different depths. ► The Al–Ge Raman peak at about 370 cm{sup −1} is directly related to the SRP behavior. ► The electrically active content is entirely due to the substitutional Al atoms. ► Carrier effects are observed on the Ge–Ge peak at ∼ 300 cm{sup −1}.

  12. Low-noise Raman fiber amplifier pumped by semiconductor disk laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorovskiy, A; Rautiainen, J; Rantamäki, A; Okhotnikov, O G

    2011-03-28

    A 1.3 µm Raman fiber amplifier pumped by 1.22 µm semiconductor disk laser in co-propagation geometry is demonstrated. Measured relative intensity noise of -148 dB/Hz over frequency range up to 3.5 GHz was measured at 900 mW of pump power. 9 dB gain was achieved with co-propagating pumping geometry with less than 2 dB additional noise induced by amplifier to the signal. Nearly shot-noise-limited operation of semiconductor disk laser combined with the diffraction-limited beam allows for efficient core-pumping of the single-mode fiber Raman amplifiers and represents a highly practical approach which takes full advantage of co-propagating pumping.

  13. High Efficient C6H12 Raman Laser Enhanced by DCM Fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-Bo; LIANG Hui-Min; WANG Zhi-Hua; LUO Shi-Rong; YANG Jing-Guo; ZHENG Wan-Guo; WEI Xiao-Feng; HE Shao-Bo; CHEN Yuan-Bin

    2007-01-01

    @@ We report the first-order Stokes output (wavelength of 627.6 nm) from C6H12 enhanced by DCM dye fluorescence with high energy conversion efficiency of 47.9%, quantum conversion efficiency of 56.5%. To our knowledge, it is the highest conversion efficiency of stimulated Raman scattering obtained from liquid Raman laser. A 532nm frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser with 8Hz repetition rate is employed as the pump source, and the enhancement medium is DCM dye solution in ethanol. The conversion efficiencies at various pump energies and various pump repetition rates are measured and analysed. The enhancement mechanism of SRS together with its potential application is discussed.

  14. 2 μm Raman fiber laser based on a multimaterial chalcogenide microwire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdukerim, Nurmemet; Li, Lizhu; El Amraoui, Mohammed; Messaddeq, Younès; Rochette, Martin

    2017-04-01

    We report a Raman fiber laser based on a multimaterial chalcogenide microwire. The microwire structure comprises a core of As38Se62, a cladding of As38S62, and a coating of poly-methyl methacrylate. The microwire is a robust, high confinement waveguide compatible with the mid-infrared. With the microwire inserted in a ring cavity, Raman laser oscillation at a wavelength of 2.025 μm occurs from synchronous pumping at a wavelength of 1.938 μm. The input peak power required to reach threshold is 4.6 W and the power slope efficiency is 4.5%. Numerical simulations are in good agreement with experimental results and predict chirp-free femtosecond pulses.

  15. Efficient second harmonic generation of double-end diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO4 self-Raman laser producing 7.9 W yellow light

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Haiyong; Duan, Yanmin; Zhang, Ge; Huang, Chenghui; Wei, Yong; Shen, Hongyuan; Zheng, Yiqun; Huang, Lingxiong; Chen, Zhenqiang

    2009-01-01

    .... A 30-mm-length double-end diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO(4) crystal was utilized for efficient self-Raman laser operation by reducing the thermal effects and increasing the interaction length for the stimulated Raman scattering...

  16. Efficient second harmonic generation of double-end diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO_4 self-Raman laser producing 7.9 W yellow light

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haiyong Zhu; Yanmin Duan; Ge Zhang; Chenghui Huang; Yong Wei; Hongyuan Shen; Yiqun Zheng; Lingxiong Huang; Zhenqiang Chen

    2009-01-01

    .... A 30-mm-length double-end diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO_4 crystal was utilized for efficient self-Raman laser operation by reducing the thermal effects and increasing the interaction length for the stimulated Raman scattering...

  17. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering activity of Ag/graphene/polymer nanocomposite films synthesized by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petreska, Gordana Siljanovska; Blazevska-Gilev, Jadranka [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy (FTM), University St. Cyril and Methodius, Ruger Boskovic 16, 1000 Skopje, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Fajgar, Radek, E-mail: fajgar@icpf.cas.cz [Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the AS CR, Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague (Czech Republic); Tomovska, Radmila, E-mail: radmila.tomovska@ehu.es [POLYMAT and Departamento de Química Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Joxe Mari Korta zentroa, Tolosa etorbidea 72, Donostia-San Sebastián 20018 (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-08-01

    Nanocomposites composed of poly(butylacrylate-co-methyl methacrylate) and graphene were ablated with a transversely excited atmosphere CO{sub 2} laser using an incident fluence of up to 7.3 J cm{sup −2}. This resulted in a deposition of thin composite films with graphene sheets that were very well distributed in the polymer matrix. The active substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) were prepared by subsequent depositions of silver nanoparticles on the surface of the composite films, with an ArF excimer laser ablation of elemental silver. The deposits were characterized by means of spectroscopy, microscopy, and diffraction techniques. The SERS substrate performance was tested using Rhodamine 6G as a probe substance. The probe substance was detected at low concentrations and a highly enhanced Raman signal was achieved. - Highlight: • Deposition of graphene nanosheet s-polymer nanocomposites was achieved. • Nanocomposites were decorated by deposited Ag nanoparticles on the film surface. • Ag/GNS/polymer thin films were tested as SERS substrate using Rhodamine 6G. • The enhancement factor of Ag/GNS/polymer substrate was calculated to be around 22. • Both chemical and electromagnetic mechanisms contribute to the SERS enhancement.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering in femtosecond laser-nanostructured Ag substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai Ye; He Min; Yan Xiaona; Ma Guohong [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Lu Bo, E-mail: yedai@shu.edu.cn [Instrumental Analysis and Research Center, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate that a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate could be directly fabricated on the surface of Ag film by femtosecond laser micromachining. According to the morphology observation by SEM, an amount of nanoparticles, nanoprotrusions, and nanospikes were found to form in the ablation region and the density and size distribution of these Ag nanoparticles depended possibly on the incident laser intensity. Additionally, a large area of nanostructured region was produced by fast line scanning, and an enhancement factor of {approx}10{sup 5} was obtained in this region after the sample was soaked in the rhodamine 6G solution for 30 min.

  19. Raman probing of competitive laser heating and local recrystallization effect in ZnO nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, J D; Parkinson, P; Ren, F F; Gu, S L; Tan, H H; Jagadish, C

    2012-10-01

    The competitive laser-induced local heating and recrystallization effects in ZnO nanocrystals embedded in a MgO/ZnO stack are reported via resonance Raman spectra. The dependence of the intensity, energy, and resonance effects of the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon on laser excitation condition are discussed in the context of Fröhlich interaction. Redistribution of defects, impurity-diffusion, and grain regrowth caused by thermal and photochemical effects lead to significant changes in coupling strength of electron-phonon interaction, and the resonance behaviors are strongly affected by the interplay of local heating, heat trapping, and local structural modification in such nanostructures.

  20. Development of Raman-shifted probe laser beam for plasma diagnosis using polaro-interferometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M P Kamath; A P Kulkarni; S Jain; P K Tripathi; A S Joshi; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2010-11-01

    Optical diagnostics of laser-produced plasma requires a coherent, polarized probe beam synchronized with the pump beam. The probe beam should have energy above the background emission of plasma. Though the second harmonic probe beam satisfies most of the requirements, the plasma emission is larger at the harmonic frequencies of the pump. Hence, at high intensities we need a probe beam at non-harmonic frequencies. We have set up a Raman frequency shifted probe beam using a pressurized hydrogen cell that is pumped by the second harmonic of the Nd glass laser that operates at only one Stokes line of 673.75 nm.

  1. Dynamic Characteristics of Growing Modes of Raman Instability from Intense Laser Beam Propagating Through Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shi-Bing; CHEN Tao; CHEN Shi-Gang

    2004-01-01

    An essential dispersion relation,which can describe the dynamic properties of stimulated Raman scattering instability as a laser beam propagates through plasmas,is derived analytically.The development of growth mode,angle distribution,and temperature dependence of the instabilities are presented by solving this dispersion relation numerically.A significant dynamic characteristic has been revealed that the temperature increasing of the electron would result in redshift of scattered spectrum at high laser intensities.Furthermore,a novel modulational instability with double-peak temporal structure appears in a limited density region because of the coupling of scattered upshift and downshift waves.

  2. Portable Raman spectroscopy using retina-safe (1550 nm) laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, Carl; Smith, Wayne; Donahue, Michael; Huang, Hermes; Shende, Chetan; Sengupta, Atanu; Inscore, Frank; Patient, Michael; Farquharson, Stuart

    2012-06-01

    The use of portable Raman analyzers to identify unknown substances in the field has grown dramatically during the past decade. Measurements often require the laser beam to exit the confines of the sample compartment, which increases the potential of eye or skin damage. This is especially true for most commercial analyzers, which use 785 nm laser excitation. To overcome this safety concern, we have built a portable FT-Raman analyzer using a 1550 nm retina-safe excitation laser. Excitation at 1550 nm falls within the 1400 to 2000 nm retina-safe range, so called because the least amount of damage to the eye occurs in this spectral region. In contrast to wavelengths below 1400 nm, the retina-safe wavelengths are not focused by the eye, but are absorbed by the cornea, aqueous and vitreous humor. Here we compare the performance of this system to measurements of explosives at shorter wavelengths, as well as its ability to measure surface-enhanced Raman spectra of several chemicals, including the food contaminant melamine.

  3. Fast spectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with high-speed tunable picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyadi, Harsono; Iwatsuka, Junichi; Minamikawa, Takeo; Niioka, Hirohiko; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2013-09-01

    We develop a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy system equipped with a tunable picosecond laser for high-speed wavelength scanning. An acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is integrated in the laser cavity to enable wavelength scanning by varying the radio frequency waves applied to the AOTF crystal. An end mirror attached on a piezoelectric actuator and a pair of parallel plates driven by galvanometer motors are also introduced into the cavity to compensate for changes in the cavity length during wavelength scanning to allow synchronization with another picosecond laser. We demonstrate fast spectral imaging of 3T3-L1 adipocytes every 5  cm-1 in the Raman spectral region around 2850  cm-1 with an image acquisition time of 120 ms. We also demonstrate fast switching of Raman shifts between 2100 and 2850  cm-1, corresponding to CD2 symmetric stretching and CH2 symmetric stretching vibrations, respectively. The fast-switching CARS images reveal different locations of recrystallized deuterated and nondeuterated stearic acid.

  4. Raman-scattering-assistant broadband noise-like pulse generation in all-normal-dispersion fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Daojing; Li, Lei; Chen, Hao; Tang, Dingyuan; Zhao, Luming

    2015-01-01

    We report on the observation of both stable dissipative solitons and noise-like pulses with the presence of strong Raman scattering in a relatively short all-normal-dispersion Yb-doped fiber laser. We show that Raman scattering can be filtered out by intracavity filter. Furthermore, by appropriate intracavity polarization control, the Raman effect can be utilized to generate broadband noise-like pulses (NLPs) with bandwidth up to 61.4 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the broadest NLP achieved in all-normal-dispersion fiber lasers

  5. Amplification and generation of ultra-intense twisted laser pulses via stimulated Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, J; Alves, E P; Fonseca, R A; Mendonça, J T; Bingham, R; Norreys, P; Silva, L O

    2016-01-01

    Twisted Laguerre-Gaussian lasers, with orbital angular momentum and characterised by doughnut shaped intensity profiles, provide a transformative set of tools and research directions in a growing range of fields and applications, from super-resolution microcopy and ultra-fast optical communications to quantum computing and astrophysics. The impact of twisted light is widening as recent numerical calculations provided solutions to long-standing challenges in plasma-based acceleration by allowing for high gradient positron acceleration. The production of ultrahigh intensity twisted laser pulses could then also have a broad influence on relativistic laser-matter interactions. Here we show theoretically and with ab-initio three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, that stimulated Raman backscattering can generate and amplify twisted lasers to Petawatt intensities in plasmas. This work may open new research directions in non-linear optics and high energy density science, compact plasma based accelerators and ...

  6. Note: A novel technique for analysis of aqueous solutions by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusak, D A; Anthony, T P; Bell, Z T

    2015-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates typically consist of gold or silver nanoparticles deposited on a non-conductive substrate. In Raman spectroscopy, the nanoparticles produce an enhancement of the electromagnetic field which, in turn, leads to greater electronic excitation of molecules in the local environment. Here, we show that these same surfaces can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio obtained in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aqueous solutions. In this case, the SERS substrates not only lower breakdown thresholds and lead to more efficient plasma initiation but also provide an appropriately wettable surface for the deposition of the liquid. We refer to this technique as surface-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  7. Fluorescence and Raman spectra on surface of K9 glass by high fluence ultraviolet laser irradiation at 355 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Huang, Jin; Geng, Feng; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Feng, Shiquan; Ren, Dahua; Cheng, Xinlu; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Zheng, Wanguo; Tang, Yongjian

    2013-11-01

    In order to explore the damage mechanisms of K9 glass irradiated by high energy density ultraviolet laser, laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectra were investigated. Compared the fluorescence spectra of damaged area, undamaged area and sub-damaged area, it can be conclude that the fluorescence spectrum of sub-damaged area is different from the structure of the other two areas. Especially, the main peak of the spectra at 415 nm reveals the unique characteristics of K9 glass. The structure at the sub-damaged area enhances intensity of the Raman scattering spectra. Three peaks of the spectra at about 500 nm and two characteristic peaks at about 550 nm exhibit the characterization of damaged area. A peak of the Raman scattering spectra at 350 nm which related to water can be observed. The relationship between intensity of Raman scattering and laser intensity at 355 nm is investigated by confocal Raman microscopy. At sub-damage area, signal of Raman scattering is rather high and decreased dramatically with respect to energy density. The major band at about 1470 cm-1 sharpened and moved to higher frequency with densification. These phenomena demonstrate that the structure of sub-damaged area has some characterization compared with the damaged area. The investigation of defect induced fluorescence and Raman spectra on surface of K9 glass is important to explore the damage mechanisms of optical materials irradiated by ultraviolet laser irradiation at 355 nm.

  8. 5,000 h reliable operation of 785nm dual-wavelength DBR-RW diode lasers suitable for Raman spectroscopy and SERDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumpf, Bernd; Müller, André; Maiwald, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Monolithic wavelength stabilized diode lasers, e.g. distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) ridge waveguide (RW) lasers, are well-suited light sources for compact and portable Raman spectroscopic systems. In the case of in situ and outdoor investigations, the weak Raman lines are often superimposed by daylight, artificial light sources or fluorescence signals from the samples under study. Among others, shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) has been demonstrated as a powerful and easy-to-use technique to separate the Raman lines from disturbing background signals. SERDS is based on subsequential excitation of the sample with two slightly shifted wavelengths. The Raman lines follow the change in the excitation wavelength whereas the non-Raman signals remain unchanged. For SERDS dual-wavelength light sources, e.g., mini-arrays containing two DBR-RW lasers, are requested. Moreover, for portable Raman instruments such as handheld devices robust and reliable excitation light sources with lifetimes > 1,000 h are preferred. In this work, reliability investigations of dual-wavelength DBR-RW mini-arrays over a total test time of 5,000 h are presented. Wavelength stabilization and narrowing of the spectral emission is realized by 10th-order DBR surface gratings defined by i-line wafer stepper technology. The DBR-section has a length of 500 μm, the devices a total length of 3 mm. The ridge waveguide has a stripe width of 2.2 μm. Maximum output powers up to 215 mW per emitter were measured. Over the whole power range, 95 % of the emitted power is within a spectral width of 0.15 nm (2.5 cm-1), which is smaller than the spectral width needed to resolve most Raman lines of solid and liquid samples. In a step-stress test, the devices were tested at 50 mW, followed by 75 mW and finally at 100 mW per emitter. Electro-optical and spectral measurements were performed before, during and after the test. All emitters under study did not show any deterioration of their

  9. A Technique for Measuring Microparticles in Polar Ice Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshimitsu Sakurai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe in detail our method of measuring the chemical forms of microparticles in polar ice samples through micro-Raman spectroscopy. The method is intended for solid ice samples, an important point because melting the ice can result in dissociation, contamination, and chemical reactions prior to or during a measurement. We demonstrate the technique of measuring the chemical forms of these microparticles and show that the reference spectra of those salts expected to be common in polar ice are unambiguously detected. From our measurements, Raman intensity of sulfate salts is relatively higher than insoluble dust due to the specific Raman scattering cross-section of chemical forms of microparticles in ice.

  10. Solderjet bumping technique used to manufacture a compact and robust green solid-state laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribes, P.; Burkhardt, T.; Hornaff, M.; Kousar, S.; Burkhardt, D.; Beckert, E.; Gilaberte, M.; Guilhot, D.; Montes, D.; Galan, M.; Ferrando, S.; Laudisio, M.; Belenguer, T.; Ibarmia, S.; Gallego, P.; Rodríguez, J. A.; Eberhardt, R.; Tünnermann, A.

    2015-06-01

    Solder-joining using metallic solder alloys is an alternative to adhesive bonding. Laser-based soldering processes are especially well suited for the joining of optical components made of fragile and brittle materials such as glasses, ceramics and optical crystals due to a localized and minimized input of thermal energy. The Solderjet Bumping technique is used to assemble a miniaturized laser resonator in order to obtain higher robustness, wider thermal conductivity performance, higher vacuum and radiation compatibility, and better heat and long term stability compared with identical glued devices. The resulting assembled compact and robust green diode-pumped solid-state laser is part of the future Raman Laser Spectrometer designed for the Exomars European Space Agency (ESA) space mission 2018.

  11. XPS and μ-Raman study of nanosecond-laser processing of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armyanov, S., E-mail: armyanov@ipc.bas.bg [Rostislaw Kaischew Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 11, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Stankova, N.E.; Atanasov, P.A. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsarigradsko Shose, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Valova, E.; Kolev, K.; Georgieva, J. [Rostislaw Kaischew Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 11, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Steenhaut, O.; Baert, K.; Hubin, A. [Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Faculty of Engineering, Research Group, SURF “Electrochemical and Surface Engineering” (Belgium)

    2015-10-01

    Data about the chemical status of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) after nanosecond Q-switched Nd:YAG laser treatment with near infrared, visible and ultraviolet radiation are presented. The μ-Raman spectroscopy analyses reveal as irradiation result a new sharp peak of crystalline silicon. In addition, broad bands appear assigned to D band of amorphous carbon and G band of microcrystalline and polycrystalline graphite. The μ-Raman spectra are variable taken in different inspected points in the trenches formed by laser treatment. The XPS surface survey spectra indicate the constituent elements of PDMS: carbon, oxygen and silicon. The spectra of detail XPS scans illustrate the influence of the laser treatment. The position of Si 2p peaks of the treated samples is close to the value of non-treated except that irradiated by 1064 nm 66 pulses, which is shifted by 0.9 eV. Accordingly, a shift by 0.4 eV is noticed of the O 1s peak, which reflects again a stronger oxidation of silicon. The curve fitting of Si 2p and O 1s peaks after this particular laser treatment shows the degree of conversion of organic to inorganic silicon that takes place during the irradiation.

  12. Metrology of vibration measurements by laser techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Martens, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-06-01

    Metrology as the art of careful measurement has been understood as uniform methodology for measurements in natural sciences, covering methods for the consistent assessment of experimental data and a corpus of rules regulating application in technology and in trade and industry. The knowledge, methods and tools available for precision measurements can be exploited for measurements at any level of uncertainty in any field of science and technology. A metrological approach to the preparation, execution and evaluation (including expression of uncertainty) of measurements of translational and rotational motion quantities using laser interferometer methods and techniques will be presented. The realization and dissemination of the SI units of motion quantities (vibration and shock) have been based on laser interferometer methods specified in international documentary standards. New and upgraded ISO standards are reviewed with respect to their suitability for ensuring traceable vibration measurements and calibrations in an extended frequency range of 0.4 Hz to higher than 100 kHz. Using adequate vibration exciters to generate sufficient displacement or velocity amplitudes, the upper frequency limits of the laser interferometer methods specified in ISO 16063-11 for frequencies procedures (i.e. measurement uncertainty 0.05 % at frequencies <= 10 kHz, <= 1 % up to 100 kHz).

  13. Apparatus and method for enabling quantum-defect-limited conversion efficiency in cladding-pumped Raman fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heebner, John E.; Sridharan, Arun K.; Dawson, Jay Walter; Messerly, Michael J.; Pax, Paul H.

    2016-09-20

    Cladding-pumped Raman fiber lasers and amplifiers provide high-efficiency conversion efficiency at high brightness enhancement. Differential loss is applied to both single-pass configurations appropriate for pulsed amplification and laser oscillator configurations applied to high average power cw source generation.

  14. Raman spectroscopy of organic dyes adsorbed on pulsed laser deposited silver thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazio, E.; Neri, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica della Materia e Ingegneria Elettronica, Universitá di Messina, V.le F. Stagno d’Alcontres 31, I-98166, Messina, Italy. (Italy); Valenti, A. [Dipartimento di Chimica Inorganica, Chimica Analitica e Chimica Fisica, Universitá di Messina, V.le F. Stagno d’Alcontres 31, I-98166, Messina, Italy. (Italy); Ossi, P.M., E-mail: paolo.ossi@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34-3, 20133 Milano, Italy. (Italy); Trusso, S.; Ponterio, R.C. [CNR-Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici Sede di Messina, V.le F. Stagno d’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina, Italy. (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    The results of a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study performed on representative organic and inorganic dyes adsorbed on silver nanostructured thin films are presented and discussed. Silver thin films were deposited on glass slides by focusing the beam from a KrF excimer laser (wavelength 248 nm, pulse duration 25 ns) on a silver target and performing the deposition in a controlled Ar atmosphere. Clear Raman spectra were acquired for dyes such as carmine lake, garanza lake and brazilwood overcoming their fluorescence and weak Raman scattering drawbacks. UV–visible absorption spectroscopy measurements were not able to discriminate among the different chromophores usually referred as carmine lake (carminic, kermesic and laccaic acid), as brazilwood (brazilin and brazilein) and as garanza lake (alizarin and purpurin). SERS measurements showed that the analyzed samples are composed of a mixture of different chromophores: brazilin and brazilein in brazilwood, kermesic and carminic acid in carmine lake, alizarin and purpurin in garanza lake. Detection at concentration level as low as 10{sup −7} M in aqueous solutions was achieved. Higher Raman intensities were observed using the excitation line of 632.8 nm wavelength with respect to the 785 nm, probably due to a pre-resonant effect with the molecular electronic transitions of the dyes.

  15. Stimulated Raman scattering in helium with soft-x-ray laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fill, E. E.; van Enk, S. J.; Zhang, Jian; Lambropoulos, P.

    1996-12-01

    We report calculations for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) with pump photons from a soft-x-ray laser. The Raman transitions from the 1 1S0 ground state to the 2 1S0 and 3 1S0 metastable states of helium at 20.6 and 22.9 eV, respectively, are considered. We calculate χ(3) for pump photons with an energy close to the autoionizing resonances (2s2p)1P at 60.15 eV and (sp,23+)1P at 63.66 eV. SRS gain coefficients are derived for x-ray laser lines in close resonance with the autoionizing levels, viz., the 3p(3/2,3/2)2-->3s(3/2,1/2)1 transition in neonlike selenium (λ=20.64 nm) and the analogous transition in neonlike bromine (λ=19.47 nm). It is shown that the Raman gain coefficient with experimentally realistic parameters is significant and that a high gain length product can be achieved even with pump intensities below 1011 W/cm2.

  16. Laser Raman and ac impedance spectroscopic studies of PVA: NH4NO3 polymer electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hema, M; Selvasekarapandian, S; Hirankumar, G; Sakunthala, A; Arunkumar, D; Nithya, H

    2010-01-01

    Ion conducting polymer electrolyte PVA:NH(4)NO(3) has been prepared by solution casting technique and characterized using XRD, Raman and ac impedance spectroscopic analyses. The amorphous nature of the polymer films has been confirmed by XRD and Raman spectroscopy. An insight into the deconvoluted Raman peaks of upsilon(1) vibration of NO(3)(-) anion for the polymer electrolyte reveals the dominancy of ion aggregates at higher NH(4)NO(3) concentration. From the ac impedance studies, the highest ion conductivity at 303 K has been found to be 7.5x10(-3)Scm(-1) for 80PVA:20NH(4)NO(3). The conductivity of the polymer electrolytes has been found to depend on the degree of dissociation of the salt in the host polymer matrix. The combination of the above-mentioned analyses has proven worth while and in fact necessary in order to achieve better understanding of these complex systems.

  17. Detailed study of four-wave mixing in Raman DFB fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jindan; Horak, Peter; Alam, Shaif-Ul; Ibsen, Morten

    2014-09-22

    We both experimentally and numerically studied the ultra-compact wavelength conversion by using the four-wave mixing (FWM) process in Raman distributed-feedback (R-DFB) fiber lasers. The R-DFB fiber laser is formed in a 30 cm-long commercially available Ge/Si standard optical fiber. The internal generated R-DFB signal acts as the pump wave for the FWM process and is in the normal dispersion range of the fiber. Utilizing a tunable laser source as a probe wave, FWM frequency conversion up to ~40 THz has been demonstrated with conversion efficiency > -40 dB. The principle of such a wide bandwidth and high conversion efficiency in such a short R-DFB cavity has been theoretically analyzed. The simulation results match well with the experimental data.

  18. Split-probe hybrid femtosecond/picosecond rotational CARS for time-domain measurement of S-branch Raman linewidths within a single laser shot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brian D; Gao, Yi; Seeger, Thomas; Kliewer, Christopher J

    2013-11-15

    We introduce a multiplex technique for the single-laser-shot determination of S-branch Raman linewidths with high accuracy and precision by implementing hybrid femtosecond (fs)/picosecond (ps) rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) with multiple spatially and temporally separated probe beams derived from a single laser pulse. The probe beams scatter from the rotational coherence driven by the fs pump and Stokes pulses at four different probe pulse delay times spanning 360 ps, thereby mapping collisional coherence dephasing in time for the populated rotational levels. The probe beams scatter at different folded BOXCARS angles, yielding spatially separated CARS signals which are collected simultaneously on the charge coupled device camera. The technique yields a single-shot standard deviation (1σ) of less than 3.5% in the determination of Raman linewidths and the average linewidth values obtained for N(2) are within 1% of those previously reported. The presented technique opens the possibility for correcting CARS spectra for time-varying collisional environments in operando.

  19. Luminescence, optical and laser Raman scattering studies on γ -irradiated terbium-doped potassium iodide crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangaru, S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the thermoluminescence (TL), optical absorption and other laser Raman scattering studies performed on terbium-doped KI crystals γ-irradiated at room temperature. Photoluminescence studies confirm the presence of terbium ions in the KI matrix in their trivalent form. Formation of V3- and Z1-centres on F-bleaching of γ-irradiated crystals was observed. The characteristic emission due to Tb3+ ions in the spectral distribution under optically stimulated emission and TL emission confirms the participation of the Tb3+ ions in the recombination process. The Raman bands were identified as the totally symmetric vibration modes of f.c.c. species KI:Tb3+.

  20. Stimulated Raman Scattering and Nonlinear Focusing of High-Power Laser Beams Propagating in Water

    CERN Document Server

    Hafizi, B; Penano, J R; Gordon, D F; Jones, T G; Helle, M H; Kaganovich, D

    2015-01-01

    The physical processes associated with propagation of a high-power (power > critical power for self-focusing) laser beam in water include nonlinear focusing, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), optical breakdown and plasma formation. The interplay between nonlinear focusing and SRS is analyzed for cases where a significant portion of the pump power is channeled into the Stokes wave. Propagation simulations and an analytical model demonstrate that the Stokes wave can re-focus the pump wave after the power in the latter falls below the critical power. It is shown that this novel focusing mechanism is distinct from cross-phase focusing. While discussed here in the context of propagation in water, the gain-focusing phenomenon is general to any medium supporting nonlinear focusing and stimulated forward Raman scattering.

  1. Exploiting vibrational strong coupling to make an optical parametric oscillator out of a Raman laser

    CERN Document Server

    del Pino, Javier; Feist, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    When the collective coupling of the rovibrational states in organic molecules and confined electromagnetic modes is sufficiently strong, the system enters into vibrational strong coupling, leading to the formation of hybrid light-matter quasiparticles. In this work we demonstrate theoretically how this hybridization in combination with stimulated Raman scattering can be utilized to widen the capabilities of Raman laser devices. We explore the conditions under which the lasing threshold can be diminished and the system can be transformed into an optical parametric oscillator. Finally, we show how the dramatic reduction of the many final molecular states into two collective excitations can be used to create an all-optical switch with output in the mid-infrared.

  2. A multi-milliJoule femtosecond Raman laser emitting at 1.28 um

    CERN Document Server

    Vicario, Carlo; Konyashchenko, Aleksandr; Losev, Leonid; Hauri, Christoph P

    2016-01-01

    We report on the generation of broadband, high-energy femtosecond pulses centered at 1.28 um by stimulated Raman scattering in pressurized hydrogen cell. Stimulated Raman scattering is performed by two chirped and delayed pulses originating from a multi-mJ Ti:Sapphire amplifier. The Stokes pulse carries energy of 4.4 mJ and is recompressed down to 66 fs by reflective grating pair. We characterized the short-wavelength mid-infrared source in view of energy stability, beam profile and conversion efficiency at a repetition rate of 100 Hz and 10 Hz. The demonstrated laser will benefit intense THz generation applications from highly nonlinear organic crystals.

  3. Exploiting Vibrational Strong Coupling to Make an Optical Parametric Oscillator Out of a Raman Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pino, Javier; Garcia-Vidal, Francisco J.; Feist, Johannes

    2016-12-01

    When the collective coupling of the rovibrational states in organic molecules and confined electromagnetic modes is sufficiently strong, the system enters into vibrational strong coupling, leading to the formation of hybrid light-matter quasiparticles. In this Letter, we demonstrate theoretically how this hybridization in combination with stimulated Raman scattering can be utilized to widen the capabilities of Raman laser devices. We explore the conditions under which the lasing threshold can be diminished and the system can be transformed into an optical parametric oscillator. Finally, we show how the dramatic reduction of the many final molecular states into two collective excitations can be used to create an all-optical switch with output in the midinfrared.

  4. Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy has gained increased use and importance in recent years for accurate and precise detection of physical and chemical properties of food materials, due to the greater specificity and sensitivity of Raman techniques over other analytical techniques. This book chapter presents Raman s...

  5. Monitoring changes of proteins and lipids in laser welded aorta tissue using Raman spectroscopy and basis biochemical component analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.; Wang, W. B.; Alimova, A.; Sriramoju, V.; Kartazayev, V.; Alfano, R. R.

    2009-02-01

    The changes of Raman spectra from ex-vivo porcine aorta tissues were studied before and after laser tissue welding (LTW). Raman spectra were measured and compared for normal and welded tissues in both tunica adventitial and intimal sides. The vibrational modes at the peak of 1301 cm-1 and the weak shoulder peak of 1264 cm-1 of amide III for the normal tissue changed to a peak at 1322cm-1 and a relative intense peak at 1264cm-1, respectively, for the welded tissue. The Raman spectra were analyzed using a linear regression fitting method and compared with characteristic Raman spectra from proteins and lipids compounds. The relative biochemical molecular composition changes of proteins (Collagen types I, III, V and Elastin) and lipids for the laser welded tissue were modeled by basis biochemical component analyses (BBCA) and compared with the normal tissue.

  6. Raman Spectroscopy of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Technique Overview and Application to Carbon Deposition Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Maher, R. C.

    2013-07-30

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful characterization tool for improving the understanding of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), capable of providing direct, molecularly specific information regarding the physical and chemical processes occurring within functional SOFCs in real time. In this paper we give a summary of the technique itself and highlight ex situ and in situ studies that are particularly relevant for SOFCs. This is followed by a case study of carbon formation on SOFC Ni-based anodes exposed to carbon monoxide (CO) using both ex situ and in situ Raman spectroscopy combined with computational simulations. In situ measurements clearly show that carbon formation is significantly reduced for polarized SOFCs compared to those held at open circuit potential (OCP). Ex situ Raman mapping of the surfaces showed clear variations in the rate of carbon formation across the surface of polarized anodes. Computational simulations describing the geometry of the cell showed that this is due to variations in gas access. These results demonstrate the ability of Raman spectroscopy in combination with traditional characterization tools, to provide detailed understanding of critical processes occurring within functional SOFCs. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Laser Raman detection of platelet as a non-invasive approach for early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P.; Tian, Q.; Baek, S. J.; Shang, X. L.; Park, A.; Liu, Z. C.; Yao, X. Q.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, X. H.; Cheng, Y.; Peng, J.; Shen, A. G.; Hu, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    Early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a problem that puzzled many doctors. Reliable markers in easy-assembling samples are of considerable clinical diagnostic value. In this work, laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) was developed a new method that potentially allows early and differential diagnosis of AD from the platelet sample. Raman spectra of platelets isolated from different ages of AD transgenic mice and non-transgenic controls were collected and analyzed. Multilayer perceptron networks (MLP) classification method was used to classify spectra and establish the diagnostic models. For differential diagnosis, spectra of platelets isolated from AD, Parkinson's disease (PD) and vascular dementia (VD) mice were also discriminated. Two notable spectral differences at 740 and 1654 cm-1 were revealed in the mean spectrum of platelets isolated from AD transgenic mice and the controls. MLP displayed a powerful ability in the classifying of early, advanced AD and the control group, and in differential diagnosis of PD and advanced AD, as well as VD and advanced AD. The results suggest that platelet detecting by LRS coupled with MLP analysis appears to be an easy and accurate method for early and differential diagnosis of AD. This technique could be rapidly promoted from laboratory to the hospital.

  8. Highly efficient cascaded P-doped Raman fiber laser pumped by Nd:YVO4 solid-state laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaohong Huang; Zhiping Cai; Zhengqian Luo; Wencai Huang; Huiying Xu; Chenchun Ye

    2008-01-01

    A highly efficient cascaded P-doped Raman fiber laser (RFL) pumped by a 1064-nm continuous wave (CW) Nd:YVO4 solid-state laser is reported. 1.15-W CW output power at 1484 nm is obtained while the input pump power is 4 W, corresponding to the power conversion efficiency of 28.8%. The threshold pump power for the second-order Stokes radiation is 1.13 W. The slope efficiency is as high as 42.6%. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical ones. Furthermore, the power instability of the P-doped RFL at 1484 nm in an hour is observed to be less than 5%.

  9. Raman backscatter as a remote laser power sensor in high-energy-density plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Moody, J D; Divol, L; Michel, P; Robey, H F; LePape, S; Ralph, J; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H; Kirkwood, R K; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Nikroo, A; Williams, E A

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) is used as a remote sensor to quantify the instantaneous laser power after transfer from outer to inner cones that cross in a National Ignition Facility (NIF) gas-filled hohlraum plasma. By matching SRS between a shot reducing outer vs a shot reducing inner power we infer that ~half of the incident outer-cone power is transferred to inner cones, for the specific time and wavelength configuration studied. This is the first instantaneous non-disruptive measure of power transfer in an indirect drive NIF experiment using optical measurements.

  10. A superradiant laser based on two-photon Raman transition of caesium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Pengfei

    2013-01-01

    We propose a superradiant laser based on two-photon Raman transition of caesium-133 atoms which collectively emit photons on an ultra narrow transition into the mode of a low Q resonator known as optical bad-cavity regime. The spin-spin correlation which characterizes the collective effect is demonstrated. We theoretically predict that the optical radiation has an extremely narrow linewidth in the 98 (1) *10-2 mHz range, smaller than the transition itself due to collective effects, and a power level of 7 (1)*10-10 W is possible, which can provide a possible new way to realize an optical clock with a millihertz linewidth.

  11. Series solution to the laser-ion interaction in a Raman-type configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, M

    2001-01-01

    The Raman interaction of a trapped ultracold ion with two travelling wave lasers is studied analytically with series solutions, in the absence of the rotating wave approximation (RWA) and the restriction of both the Lamb-Dicke limit and the weak excitation regime. The comparison is made between our solutions and those under the RWA to demonstrate the validity region of the RWA. As a practical example, the preparation of Schr\\"odinger-cat states with our solutions is proposed beyond the weak excitation regime.

  12. Broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering light generation in BBO crystal by using two crossing femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jun; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2008-07-01

    As broad as 12000 cm(-1) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) light from ultraviolet to infrared was generated in a BBO crystal by using two crossing femtosecond laser pulses with 30% conversion efficiency. More than fifteenth-order anti-Stokes and second-order Stokes Raman sidebands were observed with nice Gaussian spatial mode. The effect of the crossing angle between two input beams on the spectrum and emitting angle of the Raman sidebands was studied in detail. Calculation shows that the phase-matching condition determines the frequencies and angles of the sidebands.

  13. Radiation-reaction-force-induced nonlinear mixing of Raman sidebands of an ultraintense laser pulse in a plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naveen; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z; Keitel, Christoph H

    2013-09-06

    Stimulated Raman scattering of an ultraintense laser pulse in plasmas is studied by perturbatively including the leading order term of the Landau-Lifshitz radiation reaction force in the equation of motion for plasma electrons. In this approximation, the radiation reaction force causes a phase shift in nonlinear current densities that drive the two Raman sidebands (anti-Stokes and Stokes waves), manifesting itself into the nonlinear mixing of two sidebands. This mixing results in a strong enhancement in the growth of the forward Raman scattering instability.

  14. Raman spectroscopy of white wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Coralie; Bruneel, Jean-Luc; Guyon, François; Médina, Bernard; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Guillaume, François

    2015-08-15

    The feasibility of exploiting Raman scattering to analyze white wines has been investigated using 3 different wavelengths of the incoming laser radiation in the near-UV (325 nm), visible (532 nm) and near infrared (785 nm). To help in the interpretation of the Raman spectra, the absorption properties in the UV-visible range of two wine samples as well as their laser induced fluorescence have also been investigated. Thanks to the strong intensity enhancement of the Raman scattered light due to electronic resonance with 325 nm laser excitation, hydroxycinnamic acids may be detected and analyzed selectively. Fructose and glucose may also be easily detected below ca. 1000 cm(-1). This feasibility study demonstrates the potential of the Raman spectroscopic technique for the analysis of white wines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Intra-pulse Raman frequency shift versus conventional Stokes generation of diode laser pulses in optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, Evgeny; Mendoza-Vazquez, Sergio; Gutierrez-Gutierrez, Jaime; Ibarra-Escamilla, Baldemar; Haus, Joseph; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto

    2005-05-02

    We report experimental observations of stimulated Raman scattering in a standard fiber using a directly modulated DFB semiconductor laser amplified by two erbium-doped fibers. The laser pulse width was variably controlled on a nanosecond-scale; the laser emission was separated into two distinct regimes: an initial transient peak regime, followed by a quasi steady-state plateau regime. The transient leading part of the pump pulse containing fast amplitude modulation generated a broadband Raman-induced spectral shift through the modulation instability and subsequent intra-pulse Raman frequency shift. The plateau regime amplified the conventional Stokes shifted emission expected from the peaks of the gain distribution. The output signal spectrum at the end of a 9.13 km length of fiber for the transient part extends from 1550 nm to 1700 nm for a pump pulse peak power of 65 W. We found that the Raman-induced spectral shift is measurable about 8 W for every fiber length examined, 0.6 km, 4.46 km, and 9.13 km. All spectral components of the broadband scattering appear to be generated in the initial kilometer of the fiber span. The Stokes shifted light generation threshold was higher than the threshold for the intra-pulse Raman-induced broadened spectra. This fact enables the nonlinear spectral filtering of pulses from directly modulated semiconductor lasers.

  16. Sensitive Raman gas analysis using a 500 mW external cavity diode laser at 410 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Luo, Shiwen; Yu, Anlan; Gao, Jun; Sun, Pengfei; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo

    2017-09-01

    Sensitive Raman gas analysis based on a home-made high power 410 nm Littrow-arranged external cavity diode laser (ECDL) and a parabolic sample cell is presented. Using a commercially available violet laser diode and a reflective holographic grating, the ECDL achieves a maximum output power of 505 mW with line-width about 50 pm. Spontaneous Raman scattering of ambient air is acquired with this ECDL, in which an imaging Raman spectrometer is applied. Strong Raman signals of O2, N2 and H2O are observed with 1 s exposure time; a limit of detection (LOD) of CO2 about 210 ppm is achieved with an exposure time of 100 s and a 3.5-fold enhancement to the signal level is also demonstrated compared with a 532 nm green laser with the same exciting power. The results show that violet diode laser can be an attractive excitation source for Raman gas analysis.

  17. Intra-pulse Raman frequency shift versus conventional Stokes generation of diode laser pulses in optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, Evgeny A.; Mendoza-Vazquez, Sergio; Gutierrez-Gutierrez, Jaime; Ibarra-Escamilla, Baldemar; Haus, Joseph W.; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto

    2005-05-01

    We report experimental observations of stimulated Raman scattering in a standard fiber using a directly modulated DFB semiconductor laser amplified by two erbium-doped fibers. The laser pulse width was variably controlled on a nanosecond-scale; the laser emission was separated into two distinct regimes: an initial transient peak regime, followed by a quasi steady-state plateau regime. The transient leading part of the pump pulse containing fast amplitude modulation generated a broadband Raman-induced spectral shift through the modulation instability and subsequent intra-pulse Raman frequency shift. The plateau regime amplified the conventional Stokes shifted emission expected from the peaks of the gain distribution. The output signal spectrum at the end of a 9.13 km length of fiber for the transient part extends from 1550 nm to 1700 nm for a pump pulse peak power of 65 W. We found that the Raman-induced spectral shift is measurable about 8 W for every fiber length examined, 0.6 km, 4.46 km, and 9.13 km. All spectral components of the broadband scattering appear to be generated in the initial kilometer of the fiber span. The Stokes shifted light generation threshold was higher than the threshold for the intra-pulse Raman-induced broadened spectra. This fact enables the nonlinear spectral filtering of pulses from directly modulated semiconductor lasers.

  18. Raman scattering probe of ion-implanted and pulse laser annealed GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Prabhat; Jain, K. P.; Abbi, S. C.

    1996-04-01

    We report Raman scattering studies of phosphorus-ion-implanted and subsequently pulse laser annealed (PLA) GaAs. The threshold value of implantation fluence for the disappearance of one-phonon modes in the Raman spectrum of ion-implanted GaAs sample is found to be greater than that for the two-phonon modes by an order of magnitude. The phonon correlation length decreases with increasing disorder. The lattice reconstruction process during PLA creates microcrystallites for incomplete annealing, whose sizes can be given by the phonon correlation lengths, and are found to increase with the annealing power density. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectra corresponding to the allowed longitudinal-optical (LO)-phonon mode to the forbidden transverse-optical (TO)-phonon mode, ILO/ITO, is used as a quantitative measure of crystallinity in the implantation and PLA processes. The threshold annealing power density is estimated to be 20 MW/cm2 for 70 keV phosphorus-ion-implanted GaAs at a fluence of 5×1015 ions/cm2. The localized vibrational mode of phosphorus is observed in PLA samples for fluences above 1×1015 ions/cm2.

  19. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  20. Adaptation of a commercial Raman spectrometer for multiline and broadband laser operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabian, Gabor [Department of Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki ut 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary); Kramberger, Christian [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Strudlhofgasse 4, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Friedrich, Alexander; Pichler, Thomas [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Strudlhofgasse 4, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Simon, Ferenc [Department of Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki ut 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary); Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Strudlhofgasse 4, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-11-15

    A commercial single laser line Raman spectrometer is modified to accommodate multiline and tunable dye lasers, thus combining the high sensitivity of such single monochromator systems with broadband operation. Such instruments rely on high-throughput interference filters that perform both beam alignment and Rayleigh filtering. Our set-up handles this dual task with two independent elements: a beam splitter and a long pass filter. Filter rotation shifts the transmission passband, effectively expanding the range of operation. Operation is demonstrated on single-walled carbon nanotubes, for which the set-up was optimized. As the set-up operates with standard optical elements it can be customized for specific needs with relative ease. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Delivery of picosecond lasers in multimode fibers for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyong; Yang, Yaliang; Luo, Pengfei; Gao, Liang; Wong, Kelvin K; Wong, Stephen T C

    2010-06-07

    We investigated the possibility of using standard commercial multimode fibers (MMF), Corning SMF28 fibers, to deliver picosecond excitation lasers for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging. We theoretically and/or experimentally analyzed issues associated with the fiber delivery, such as dispersion length, walk-off length, nonlinear length, average threshold power for self-phase modulations, and four-wave mixing (FWM). These analyses can also be applied to other types of fibers. We found that FWM signals are generated in MMF, but they can be filtered out using a long-pass filter for CARS imaging. Finally, we demonstrated that MMF can be used for delivery of picosecond excitation lasers in the CARS imaging system without any degradation of image quality.

  2. Femtosecond laser irradiation of indium phosphide in air: Raman spectroscopic and atomic force microscopic investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonse, J.; Wrobel, J.M.; Brzezinka, K.-W.; Esser, N.; Kautek, W

    2002-12-30

    Surface modification and ablation of crystalline indium phosphide was performed with single and double 130 fs pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser. The morphological features resulting from laser processing, have been investigated by means of micro Raman spectroscopy as well as by optical, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. The studies indicate amorphous, ablated and recrystallized zones on the processed surface. In the single-pulse irradiation experimentsveral different threshold fluences could be assigned to the processes of melting, ablation and polycrystalline resolidification. Residual stress has been detected within the irradiated areas. Double-pulse exposure experiments have been analyzed in order to clarify the effect of cumulative damage in the ablation process of indium phosphide.

  3. Monitoring Dynamic Protein Expression in Single Living E. Coli. Bacterial Cells by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J W; Winhold, H; Corzett, M H; Ulloa, J M; Cosman, M; Balhorn, R; Huser, T

    2007-01-09

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) is a novel, nondestructive, and label-free method that can be used to quantitatively measure changes in cellular activity in single living cells. Here, we demonstrate its use to monitor changes in a population of E. coli cells that occur during overexpression of a protein, the extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(1-120)) Raman spectra were acquired of individual E. coli cells suspended in solution and trapped by a single tightly focused laser beam. Overexpression of MOG(1-120) in transformed E. coli Rosetta-Gami (DE3)pLysS cells was induced by addition of isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). Changes in the peak intensities of the Raman spectra from a population of cells were monitored and analyzed over a total duration of three hours. Data was also collected for concentrated purified MOG(1-120) protein in solution, and the spectra compared with that obtained for the MOG(1-120) expressing cells. Raman spectra of individual, living E. coli cells exhibit signatures due to DNA and protein molecular vibrations. Characteristic Raman markers associated with protein vibrations, such as 1257 cm{sup -1}, 1340 cm{sup -1}, 1453 cm{sup -1} and 1660 cm{sup -1}, are shown to increase as a function of time following the addition of IPTG. Comparison of these spectra and the spectra of purified MOG protein indicates that the changes are predominantly due to the induction of MOG protein expression. Protein expression was found to occur mostly within the second hour, with a 470% increase relative to the protein expressed in the first hour. A 230% relative increase between the second and third hour indicates that protein expression begins to level off within the third hour. It is demonstrated that LTRS has sufficient sensitivity for real-time, nondestructive, and quantitative monitoring of biological processes, such as protein expression, in single living cells. Such capabilities, which are not currently available in

  4. Studies on Nephrite and Jadeite Jades by Fourier Transform Infrared (ftir) and Raman Spectroscopic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, T. L.; Ng, L. L.; Lim, L. C.

    2013-10-01

    The mineralogical properties of black nephrite jade from Western Australia are studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy using both transmission and specular reflectance techniques in the 4000-400 cm-1 wavenumber region. The infrared absorption peaks in the 3700-3600 cm-1 region which are due to the O-H stretching mode provides a quantitative analysis of the Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratio in the mineral composition of jade samples. The Fe/(Fe+Mg) percentage in black nephrite is found to be higher than that in green nephrite, but comparable to that of actinolite (iron-rich nephrite). This implies that the mineralogy of black nephrite is closer to actinolite than tremolite. The jade is also characterized using Raman spectroscopy in the 1200-200 cm-1 region. Results from FTIR and Raman spectroscopic data of black nephrite jade are compared with those of green nephrite jade from New Zealand and jadeite jade from Myanmar. Black nephrite appears to have a slightly different chemical composition from green nephrite. Spectra from FTIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques were found to be useful in differentiating black nephrite, green nephrite, and green jadeite jades. Furthermore, data on refractive index, specific gravity, and hardness of black nephrite jade are measured and compared with those of green nephrite and of jadeite jade.

  5. Continuous-wave anti-Stokes Raman laser based on phase-matched nondegenerate four-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsu, Shin-ichi; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate phase-matched nondegenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) in a high-finesse optical cavity using a gaseous Raman-active medium pumped by two independent continuous-wave lasers. Efficient upconversion is achieved for pump beams at different wavelengths under phase-matched conditions by optimizing the total dispersion of the hydrogen-filled optical cavity. The independent control of the pump-beam polarizations leads to further enhancement of the upconversion efficiency arising from a larger Raman gain than that in degenerate FWM. This approach offers a promising alternative for a narrow-linewidth tunable light source for highly precise laser spectroscopy.

  6. Thermal damage study on diamond tools at varying laser heating time and temperature by Raman spectroscopy and SEM

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available damage study on diamond tools at varying laser heating time and temperature by Raman spectroscopy and SEM BN Masina1, BW Mwakikunga2, M Elayaperumal2, A Forbes1, and R Bodkin3 1CSIR National Laser Centre, PO BOX 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa 2CSIR... Slide 11 Optical images at the surface of the PCD layer Initial 15 min 968 K 25 min 979 K 5 min 895 K Dark phase is cobalt or tungsten Grey phase is diamond Slide 12 Raman shift at the surface of the PCD layer 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 0 2000...

  7. Stimulated Raman scattering in hydrogen by ultrashort laser pulse in the keV regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachau, H.; Dondera, M.

    2016-04-01

    This letter addresses the problem of stimulated Raman excitation of a hydrogen atom submitted to an ultrashort and intense laser pulse in the keV regime. The pulse central frequency ω of 55 a.u. (about 1.5 keV) is in the weakly relativistic regime, ω ≤ c/a0 (c is the speed of light in vacuum and a 0 the Bohr radius) and the pulse duration is τ ≈ 18.85 a.u. (about 456 attoseconds). We solve the corresponding time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) using a spectral approach, retardation (or nondipole) effects are included up to O(1/c) , breaking the conservation of the magnetic quantum number m and forcing the resolution of the TDSE in a three-dimensional space. Due to the laser bandwidth, which is of the order of the ionization potential of hydrogen, stimulated Raman scattering populates nlm excited states (n and l are the principal and azimuthal quantum numbers, respectively). The populations of these excited states are calculated and analyzed in terms of l and m quantum numbers, this showing the contributions of the retardation effects and their relative importance.

  8. Raman study of localized recrystallization of amorphous silicon induced by laser beam

    KAUST Repository

    Tabet, Nouar A.

    2012-06-01

    The adoption of amorphous silicon based solar cells has been drastically hindered by the low efficiency of these devices, which is mainly due to a low hole mobility. It has been shown that using both crystallized and amorphous silicon layers in solar cells leads to an enhancement of the device performance. In this study the crystallization of a-Si prepared by PECVD under various growth conditions has been investigated. The growth stresses in the films are determined by measuring the curvature change of the silicon substrate before and after film deposition. Localized crystallization is induced by exposing a-Si films to focused 532 nm laser beam of power ranging from 0.08 to 8 mW. The crystallization process is monitored by recording the Raman spectra after various exposures. The results suggest that growth stresses in the films affect the minimum laser power (threshold power). In addition, a detailed analysis of the width and position of the Raman signal indicates that the silicon grains in the crystallized regions are of few nm diameter. © 2012 IEEE.

  9. The frenectomy: a comparison of classic versus laser technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, S R

    1991-08-01

    When an abnormal labial frenum causes certain complications, frenectomy should be considered. In this article, the indications for frenectomy are outlined, classical and laser frenectomy techniques are described, and the advantages and disadvantages of both techniques are discussed.

  10. Laser beam shaping theory and techniques, second edition

    CERN Document Server

    Dickey, Fred M

    2014-01-01

    Laser Beam Shaping: Theory and Techniques addresses the theory and practice of every important technique for lossless beam shaping. Complete with experimental results as well as guidance on when beam shaping is practical and when each technique is appropriate, the Second Edition is updated to reflect significant developments in the field. This authoritative text:Features new chapters on axicon light ring generation systems, laser-beam-splitting (fan-out) gratings, vortex beams, and microlens diffusersDescribes the latest advances in beam profile measurement technology and laser beam shaping using diffractive diffusersContains new material on wavelength dependence, channel integrators, geometrical optics, and optical softwareLaser Beam Shaping: Theory and Techniques, Second Edition not only provides a working understanding of the fundamentals, but also offers insight into the potential application of laser-beam-profile shaping in laser system design.

  11. Lasers techniques Improvement of classical accelerators by lasers. Laser accelerators with and without plasmas. Lasers accelerators in vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    1991-01-01

    Of the unconventional accelerator techniques those including lasers are reported. After explaining the advances by lasers for classical accelerator techniques, as FELs and other methods for 100 GHz generation of GW pulses, a survey is given of far field and near field laser acceleration. Problems of the beat-wave accelerator are discussed and schemes for particle interaction in vacuum without plasma are elaborated. One scheme is the Boreham experiment and another is the acceleration of "standing" wave fields where charged particles are trapped in the intensity minima. Another scheme uses the relativistic acceleration by half waves where the now available petawatt-picosecond laser pulses should produce GeV electron pulses of high luminosity. Increase of these electron enrgies would need very large lasers in the future.

  12. Supercontinuum generation enhanced by conventional Raman amplification at pumping by nanosecond pulses from a directly modulated DFB laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Jaime; Kuzin, Evgeny A.; Ibarra-Escamilla, Baldemar; Mendoza-Vázquez, Sergio; Estudillo-Ayala, Julián Moisés; Haus, Joseph W.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated spectral broadening in a standard fiber using a nanosecond directly modulated DFB laser (λ=1549 nm), amplified by a two stage Erbium-doped fiber amplifier. The amplifier provided amplification of 2-mW peak power input pulses to 100-W peak power output pulses. In other hand, the directly modulation of DFB lasers caused transient oscillations at the beginning of pulses. In our case pulses consisted of a 2-ns transient part followed by a steady-state plateau. We used a monochromator to measure the spectrum at the fiber output. A fast photodetector was placed at the monochromator output and pulse shapes were measured for different wavelengths. This technique allowed the separate measurement of different parts in output pulses spectrum. We used the SMF-28 fiber with the standard dispersion of 20 ps/nm-km for our wavelength. We made measurements of the output spectra for three fiber lengths: 0.6-km, 4.46-km and 9.15-km; finding that the initial transient part of a pulse shows supercontinuum generation whereas the plateau results in conventional Raman amplification of this supercontinuum.

  13. The characteristics of Kerr-lens mode-locked self-Raman Nd:YVO4 1176 nm laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuohan; Peng, Jiying; Yao, Jianquan; Han, Ming

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we report on a compact and feasible dual-concave cavity CW Kerr-lens mode-locked self-Raman Nd:YVO4 laser. A self-starting diode-pumped picosecond Nd:YVO4 1176 nm laser is demonstrated without any additional components, where the stimulated Stokes Raman scattering and Kerr-lens-induced mode locking are operated in the same crystal. With an incident pump power of 12 W, the average output power at 1176 nm is up to 643 mW. Meanwhile, the repetition rate and the pulse width of the fundamental laser are measured to be 1.53 GHz and 8.6 ps, respectively. In addition, the yellow laser output at 588 nm is realized by frequency doubling with a LiB3O5 crystal.

  14. Dual-wavelength Y-branch distributed Bragg reflector diode laser at 785 nanometers for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwald, Martin; Eppich, Bernd; Fricke, Jörg; Ginolas, Arnim; Bugge, Frank; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2014-01-01

    A dual-wavelength Y-branch distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) diode laser at 785 nm is presented as an excitation light source for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS). The monolithic device was realized with deeply etched surface DBR gratings using one-step epitaxy. An optical output power of 140 mW was obtained in continuous-wave (CW) operation for each laser cavity, with emission wavelengths of the device at 784.50 and 785.12 nm. A spectral width of the laser emission of 30 pm (0.5 cm(-1)), including 95% of optical power, was measured. The mean spectral distance of both excitation lines is 0.63 nm (10.2 cm(-1)) over the whole operating range. Raman experiments using polystyrene as the test sample and ambient light as the interference source were carried out and demonstrate the suitability of the dual-wavelength diode laser for SERDS.

  15. Raman spectroscopy and electrical properties of InAs nanowires with local oxidation enabled by substrate micro-trenches and laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanta, R.; Krogstrup, P.; Nygård, J.; Jespersen, T. S., E-mail: tsand@fys.ku.dk [Center for Quantum Devices and Nano Science Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2100 (Denmark); Madsen, M. H. [Danish Fundamental Metrology, Matematiktorvet 307, Kgs. Lyngby 2800 (Denmark); Liao, Z.; Vosch, T. [Nano-Science Center, Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2100 (Denmark)

    2015-12-14

    The thermal gradients along indium arsenide nanowires were engineered by a combination of fabricated micro-trenches in the supporting substrate and focused laser irradiation. This allowed local spatial control of thermally activated oxidation reactions of the nanowire on the scale of the diffraction limit. The locality of the oxidation was detected by micro-Raman mapping, and the results were found to be consistent with numerical simulations of the temperature profile. Applying the technique to nanowires in electrical devices the locally oxidized nanowires remained conducting with a lower conductance as expected for an effectively thinner conducting core.

  16. Raman spectroscopy and electrical properties of InAs nanowires with local oxidation enabled by substrate micro-trenches and laser irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tanta, R; Liao, Z; Krogstrup, P; Vosch, T; Nygard, J; Jespersen, T S

    2016-01-01

    The thermal gradient along indium-arsenide nanowires was engineered by a combination of fabricated micro- trenches in the supporting substrate and focused laser irradiation. This allowed local control of thermally activated oxidation reactions of the nanowire on the scale of the diffraction limit. The locality of the oxidation was detected by micro-Raman mapping, and the results were found consistent with numerical simulations of the temperature profile. Applying the technique to nanowires in electrical devices the locally oxidized nanowires remained conducting with a lower conductance as expected for an effectively thinner conducting core.

  17. Raman spectroscopy and electrical properties of InAs nanowires with local oxidation enabled by substrate micro-trenches and laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanta, R.; Madsen, M. H.; Liao, Z.; Krogstrup, P.; Vosch, T.; Nygârd, J.; Jespersen, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal gradients along indium arsenide nanowires were engineered by a combination of fabricated micro-trenches in the supporting substrate and focused laser irradiation. This allowed local spatial control of thermally activated oxidation reactions of the nanowire on the scale of the diffraction limit. The locality of the oxidation was detected by micro-Raman mapping, and the results were found to be consistent with numerical simulations of the temperature profile. Applying the technique to nanowires in electrical devices the locally oxidized nanowires remained conducting with a lower conductance as expected for an effectively thinner conducting core.

  18. Application of the laser spectroscopy techniques for analysis of pigments on paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Katarzyna; Śliwiński, Gerard

    2005-09-01

    Techniques of laser emission spectroscopy such as LIPS and LIF are applied to identify pastels and pigments composition for the use in conservation of historical documents. The question of data reliable for pigment identification by these techniques is considered. For model samples made of the cotton paper of chemical composition corresponding to the historical ones, and coated with pastels of different colors the LIPS and LIF spectra are recorded. Samples are excited by the pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 355 or 266 nm. The reference Raman spectra are collected, too. Bands characteristic for the blue pigments: PB15, PB29; violet one PV16, and yellow PY 184 are identified exclusively by LIPS in agreement with literature. Also additives such as the barium white found in the Scarlet pastel, and ultramarine (Na8-10[Al6Si6O24]S2-4) with titanium white (TiO2) in the Phthalo Blue are identified, and confirmed by the Raman technique as well. The pigments anthraquinone (PR 168), isoindolinone (PY 110) and monoazo (PY 74) are not revealed. In the LIF spectra only a broad band centered at 612 nm and corresponding to anthraquinone (red pastel) can be clearly assigned.

  19. Laser-MBE of nickel nanowires using AAO template: a new active substrate of surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lisheng; Fang, Yan; Zhang, Pengxiang

    2008-01-01

    The highly ordered anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template was fabricated using aluminum anodizing in electrolytes with two-step method, which apertures were about 50-80nm. The nickel nanowires with about 40-70nm in diameter was prepared on the AAO template by laser-MBE (molecular beam epitaxy). And high quality Raman spectra of SudanII were obtained on the glass covered with the nickel nanowires. On the nickel nanowires there are both surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and tip enhanced Raman scattering (TERS). The new observations not only enlarge the range of SERS applications, but also imply a possible new enhancement mechanism. Otherwise the Raman and SERS frequencies of SudanII molecule were calculated using, respectively, DFT and B3PW91.

  20. Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy based on a line-scan hyperspectral Raman system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) is a technique that can obtain subsurface layered information by collecting Raman spectra from a series of surface positions laterally offset from the excitation laser. The current methods of SORS measurement are typically either slow due to mechanical move...

  1. Laser image denoising technique based on multi-fractal theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lin; Sun, Huayan; Tian, Weiqing; Wang, Shuai

    2014-02-01

    The noise of laser images is complex, which includes additive noise and multiplicative noise. Considering the features of laser images, the basic processing capacity and defects of the common algorithm, this paper introduces the fractal theory into the research of laser image denoising. The research of laser image denoising is implemented mainly through the analysis of the singularity exponent of each pixel in fractal space and the feature of multi-fractal spectrum. According to the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the processed image, the laser image processing technique based on fractal theory not only effectively removes the complicated noise of the laser images obtained by range-gated laser active imaging system, but can also maintains the detail information when implementing the image denoising processing. For different laser images, multi-fractal denoising technique can increase SNR of the laser image at least 1~2dB compared with other denoising techniques, which basically meet the needs of the laser image denoising technique.

  2. 2 nm continuously tunable 488nm micro-integrated diode-laser-based SHG light source for Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braune, M.; Maiwald, M.; Sumpf, B.; Tränkle, G.

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy in the visible spectral range is of great interest due to resonant Raman effects. Nevertheless, fluorescence and ambient light can mask the weak Raman lines. Shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy is a demonstrated tool to overcome this drawback. To apply this method, a light source with two alternating wavelengths is necessary. The spectral distance between these two wavelengths has to be adapted to the width of the Raman signal. According to the sample under investigation the width of the Raman signal could be in the range of 3 cm-1 - 12 cm-1. In this work, a micro-integrated light source emitting at 488 nm with a continuous wavelength tuning range up to 2 nm (83 cm-1) is presented. The pump source, a DFB laser emitting at 976 nm, and a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) ridge waveguide crystal is used for the second harmonic generation (SHG). Both components are mounted on a μ-Peltier-element for temperature control. Here, a common wavelength tuning of the pump wavelength and the acceptance bandwidth of the SHG crystal via temperature is achieved. With the results the light source is suitable for portable Raman and SERDS experiments with a flexible spectral distance between both excitation wavelengths for SERDS with respect to the sample under investigation.

  3. Measurement of Fuel Concentration Distribution in a Sooting Flame through Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Kazuhiro; Amagai, Kenji; Satoh, Keiji; Arai, Masataka

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy with KrF excimer laser was applied to obtain a fuel concentration distribution in a sooting flame. In the case of sooting flame, fluorescence from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and laser-induced incandescence (LII) from soot particles appeared with Raman scattering. These background emissions overlapped on the Raman scattering. In order to separate the Raman scattering and the background emissions, polarization property of laser-induced emissions was utilized. Since the background emissions were depolarized whereas the Raman scattering was highly polarized, it is possible to subtract the background emissions from the overlapping signal of the Raman scattering and the background emissions. Subtracting the emission signals for the electric vector of the laser light perpendicular and parallel to the direction of observation allows to extract the precise Raman signals. By using this technique, detailed fuel concentration distribution in sooting flames could be obtained based on Raman scattering.

  4. A versatile setup using femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yujie, E-mail: styojm@physics.tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Voronine, Dmitri V.; Sokolov, Alexei V. [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798 (United States); Scully, Marlan O. [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798 (United States); Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We report a versatile setup based on the femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The setup uses a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire oscillator source and a folded 4f pulse shaper, in which the pulse shaping is carried out through conventional optical elements and does not require a spatial light modulator. Our setup is simple in alignment, and can be easily switched between the collinear single-beam and the noncollinear two-beam configurations. We demonstrate the capability for investigating both transparent and highly scattering samples by detecting transmitted and reflected signals, respectively.

  5. 2D Raman spectroscopy as an alternative technique for distinguishing oleanoic acid and ursolic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, César; Crotti, Antônio E. M.; Vessecchi, Ricardo; Cunha, Wilson R.

    2006-11-01

    The isomeric triterpenes oleanoic acid and ursolic acid are compounds exhibiting a variety of biological activities. Structurally, they differ only in the position of the methyl group (C-29) at ring E. The differentiation of these two compounds requires a detailed analysis of their 13C and 1H NMR spectra which is often tedious and time-consuming, besides the need of using deuterated solvents. In this work, we report the use of bidimensional Raman spectroscopy as a fast technique to distinguish these two bioactive isomeric compounds.

  6. Raman facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raman scattering is a powerful light scattering technique used to diagnose the internal structure of molecules and crystals. In a light scattering experiment, light...

  7. Fast identification of substance by measuring two Raman peaks with dual strip silicon photomultipliers and gated photon counting technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoqing; Hu, Xiaobo; Cheng, Yue; Zhang, Chunling; Liu, Lina; Yang, Ru; Liang, Kun; Han, Dejun

    2011-08-20

    In this report, we use carbon tetrachloride as an example to demonstrate that substance can be quickly identified through the measurement of the two Raman peaks simply by an integrated module of dual strip silicon photomultipliers operating at room temperature in conjunction with a gated photon counting technique. Both the peak positions and the relative intensity ratio of the two Raman peaks are used to identify the substance with a reduced false acceptance rate. A complete Raman spectrum of the substance can also be measured by using this method combined with a scanning monochromator. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  8. FAST CARS: engineering a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid identification of bacterial spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, M O; Kattawar, G W; Lucht, R P; Opatrny, T; Pilloff, H; Rebane, A; Sokolov, A V; Zubairy, M S

    2002-08-20

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is challenging. In particular, the short dephasing times and rapid internal conversion rates are major obstacles. However, adiabatic fast passage techniques and the ability to generate combs of phase-coherent femtosecond pulses provide tools for the generation and utilization of maximal quantum coherence in large molecules and biopolymers. We call this technique FAST CARS (femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy), and the present article proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify preselected molecules in real time.

  9. The future of high power laser techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poprawe, Reinhart; Loosen, Peter; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-05-01

    High Power Lasers have been used for years in corresponding applications. Constantly new areas and new processes have been demonstrated, developed and transferred to fruitful use in industry. With the advent of diode pumped solid state lasers in the multi-kW-power regime at beam qualities not far away from the diffraction limit, a new area of applicability has opened. In welding applications speeds could be increased and systems could be developed with higher efficiently leading also to new perspectives for increased productivity, e.g. in combined processing. Quality control is increasingly demanded by the applying industries, however applications still are rare. Higher resolution of coaxial process control systems in time and space combined with new strategies in signal processing could give rise to new applications. The general approach described in this paper emphasizes the fact, that laser applications can be developed more efficiently, more precisely and with higher quality, if the laser radiation is tailored properly to the corresponding application. In applying laser sources, the parameter ranges applicable are by far wider and more flexible compared to heat, mechanical or even electrical energy. The time frame ranges from several fs to continuous wave and this spans approximately 15 orders of magnitude. Spacewise, the foci range from several µm to cm and the resulting intensities suitable for materials processing span eight orders of magnitude from 10 3 to 10 11 W/cm2. In addition to space (power, intensity) and time (pulse) the wavelength can be chosen as a further parameter of optimization. As a consequence, the resulting new applications are vast and can be utilized in almost every market segment of our global economy (Fig. 1). In the past and only partly today, however, this flexibility of laser technology is not exploited in full in materials processing, basically because in the high power regime the lasers with tailored beam properties are not

  10. Analysis of the enamel/adhesive resin interface with laser Raman microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Sato, Hikaru; Onose, Hideo; Moore, B Keith; Platt, Jeffery A

    2003-01-01

    Adhesion of resin composites into enamel is currently believed to rely on infiltration of bonding resin into the porous zone, establishing micromechanical retention to etched enamel. This study investigated the change in chemical composition of the enamel/resin interface using a laser Raman microscopic system (System-2000, Renishaw). Two-step bonding systems, Mac Bond II (Tokuyama Corp), Clearfil Mega Bond and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were employed. Resin composites were bonded to bovine enamel with bonding systems and sectioned through the bonded interface. The sectioned surfaces were then polished with diamond pastes down to 1.0 microm particle size. Raman spectra were successively recorded along a line perpendicular to the enamel/ resin interface. The sample stage was moved in 0.2 microm increments on a computer-controlled X-Y precision table. Additional spectra from samples of enamel and cured bonding resins were recorded for reference. The relative amounts of the hydroxyapatite (960cm(-1), P-O), bonding agent (640cm(-1), aromatic ring) and alkyl group (1450cm(-1), C-H) in the enamel/resin bonding area were calculated. From Raman spectroscopy, a gradual decrease in hydroxyapatite was observed, and it was estimated to extend 2.2-2.6 microm for Mac Bond II, 1.2-1.6 pm for Clearfil Mega Bond and 5.2-5.6 microm for Single Bond. Furthermore, the enamel/resin interface represents a gradual transition of bonding agent from the resin to tooth side. Evidence of poor saturation of adhesive resin in etched enamel with Single Bond was detected. From the results of this study, non-uniform resin infiltration into etched enamel was detected and the degree of resin infiltration was found to be different among the bonding systems used.

  11. Micro-Raman spectroscopy a powerful technique to identify crocidolite and erionite fibers in tissue sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaudo, C.; Croce, A.; Allegrina, M.; Baris, I. Y.; Dogan, A.; Powers, A.; Rivera, Z.; Bertino, P.; Yang, H.; Gaudino, G.; Carbone, M.

    2013-05-01

    Exposure to mineral fibers such asbestos and erionite is widely associated with the development of lung cancer and pleural malignant mesothelioma (MM). Pedigree and mineralogical studies indicated that genetics may influence mineral fiber carcinogenesis. Although dimensions strongly impact on the fiber carcinogenic potential, also the chemical composition and the fiber is relevant. By using micro-Raman spectroscopy we show here persistence and identification of different mineral phases, directly on histopathological specimens of mice and humans. Fibers of crocidolite asbestos and erionite of different geographic areas (Oregon, US and Cappadocia, Turkey) were injected in mice intra peritoneum. MM developed in 10/15 asbestos-treated mice after 5 months, and in 8-10/15 erionite-treated mice after 14 months. The persistence of the injected fibers was investigated in pancreas, liver, spleen and in the peritoneal tissue. The chemical identification of the different phases occurred in the peritoneal cavity or at the organ borders, while only rarely fibers were localized in the parenchyma. Raman patterns allow easily to recognize crocidolite and erionite fibers. Microscopic analysis revealed that crocidolite fibers were frequently coated by ferruginous material ("asbestos bodies"), whereas erionite fibers were always free from coatings. We also analyzed by micro-Raman spectroscopy lung tissues, both from MM patients of the Cappadocia, where a MM epidemic developed because of environmental exposure to erionite, and from Italian MM patients with occupational exposure to asbestos. Our findings demonstrate that micro-Raman spectroscopy is technique able to identify mineral phases directly on histopathology specimens, as routine tissue sections prepared for diagnostic purpose. REFERENCES A.U. Dogan, M. Dogan. Environ. Geochem. Health 2008, 30(4), 355. M. Carbone, S. Emri, A.U. Dogan, I. Steele, M. Tuncer, HI. Pass, et al. Nat. Rev. Cancer. 2007, 7 (2),147. M. Carbone, Y

  12. Identification of carotenoids in ancient salt from Death Valley, Saline Valley, and Searles Lake, California, using laser Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Y D; Lowenstein, T K; Timofeeff, M N

    2013-11-01

    Carotenoids are common components of many photosynthetic organisms and are well known from the red waters of hypersaline ecosystems where they are produced by halophilic algae and prokaryotes. They are also of great interest as biomarkers in extraterrestrial samples. Few laser Raman spectroscopy studies have examined ancient field samples, where pigments and microscopic life are less defined. Here, we have identified carotenoids in ancient halite brine inclusions, 9 ka to 1.44 Ma in age, from borehole cores taken from Death Valley, Saline Valley, and Searles Lake, California, for the first time with laser Raman spectroscopy. Carotenoids occurred in fluid inclusions as colorless to red-brown amorphous and crystalline masses associated with spheroidal algal cells similar in appearance to the common halophilic alga Dunaliella. Spectra from carotenoid standards, including β-carotene, lycopene, and lutein, were compared to microscopically targeted carotenoids in fluid inclusions. Carotenoids produced characteristic bands in the Raman spectrum, 1000-1020 cm⁻¹ (v₃), 1150-1170 cm⁻¹ (v₂), and 1500-1550 cm⁻¹ (v₁), when exposed to visible laser excitation. Laser Raman analyses confirmed the presence of carotenoids with these characteristic peaks in ancient halite. A number of band sets were repeated at various depths (ages), which suggests the stability of this class of organic molecules. Carotenoids appear well preserved in ancient salt, which supports other observations, for example, preserved DNA and live cells, that fluid inclusions in buried halite deposits preserve intact halophilic microbial ecosystems. This work demonstrates the value of laser Raman spectroscopy and carotenoids in extraterrestrial exploration for remnants of microbial life.

  13. Self-Raman Nd:YVO4 laser and electro-optic technology for space-based sodium lidar instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yu, Anthony W.; Janches, Diego; Jones, Sarah L.; Blagojevic, Branimir; Chen, Jeffrey

    2014-02-01

    We are developing a laser and electro-optic technology to remotely measure Sodium (Na) by adapting existing lidar technology with space flight heritage. The developed instrumentation will serve as the core for the planning of an Heliophysics mission targeted to study the composition and dynamics of Earth's mesosphere based on a spaceborne lidar that will measure the mesospheric Na layer. We present performance results from our diode-pumped tunable Q-switched self-Raman c-cut Nd:YVO4 laser with intra-cavity frequency doubling that produces multi-watt 589 nm wavelength output. The c-cut Nd:YVO4 laser has a fundamental wavelength that is tunable from 1063-1067 nm. A CW External Cavity diode laser is used as a injection seeder to provide single-frequency grating tunable output around 1066 nm. The injection-seeded self-Raman shifted Nd:VO4 laser is tuned across the sodium vapor D2 line at 589 nm. We will review technologies that provide strong leverage for the sodium lidar laser system with strong heritage from the Ice Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS). These include a space-qualified frequency-doubled 9W @ 532 nm wavelength Nd:YVO4 laser, a tandem interference filter temperature-stabilized fused-silica-etalon receiver and high-bandwidth photon-counting detectors.

  14. Self-Raman Nd:YVO4 Laser and Electro-Optic Technology for Space-Based Sodium Lidar Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yu, Anthony W.; Janches, Diego; Jones, Sarah L.; Blagojevic, Branimir; Chen, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a laser and electro-optic technology to remotely measure Sodium (Na) by adapting existing lidar technology with space flight heritage. The developed instrumentation will serve as the core for the planning of an Heliophysics mission targeted to study the composition and dynamics of Earth's mesosphere based on a spaceborne lidar that will measure the mesospheric Na layer. We present performance results from our diode-pumped tunable Q-switched self-Raman c-cut Nd:YVO4 laser with intra-cavity frequency doubling that produces multi-watt 589 nm wavelength output. The c-cut Nd:YVO4 laser has a fundamental wavelength that is tunable from 1063-1067 nanometers. A CW (Continuous Wave) External Cavity diode laser is used as a injection seeder to provide single-frequency grating tunable output around 1066 nanometers. The injection-seeded self-Raman shifted Nd:VO4 laser is tuned across the sodium vapor D2 line at 589 nanometers. We will review technologies that provide strong leverage for the sodium lidar laser system with strong heritage from the Ice Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS). These include a space-qualified frequency-doubled 9 watts-at-532-nanometer wavelength Nd:YVO4 laser, a tandem interference filter temperature-stabilized fused-silica-etalon receiver and high-bandwidth photon-counting detectors.

  15. A comparison of crud phases appearing on some Swedish BWR fuel rods using Laser Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, H.P. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)]|[Lulea Univ. of Technology (Sweden)

    2002-07-01

    Previous investigations showed that laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) can be used as a phase specific analytical tool for radioactive fuel crud samples and also for details in the underlying layer of zirconium dioxide. It is relatively easy to record Raman spectra that discriminate between chemical phases for all crud oxides of interest. The method has therefore been recommended for crud investigations within the Swedish program. At ideal conditions the resolution is about 1 {mu}m, permitting detailed position determination of crud phases in the sample. Therefore LRS is a very good complement to X-ray diffraction (XRD). The methods for sample preparation and handling of radioactive crud samples for LRS turn out to be relatively simple. A detailed LRS study on fuel crud samples from Barsebaeck 2, Forsmark 2, Forsmark 3 and Ringhals 1 was performed in this work. All of those Swedish BWRs were operated at different conditions at the time of sampling. The chemistry regimes covered NWC, HWC and other variable conditions. Also different types of fuel, exposure times and sampling positions were selected. (authors)

  16. Laser Raman and infra-red spectra of biomolecule: 5-aminouracil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J S Singh

    2008-03-01

    Laser Raman (200-4000 cm-1) and IR (200-4000 cm-1) spectra of 5-aminouracil were recorded in the region 200{4000 cm-1. Assuming a planar geometry and C point group symmetry, it has been possible to assign all the 36 (25′ + 11″) normal modes of vibration for the first time. The two NH bonds of the NH2 group appear to be equivalent as the NH2 stretching frequencies satisfy the empirical relation proposed for the two equivalent NH bonds of the NH2 group. The two NH2 stretching frequencies are distinctly separated from the CH/NH ring stretching frequencies. A strong and sharp IR band at 3360 cm-1 could be identified as the anti-symmetric NH2 mode whereas the band at 3290 cm-1 with smaller density could be identified as the symmetric NH2 stretching mode. All other bands have also been assigned different fundamentals/overtones/combinations.

  17. Laser writing of single-crystalline gold substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Astha; Sharma, Geeta; Ranjan, Neeraj; Mittholiya, Kshitij; Bhatnagar, Anuj; Singh, B. P.; Mathur, Deepak; Vasa, Parinda

    2017-07-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy, a powerful contemporary tool for studying low-concentration analytes via surface plasmon induced enhancement of local electric field, is of utility in biochemistry, material science, threat detection, and environmental studies. We have developed a simple, fast, scalable, and relatively low-cost optical method of fabricating and characterizing large-area, reusable and broadband SERS substrates with long storage lifetime. We use tightly focused, intense infra-red laser pulses to write gratings on single-crystalline, Au (1 1 1) gold films on mica which act as SERS substrates. Our single-crystalline SERS substrates compare favourably, in terms of surface quality and roughness, to those fabricated in poly-crystalline Au films. Tests show that our SERS substrates have the potential of detecting urea and 1,10-phenantroline adulterants in milk and water, respectively, at 0.01 ppm (or lower) concentrations.

  18. Techniques for preventing damage to high power laser components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowers, I.F.; Patton, H.G.; Jones, W.A.; Wentworth, D.E.

    1977-09-01

    Techniques for preventing damage to components of the LASL Shiva high power laser system were briefly presented. Optical element damage in the disk amplifier from the combined fluence of the primary laser beam and the Xenon flash lamps that pump the cavity was discussed. Assembly and cleaning techniques were described which have improved optical element life by minimizing particulate and optically absorbing film contamination on assembled amplifier structures. A Class-100 vertical flaw clean room used for assembly and inspection of laser components was also described. The life of a disk amplifier was extended from less than 50 shots to 500 shots through application of these assembly and cleaning techniques. (RME)

  19. Imaging of Scleral Collagen Deformation Using Combined Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy and Polarized Light Microscopy Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Nilay; Wang, Mian; Solocinski, Jason; Kim, Wonsuk; Argento, Alan

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an optospectroscopic characterization technique for soft tissue microstructure using site-matched confocal Raman microspectroscopy and polarized light microscopy. Using the technique, the microstructure of soft tissue samples is directly observed by polarized light microscopy during loading while spatially correlated spectroscopic information is extracted from the same plane, verifying the orientation and arrangement of the collagen fibers. Results show the response and orientation of the collagen fiber arrangement in its native state as well as during tensile and compressive loadings in a porcine sclera model. An example is also given showing how the data can be used with a finite element program to estimate the strain in individual collagen fibers. The measurements demonstrate features that indicate microstructural reorganization and damage of the sclera's collagen fiber arrangement under loading. The site-matched confocal Raman microspectroscopic characterization of the tissue provides a qualitative measure to relate the change in fibrillar arrangement with possible chemical damage to the collagen microstructure. Tests and analyses presented here can potentially be used to determine the stress-strain behavior, and fiber reorganization of the collagen microstructure in soft tissue during viscoelastic response.

  20. Design and simulation of 1310 nm and 1480 nm single-mode photonic crystal fiber Raman lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, S K; Sasaki, K; Saitoh, K; Koshiba, M

    2008-01-21

    We have numerically investigated the Raman lasing characteristics of a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (HNPCF). HNPCF Raman lasers are designed to deliver outputs at 1.3 microm and 1.48 microm wavelengths through three and six cascades of Raman Stokes cavities when the pumps of 1117 nm and 1064 nm are injected into HNPCF module, respectively. A quantum efficiency of approximately 47% was achieved in a short length of HNPCF for 1.3 microm lasing wavelength. The HNPCF design is modified further to operate in single-mode fashion keeping intact its Raman lasing characteristics. The modified HNPCF design consists of two air-hole rings where the higher-order modes in the central core are suppressed by enhancing their leakage losses drastically, thus ceasing their propagation in the short length of HNPCF. On the other hand, the fundamental mode is well confined to the central core region, unaffecting its lasing performances. Further, the lasing characteristics of HNPCF at 1480 nm are compared with conventional highly nonlinear fiber Raman laser operating at 1480 nm. It is found that one can reduce the fiber length by five times in case of HNPCF with nearly similar conversion efficiency.

  1. Kinetics of the laser-induced solid phase crystallization of amorphous silicon-Time-resolved Raman spectroscopy and computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Očenášek, J.; Novák, P.; Prušáková, L.

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates that a laser-induced crystallization instrumented with Raman spectroscopy is, in general, an effective tool to study the thermally activated crystallization kinetics. It is shown, for the solid phase crystallization of an amorphous silicon thin film, that the integral intensity of Raman spectra corresponding to the crystalline phase grows linearly in the time-logarithmic scale. A mathematical model, which assumes random nucleation and crystal growth, was designed to simulate the crystallization process in the non-uniform temperature field induced by laser. The model is based on solving the Eikonal equation and the Arhenius temperature dependence of the crystal nucleation and the growth rate. These computer simulations successfully approximate the crystallization process kinetics and suggest that laser-induced crystallization is primarily thermally activated.

  2. “Two-Step” Raman Imaging Technique To Guide Chemo-Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Lin

    2015-08-13

    Graphene oxide-wrapped gold nanorods (GO@AuNRs) offer efficient drug delivery as well as NIR laser photothermal therapy (PTT) in vitro and in vivo. However, no real-time observation of drug release has been reported to better understand the synergy of chemotherapy and PTT. Herein, surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is employed to guide chemo-photothermal cancer therapy by a two-step mechanism. In the presence of GO as an internal standard, SERS signals of DOX (doxorubicin) loaded onto GO@AuNRs are found to be pH-responsive. Both DOX and GO show strong SERS signals before the DOX@GO@AuNRs are endocytic. However, when the DOX@GO@AuNRs enter acidic microenvironments such as endosomes and/or lysosomes, the DOX signals start decreasing while the GO signals remain the same. This plasmonic antenna could be used to identify the appropriate time to apply the PTT laser during chemo-photothermal therapy.

  3. Effect of collisional lines broadening and calibration functions in the pure rotational Raman lidar technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, Vladislav V.; Zuev, Vladimir V.

    2016-10-01

    We present and examine two three-coefficient calibration functions to be used for the tropospheric temperature retrievals via the pure rotational Raman (PRR) lidar technique. These functions are the special cases of the general analytical calibration function in the PRR lidar technique. The general function special cases take into account the collisional (pressure) broadening of all individual atmospheric N2 and O2 PRR lines in varying degrees. We apply these two special cases to real lidar remote sensing data and compare nighttime temperature profiles retrieved using these calibration functions to the profiles retrieved using other known ones. The absolute statistical uncertainties of temperature retrieval are also given in an analytical form. Lidar measurements data, obtained in Tomsk (56.48° N, 85.05° E, Western Siberia, Russia) using the IMCES PRR lidar at λ = 354.67 nm on 1 April 2015, were used for the tropospheric temperature retrievals (3-12 km).

  4. Polarized Raman study on the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yang

    2014-11-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films on different substrates prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Interestingly, the Raman spectra of BiFeO3 films exhibit distinct polarization dependences. The symmetries of the fundamental Raman modes in 50-700 cm-1 were identified based on group theory. The symmetries of the high order Raman modes in 900-1500 cm-1 of BiFeO3 are determined for the first time, which can provide strong clarifications to the symmetry of the fundamental peaks in 400-700 cm-1 in return. Moreover, the lattice structures of BiFeO3 films are identified consequently on the basis of Raman spectroscopy. BiFeO3 films on SrRuO3 coated SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate, CaRuO3 coated SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate and tin-doped indium oxide substrate are found to be in the rhombohedral structure, while BiFeO3 film on SrRuO3 coated Nb: SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate is in the monoclinic structure. Our results suggest that polarized Raman spectroscopy would be a feasible tool to study the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films.

  5. Study of engineering surfaces using laser-scattering techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Babu Rao; Baldev Raj

    2003-06-01

    Surface roughness parameters are described. Various surface characterization techniques are reviewed briefly. Interaction of light with the surface is discussed. Laser-scattering methods to characterise the surface are detailed. Practical cases, where laser-scattering methods have provided useful information about surface characteristics, are illustrated.

  6. Nonreciprocal lasing and polarization selectivity in silicon ring Raman lasers based on micro- and nano-scale waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, N.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper I present a generic model that describes the lasing characteristics of continuous-wave circular and racetrack-shaped ring Raman lasers based on micro- and nano-scale silicon waveguides, including their lasing directionality and polarization behavior. This model explicitly takes into account the effective Raman gain values for forward and backward lasing, the Raman amplification in the bus waveguide, and the spatial gain variations for different polarization states in the ring structure. I show numerically that ring lasers based on micro-scale waveguides generate unidirectional lasing in either the forward or backward direction because of an asymmetry in nonlinear losses at near-infrared telecommunication wavelengths, whereas those based on nanowires yield only backward lasing due to a non-reciprocity in effective gain. Furthermore, the model indicates that backward lasing can yield a significantly higher lasing output at the bus waveguide facets than lasing in the forward direction. Finally, considering a TE-polarized pump input for a (100) grown silicon ring Raman laser, I demonstrate numerically that the polarization state of the lasing radiation strongly depends on whether micro-scale or nano-scale waveguides are used.

  7. Vibrational techniques applied to photosynthesis: Resonance Raman and fluorescence line-narrowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Andrew; Pascal, Andrew A; Robert, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy may yield precise information on the conformation of, and the interactions assumed by, the chromophores involved in the first steps of the photosynthetic process. Selectivity is achieved via resonance with the absorption transition of the chromophore of interest. Fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy is a complementary technique, in that it provides the same level of information (structure, conformation, interactions), but in this case for the emitting pigment(s) only (whether isolated or in an ensemble of interacting chromophores). The selectivity provided by these vibrational techniques allows for the analysis of pigment molecules not only when they are isolated in solvents, but also when embedded in soluble or membrane proteins and even, as shown recently, in vivo. They can be used, for instance, to relate the electronic properties of these pigment molecules to their structure and/or the physical properties of their environment. These techniques are even able to follow subtle changes in chromophore conformation associated with regulatory processes. After a short introduction to the physical principles that govern resonance Raman and fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopies, the information content of the vibrational spectra of chlorophyll and carotenoid molecules is described in this article, together with the experiments which helped in determining which structural parameter(s) each vibrational band is sensitive to. A selection of applications is then presented, in order to illustrate how these techniques have been used in the field of photosynthesis, and what type of information has been obtained. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems.

  8. Monolithic Y-branch dual wavelength DBR diode laser at 671nm for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwald, M.; Fricke, J.; Ginolas, A.; Pohl, J.; Sumpf, B.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2013-05-01

    A dual-wavelength laser diode source suitable for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) is presented. This monolithic device contains two ridge waveguide (RW) sections with wavelengths adjusted distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) gratings as rear side mirrors. An integrated Y-branch coupler guides the emission into a common output aperture. The two wavelengths are centered at 671 nm with a well-defined spectral spacing of about 0.5 nm, i.e. 10 cm-1. Separate RW sections can be individually addressed by injection current. An output power up to 110 mW was achieved. Raman experiments demonstrate the suitability of these devices for SERDS.

  9. Raman monitoring of a catalytic system at work: Influence of the reactant on the sensitivity to laser-induced heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, Josefine; Gaigneaux, Eric M.

    2017-02-01

    Characterizing catalysts under working conditions is crucial to understand and to optimize their behavior and performance. However, when Raman spectroscopy is used, attention has to be paid to laser-induced artefacts. While laser irradiation is often claimed to lead to a temperature gradient between the integral catalyst bed and the sampling point, neither the circumstances when such effect appears, nor if it systematically occurs or not, are really explored in details. The present paper shows that the sensitivity of a catalyst to laser-induced heating largely depends on the gas composition under which the analysis is done, in particular that it depends whether the catalyst has adsorbed reactant molecules or not. These aspects are here addressed via the Raman in situ exploration of H3PW12O40. This heteropolyacid is a widely used acid catalyst due to its very high Brönsted acidity, approaching the superacid region. In particular, we have investigated the impact of laser irradiation in the Raman monitoring of solid H3PW12O40 at work under a flow of methanol in nitrogen at 50 °C. When 1 single spectrum of H3PW12O40 was measured after 3 h of exposure to methanol, the characteristic Csbnd H vibration bands of adsorbed methanol appeared. However, when spectra were measured continuously throughout the experiment, the same Csbnd H vibration bands were observed only during the first hour, then they disappeared and the characteristic bands of polyaromatic molecules appeared. Under continuous laser irradiation, adsorbed methanol was thus converted into polyaromatic coke as resulting from a laser-induced heating. However, the spectra collected under pure nitrogen show that the laser does not heat the catalyst in the absence of methanol. UV-Vis revealed the reason of the laser-induced heating in the presence of methanol, and the subsequent formation of coke. Actually the catalyst gets reduced by the adsorbed methanol, what darkens the catalyst bed. Such a darkening renders

  10. 1 400-1 500 nm,Different Material-doped Raman Fiber Lasers Pumped by Nd∶YVO4 Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Jin-jie; LIU De-ming; WANG Ying; HUANG De-xiu

    2003-01-01

    Different material-doped Raman fiber lasers with very high efficiency operating in continuous-wave are presented.With 1 W Nd∶YVO4 laser pumping at wavelength of 1 342 nm,single mode output power of above 500 mW (optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 50%) is simulated in the range of 1 400-1 500 nm.Using high-germanium,high-phosphate and high-borate silicate fibers as the gain medium,laser output at wavelengths of 1 420,1 450,1 480 and 1 495 nm can be achieved with different geometries,which are just as pumping C-band and L-band distributed Raman fiber amplifiers.

  11. Measurement of fuel spray vaporisation by laser techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, A. J.; Seng, C. A.; Felton, P. G.; Ungut, A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    Comparison of fuel spray structures in heated and in cold environments is made by using a new laser tomographic technique and laser anemometry. The tomography technique is shown to give accurate and rapid 'point' measurements of droplet sizes and concentrations. Experimental results show acceleration of droplets to the local gas velocity, preferential vaporisation of the smallest droplets and the dispersion of droplets by the turbulence.

  12. The Progress on Laser Surface Modification Techniques of Titanium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Cheng; PAN Lin; Al Ding-fei; TAO Xi-qi; XIA Chun-huai; SONG Yan

    2004-01-01

    Titanium alloy is widely used in aviation, national defence, automobile, medicine and other fields because of their advantages in lower density, corrosion resistance, and fatigue resistance etc. As titanium alloy is higher friction coefficients, weak wear resistance, bad high temperature oxidation resistance and lower biocompatibility, its applications are restricted. Using laser surface modification techniques can significantly improve the surface properties of titanium alloy. a review is given for progress on laser surface modification techniques of titanium alloy in this paper.

  13. Laser induced fluorescence technique for environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Felizardo, Rui; Gameiro, Carla; Matos, Ana R.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the development of laser induced fluorescence sensors and their application in the evaluation of water pollution and physiological status of higher plants and algae. The sensors were built on the basis of reliable and robust solid-state Nd:YAG lasers. They demonstrated good efficiency in: i) detecting and characterizing oil spills and dissolved organic matter; ii) evaluating the impact of stress on higher plants (cork oak, maritime pine, and genetically modified Arabidopsis); iii) tracking biomass changes in intertidal microphytobenthos; and iv) mapping macroalgal communities in the Tagus Estuary.

  14. Raman tensor and domain structure study of single-crystal-like epitaxial films of CaCu3Ti4O12 grown by pulsed laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlawat, Anju; Mishra, Dileep K; Sathe, V G; Kumar, Ravi; Sharma, T K

    2013-01-16

    The local domain structure of a strain free, 150 nm thick, epitaxially grown single crystalline thin film of CaCu(3)Ti(4)O(12) is probed by polarized Raman spectroscopy. The polarization dependence of the Raman intensities of the observed bands as a function of varying angle between the domain axes and the polarization vector of the scattered laser photon is measured. Theoretical formulations involving the Raman tensor are presented, which enable determination of the domain structure from the observed polarized Raman spectra, and a single-crystal-like domain structure is found. The Raman tensor elements and domain orientation direction were determined by fitting the observed Raman intensities with theoretical calculations and by carrying out Raman mapping of the film. Our data show an absence of twin domain structure and twin domain boundaries in the single-crystal-like epitaxial thin films of CaCu(3)Ti(4)O(12).

  15. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short Jr., Billy Joe [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  16. A power ramped pulsed mode laser piercing technique for improved CO 2 laser profile cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirumala Rao, B.; Ittoop, M. O.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2009-11-01

    Laser piercing is one of the inevitable requirements of laser profile cutting process and it has a direct bearing on the quality of the laser cut profiles. We have developed a novel power ramped pulsed mode (PRPM) laser piercing technique to produce much finer pierced holes and to achieve a better control on the process parameters compared to the existing methodology based on normal pulsed mode (NPM). Experiments were carried out with both PRPM and NPM laser piercing on 1.5-mm-thick mild steel using an in-house developed high-power transverse flow continuous wave (CW)-CO 2 laser. Significant improvements in the spatter, circularity of the pierced hole and reproducibility were achieved through the PRPM technique. We studied, in detail, the dynamics of processes involved in PRPM laser piercing and compared that with those of the NPM piercing.

  17. Novel single-cell functional analysis of red blood cells using laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy: application for sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Mao, Ziliang; Matthews, Dennis L; Li, Chin-Shang; Chan, James W; Satake, Noriko

    2013-07-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the oxygenation response of single normal adult, sickle, and cord blood red blood cells (RBCs) to an applied mechanical force. Individual cells were subjected to different forces by varying the laser power of a single-beam optical trap, and the intensities of several oxygenation-specific Raman spectral peaks were monitored to determine the oxygenation state of the cells. For all three cell types, an increase in laser power (or mechanical force) induced a greater deoxygenation of the cell. However, sickle RBCs deoxygenated more readily than normal RBCs when subjected to the same optical forces. Conversely, cord blood RBCs were able to maintain their oxygenation better than normal RBCs. These results suggest that differences in the chemical or mechanical properties of fetal, normal, and sickle cells affect the degree to which applied mechanical forces can deoxygenate the cell. Populations of normal, sickle, and cord RBCs were identified and discriminated based on this mechanochemical phenomenon. This study demonstrates the potential application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy as a single-cell, label-free analytical tool to characterize the functional (e.g., mechanical deformability, oxygen binding) properties of normal and diseased RBCs.

  18. Laser Photoacoustic Technique Detects Photo-Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liange, R. H.; Coulter, D. R.; Gupta, A.

    1986-01-01

    Laser photoacoustic instrument detects small amounts of oxidation in polymers. Instrument used to evaluate resistance to oxidation in Sunlight of polymer encapsulants for solar-cell arrays. With instrument, researchers monitor samples for early stages of photooxidation and study primary mechanisms of oxidation and degradation. Effects of these mechanisms masked during later stages.

  19. Alternative technique for laser cooling with superradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemova, Galina; Kashyap, Raman

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical scheme for laser cooling of rare-earth-doped solids with optical superradiance (SR), which is the coherent, sharply directed spontaneous emission of photons by a system of laser-excited rare-earth ions in the solid-state host (glass or crystal). We consider an Yb+-doped ZnF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN) sample pumped at a wavelength 1015 nm, with a rectangular pulsed source with a power of ˜433 W and a duration of 10 ns. The intensity of the SR is proportional to the square of the number of excited ions. This unique feature of SR permits an increase in the rate of the cooling process in comparison with the traditional laser cooling of the rare-earth-doped solids with anti-Stokes spontaneous incoherent radiation (fluorescence). This scheme overcomes the limitation of using only low phonon energy glasses for laser cooling.

  20. Novel technique for mode selection in a multimode fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J M O; Chan, J S P; Kim, J W; Sahu, J K; Ibsen, M; Clarkson, W A

    2011-06-20

    A simple technique for transverse mode selection in a large-mode-area (multimode) fiber laser is described. The technique exploits the different spectral responses of feedback elements based on a fiber Bragg grating and a volume Bragg grating to achieve wavelength-dependent mode filtering. This approach has been applied to a cladding-pumped thulium-doped fiber laser with a multimode core to achieve a single-spatial-mode output beam with a beam propagation factor (M2) of 1.05 at 1923 nm. Without mode selection the free-running fiber laser has a multimode output beam with an M2 parameter of 3.3. Selective excitation of higher order modes is also possible via the technique and preliminary results for laser oscillation on the LP11 mode are also discussed along with the prospects for scaling to higher power levels.

  1. Raman spectroscopic analysis of iron chromium oxide microspheres generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation on stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Soto-Bernal, J J; Frausto-Reyes, C; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2015-06-15

    Iron chromium oxide microspheres were generated by pulsed laser irradiation on the surface of two commercial samples of stainless steel at room temperature. An Ytterbium pulsed fiber laser was used for this purpose. Raman spectroscopy was used for the characterization of the microspheres, whose size was found to be about 0.2-1.7 μm, as revealed by SEM analysis. The laser irradiation on the surface of the stainless steel modified the composition of the microspheres generated, affecting the concentration of the main elemental components when laser power was increased. Furthermore, the peak ratio of the main bands in the Raman spectra has been associated to the concentration percentage of the main components of the samples, as revealed by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. These experiments showed that it is possible to generate iron chromium oxide microspheres on stainless steel by laser irradiation and that the concentration percentage of their main components is associated with the laser power applied.

  2. Pulsed laser deposited Ag nanoparticles on nickel hydroxide nanosheet arrays for highly sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Yuting; Wang, Huanwen; Chen, Xiao [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Xuefeng, E-mail: xfwang@tongji.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wei, Huige [Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas 77710 (United States); Guo, Zhanhu, E-mail: zhanhu.guo@lamar.edu [Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas 77710 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited on nickel hydroxide nanosheet (NS) arrays by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. • The Ag/Ni(OH){sub 2} composite film exhibits very high Raman scattering enhancement ability, possessing an enhancement factor as high as 5 × 10{sup 6}. • The enhancement ability of the substrate was strongly dependent on the size and interparticle gap of Ag NPs. • The 3D structure of Ni(OH){sub 2} NS arrays and the charge transfer of Ag NPs may be responsible for this high sensitivity Raman phenomenon. - Abstract: In the present work, silver nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited on nickel hydroxide nanosheet (NS) arrays by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. The effective high specific surface area with silver NPs decorated on the NS arrays was revealed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructure and optical property of this three-dimensional (3D) substrate were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV–vis spectra, respectively. Using rhodamine 6G (R6G) as probe molecules with the concentration down to 10{sup −5} M, the Ag/Ni(OH){sub 2} composite film exhibits very high Raman scattering enhancement ability, possessing an enhancement factor as high as 5 × 10{sup 6}. It has been found that the enhancement ability of the substrate was strongly dependent on the size and interparticle gap of Ag NPs rather than the testing position on the film surface. In addition, the 3D structure of Ni(OH){sub 2} NS arrays and the charge transfer of Ag NPs may be responsible for this high sensitivity Raman phenomenon.

  3. Application of the lamp mapping technique for overlap function for Raman lidar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Monique; Venable, Demetrius; Whiteman, David N; Sakai, Tetsu

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, the lidar water vapor mixing ratio (WVMR) is corrected for overlap using data from another instrument, such as a radiosonde. Here we introduce a new experimental method to determine the overlap function using the lamp mapping technique (LMT), which relies on the lidar optics and detection system. The LMT discussed here involves a standard halogen lamp being scanned over the aperture of a Raman lidar telescope in synchronization with the lidar detection system [Appl. Opt.50, 4622 (2011)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.50.004622, Appl. Opt.53, 8538 (2014)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.53.008535]. In this paper, we show results for a LMT-determined overlap function for individual channels, as well as a WVMR overlap function. We found that the LMT-determined WVMR overlap functions deviate within 5% of the traditional radiosonde-determined overlap.

  4. A Remote Raman and Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectrometer and its Application for Lidar Remote Sensing of Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S.; Sharma, S. K.; Angel, S. M.; Lucey, P. G.; McKay, C. P.; Misra, A. K.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Newsom, H.; Scott, E. R.; Singh, U. N.; Taylor, J. G.; Porter, J. N.

    2005-05-01

    A combined remote Raman and Laser Induced Fluorescence (RLIF) spectrometer was proposed as a mast-mounted instrument for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). This remote RLIF system is capable of conducting reconnaissance of fluorescence materials and minerals with high sensitivity (e.g., carbonates, sulfates, phosphates, quartz, etc.) that can be recorded with a single 532 nm (35 mJ) laser pulse of 8 ns half-width. The RLIF system is also capable of identification of mineral, organic, and biogenic materials and is sitable for atmospheric studies of Mars. This instrument design is based on a prototypes that was developed with partial support from NASA's Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) at the University of Hawaii. This prototype instrument has been modified to operate in the lidar mode to obtain Mie-Rayleigh scattering profiles in the atmosphere for studying meteorological processes in the marine atmosphere. Application of RLIF to obtain range-resolved atmospheric backscattering profiles using the AOTF technique are capable of providing atmospheric backscatter profiles. Data from RLIF can be used to retrieve optical properties of dust aerosols and clouds, including the profiling of scattering intensity, location of cloud base and thickness, atmospheric extinction, and de-polarization. These measurements can be made at high vertical resolution up to altitudes >5 km. Simultaneous measurements can be made of atmospheric CO2 and its variations; surface CO2-ice and water-ice; and surface and subsurface hydrated methane on Mars. Capability of RLIF and examples of atmospheric measurements applicable to RLIF will be presented in this paper.

  5. 671-nm microsystem diode laser based on portable Raman sensor device for in-situ identification of meat spoilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowoidnich, Kay; Schmidt, Heinar; Schwägele, Fredi; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2011-05-01

    Based on a miniaturized optical bench with attached 671 nm microsystem diode laser we present a portable Raman system for the rapid in-situ characterization of meat spoilage. It consists of a handheld sensor head (dimensions: 210 x 240 x 60 mm3) for Raman signal excitation and collection including the Raman optical bench, a laser driver, and a battery pack. The backscattered Raman radiation from the sample is analyzed by means of a custom-designed miniature spectrometer (dimensions: 200 x 190 x 70 mm3) with a resolution of 8 cm-1 which is fiber-optically coupled to the sensor head. A netbook is used to control the detector and for data recording. Selected cuts from pork (musculus longissimus dorsi and ham) stored refrigerated at 5 °C were investigated in timedependent measurement series up to three weeks to assess the suitability of the system for the rapid detection of meat spoilage. Using a laser power of 100 mW at the sample meat spectra can be obtained with typical integration times of 5 - 10 seconds. The complex spectra were analyzed by the multivariate statistical tool PCA (principal components analysis) to determine the spectral changes occurring during the storage period. Additionally, the Raman data were correlated with reference analyses performed in parallel. In that way, a distinction between fresh and spoiled meat can be found in the time slot of 7 - 8 days after slaughter. The applicability of the system for the rapid spoilage detection of meat and other food products will be discussed.

  6. Raman spectral features of single walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by laser vaporization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, MK

    2006-07-05

    Full Text Available In Raman spectra of SWCNTs, there are many features which can be identifed with specific phonon modes and with specific Raman scattering processes that contribute to each feature. Mechanical, elastic and thermal properties are strongly influenced...

  7. Laser-induced backside wet cleaning technique for glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Tsu-Shien; Tsai, Chwan-Huei

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the laser-induced backside wet cleaning techniques for glass substrates. Two kinds of laser cleaning techniques are proposed in this study. The first involves applying an Nd:YAG laser to the backside of the substrate which is submerged in water. A metal plate is placed below the glass substrate. Most of the laser energy will be absorbed by the metal plate. The metal then vaporizes the water and generates a turbulent bubble flow. The bubble flow removes the alumina particles from the surface of the glass substrate. The second involves using a CO2 laser to generate turbulent bubble flow to remove the particles. Both methods were successfully demonstrated for the removal of submicron particles of 0.5 μm in size. The phenomena of bubble generation and diffusion are presented in the paper. Because the laser is applied to the backside of the substrate, the damage due to the laser heat can be significantly reduced. The quality and efficient of the backside processing is better than those of the front side processing. The proposed techniques have great potential to provide an improved solution for glass cleaning.

  8. Removable partial denture alloys processed by laser-sintering technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alageel, Omar; Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Alsheghri, Ammar; Song, Jun; Caron, Eric; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-05-31

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are traditionally made using a casting technique. New additive manufacturing processes based on laser sintering has been developed for quick fabrication of RPDs metal frameworks at low cost. The objective of this study was to characterize the mechanical, physical, and biocompatibility properties of RPD cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys produced by two laser-sintering systems and compare them to those prepared using traditional casting methods. The laser-sintered Co-Cr alloys were processed by the selective laser-sintering method (SLS) and the direct metal laser-sintering (DMLS) method using the Phenix system (L-1) and EOS system (L-2), respectively. L-1 and L-2 techniques were 8 and 3.5 times more precise than the casting (CC) technique (p laser-sintered and cast alloys were biocompatible. In conclusion, laser-sintered alloys are more precise and present better mechanical and fatigue properties than cast alloys for RPDs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronne, Antonio [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Bloisi, Francesco, E-mail: bloisi@na.infn.it [SPIN – CNR, Naples (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria [Istituto Motori – CNR, Naples (Italy); Depero, Laura E. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Fanelli, Esther [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Federici, Stefania [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Massoli, Patrizio [Istituto Motori – CNR, Naples (Italy); Vicari, Luciano R.M. [SPIN – CNR, Naples (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • A lipase film was deposited with Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique. • FTIR spectra show that laser irradiation do not damage lipase molecule. • Laser fluence controls the characteristics of complex structure generated by MAPLE. - Abstract: Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  10. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela, J.A.; Amado, J.M.; Tobar, M.J.; Mateo, M.P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G., E-mail: gines@udc.es

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Chemical mapping and profiling by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of coatings produced by laser cladding. • Production of laser clads using tungsten carbide (WC) and nickel based matrix (NiCrBSi) powders. • Calibration by LIBS of hardfacing alloys with different WC concentrations. - Abstract: Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating.

  11. In vivo molecular evaluation of guinea pig skin incisions healing after surgical suture and laser tissue welding using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimova, A; Chakraverty, R; Muthukattil, R; Elder, S; Katz, A; Sriramoju, V; Lipper, Stanley; Alfano, R R

    2009-09-01

    The healing process in guinea pig skin following surgical incisions was evaluated at the molecular level, in vivo, by the use of Raman spectroscopy. After the incisions were closed either by suturing or by laser tissue welding (LTW), differences in the respective Raman spectra were identified. The study determined that the ratio of the Raman peaks of the amide III (1247 cm(-1)) band to a peak at 1326 cm(-1) (the superposition of elastin and keratin bands) can be used to evaluate the progression of wound healing. Conformational changes in the amide I band (1633-1682 cm(-1)) and spectrum changes in the range of 1450-1520 cm(-1) were observed in LTW and sutured skin. The stages of the healing process of the guinea pig skin following LTW and suturing were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, using histopathology as the gold standard. LTW skin demonstrated better healing than sutured skin, exhibiting minimal hyperkeratosis, minimal collagen deposition, near-normal surface contour, and minimal loss of dermal appendages. A wavelet decomposition-reconstruction baseline correction algorithm was employed to remove the fluorescence wing from the Raman spectra.

  12. Graphitic carbon nanospheres: A Raman spectroscopic investigation of thermal conductivity and morphological evolution by pulsed laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Radhe; Sahoo, Satyaprakash, E-mail: satya504@gmail.com, E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu; Chitturi, Venkateswara Rao; Katiyar, Ram S., E-mail: satya504@gmail.com, E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936-8377 (United States)

    2015-12-07

    Graphitic carbon nanospheres (GCNSs) were prepared by a unique acidic treatment of multi-walled nanotubes. Spherical morphology with a narrow size distribution was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy studies. The room temperature Raman spectra showed a clear signature of D- and G-peaks at around 1350 and 1591 cm{sup −1}, respectively. Temperature dependent Raman scattering measurements were performed to understand the phonon dynamics and first order temperature coefficients related to the D- and G-peaks. The temperature dependent Raman spectra in a range of 83–473 K were analysed, where the D-peak was observed to show a red-shift with increasing temperature. The relative intensity ratio of D- to G-peaks also showed a significant rise with increasing temperature. Such a temperature dependent behaviour can be attributed to lengthening of the C-C bond due to thermal expansion in material. The estimated value of the thermal conductivity of GCNSs ∼0.97 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1} was calculated using Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the effect of pulsed laser treatment on the GCNSs was demonstrated by analyzing the Raman spectra of post irradiated samples.

  13. Laser sources and techniques for spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, A.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program focuses on the development of novel laser and spectroscopic techniques in the IR, UV, and VUV regions for studying combustion related molecular dynamics at the microscopic level. Laser spectroscopic techniques have proven to be extremely powerful in the investigation of molecular processes which require very high sensitivity and selectivity. The authors approach is to use quantum electronic and non-linear optical techniques to extend the spectral coverage and to enhance the optical power of ultrahigh resolution laser sources so as to obtain and analyze photoionization, fluorescence, and photoelectron spectra of jet-cooled free radicals and of reaction products resulting from unimolecular and bimolecular dissociations. New spectroscopic techniques are developed with these sources for the detection of optically thin and often short-lived species. Recent activities center on regenerative amplification of high resolution solid-state lasers, development of tunable high power mid-IR lasers and short-pulse UV/VUV tunable lasers, and development of a multipurpose high-order suppressor crossed molecular beam apparatus for use with synchrotron radiation sources. This program also provides scientific and technical support within the Chemical Sciences Division to the development of LBL`s Combustion Dynamics Initiative.

  14. Laser-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopic studies of peptide-analogues of silkmoth chorion protein segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaki, D C; Aggeli, A; Chryssikos, G D; Yiannopoulos, Y D; Kamitsos, E I; Brumley, E; Case, S T; Boden, N; Hamodrakas, S J

    1998-07-01

    Silkmoth chorion, the proteinaceous major component of the eggshell, with extraordinary mechanical and physiological properties, consists of a complex set of proteins, which have a tripartite structure: a central, evolutionarily conserved, domain and two more variable 'arms'. Peptide-analogues of silkmoth chorion protein central domain segments have been synthesized. Laser-Raman and infrared spectroscopic studies suggest the preponderance of antiparallel beta-pleated sheet structure for these peptides, both in solution and in the solid state.

  15. Brillouin/Raman compensation of the Kerr-effect-induced bias in a nonlinear ring laser gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhang; Yuan, Xiaodong; Zhu, Zhihong; Liu, Ken; Ye, Weimin; Zeng, Chun; Ji, Jiarong

    2013-04-01

    In this Letter, the beat frequency at rest of a ring laser gyroscope with nonlinear effects is discussed in detail. Even without an additional intensity-stabilizing system, the random nullshift bias induced by the Kerr effect is compensated by the phase shift associated with the stimulated Brillouin/Raman scattering. And the nonlinear stimulated scattering also serves as the gain mechanism of the gyroscope. And thus the influence of the fluctuation of the injected pump intensity on the beat frequency is eliminated.

  16. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS: Influence of intracavity stimulated Raman scattering on self-modulation of a ring laser emitting ultrashort pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashkir, Yu N.; Yashkir, O. V.

    1991-11-01

    An investigation is made of the generation of ultrashort pulses in a ring laser in the presence of intracavity nonlinear losses due to stimulated Raman scattering. A numerical analysis of the attractors of the problem is used in a study of typical lasing regimes: stable, unstable regular, and unstable irregular (optical turbulence). A change in the nonlinearity parameter reveals also "intermittence" regions. An analysis is made of the influence of feedback provided by the Stokes radiation on the localization of an instability region.

  17. The SALUT Project: Study of Advanced Laser Techniques for the Uncovering of Polychromed Works of Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Snickt, G.; De Boeck, A.; Keutgens, K.; Anthierens, D.

    In order to find out whether the existing laser systems can be employed to remove superimposed layers of paint on secco wall paintings in a selective way, laser tests were carried out on three types of prepared samples simulating three stratigraphies that are frequently encountered in practice. OM, EPMA, colorimetry, μRaman, and FT-IR were used to evaluate the results. It was found that Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers emitting at 1,064nm could be employed to remove unwanted layers of oil paint and limewash, but the treatment of large areas requires implementation of a computer-controlled X-Y-Z station in order to control the parameters. However, the applicability of this technique will remain limited as ablation at the established optimum parameters implied a discoloration of the pigments cinnabar, yellow ochre, and burnt sienna. Moreover, it was observed that no ablation took place when the limewash thickness exceeds 25 μm. Unwanted layers of acrylic could be removed in an efficient way with an excimer laser emitting at 193 nm.

  18. Triplet State Resonance Raman Spectrum of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Grossman, W.E.L.; Killough, P.M

    1984-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene (DPB) in its ground state and the resonance Raman spectrum (RRS) of DPB in its short-lived electronically excited triplet state are reported. Transient spectra were obtained by a pump-probe technique using two pulsed lasers...

  19. Raman spectroscopy of femtosecond laser written low propagation loss optical waveguides in Schott N-SF8 glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotillo, B.; Chiappini, A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Ramos, M.; Fernandez, T. T.; Rampini, S.; Ferrari, M.; Ramponi, R.; Fernández, P.; Gholipour, B.; Soci, C.; Eaton, S. M.

    2017-10-01

    We have performed high repetition rate femtosecond laser bulk modification of TiO2-SiO2 based glass (Schott N-SF8 glass), leading to a decrease in the refractive index near the focal volume. From μRaman and X-ray microanalysis we have associated the decrease in the refractive index to a volume expansion due to glass network modifications induced by the laser irradiation. By writing two lines close together we have been able to confine the optical mode and obtain propagation losses of 0.7 dB/cm in the near infrared.

  20. Transmission resonance Raman spectroscopy: experimental results versus theoretical model calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzálvez, Alicia G; González Ureña, Ángel

    2012-10-01

    A laser spectroscopic technique is described that combines transmission and resonance-enhanced Raman inelastic scattering together with low laser power (view, a model for the Raman signal dependence on the sample thickness is also presented. Essentially, the model considers the sample to be homogeneous and describes the underlying physics using only three parameters: the Raman cross-section, the laser-radiation attenuation cross-section, and the Raman signal attenuation cross-section. The model was applied successfully to describe the sample-size dependence of the Raman signal in both β-carotene standards and carrot roots. The present technique could be useful for direct, fast, and nondestructive investigations in food quality control and analytical or physiological studies of animal and human tissues.

  1. Laser-based direct-write techniques for cell printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Nathan R; Corr, David T; Huang, Yong; Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Xie, Yubing; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2010-09-01

    Fabrication of cellular constructs with spatial control of cell location (+/-5 microm) is essential to the advancement of a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research. Precise cell placement, especially of multiple cell types in co- or multi-cultures and in three dimensions, can enable research possibilities otherwise impossible, such as the cell-by-cell assembly of complex cellular constructs. Laser-based direct writing, a printing technique first utilized in electronics applications, has been adapted to transfer living cells and other biological materials (e.g., enzymes, proteins and bioceramics). Many different cell types have been printed using laser-based direct writing, and this technique offers significant improvements when compared to conventional cell patterning techniques. The predominance of work to date has not been in application of the technique, but rather focused on demonstrating the ability of direct writing to pattern living cells, in a spatially precise manner, while maintaining cellular viability. This paper reviews laser-based additive direct-write techniques for cell printing, and the various cell types successfully laser direct-written that have applications in tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research are highlighted. A particular focus is paid to process dynamics modeling and process-induced cell injury during laser-based cell direct writing.

  2. Laser-based direct-write techniques for cell printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiele, Nathan R; Corr, David T [Biomedical Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Huang Yong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Xie Yubing [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY (United States); Chrisey, Douglas B, E-mail: schien@rpi.ed, E-mail: chrisd@rpi.ed [Material Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Fabrication of cellular constructs with spatial control of cell location ({+-}5 {mu}m) is essential to the advancement of a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research. Precise cell placement, especially of multiple cell types in co- or multi-cultures and in three dimensions, can enable research possibilities otherwise impossible, such as the cell-by-cell assembly of complex cellular constructs. Laser-based direct writing, a printing technique first utilized in electronics applications, has been adapted to transfer living cells and other biological materials (e.g., enzymes, proteins and bioceramics). Many different cell types have been printed using laser-based direct writing, and this technique offers significant improvements when compared to conventional cell patterning techniques. The predominance of work to date has not been in application of the technique, but rather focused on demonstrating the ability of direct writing to pattern living cells, in a spatially precise manner, while maintaining cellular viability. This paper reviews laser-based additive direct-write techniques for cell printing, and the various cell types successfully laser direct-written that have applications in tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research are highlighted. A particular focus is paid to process dynamics modeling and process-induced cell injury during laser-based cell direct writing. (topical review)

  3. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown.

  4. Analysis of experimental tendinitis in rats treated with laser and platelet-rich plasma therapies by Raman spectroscopy and histometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Paula Kariluce; Silveira, Landulfo; Barbosa, Danillo; Munin, Egberto; Salgado, Miguel Angel Castillo; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this controlled experimental study was to analyze the changes in the Achilles tendons of rats with experimentally induced tendinitis after treatment with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and/or laser therapies by histometry to quantify fibroblasts and by Raman spectroscopy to determine the biochemical concentration of collagen types I and III. Fifty-four male Wistar rats were divided into six treatment groups: control (G1); PRP only (G2); irradiation with 660 nm laser (G3); irradiation with 830 nm laser (G4); PRP plus 660 nm laser irradiation (G5); and PRP plus 830 nm laser irradiation (G6). Injuries (partial tenotomy) were inflicted in the middle third of the Achilles tendon, with PRP added prior to suture in the appropriate experimental groups. A diode laser (model Laser Flash® III, DMC Equipamentos Ltda, São Carlos, SP, Brazil) that can be operated in two wavelengths 660 and 830 nm was used for irradiation treatments. The irradiation protocol was energy density of 70 J/cm², 20 s irradiation time, and 0.028 cm² spot area, per point in three points in the injured. The histometry was made in micrographical images of the H&E stained sections and evaluated by ImageJ (version 1.46r)®. Raman spectra were collected using a dispersive spectrometer at 830 nm excitation, 200 mW power, and 10 s integration time (P-1 Raman system, Lambda Solutions, Inc. MA, USA). The relative amount of type I collagen was significantly greater in the PRP plus 830 nm laser irradiation group (468 ± 188) than in the control (147 ± 137), 630 nm laser only (191 ± 117), and 830 nm laser only (196 ± 106) groups (p < 0.01), while the quantity of type III collagen was significantly greater in the PRP-only group compared to both irradiated groups without PRP (p < 0.05). Treatment with PRP combined with irradiation at 830 nm resulted in a larger number of fibroblasts and increased concentration of type I collagen, thus accelerating the healing of the injured

  5. Dye-sensitized solar cells using laser processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heungsoo; Pique, Alberto; Kushto, Gary P.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Lee, S. H.; Arnold, Craig B.; Kafafi, Zakia H.

    2004-07-01

    Laser processing techniques, such as laser direct-write (LDW) and laser sintering, have been used to deposit mesoporous nanocrystalline TiO2 (nc-TiO2) films for use in dye-sensitized solar cells. LDW enables the fabrication of conformal structures containing metals, ceramics, polymers and composites on rigid and flexible substrates without the use of masks or additional patterning techniques. The transferred material maintains a porous, high surface area structure that is ideally suited for dye-sensitized solar cells. In this experiment, a pulsed UV laser (355nm) is used to forward transfer a paste of commercial TiO2 nanopowder (P25) onto transparent conducting electrodes on flexible polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) and rigid glass substrates. For the cells based on flexible PET substrates, the transferred TiO2 layers were sintered using an in-situ laser to improve electron paths without damaging PET substrates. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of laser processing techniques to produce nc-TiO2 films (~10 μm thickness) on glass for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (Voc = 690 mV, Jsc = 8.7 mA/cm2, ff = 0.67, η = 4.0 % at 100 mW/cm2). This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  6. Raman and histological study of the repair of surgical bone defects grafted with biphasic synthetic micro-granular HA + β- calcium triphosphate and irradiated or not with λ780 nm laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B.; Soares, Luiz Guilherme P.; Marques, Aparecida Maria C.; Aciole, Jouber Mateus S.; dos Santos, Jean N.; Silveira, Landulfo

    2014-02-01

    The treatment of bone loss due to different etiologic factors is difficult and many techniques aim to improve repair, including a wide range of biomaterials and, recently, phototherapies. This work assessed, by Raman spectroscopy and histology, the mineralization of bone defects. Forty rats divided into 4 groups each subdivided into 2 subgroups according to the time of sacrifice were used. Bone defects were made on the femur of each animal with a trephine drill. On animals of group Clot the defect was filled only by blood clot, on group Laser the defect filled with the clot was further irradiated. On animals of groups Biomaterial and Laser + Biomaterial the defect was filled by biomaterial and the last one was further irradiated (λ780 nm, 70 mW, Φ ~ 0.4 cm2, 20 J/cm2-session, 140 J/cm2-treatment). At both 15th and 30th days following sacrifice, samples were taken and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and light microscopy. Raman peaks of inorganic and organic contents and a more advanced stage of repair were seen on group Laser + Biomaterial. It is concluded that the use of Laser phototherapy associated to biomaterial was effective to improve the repair of bone defects.

  7. Study on the formation of peroxodisulfate ion on platinum anode using laser raman spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasaka, Akimasa; Takenaka, Yutaka; Matsugidaira, Shin' ichi; Yasuzawa, Toru; Fujikawa, Toshiyuki; Sakamoto, Eibun

    1988-09-05

    In order to determine the reaction intermediates in the electrolysis formation of peroxodisulfate ion (S/sub 2/O/sub 8//sup 2/minus//), the galvanostatic oxidation of SO/sub 4//sup 2/minus// ion and HSO/sub 4//sup /minus// ion on platinum has been investigated in an H-shaped cell with a glass-filter. The electrolysis was carried out at constant curent density of 1 A/cm/sup 2/ in ammonium sulfate solution or mixed solution of ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid. Produced S/sub 2/O/sub 8//sup 2/minus// or HSO/sub 5//sup /minus// was determined by both iodometry and permanganometry, whereas SO/sub 4//sup 2/minus// or HSO/sub 4//sup /minus// by the laser Raman spectrometry. On the formation of S/sub 2/O/sub 8//sup 2/minus//, it was revealed that not only SO/sub 4//sup -/ but also HSO/sub 4//sup /minus// will react and that the rate constant of S/sub 2/O/sub 8//sup 2/minus// formation from SO/sub 4//sup 2/minus// is about two times larger than that from HSO/sub 4//sup /minus//. 12 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Hybrid wide-band, low-phase-noise scheme for Raman lasers in atom interferometry by integrating an acousto-optic modulator and a feedback loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Yao, Zhanwei; Li, Runbing; Lu, Sibin; Chen, Xi; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-02-10

    We report a hybrid scheme for phase-coherent Raman lasers with low phase noise in a wide frequency range. In this scheme, a pair of Raman lasers with a frequency difference of 3.04 GHz is generated by the ±1-order diffracted lights of an acousto-optic modulator (1.52 GHz), where a feedback loop is simultaneously applied for suppressing the phase noise. The beat width of the Raman lasers is narrower than 3 Hz. In the low-frequency range, the phase noise of the Raman lasers is suppressed by 35 dB with the feedback. The phase noise is less than -109  dBc/Hz in the high-frequency range. The sensitivity of an atom gyroscope employing the hybrid Raman lasers can be implicitly improved 10 times. Due to the better high-frequency response, the sensitivity is not limited by the durations of Raman pulses. This work is important for improving the performance of atom-interferometer-based measurements.

  9. Flexible neuroendoscopy with laser and microsystem technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huewel, Norbert M.; Urban, Volker; Perneczky, A.

    1994-05-01

    The use of flexible neuroendoscopic techniques in neurosurgical procedures is routinely performed in the spinal canal and in the intracranial subdural space. Treated entities are syringomyelia, tumors with concomitant syrinxes in spinal cord, cystic legions in the subdural and subarachnoid space in the spinal canal as myelomeningoceles.

  10. New ceramic coating technique using laser spraying process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Koichi; Yanagisawa, Takeshi; Uchiyama, Futodhi; Obara, Akira; Okutomi, Mamoru; Kimura, Shinji; Yamada, Akimasa; Shen, Hong L.; Wang, Zhongcheng; Shen, Qinwo; Chatterjee, Udit; Bhar, Gopal C.

    1998-08-01

    A new ceramic coating technique using a CO2 laser has been developed. A high power density laser beam passes near the substrate. Coating materials are supplied by an extra-high accuracy powder supply device and pass across the laser beam. The coating materials are melted in the laser beam and deposited on the substrate surface. A YSZ (Yttria Stabilized Zirconia) layer and a LaCoO3 layer are made for high temperature solid oxide fuel cells. The crystal structures of the coated layers are the same as that of the original coating materials. Superconducting BPSCCO ceramic films are also made with this process. The films show super-conductivity with Tc at 81 K. The Jc of the specimen is 440 A/cm2 at 77 K. We can easily handle and arrange not only metal but also refractory materials. By adopting a multi-axis robot and a surface treatment laser technique, the laser spraying method described here makes it possible to produce highly functional and three dimensional parts of devices directly from raw powder materials. Thus the proposed method will open the path to an unexplored field of key production technology.

  11. Lacquerware Pigment Identification with Fixed and Mobile Raman Microspectrometers: A Potential Technique to Differentiate Original/Fake Artworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Colomban

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available (FT Raman spectroscopy is used for the first time to identify pigments used in 19th & 20th century Japanese and Vietnamese Lacquerwares. IR spectroscopy is used to assess the Lacquer matrix. Different operative conditions and parameters were experimented with on a limited number of lacquerwares in order to determine the optimal procedure for the identification of pigments/dyes as potential chronological or technological markers. The test was then performed in the collector’s rooms with a mobile Raman set-up. Different pigments (vermilion, Prussian Blue, Naples Yellow, Phtalocyanine Blue, anatase, rutile, chalk, carbon black were identified despite a strong fluorescence and a rapid degradation of both pigments and binder under increasing laser power. Better spectra were obtained on older lacquerwares.

  12. A 1024 x 8, 700-ps Time-Gated SPAD Line Sensor for Planetary Surface Exploration With Laser Raman Spectroscopy and LIBS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maruyama, Y.; Blacksberg, J.; Charbon, E.

    2013-01-01

    A 1024 8 time-gated, single-photon avalanche diode line sensor is presented for time-resolved laser Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Two different chip geometries were implemented and characterized. A type-I sensor has a maximum photon detection efficiency of 0.3% and

  13. A 1024 x 8, 700-ps Time-Gated SPAD Line Sensor for Planetary Surface Exploration With Laser Raman Spectroscopy and LIBS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maruyama, Y.; Blacksberg, J.; Charbon, E.

    2013-01-01

    A 1024 8 time-gated, single-photon avalanche diode line sensor is presented for time-resolved laser Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Two different chip geometries were implemented and characterized. A type-I sensor has a maximum photon detection efficiency of 0.3% and med

  14. High volume fabrication of laser targets using MEMS techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindloe, C.; Arthur, G.; Hall, F.; Tomlinson, S.; Potter, R.; Kar, S.; Green, J.; Higginbotham, A.; Booth, N.; Tolley, M. K.

    2016-04-01

    The latest techniques for the fabrication of high power laser targets, using processes developed for the manufacture of Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) devices are discussed. These laser targets are designed to meet the needs of the increased shot numbers that are available in the latest design of laser facilities. Traditionally laser targets have been fabricated using conventional machining or coarse etching processes and have been produced in quantities of 10s to low 100s. Such targets can be used for high complexity experiments such as Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) studies and can have many complex components that need assembling and characterisation with high precision. Using the techniques that are common to MEMS devices and integrating these with an existing target fabrication capability we are able to manufacture and deliver targets to these systems. It also enables us to manufacture novel targets that have not been possible using other techniques. In addition, developments in the positioning systems that are required to deliver these targets to the laser focus are also required and a system to deliver the target to a focus of an F2 beam at 0.1Hz is discussed.

  15. Rashba realization: Raman with RF

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically explore a Rashba spin-orbit coupling scheme which operates entirely in the absolute ground state manifold of an alkali atom, thereby minimizing all inelastic processes. An energy gap between ground eigenstates of the proposed coupling can be continuously opened or closed by modifying laser polarizations. Our technique uses far-detuned "Raman" laser coupling to create the Rashba potential, which has the benefit of low spontaneous emission rates. At these detunings, the Raman matrix elements that link $m_F$ magnetic sublevel quantum numbers separated by two are also suppressed. These matrix elements are necessary to produce the Rashba Hamiltonian within a single total angular momentum $f$ manifold. However, the far-detuned Raman couplings can link the three XYZ states familiar to quantum chemistry, which possess the necessary connectivity to realize the Rashba potential. We show that these XYZ states are essentially the hyperfine spin eigenstates of $^{87}\\text{Rb}$ dressed by a strong radio-fr...

  16. Time-resolved detection of aromatic compounds on planetary surfaces by ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshelman, E.; Daly, M. G.; Slater, G.; Cloutis, E.

    2015-12-01

    Raman spectroscopic instruments are highly capable in the search for organics on Mars due to the potential to perform rapid and nondestructive measurements on unprepared samples. Upcoming and future Raman instruments are likely to also incorporate laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) capabilities, which can be added for modest cost and complexity. We demonstrate that it is possible to obtain sub-ns fluorescence lifetime measurements of Mars-relevant organics and minerals if a fast time-gating capability is used with an intensified detector and a short ultraviolet laser pulse. This serves a primary purpose of discriminating mineral from short-lived (less than 10 ns) organic fluorescence, considered a potential biosignature. Additionally, lifetime measurements may assist in determining if more than one fluorescing species is present and provide information concerning the molecular structure as well as the local environment. Fast time-gating is also useful at longer visible or near-IR wavelengths, as this approach increases the sensitivity of the instrument to organic material by removing the majority of the fluorescence background from the Raman signal and reducing the effect of ambient light.

  17. Three-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes/Stokes Raman scattering (CARS/CSRS) microspectroscopy using a white-light laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bito, Kotatsu; Okuno, Masanari; Kano, Hideaki; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o.

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a three-pulse non-degenerate multiplex coherent Raman microspectroscopic system using a white-light laser source. The fundamental output (1064 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser is used for the pump radiation with the white-light laser output (1100-1700 nm) for the Stokes radiation to achieve broadband multiplex excitations of vibrational coherences. The second harmonic (532 nm) of the same Nd:YAG laser is used for the probe radiation. Thanks to the large wavelength difference between the pump and probe radiations, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) can be detected simultaneously. Simultaneous detection of CARS and CSRS enables us to obtain information on the electronic resonance effect that affects differently the CARS and CSRS signals. Simultaneous analysis of the CARS and CSRS signals provides us the imaginary part of χ(3) without introducing any arbitrary parameter in the maximum entropy method (MEM).

  18. Characteristics of 1.9 μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bo; Chen, Yubin; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-11-01

    We report here the detailed characteristics of 1.9 μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering. A 6.5 m hydrogen-filled Ice-cream negative curvature hollow-core fiber is pumped with a high peak power, narrow linewidth, liner polarized subnanosecond pulsed 1064 nm microchip laser, generating pulsed 1908.5 nm vibrational Stokes wave. The linewidth of the pump laser and the vibrational Stokes wave is about 1 GHz and 2 GHz respectively. And the maximum Raman conversion quantum efficiency is about 48%. We also studied the pulse shapes of the pump laser and the vibrational Stokes wave. The polarization dependence of the vibrational and the rotational stimulated Raman scattering is also investigated. In addition, the beam profile of vibrational Stokes wave shows good quality, which may be taken advantage of in many applications.

  19. Dual-wavelength eye-safe Nd:GYSGG/YVO4 intracavity Raman laser under in-band pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, P. B.; Sheng, Q.; Ding, X.; Sun, B.; Liu, J.; Zhao, C.; Zhang, G. Z.; Yu, X. Y.; Li, B.; Wu, L.; Yao, J. Q.

    2017-01-01

    An acousto-optic (AO) Q-switched dual-wavelength laser operating at 1.5 μm eye-safe region is demonstrated via stimulated Raman scatting of a-cut YVO4-Nd:YVO4 crystal within an end-pumped dual-wavelength Nd:GYSGG laser cavity. The in-band pumping absorption peak and coefficient of the dual-wavelength laser crystal Nd:GYSGG are measured in order to carry out efficient pumping, thus overcoming the drawbacks of short thermal focal length of the crystal and scale up the eye-safe output. Under 23.2 W absorbed pump power, 2.11 W of simultaneous dual-wavelength outputs at 1497 and 1516 nm are obtained with a pulse repetition rate of 23 kHz and a corresponding conversion efficiency of 9.1%.

  20. Stand-off Raman spectroscopy: a powerful technique for qualitative and quantitative analysis of inorganic and organic compounds including explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachhuber, Bernhard; Ramer, Georg; Hobro, Alison; Chrysostom, Engelene T H; Lendl, Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    A pulsed stand-off Raman system has been built and optimised for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of inorganic and organic samples including explosives. The system consists of a frequency doubled Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 Hz, 4.4 ns pulse length), aligned coaxially with a 6″ Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope for the collection of Raman scattered light. The telescope was coupled via a fibre optic bundle to an Acton standard series SP-2750 spectrograph with a PI-MAX 1024RB intensified CCD camera equipped with a 500-ps gating option for detection. Gating proved to be essential for achieving high signal-to-noise ratios in the recorded stand-off Raman spectra. In some cases, gating also allowed suppression of disturbing fluorescence signals. For the first time, quantitative analysis of stand-off Raman spectra was performed using both univariate and multivariate methods of data analysis. To correct for possible variation in instrumental parameters, the nitrogen band of ambient air was used as an internal standard. For the univariate method, stand-off Raman spectra obtained at a distance of 9 m on sodium chloride pellets containing varying amounts of ammonium nitrate (0-100%) were used. For the multivariate quantification of ternary xylene mixtures (0-100%), stand-off spectra at a distance of 5 m were used. The univariate calibration of ammonium nitrate yielded R (2) values of 0.992, and the multivariate quantitative analysis yielded root mean square errors of prediction of 2.26%, 1.97% and 1.07% for o-, m- and p-xylene, respectively. Stand-off Raman spectra obtained at a distance of 10 m yielded a detection limit of 174 μg for NaClO(3). Furthermore, to assess the applicability of stand-off Raman spectroscopy for explosives detection in "real-world" scenarios, their detection on different background materials (nylon, polyethylene and part of a car body) and in the presence of interferents (motor oil, fuel oil and soap) at a distance of 20 m was also

  1. In-Vivo functional optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy with stimulated Raman scattering fiber-laser source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajireza, Parsin; Forbrich, Alexander; Zemp, Roger

    2014-02-01

    In this paper a multi-wavelength optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) system using stimulated Raman scattering is demonstrated for both phantom and in vivo imaging. A 1-ns pulse width ytterbium-doped fiber laser is coupled into a single-mode polarization maintaining fiber. Discrete Raman-shifted wavelength peaks extending to nearly 800 nm are generated with pulse energies sufficient for OR-PAM imaging. Bandpass filters are used to select imaging wavelengths. A dual-mirror galvanometer system was used to scan the focused outputs across samples of carbon fiber networks, 200μm dye-filled tubes, and Swiss Webster mouse ears. Photoacoustic signals were collected in transmission mode and used to create maximum amplitude projection C-scan images. Double dye experiments and in vivo oxygen saturation estimation confirmed functional imaging potential.

  2. Probing molecular symmetry with polarization-sensitive stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kerdoncuff, Hugo; Westergaard, Philip G; Petersen, Jan C; Lassen, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate polarization-sensitive stimulated Raman spectroscopy (PS-SRS) enabling fast, high resolution measurement of the depolarization ratio by simultaneous detection of Raman scattered light in orthogonal polarizations. The method provides information about the symmetry of the Raman-active vibrational modes. Our compact PS-SRS setup is based on a tunable continuous wave (CW) probe laser combined with a semi-monolithic nanosecond pulsed pump laser. The CW operation of the laser offers narrow linewidth and low noise, and does not require temporal synchronization with the pump. We demonstrate the technique by measuring the depolarization ratios of carbon-hydrogen (CH) stretches in two different polymer samples in the spectral range of 2825-3025 cm-1. Raman spectra are obtained at a sweep rate of 20 nm/s (84 cm-1/s) with a resolution of 0.65 cm-1. A normalization method is introduced for the direct comparison of the simultaneously acquired polarization Raman spectra.

  3. Diagnostic techniques for photonic materials based on Raman and Brillouin spectroscopies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Mattarelli; M. Ferrari; Y. Jestin; G. Nunzi Conti; S. Pelli; G.C. Righini; S.Caponi; A. Chiappini; M. Montagna; E. Moser; F. Rossi; C.Tosello; C. Armellini; A. Chiasera

    2007-01-01

    The elastic and vibrational properties of a material, bulk or planar waveguide, are studied by Brillouin and Raman spectroscopy to follow the process of nanocrystals growth in glass-ceramics. The nanoparticles cause the appearance, in the low frequency Raman spectrum, of characteristic peaks, whose position depends on the size of the crystals. At the same time, sharp crystal peaks, due to optical phonons, appear in the Raman spectra, allowing the determination of the nucleated phase, and a frequency shift of the Brillouin peaks is observed.

  4. Compact Ultraintense Femtosecond Laser via Raman Amplifier and Compressor in Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suckewer, Szymon [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The main objective of this project was to conduct experimental and theoretical research to find conditions leading to higher, than previously obtained efficiency η of transfer the pump energy into the short seed beam in plasma of Stimulated Raman Back-Scattering (SRBS). We have demonstrated very large amplification and compression in our earlier SRBS plasma. However, the efficiency η was much too low to reach very high intensity of the output beam in the focal spot. Recently, by solving a very difficult technical SRBS’ problem, namely, the creation of very reproducible and much larger diameter plasma channels than in our earlier research, we propose a new approach to obtain higher efficiency η. The crucial new result was a very reproducible, low noise amplified seed in the larger diameter of the plasma channel leading to the higher efficiency. Using this new setup and very encouraging results about increase efficiency continuing this approach in the future the efficiency is expect to reach the range of η ≈15 - 20 % required to develop practical SRBS plasma laser. Intellectual Merit: The model for the present project was created by our earlier SRBS experiments. The main objective of those experiments was to amplify and compress the seed pulses in a plasma . The experiments demonstrated an unprecedented large pulse intensity amplification of 20,000 in system of 2-passes in ~2mm long plasma, and the seed pulse compression from 550fsec down to ~50fsec. The pump and seed beams in the present project have diameters of ~0.2–0.25mm each, propagating in ~0.35 - 0.45mm diameter and ~2-2.5mm long plasma channels (optimal length for our SRBS experiment) with input pump and seed intensities of 2x1014 and 3x1013 W/cm2, respectively. Such an SRBS system design was “prescribed” by computer simulations, which predict elimination of the SRBS “ saturation” for a such relatively short plasma channel. Plasma channels has been created by combining shorter (200psec) and

  5. Laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy in capillary electrophoresis as an possible instrument for extraterrestrial life signs detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Gorlenko; Cheptcov, Vladimir; Anton, Maydykovskiy; Eugeniy, Vasilev

    The one of a significant aims in extraterrestrial exploration is a seeking for a life traces in a open space and planetary objects. Complex composition and unknown origin of suspected signs of life required у new analytical approaches and technical solutions. The promising assai here can be Laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy methods. The combined instrument developed by our team reveal the advantage of capillary electrophoresis assays in a junction with laser induced fluorescence detection technology. We optimized excitation configuration of fluorescence in capillary electrophoresis to reduce pumping laser power up to 1 mW and decrease background scattering. The improvement of the device sensitivity at poor sample concentration we achieved by incorporating fluorescence flow-through cuvette into spectrometer. That allows to simplify setup, to minimize weight and increase reproducibility of measurements. The device has been tasted in complex organic chemical mixes and microbial strains differentiation tasks. 3d multinational spectra allow us to increase the spectra information loads in comparison with ordinary capillary electrophoresis approaches. Possible updating the device with Raman approach can even furthermore multiple the differentiation power of the instrument. The analytical module developed using this approach can be potentially effectively used in extraterrestrial researches as a payload of the future spacecraft.

  6. High Rate Laser Pitting Technique for Solar Cell Texturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans J. Herfurth; Henrikki Pantsar

    2013-01-10

    High rate laser pitting technique for solar cell texturing Efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells can be improved by creating a texture on the surface to increase optical absorption. Different techniques have been developed for texturing, with the current state-of-the-art (SOA) being wet chemical etching. The process has poor optical performance, produces surfaces that are difficult to passivate or contact and is relatively expensive due to the use of hazardous chemicals. This project shall develop an alternative process for texturing mc-Si using laser micromachining. It will have the following features compared to the current SOA texturing process: -Superior optical surfaces for reduced front-surface reflection and enhanced optical absorption in thin mc-Si substrates -Improved surface passivation -More easily integrated into advanced back-contact cell concepts -Reduced use of hazardous chemicals and waste treatment -Similar or lower cost The process is based on laser pitting. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a high rate laser pitting process which will exceed the rate of former laser texturing processes by a factor of ten. The laser and scanning technologies will be demonstrated on a laboratory scale, but will use inherently technologies that can easily be scaled to production rates. The drastic increase in process velocity is required for the process to be implemented as an in-line process in PV manufacturing. The project includes laser process development, development of advanced optical systems for beam manipulation and cell reflectivity and efficiency testing. An improvement of over 0.5% absolute in efficiency is anticipated after laser-based texturing. The surface textures will be characterized optically, and solar cells will be fabricated with the new laser texturing to ensure that the new process is compatible with high-efficiency cell processing. The result will be demonstration of a prototype process that is suitable for scale-up to a

  7. SEM and Raman spectroscopy analyses of laser-induced periodic surface structures grown by ethanol-assisted femtosecond laser ablation of chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Shazia; Shahid Rafique, M.; Nathala, Chandra S. R.; Ajami, Ali; Husinsky, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    The effect of fluence and pulse duration on the growth of nanostructures on chromium (Cr) surfaces has been investigated upon irradiation of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses in a liquid confined environment of ethanol. In order to explore the effect of fluence, targets were exposed to 1000 pulses at various peak fluences ranging from 4.7 to 11.8 J cm-2 for pulse duration of ∼25 fs. In order to explore the effect of pulse duration, targets were exposed to fs laser pulses of various pulse durations ranging from 25 to 100 fs, for a constant fluence of 11.8 J cm-2. Surface morphology and structural transformations have been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. After laser irradiation, disordered sputtered surface with intense melting and cracking is obtained at the central ablated areas, which are augmented with increasing laser fluence due to enhanced thermal effects. At the peripheral ablated areas, where local fluence is approximately in the range of 1.4-4 mJ cm-2, very well-defined laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) with periodicity ranging from 270 to 370 nm along with dot-like structures are formed. As far as the pulse duration is concerned, a significant effect on the surface modification of Cr has been revealed. In the central ablated areas, for the shortest pulse duration (25 fs), only melting has been observed. However, LIPSS with dot-like structures and droplets have been grown for longer pulse durations. The periodicity of LIPSS increases and density of dot-like structures decreases with increasing pulse duration. The chemical and structural modifications of irradiated Cr have been revealed by Raman spectroscopy. It confirms the formation of new bands of chromium oxides and enol complexes or Cr-carbonyl compounds. The peak intensities of identified bands are dependent upon laser fluence and pulse duration.

  8. Chemometric techniques on the analysis of Raman spectra of serum blood samples of breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Osornio, L. N.; Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Barbosa-Garcia, O.; Frausto-Reyes, C.; Araujo-Andrade, C.; Huerta-Franco, R.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.

    2008-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy and Multivariate methods were used to study serum blood samples of control and breast cancer patients. Blood samples were obtained from 11 patients and 12 controls from the central region of Mexico. Our results show that principal component analysis is able to discriminate serum sample of breast cancer patients from those of control group, also the loading vectors of PCA plotted as a function of Raman shift shown which bands permitted to make the maximum discrimination between both groups of samples.

  9. [USE OF LASER RAMAN-LUMINESCENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR EVALUATION OF QUALITY OF MEAT PRODUCTS AND DETERMINATION OF THE DEGREE OF THEIR BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukushkin, V I; Satusheva, E V; Aleksandrov, M T; Morozova, O A; Pashkov, E P; Ambartsumyan, O A; Amosova, V A

    2015-01-01

    Determination of the effect of microorganisms on spoilage of meat products during various temperature regimes of storage by integral indexes of luminescent lines in their spectra and development of an algorithm of microorganism indication by an express method using laser Raman-luminescent spectroscopy. Minced meat from beef and pork was used. Determination of quantity of mesophilic aerobic and opportunistic-anaerobic microorganisms was carried out by serial 10-fold dilutions with subsequent parallel seeding into Rida count total 24 plates and Petri dishes with 5% blood agar. Sample study was carried out in luminescent software-hardware complex Enspectr L405 (a variant of Enspectr M software-hardware complexes). Meat spoilage was established to be caused to a large degree by Pseudomonas genus (P. fluorescens, P. putida, P. fragi et al.) bacterial growth. Raman-luminescent spectra of bacteria that compose microflora, characterizing and accompanying beef and pork spoilage, were measured and recorded into a database. The results obtained will allow to use this technique in the future for both express-indication and differentiation of microorganisms and express-evaluation of quality of meat products at all stages of their manufacturing, storage, transport and realization.

  10. Evaluation of laser photobiomodulation on bone defect in the femur of osteoporotic rats: a Raman spectral study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luiz Guilherme P.; Aciole, Jouber Mateus d. S.; Neves, Bruno Luiz R. C.; Silveira, Landulfo; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2015-03-01

    Phototherapies have shown positive effects on the bone repair process, increasing the blood supply to the injured area. The aim of this study was to assess through Raman spectroscopy, the efficacy of laser phototherapy (λ = 780 nm, P = 70 mW, CW, 20.4 J/cm2 per session, 163.2 J/cm2 per treatment) on the bone repair process of osteoporotic rats. The osteoporosis induction was achieved by ovariectomy surgery. Thirty Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (Basal; OVX, OVX + Clot and OVX + Clot + Laser), then subdivided into 2 subgroups according to the experimental time (15 and 30 days). After the osteoporosis induction time (60 days), a bone defect with 2 mm was created with a trephine drill in the right femur in the animals of groups OVX, Clot and Clot + Laser. After surgery, the irradiation protocol was applied in the same groups on repeated sessions every 48 hours during 15 days. The samples were analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy to assess the inorganic content of phosphate and carbonated hydroxyapatite (~960 and 1070 cm-1, respectively) and organic lipids and proteins (~1454 cm-1). Statistical analysis (ANOVA, Student-T test) showed significant difference between groups Basal, OVX + Clot, and OVX + Clot + Laser for the inorganic content peaks at ~960 (p≤0.001), and ~1070 cm-1 (p≤0.001) in both periods of 15 and 30 days, however on peak at ~1450 cm-1 no differences were detected. It was concluded that the Laser phototherapy increased deposition of HA on bone repair process of osteoporotic rats.

  11. Impact of zirconium dopants on the lasing efficiency of Raman microcavity laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungwoo; Armani, Andrea M.

    2017-02-01

    Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) silica microresonators are a particularly unique group of microcavities in the sense that they can confine light inside the device for an extended period of time while maintaining a high quality (Q) factor due to the total internal reflection. As a result, WGM resonators have high circulating optical power, which can cause nonlinear optical processes such as stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). It has been demonstrated that SRS has been observed in various WGM silica microresonators with the sub-mW Raman lasing threshold. However, in case of the Raman lasing efficiency, it is limited by the intrinsic property of silica itself, which is the Raman gain coefficient. Therefore, in the present work, we introduce a hybrid silica toroidal microcavity in order to enhance the Raman lasing efficiency. First, we synthesize a suite of silica sol-gels doped with a range of Zirconium (Zr) concentrations and integrate the material with silica toroidal microresonator. The intrinsic Raman gain of the Zr-doped silica is measured using Raman spectroscopy, and the values show a clear dependence on Zr dopant concentrations. The lasing performance is characterized using a 765 nm pump source, and the Raman emissions for the coated devices are detected at 790 nm and longer. The lasing emission and characteristic threshold curves are quantified using both an optical spectrum analyzer and an optical spectrograph. The lasing slope efficiency of exhibits a marked increase from 3.37% to 47.43% as the Zr concentration increases due to the Raman gain improvement. These values are particularly notable as they are the unidirectional, not bidirectional, lasing efficiencies.

  12. Gold nanolenses generated by laser ablation-efficient enhancing structure for surface enhanced Raman scattering analytics and sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Janina; Li, Xiangting; Sherwood, Margaret; Panne, Ulrich; Kneipp, Harald; Stockman, Mark I; Kneipp, Katrin

    2008-06-01

    Nanoaggregates formed by metal spheres of different radii and interparticle distances represent finite, deterministic, self-similar systems that efficiently concentrate optical fields and act as "nanolenses". Here we verify experimentally the theoretical concept of nanolenses and explore their potential as enhancing nanostructures in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Self-similar structures formed by gold nanospheres of different sizes are generated by laser ablation from solid gold into water. These nanolenses exhibit SERS enhancement factors on the order of 10(9). The "chemically clean" preparation process provides several advantages over chemically prepared nanoaggregates and makes the stable and biocompatible gold nanolenses potent enhancing structures for various analytical and sensing applications.

  13. Tropospheric temperature measurements with the pure rotational Raman lidar technique using nonlinear calibration functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, Vladimir V.; Gerasimov, Vladislav V.; Pravdin, Vladimir L.; Pavlinskiy, Aleksei V.; Nakhtigalova, Daria P.

    2017-01-01

    Among lidar techniques, the pure rotational Raman (PRR) technique is the best suited for tropospheric and lower stratospheric temperature measurements. Calibration functions are required for the PRR technique to retrieve temperature profiles from lidar remote sensing data. Both temperature retrieval accuracy and number of calibration coefficients depend on the selected function. The commonly used calibration function (linear in reciprocal temperature 1/T with two calibration coefficients) ignores all types of broadening of individual PRR lines of atmospheric N2 and O2 molecules. However, the collisional (pressure) broadening dominates over other types of broadening of PRR lines in the troposphere and can differently affect the accuracy of tropospheric temperature measurements depending on the PRR lidar system. We recently derived the calibration function in the general analytical form that takes into account the collisional broadening of all N2 and O2 PRR lines (Gerasimov and Zuev, 2016). This general calibration function represents an infinite series and, therefore, cannot be directly used in the temperature retrieval algorithm. For this reason, its four simplest special cases (calibration functions nonlinear in 1/T with three calibration coefficients), two of which have not been suggested before, were considered and analyzed. All the special cases take the collisional PRR lines broadening into account in varying degrees and the best function among them was determined via simulation. In this paper, we use the special cases to retrieve tropospheric temperature from real PRR lidar data. The calibration function best suited for tropospheric temperature retrievals is determined from the comparative analysis of temperature uncertainties yielded by using these functions. The absolute and relative statistical uncertainties of temperature retrieval are given in an analytical form assuming Poisson statistics of photon counting. The vertical tropospheric temperature

  14. Assessment of argon ion laser dispersive Raman spectroscopy for hot cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, B.A.

    1995-02-24

    Characterization of high-level waste tank materials at Hanford is conducted to support safety assessments and waste treatment activities. Raman spectroscopy is expected to give chemical species information which may assist in defining layering in tank waste. This report describes the dispersive Raman system used in this year`s investigation and the methology used to collect and evaluate data taken on tank waste samples. The current argon-ion Raman system was found not to be suitable for screening of tank cores, owing to silica interference, fluorescence interferences, and the extensive time required to collect and treat the data. Recommendations are given for further development.

  15. Depth-profiling by confocal Raman microscopy (CRM): data correction by numerical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomba, J Pablo; Eliçabe, Guillermo E; Miguel, María de la Paz; Perez, Claudio J

    2011-03-01

    The data obtained in confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) depth profiling experiments with dry optics are subjected to significant distortions, including an artificial compression of the depth scale, due to the combined influence of diffraction, refraction, and instrumental effects that operate on the measurement. This work explores the use of (1) regularized deconvolution and (2) the application of simple rescaling of the depth scale as methodologies to obtain an improved, more precise, confocal response. The deconvolution scheme is based on a simple predictive model for depth resolution and the use of regularization techniques to minimize the dramatic oscillations in the recovered response typical of problem inversion. That scheme is first evaluated using computer simulations on situations that reproduce smooth and sharp sample transitions between two materials and finally it is applied to correct genuine experimental data, obtained in this case from a sharp transition (planar interface) between two polymeric materials. It is shown that the methodology recovers very well most of the lost profile features in all the analyzed situations. The use of simple rescaling appears to be only useful for correcting smooth transitions, particularly those extended over distances larger than those spanned by the operative depth resolution, which limits the strategy to the study of profiles near the sample surface. However, through computer simulations, it is shown that the use of water immersion objectives may help to reduce optical distortions and to expand the application window of this simple methodology, which could be useful, for instance, to safely monitor Fickean sorption/desorption of penetrants in polymer films/coatings in a nearly noninvasive way.

  16. Resonant laser techniques for combustion and flow diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzon, Rolf

    1998-05-01

    This thesis presents results from two areas of research. Firstly, the resonant coherent laser techniques polarization spectroscopy (PS), degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) and stimulated emission (SE) have been developed in the general field of combustion diagnostics. Secondly, laser induced fluorescence (LIF) has been developed and applied for the visualization of mixture fractions in turbulent non reacting flows. PS was developed for instantaneous two-dimensional imaging of minor species in flames, the technique being demonstrated on OH and NO. Various aspects of imaging and of detection in general were investigated. Two-photon induced PS was demonstrated for the detection of NH{sub 3}, CO and N{sub 2} molecules. LIF was monitored simultaneously to allow a quantitative comparison between the techniques. Furthermore, PS and DFWM were developed for instantaneous two-dimensional OH temperature imaging. Through a novel experimental approach based on the use of a dual-wavelength dye laser and a diffraction grating the temperature imaging measurements were performed using only one laser and one CCD camera. A comparison between the two techniques was made. SE was through a crossed-beam arrangement developed for spatially resolved detection of flame species. Two-dimensional LIF was developed and applied for measuring mixture fractions in the shear layer between two co-flowing turbulent gaseous jets. The technique was further applied in a study of the mixing of a turbulent water jet impinging orthogonally onto a flat surface. Average concentration fields in the center-plane of the jet was compared with results from large eddy simulations and with data from the literature 221 refs, 48 figs, 5 tabs

  17. Laser emission from diode-pumped Nd:YAG ceramic waveguide lasers realized by direct femtosecond-laser writing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamu, Gabriela; Jipa, Florin; Zamfirescu, Marian; Pavel, Nicolaie

    2014-03-10

    We report on realization of buried waveguides in Nd:YAG ceramic media by direct femtosecond-laser writing technique and investigate the waveguides laser emission characteristics under the pump with fiber-coupled diode lasers. Laser pulses at 1.06 μm with energy of 2.8 mJ for the pump with pulses of 13.1-mJ energy and continuous-wave output power of 0.49 W with overall optical efficiency of 0.13 were obtained from a 100-μm diameter circular cladding waveguide realized in a 0.7-at.% Nd:YAG ceramic. A circular waveguide of 50-μm diameter yielded laser pulses at 1.3 μm with 1.2-mJ energy.

  18. Gold coatings on polymer laser induced periodic surface structures: assessment as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollar, Esther; Sanz, Mikel; Pérez, Susana; Hernández, Margarita; Martín-Fabiani, Ignacio; Rueda, Daniel R; Ezquerra, Tiberio A; Domingo, Concepción; Castillejo, Marta

    2012-12-05

    We report on the fabrication of gold coated nanostructured polymer thin films and on their characterization as substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were obtained on thin polymer films of poly(trimethylene terephthalate) (PTT) upon laser irradiation with the fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm, pulse duration 6 ns) resulting in a period close to the incident wavelength. The nanostructured polymer substrates were coated with a nanoparticle assembled gold layer by pulsed laser deposition using the fifth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (213 nm, pulse duration 15 ns). Different deposition times resulted in thicknesses from a few nanometres up to several tens of nanometres. Analysis by atomic force microscopy and grazing incident small angle X-ray scattering showed that gold coating preserved the LIPSS relief. The capabilities of the produced nanostructures as substrates for SERS have been investigated using benzenethiol as a test molecule. The SERS signal is substantially larger than that observed for a gold-coated flat substrate. Advantages of this new type of SERS substrates are discussed.

  19. Ultrastable and Compact Deep UV Laser Source for Raman Spectroscopy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deep-ultraviolet (UV) Raman spectroscopy is a powerful method to collect chemically specific information about complex samples because deep-UV (?? < 250 nm)...

  20. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronne, Antonio; Bloisi, Francesco; Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria; Depero, Laura E.; Fanelli, Esther; Federici, Stefania; Massoli, Patrizio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2015-05-01

    Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  1. Vibrational imaging based on stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandakumar, P; Kovalev, A; Volkmer, A [3. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)], E-mail: a.volkmer@physik.uni-stuttgart.de

    2009-03-15

    A stimulated Raman scattering microscope with near-infrared picosecond laser pulses at high repetition rates (76 MHz) and radio-frequency lock-in detection is accomplished. Based on stimulated Raman loss detection, we demonstrate noninvasive point-by-point vibrational mapping of chemical and biological samples with high sensitivity and without the requirement for labeling of the sample with natural or artificial fluorophores. We experimentally demonstrate a major benefit of this technique, which is the capability to respond exclusively to the linear Raman-resonance properties of the sample, thus allowing a direct quantitative interpretation of image contrast in terms of the number density of Raman-active modes.

  2. Vibrational imaging based on stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, P.; Kovalev, A.; Volkmer, A.

    2009-03-01

    A stimulated Raman scattering microscope with near-infrared picosecond laser pulses at high repetition rates (76 MHz) and radio-frequency lock-in detection is accomplished. Based on stimulated Raman loss detection, we demonstrate noninvasive point-by-point vibrational mapping of chemical and biological samples with high sensitivity and without the requirement for labeling of the sample with natural or artificial fluorophores. We experimentally demonstrate a major benefit of this technique, which is the capability to respond exclusively to the linear Raman-resonance properties of the sample, thus allowing a direct quantitative interpretation of image contrast in terms of the number density of Raman-active modes.

  3. Suppression of a parasitic pump side-scattering in backward Raman amplifiers of laser pulses in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodov, Andrei; Malkin, Vladimir; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2003-10-01

    In backward Raman amplifiers (BRA), the pump laser pulse can be prematurely depleted through Raman scattering, seeded by the plasma noise, as the pump encounters plasma before reaching the counter-propagating seed pulse. It was shown previously that detuning of the Raman resonance, either by a plasma density gradient or a pump frequency chirp, can prevent the premature pump backscattering, even while the desired amplification of the seed pulse persists with a high efficiency. However, parasitic pump side-scattering is not automatically suppressed together with the parasitic backscattering, and might be even more dangerous for BRA. What we show here is that by combining the above two detuning mechanisms one can suppress parasitic pump side-scattering as well. Apart from the simplest counterpropagating geometry, we examine BRA for arbitrary angles between the directions of pump and seed propagation. We show that, by selecting an appropriate direction of the plasma density gradient, one can favorably minimize the detuning in the direction of the seed pulse propagation, while strongly suppressing the parasitic pump side-scattering in all the other directions. This work was supported in part by DOE and DARPA.

  4. Complementary analysis of tissue homogenates composition obtained by Vis and NIR laser excitations and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Malek, Kamilla; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy and four excitation lines in the visible (Vis: 488, 532, 633 nm) and near infrared (NIR: 785 nm) were used for biochemical analysis of rat tissue homogenates, i.e. myocardium, brain, liver, lung, intestine, and kidney. The Vis Raman spectra are very similar for some organs (brain/intestines and kidney/liver) and dominated by heme signals when tissues of lung and myocardium were investigated (especially with 532 nm excitation). On the other hand, the NIR Raman spectra are specific for each tissue and more informative than the corresponding ones collected with the Vis excitations. The spectra analyzed without any special pre-processing clearly illustrate different chemical composition of each tissue and give information about main components e.g. lipids or proteins, but also about the content of some specific compounds such as amino acid residues, nucleotides and nucleobases. However, in order to obtain the whole spectral information about tissues complex composition the spectra of Vis and NIR excitations should be collected and analyzed together. A good agreement of data gathered from Raman spectra of the homogenates and those obtained previously from Raman imaging of the tissue cross-sections indicates that the presented here approach can be a method of choice for an investigation of biochemical variation in animal tissues. Moreover, the Raman spectral profile of tissue homogenates is specific enough to be used for an investigation of potential pathological changes the organism undergoes, in particular when supported by the complementary FTIR spectroscopy.

  5. Transient bond scission of polytetrafluoroethylene under laser-induced shock compression studied by nanosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kazutaka; Wakabayashi, Kunihiko; Konodo, Ken-Ichi

    2001-06-01

    Nanosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy has been performed to study polymer films, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), under laser driven shock compression at laser power density of 4.0 GW/cm^2. The overtone-mode line of PTFE showed red shift (18 cm-1) at delay time of 9.3 ns due to the shock compression and corresponding pressure was estimated to be approximately 2.7 GPa by analyzing static and shock compression data. The estimated pressure was in good agreement with that estimated by ablation pressure in glass-confined geometry. A new vibrational line at 1900 cm-1 appeared only under shock compression and was assigned to the C=C streching in transient species such as a monomer (C_2F_4) produced by the shock-induced bond scission. Intensity of the new line increased with increasing delay time along propagation of the shock compression with a shock velocity of 2.5 km/s.

  6. Facile synthesis of AgCl/polydopamine/Ag nanoparticles with in-situ laser improving Raman scattering effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Wenqi; Wang, Lin; Wang, Feng; Yang, Haifeng

    2017-01-01

    We reported a simple and fast method to prepare a composite material of polydopamine (PDA) adlayer covered cubic AgCl core, which was inlaid with Ag nanoparticles (NPs), shortly named as AgCl/PDA/AgNPs. The resultant AgCl/PDA/AgNPs could be employed as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate for in-situ detection and the SERS activity could be further greatly improved due to the production of more AgNPs upon laser irradiation. With 4-mercaptopyridine (4-Mpy) as the probe molecule, the enhancement factor could reach 107. Additionally, such SERS substrate shows good reproducibility with relative standard deviation of 7.32% and long term stability (after storage for 100 days under ambient condition, SERS intensity decay is less than 25%). In-situ elevating SERS activity of AgCl/PDA/AgNPs induced by laser may be beneficial to sensitive analysis in practical fields.

  7. Second Topical Meeting on Laser Techniques in the Extreme Ultraviolet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-10

    William T. Silfvast, Commissariat a I’Energle Atomique, Centre d’Etudes Obert R. Wood II, John J. Macklin and Hans Lundberg, AT&T il- Valenton, Villeneuve...L’l-uillier, L A. Lompre, G. MaInfray, and C. Manus, Centre Multiphotn Excitlation Techniques. P. M. Dehmer, S. T. Pratt, d’Etudes Nucliaires de...Houston,* Centre for Molecular Seams and Laser Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, N. Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of

  8. Laser Ultrasonic Technique for Evaluating Human Dental Enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D H-C; Fleming, S; Law, S [Insititue of Photonics and Optical Science, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Lee, Y-C [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan (China); Swain, M; Xue, J, E-mail: hsiao-chuan.wang@sydney.edu.au [Faculty of Dentistry, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-01-01

    A non-destructive laser ultrasonic surface acoustic wave technique has been demonstrated to quantitatively evaluate the elastic response of human dental enamel. We demonstrate the system performance by measuring surface acoustic wave velocity in sound and demineralised enamel. In addition, progressive measurements were made to monitor the change in the enamel elasticity during a two week remineralisation process. The results are presented and they confirm the efficacy, as well as illuminating the progress, of the treatment.

  9. Experimental demonstration of mode-selective phonon excitation of 6H-SiC by a mid-infrared laser with anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Kyohei; Hachiya, Kan; Okumura, Kensuke; Mishima, Kenta; Inukai, Motoharu; Torgasin, Konstantin; Omer, Mohamed [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Sonobe, Taro [Kyoto University Research Administration Office, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Zen, Heishun; Negm, Hani; Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasyo, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2013-10-28

    Mode-selective phonon excitation by a mid-infrared laser (MIR-FEL) is demonstrated via anti-Stokes Raman scattering measurements of 6H-silicon carbide (SiC). Irradiation of SiC with MIR-FEL and a Nd-YAG laser at 14 K produced a peak where the Raman shift corresponds to a photon energy of 119 meV (10.4 μm). This phenomenon is induced by mode-selective phonon excitation through the irradiation of MIR-FEL, whose photon energy corresponds to the photon-absorption of a particular phonon mode.

  10. Effects of LED or laser phototherapy on bone defects grafted with MTA and irradiated with laser or LED light: a comparative Raman spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Soares, Luiz G. P.; Barbosa, Artur Felipe S.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    We studied peaks of calcium hydroxyapatite - CHA on defects grafted with MTA, treated or not with Light Emitting Diode - LED or IR Laser. 54 rats were divided in 6 groups each subdivided into 3 subgroups (15,21,30d). LED (λ850 +/- 10nm) or IR Laser (λ850 nm) was applied over (LED) or in 4 points around the defect at 48 h intervals for 15 days. Raman readings were taken at the surface of the defect. The smaller overall intensity of the peak was found in Group MTA + Laser (1510.2 +/- 274.1) and the highest on Group LED (2322 +/- 715). There were no statistically significant differences between non-irradiated subjects on regards the CHA peaks. On the other hand, there were statistically significant differences between the Group Clot and LED, Clot and Laser, and Clot and MTA + Laser (p =0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.003). There were no significant differences between Group MTA and MTA + LED (p=0.2) but significant differences were seen between Groups MTA and MTA + Laser (p=0.01). Significant differences were also observed between Groups LED and Laser (p MTA + LED and MTA + Laser (p=0.009). MTA, due to its characteristics, seemed to be directly affected by the light. However, the use of either phototherapy positively affected bone healing similarly as observed on different studies using other biomaterials. The overall analysis of our results indicated that the use of either light source resulted in a better, more advanced, and of quality bone repair.

  11. Optical Microstructures Fabricated with Direct Laser Writing Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalczyk M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional photolitography, also known as Direct Laser Writing (DLW, is a powerful technique for fabrication of photonic microstructures. In this paper we present the basics of the relevant technology and discuss some features of the fabrication process. We also describe the experimental setup designed for making colour filters based on diffraction gratings, fibre-tip-integrated lens and anti-reflective coating designed for telecom wavelength (1550 nm. The results obtained demonstrate the DLW technique to be a promising fast prototyping fabrication method that may allow manipulating the properties of optical materials.

  12. Diversity reception and equalization techniques for laser communication in space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Liang; Weibiao Chen

    2007-01-01

    The principle of band-limited space optical communication system using the techniques of space diversity methods and time domain Rake receiver is analyzed. The joint channel equalizer method combining diversity reception and equalization technique is presented in space laser communication. By computer simulation, the bit error rates of noncoherent pace optical on-off keying signal using different space diversity methods, Rake reception with different inter-symbol interferences, joint diversity equalizations with different signal noise rates and different channel numbers are analysed. The results identify that joint diversity equalization method can enhance space optical communication erformance evidently.

  13. Advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedkowski, Janusz; Jankowski, Stanislaw

    2008-11-01

    This paper show an advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation. The LRF is the common sensor for unmanned ground vehicle, autonomous mobile robot and security applications. The cost of the measurement system is extremely high, therefore the simulation tool is designed. The simulation gives an opportunity to execute algorithm such as the obstacle avoidance[1], slam for robot localization[2], detection of vegetation and water obstacles in surroundings of the robot chassis[3], LRF measurement in crowd of people[1]. The Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) and alternative technique based on CUDA (NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture) is presented.

  14. Laser Raman detection for oral cancer based on a Gaussian process classification method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhanwei; Yang, Yongjian; Bai, Yuan; Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Chijun; Chen, He; Luo, Yusheng; Su, Le; Chen, Yong; Li, Xianchang; Zhou, Xiaodong; Jia, Jun; Shen, Aiguo; Hu, Jiming

    2013-06-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common neoplasm of the oral cavity. The incidence rate accounts for 80% of total oral cancer and shows an upward trend in recent years. It has a high degree of malignancy and is difficult to detect in terms of differential diagnosis, as a consequence of which the timing of treatment is always delayed. In this work, Raman spectroscopy was adopted to differentially diagnose oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral gland carcinoma. In total, 852 entries of raw spectral data which consisted of 631 items from 36 oral squamous cell carcinoma patients, 87 items from four oral gland carcinoma patients and 134 items from five normal people were collected by utilizing an optical method on oral tissues. The probability distribution of the datasets corresponding to the spectral peaks of the oral squamous cell carcinoma tissue was analyzed and the experimental result showed that the data obeyed a normal distribution. Moreover, the distribution characteristic of the noise was also in compliance with a Gaussian distribution. A Gaussian process (GP) classification method was utilized to distinguish the normal people and the oral gland carcinoma patients from the oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. The experimental results showed that all the normal people could be recognized. 83.33% of the oral squamous cell carcinoma patients could be correctly diagnosed and the remaining ones would be diagnosed as having oral gland carcinoma. For the classification process of oral gland carcinoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma, the correct ratio was 66.67% and the erroneously diagnosed percentage was 33.33%. The total sensitivity was 80% and the specificity was 100% with the Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) set to 0.447 213 595. Considering the numerical results above, the application prospects and clinical value of this technique are significantly impressive.

  15. Compact Continuous-Wave Nd:YVO4 Laser with Self-Raman Conversion and Sum Frequency Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hai-Yong; ZHANG Ge; DUAN Yan-Min; HUANG Cheng-Hui; WEI Yong

    2011-01-01

    @@ Low threshold and compact cw Nd:YVO4 self-Raman lasers at 1176 nm and sum-frequency mixing of fundamental and first-Stokes wavelengths are demonstrated.A 20-mm Nd:YVO4 crystal is adopted in a compact plane-concave resonator.The results show that the cw Raman conversion is sensitive to cavity length.At an incident pump power of 22.5 W,output power of 1.53 W at 1175.6 nm is achieved,corresponding to the threshold of only 0.8 W and the slop efficiency of 8.1%.Intra-cavity sum-frequency generation is realized in a type-Ⅱ phase-matching cut KTP crystal,480 m W at 558.6 nm is obtained at incident pump power of 12 W.%Low threshold and compact cw Nd:YVO4 self-Ranman lasers at 11 76 nm and sum-frequency mixing of fundamental and first-Stokes wavelengths are demonstrated. A 20-mm Nd:YVO4 crystal is adopted in a compact plane-concave resonator. The results show that the cw Raman conversion is sensitive to cavity length. At an incident pump power of 22.5 W, output power of 153 W at 1175.6nm is achieved, corresponding to the threshold of only 0.8 W and the slop effciency of 8. 1% Intra-cavity sum- frequency generation is realized in a type-Ⅱ phase-matching cut KTP Crystal, 480mW at 558.6nm is obtained at incident pump power of 12 W.

  16. Compact Solid-State 213 nm Laser Enables Standoff Deep Ultraviolet Raman Spectrometer: Measurements of Nitrate Photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, Sergei V; Mao, Michael; Gares, Katie L; Asher, Sanford A

    2015-08-01

    We describe a new compact acousto-optically Q-switched diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) intracavity frequency-tripled neodymium-doped yttrium vanadate laser capable of producing ~100 mW of 213 nm power quasi-continuous wave as 15 ns pulses at a 30 kHz repetition rate. We use this new laser in a prototype of a deep ultraviolet (UV) Raman standoff spectrometer. We use a novel high-throughput, high-resolution Echelle Raman spectrograph. We measure the deep UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectra of solid and solution sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) at a standoff distance of ~2.2 m. For this 2.2 m standoff distance and a 1 min spectral accumulation time, where we only monitor the symmetric stretching band, we find a solid state NaNO3 detection limit of ~100 μg/cm(2). We easily detect ~20 μM nitrate water solutions in 1 cm path length cells. As expected, the aqueous solutions UVRR spectra of NaNO3 and NH4NO3 are similar, showing selective resonance enhancement of the nitrate (NO3(-)) vibrations. The aqueous solution photochemistry is also similar, showing facile conversion of NO3(-) to nitrite (NO2(-)). In contrast, the observed UVRR spectra of NaNO3 and NH4NO3 powders significantly differ, because their solid-state photochemistries differ. Whereas solid NaNO3 photoconverts with a very low quantum yield to NaNO2, the NH4NO3 degrades with an apparent quantum yield of ~0.2 to gaseous species.

  17. Laser remote sensing of tropospheric aerosol over Southern Ireland using a backscatter Raman LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Albert A.; Acheson, Karen; Apituley, Arnoud; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Nicolae, Doina; Ortiz-Amezcua, Pablo; Stoyanov, Dimitar; Trickl, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Raman backscatter coefficients, extinction coefficients and lidar ratios were measured with a ground based Raman lidar system at University College Cork, Ireland, during the periods of July 2012 - August 2012, April 2013 - December 2013 and March 2014 - May 2014. Statistical analysis of these parameters in this time provided information about seasonal effects of Raman backscatter coefficients and the altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer. The mean of the altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer over these time periods is 950 ± 302 m. The values are larger in summer, 1206 ± 367 m, than in winter, 735 m. The altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer measured at Cork is lower than most EARLINET stations. Raman backscatter coefficients above and altitude of 2 km are highest in summer and spring where the values are greater than 0.28 Mm-1 sr-1. Winter values of Raman backscatter coefficient are less than 0.06 Mm-1 sr-1. These seasonal effects are consistent with most EARLINET stations. Large aerosol loads were detected in July 2013 due to a Canadian forest fire event. HYSPLIT air-mass back trajectory models were used to trace the origin of the detected aerosol layers. The aerosol forecast model, MACC, was used to further investigate and verify the propagation of the smoke. The Lidar ratio values and Klett and Raman backscatter coefficients at Cork, for the 4th July, the 7th to 9th of July and the 11th July were compared with observations at Cabauw, Minsk, Granada, Bucharest, Sofia and Garmisch. Lidar ratio values for the smoke detected at Cork were determined to be between 33 sr and 62 sr. The poster will discuss the seasonal changes of Raman backscatter coefficients and the altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer at Cork. An investigation of a Canadian forest fire event measured at Cork will be compared with other data from the EARLINET database.

  18. Proximal Analysis of Regolith Habitats and Protective Biomolecules in Situ by Laser Raman Spectroscopy: Overview of Terrestrial Antarctic Habitats and Mars Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn-Williams, D. D.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    2000-04-01

    Fourier-transform laser Raman spectroscopy in the near infrared (1064 nm) has been used to characterize a variety of key pigments and biomolecules produced by cyanobacteria and other stresstolerant microbes in material from extreme Antarctic cold deserts analogous to martian habitats. These compounds include photosynthetic pigments and sunscreens to protect against harmful UV radiation in the light zone (chlorophyll, scytonemin, β-carotene) and photoprotective minerals, such as silica containing iron (III) oxide. Calcium oxalate mono- and dihydrate produced as a result of the biological weathering processes and stress-protective compounds, necessary to protect organisms against desiccation, freezing temperatures, and hypersalinity, such as water-replacement molecules (trehalose), are also monitored. From the results obtained using Antarctic samples, it is shown that a laser-based system can be used to characterize biomolecules in their natural state within their mineral microhabitats. Because of the similarities between the Antarctic cold desert ecosystems, which represent some of the most extreme terrestrial environmental habitats, and putative martian analogs, the laser-Raman spectrosocopic approach is proposed for the detection of former life on Mars analogs to terrestrial cyanobacteria under stress, such as stromatolites, evaporites, and endolithic communities. To this end, the spectral database that is being accumulated from laser-Raman studies of these Antarctic communities will provide a resource of potential biomarkers for future remote laser-Raman analysis on future Mars missions.

  19. Three-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes/Stokes Raman scattering (CARS/CSRS) microspectroscopy using a white-light laser source

    OpenAIRE

    Bito, Kotatsu; Okuno, Masanari; Kano, Hideaki; LEPROUX, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a three-pulse non-degenerate multiplex coherent Raman microspectroscopic system using a white-light laser source. The fundamental output (1064 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser is used for the pump radiation with the white-light laser output (1100–1700 nm) for the Stokes radiation to achieve broadband multiplex excitations of vibrational coherences. The second harmonic (532 nm) of the same Nd:YAG laser is used for the probe radiation. Thanks to the large wavelength difference between th...

  20. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Daehak-ro 291, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701) (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  1. In-situ stress analysis of the Zr/ZrO2 system as studied by Raman spectroscopy and deflection test in monofacial oxidation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpaska, L.; Favergeon, J.; Grosseau-Poussard, J.-L.; Lahoche, L.; Moulin, G.

    2016-11-01

    A comparison of measurements performed in in-situ conditions using Raman spectroscopy and Deflection Test in Monofacial Oxidation techniques were employed to study stress states developed in zirconia films grown at 500 °C is presented. The results show a good correlation between recorded Raman peak displacement and sample deflection angle. Considering analyzed volume of the material, Raman analysis represents a local measurement while the deflection test is a global response of the material. Reported stress components: (i) hydrostatic - resulted from Raman spectroscopy and (ii) in-plane - resulted from deflection test technique have been analyzed in comparison to each of the described techniques and aim to explain the behavior of zirconia at high temperatures.

  2. Emerging Dental Applications of Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael G.

    Until recently, the application of Raman spectroscopy to investigate dental tissues has primarily focused on using microspectroscopy to characterize dentin and enamel structures as well as to understand the adhesive interface of various resin and bonding agents used in restorative procedures. With the advent of improved laser, imaging/mapping and fibre optic technologies, the applications have expanded to investigate various biomedical problems ranging from oral cancer, bacterial identification and early dental caries detection. The overall aim of these applications is to develop Raman spectroscopy into a tool for use in the dental clinic. This chapter presents the recent dental applications of Raman spectroscopy as well as discusses the potential, strengths and limitations of the technology in comparison with alternative techniques. In addition, a discussion and rationale about combining Raman spectroscopy with other optical techniques will be included.

  3. Sound Power Estimation by Laser Doppler Vibration Measurement Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Revel

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to propose simple and quick methods for the determination of the sound power emitted by a vibrating surface, by using non-contact vibration measurement techniques. In order to calculate the acoustic power by vibration data processing, two different approaches are presented. The first is based on the method proposed in the Standard ISO/TR 7849, while the second is based on the superposition theorem. A laser-Doppler scanning vibrometer has been employed for vibration measurements. Laser techniques open up new possibilities in this field because of their high spatial resolution and their non-intrusivity. The technique has been applied here to estimate the acoustic power emitted by a loudspeaker diaphragm. Results have been compared with those from a commercial Boundary Element Method (BEM software and experimentally validated by acoustic intensity measurements. Predicted and experimental results seem to be in agreement (differences lower than 1 dB thus showing that the proposed techniques can be employed as rapid solutions for many practical and industrial applications. Uncertainty sources are addressed and their effect is discussed.

  4. Infrared technique for decoding of invisible laser markings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haferkamp, Heinz; Jaeschke, Peter; Stein, Johannes; Goede, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Counterfeiting and product piracy continues to be an important issue not only for the Western industry, but also for the society in general. Due to the drastic increase in product imitation and the request for plagiarism protection as well as for reducing thefts there is a high interest in new protection methods providing new security features. The method presented here consists of security markings which are included below paint layers. These markings are invisible for the human eye due to the non-transparency of the upper layers in the visible spectral range. However, the markings can be detected by an infrared technique taking advantage on the partial transparency of the upper paint layers in the IR-region. Metal sheets are marked using laser radiation. The beam of a Nd:YAG-laser provides a modification of the surface structure, resulting in dark markings due to the annealing effect. After coating of the laser-marked material, the markings are invisible for the bare eye. In order to read out the invisible information below the coating, an infrared reflection technique is used. The samples are illuminated with halogen lamps or infrared radiators. Many coating materials (i. e. paints) show a certain transparency in the mid-infrared region, especially between 3 - 5 micrometers . The reflected radiation is detected using an IR-camera with a sensitivity range from 3.4 - 5 micrometers . Due to the different reflection properties between the markings and their surrounding, the information can be detected.

  5. Assessment of bone healing on tibial fractures treated with wire osteosynthesis associated or not with infrared laser light and biphasic ceramic bone graft (HATCP) and guided bone regeneration (GBR): Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos de Carvalho, Fabíola; Aciole, Gilberth Tadeu S.; Aciole, Jouber Mateus S.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.; Nunes dos Santos, Jean; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, through Raman spectroscopy, the repair of complete tibial fracture in rabbits fixed with wire osteosynthesis - WO, treated or not with infrared laser light (λ 780nm, 50mW, CW) associated or not to the use of HATCP and GBR. Surgical fractures were created under general anesthesia (Ketamine 0.4ml/Kg IP and Xilazine 0.2ml/Kg IP), on the tibia of 15 rabbits that were divided into 5 groups and maintained on individual cages, at day/night cycle, fed with solid laboratory pelted diet and had water ad libidum. On groups II, III, IV and V the fracture was fixed with WO. Animals of groups III and V were grafted with hydroxyapatite + GBR technique. Animals of groups IV and V were irradiated at every other day during two weeks (16J/cm2, 4 x 4J/cm2). Observation time was that of 30 days. After animal death the specimens were kept in liquid nitrogen for further analysis by Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy showed significant differences between groups (p<0.001). It is concluded that IR laser light was able to accelerate fracture healing and the association with HATCP and GBR resulted on increased deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite.

  6. Laser surface annealing technique of aged Inconel 718 by laser beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liufa; Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.

    2003-03-01

    Laser was employed to anneal a thin surface layer of aged Inconel 718 by dissolving the strengthening phase, γ". The HE (Hydrogen Embrittlement) resistance of the alloy was improved via such laser surface annealing (LSA) processes. To establish a general LSA technique for engineer applications, experimental LSA processes were conducted to study the effects of the laser process parameters on the formation of the annealed surface layers, and applicable process parameter ranges were obtained. Next, a numerical method was developed for predicting the formation of the laser annealed surface layers in the following steps. Because only the γ" phase was dissolved in the LSA process, the dissolution kinetics of this phase was studied via thermal cycling experiments, and it was proved to follow an Avrami equation. FEM (Finite Element Method) simulations were conducted to calculate the thermal distribution in each laser annealed surface layer, and thermal history data were extracted every certain depth. The volume fractions of the γ" phase at these depths were calculated using these thermal history data based on the deduced Avrami equation. Using a developed relationship between the hardness variation of the alloy and the volume fraction variation of the γ" phase, the hardness distribution in the annealed surface layer and this layer's thickness were calculated. The predicted applicable laser process parameter ranges were obtained. These calculated results were compared with their corresponding experimental results. The good agreements between the calculated and measured results suggested that this numerical prediction approach is feasible for engineer applications.

  7. Laser shockwave technique for characterization of nuclear fuel plate interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perton, M.; Lévesque, D.; Monchalin, J.-P.; Lord, M.; Smith, J. A.; Rabin, B. H.

    2013-01-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  8. Bioactive glass thin films synthesized by advanced pulsed laser techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, N.; Stan, George E.; Ristoscu, C.; Sopronyi, M.; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive materials play an increasingly important role in the biomaterials industry, and are extensively used in a range of applications, including biodegradable metallic implants. We report on Bioactive Glasses (BG) films deposition by pulsed laser techniques onto biodegradable substrates. The BG coatings were obtained using a KrF* excimer laser source (λ= 248 nm, τFWHM ≤ 25 ns).Their thickness has been determined by Profilometry measurements, whilst their morphology has been analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The obtained coatings fairly preserved the targets composition and structure, as revealed by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy analyses.

  9. Laser diode self-mixing technique for liquid velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrova, A.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-09-01

    Using the self-mixing technique, or optical feedback interferometry, fluid velocity measurements of water seeded with titanium dioxide have been performed using a laser diode to measure the effect of the seeding particle concentration and also the pump speed of the flow. The velocimeter utilises commercially available laser diodes with a built-in photodiode for detection of the self-mixing effect. The device has demonstrated an accuracy better than 10% for liquid flow velocities up to 1.5 m/s with a concentration of scattering particles in the range of 0.8-0.03%. This is an improvement of one order of magnitude compared to previous experiments. The proposed velocimeter is to be developed further for application in gas-jet measurements.

  10. Laser diode self-mixing technique for liquid velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrova, A., E-mail: a.alexandrova@liverpool.ac.uk [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Welsch, C.P. [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-11

    Using the self-mixing technique, or optical feedback interferometry, fluid velocity measurements of water seeded with titanium dioxide have been performed using a laser diode to measure the effect of the seeding particle concentration and also the pump speed of the flow. The velocimeter utilises commercially available laser diodes with a built-in photodiode for detection of the self-mixing effect. The device has demonstrated an accuracy better than 10% for liquid flow velocities up to 1.5 m/s with a concentration of scattering particles in the range of 0.8–0.03%. This is an improvement of one order of magnitude compared to previous experiments. The proposed velocimeter is to be developed further for application in gas-jet measurements.

  11. Laser Welding and Syncristallization Techniques Comparison: In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fornaini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Laser welding was first reported in 1967 and for many years it has been used in dental laboratories with several advantages versus the conventional technique. Authors described, in previous works, the possibility of using also chair-side Nd : YAG laser device (Fotona Fidelis III, =1064 nm for welding metallic parts of prosthetic appliances directly in the dental office, extra- and also intra-orally. Syncristallisation is a soldering technique based on the creation of an electric arc between two electrodes and used to connect implants to bars intra-orally. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare two different laser welding devices with a soldering machine, all of these used in prosthetic dentistry. Material and Methods. In-lab Nd : YAG laser welding (group A = 12 samples, chair-side Nd : YAG laser welding (group B = 12 samples, and electrowelder (group C = 12 samples were used. The tests were performed on 36 CrCoMo plates and the analysis consisted in evaluation, by microscopic observation, of the number of fissures in welded areas of groups A and B and in measurement of the welding strength in all the groups. The results were statistically analysed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests. Results. The means and standard deviations for the number of fissures in welded areas were 8.12±2.59 for group A and 5.20±1.38 for group B. The difference was statistical significant (=0.0023 at the level 95%. On the other hand, the means and standard deviations for the traction tests were 1185.50±288.56 N for group A, 896.41±120.84 N for group B, and 283.58±84.98 N for group C. The difference was statistical significant (=0.01 at the level 95%. Conclusion. The joint obtained by welding devices had a significant higher strength compared with that obtained by the electrowelder, and the comparison between the two laser devices used demonstrated that the chair-side Nd : YAG, even giving a

  12. Laser welding and syncristallization techniques comparison: in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, C; Merigo, E; Vescovi, P; Meleti, M; Nammour, S

    2012-01-01

    Background. Laser welding was first reported in 1967 and for many years it has been used in dental laboratories with several advantages versus the conventional technique. Authors described, in previous works, the possibility of using also chair-side Nd : YAG laser device (Fotona Fidelis III, λ = 1064 nm) for welding metallic parts of prosthetic appliances directly in the dental office, extra- and also intra-orally. Syncristallisation is a soldering technique based on the creation of an electric arc between two electrodes and used to connect implants to bars intra-orally. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare two different laser welding devices with a soldering machine, all of these used in prosthetic dentistry. Material and Methods. In-lab Nd : YAG laser welding (group A = 12 samples), chair-side Nd : YAG laser welding (group B = 12 samples), and electrowelder (group C = 12 samples) were used. The tests were performed on 36 CrCoMo plates and the analysis consisted in evaluation, by microscopic observation, of the number of fissures in welded areas of groups A and B and in measurement of the welding strength in all the groups. The results were statistically analysed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests. Results. The means and standard deviations for the number of fissures in welded areas were 8.12 ± 2.59 for group A and 5.20 ± 1.38 for group B. The difference was statistical significant (P = 0.0023 at the level 95%). On the other hand, the means and standard deviations for the traction tests were 1185.50 ± 288.56 N for group A, 896.41 ± 120.84 N for group B, and 283.58 ± 84.98 N for group C. The difference was statistical significant (P = 0.01 at the level 95%). Conclusion. The joint obtained by welding devices had a significant higher strength compared with that obtained by the electrowelder, and the comparison between the two laser devices used demonstrated that the chair-side Nd : YAG, even giving

  13. Line-scan spatially offset Raman spectroscopy for inspecting subsurface food safety and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presented a method for subsurface food inspection using a newly developed line-scan spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) technique. A 785 nm laser was used as a Raman excitation source. The line-shape SORS data was collected in a wavenumber range of 0–2815 cm-1 using a detection mod...

  14. Signs of the Biological Effect of ~2 μm Low-Intensity Laser Radiation in Raman and Absorption Spectra of Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batay, L. E.; Khodasevich, I. A.; Khodasevich, M. A.; Gorbunova, N. B.; Manina, E. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    Local exposure of experimental animals to low-intensity emission from a thulium laser (λ = 1.96 μm) leads to changes in the Raman and IR absorption spectra of blood. This indicates development of systemic effects caused by direct excitation of water molecules by radiation with wavelength ~2 μm, in particular modifi cation of the hemoglobin molecule.

  15. Studies of ground-state dynamics in isolated species by ionization-detected stimulated Raman techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    1993-12-01

    First, the author aims to develop methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. Second, the author wishes to apply such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species (molecules, complexes, and clusters) in supersonic molecular beams. In the past year, the author has made progress in several areas. The first pertains to the application of mass-selective ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS) to the size-specific vibrational spectroscopy of solute-solvent{sub n} clusters. The second involves the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The third pertains to the use of IDSRS methods in the study of intermolecular vibrational transitions in van der Waals complexes.

  16. [Research on the Quantitative Analysis for In-Situ Detection of Acid Radical Ions Using Laser Raman Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Li, Ying; Du, Zeng-feng; Gu, Yan-hong; Guo, Jin-jia

    2015-09-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopy as an in situ analytical technology can enable detailed investigation of the ocean environment. It is necessary to set up a quantitative analysis method based on laser Raman spectroscopy to understand the marine status in situ. In the laboratory investigations, varied concentration of HCO3(-), SO4(2-) and coastal waters of Qingdao are taken as the samples, operating 532 nm of laser, using fiber optic probes to simulate detection mode in situ. Raman spectra are analyzed using the method of internal standard normalization, multiple linear regression (MLR), general Partial Least Squares (PLS) and PLS based on dominant factor respectively in data processing. It was found that correlation coefficients of calibration curves are not high in internal standard normalization method and predicted relative errors on the prepared samples are much high, so internal standard normalization method cannot be effectively used in the quantitative analysis of HCO3(-), SO4(2-) in the water. And with the multiple linear regression, the analysis accuracy was improved effectively. The calibration curve of PLS based on dominant factor showed that the SO4(2-) and HCO3(-) of pre-made solution with correlation coefficient R2 of 0.990 and 0.916 respectively. The 30 mmol · L(-1) of SO4(2-) and 20 mmol · L(-1) of HCO3(-) in two target samples were determined with the relative errors lower than 3.262% and 5.267% respectively. SO4(2-) in the coastal waters as the research object was analyzed by above-mentioned methods, comparing with 28.01 mmol · L(-1) by ion chromatography. It was demonstrated that PLS based on dominant factor method is superior to the rest of the three analysis methods, which can be used in situ calibration, with the mean relative error about 1.128%. All the results show that analysis accuracy would be improved by the PLS based on dominant factor method to predict concentration of acid radical ions.

  17. Single longitudinal mode diamond Raman laser in the eye-safe spectral region for water vapor detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Oliver; Sarang, Soumya; Williams, Robert J; McKay, Aaron; Mildren, Richard P

    2016-11-28

    We report a narrowband and tunable diamond Raman laser generating eye-safe radiation suitable for water vapor detection. Frequency conversion of a tunable pump laser operating from 1063 to 1066 nm to the second order Stokes component in an external standing-wave cavity yielded 7 W of multimode output power in the wavelength range from 1483 to 1488 nm at a conversion efficiency of 21%. Stable single longitudinal mode operation was achieved over the whole tuning range at low power (0.1 W), whereas incorporation of a volume Bragg grating as an output coupler enabled much higher stable power to be attained (0.5 W). A frequency stability of 40 MHz was obtained over a minute without active cavity stabilization. It was found that mode stability is aided via seeding of the second Stokes by four-wave mixing, which leads to a doubling of the mode-hopping interval. The laser was employed for the detection of water vapor in ambient air, demonstrating its potential for remote sensing applications.

  18. Synchronized and timing-stabilized pulse generation from a gain-switched laser diode for stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Kyoya; Fang, Yi-Cheng; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Ozeki, Yasuyuki

    2016-03-01

    We present a picosecond laser source based on a gain-switched laser diode (GS-LD) that can be applied to stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. A 1.06-μm GS-LD was used to generate 14-ps pulses at a repetition rate of 38 MHz. The GS-LD was driven by 200-ps electrical pulses, which were triggered through a toggle flip-flop (T-FF). As a result, the GS-LD pulses were subharmonically synchronized to Ti:sapphire laser (TSL) pulses at a repetition rate of 76 MHz. We investigated the timing jitter of GS-LD pulses and found it to be less than 2.5 ps. We also show that the trigger delay can be less sensitive to the optical power of TSL pulses by controlling the threshold voltage of the T-FF. As a result, GS-LD pulses sufficiently overlapped with TSL pulses even when we scanned the wavelength of the TSL pulses. We demonstrate the SRS imaging of HeLa cells with GS-LD pulses and TSL pulses, proving that GS-LD is readily applicable to SRS microscopy as a compact and stable pulse source.

  19. Three-dimensional topographic scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopic analyses of the irradiation effect on teeth by Nd:YAG, Er: YAG, and CO(2) lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Magda K; Uo, Motohiro; Ohkawa, Shoji; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Watari, Fumio

    2004-10-15

    A three-dimensional analyzer installed in a scanning electron microscope was used to evaluate the morphology and surface roughness using noncontact profilometry. Observations were carried out on the enamel and dentin surface irradiated by three different lasers: Nd:YAG (wavelength 1.06 microm), Er:YAG (2.94 microm), and CO(2) (10.6 microm). Spectroscopic analysis was done by Raman spectroscopy for nonirradiated and laser-irradiated surfaces. The lasers were applied perpendicularly to vertically sectioned and polished human extracted caries-free molars. The tooth was sectioned at each cavity for cross-section analysis after laser irradiation. Irradiation by Nd:YAG and CO(2) lasers of the enamel surface showed an opaque white color, different from dentin where the surface turned black. The Er:YAG laser induced no changes in color of the dentin. Numerous cracks associated with thermal stress were observed in the CO(2) laser-irradiated dentin. Noncontact surface profile analysis of Er:YAG laser-irradiated enamel and dentin showed the deepest cavities, and direct cross-sectional observations of them showed similar cavity outlines. The CO(2) laser-irradiated dentin had the least surface roughness. Raman spectroscopic analysis showed that fluorescence from the laser-irradiated tooth was generally greater than from nonirradiated teeth. Bands in dentin attributed to organic collagen matrix were lost after Nd:YAG and CO(2) laser irradiation, and a broad peak due to amorphous carbon appeared. The Er:YAG laser-irradiated dentin showed no sign of a carbon band and had more suitable results for dental ablation. Noncontact surface profile analysis was effective to evaluate the structural change in the tooth in the microarea of study after laser irradiation.

  20. A laser speckle imaging technique for measuring tissue perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Kevin R; Tulip, J; Leonard, C; Stewart, C; Bray, Robert C

    2004-11-01

    Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) has become a standard method for optical measurement of tissue perfusion, but is limited by low resolution and long measurement times. We have developed an analysis technique based on a laser speckle imaging method that generates rapid, high-resolution perfusion images. We have called it laser speckle perfusion imaging (LSPI). This paper investigates LSPI output and compares it to LDI using blood flow models designed to simulate human skin at various levels of pigmentation. Results show that LSPI parameters can be chosen such that the instrumentation exhibits a similar response to changes in red blood cell concentration (0.1%-5%, 200 microL/min) and velocity (0-800 microL/min, 1% concentration) and, given its higher resolution and quicker response time, could provide a significant advantage over LDI for some applications. Differences were observed in the LDI and LSPI response to tissue optical properties. LDI perfusion values increased with increasing tissue absorption, while LSPI perfusion values showed a slight decrease. This dependence is predictable, owing to the perfusion algorithms specific to each instrument, and, if properly compensated for, should not influence each instrument's ability to measure relative changes in tissue perfusion.

  1. Second (1178 nm) and third (1242 nm) Stokes Raman fiber lasers without intermediate Stokes cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, E. B.; Juárez-Hernández, M.; De la Cruz-May, L.

    2017-07-01

    We report and propose a simple Raman fiber laser scheme that generates two or three order Raman Stokes components by using a single strong (unidirectional) cavity formed by a high-reflecting fiber Bragg grating and air-glass interface (fiber output); the intermediate cavities are non-grating, weak and bi-directional cavities that serve as ‘virtual links’ or energy reservoirs. Once the strong cavity reaches operation, it practically consumes (converts) all the energy from pump and intermediate components into a single and clamped (unidirectional) signal. For example, the use of second-Stokes fiber Bragg grating together with glass-air output operated and harvested practically all the energy. Analogously, third Stokes emission was obtained by changing the grating and hence relying on first and second non-grating formed intermediate cavities. The system uses commercial silica fiber and minimizes the use of lossy and costly fiber Bragg gratings. This proposal broadens the possibilities for covering the entire 1000-2000 nm window for applications that use silica fibers.

  2. Escherichia coli activity characterization using a laser dynamic speckle technique

    CERN Document Server

    Ramírez-Miquet, Evelio E; Contreras-Alarcón, Orestes R

    2012-01-01

    The results of applying a laser dynamic speckle technique to characterize bacterial activity are presented. The speckle activity was detected in two-compartment Petri dishes. One compartment was inoculated and the other one was left as a control blank. The speckled images were processed by the recently reported temporal difference method. Three inoculums of 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 McFarland units of cell concentration were tested; each inoculum was tested twice for a total of six experiments. The dependences on time of the mean activity, the standard deviation of activity and other descriptors of the speckle pattern evolution were calculated for both the inoculated compartment and the blank. In conclusion the proposed dynamic speckle technique allows characterizing the activity of Escherichia coli bacteria in solid medium.

  3. Cost effective nanostructured copper substrates prepared with ultrafast laser pulses for explosives detection using surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, Syed [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Podagatlapalli, G. Krishna; Soma, Venugopal Rao, E-mail: svrsp@uohyd.ernet.in, E-mail: soma-venu@yahoo.com [Advanced Center of Research in High Energy Materials (ACRHEM), University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Mohiddon, Md. Ahamad [Center for Nanotechnology, University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2014-06-30

    Ultrafast laser pulses induced surface nanostructures were fabricated on a copper (Cu) target through ablation in acetone, dichloromethane, acetonitrile, and chloroform. Surface morphological information accomplished from the field emission scanning electron microscopic data demonstrated the diversities of ablation mechanism in each case. Fabricated Cu substrates were utilized exultantly to investigate the surface plasmon (localized and propagating) mediated enhancements of different analytes using surface enhance Raman scattering (SERS) studies. Multiple utility of these substrates were efficiently demonstrated by collecting the SERS data of Rhodamine 6G molecule and two different secondary explosive molecules such as 5-amino-3-nitro-l,2,4-triazole and trinitrotoluene on different days which were weeks apart. We achieved significant enhancement factors of >10{sup 5} through an easily adoptable cleaning procedure.

  4. Studies of growth, microstructure, Raman spectroscopy and annealing effect of pulsed laser deposited Ca-doped NBCO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palai, R [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Romans, E J [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Martin, R W [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Docherty, F T [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XL (United Kingdom); Maas, P [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Pegrum, C M [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-07

    Superconducting thin films of Nd{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (x = 0.03 and 0.08) have been grown on single crystal SrTiO{sub 3} substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The statistical methods of Experimental Design and regression analysis were used to optimize the film properties and to understand the correlation between the growth parameters and film properties. The orientation of the films was investigated by x-ray diffraction. The surface morphology of the films was examined by atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy. Qualitative and quantitative elemental analyses of the films were carried out using electron probe microanalysis. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to study the oxygen sublattice vibrations of the films. The effect of annealing on the superconducting transition temperature of the patterned films was also studied.

  5. Development of a Technique of an Analytical Assessment of Crossing of Ellipses of Distribution on Polarizing Raman Ranges at Identification of Nanoparticles of Silver on Polyester Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Dobrovolskaya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Analytical estimates of crossing of ellipses of distribution at recognition of nanoparticles of colloidal silver are given in polyair fibers on multidimensional correlation components of the Raman ranges with control according to polarizing characteristics. Reliability of recognition of nanoparticles was estimated on joint probability of normal distributions of intensivnost of the Raman spectrograms of nanoparticles of silver on polyair fibers depending on longitudinal and cross polarization of laser radiation on all range of a range with the analysis of 9 main peaks.

  6. Technique for cellular microsurgery using the 193-nm excimer laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanker, D; Ohad, S; Lewis, A; Simon, A; Shenkar, J; Penchas, S; Laufer, N

    1991-01-01

    A new cell surgery technique has been developed to produce well-defined alterations in cells and tissue without detectable heating and/or other structural damage in the surroundings. The technique involves the use of an argon fluoride excimer laser, in the deep ultraviolet (UV) region of the spectrum at 193 nm, which is guided through a glass pipette filled with a positive air pressure. To demonstrate the method, holes were drilled in the zona pellucida of mouse oocytes. The diameter of the drilled hole was determined by the pipette tip size, and its depth by an energy emitted per pulse and number of pulses. Scanning electron microscopy of the drilled mouse oocytes showed uniform, round, well-circumscribed holes with sharp edges. Oocytes that had their zona pellucida drilled with this new method fertilized in vitro and developed to the blastocyst stage in a rate similar to that of control group. These results demonstrate the nonperturbing nature of this cold laser microsurgical procedure. In addition to the extension of our results for clinical in vitro fertilization purposes, such as enhancement of fertilization and embryo biopsy, there are wide-ranging possible uses of our method in fundamental and applied investigations that require submicron accuracy in cellular alteration.

  7. Vestibuloplasty: a retrospective study on conventional and laser operation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neckel, Claus P.

    1999-05-01

    40 patients with edentulous maxillary jaws were referred to our private practice limited to maxillofacial surgery, due to atrophy of the alveolar ridge. Before prosthetic renewal of the upper removable prosthesis the restorative dentist requested a sufficient vestibule. After supraperiostal preparation, soft tissue advancement and fixation with absorbable sutures. The recipient site was covered with a free gingival graft. Group I was operated on traditionally using a scalpel. In group II incision and soft tissue preparation was performed using a diode laser. Wavelength: 810 nm; Continuous wave mode; 400 micron optic fiber; Output power 1.6 Watt. All operations were performed by one surgeon experienced in both operation techniques. Every patient was followed-up 1, 4, 8 weeks, 6 and 12 months. The vestibular height directly adjacent to the nasal cavity and 2cm distal to these first measuring locations were taken. Each patient was asked to evaluate their individual discomfort and postoperative pain level. Both groups showed no significant difference in vestibular height after 1, 4, 8 weeks, 6 months and 1 year. The postoperative height of 1.28 cm was reduced to 0.84 cm after 1 year. Furthermore both groups showed uneventful healing and take of the free gingival grafts. The assessment of the pain and discomfort level by the patients brought a significant difference between both groups in favor of the laser assisted operation technique.

  8. Injection-locking of two frequency-doubled lasers with 3.2 GHz offset for driving Raman transitions with low photon scattering in $^{43}$Ca$^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Linke, N M; Lucas, D M

    2013-01-01

    We describe the injection locking of two infrared (794 nm) laser diodes which are each part of a frequency doubled laser system. An acousto-optic modulator (AOM) in the injection path gives an offset of 1.6 GHz between the lasers for driving Raman transitions between states in the hyperfine split (by 3.2 GHz) ground level of $^{43}$Ca$^+$. The offset can be disabled for use in $^{40}$Ca$^+$. We measure the relative linewidth of the frequency-doubled beams to be 42 mHz in an optical heterodyne measurement. The use of both injection locking and frequency doubling combines spectral purity with high optical power. Our scheme is applicable for providing Raman beams across other ion species and neutral atoms where coherent optical manipulation is required.

  9. Analysis of the dentin-resin interface by use of laser Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, M; Onose, H; Moore, B K

    2002-12-01

    Adhesion of resin-bonding agents to dentin is currently believed to result from impregnation of adhesive resin into superficially demineralized dentin. The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical composition of the resin-impregnated dentin (hybrid) layer using a micro-Raman spectroscopy. Resin composites were bonded to bovine dentin with the two-step bonding systems, and specimens were sectioned parallel to dentinal tubules. These surfaces were then polished down to 1 microm diamond pastes. Raman spectra were successively recorded along a line perpendicular to the dentin-adhesive interface by steps of 0.2 microm on a computer controlled X-Y stage. The relative amounts of hydroxyapatite (960 cm(-1), P-O), adhesive resin (640 cm(-1), aromatic ring), and organic substrate (1450 cm(-1), C-H) in the dentin-adhesive bonding area were calculated. From the Raman spectroscopy results, the hybrid layer represents a gradual transition in the relative amount of adhesive from the resin side to dentin side. Evidence of poor saturation of the adhesive resin in the demineralized dentin with the one-bottle adhesive system was detected. From the results of this study, inhomogeneity of the hybrid layer composition was detected, and the degree of resin impregnation was found to be different between the bonding systems tested.

  10. Investigations in CO2 laser beam caustics measuring techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Bagger, Claus

    2004-01-01

    The performance of an industrial laser is very much depending upon the characteristics of the laser beam. The ISO standards 11146 and 11154 which are describing test methods for laser beam parameters have been approved.......The performance of an industrial laser is very much depending upon the characteristics of the laser beam. The ISO standards 11146 and 11154 which are describing test methods for laser beam parameters have been approved....

  11. Investigations in CO2 laser beam caustics measuring techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Bagger, Claus

    2004-01-01

    The performance of an industrial laser is very much depending upon the characteristics of the laser beam. The ISO standards 11146 and 11154 which are describing test methods for laser beam parameters have been approved.......The performance of an industrial laser is very much depending upon the characteristics of the laser beam. The ISO standards 11146 and 11154 which are describing test methods for laser beam parameters have been approved....

  12. Analysis of natural and artificial ultramarine blue pigments using laser induced breakdown and pulsed Raman spectroscopy, statistical analysis and light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osticioli, I.; Mendes, N. F. C.; Nevin, A.; Gil, Francisco P. S. C.; Becucci, M.; Castellucci, E.

    2009-08-01

    Pulsed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy were performed using a novel laboratory setup employing the same Nd:YAG laser emission at 532 nm for the analysis of five commercially available pigments collectively known as "ultramarine blue", a sodium silicate material of either mineral origin or an artificially produced glass. LIBS and Raman spectroscopy have provided information regarding the elemental and molecular composition of the samples; additionally, an analytical protocol for the differentiation between natural (lapis lazuli) and artificial ultramarine blue pigments is proposed. In particular LIBS analysis has allowed the discrimination between pigments on the basis of peaks ascribed to calcium. The presence of calcite in the natural blue pigments has been confirmed following Raman spectroscopy in specific areas of the samples, and micro-Raman and optical microscopy have further corroborated the presence of calcite inclusions in the samples of natural origin. Finally multivariate analysis of Laser induced breakdown spectra using principal component analysis (PCA) further enhanced the differentiation between natural and artificial ultramarine blue pigments.

  13. Analysis of natural and artificial ultramarine blue pigments using laser induced breakdown and pulsed Raman spectroscopy, statistical analysis and light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osticioli, I; Mendes, N F C; Nevin, A; Gil, Francisco P S C; Becucci, M; Castellucci, E

    2009-08-01

    Pulsed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy were performed using a novel laboratory setup employing the same Nd:YAG laser emission at 532 nm for the analysis of five commercially available pigments collectively known as "ultramarine blue", a sodium silicate material of either mineral origin or an artificially produced glass. LIBS and Raman spectroscopy have provided information regarding the elemental and molecular composition of the samples; additionally, an analytical protocol for the differentiation between natural (lapis lazuli) and artificial ultramarine blue pigments is proposed. In particular LIBS analysis has allowed the discrimination between pigments on the basis of peaks ascribed to calcium. The presence of calcite in the natural blue pigments has been confirmed following Raman spectroscopy in specific areas of the samples, and micro-Raman and optical microscopy have further corroborated the presence of calcite inclusions in the samples of natural origin. Finally multivariate analysis of Laser induced breakdown spectra using principal component analysis (PCA) further enhanced the differentiation between natural and artificial ultramarine blue pigments.

  14. MATILDA: A Military Laser Range Safety Tool Based on Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    AFRL-RH-FS-TR-2014-0035 MATILDA: A Military Laser Range Safety Tool Based on Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Techniques Paul...the Government’s approval or disapproval of its ideas or findings. MATILDA: A Military Laser Range Safety Tool Based on Probabilistic Risk Assessment... Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) techniques to perform laser safety and hazard analysis for high output lasers in outdoor environments has become

  15. Self-organized coherent bursts of stimulated Raman scattering and speckle interaction in multi-speckled laser beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Rose, H. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Bowers, K. J.; Bergen, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kirkwood, R. K.; Michel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Nonlinear physics governing the kinetic behavior of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in multi-speckled laser beams has been identified in the trapping regime over a wide range of k{lambda}{sub D} values (here k is the wave number of the electron plasma waves and {lambda}{sub D} is the Debye length) in homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas. Hot electrons from intense speckles, both forward and side-loss hot electrons produced during SRS daughter electron plasma wave bowing and filamentation, seed and enhance the growth of SRS in neighboring speckles by reducing Landau damping. Trapping-enhanced speckle interaction through transport of hot electrons, backscatter, and sidescatter SRS light waves enable the system of speckles to self-organize and exhibit coherent, sub-ps SRS bursts with more than 100% instantaneous reflectivity, resulting in an SRS transverse coherence width much larger than a speckle width and a SRS spectrum that peaks outside the incident laser cone. SRS reflectivity is found to saturate above a threshold laser intensity at a level of reflectivity that depends on k{lambda}{sub D}: higher k{lambda}{sub D} leads to lower SRS and the reflectivity scales as {approx}(k{lambda}{sub D}){sup -4}. As k{lambda}{sub D} and Landau damping increase, speckle interaction via sidescattered light and side-loss hot electrons decreases and the occurrence of self-organized events becomes infrequent, leading to the reduction of time-averaged SRS reflectivity. It is found that the inclusion of a moderately strong magnetic field in the laser direction can effectively control SRS by suppressing transverse speckle interaction via hot electron transport.

  16. Laser ultrasonic techniques for assessment of tooth structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, David W.; Baldwin, Kevin C.

    2000-06-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. For example, there is a need to image the margins of a restoration for the detection of poor bonding or voids between the restorative material and the dentin. With conventional x-ray techniques, it is difficult to detect cracks and to visualize interfaces between hard media. This due to the x-ray providing only a 2 dimensional projection of the internal structure (i.e. a silhouette). In addition, a high resolution imaging modality is needed to detect tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated which can help the tooth to re-mineralize itself. Currently employed x-ray imaging is incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration with a synthetic material. Other clinical applications include the visualization of periodontal defects, the localization of intraosseous lesions, and determining the degree of osseointegration between a dental implant and the surrounding bone. A means of assessing the internal structure of the tooth based upon use of high frequency, highly localized ultrasound (acoustic waves) generated by a laser pulse is discussed. Optical interferometric detection of ultrasound provides a complementary technique with a very small detection footprint. Initial results using laser-based ultrasound for assessment of dental structures are presented. Discussion will center on the adaptability of this technique to clinical applications.

  17. FIBER AND INTEGRATED OPTICS, LASER APPLICATIONS, AND OTHER PROBLEMS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Raman scattering spectra recorded in the course of the water-ice phase transition and laser diagnostics of heterophase water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, S. M.; Panchishin, I. M.; Fadeev, V. V.

    1989-04-01

    The method of laser Raman spectroscopy was used to study heterophase water systems. The apparatus included an argon laser, an optical multichannel analyzer, and a microcomputer. The temperature dependences of the profiles of the valence (stretching) band in the Raman spectrum of liquid water between + 50 °C and - 7 °C and of polycrystalline ice Ih (from 0 to - 62 °C) were determined, as well as the spectral polarization characteristics of the Raman valence band. A method was developed for the determination of the partial concentrations of the H2O molecules in liquid and solid phases present as a mixture. An analysis was made of the errors of the method and the sources of these errors. Applications of the method to multiparameter problems in more complex water systems (for example, solutions of potassium iodide in water) were considered. Other potential practical applications of the method were discussed.

  18. Moire Ct technique and its application on laser flexible manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianze; Hou, Luan; Jiang, Chuan; Zhang, Xia

    2010-10-01

    In the paper, the main properties of Moire fringe, such as average effect, amplification effect, corresponding relation are elaborated, and the principle of Moire Ct technique is represented. On the basis of main features of Moire fringe, multidirectional Moire Ct deflection system is designed using high accuracy Ccd, grating, filter, lens, planar mirror and optical splitter. The system has simple light path, and can be easily made into the one that has large caliber.It can analyze multidirectional records of the probe at the same time, and can obtain clear interference patterns.The iterative technique combined with computer chromatography algorithms is used to achieve inversion of multidirectional clear interference patterns so that the required parameters can be acquired. Moire Ct technique is applied to laser flexible manufacture. Produced parts are delaminated on the paper, and are stratified manufactured until they are connected to forming. Cad/Cam system is adopted to construct Spatial three-dimensional geometric model, and the data files are formed. Then by using the Small triangle plane, the inner and outer surfaces of the data files are discretized. Discretized parts model is made chromatography with mathematical methods using Cam software. A series of parallel horizontal intersecting planes are generated. The problems of filtering arrangement tangent points are solved by recombining the shape and structure relationship among the triangular mesh. Several conclusions are presented.

  19. Three-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes/Stokes Raman scattering (CARS/CSRS) microspectroscopy using a white-light laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bito, Kotatsu [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Analytical Science Research Laboratories, Kao Corporation, 2606 Akabane, Ichikai-Machi, Haga-Gun, Tochigi 321-3497 (Japan); Okuno, Masanari [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kano, Hideaki [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tenodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Leproux, Philippe [Institut de Recherche XLIM, UMR CNRS No. 7252, 123 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); LEUKOS, ESTER Technopole, 1 Avenue d’Ester, 87069 Limoges Cedex (France); Couderc, Vincent [Institut de Recherche XLIM, UMR CNRS No. 7252, 123 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); Hamaguchi, Hiro-o, E-mail: hhama@nctu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Institute of Molecular Science and Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 Ta Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► We have developed a simultaneous measurement system of CARS and CSRS. ► We can obtain information on the electronic resonance effect with the measurement. ► The simultaneous measurement provides us with more reliable spectral information. - Abstract: We have developed a three-pulse non-degenerate multiplex coherent Raman microspectroscopic system using a white-light laser source. The fundamental output (1064 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser is used for the pump radiation with the white-light laser output (1100–1700 nm) for the Stokes radiation to achieve broadband multiplex excitations of vibrational coherences. The second harmonic (532 nm) of the same Nd:YAG laser is used for the probe radiation. Thanks to the large wavelength difference between the pump and probe radiations, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) can be detected simultaneously. Simultaneous detection of CARS and CSRS enables us to obtain information on the electronic resonance effect that affects differently the CARS and CSRS signals. Simultaneous analysis of the CARS and CSRS signals provides us the imaginary part of χ{sup (3)} without introducing any arbitrary parameter in the maximum entropy method (MEM)

  20. The discrimination of honey origin using melissopalynology and Raman spectroscopy techniques coupled with multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvucci, Francesca; Nobili, Lara; Melucci, Dora; Grillenzoni, Francesca-Vittoria

    2015-02-15

    Honey traceability to food quality is required by consumers and food control institutions. Melissopalynologists traditionally use percentages of nectariferous pollens to discriminate the botanical origin and the entire pollen spectrum (presence/absence, type and quantities and association of some pollen types) to determinate the geographical origin of honeys. To improve melissopalynological routine analysis, principal components analysis (PCA) was used. A remarkable and innovative result was that the most significant pollens for the traditional discrimination of the botanical and geographical origin of honeys were the same as those individuated with the chemometric model. The reliability of assignments of samples to honey classes was estimated through explained variance (85%). This confirms that the chemometric model properly describes the melissopalynological data. With the aim to improve honey discrimination, FT-microRaman spectrography and multivariate analysis were also applied. Well performing PCA models and good agreement with known classes were achieved. Encouraging results were obtained for botanical discrimination.

  1. The efficacy of the use of IR laser phototherapy (LPT) on bone defect grafted with biphasic ceramic on rats with iron deficiency anemia: Raman spectroscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Cristiane Becher; de Castro, Isabele Cardoso Vieira; Júnior, João Alves Reis; Aragão, Juliana Silveira; Barbosa, Artur Felipe Santos; Silveira, Landulfo; Pinheiro, Antonio L B

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate bone repair in anemic and non-anemic rats submitted or not to laser phototherapy and hydroxyapatite graft. Animals were divided in eight groups of five animals: Clot; Laser; Graft; Graft + Laser; iron deficiency anemia (IDA) + Clot; IDA + Laser; IDA + graft; IDA + graft + Laser. When appropriate irradiation with infrared laser was done during 15 days at a 48-h interval. Animals were killed at day 30; samples were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Three shifts were studied and statistically analyzed: ~960, ~1,070, and ~1,454 cm(-1). Graft + laser showed highest ~960 peak was statistically different from all other healthy groups. No statistical difference was found between Clot and IDA + Clot in any shift. The IDA + Graft and IDA + Graft + Laser groups had low mean peak values for shifts ~960, ~1,070, and ~1,454 cm(-1). The results in this study indicate that using hydroxyapatite (HA) and laser irradiation in healthy subjects is favorable to mineral deposition and bone maturation, this being of importance for some groups at risk, such as astronauts. In iron deficiency anemia cases, the use of graft, associated or not to laser irradiation, resulted in low collagen and low carbonate and phosphate HA.

  2. Elastic characterization of platinum/rhodium alloy at high temperature by combined laser heating and laser ultrasonic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, K; Prakapenka, V; Hellebrand, E; Zinin, P V

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate an innovative pump-probe technique combined with laser heating to determine the velocity of a surface Rayleigh wave at high temperature. Laser ultrasonics in a point-source-point-receiver configuration was combined with laser heating to evaluate the elastic properties of micron size specimens. The measurements of the velocity of the surface Rayleigh wave (SRW) were conducted at 1070K. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B P; Saini, G S S

    2016-02-15

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-02-01

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  5. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of single leukemic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changmei Cai; Rong Chen; Juqiang Lin; Yongzeng Li; Shangyuan Feng

    2008-01-01

    The Raman spectra from leukemic cell line (HL60) and normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are obtained by confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy using near-infrared laser (785 nm) excitation. The scanning range is from 500 to 2000 cm-1. The two average Raman spectra of normal PBMCs and carcinoma cells have clear differences because their structure and amount of nucleic acid, protein, and other major molecules are changed. The spectra are also compared and analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) to demonstrate the two distinct clusters of normal and transformed cells. The sensitivity of this technique for identifying transformed cells is 100%.

  6. Quasi-continuous-wave 589-nm radiation based on intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:GGG/BaWO4 Raman laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaojun; Cong, Zhenhua; Men, Shaojie; Rao, Han; Xia, Jinbao; Zhang, Sasa; Zhang, Huaijin

    2016-07-01

    Quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) 589-nm radiation was realized based on a frequency-doubled crystalline Raman laser. The fundamental wave with macro-micro-pulse trains was generated from an acousto-optically Q-switched QCW diode side-pumped Nd:GGG laser. Intracavity Raman conversion was accomplished by a BaWO4 crystal and the second harmonic generation was finished by a KTP crystal. Under a pumping power of 126.0 W with a macro-pulse frequency of 300 Hz and duration of 300 μs, the maximum 589 nm output power of 4.2 W was obtained at a micro-pulse frequency of 33.3 kHz. The micro-pulse width was 13.6 ns.

  7. Over-five octaves wide Raman combs in high-power picosecond-laser pumped H(2)-filled inhibited coupling Kagome fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoît, Aurélien; Beaudou, Benoit; Alharbi, Meshaal; Debord, Benoit; Gérôme, Frédéric; Salin, François; Benabid, Fetah

    2015-06-01

    We report on the generation of over 5 octaves wide Raman combs using inhibited coupling Kagome guiding hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with hydrogen and pumped with 22.7 W average power and 27 picosecond pulsed fiber laser. Combs spanning from ~321 nm in the UV to ~12.5 µm in the long-wavelength IR (i.e. from 24 THz to 933 THz) with different spectral content and with an output average power of up to ~10 W were generated. In addition to the clear potential of such a comb as a laser source emitting at spectral ranges, which existing technology poorly addresses like long-wavelength IR and UV, the combination of high Raman net gain and short pump-pulse duration makes these spectra an excellent candidate for intra-pulse waveform synthesis.

  8. Development and application of laser techniques for studying fuel dynamics and NO formation in engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Oeivind

    2000-11-01

    In this work a number of laser techniques have been applied in new ways for combustion diagnostics in engines. The applications cover small two-stroke engines, ordinary spark ignition (SI) engines, direct-injection spark ignition (DISI) engines, and heavy-duty diesel truck engines. In an investigation of unmodified two-stroke engines running at high engine speed, it has been shown that cycle-resolved laser diagnostics are applicable to real-world engines. The emission of unburned fuel was detected at the exhaust port with successful discrimination against other unburned hydrocarbons. Although a few problems remain to be solved in order to get quantitative concentration data, valuable information can nonetheless be attained using this technique. The technique would benefit from the use of a non-fluorescing lubricant, as that would decrease the background fluorescence. Laser-based techniques also provide a useful tool for studying the fuel dynamics inside the cylinder. In the development of DISI engines it is of particular importance to acquire knowledge about the distribution of fuel around the spark plug. Numerical computer codes are often used as design tools in these applications. Laser techniques are capable of yielding instantaneous multi-point concentration information with high spatial and temporal resolution, making them ideal both for validation of CFD simulations and for testing designs. The feasibility of using laser diagnostics in the development of DISI engines has been shown. Future research should be aimed at simplifying the procedure for quantifying the data, since a fairly simple and reliable technique would be an important asset for the industry. In a more fundamental study, it has been shown that it is possible to simultaneously detect a substance in both liquid and vapour phase. Water was used in the study since it is easily produced in both phases. Liquid drops were detected using spontaneous Raman scattering, whereas the vapour surrounding them

  9. Development and application of laser techniques for studying fuel dynamics and NO formation in engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Oeivind

    2000-11-01

    In this work a number of laser techniques have been applied in new ways for combustion diagnostics in engines. The applications cover small two-stroke engines, ordinary spark ignition (SI) engines, direct-injection spark ignition (DISI) engines, and heavy-duty diesel truck engines. In an investigation of unmodified two-stroke engines running at high engine speed, it has been shown that cycle-resolved laser diagnostics are applicable to real-world engines. The emission of unburned fuel was detected at the exhaust port with successful discrimination against other unburned hydrocarbons. Although a few problems remain to be solved in order to get quantitative concentration data, valuable information can nonetheless be attained using this technique. The technique would benefit from the use of a non-fluorescing lubricant, as that would decrease the background fluorescence. Laser-based techniques also provide a useful tool for studying the fuel dynamics inside the cylinder. In the development of DISI engines it is of particular importance to acquire knowledge about the distribution of fuel around the spark plug. Numerical computer codes are often used as design tools in these applications. Laser techniques are capable of yielding instantaneous multi-point concentration information with high spatial and temporal resolution, making them ideal both for validation of CFD simulations and for testing designs. The feasibility of using laser diagnostics in the development of DISI engines has been shown. Future research should be aimed at simplifying the procedure for quantifying the data, since a fairly simple and reliable technique would be an important asset for the industry. In a more fundamental study, it has been shown that it is possible to simultaneously detect a substance in both liquid and vapour phase. Water was used in the study since it is easily produced in both phases. Liquid drops were detected using spontaneous Raman scattering, whereas the vapour surrounding them

  10. Generation of UV laser light by stimulated Raman scattering in D2, D2/Ar and D2/He using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 355nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐贲; 岳古明; 张寅超; 胡欢陵; 周军; 胡顺星

    2003-01-01

    A pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 355nm is used to pump Raman cell filled with D2,D2/Ar and D2/He.With adequately adjusted parameters,the maximum photon conversion efficiency of the first-order Stokes light(S1,396.796nm)reaches 33.33% in D2/Ar and the stability of S1 in pure D2 is fairly high,the energy drift being less than 10% when the pump energy drifts in the range of 5%.The conversion efficiency and stability,which are functions of the composition and pressure of the Raman medium and the energy of pump laser,are investigated.The result has been used to optimize the laser transmitter system for a differential absorption lidar system to measure NO2 concentration profiles.

  11. Combined X-Ray and Raman Spectroscopic Techniques for the Characterization of Sea Spray Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, J. Y.; Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Gilles, M. K.; OBrien, R. E.; Moffet, R.; Radway, J.

    2014-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol along with mineral dust dominates the global mass flux of particles to the atmosphere. Marine aerosol particles are of particular interest because of their continual impact on cloud formation, precipitation, atmospheric chemical processes, and thus global climate. Here we report on the physical/chemical characteristics of sub-surface waters, aerosolized sea spray particles, and particles/organic species present in surface microlayer (SML) samples collected during oceanic field campaigns and generated during laboratory experiments, revealing a biogenic primary source of the organic fraction of airborne particles. We also report on ice nucleation experiments with aerosolized particles collected during the May 2014 WACS II North Atlantic cruise and with laboratory generated exudate material from diatom cultures with the potential to impact cirrus and mixed phase clouds. Physicochemical analyses using a multi-modal approach which includes Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy coupled with Near-Edge Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) and Raman spectroscopy confirm the presence and chemical similarity of polysaccharide-rich transparent exopolymer (TEP) material and proteins in both SML sea spray aerosol and ice forming aerosol particles, regardless of the extent of biological activity in surface waters. Our results demonstrate a direct relationship between the marine environment and composition of marine aerosol through primary particle emission.

  12. Solid-State Raman Converters for High-Average Power Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    spectral resolution of the system was 0.2-1.0 cmŕ. The argon laser plasma discharge lines were cut by an additional ÖD •TM...Principles of Nonlinear Optics. New York; Wiley, 1984, ch. 10. 15. R. L. Carman , F. Shimizu, C. S. Wang, and N. Bloembergen, "Theory of Stokes pulse shapes

  13. Laser pediatric crowns performed without anesthesia: a contemporary technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacboson, B; Berger, J; Kravitz, R; Patel, P

    2003-01-01

    Extensive caries resulting in the need for a stainless steel crown in primary teeth may now be prepared with the use of the WaterlaseTM YSGG Laser, (Biolase) hard and soft-tissue laser. The use of the laser eliminates the need for local anesthesia, thereby providing optimal patient comfort and compliance.

  14. Laser-induced synthesis of metallic silver-gold nanoparticles encapsulated in carbon nanospheres for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and toxins detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povolotskiy, Alexey; Povolotckaia, Anastasia; Petrov, Yuriy; Manshina, Alina; Tunik, Sergey

    2013-09-01

    Metallic silver-gold nanoparticles (1-5 nm) encapsulated into carbon nanospheres (20-30 nm) were synthesized via laser-induced chemical liquid phase deposition. The obtained carbon-silver-gold nanostructures were characterized by high specific surface area and demonstrated high sensitivity as a material for surface-enhanced Raman scattering and adsorption properties allowing analyte extraction from a dilute solution for quantitative monitoring of low concentration components.

  15. Recent progress of laser metrology in chemically reacting flows at onera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, A.; Dorval, N.; Vilmart, G.; Orain, M.; George, R.; Scherman, M.; Nafa, M.; Bresson, A.; Attal-Tretout, B.; Lefebvre, M.

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents some of the development actions performed these last years at ONERA using laser spectroscopic techniques to probe chemically reacting flows. Techniques like laser absorption, laser induced fluorescence (LIF), and Raman scattering will be described with focus on present drawbacks as well as expectations from new laser technologies (Interband Cascade Lasers (ICL) diodes, Optical Parametrical Oscillators (OPO), frequency comb, and femto/picosecond lasers) before showing some results of recent applications in ground facilities.

  16. 拉曼光谱在锂离子电池研究中的应用%Applications of Raman Spectroscopy Technique in Lithium Ion Batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亮; 胡勇胜; 李泓; 王兆翔; 徐红星; 黄学杰; 陈立泉

    2011-01-01

    综述拉曼光谱(Raman spectroscopy)在锂离子电池碳负极材料、尖晶石LiMn2O4和LiFePO4正极材料、聚合物和室温熔盐电解质以及电极/电解质界面膜研究中的应用,分析了非原位拉曼测试手段与原位拉曼测试手段的优缺点,展望了这一领域目前有待解决的问题和可能应用的新技术.%The Raman spectroscopy has been widely used in the study of lithium ion batteries. In this short review, we gave some examples of the applications of Raman spectroscopy in the study of electrode materials including carbonaceous materials, spinel LiMxMn2-x O4, LiFePO4, as well as polymer electrolytes, room temperature molten salt electrolytes and the solid-electrolyte interphase layers. The advantages and disadvantages of the ex-situ and in-situ Raman spectrum techniques are discussed. Using new Raman techniques to investigate Li-ion batteries are suggested.

  17. Multiwavelength Raman fiber ring laser with the spectrum profile broadened by parametric four wave mixing in highly nonlinear dispersion-shifted fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Wang; Qing Wang; Wei Zhang; Xiaoming Liu; Jiangde Peng

    2005-01-01

    @@ A broadband multiwavelength Raman fiber ring laser (RFRL) covering the whole C-band at room temperature are presented. The effect of the intracavity highly nonlinear dispersion-shifted fiber on broadening and flattening the output spectrum envelope is discussed and experimentally demonstrated. More than 45-dB extinction-ratio multiwavelength output from 1527.76 to 1566.86 nm with 100-GHz channel spacing and 2.1-dB power ripple has been achieved by carefully controlling the individual powers of three pump lasers.

  18. Assessment of liver steatosis and fibrosis in rats using integrated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Lu, Fake; Zheng, Wei; Xu, Shuoyu; Tai, Dean; Yu, Hanry; Huang, Zhiwei

    2011-11-01

    We report the implementation of a unique integrated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second-harmonic generation (SHG), and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy imaging technique developed for label-free monitoring of the progression of liver steatosis and fibrosis generated in a bile duct ligation (BDL) rat model. Among the 21 adult rats used in this study, 18 rats were performed with BDL surgery and sacrificed each week from weeks 1 to 6 (n = 3 per week), respectively; whereas 3 rats as control were sacrificed at week 0. Colocalized imaging of the aggregated hepatic fats, collagen fibrils, and hepatocyte morphologies in liver tissue is realized by using the integrated CARS, SHG, and TPEF technique. The results show that there are significant accumulations of hepatic lipid droplets and collagen fibrils associated with severe hepatocyte necrosis in BDL rat liver as compared to a normal liver tissue. The volume of normal hepatocytes keeps decreasing and the fiber collagen content in BDL rat liver follows a growing trend until week 6; whereas the hepatic fat content reaches a maximum in week 4 and then appears to stop growing in week 6, indicating that liver steatosis and fibrosis induced in a BDL rat liver model may develop at different rates. This work demonstrates that the integrated CARS and multiphoton microscopy imaging technique has the potential to provide an effective means for early diagnosis and detection of liver steatosis and fibrosis without labeling.

  19. Next generation laser-based standoff spectroscopy techniques for Mars exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasda, Patrick J; Acosta-Maeda, Tayro E; Lucey, Paul G; Misra, Anupam K; Sharma, Shiv K; Taylor, G Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    In the recent Mars 2020 Rover Science Definition Team Report, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has sought the capability to detect and identify elements, minerals, and most importantly, biosignatures, at fine scales for the preparation of a retrievable cache of samples. The current Mars rover, the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity, has a remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument, a type of quantitative elemental analysis, called the Chemistry Camera (ChemCam) that has shown that laser-induced spectroscopy instruments are not only feasible for space exploration, but are reliable and complementary to traditional elemental analysis instruments such as the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer. The superb track record of ChemCam has paved the way for other laser-induced spectroscopy instruments, such as Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. We have developed a prototype remote LIBS-Raman-fluorescence instrument, Q-switched laser-induced time-resolved spectroscopy (QuaLITy), which is approximately 70 000 times more efficient at recording signals than a commercially available LIBS instrument. The increase in detection limits and sensitivity is due to our development of a directly coupled system, the use of an intensified charge-coupled device image detector, and a pulsed laser that allows for time-resolved measurements. We compare the LIBS capabilities of our system with an Ocean Optics spectrometer instrument at 7 m and 5 m distance. An increase in signal-to-noise ratio of at least an order of magnitude allows for greater quantitative analysis of the elements in a LIBS spectrum with 200-300 μm spatial resolution at 7 m, a Raman instrument capable of 1 mm spatial resolution at 3 m, and bioorganic fluorescence detection at longer distances. Thus, the new QuaLITy instrument fulfills all of the NASA expectations for proposed instruments.

  20. Multi-wavelength passively Q-switched c-cut Nd:YVO4 self-Raman laser with Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H. Y.; Pan, X.; Huang, X. H.; Xiao, M.; Liu, X.; Sun, D.; Zhu, W. Z.

    2016-06-01

    A multi-wavelength passively Q-switched self-Raman laser with a c-cut Nd:YVO4 both as laser and Raman medium is reported. With the increasing pump power, the multi-wavelength laser including the fundamental line at 1067.4 nm, 1st-Stokes at 1097.9 nm, 2nd-Stokes at 1130.1 nm, and 3rd-Stokes at 1163.6 nm is generated sequentially. At a pump power of 5.0 W, the maximum output power of the four discrete lines are 186.8 mW, 246.5 mW, 158.4 mW and 63.6 mW, with corresponding optical conversion efficiencies of 3.7%, 4.9%, 3.2% and 1.3% respectively. The total stimulated Raman scattering conversion efficiency is 9.4%. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the 2nd-Stokes at 1130.1 nm and 3rd-Stokes at 1163.6 nm.

  1. Structural Changes Induced in Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. DNA by Femtosecond IR Laser Pulses: A Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta E. Dina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, surface-enhanced Raman spectra of ten genomic DNAs extracted from leaf tissues of different grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. varieties, respectively, are analyzed in the wavenumber range 300–1800 cm−1. Furthermore, structural changes induced in grapevine genomic nucleic acids upon femtosecond (170 fs infrared (IR laser pulse irradiation (λ = 1100 nm are discussed in detail for seven genomic DNAs, respectively. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS signatures, vibrational band assignments and structural characterization of genomic DNAs are reported for each case. As a general observation, the wavenumber range between 1500 and 1660 cm−1 of the spectra seems to be modified upon laser treatment. This finding could reflect changes in the base-stacking interactions in DNA. Spectral shifts are mainly attributed to purines (dA, dG and deoxyribose. Pyrimidine residues seem to be less affected by IR femtosecond laser pulse irradiation. Furthermore, changes in the conformational properties of nucleic acid segments are observed after laser treatment. We have found that DNA isolated from Feteasca Neagra grapevine leaf tissues is the most structurally-responsive system to the femtosecond IR laser irradiation process. In addition, using unbiased computational resources by means of principal component analysis (PCA, eight different grapevine varieties were discriminated.

  2. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Lasers do not require a vacuum (as do electron beam welders) and the welds they produce high depth-to-width ratios. Scoping with a small pulsed 50 J YAG laser indicated that lasers could produce successful welds in vanadium alloy (V-5%Cr-5%Ti) sheet (1 mm thick) when the fusion zone was isolated from air. The pulsed laser required an isolating chamber filled with inert gas to produce welds that did not contain cracks and showed only minor hardness increases. Following the initial scoping tests, a series of tests were preformed with a 6 kW continuous CO{sub 2} laser. Successful bead-on-plate welds were made on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys to depths of about 4 mm with this laser.

  3. Coherent Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Eesley, G L

    1981-01-01

    Coherent Raman Spectroscopy provides a unified and general account of the fundamental aspects of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy, also known as coherent Raman spectroscopy. The theoretical basis from which coherent Raman spectroscopy developed is described, along with its applications, utility, and implementation as well as advantages and disadvantages. Experimental data which typifies each technique is presented. This book is comprised of four chapters and opens with an overview of nonlinear optics and coherent Raman spectroscopy, followed by a discussion on nonlinear transfer function of matter

  4. Active Laser and Raman Materials for 1.3-5 Micron Spectral Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    1989, pp. 270 (in Russian) 31. Handbook of lasers with selected data on optical technology, Ed. R.J. Pressley, Chemical Rubber Co, Cleveland, 1971 32...decreasing from surface to volume. Black surface has high electric conductivity . The results of electron microanalysis indicate that color is connected with...effective samples purification from tungsten without it destroying. The dipping of green yttria compact into crumb from yttria particles was

  5. FT-IR, Laser-Raman spectra and computational analysis of 5-Methyl-3-phenylisoxazole-4-carboxylic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert, Yusuf; Mahendra, M.; Keskinoğlu, S.; Chandra; Srikantamurthy, N.; Umesha, K. B.; Çırak, Ç.

    2015-03-01

    In this study the experimental and theoretical vibrational frequencies of a newly synthesized anti-tumor, antiviral, hypoglycemic, antifungal and anti-HIV agent namely, 5-Methyl-3-phenylisoxazole-4-carboxylic acid has been investigated. The experimental FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and Laser-Raman spectra (4000-100 cm-1) of the molecule in solid phase have been recorded. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths, bond angles and torsion angles) have been calculated by using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP: Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr and DFT/M06-2X: highly parametrized, empirical exchange correlation function) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set by Gaussian 09W software, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies have been done by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis by using VEDA 4 software. The theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies have been found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data and results in the literature. In addition, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy and the other related molecular energy values of the compound have been investigated by using the same theoretical calculations.

  6. Laser polymerization-based novel lift-off technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuian, B. [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland); Department of Microelectronic Engineering, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Winfield, R.J. [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)], E-mail: richard.winfield@tyndall.ie; Crean, G.M. [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland); Department of Microelectronic Engineering, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2009-03-01

    The fabrication of microstructures by two-photon polymerization has been widely reported as a means of directly writing three-dimensional nanoscale structures. In the majority of cases a single point serial writing technique is used to form a polymer model. Single layer writing can also be used to fabricate two-dimensional patterns and we report an extension of this capability by using two-photon polymerization to form a template that can be used as a sacrificial layer for a novel lift-off process. A Ti:sapphire laser, with wavelength 795 nm, 80 MHz repetition rate, 100 fs pulse duration and an average power of 700 mW, was used to write 2D grid patterns with pitches of 0.8 and 1.0 {mu}m in a urethane acrylate resin that was spun on to a lift-off base layer. This was overcoated with gold and the grid lifted away to leave an array of gold islands. The optical transmission properties of the gold arrays were measured and found to be in agreement with a rigorous coupled-wave analysis simulation.

  7. Effect of the laser and light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy on midpalatal suture bone formation after rapid maxilla expansion: a Raman spectroscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Cristiane Becher; Habib, Fernando Antonio Lima; de Araújo, Telma Martins; Aragão, Juliana Silveira; Gomes, Rafael Soares; Barbosa, Artur Felipe Santos; Silveira, Landulfo; Pinheiro, Antonio L B

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of laser or light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy on the bone formation at the midpalatal suture after rapid maxilla expansion. Twenty young adult male rats were divided into four groups with 8 days of experimental time: group 1, no treatment; group 2, expansion; group 3, expansion and laser irradiation; and group 4, expansion and LED irradiation. In groups 3 and 4, light irradiation was in the first, third, and fifth experimental days. In all groups, the expansion was accomplished with a helicoid 0.020" stainless steel orthodontic spring. A diode laser (λ780 nm, 70 mW, spot of 0.04 cm(2), t = 257 s, spatial average energy fluence (SAEF) of 18 J/cm(2)) or a LED (λ850 nm, 150 mW ± 10 mW, spot of 0.5 cm(2), t = 120 s, SAEF of 18 J/cm(2)) were used. The samples were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy carried out at midpalatal suture and at the cortical area close to the suture. Two Raman shifts were analyzed: ∼ 960 (phosphate hydroxyapatite) and ∼ 1,450 cm(-1) (lipids and protein). Data was submitted to statistical analysis. Significant statistical difference (p ≤ 0.05) was found in the hydroxyapatite (CHA) peaks among the expansion group and the expansion and laser or LED groups. The LED group presented higher mean peak values of CHA. No statistical differences were found between the treated groups as for collagen deposition, although LED also presented higher mean peak values. The results of this study using Raman spectral analysis indicate that laser and LED light irradiation improves deposition of CHA in the midpalatal suture after orthopedic expansion.

  8. 7th International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The proceedings volumes 1 and 2 comprise the papers that were accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics held at The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, during the period of July 11 to 14, 1994. The prime objective of this Seventh Symposium is to provide a forum for the presentation of the most advanced research on laser techniques for flow measurements, and reveal significant results to fluid mechanics. The applications of laser techniques to scientific and engineering fluid flow research is emphasized, but contributions to the theory and practice of laser methods are also considered where they facilitate new improved fluid mechanic research. Attention is focused on laser-Doppler anemometry, particle sizing and other methods for the measurement of velocity and scalars such as particle image velocimetry and laser induced fluorescence.

  9. 7th International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The proceedings volumes 1 and 2 comprise the papers that were accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics held at The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, during the period of July 11 to 14, 1994. The prime objective of this Seventh Symposium is to provide a forum for the presentation of the most advanced research on laser techniques for flow measurements, and reveal significant results to fluid mechanics. The applications of laser techniques to scientific and engineering fluid flow research is emphasized, but contributions to the theory and practice of laser methods are also considered where they facilitate new improved fluid mechanics research. Attention is focused on laser-Doppler anemometry, particle sizing and other methods for the measurement of velocity and scalars such as particle image velocimetry and laser induced fluorescence.

  10. Review of laser speckle contrast techniques for visualizing tissue perfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draijer, Matthijs; Hondebrink, Erwin; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2009-01-01

    When a diffuse object is illuminated with coherent laser light, the backscattered light will form an interference pattern on the detector. This pattern of bright and dark areas is called a speckle pattern. When there is movement in the object, the speckle pattern will change over time. Laser speckle

  11. Microstructure variation in fused silica irradiated by different fluence of UV laser pulses with positron annihilation lifetime and Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhong; Zheng, Wanguo; Zhu, Qihua; Chen, Jun; Wang, B. Y.; Ju, Xin

    2016-10-01

    We present an original study on the non-destructive evaluation of the microstructure evolution of fused silica induced by pulsed UV laser irradiation at low fluence (less than 50% Fth). Positron annihilation spectroscopy discloses that the spatial size of the vacancy cluster is increased exponentially with the linearly elevated laser fluence. Particularly, the vacancy cluster size in bulk silica is significantly increased by 14.5% after irradiated by pulsed 355 nm laser at F = 14 J/cm2 (50% Fth), while the void size varies only ∼2%. UV laser-excited Raman results suggest that the bond length and average bond angle of Sisbnd Osbnd Si bridging bond are both slightly reduced. Results reveals that the rearrangement process of (Sisbnd O)n fold rings and breakage of the Sisbnd O bridging bond in bulk silica occurred during pulsed UV laser irradiation. The micro-structural changes were taken together to clarify the effect of sub-threshold laser fluence on material stability of silica glass. The obtained data provide important information for studying material stability and controlling the lifetime of fused silica optics for high power laser system.

  12. Broadband Fiber Raman Power-Amplifier for Narrow Linewidth Tunable Seed Lasers Used in Spectroscopic Sensing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an energy and space efficient high power continuous wave (cw) narrow linewidth broadband fiber Raman amplifier (FRA) with spectrally tunable...

  13. Efficient optical design and measurement technique to six sigma laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaggs, Michael; Haas, Gil

    2014-03-01

    A six sigma laser processing system is proposed that utilizes real time measurement of ISO 11146 and ISO 13694 laser beam parameters without disrupting the process beam and with minimal loss. If key laser beam parameters can be measured during a laser process, without a disruption to the process, then a higher level of process control can be realized. The difficulty in achieving this concept to date is that most accepted beam measurement techniques are time averaged and require interruption of the laser beam and therefore have made it impractical for real time measurement which is necessary to consider six sigma process control. Utilizing an all passive optical technique to measure a laser's beam waist and other parameters for both focused and unfocused beams, the direct measurement of the ISO laser beam parameters are realized without disruption to the process and with minimal loss. The technique is simple enough to be applied to low and high power systems well into the multi-kilowatt range. Through careful monitoring of all laser beam parameters via software control of upper and lower limits for these parameters, tighter quality control is possible for achieving a six sigma process. In this paper we describe the optical design for both low and high power laser systems and how six sigma laser processing may be realized.

  14. Efficient second harmonic generation of double-end diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO4 self-Raman laser producing 7.9 W yellow light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiyong; Duan, Yanmin; Zhang, Ge; Huang, Chenghui; Wei, Yong; Shen, Hongyuan; Zheng, Yiqun; Huang, Lingxiong; Chen, Zhenqiang

    2009-11-23

    A high power and efficient 588 nm yellow light is demonstrated through intracavity frequency doubling of an acousto-optic Q-switched self-frequency Raman laser. A 30-mm-length double-end diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO(4) crystal was utilized for efficient self-Raman laser operation by reducing the thermal effects and increasing the interaction length for the stimulated Raman scattering. A 15-mm-length LBO with non-critical phase matching (theta = 90 degrees, phi = 0 degrees) cut was adopted for efficient second-harmonic generation. The focus position of incident pump light and both the repetition rate and the duty cycle of the Q-switch have been optimized. At a repetition rate of 110 kHz and a duty cycle of 5%, the average power of 588 nm light is up to 7.93 W while the incident pump power is 26.5 W, corresponding to an overall diode-yellow conversion efficiency of 30% and a slope efficiency of 43%.

  15. Raman laser based on a KGd(WO4)2 crystal: generation of stokes components in the 1.7-1.8 μm range*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashkevich, V. I.; Orlovich, V. A.

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the lasing characteristics of a Raman laser based on an Nd:KGW crystal, converting multimode emission of a pulsed Nd:KGW laser with working transition 4F3/2-4I13/2 (1351 nm) to Stokes components with wavelengths in the 1700-1800 nm range. We show that when the pump polarization coincides with the N m axis of the optical indicatrix of KGW ( E || N m ), the conversion efficiency for converting the pump radiation to the single second Stokes component with λ ~ 1786 nm reaches 17.5%, which results in an ~6.6 mJ Raman pulse. For E || N g , the conversion efficiency increases up to 22.5% and generation of an ~15 ns pulse occurs on four Stokes components with wavelengths 1704, 1744, 1770, and 1786 nm due to involvement of 86 cm-1, 767 cm-1, and 901 cm-1 vibrational modes in the stimulated Raman (SRS) process. We have determined the spectral distribution of the pulse energy. A total of 11 Stokes components are generated with participation of the indicated vibrational modes.

  16. Efficient picosecond traveling-wave Raman conversion in a SrWO4 crystal pumped by multi-Watt MOPA lasers at 1064 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinello, Paolo; Pirzio, Federico; Zhang, Xingyu; Petrov, Valentin; Agnesi, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Raman conversion with a 50-mm-long SrWO4 crystal in a single-pass, traveling-wave setup has been investigated in both purely steady-state and transient stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) regimes. For steady-state SRS experiment, we employed as a pump source a Q-Switched master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser system at 1064 nm, delivering 325 μJ, 550-ps-long pulses with diffraction limited beam quality and high spectral purity. At 2-kHz repetition rate, we obtained up to 90 μJ pulse energy and 250 ps pulse duration at 1180 nm, with a conversion slope efficiency close to quantum limit. To approach the transient SRS regime, we pumped the same crystal with 16-ps-long pulses from a hybrid MOPA laser system based on a mode-locked Yb-fiber oscillator followed by a diode-pumped bulk Nd:YVO4 power amplifier. At the maximum incident pump average power of 3.75 W, we obtained 1.4 W at the first Stokes Raman-shifted wavelength of 1180 nm (37 % optical-to-optical conversion efficiency), with 15 ps pulse duration and 70 % conversion slope efficiency.

  17. Pulsed laser deposition of Ag nanoparticles on titanium hydroxide/oxide nanobelt arrays for highly sensitive surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Yuting; Wang, Huanwen; Zhao, Jie; Yi, Huan; Wang, Xuefeng, E-mail: xfwang@tongji.edu.cn

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited on Ti(OH){sub 4} nanobelt by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). • The highest enhancement factor of 10{sup 6} and a maximum relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.18. • Ag{sub 2}O play important role for the high sensitivity Raman phenomenon. • Charge transfer from Ag NPs is also responsible for the enhancement ability. - Abstract: Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate of Ti(OH){sub 4} nanobelt arrays (NBAs) was synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction, on which silver nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the effective high specific surface area with silver NPs decorated on three-dimensional NBAs. Using rhodamine 6G (R6G) as an analyte molecule, the highest enhancement factor of 10{sup 6} and a maximum relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.18 were obtained. It has been found that the specific morphology of these composite nanobelt arrays and the formation of Ag{sub 2}O play important role for the high sensitivity Raman phenomenon. In addition, the surface plasmon resonance wavelength of Ag decorated Ti(OH){sub 4} NBAs and the charge transfer from Ag NPs are also responsible for the enhancement ability. For comparison SERS was investigated with silver particles decorated on TiO{sub 2} NBAs, which is much less active.

  18. Applicability of confocal Raman microscopy for the signal detective of organic reagents in a PDMS microfluidic chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Yeol; Choo, Jae Bum; Ahn, Yoo Min; Kim, Yang S. [Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    A PDMS microfluidic chip has been constructed using a photolithographic fabrication technique. Confocal laser-induced Raman microscopy has been utilized for the signal detection of chemical species in a PDMS microfluidic chip. The CC1{sub 4} benzene binary mixtures with different % concentrations have been prepared and injected into the PDMS chip using a microsyringe pump. Raman spectra were measured by focusing the Ar{sup +} laser on a microfluidic channel using a 10x objective lens. The concentration of each solvent mixture has been determined from the ratio of Raman intensity profiles, which were measured by integrating the area of characteristic Raman peaks for CC1{sub 4} and benzene. In this work, the feasibility of confocal laser-induced Raman microscopy for the quantitative analysis of organic reagents in a PDMS microfluidic chip will be demonstrated.

  19. Differential high-resolution stimulated CW Raman spectroscopy of hydrogen in a hollow-core fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Westergaard, Philip G; Petersen, Jan C

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate sensitive high-resolution stimulated Raman measurements of hydrogen using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). The Raman transition is pumped by a narrow linewidth (<50 kHz) 1064 nm continuous-wave (CW) fiber laser. The probe light is produced by a homebuilt CW optical parametric oscillator (OPO), tunable from around 800 nm to 1300 nm (linewidth ~ 5 MHz). These narrow linewidth lasers allow for an excellent spectral resolution of approximately 10^-4 cm^(-1). The setup employs a differential measurement technique for noise rejection in the probe beam, which also eliminates background signals from the fiber. With the high sensitivity obtained, Raman signals were observed with only a few mW of optical power in both the pump and probe beams. This demonstration allows for high resolution Raman identification of molecules and quantification of Raman signal strengths.

  20. A phase-locked laser system based on modulation technique for atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Wei; Song, Ningfang; Xu, Xiaobin; Lu, Xiangxiang

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a Raman laser system based on phase modulation technology and phase feedback control. The two laser beams with frequency difference of 6.835 GHz are modulated using electro-optic and acousto-optic modulators, respectively. Parasitic frequency components produced by the electro-optic modulator are filtered using a Fabry-Perot Etalon. A straightforward phase feedback system restrains the phase noise induced by environmental perturbations. The phase noise of the laser system stays below -125 rad2/Hz at frequency offset higher than 500 kHz. Overall phase noise of the laser system is evaluated by calculating the contribution of the phase noise to the sensitivity limit of a gravimeter. The results reveal that the sensitivity limited by the phase noise of our laser system is lower than that of a state-of-art optical phase-lock loop scheme when a gravimeter operates at short pulse duration, which makes the laser system a promising option for our future application of atom interferometer.

  1. Fabrication of narrow pulse passively Q-switched self-stimulated Raman laser with c-cut Nd:GdVO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Gao; Li, Zuo-han; Han, Ming

    2016-11-01

    Combining the self-stimulated Raman scattering technology and saturable absorber of Cr4+:YAG, a 1.17 μm c-cut Nd:GdVO4 picosecond Q-switched laser is demonstrated in this paper. With an incident pump power of 10 W, the Q-switched laser with average power of 430 mW for 1.17 μm, pulse width of 270 ps, repetition rate of 13 kHz and the first order Stokes conversion efficiency of 4.3% is obtained. The Q-switched pulse width can be the narrowest in our research. In addition, the yellow laser at 0.58 μm is also achieved by using the LiB3O5 frequency doubling crystal.

  2. Successful treatment of traumatic scars with combined nonablative fractional laser and pinpoint technique of standard CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Shady M; Elsaie, Mohamed L; Kamel, Mohamed Ismail; Mohammed, Essam-Eldin

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the use of a pinpoint irradiation technique followed by nonablative fractional technique in treatment of traumatic scars. Thirteen patients with traumatic sacrs were treated with pinpoint technique of CO2 laser using traditional headpiece activating laser at a frequency (50 Hz) to deliver pulsed mode with power of 1 W using the focusing technique followed by 3-5 passes of the nonablative 1540 nm fractional Er:glass laser. An independent physician evaluator assessed the treatment outcomes using Vancouver scar scale (VSS) and 5-point grading scale (grade 0, no improvement; grade 1, 1-25%; grade 2, 26-50%; grade 3, 51-75%; grade 4, 76-100% improvement). After the final treatment, average percentage changes of VSS were 41.5%. Improvement was evident in terms of vascularity, pigmentation, and height, while insignificant in terms of Pliability. Based on physician's global assessment, mean grade of 2.5 was achieved. Patient's subjective satisfaction scores paralleled the physician's objective evaluation. Pinpoint irradiation technique by CO2 laser followed by nonablative fractional laser is a safe and effective modality in treatment of scars.

  3. Investigation of the cutaneous penetration behavior of dexamethasone loaded to nano-sized lipid particles by EPR spectroscopy, and confocal Raman and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohan, Silke B; Saeidpour, Siavash; Solik, Agnieszka; Schanzer, Sabine; Richter, Heike; Dong, Pin; Darvin, Maxim E; Bodmeier, Roland; Patzelt, Alexa; Zoubari, Gaith; Unbehauen, Michael; Haag, Rainer; Lademann, Jürgen; Teutloff, Christian; Bittl, Robert; Meinke, Martina C

    2017-07-01

    An improvement of the penetration efficiency combined with the controlled release of actives in the skin can facilitate the medical treatment of skin diseases immensely. Dexamethasone (Dx), a synthetic glucocorticoid, is frequently used for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. To investigate the penetration of nano-sized lipid particles (NLP) loaded with Dx in comparison to a commercially available base cream, different techniques were applied. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to monitor the penetration of Dx, which was covalently labeled with the spin probe 3-(Carboxy)-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxy (PCA). The penetration into hair follicles was studied using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with curcumin-loaded NLP. The penetration of the vehicle was followed by confocal Raman microscopy (CRM). Penetration studies using excised porcine skin revealed a more than twofold higher penetration efficiency for DxPCA into the stratum corneum (SC) after 24h incubation compared to 4h incubation when loaded to the NLP, whereas when applied in the base cream, almost no further penetration was observed beyond 4h. The distribution of DxPCA within the SC was investigated by consecutive tape stripping. The release of DxPCA from the base cream after 24h in deeper SC layers and the viable epidermis was shown by EPR. For NLP, no release from the carrier was observed, although DxPCA was detectable in the skin after the complete SC was removed. This phenomenon can be explained by the penetration of the NLP into the hair follicles. However, penetration profiles measured by CRM indicate that NLP did not penetrate as deeply into the SC as the base cream formulation. In conclusion, NLP can improve the accumulation of Dx in the skin and provide a reservoir within the SC and in the follicular infundibula. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Advanced Laser Techniques for Filler-Induced Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassuto, D.; Marangoni, O.; Santis, G. De

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The increasing use of injectable fillers has been increasing the occurrence of disfiguring anaerobic infection or granulomas. This study presents two types of laser-assisted evacuation of filler material and inflammatory and necrotic tissue that were used to treat disfiguring facial...... nodules after different types of gel fillers. MATERIALS AND METHODS Infectious lesions after hydrogels were drained using a lithium triborate laser at 532 nm, with subsequent removal of infected gel and pus (laser assisted evacuation). Granuloma after gels containing microparticles were treated using...

  5. Development and biological applications of optical tweezers and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chang'an

    Optical tweezers is a three-dimensional manipulation tool that employs a gradient force that originates from the single highly focused laser beam. Raman spectroscopy is a molecular analytical tool that can give a highly unique "fingerprint" for each substance by measuring the unique vibrations of its molecules. The combination of these two optical techniques offers a new tool for the manipulation and identification of single biological cells and microscopic particles. In this thesis, we designed and implemented a Laser-Tweezers-Raman-Spectroscopy (LTRS) system, also called the Raman-tweezers, for the simultaneous capture and analysis of both biological particles and non-biological particles. We show that microparticles can be conveniently captured at the focus of a laser beam and the Raman spectra of trapped particles can be acquired with high quality. The LTRS system overcomes the intrinsic Brownian motion and cell motility of microparticles in solution and provides a promising tool for in situ identifying suspicious agents. In order to increase the signal to noise ratio, several schemes were employed in LTRS system to reduce the blank noise and the fluorescence signal coming from analytes and the surrounding background. These techniques include near-infrared excitation, optical levitation, confocal microscopy, and frequency-shifted Raman difference. The LTRS system has been applied for the study in cell biology at the single cell level. With the built Raman-tweezers system, we studied the dynamic physiological processes of single living cells, including cell cycle, the transcription and translation of recombinant protein in transgenic yeast cells and the T cell activation. We also studied cell damage and associated biochemical processes in optical traps, UV radiations, and evaluated heating by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. These studies show that the Raman-tweezers system is feasible to provide rapid and reliable diagnosis of cellular disorders and can be

  6. Treatment of gingival hyperpigmentation with rotary abrasive, scalpel, and laser techniques: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, M Bhanu; Kaur, Jasjit; Das, Rupali

    2012-10-01

    Melanin pigmentation often occurs in the gingiva as a result of an abnormal deposition of melanin, due to which the gums may appear black, but the principles, techniques, and management of the problems associated with gingival melanin pigmentation are still not fully established. Depigmentation procedures such as scalpel surgery, gingivectomy with free gingival autografting, electrosurgery, cryosurgery, chemical agents such as 90% phenol and 95% alcohol, abrasion with diamond bur, Nd: YAG laser, semiconductor diode laser, and CO2 laser have been employed for removal of melanin hyper pigmentation. The following case series describes three different surgical depigmentation techniques: scalpel surgery, abrasion with rotary abrasive, and a diode laser. Better results of depigmentation were achieved with diode laser than conventional scalpel and with rotary abrasion with respect to esthetics. The results point out that lasers are an effective and a safe means to removal of hyperpigmentation from the gingiva. Healing was uneventful and no repigmentation occurred.

  7. Use of laser reflection technique for defect detection in CFRP-concrete systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qiwen; Lau, Denvid

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a new laser reflection technique which can identify the near-surface defects in concrete structures bonded with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP). In this study, a laser beam is used to illuminate the surface of CFRP-concrete panel, and the pattern of the laser reflection is recorded by a high resolution digital camera. Under the laser illumination, the surface of the tested object is heated and expanded. The surface expansion can be identified through observing the expanding reflection pattern. Based on our experimental observation, the defect region exhibits much greater expansion of laser reflection pattern than that in intact region. Results also indicate that both the defect area and the defect depth can influence the change of reflection pattern. In view of the measurement principle of the laser reflection technique, it is expected that the application can be further extended to the areas like CFRP-wood structures, CFRP-masonry structures and CFRP-steel structures.

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering by colloidal CdSe nanocrystal submonolayers fabricated by the Langmuir–Blodgett technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G. Milekhin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of an investigation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS by optical phonons in colloidal CdSe nanocrystals (NCs homogeneously deposited on both arrays of Au nanoclusters and Au dimers using the Langmuir–Blodgett technique. The coverage of the deposited NCs was less than one monolayer, as determined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. SERS by optical phonons in CdSe nanocrystals showed a significant enhancement that depends resonantly on the Au nanocluster and dimer size, and thus on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR energy. The deposition of CdSe nanocrystals on the Au dimer nanocluster arrays enabled us to study the polarization dependence of SERS. The maximal SERS signal was observed for light polarization parallel to the dimer axis. The polarization ratio of the SERS signal parallel and perpendicular to the dimer axis was 20. The SERS signal intensity was also investigated as a function of the distance between nanoclusters in a dimer. Here the maximal SERS enhancement was observed for the minimal distance studied (about 10 nm, confirming the formation of SERS “hot spots”.

  9. Non-destructive method for strain imaging in an individual GaN nanorod by confocal Raman technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, S.; Sopanen, M.

    2016-11-01

    GaN based layer structures on highly lattice mismatched substrates are widely used for electronic and optoelectronic devices. Top down etched, GaN based nanorod structures are mainly studied due to their more effective strain relaxation. The previous measurements on the strain state of these structures have been performed either on single detached nanorods or on ensembles of nanorods still on the substrate. Here we demonstrate a technique based on confocal Raman scattering spectroscopy to probe the strain state of a single GaN nanorod still on the original substrate non-destructively. Both lateral and depth resolved imaging is achieved close to the diffraction limit of light. We observe that a GaN nanorod on the substrate is compressively strained throughout. The strain decreases from the base of the nanorod towards the top surface, but the top surface is still compressively strained. The detached GaN nanorod is less compressively strained overall, and the strain relaxes from the center towards all the edges.

  10. Evaluation of the effectiveness of laser crust removal on granites by means of hyperspectral imaging techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozo-Antonio, J.S., E-mail: santiago.pozo@udc.es [Laboratorio de Aplicacións Industriais do Láser, Centro de Investigacións Tecnolóxicas (CIT), Departamento de Enxeñaría Industrial II, Escola Politécnica Superior, Universidade de Coruña (UDC), Campus Ferrol, 15403 Ferrol (Spain); Fiorucci, M.P.; Ramil, A.; López, A.J. [Laboratorio de Aplicacións Industriais do Láser, Centro de Investigacións Tecnolóxicas (CIT), Departamento de Enxeñaría Industrial II, Escola Politécnica Superior, Universidade de Coruña (UDC), Campus Ferrol, 15403 Ferrol (Spain); Rivas, T. [Departamento de Enxeñaría dos Recursos Naturais e Medioambiente, Escola Superior de Minas, Universidade de Vigo, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Hyperspectral imaging techniques for determining the degree of crust removal on granites used in Cultural Heritage. • Hyperspectral imaging techniques allow to in situ evaluate of the effectiveness of the laser cleaning. • Hyperspectral imaging data are consistent with the information obtained by conventional techniques about the cleaning effectiveness. - Abstract: In this paper, we present a study of the application of the hyperspectral imaging technique in order to non-destructively evaluate the laser cleaning of the biogenic patina and the sulphated black crust developed on a fine-grained granite used in the construction of Cultural Heritage in NW Spain. The grained polymineral texture of the granite hinders the adjustment of laser irradiation parameters during the cleaning, and therefore the in situ process control. The cleaning was performed with a nanosecond pulsed Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser at 355 nm. A hyperspectral camera was used to in situ assess the effectiveness of cleaning by recording images of the rock surfaces before and during the laser treatment. Different analytical techniques were used to test the ability of the hyperspectral imaging technique to evaluate the cleaning process of the granite samples: optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM - EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and spectrophotometer colour measurements. The results indicated that hyperspectral imaging technique is a reliable and more affordable technique to in situ evaluate the process of laser cleaning of the biogenic patina and the sulphated black crust in fine-grained granites.

  11. Influence of ns-laser wavelength in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for discrimination of painting techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xueshi; Syvilay, Delphine; Wilkie-Chancellier, Nicolas; Texier, Annick; Martinez, Loic; Serfaty, Stéphane; Martos-Levif, Dominique; Detalle, Vincent

    2017-08-01

    The influence of ns-laser wavelength to discriminate ancient painting techniques such as are fresco, casein, animal glue, egg yolk and oil was investigated in this work. This study was carried out with a single shot laser on samples covered by a layer made of a mixture of the cinnabar pigment and different binders. Three wavelengths based on Nd: YAG laser were investigated (1064, 532 and 266 nm). The plasma is controlled at the same electron temperature after an adjustment of pulse energy for these three wavelengths on a fresco sample without organic binder. This approach allows to eliminate the effects of laser pulse energy and the material laser absorption. Afterwards, the emission spectra were compared to separate different techniques. The organic binding media has been separated based on the relative emission intensity of the present CN or C2 rovibrational emissions. In order to test the capability of separating or identifying, the chemometric approach (PCA) was applied to the different matrix. The different solutions in term of wavelength range to optimise the identification was investigated. We focused on the evaluation for the laser wavelength to insure a better separation. The different capacity was interpreted by differentiating the binders by the altered interaction mechanisms between the laser photon and the binders. Also, the electron temperature in the plasma was estimated, which provided the evidences to our findings.

  12. Raman microspectroscopy for visualization of peripheral nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Koizumi, Noriaki; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2013-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery is essential for improving quality of life of patients. To preserve peripheral nerves, detection of ne peripheral nerves that cannot be identi ed by human eye or under white light imaging is necessary. In this study, we sought to provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerve tissues against adjacent tissues that employs spontaneous Raman microspectroscopy. A line-illumination confocal Raman microscope was used for the experiment. A laser operating at the wavelength of 532 nm was used as an excitation laser light. We obtained Raman spectra of peripheral nerve, brous connective tissue, skeletal muscle, blood vessel, and adipose tissue of Wistar rats, and extracted speci c spectral features of peripheral nerves and adjacent tissues. By applying multivariate image analysis, peripheral nerves were clearly detected against adjacent tissues without any preprocessing neither xation nor staining. These results suggest the potential of the Raman spectroscopic observation for noninvasive and label-free nerve detection, and we expect this method could be a key technique for nerve-sparing surgery.

  13. Nonadiabatic interaction effects on population transfer in H2 by stimulated Raman transition with partially overlapping laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Swaralipi; Sen, Sanjay; Bhattacharyya, S. S.; Saha, Samir

    1999-06-01

    We have theoretically investigated the population transfer in a four-level H2 system by stimulated Raman transition from the ground X 1Σ+g(νg=0,Jg=0) level to higher rovibrational levels (νf,Jf) of the X 1Σ+g state via the excited intermediate B 1Σ+u(νi=14,Ji=1) and C 1Π+u(νi=3,Ji=1) levels coupled with each other by nonadiabatic interaction, using time-dependent overlapping pump and Stokes laser fields. The density-matrix treatment, which permits the convenient inclusion of the spontaneous emissions from the intermediate levels, has been employed to describe the dynamics of the two-photon Raman resonance process. The present study performs the calculations of final populations (after both the pulses are over) of the ground and terminal levels for Q-branch (Jf=0) fundamental (νf=1) and first overtone (νf=2) transitions and the S-branch (Jf=2) fundamental (νf=1) transition as a function of time delay between the two pulses for the cases of on-resonance as well as off-resonance excitations in a wide range (2×105-2×107 W/cm2) of peak intensities I0P (I0S) of the pump (Stokes) fields. Both fields are assumed to have the same temporal shape, duration, peak intensities, and linear parallel polarizations. The accurate values of spontaneous radiative relaxation rates of the intermediate levels to the initial and final levels, taking into account their J and M dependence, are explicitly included in our calculations. The pulse width (full width at half maximum) τp is taken as 170 ns so that total spontaneous decay can occur during the pulse duration. The transfer efficiency is found to be very sensitive to the peak intensities of the laser pulses in each case of transition considered. Special attention is paid to the effects of the nonadiabatic (NA) interaction between B(14,1) and C(3,1) levels on population transfer efficiency. Calculations are also done in some particular cases using the adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer (ABO) approximation. The results with ABO

  14. Cr4+:YAG passively Q-switched c-cut Nd:YVO4 self-Raman laser at 1168.6 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H. Y.; Pan, X.; Huang, X. H.; Xiao, M.; Xu, Y. C.; Zhu, W. Z.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the first Cr4+:YAG passively Q-switched c-cut Nd:YVO4 self-Raman laser at 1168.6 nm based on the Stokes shift of 816 cm-1. At the pump power of 4.7 W, the maximum output power of the Stokes line at 1168.6 nm is 270.5 mW, corresponding to an optical conversion efficiency of 5.8%. The pulse width, pulse repetition rate, pulse energy and peak power are 8.8 ns, 35.8 kHz, 7.6 μJ and 0.86 kW, respectively. At the pump of 5.0 W, the Stokes line at 1097.2 nm based on Raman shift of 259 cm-1 also appears.

  15. 食用植物油的激光喇曼光谱研究%Study on laser Raman spectra of edible vegetable oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈慰宗; 宋应谦; 忽满利; 高平安

    2001-01-01

    The vibration Raman spectra of molecular groups in edible vegetable oils were investigated by laser.The C=C double bond vibration Raman spectra in unsaturative fatty acids were observed and found it declined after the edible vegetable oils have been heated.%用激光喇曼光谱方法测量和研究了食用植物油中某些分子基团的振动谱线,观察到了不饱合脂肪酸中的C=C双键的振动喇曼谱线在油被长时间加热后减弱的现象。

  16. A new technique for laser cooling with superradiance

    CERN Document Server

    Nemova, Galina

    2010-01-01

    We present a new theoretical scheme for laser cooling of rare earth doped solids with optical super-radiance (SR), which is the coherent, sharply directed spontaneous emission of photons by a system of laser excited rare earth ions in the solid state host (glass or crystal). We consider an Yb3+ doped ZBLAN sample pumped at the wavelength 1015 nm with a rectangular pulsed source with a power of ~433W and duration of 10ns. The intensity of the SR is proportional to the square of the number of excited ions. This unique feature of SR permits a dramatic increase in the rate of the cooling process in comparison with the traditional laser cooling of the rare earth doped solids with anti-Stokes spontaneous incoherent radiation (fluorescence). This scheme overcomes the limitation of using only low phonon energy hosts for laser cooling.

  17. Mitigation of wear damage by laser surface alloying technique

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adebiyi, ID

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available replacement costs, and all downtime costs related to such replacement. Consequently, companies will increasingly need to look to wear reduction as a direct, immediate avenue for maintaining output quotas and for cutting production costs. Laser coating...

  18. Raman correlation spectroscopy: A feasibility study of a new optical correlation technique and development of multi-component nanoparticles using the reprecipitation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Maki

    The feasibility of Raman correlation spectroscopy (RCS) is investigated as a new temporal optical fluctuation spectroscopy in this dissertation. RCS analyzes the correlations of the intensity fluctuations of Raman scattering from particles in a suspension that undergo Brownian motion. Because each Raman emission line arises from a specific molecular bond, the RCS method could yield diffusion behavior of specific chemical species within a dispersion. Due to the nature of Raman scattering as a coherent process, RCS could provide similar information as acquired in dynamic light scattering (DLS) and be practical for various applications that requires the chemical specificity in dynamical information. The theoretical development is discussed, and four experimental implementations of this technique are explained. The autocorrelation of the intensity fluctuations from a beta-carotene solution is obtained using the some configurations; however, the difficulty in precise alignment and weak nature of Raman scattering prevented the achievement of high sensitivity and resolution. Possible fluctuations of the phase of Raman scattering could also be affecting the results. A possible explanation of the observed autocorrelation in terms of number fluctuations of particles is also examined to test the feasibility of RCS as a new optical characterization method. In order to investigate the complex systems for which RCS would be useful, strategies for the creation of a multicomponent nanoparticle system are also explored. Using regular solution theory along with the concept of Hansen solubility parameters, an analytical model is developed to predict whether two or more components will form single nanoparticles, and what effect various processing conditions would have. The reprecipitation method was used to demonstrate the formation of the multi-component system of the charge transfer complex perylene:TCNQ (tetracyanoquinodimethane) and the active pharmaceutical ingredient cocrystal

  19. Influence of a laser profile in impedance mismatch techniques applied to carbon EOS measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Aliverdiev; D.Batani; R.Dezulian

    2013-01-01

    We present a recent numerical analysis of impedance mismatch technique applied to carbon equation of state measurements.We consider high-power laser pulses with a Gaussian temporal profile of different durations.We show that for the laser intensity(≈1014W/cm2)and the target design considered in this paper we need to have laser pulses with rise-time less than 150 ps.

  20. Development of laser repair technique for cutting impurities in secondary side of a steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Chung, Chin Man; Kim, Min Suk; Jeong, Tae Moon

    1999-12-01

    In this research, the laser repair technique was investigated for the purpose of cutting impurities in secondary side of a steam generator. For this research, a high quality Nd:YAG laser was manufactured and the beam delivery experiments was performed with multimode optical fibers. Also, the small size focusing system was designed and fabricated for remote cutting and the laser cutting experiment was performed. (author)

  1. Laser transmission welding of Clearweld-coated polyethylene glycol terephthalate by incremental scanning technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Wang, A. H.; Weng, Z. K.; Xia, H. B.

    2016-06-01

    Transmission laser welding using Incremental Scanning Technique(TWIST) mode and conventional contour welding mode were adopted to investigate laser transmission welding of 0.5 mm thick PET plate. A 1064 nm fiber laser was used to weld PET at the (TWIST) mode, and an 808 nm diode laser was applied to conduct the conventional contour welding. The Clearweld coating was used as laser absorbing material. The influences of laser parameters (i.e. defocusing distance, distance between two circles) on the quality of weld seams were analyzed by optical microscopy. Moreover, geometry and shear strength of the weld zone were tested to optimize laser parameters. Additionally, the water vapor permeability (WVP) of weld seams was measured to test hermetical capacity. Results show that the shear strength and hermetic capacity of weld seam by TWIST mode are at the same level in comparison with that of the conventional contour welding.

  2. Green and Fast Laser Fusion Technique for Bulk Silicate Rock Analysis by Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenxi; Hu, Zhaochu; Zhang, Wen; Liu, Yongsheng; Zong, Keqing; Li, Ming; Chen, Haihong; Hu, Shenghong

    2016-10-18

    Sample preparation of whole-rock powders is the major limitation for their accurate and precise elemental analysis by laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). In this study, a green, efficient, and simplified fusion technique using a high energy infrared laser was developed for major and trace elemental analysis. Fusion takes only tens of milliseconds for each sample. Compared to the pressed pellet sample preparation, the analytical precision of the developed laser fusion technique is higher by an order of magnitude for most elements in granodiorite GSP-2. Analytical results obtained for five USGS reference materials (ranging from mafic to intermediate to felsic) using the laser fusion technique generally agree with recommended values with discrepancies of less than 10% for most elements. However, high losses (20-70%) of highly volatile elements (Zn and Pb) and the transition metal Cu are observed. The achieved precision is within 5% for major elements and within 15% for most trace elements. Direct laser fusion of rock powders is a green and notably simple method to obtain homogeneous samples, which will significantly accelerate the application of laser ablation ICPMS for whole-rock sample analysis.

  3. Study of laser-induced plasma shock waves by the probe beam deflection technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Qian; Jian Lu; Xiaowu Ni

    2009-01-01

    Laser probe beam deflection technique is used for the analysis of laser-induced plasma shock waves in air and distilled water.The temporal and spatial variations of the parameters on shock fronts are studied as funotions of focal lens position and laser energy.The influences of the characteristics of media are investigated on the well-designed experimental setup.It is found that the shock wave in distilled water attenuates to an acoustic wave faster than in air under the same laser energy.Good agreement is obtained between our experimental results and those attained with other techniques.This technique is versatile,economic,and simple to implement,being a pronmising diagnostic tool for pulsed laser processing.

  4. Laser welding and syncristallization techniques comparison: "Ex vivo" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Meleti, Marco; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Rocca, Jean-Paul

    2013-12-30

    Stabilization of implant abutments through electric impulses at high voltage for a very short time (electrowelding) was developed in the Eighties. In 2009, the same procedure was performed through the use of laser (laser welding) The aim of this study is to compare electrowelding and laser welding for intra-oral implant abutments stabilization on "ex vivo models" (pig jaws). Six bars were welded with two different devices (Nd:YAG laser and Electrowelder) to eighteen titanium implant abutment inserted in three pig jaws. During the welding process, thermal increase was recorded, through the use of k-thermocouples, in the bone close to the implants. The strength of the welded joints was evaluated by a traction test after the removal of the implants. For temperature measurements a descriptive analysis and for traction test "values unpaired t test with Welch's correction" were performed: the significance level was set at PLaser welding gives a lower thermal increase than Electrowelding at the bone close to implants (Mean: 1.97 and 5.27); the strength of laser welded joints was higher than that of Electrowelding even if nor statistically significant. (Mean: 184.75 and 168.29) CONCLUSION: Electrowelding seems to have no advantages, in term of thermal elevation and strength, while laser welding may be employed to connect titanium implants for immediate load without risks of thermal damage at surrounding tissues.

  5. Nondestructive and rapid concurrent estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form using raman spectroscopic technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargi R Lakhwani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid, nondestructive Raman spectroscopic method was developed for quantitative estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form. A Raman univariate calibration model was developed by measuring the peak intensities of paracetamol and nimesulide at 853 cm−1 and 1336 cm−1 , respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for in situ, concurrent estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage and method was also validated according to International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. Thus, the developed Raman spectroscopic method can be applied for simultaneous estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form as a process analytical technology tool by pharmaceutical industries for routine quality control.

  6. Effect of polarization on population transfer in H2 by stimulated Raman transition with partially overlapping laser pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swaralipi Ghosh; Sanjay Sen; S S Bhattacharyya; Samir Saha

    2000-06-01

    Polarization effects on population transfer by stimulated Raman transition using overlapping time dependent pump and Stokes laser pulses from the ground 1$^{+}_{g}$(g=0,g=1) level of H2 to the final 1$^{+}_{g}$(f=1,f=1) level via the intermediate 1$^{+}_{u}(i=14,i=0,2), 1$^{+}_{u}$(i=3,i=2) and 1$^{-}_{u}$(i=3,i=1) levels have been theoretically investigated by applying the density matrix formalism. We have studied in detail the dependence of the population transfer on time delay between two pulses for the cases of on-resonance excitations considering linear parallel and same-sense circular polarizations of the fields. The pump and Stokes fields are taken as having Gaussian pulse shapes with peak intensities $I^{0}_{P}(I^{0}_{S})$=2 × 106 and 1 × 107 W/cm2. Density matrix equations have been solved for each value of the magnetic quantum number g(0,± 1)$ of the initial ground level taking into account the g dependence of the Rabi frequencies. g – averaged population transfer to the final level has also been calculated. For resonance excitations to the (14, 0) or (3,1) levels, appreciable population transfer is achieved for intuitive pulse order for some particular values of g and i (magnetic quantum number of the resonant intermediate level) depending on the nature of polarizations. The calculated values of g – averaged population transfer for the two cases of polarizations show that for on-resonance excitation to the (14, 0) or the (3, 1) level, linear parallel polarization of the laser fields yield more transfer efficiency whereas for resonance excitation to the (14, 2) level, larger population transfer results from the same-sense circular polarizations. For resonance excitation to the (3, 2) level, g – averaged population is found to be almost polarization independent. The calculations for the six-level H2 system reveal some interesting features of polarization effects on the population transfer efficiency

  7. A SIGNAL ENHANCED PORTABLE RAMAN PROBE FOR ANESTHETIC GAS MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schlüter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous Raman scattering technique is an excellent tool for a quantitative analysis of multi-species gas mixtures. It is a noninvasive optical method for species identification and gas phase concentration measurement of all Raman active molecules, since the intensity of the species specific Raman signal is linearly dependent on the concentration. Applying a continuous wave (CW laser it typically takes a few seconds to capture a gas phase Raman spectrum at room temperature. Nevertheless in contrast to these advantages the weak Raman signal intensity is a major drawback. Thus, it is still challenging to detect gas phase Raman spectra in alow-pressure regime with a temporal resolution of only a few 100 ms. In this work a fully functional gas phase Raman system for measurements in the low-pressure regime (p ≥ 980 hPa (absolute is presented. It overcomes the drawback of a weak Raman signal by using a multipass cavity. A description of the sensor setup and of the multipass arrangement will be presented. Moreover the complete functionality of the sensor system will be demonstrated by measurements at an anesthesia simulator under clinical relevant conditions and in comparison to a conventional gas monitor.

  8. Design of an 1800nm Raman amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental results for a Raman amplifier that operates at 1810 nm and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser at 1680 nm. Both the pump laser and the Raman amplifier is polarization maintaining. A challenge when scaling Raman amplifiers to longer wavelengths is the increase...... in transmission loss, but also the reduction in the Raman gain coefficient as the amplifier wavelength is increased. Both polarization components of the Raman gain is characterized, initially for linearly co-polarized signal and pump, subsequently linearly polarized orthogonal signal and pump. The noise...

  9. Laser rapid prototyping techniques for fabrication of advanced implants and scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Rapid prototyping (RP) techniques become more and more extensively used instrument for numerous biomedical applications ranging from 3-D biomodels design to fabrication of custom-designed implants and scaffolds for tissue engineering. In this paper we present the results of our development of advanced Laser Stereolithography (LS) and new Surface Selective Laser Sintering (SSLS) methodologies for these purposes.

  10. Problems on holographic imaging technique and adapt lasers for bubble chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Bjelkhagen, H I

    1982-01-01

    Different types of holographic recording technique for bubble chambers are presented and compared. The influence of turbulence on resolution is discussed as well as the demand on laser equipment. Experiments on a test model of HOLEBC using a pulsed ruby laser are also presented.

  11. Laser rapid prototyping techniques for fabrication of advanced implants and scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Popov; V.; K.

    2005-01-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) techniques become more and more extensively used instrument for numerous biomedical applications ranging from 3-D biomodels design to fabrication of custom-designed implants and scaffolds for tissue engineering. In this paper we present the results of our development of advanced Laser Stereolithography (LS) and new Surface Selective Laser Sintering (SSLS) methodologies for these purposes.……

  12. Analytical and laser scanning techniques to determine shape properties of mineral aggregates

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Komba, Julius J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available using a laser-based scanning technique to determine the form of aggregates used in construction of pavements in South Africa. A three-dimensional (3-D) laser scanning system was used to scan aggregate materials from different sources, and the data were...

  13. Design and Calibration of a Raman Spectrometer for use in a Laser Spectroscopy Instrument Intended to Analyze Martian Surface and Atmospheric Characteristics for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, John F.; Hornef, James

    2016-01-01

    This project's goal is the design of a Raman spectroscopy instrument to be utilized by NASA in an integrated spectroscopy strategy that will include Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser-Induced Florescence Spectroscopy (LIFS) for molecule and element identification on Mars Europa, and various asteroids. The instrument is to be down scaled from a dedicated rover mounted instrument into a compact unit with the same capabilities and accuracy as the larger instrument. The focus for this design is a spectrometer that utilizes Raman spectroscopy. The spectrometer has a calculated range of 218 nm wavelength spectrum with a resolution of 1.23 nm. To filter out the laser source wavelength of 532 nm the spectrometer design utilizes a 532 nm wavelength dichroic mirror and a 532 nm wavelength notch filter. The remaining scatter signal is concentrated by a 20 x microscopic objective through a 25-micron vertical slit into a 5mm diameter, 1cm focal length double concave focusing lens. The light is then diffracted by a 1600 Lines per Millimeter (L/mm) dual holographic transmission grating. This spectrum signal is captured by a 1-inch diameter double convex 3 cm focal length capture lens. An Intensified Charge Couple Device (ICCD) is placed within the initial focal cone of the capture lens and the Raman signal captured is to be analyzed through spectroscopy imaging software. This combination allows for accurate Raman spectroscopy to be achieved. The components for the spectrometer have been bench tested in a series of prototype developments based on theoretical calculations, alignment, and scaling strategies. The mounting platform is 2.5 cm wide by 8.8 cm long by 7 cm height. This platform has been tested and calibrated with various sources such as a neon light source and ruby crystal. This platform is intended to be enclosed in a ruggedized enclosure for mounting on a rover platform. The size and functionality of the Raman spectrometer allows for the rover to

  14. Interference-free optical detection for Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor); Fischer, David G (Inventor); Kojima, Jun (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An architecture for spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS) that utilizes a frame-transfer charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor operating in a subframe burst gating mode to realize time-resolved combustion diagnostics is disclosed. The technique permits all-electronic optical gating with microsecond shutter speeds (<5 .mu.s), without compromising optical throughput or image fidelity. When used in conjunction with a pair of orthogonally-polarized excitation lasers, the technique measures time-resolved vibrational Raman scattering that is minimally contaminated by problematic optical background noise.

  15. A Novel Technique to Measure Gain Spectrum for Fabry-Pérot Semiconductor Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel gain measurement technique based on the integration of the measured amplified spontaneous emission spectrum multiplying a phase function over one longitudinal mode interval is proposed for Fabry-Perot semiconductor lasers.

  16. Photoacoustic Techniques for Trace Gas Sensing Based on Semiconductor Laser Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Spagnolo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides an overview on the use of photoacoustic sensors based on semiconductor laser sources for the detection of trace gases. We review the results obtained using standard, differential and quartz enhanced photoacoustic techniques.

  17. Three-dimensional laser scanning technique to quantify aggregate and ballast shape properties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available methods towards a more accurate and automated techniques to quantify aggregate shape properties. This paper validates a new flakiness index equation using three-dimensional (3-D) laser scanning data of aggregate and ballast materials obtained from...

  18. Phase generated carrier technique for fiber laser hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rizhong; Wang, Xinbing; Huang, Junbin; Gu, Hongcan

    2013-08-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser is compact, and is very suitable for using as a hydrophone to sense acoustic pressure. A DFB fiber laser hydrophone was researched. In the fiber laser hydrophone signal demodulating system, an unbalanced Michelson fiber interferometer and a Phase Generated Carrier (PGC) method were used. The PGC method can be used to demodulating the acoustic signal from the interference signal. Comparing with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) method and Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) method, the digitized PGC method requires a greater amount of computation because of the high signal sampling, but it demands only one interference signal which makes the less fiber connections of the fiber laser hydrophone array. So the fiber laser hydrophone array based on the PGC method has lower complexity and higher reliability than that based on the NRL method or NPS method. The experimental results approve that the PGC method can demodulate acoustic signal between 20~2000 Hz frequency range with good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when the PZT driving frequency is 20 kHz.

  19. Dragging technique versus blanching technique for endometrial ablation with the Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of chronic menorrhagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomano, J M

    1988-07-01

    Endometrial ablation performed with the Nd:YAG laser was developed to treat patients with chronic menorrhagia as an alternative to hysterectomy. The original dragging technique may result in an obscured operating field and fluid overload. This study compares results of endometrial ablation performed in 62 patients. The first 17 procedures were performed by use of the dragging technique; the last 45 procedures were performed with a blanching technique. Both procedures were performed at the same institution and by the same surgeon. Sixty-five percent of patients undergoing the blanching technique became amenorrheic after the procedure versus 12% of those undergoing the dragging technique. Moreover, the blanching technique required less time, fewer joules of energy, and resulted in less fluid absorption by the patient. The blanching technique is apparently more effective, easier to accomplish, and safer for the patient than the dragging technique.

  20. Effective use of an EDFA and Raman pump residual powers via a Bi-EDF in L-band multi-wavelength fiber laser generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, M. R.; Harun, S. W.; Ahmad, H.

    2015-01-01

    Residual powers of an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) and a Raman pump are utilized effectively for pumping a 0.45 m long bismuth-based EDF (Bi-EDF) in linear-cavity L-band multi-wavelength fiber laser generation. A 7.7 km dispersion compensating fiber (DCF) operates as both Brillouin and Raman gain media and a 6.5 dBm fixed-power tunable laser source (TLS) amplified by an EDFA works as a Brillouin pump (BP). By inserting the Bi-EDF in the linear cavity and using the EDFA and the fixed Raman pump residual powers 13.6 mW and 64 mW, at wavelengths 978.8 nm and 1490.6 nm respectively, the gain spectrum is inhomogeneously broadened so that linewidth of the gain spectrum is expanded from 3.4 to 12.3 nm. As a result, the number of lines of an L-band multi-wavelength fiber laser (MFL) is increased noticeably. In addition, the number of lines at a BP wavelength 1590.6 nm decreased from 38 to 32 by using the maximum EDFA pump residual power of 44 mW due to a reduction in the quantum coefficient efficiency. However, flatness and stability characteristics of the MFL are improved. The MFL can be generated in the wavelength region 1570-1610 nm with the signal to noise ratio of about 42.