WorldWideScience

Sample records for laser radar image

  1. Numerical simulation of imaging laser radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shaokun; Lu, Bo; Jiang, Ming; Liu, Xunliang

    2008-03-01

    Rational and effective design of imaging laser radar systems is the key of imaging laser radar system research. Design must fully consider the interrelationship between various parameters. According to the parameters, choose suitable laser, detector and other components. To use of mathematical modeling and computer simulation is an effective imaging laser radar system design methods. This paper based on the distance equation, using the detection statistical methods, from the laser radar range coverage, detection probability, false-alarm rate, SNR to build the laser radar system mathematical models. In the process of setting up the mathematical models to fully consider the laser, atmosphere, detector and other factors on the performance that is to make the models be able to respond accurately the real situation. Based on this using C# and Matlab designed a simulation software.

  2. Digital Receiver for Laser Imaging Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei Ran; SUN Bing

    2004-01-01

    With the extension of the application domains for laser imaging radar,it is necessary to find a new technical way to obtain high technical performance and adaptive ability.In this paper,A new concept of digital receiver of laser imaging radar system is presented.This digital receiver is defined as a time varying parameter receiver which possesses large dynamics region and time domain filter.The receiver's mode,component structure as well as every function of its processing are described.The results and laboratorial data show the feasibility of digital reception.Also,it can exploit the inherent nature of laser imaging radar to obtain high probability of detection.

  3. Clutter discrimination algorithm simulation in pulse laser radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; Su, Xuan; Zhu, Fule

    2015-10-01

    Pulse laser radar imaging performance is greatly influenced by different kinds of clutter. Various algorithms are developed to mitigate clutter. However, estimating performance of a new algorithm is difficult. Here, a simulation model for estimating clutter discrimination algorithms is presented. This model consists of laser pulse emission, clutter jamming, laser pulse reception and target image producing. Additionally, a hardware platform is set up gathering clutter data reflected by ground and trees. The data logging is as clutter jamming input in the simulation model. The hardware platform includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. The laser diode transmits short laser pulses (40ns FWHM) at 12.5 kilohertz pulse rate and at 905nm wavelength. An analog-to-digital converter chip integrated in the sample circuit works at 250 mega samples per second. The simulation model and the hardware platform contribute to a clutter discrimination algorithm simulation system. Using this system, after analyzing clutter data logging, a new compound pulse detection algorithm is developed. This new algorithm combines matched filter algorithm and constant fraction discrimination (CFD) algorithm. Firstly, laser echo pulse signal is processed by matched filter algorithm. After the first step, CFD algorithm comes next. Finally, clutter jamming from ground and trees is discriminated and target image is produced. Laser radar images are simulated using CFD algorithm, matched filter algorithm and the new algorithm respectively. Simulation result demonstrates that the new algorithm achieves the best target imaging effect of mitigating clutter reflected by ground and trees.

  4. Agile beam laser radar using computational imaging for robotic perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael A.; Stann, Barry L.; Giza, Mark M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper introduces a new concept that applies computational imaging techniques to laser radar for robotic perception. We observe that nearly all contemporary laser radars for robotic (i.e., autonomous) applications use pixel basis scanning where there is a one-to-one correspondence between world coordinates and the measurements directly produced by the instrument. In such systems this is accomplished through beam scanning and/or the imaging properties of focal-plane optics. While these pixel-basis measurements yield point clouds suitable for straightforward human interpretation, the purpose of robotic perception is the extraction of meaningful features from a scene, making human interpretability and its attendant constraints mostly unnecessary. The imposing size, weight, power and cost of contemporary systems is problematic, and relief from factors that increase these metrics is important to the practicality of robotic systems. We present a system concept free from pixel basis sampling constraints that promotes efficient and adaptable sensing modes. The cornerstone of our approach is agile and arbitrary beam formation that, when combined with a generalized mathematical framework for imaging, is suited to the particular challenges and opportunities of robotic perception systems. Our hardware concept looks toward future systems with optical device technology closely resembling modern electronically-scanned-array radar that may be years away from practicality. We present the design concept and results from a prototype system constructed and tested in a laboratory environment using a combination of developed hardware and surrogate devices for beam formation. The technological status and prognosis for key components in the system is discussed.

  5. Terahertz inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging using self-mixing interferometry with a quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, H S; Taimre, T; Bertling, K; Lim, Y L; Dean, P; Khanna, S P; Lachab, M; Valavanis, A; Indjin, D; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G; Rakić, A D

    2014-05-01

    We propose a terahertz (THz)-frequency synthetic aperture radar imaging technique based on self-mixing (SM) interferometry, using a quantum cascade laser. A signal processing method is employed which extracts and exploits the radar-related information contained in the SM signals, enabling the creation of THz images with improved spatial resolution. We demonstrate this by imaging a standard resolution test target, achieving resolution beyond the diffraction limit.

  6. High-frequency scannerless imaging laser radar for industrial inspection and measurement applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R.L.; Williams, R.J.; Matthews, J.D.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes the development and testing of a high-frequency scannerless imaging laser radar system to evaluate its viability as an industrial inspection and measurement sensor. We modified an existing 5.5-Mhz scannerless laser radar to operate at 150 Mhz, and measured its performance including its spatial resolution and range resolution. We also developed new algorithms that allow rapid data reduction with improved range resolution. The resulting 150-Mhz ladar system demonstrated a range resolution of better than 3 mm, which represents nearly a factor-of-100 improvement in range resolution over the existing scannerless laser radar system. Based on this work, we believe that a scannerless range imager with 1- to 2-mm range resolution is feasible. This work was performed as part of a small-business CRADA between Sandia National Laboratories and Perceptron, Inc.

  7. Synthetic-aperture imaging laser radar: laboratory demonstration and signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Steven M; Buck, Joseph R; Buell, Walter F; Dickinson, Richard P; Kozlowski, David A; Marechal, Nicholas J; Wright, Timothy J

    2005-12-10

    The spatial resolution of a conventional imaging laser radar system is constrained by the diffraction limit of the telescope's aperture. We investigate a technique known as synthetic-aperture imaging laser radar (SAIL), which employs aperture synthesis with coherent laser radar to overcome the diffraction limit and achieve fine-resolution, long-range, two-dimensional imaging with modest aperture diameters. We detail our laboratory-scale SAIL testbed, digital signal-processing techniques, and image results. In particular, we report what we believe to be the first optical synthetic-aperture image of a fixed, diffusely scattering target with a moving aperture. A number of fine-resolution, well-focused SAIL images are shown, including both retroreflecting and diffuse scattering targets, with a comparison of resolution between real-aperture imaging and synthetic-aperture imaging. A general digital signal-processing solution to the laser waveform instability problem is described and demonstrated, involving both new algorithms and hardware elements. These algorithms are primarily data driven, without a priori knowledge of waveform and sensor position, representing a crucial step in developing a robust imaging system.

  8. Active laser radar (lidar) for measurement of corresponding height and reflectance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Christoph; Mettenleiter, M.; Haertl, F.

    1997-08-01

    For the survey and inspection of environmental objects, a non-tactile, robust and precise imaging of height and depth is the basis sensor technology. For visual inspection,surface classification, and documentation purposes, however, additional information concerning reflectance of measured objects is necessary. High-speed acquisition of both geometric and visual information is achieved by means of an active laser radar, supporting consistent 3D height and 2D reflectance images. The laser radar is an optical-wavelength system, and is comparable to devices built by ERIM, Odetics, and Perceptron, measuring the range between sensor and target surfaces as well as the reflectance of the target surface, which corresponds to the magnitude of the back scattered laser energy. In contrast to these range sensing devices, the laser radar under consideration is designed for high speed and precise operation in both indoor and outdoor environments, emitting a minimum of near-IR laser energy. It integrates a laser range measurement system and a mechanical deflection system for 3D environmental measurements. This paper reports on design details of the laser radar for surface inspection tasks. It outlines the performance requirements and introduces the measurement principle. The hardware design, including the main modules, such as the laser head, the high frequency unit, the laser beam deflection system, and the digital signal processing unit are discussed.the signal processing unit consists of dedicated signal processors for real-time sensor data preprocessing as well as a sensor computer for high-level image analysis and feature extraction. The paper focuses on performance data of the system, including noise, drift over time, precision, and accuracy with measurements. It discuses the influences of ambient light, surface material of the target, and ambient temperature for range accuracy and range precision. Furthermore, experimental results from inspection of buildings, monuments

  9. Advanced system model for 1574-nm imaging, scannerless, eye-safe laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schael, Ulrich; Rothe, Hendrik

    2002-10-01

    Laser radar based on gated viewing uses narrow laser pulses to illuminate a whole scene for direct (incoherent) detection. Due to the time of flight principle and a very fast shutter with precisely controlled delay time, only light reflected in the range R (range slice ΔR) is detected by a camera. Scattered light which reaches the shutter outside a given exposure time (gate) is suppressed. Hence, it is possible to "look" along the optical axis through changing atmospheric transmissions (rain, haze, fog, snow). For each laser pulse, the grey value image ES(x,y) of the camera is captured by a framegrabber for subsequent evaluation. Image sequences from these laser radar systems are ideally suited to recognize objects, because of the automatic contrast generation of the technology. Difficult object recognition problems, detection, target tracking, or obstacle avoidance at bad weather conditions are favorite applications. In this paper we discuss improvements in the system modelling and simulation of our laser radar system. Formerly the system performance was calculated for the whole system using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), leading to a general estimation of the maximum range of target detection. Changing to a pixel oriented approach, we are now able to study the system response for targets with arbitrary two and even three dimensional form. We take into account different kinds of target reflectivity and the Gaussian nature of the illuminating laser spot. Hence it is possible to simulate gray value images (range slices) and calculate range images. This will lead to a modulation transfer function for the system in future. Finally, the theoretical considerations are compared with experimental results from indoor measurements.

  10. Application of phase retrieval algorithm in reflective tomography laser radar imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Jin; Jianfeng Sun; Yi Yan; Yu Zhou; Liren Liu

    2011-01-01

    @@ We apply phase retrieval method to align projection data for tomographic reconstruction in reflective tomography laser radar imaging. In our experiment, the target is placed on a spin table with an unknown,but fixed, axis. The oscillatory motion of the target in the incident direction of the laser pulse is added at each view to simulate the real satellites random motion. The experimental simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method to improve image reconstruction quality. Future research also includes the development of projection registration based on phase retrieval for targets with more complicated structure.%We apply phase retrieval method to align projection data for tomographic reconstruction in reflective tomography laser radar imaging. In our experiment, the target is placed on a spin table with an unknown,but fixed, axis. The oscillatory motion of the target in the incident direction of the laser pulse is added at each view to simulate the real satellites random motion. The experimental simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method to improve image reconstruction quality. Future research also includes the development of projection registration based on phase retrieval for targets with more complicated structure.

  11. Intelligent multisensor concept for image-guided 3D object measurement with scanning laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Juergen

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents an intelligent multisensor concept for measuring 3D objects using an image guided laser radar scanner. The field of application are all kinds of industrial inspection and surveillance tasks where it is necessary to detect, measure and recognize 3D objects in distances up to 10 m with high flexibility. Such applications might be the surveillance of security areas or container storages as well as navigation and collision avoidance of autonomous guided vehicles. The multisensor system consists of a standard CCD matrix camera and a 1D laser radar ranger which is mounted to a 2D mirror scanner. With this sensor combination it is possible to acquire gray scale intensity data as well as absolute 3D information. To improve the system performance and flexibility, the intensity data of the scene captured by the camera can be used to focus the measurement of the 3D sensor to relevant areas. The camera guidance of the laser scanner is useful because the acquisition of spatial information is relatively slow compared to the image sensor's ability to snap an image frame in 40 ms. Relevant areas in a scene are located by detecting edges of objects utilizing various image processing algorithms. The complete sensor system is controlled by three microprocessors carrying out the 3D data acquisition, the image processing tasks and the multisensor integration. The paper deals with the details of the multisensor concept. It describes the process of sensor guidance and 3D measurement and presents some practical results of our research.

  12. Design and Tests of A Cable Detection Laser Imaging Radar System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-ran; YUAN Jin

    2005-01-01

    Rotorcraft in low-level flight is endangered by power lines or telephone wires. The development of automation tools that can detect obstacles in the flight path and warn the crew would significantly reduce pilot workload and increase safety. Therefore, a cable detection radar system is developed. The real-time dynamic imaging synchronizing with radar space scanning has been implemented in developed ladar system. The requirements of the flight mission to prevent "wire strike"are analyzed and estimated, the advantages and disadvantages of the millimeter wave system with the laser system are weighted. The result shows that Laser system is the best suited for helicopter avoidance obstacle. In addition, several design gist of detecting wire radar that was used in the developed ladar system is proposed and the developed zero backlash imaging technology and several advanced warning function are described. The detailed results of system ground tests and the performances description are presented. The ground test of the developed ladar system has demonstrated that the developed imaging ladar system performance can achieve and satisfy the requirements of the mission to prevent "wire strike".

  13. Study of imaging radar using ultra-wideband microwave-modulated infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Atsushi; Kogi, Yuichiro; Ikezi, Hiroyuki; Inutake, Masaaki; Wang, Xiaolong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present an ultra-wideband microwave-modulated laser radar which is designed and fabricated for improvement of the spatial resolution both in the range direction and the azimuth direction. The amplitude modulation in a range of 0.01-18 GHz is applied to an infrared laser source of 1550 nm wavelength. The frequency and the bandwidth are assigned by the Administration of Radio under the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications in Japan. However, there is no bandwidth limitation in the infrared region. Considering the influence of radiation pattern for microwave antennas case, there is no side lobe in laser beam transmission. Ambiguous signal and interferences which are returned from the ground can be suppressed. A prototype of laser-radar system with a fiber collimator for both transmitting and receiving optics has been fabricated. A vector network analyzer is used to obtain S21 signal between the microwave modulation input and that of received signal. The system is, at first, applied to the measurement of the distance (position) of an object. It is proved that the spatial resolution is less than 1 cm during 5-10 m. As an initial experiment, we have succeeded to obtain 3D image of object by scanning a laser beam in two dimensions.

  14. Feasibility study of synthetic aperture infrared laser radar techniques for imaging of static and moving objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikado, S; Aruga, T

    1998-08-20

    Techniques for two types of 10-mum band synthetic aperture infrared laser radar using a hypothetical reference point target (RPT) are presented. One is for imaging static objects with a single two-dimensional scanning aperture. Through the simple manipulation of a reference wave phase, a desired image can be obtained merely by the two-dimensional Fourier transformation of the correlator output between the intermediate frequency signals of the reference and object waves. The other, with a one-dimensional aperture array, is for moving objects that pass across the array direction without attitude change. We performed imaging by using a two-dimensional RPT correlation method. We demonstrate the capability of these methods for imaging and evaluate the necessary conditions for signal-to-noise ratio and random phase errors in signal reception through numerical simulations in terms of feasibility.

  15. Using a neural networks algorithm for high-resolution imaging in pulsed laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joodaki, Mojtaba; Kompa, Guenter; Golam Arshad, Seyed M.; Ahmadi, Vahid; Moravvej-Farshi, Mohammed K.

    2001-11-01

    A new imaging method which can obtain the gray levels directly from the output waveform of Pulsed Laser Radar (PLR) is developed. A simple digital signal processing technique and multi layer perceptrons (MLP) type neural network (NN) have been used to obtain the gray level information from the pulse shapes. The method has been implemented in a real PLR to improve contrast and speed of 2D imaging in PLR. To compare the method with the standard method, a picture consists of 16 gray levels (from 0 for black to 1 for white) with both method has been scanned. Because of the ability of NNs in extracting the information from nonlinear and noisy data and preprocessing of the noisy input pulse shapes to the NN, the average and maximum of errors in the gray levels in comparison with standard method more than 88.5% and 72.6% improved, respectively. Because in this method the effect of the noise is decreased, it is possible to make the imaging with the same resolution as in standard method but with a lower averaging in sampling unit and this dramatically increases speed of the measurements.

  16. Full Waveform Analysis for Long-Range 3D Imaging Laser Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace AndrewM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The new generation of 3D imaging systems based on laser radar (ladar offers significant advantages in defense and security applications. In particular, it is possible to retrieve 3D shape information directly from the scene and separate a target from background or foreground clutter by extracting a narrow depth range from the field of view by range gating, either in the sensor or by postprocessing. We discuss and demonstrate the applicability of full-waveform ladar to produce multilayer 3D imagery, in which each pixel produces a complex temporal response that describes the scene structure. Such complexity caused by multiple and distributed reflection arises in many relevant scenarios, for example in viewing partially occluded targets, through semitransparent materials (e.g., windows and through distributed reflective media such as foliage. We demonstrate our methodology on 3D image data acquired by a scanning time-of-flight system, developed in our own laboratories, which uses the time-correlated single-photon counting technique.

  17. High-resolution laser radar for 3D imaging in artwork cataloging, reproduction, and restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Roberto; Fantoni, Roberta; Ferri de Collibus, Mario; Fornetti, Giorgio G.; Guarneri, Massimiliano; Poggi, Claudio

    2003-10-01

    A high resolution Amplitude Modulated Laser Radar (AM-LR) sensor has recently been developed, aimed at accurately reconstructing 3D digital models of real targets, either single objects or complex scenes. The sensor sounding beam can be swept linearly across the object or circularly around it, by placing the object on a controlled rotating platform, enabling to obtain respectively linear and cylindrical range maps. Both amplitude and phase shift of the modulating wave of back-scattered light are collected and processed, providing respectively a shade-free, high resolution, photographic-like picture and accurate range data in the form of a range image. The resolution of range measurements depends mainly on the laser modulation frequency, provided that the power of the backscattered light reaching the detector is at least a few nW (current best performances are ~100 μm). The complete object surface can be reconstructed from the sampled points by using specifically developed software tools. The system has been successfully applied to scan different types of real surfaces (stone, wood, alloys, bones), with relevant applications in different fields, ranging from industrial machining to medical diagnostics, to vision in hostile environments. Examples of artwork reconstructed models (pottery, marble statues) are presented and the relevance of this technology for reverse engineering applied to cultural heritage conservation and restoration are discussed. Final 3D models can be passed to numeric control machines for rapid-prototyping, exported in standard formats for CAD/CAM purposes and made available on the Internet by adopting a virtual museum paradigm, thus possibly enabling specialists to perform remote inspections on high resolution digital reproductions of hardly accessible masterpieces.

  18. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  19. Imaging Radar Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanZyl, J. J.; Zebker, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we review the state of the art in imaging radar polarimetry, examine current developments in sensor technology and implementation for recording polarimetric measurements, and describe techniques and areas of application for the new remote sensing data.

  20. Multi-channel photon counting three-dimensional imaging laser radar system using fiber array coupled Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Rong; Huang, Genghua; Hou, Libing; He, Zhiping; Hu, Yihua

    2012-09-01

    Photon counting laser radar is the most sensitive and efficiency detection method of direct-detection laser radar. With the use of Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (APD) or other single photon detectors, every laser photon could be sufficiently used for ranging and three-dimensional imaging. The average energy of received laser signal could be as low as a single photon, or even less than one. This feature of photon counting laser radar enables ranging under conditions of long range, low laser pulse energy, and multi-pixel detection, while receiver size, mass, power, and complexity of laser radar are reduced. In this paper, a latest multi-channel photon counting 3D imaging laser radar system using fiber array coupled Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (APD) is introduced. Detection model based on Poisson statistics of a photon counting laser radar is discussed. A laser radar system, working under daylight condition with ultra-low signal level (less than single photon per pulse), has been designed and analyzed with the detection model and photon counting three-dimensional imaging theory. A passively Q-switched microchip laser is used to transmit short sub-nanosecond laser pulses at 532nm. The output laser is divided into 1×8 laser spots, which correspond to 8 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes coupled by a 1×8-pixel fiber array. A FPGA based time-to-digital converter (TDC), which is designed by delay line interpolation technology, is used for multi-hit signal acquisition. The algorithm of photon counting three-dimensional imaging is developed for signal photon events extraction and noise filter. Three-dimensional images under daylight conditions were acquired and analyzed. The results show that system could operate at strong solar background. The ranging accuracy of the system is 6.3cm (σ) while received laser pulse signal level is only 0.04 photoelectrons on average. The advantages and feasibility of photon counting laser radar working at daylight have been

  1. The irradiating field of view of imaging laser radar under fog conditions in a controlled laboratory environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wen-Hua; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Lai, Jian-Cheng; Yan, Wei; Wang, Chun-Yong; Li, Zhen-Hua

    2017-04-01

    This paper theoretically and experimentally investigates the performance of the imaging laser radar (ILR) system under the fog condition. Fog is generated and controlled homogeneously within a dedicated indoor atmospheric chamber. A physical model of the reflected laser pulses due to fog and a standard Lambertian target are developed to determine the width of each echo pulse for different fog concentrations. We show that there is a good agreement between the predicted and measured results for the width of backscattered return pulses. Based on experimental results an empirical model of the horizontal and vertical irradiating field of views (FOVs) of ILR under different visibilities is also developed. Consequently, a new model is proposed to predict the horizontal and vertical irradiating FOVs of ILR by using the width of the backscattered return pulse under different fog conditions. The reported results can be used to dynamically adjust the scanning interval based on the variation of the irradiating FOVs of laser radar and improve the precision of target ranging and imaging.

  2. Terahertz inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging with a quantum cascade laser transmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylov, Andriy A; Goyette, Thomas M; Waldman, Jerry; Coulombe, Michael J; Gatesman, Andrew J; Giles, Robert H; Qian, Xifeng; Chandrayan, Neelima; Vangala, Shivashankar; Termkoa, Krongtip; Goodhue, William D; Nixon, William E

    2010-07-19

    A coherent transceiver using a THz quantum cascade (TQCL) laser as the transmitter and an optically pumped molecular laser as the local oscillator has been used, with a pair of Schottky diode mixers in the receiver and reference channels, to acquire high-resolution images of fully illuminated targets, including scale models and concealed objects. Phase stability of the received signal, sufficient to allow coherent image processing of the rotating target (in azimuth and elevation), was obtained by frequency-locking the TQCL to the free-running, highly stable optically pumped molecular laser. While the range to the target was limited by the available TQCL power (several hundred microwatts) and reasonably strong indoor atmospheric attenuation at 2.408 THz, the coherence length of the TQCL transmitter will allow coherent imaging over distances up to several hundred meters. Image data obtained with the system is presented.

  3. Status Of Imaging Radar Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1991-01-01

    Report pulls together information on imaging radar polarimetry from a variety of sources. Topics include theory, equipment, and experimental data. Reviews state of the art, examines current applicable developments in radar equipment, describes recording and processing of radar polarimetric measurements, and discusses interpretation and application of resulting polarimetric images.

  4. Imaging synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Bryan L.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    A linear-FM SAR imaging radar method and apparatus to produce a real-time image by first arranging the returned signals into a plurality of subaperture arrays, the columns of each subaperture array having samples of dechirped baseband pulses, and further including a processing of each subaperture array to obtain coarse-resolution in azimuth, then fine-resolution in range, and lastly, to combine the processed subapertures to obtain the final fine-resolution in azimuth. Greater efficiency is achieved because both the transmitted signal and a local oscillator signal mixed with the returned signal can be varied on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of radar motion. Moreover, a novel circuit can adjust the sampling location and the A/D sample rate of the combined dechirped baseband signal which greatly reduces processing time and hardware. The processing steps include implementing a window function, stabilizing either a central reference point and/or all other points of a subaperture with respect to doppler frequency and/or range as a function of radar motion, sorting and compressing the signals using a standard fourier transforms. The stabilization of each processing part is accomplished with vector multiplication using waveforms generated as a function of radar motion wherein these waveforms may be synthesized in integrated circuits. Stabilization of range migration as a function of doppler frequency by simple vector multiplication is a particularly useful feature of the invention; as is stabilization of azimuth migration by correcting for spatially varying phase errors prior to the application of an autofocus process.

  5. The Precision Expandable Radar Calibration Sphere (PERCS) With Applications for Laser Imaging and Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    HF facilities such as HAARP in Alaska, EISCAT in Norway, and Arecibo in Puerto Rico; (3) the chain of high latitude SuperDARN radars used for auroral...DF arrays, ground HF transmitters such as the Navy relocatable over the horizon radar (ROTHR) and the Air Force/Navy HAARP system would be employed...United States and Australia; (2) high power HF facilities such as HAARP in Alaska, EISCAT in Norway, and Arecibo in Puerto Rico; (3) the chain of high

  6. High accuracy 3-D laser radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck, Jens; Heiselberg, Henning

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a mono-static staring 3-D laser radar based on gated viewing with range accuracy below 1 m at 10 m and 1 cm at 100. We use a high sensitivity, fast, intensified CCD camera, and a Nd:Yag passively Q-switched 32.4 kHz pulsed green laser at 532 nm. The CCD has 752x582 pixels. Camera...... shutter is controlled in steps of 100 ps. Camera delay is controlled in steps of 100 ps. Each laser pulse triggers the camera delay and shutter. A 3-D image is constructed from a sequence of 50-100 2-D reflectivity images, where each frame integrates about 700 laser pulses on the CCD. In 50 Hz video mode...

  7. A radar image time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leberl, F.; Fuchs, H.; Ford, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    A set of ten side-looking radar images of a mining area in Arizona that were aquired over a period of 14 yr are studied to demonstrate the photogrammetric differential-rectification technique applied to radar images and to examine changes that occurred in the area over time. Five of the images are rectified by using ground control points and a digital height model taken from a map. Residual coordinate errors in ground control are reduced from several hundred meters in all cases to + or - 19 to 70 m. The contents of the radar images are compared with a Landsat image and with aerial photographs. Effects of radar system parameters on radar images are briefly reviewed.

  8. Radar image registration and rectification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraghi, M.; Stromberg, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    Two techniques for radar image registration and rectification are presented. In the registration method, a general 2-D polynomial transform is defined to accomplish the geometric mapping from one image into the other. The degree and coefficients of the polynomial are obtained using an a priori found tiepoint data set. In the second part of the paper, a rectification procedure is developed that models the distortion present in the radar image in terms of the radar sensor's platform parameters and the topographic variations of the imaged scene. This model, the ephemeris data and the digital topographic data are then used in rectifying the radar image. The two techniques are then used in registering and rectifying two examples of radar imagery. Each method is discussed as to its benefits, shortcomings and registration accuracy.

  9. Micro pulse laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinhirne, James D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering is disclosed. The transmitter of the micro pulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited to optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that micropulse lider systems are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  10. Imaging with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Massonnet, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Describing a field that has been transformed by the recent availability of data from a new generation of space and airborne systems, the authors offer a synthetic geometrical approach to the description of synthetic aperture radar, one that addresses physicists, radar specialists, as well as experts in image processing.  

  11. Remote sensing with laser spectrum radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianhe; Zhou, Tao; Jia, Xiaodong

    2016-10-01

    The unmanned airborne (UAV) laser spectrum radar has played a leading role in remote sensing because the transmitter and the receiver are together at laser spectrum radar. The advantages of the integrated transceiver laser spectrum radar is that it can be used in the oil and gas pipeline leak detection patrol line which needs the non-contact reflective detection. The UAV laser spectrum radar can patrol the line and specially detect the swept the area are now in no man's land because most of the oil and gas pipelines are in no man's land. It can save labor costs compared to the manned aircraft and ensure the safety of the pilots. The UAV laser spectrum radar can be also applied in the post disaster relief which detects the gas composition before the firefighters entering the scene of the rescue.

  12. Haystack Ultrawideband Satellite Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    enable long-range imaging. In 2013, a major upgrade to the facility was completed, adding a millimeter - wave W-band radar capability to Haystack’s X...diameter antenna was completely rebuilt to provide a 100 μm root-mean-square (rms) surface accuracy to support operation at the 3 mm wave - length (W...electromagnetic wave propagation through the troposphere. − The signal processing system lev- eraged Lincoln Laboratory‘s Radar Open Systems

  13. Radar Imaging and Target Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-09

    Methods in Wave Propagation, Vaxjo, Swe- den. • February 19, 2008, "Radar Imaging", math colloquium, Brigham- Young University. • January 31, 2008...manuscript, namely "Radar detection using sparsely distributed 19 apertures in urban environments", Ling Wang, II- Young Son, Trond Varslot, C. Evren...Coinmun. COM- 20, pp. 774-780, 1972. [24] M. Tomlinson, "New automatic equalizer employing modulo arithmetic," Electron. Lett. 7, pp. 138-139, 1971

  14. Radar foundations for imaging and advanced concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Through courses internally taught at IDA, Dr. Roger Sullivan has devised a book that brings readers fully up to speed on the most essential quantitave aspects of general radar in order to introduce study of the most exciting and relevant applications to radar imaging and advanced concepts: Synthetic Aperture Radar (4 chapters), Space-time Adaptive Processing, moving target indication (MTI), bistatic radar, low probability of intercept (LPI) radar, weather radar, and ground-penetrating radar. Whether you're a radar novice or experienced professional, this is an essential refer

  15. Autofocus technique for three-dimensional imaging, direct-detection laser radar using Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode focal-plane array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Min Seok; Kong, Hong Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Jo, Sung Eun

    2010-12-15

    An autofocus technique is proposed for a three-dimensional imaging, direct-detection laser radar system that uses a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode focal plane array (GmAPD-FPA). This technique is implemented by pointing laser pulses on a target of interest and observing its scattered photon distribution on a GmAPD-FPA. Measuring the standard deviation of the photon distribution on a GmAPD-FPA enables the best focus condition to be found. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated experimentally by employing a 1 × 8 pixel GmAPD-FPA. It is shown that the spatial resolution improves when the GmAPD-FPA is located in the best focus position found by the autofocus technique.

  16. Ocean wave imaging mechanism by imaging radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何宜军

    2000-01-01

    Analytical representations of the high frequency spectra of ocean wave and its variation due to the variation of ocean surface current are derived from the wave-number spectrum balance equation. The ocean surface imaging formulation of real aperture radar (RAR) is given using electromagnetic wave backscattering theory of ocean surface and the modulations of ocean surface winds, currents and their variations to RAR are described. A general representation of the phase modulation induced by the ocean surface motion is derived according to standard synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging theory. The detectability of ocean current and sea bottom topography by imaging radar is discussed. The results constitute the theoretical basis for detecting ocean wave fields, ocean surface winds, ocean surface current fields, sea bottom topography, internal wave and so on.

  17. Techniques for Effective Optical Noise Rejection in Amplitude-Modulated Laser Optical Radars for Underwater Three-Dimensional Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francucci M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Amplitude-modulated (AM laser imaging is a promising technology for the production of accurate three-dimensional (3D images of submerged scenes. The main challenge is that radiation scattered off water gives rise to a disturbing signal (optical noise that degrades more and more the quality of 3D images for increasing turbidity. In this paper, we summarize a series of theoretical findings, that provide valuable hints for the development of experimental methods enabling a partial rejection of optical noise in underwater imaging systems. In order to assess the effectiveness of these methods, which range from modulation/demodulation to polarimetry, we carried out a series of experiments by using the laboratory prototype of an AM 3D imager ( = 405 nm for marine archaeology surveys, in course of realization at the ENEA Artificial Vision Laboratory (Frascati, Rome. The obtained results confirm the validity of the proposed methods for optical noise rejection.

  18. Techniques for Effective Optical Noise Rejection in Amplitude-Modulated Laser Optical Radars for Underwater Three-Dimensional Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ricci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Amplitude-modulated (AM laser imaging is a promising technology for the production of accurate three-dimensional (3D images of submerged scenes. The main challenge is that radiation scattered off water gives rise to a disturbing signal (optical noise that degrades more and more the quality of 3D images for increasing turbidity. In this paper, we summarize a series of theoretical findings, that provide valuable hints for the development of experimental methods enabling a partial rejection of optical noise in underwater imaging systems. In order to assess the effectiveness of these methods, which range from modulation/demodulation to polarimetry, we carried out a series of experiments by using the laboratory prototype of an AM 3D imager (λ = 405 nm for marine archaeology surveys, in course of realization at the ENEA Artificial Vision Laboratory (Frascati, Rome. The obtained results confirm the validity of the proposed methods for optical noise rejection.

  19. Artifacts in Radar Imaging of Moving Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    leads to the wrong object localization and defocusing on the image. For SAR , a moving target’s physical location varies throughout the imaging...Imaging, Synthetic Aperture Radar, Bistatic Radar, Multistatic Radar, Moving Targets, Backprojection 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 133 16. PRICE CODE 17...broadening and range errors were introduced by target motion. This leads to incorrect object localization and defocusing on the image. For SAR , a

  20. High accuracy 3-D laser radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck, Jens; Heiselberg, Henning

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a mono-static staring 3-D laser radar based on gated viewing with range accuracy below 1 m at 10 m and 1 cm at 100. We use a high sensitivity, fast, intensified CCD camera, and a Nd:Yag passively Q-switched 32.4 kHz pulsed green laser at 532 nm. The CCD has 752x582 pixels. Camera...

  1. Influences of weather phenomena on automotive laser radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasshofer, R. H.; Spies, M.; Spies, H.

    2011-07-01

    Laser radar (lidar) sensors provide outstanding angular resolution along with highly accurate range measurements and thus they were proposed as a part of a high performance perception system for advanced driver assistant functions. Based on optical signal transmission and reception, laser radar systems are influenced by weather phenomena. This work provides an overview on the different physical principles responsible for laser radar signal disturbance and theoretical investigations for estimation of their influence. Finally, the transmission models are applied for signal generation in a newly developed laser radar target simulator providing - to our knowledge - worldwide first HIL test capability for automotive laser radar systems.

  2. Space Radar Image of Bahia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is a color composite image of southern Bahia, Brazil, centered at 15.22 degree south latitude and 39.07 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 38th orbit of Earth on October 2, 1994. The image covers an area centered over the Una Biological Reserve, one the largest protected areas in northeastern Brazil. The 7,000-hectare reserve is administered by the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and is part of the larger Atlantic coastal forest, a narrow band of rain forest extending along the eastern coast of Brazil. The Atlantic coastal forest of southern Bahia is one of the world's most threatened and diverse ecosystems. Due to widespread settlement, only 2 to 5 percent of the original forest cover remains. Yet the region still contains an astounding variety of plants and animals, including a large number of endemic species. More than half of the region's tree species and 80 percent of its animal species are indigenous and found nowhere else on Earth. The Una Reserve is also the only federally protected habitat for the golden-headed lion tamarin, the yellow-breasted capuchin monkey and many other endangered species. In the past few years, scientists from Brazilian and international conservation organizations have coordinated efforts to study the biological diversity of this region and to develop practical and economically viable options for preserving the remaining primary forests in southern Bahia. The shuttle imaging radar is used in this study to identify various land uses and vegetation types, including remaining patches of primary forest, cabruca forest (cacao planted in the understory of the native forest), secondary forest, pasture and coastal mangrove. Standard remote-sensing technology that relies on light reflected from the forest canopy cannot accurately distinguish between cabruca and undisturbed forest. Optical remote sensing is also

  3. Imaging radar polarimetry - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present a tutorial review of the broad sweep of topics relating to imaging radar polarimetry, ranging from mathematical foundations to hardware and from implementation approaches to signal processing and calibration. The authors examine current developments in sensor technology and implementation for recording polarimetric measurements, and describe techniques and areas of application for this form of remotely sensed data. Those aspects of ground signal processing and calibration peculiar to the polarimetric signals are addressed. Several of the currently operating instruments and some of the implementations planned for future use are discussed.

  4. Comparing Accuracy of Airborne Laser Scanning and TerraSAR-X Radar Images in the Estimation of Plot-Level Forest Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Hyyppä

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we compared the accuracy of low-pulse airborne laser scanning (ALS data, multi-temporal high-resolution noninterferometric TerraSAR-X radar data and a combined feature set derived from these data in the estimation of forest variables at plot level. The TerraSAR-X data set consisted of seven dual-polarized (HH/HV or VH/VV Stripmap mode images from all seasons of the year. We were especially interested in distinguishing between the tree species. The dependent variables estimated included mean volume, basal area, mean height, mean diameter and tree species-specific mean volumes. Selection of best possible feature set was based on a genetic algorithm (GA. The nonparametric k-nearest neighbour (k-NN algorithm was applied to the estimation. The research material consisted of 124 circular plots measured at tree level and located in the vicinity of Espoo, Finland. There are large variations in the elevation and forest structure in the study area, making it demanding for image interpretation. The best feature set contained 12 features, nine of them originating from the ALS data and three from the TerraSAR-X data. The relative RMSEs for the best performing feature set were 34.7% (mean volume, 28.1% (basal area, 14.3% (mean height, 21.4% (mean diameter, 99.9% (mean volume of Scots pine, 61.6% (mean volume of Norway spruce and 91.6% (mean volume of deciduous tree species. The combined feature set outperformed an ALS-based feature set marginally; in fact, the latter was better in the case of species-specific volumes. Features from TerraSAR-X alone performed poorly. However, due to favorable temporal resolution, satellite-borne radar imaging is a promising data source for updating large-area forest inventories based on low-pulse ALS.

  5. Bistatic Forward Scattering Radar Detection and Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Forward Scattering Radar (FSR) is a special type of bistatic radar that can implement image detection, imaging, and identification using the forward scattering signals provided by the moving targets that cross the baseline between the transmitter and receiver. Because the forward scattering effect has a vital significance in increasing the targets’ Radar Cross Section (RCS), FSR is quite advantageous for use in counter stealth detection. This paper first introduces the front line technology u...

  6. Shuttle Imaging Radar Survey Mission C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Abstract: Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) was part of an imaging radar system that was flown on board two Space Shuttle flights (9 - 20 April, 1994 and 30...

  7. Shuttle Imaging Radar Survey Mission C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) was part of an imaging radar system that was flown on board two Space Shuttle flights (9 - 20 April, 1994 and 30 September - 11...

  8. Laser radar monitoring of tropospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devara, P. C. S.; Raj, P. Ernest; Londhe, A. L.

    1989-04-01

    A bistatic laser radar (using a continuous wave argon ion laser) installed at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, for remote sounding of atmospheric aerosol characteristics has been briefly described. The day-to-day and height-time variations in the vertical distribution of aerosol number density (up to 3680 m AGL) have been studied by operating the radar on 6 clear days during nighttime in the month of April 1987. The results of the study indicated the formation and redistribution of aerosol layer structure in the lower altitudes (up to 1800 m). Also, conspicuous differences in the height distribution of aerosol number density were noticed between the post-sunset and pre-sunrise periods. The observed features have been explained on the basis of aerosol transport and diffusion processes occurring in the nocturnal urban atmosphere.

  9. 18th International Laser Radar Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Neuber, Roland; Rairoux, Patrick; Wandinger, Ulla

    1997-01-01

    Lidar or laser radar, the depth-resolved remote measurement of atmospheric parameters with optical means, has become an important tool in the field of atmospheric and environmental remote sensing. In this volume the latest progress in the development of lidar methods, experiments, and applications is described. The content is based on selected and thoroughly refereed papers presented at the 18th International Laser Radar Conference, Berlin, 22-26 July 1996. The book is divided into six parts which cover the topics of tropospheric aerosols and clouds, lidar in space, wind, water vapor, troposheric trace gases and plumes, and stratospheric and mesospheric profiling. As a supplement to fundamental lidar textbooks this volume may serve as a guide for scientists, engineers, and graduate students through the blossoming field of modern lidar techniques and their contribution to atmospheric and environmental research.

  10. Classification of Agricultural Crops in Radar Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, P.

    1983-01-01

    For the past few years an accurate X-band SLAR system with digital recording has been available in The Netherlands. The images of this system are corrected to indicate radar backscatter coefficients (gamma) instead of arbitrary greytones. In 1980 a radar measurement campaign was organized in the

  11. 基于面阵探测器的凝视成像激光雷达%The Staring Imaging Laser Radar Based on Plane Array Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严惠民; 胡剑; 张秀达; 方毅; 王鹏鹏; 冯华君

    2013-01-01

      本文介绍了一种基于面阵探测器的凝视成像激光雷达系统。整个系统分为三部分,第一部分是脉冲激光发射系统,采用中心波长为808 nm 的半导体堆叠激光器作为光源;第二部分是接收系统,由成像物镜,像增强器和面阵探测器组成。第三部分是计算机图像数据采集处理系统。系统使用分时的两次测量法,先后用恒定增益和线性增益两种方式对接收到的光强进行调制,由这两次测量得到的光强信息解调出距离信息。文章分析了系统的噪声特性,对给定的系统参数用仿真软件估计了距离误差。实验表明,系统的实际距离分辨力和仿真分析得到的距离分辨力相符。%In order to quickly obtain the three-dimensional structural information of targets, a staring imaging laser radar system is developed. The system consists of three parts. The first part is that of light emission. The pulsed laser diode stack with center wavelength of 808 nm was used. The second part is the receiver which is made up of objective lens, image intensifier and CCD camera. The third part is that of image capture and processing. Two images with constant gain modulation and linear gain modulation were obtained in two measurements, and the distance information was demodulated. The error based on noise model was analyzed and estimated for given parameters. Some experiments were made and the results were consistent with theoretical analysis.

  12. 3D Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    GPiR (ground-penetrating imaging radar) is a new technology for mapping the shallow subsurface, including society’s underground infrastructure. Applications for this technology include efficient and precise mapping of buried utilities on a large scale.

  13. Application Research on Space Laser Communication in Bistatic Radar System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓萍; 韩绍坤; 郝小宁

    2003-01-01

    There exist three synchronizing problems in the bistatic radar system that some signals of the radar receiver must be synchronized with those of the radar transmitter. Several methods realizing data transmission, which are used to complete the synchronization existing in the bistatic radar system, are described. Then a new idea is brought forward that employs space laser communication in the bistatic radar system to realize its data transmission. The theoretic analysis of the idea's usability and its merits are discussed in details. Finally the latest development of space laser communication is introduced, and the utility of the idea is pointed out further.

  14. Through-the-wall radar imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Moeness G

    2011-01-01

    Wall Attenuation and Dispersion, A. Hussein Muqaibel, M.A. Alsunaidi, Nuruddeen M. Iya, and A. Safaai-JaziAntenna Elements, Arrays, and Systems for Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging, A. Hoorfar and A. FathyBeamforming for Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging, G. Alli and D. DiFilippoImage and Localization of Behind-the-Wall Targets Using Collocated and Distributed Apertures, Y.D. Zhang and A. HuntConventional and Emerging Waveforms for Detection and Imaging of Targets behind Walls, F. Ahmad and R.M. NarayananInverse Scattering Approaches in Through-the-Wall Imaging, K. Sarabandi, M. Thiel, M. Dehmollai

  15. Study on Effectiveness of the chaos laser radar

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    A laser is widely applied for measurements, since it is invented. There are two types of laser distance meter for short and long distance. For long distance, a laser radar using propagation time of laser light is used. Generally, a distance is measured from delay time using either a periodic signal or a single pulse. But the signal becomes to be buried in noise with increasing distance. A new type of chaos laser radar which processes by only an addition is proposed. This radar can quickly pro...

  16. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  17. Space radar image of New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This radar image of the New York city metropolitan area. The island of Manhattan appears in the center of the image. The green-colored rectangle on Manhattan is Central Park. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/ X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 10, 1994. North is toward the upper right. The area shown is 75.0 kilometers by 48.8 kilometers (46.5 miles by 30.2 miles). The image is centered at 40.7 degrees north latitude and 73.8 degrees west longitude. In general, light blue areas correspond to dense urban development, green areas to moderately vegetated zones and black areas to bodies of water. The Hudson River is the black strip that runs from the left edge to the upper right corner of the image. It separates New Jersey, in the upper left of the image, from New York. The Atlantic Ocean is at the bottom of the image where two barrier islands along the southern shore of Long Island are also visible. John F. Kennedy International Airport is visible above these islands. Long Island Sound, separating Long Island from Connecticut, is the dark area right of the center of the image. Many bridges are visible in the image, including the Verrazano Narrows, George Washington and Brooklyn bridges. The radar illumination is from the left of the image; this causes some urban zones to appear red because the streets are at a perpendicular angle to the radar pulse. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received). Radar images like this one could be used as a tool for city planners and resource managers to map and monitor land use patterns. The radar imaging systems can clearly detect the variety of landscapes in the area, as well as the density of urban

  18. Space Radar Image of Central Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of the central part of the island of Sumatra in Indonesia that shows how the tropical rainforest typical of this country is being impacted by human activity. Native forest appears in green in this image, while prominent pink areas represent places where the native forest has been cleared. The large rectangular areas have been cleared for palm oil plantations. The bright pink zones are areas that have been cleared since 1989, while the dark pink zones are areas that were cleared before 1989. These radar data were processed as part of an effort to assist oil and gas companies working in the area to assess the environmental impact of both their drilling operations and the activities of the local population. Radar images are useful in these areas because heavy cloud cover and the persistent smoke and haze associated with deforestation have prevented usable visible-light imagery from being acquired since 1989. The dark shapes in the upper right (northeast) corner of the image are a chain of lakes in flat coastal marshes. This image was acquired in October 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. Environmental changes can be easily documented by comparing this image with visible-light data that were acquired in previous years by the Landsat satellite. The image is centered at 0.9 degrees north latitude and 101.3 degrees east longitude. The area shown is 50 kilometers by 100 kilometers (31 miles by 62 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; blue is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  19. Space Radar Image of Central Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of the central part of the island of Sumatra in Indonesia that shows how the tropical rainforest typical of this country is being impacted by human activity. Native forest appears in green in this image, while prominent pink areas represent places where the native forest has been cleared. The large rectangular areas have been cleared for palm oil plantations. The bright pink zones are areas that have been cleared since 1989, while the dark pink zones are areas that were cleared before 1989. These radar data were processed as part of an effort to assist oil and gas companies working in the area to assess the environmental impact of both their drilling operations and the activities of the local population. Radar images are useful in these areas because heavy cloud cover and the persistent smoke and haze associated with deforestation have prevented usable visible-light imagery from being acquired since 1989. The dark shapes in the upper right (northeast) corner of the image are a chain of lakes in flat coastal marshes. This image was acquired in October 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. Environmental changes can be easily documented by comparing this image with visible-light data that were acquired in previous years by the Landsat satellite. The image is centered at 0.9 degrees north latitude and 101.3 degrees east longitude. The area shown is 50 kilometers by 100 kilometers (31 miles by 62 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; blue is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  20. CS Radar Imaging via Adaptive CAMP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present results on application of Compressive Sensing (CS) to high resolution radar imaging and pro- pose the adaptive Complex Approximate Message Passing (CAMP) algorithm for image reconstruction. CS provides a theoretical framework that guarantees, under certain assumptions,

  1. CS Radar Imaging via Adaptive CAMP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present results on application of Compressive Sensing (CS) to high resolution radar imaging and pro- pose the adaptive Complex Approximate Message Passing (CAMP) algorithm for image reconstruction. CS provides a theoretical framework that guarantees, under certain assumptions, recon

  2. Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W [Albuquerque, NM; Jordan, Jay D [Albuquerque, NM; Kim, Theodore J [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

  3. Space Radar Image of Star City, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the Star City cosmonaut training center, east of Moscow, Russia. Four American astronauts are training here for future long-duration flights aboard the Russian Mir space station. These joint flights are giving NASA and the Russian Space Agency experience necessary for the construction of the international Alpha space station, beginning in late 1997. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), on its 62nd orbit on October 3, 1994. This Star City image is centered at 55.55 degrees north latitude and 38.0 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 32 kilometers by 49 kilometers (20 miles by 30 miles). North is to the top in this image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The image was produced using three channels of SIR-C radar data: red indicates L-band (23 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and received); green indicates L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue indicates C-band (6 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In general, dark pink areas are agricultural; pink and light blue areas are urban communities; black areas represent lakes and rivers; dark blue areas are cleared forest; and light green areas are forested. The prominent black runways just right of center are Shchelkovo Airfield, about 4 km long. The textured pale blue-green area east and southeast of Shchelkovo Airfield is forest. Just east of the runways is a thin railroad line running southeast; the Star City compound lies just east of the small bend in the rail line. Star City contains the living quarters and training facilities for Russian cosmonauts and their families. Moscow's inner loop road is visible at the lower left edge of the image. The Kremlin is just off the left edge, on the banks of the meandering Moskva River. The Klyazma River snakes to the southeast from the reservoir in the upper left (shown in bright red

  4. High Accuracy and Real-Time Gated Viewing Laser Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Li; Hua-Jun Yang; Shan-Pei Zhou

    2011-01-01

    A gated viewing laser radar has an excellent performance in underwater low light level imaging,and it also provides a viable solution to inhibit backscattering.In this paper,a gated viewing imaging system according to the demand for real-time imaging is presented,and then the simulation is used to analyze the performance of the real-time gated viewing system.The range accuracy performance is limited by the slice number,the width of gate,the delay time step,the initial delay time,as well as the system noise and atmospheric turbulence.The simulation results indicate that the highest range accuracy can be achieved when the system works with the optimal parameters.Finally,how to choose the optimal parameters has been researched.

  5. Triangulation using synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Howington-Kraus, Annie E.

    1991-01-01

    For the extraction of topographic information about Venus from stereoradar images obtained from the Magellan Mission, a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) compilation system was developed on analytical stereoplotters. The system software was extensively tested by using stereoradar images from various spacecraft and airborne radar systems, including Seasat, SIR-B, ERIM XCL, and STAR-1. Stereomodeling from radar images was proven feasible, and development is on a correct approach. During testing, the software was enhanced and modified to obtain more flexibility and better precision. Triangulation software for establishing control points by using SAR images was also developed through a joint effort with the Defense Mapping Agency. The SAR triangulation system comprises four main programs, TRIDATA, MODDATA, TRISAR, and SHEAR. The first two programs are used to sort and update the data; the third program, the main one, performs iterative statistical adjustment; and the fourth program analyzes the results. Also, input are flight data and data from the Global Positioning System and Inertial System (navigation information). The SAR triangulation system was tested with six strips of STAR-1 radar images on a VAX-750 computer. Each strip contains images of 10 minutes flight time (equivalent to a ground distance of 73.5 km); the images cover a ground width of 22.5 km. All images were collected from the same side. With an input of 44 primary control points, 441 ground control points were produced. The adjustment process converged after eight iterations. With a 6-m/pixel resolution of the radar images, the triangulation adjustment has an average standard elevation error of 81 m. Development of Magellan radargrammetry will be continued to convert both SAR compilation and triangulation systems into digital form.

  6. Compound Radar Approach for Breast Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Dallan; Sarafianou, Mantalena; Craddock, Ian J

    2017-01-01

    Multistatic radar apertures record scattering at a number of receivers when the target is illuminated by a single transmitter, providing more scattering information than its monostatic counterpart per transmission angle. This paper considers the well-known problem of detecting tumor targets within breast phantoms using multistatic radar. To accurately image potentially cancerous targets size within the breast, a significant number of multistatic channels are required in order to adequately calibrate-out unwanted skin reflections, increase the immunity to clutter, and increase the dynamic range of a breast radar imaging system. However, increasing the density of antennas within a physical array is inevitably limited by the geometry of the antenna elements designed to operate with biological tissues at microwave frequencies. A novel compound imaging approach is presented to overcome these physical constraints and improve the imaging capabilities of a multistatic radar imaging modality for breast scanning applications. The number of transmit-receive (TX-RX) paths available for imaging are increased by performing a number of breast scans with varying array positions. A skin calibration method is presented to reduce the influence of skin reflections from each channel. Calibrated signals are applied to receive a beamforming method, compounding the data from each scan to produce a microwave radar breast profile. The proposed imaging method is evaluated with experimental data obtained from constructed phantoms of varying complexity, skin contour asymmetries, and challenging tumor positions and sizes. For each imaging scenario outlined in this study, the proposed compound imaging technique improves skin calibration, clearly detects small targets, and substantially reduces the level of undesirable clutter within the profile.

  7. Bistatic Forward Scattering Radar Detection and Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Forward Scattering Radar (FSR is a special type of bistatic radar that can implement image detection, imaging, and identification using the forward scattering signals provided by the moving targets that cross the baseline between the transmitter and receiver. Because the forward scattering effect has a vital significance in increasing the targets’ Radar Cross Section (RCS, FSR is quite advantageous for use in counter stealth detection. This paper first introduces the front line technology used in forward scattering RCS, FSR detection, and Shadow Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (SISAR imaging and key problems such as the statistical characteristics of forward scattering clutter, accurate parameter estimation, and multitarget discrimination are then analyzed. Subsequently, the current research progress in FSR detection and SISAR imaging are described in detail, including the theories and experiments. In addition, with reference to the BeiDou navigation satellite, the results of forward scattering experiments in civil aircraft detection are shown. Finally, this paper considers future developments in FSR target detection and imaging and presents a new, promising technique for stealth target detection.

  8. Space Radar Image of Tuva, Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image shows part of the remote central Asian region of Tuva, an autonomous republic of the Russian Federation. Tuva is a mostly mountainous region that lies between western Mongolia and southern Siberia. This image shows the area just south of the republic's capital of Kyzyl. Most of the red, pink and blue areas in the image are agricultural fields of a large collective farming complex that was developed during the era of the Soviet Union. Traditional agricultural activity in the region, still active in remote areas, revolves around practices of nomadic livestock herding. White areas on the image are north-facing hillsides, which develop denser forests than south-facing slopes. The river in the upper right is one of the two major branches of the Yenesey River. Tuva has received some notoriety in recent years due to the intense interest of the celebrated Caltech physicist Dr. Richard Feynman, chronicled in the book 'Tuva or Bust' by Ralph Leighton. The image was acquired by Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band SyntheticAperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour onOctober 1, 1994. The image is 56 kilometers by 74 kilometers (35 miles by 46 miles) and is centered at 51.5 degrees north latitude, 95.1 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar fequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted andreceived; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted and verticallyreceived. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to PlanetEarth program.

  9. Coherent Doppler Laser Radar: Technology Development and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating, developing, and applying coherent Doppler laser radar technology for over 30 years. These efforts have included the first wind measurement in 1967, the first airborne flights in 1972, the first airborne wind field mapping in 1981, and the first measurement of hurricane eyewall winds in 1998. A parallel effort at MSFC since 1982 has been the study, modeling and technology development for a space-based global wind measurement system. These endeavors to date have resulted in compact, robust, eyesafe lidars at 2 micron wavelength based on solid-state laser technology; in a factor of 6 volume reduction in near diffraction limited, space-qualifiable telescopes; in sophisticated airborne scanners with full platform motion subtraction; in local oscillator lasers capable of rapid tuning of 25 GHz for removal of relative laser radar to target velocities over a 25 km/s range; in performance prediction theory and simulations that have been validated experimentally; and in extensive field campaign experience. We have also begun efforts to dramatically improve the fundamental photon efficiency of the laser radar, to demonstrate advanced lower mass laser radar telescopes and scanners; to develop laser and laser radar system alignment maintenance technologies; and to greatly improve the electrical efficiency, cooling technique, and robustness of the pulsed laser. This coherent Doppler laser radar technology is suitable for high resolution, high accuracy wind mapping; for aerosol and cloud measurement; for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric and trace gases; for hard target range and velocity measurement; and for hard target vibration spectra measurement. It is also suitable for a number of aircraft operations applications such as clear air turbulence (CAT) detection; dangerous wind shear (microburst) detection; airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip measurement; and fuel savings through

  10. Space Radar Image of Reunion Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the volcanic island of Reunion, about 700 km (434 miles) east of Madagascar in the southwest Indian Ocean. The southern half of the island is dominated by the active volcano, Piton de la Fournaise. This is one of the world's most active volcanoes, with more than 100 eruptions in the last 300 years. The most recent activity occurred in the vicinity of Dolomieu Crater, shown in the lower center of the image within a horseshoe-shaped collapse zone. Recent lava flows appear in shades of red, purple and orange. Light green areas are heavily vegetated forest, while much of the purple area near the coast is farmland. The radar illumination is from the left side of the image and dramatically emphasizes the precipitous cliffs at the edges of the central canyons of the island. These canyons are remnants from the collapse of formerly active parts of the volcanoes that built the island. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 5, 1994. The image is centered at 21.2 degrees south latitude, 55.6 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 50 km by 80 km (31 miles by 50 miles). North is toward the upper right. Colors are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  11. Laser Radar Receiver Performance Improvement by Inter Symbol Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuesong; Inoue, Daisuke; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Kagami, Manabu

    The power of laser radar received echoes varies over a large range due to many factors such as target distance, size, reflection ratio, etc, which leads to the difficulty of decoding codes from the received noise buried signals for spectrum code modulated laser radar. Firstly, a pseudo-random noise (PN) code modulated laser radar model is given, and the problem to be addressed is discussed. Then, a novel method based on Inter Symbol Interference (ISI) is proposed for resolving the problem, providing that only Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) exists. The ISI effect is introduced by using a high pass filter (HPF). The results show that ISI improves laser radar receiver decoding ratio, thus the peak of the correlation function of decoded codes and modulation codes. Finally, the effect of proposed method is verified by a simple experiment.

  12. Compressive sensing for high resolution radar imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present some preliminary results on the application of Compressive Sensing (CS) to high resolution radar imaging. CS is a recently developed theory which allows reconstruction of sparse signals with a number of measurements much lower than what is required by the Shannon sampling th

  13. Algorithm for Fast Registration of Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Rakshit

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Radar imagery provides an all-weather and 24 h coverage, making it ideal for critical defence applications. In some applications, multiple images acquired of an area need to be registered for further processing. Such situations arise for battlefield surveillance based on satellite imagery. The registration has to be done between an earlier (reference image and a new (live image. For automated surveillance, registration is a prerequisite for change detection. Speed is essential due to large volumes of data involved and the need for quick responses. The registration transformation is quite simple, being mainly a global translation. (Scale and rotation corrections can be applied based on known camera parameters. The challenge lies in the fact that the radar images are not as feature-rich as optical images and the image content variation can be as high as 90 per cent. Even though the change on the ground may not be drastic, seasonal variations can significantly alter the radar signatures of ground, vegetation, and water bodies. This necessitates a novel approach different from the techniques developed for optical images. An algorithm has been developed that leads to fast registration of radar images, even in the presence of specular noise and significant scene content variation. The key features of this approach are adaptability to sensor/terrain types, ability to handle large content variations and false positive rejection. The present work shows that this algorithm allows for various cost-performance trade-offs, making it suitable for a wide variety of applications. The algorithm, in various cost-performance configurations, is tested on a set of ERS images. Results of such tests have been reported, indicating the performance of the algorithm for various cost-performance trade-offs.

  14. Space radar image of Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This image of the Mauna Loa volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii shows the capability of imaging radar to map lava flows and other volcanic structures. Mauna Loa has erupted more than 35 times since the island was first visited by westerners in the early 1800s. The large summit crater, called Mokuaweoweo Caldera, is clearly visible near the center of the image. Leading away from the caldera (towards top right and lower center) are the two main rift zones shown here in orange. Rift zones are areas of weakness within the upper part of the volcano that are often ripped open as new magma (molten rock) approaches the surface at the start of an eruption. The most recent eruption of Mauna Loa was in March and April 1984, when segments of the northeast rift zones were active. If the height of the volcano was measured from its base on the ocean floor instead of from sea level, Mauna Loa would be the tallest mountain on Earth. Its peak (center of the image) rises more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) above the ocean floor. The South Kona District, known for cultivation of macadamia nuts and coffee, can be seen in the lower left as white and blue areas along the coast. North is toward the upper left. The area shown is 41.5 by 75 kilometers (25.7 by 46.5 miles), centered at 19.5 degrees north latitude and 155.6 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/ X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 36th orbit on October 2, 1994. The radar illumination is from the left of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received). The resulting color combinations in this radar image are caused by differences in surface roughness of the lava flows. Smoother flows

  15. Digital image transformation and rectification of spacecraft and radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The application of digital processing techniques to spacecraft television pictures and radar images is discussed. The use of digital rectification to produce contour maps from spacecraft pictures is described; images with azimuth and elevation angles are converted into point-perspective frame pictures. The digital correction of the slant angle of radar images to ground scale is examined. The development of orthophoto and stereoscopic shaded relief maps from digital terrain and digital image data is analyzed. Digital image transformations and rectifications are utilized on Viking Orbiter and Lander pictures of Mars.

  16. Techniques for Radar Imaging Based on MUSIC Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    At first, the radar target scattering centers model and MUSIC algorithm are analyzed in this paper. How to efficiently set the parameters of the MUSIC algorithms is given by a great deal of simulated radar data in experiments. After that, according to measured data from two kinds of plane targets on fully polarized and high range resolution radar system, the author mainly investigated particular utilization of MUSIC algorithm in radar imaging. And two-dimensional radar images are generated for two targets measured in compact range. In the end, a conclusion is drew about the relation of radar target scattering properties and imaging results.

  17. Biometric identification using holographic radar imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Kennedy, Mike O.; Foote, Harlen P.

    2007-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have been at the forefront of developing innovative screening systems to enhance security and a novel imaging system to provide custom-fit clothing using holographic radar imaging techniques. First-of-a-kind cylindrical holographic imaging systems have been developed to screen people at security checkpoints for the detection of concealed, body worn, non-metallic threats such as plastic and liquid explosives, knifes and contraband. Another embodiment of this technology is capable of obtaining full sized body measurements in near real time without the person under surveillance removing their outer garments. Radar signals readily penetrate clothing and reflect off the water in skin. This full body measurement system is commercially available for best fitting ready to wear clothing, which was the first "biometric" application for this technology. One compelling feature of this technology for security biometric applications is that it can see effectively through disguises, appliances and body hair.

  18. Space Radar Image of Sudan Collision Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of a region in northern Sudan called the Keraf Suture that reveals newly discovered geologic features buried beneath layers of sand. This discovery is being used to guide field studies of the region and has opened up new perspectives on old problems, such as what controls the course of the Nile, a question that has perplexed geologists for centuries. The Nile is the yellowish/green line that runs from the top to the bottom of the image. A small town, Abu Dis, can be seen as the bright, white area on the east (right) bank of the Nile (about a third of the way down from the top) at the mouth of a dry stream valley or 'wadi' that drains into the river. Wadis flowing into the Nile from both east and west stand out as dark, reddish branch-like drainage patterns. The bright pink area on the west (left) side of the Nile is a region where rocks are exposed, but the area east (right) of the Nile is obscured by layers of sand, a few inches to several feet thick. Virtually everything visible on the right side of this radar image is invisible when standing on the ground or when viewing photographs or satellite images such as the United States' Landsat or the French SPOT satellite. A sharp, straight fault cuts diagonally across the image, to the right of the Nile river. The area between the fault and the Nile is part of the collision zone where the ancient continents of East and West Gondwana crashed into each other to form the supercontinent Greater Gondwana more than 600 million years ago. On this image, the Nile approaches but never crosses the fault, indicating that this fault seems to be controlling the course of the Nile in this part of Sudan. The image is centered at 19.5 degrees north latitude, 33.35 degrees east longitude, and shows an area approximately 18 km by 20 km (10 miles by 12 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: Red is L-band, vertically transmitted and vertically

  19. Space Radar Image of Sydney, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image is dominated by the metropolitan area of Australia's largest city, Sydney. Sydney Harbour, with numerous coves and inlets, is seen in the upper center of the image, and the roughly circular Botany Bay is shown in the lower right. The downtown business district of Sydney appears as a bright white area just above the center of the image. The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a white line adjacent to the downtown district. The well-known Sydney Opera House is the small, white dot to the right of the bridge. Urban areas appear yellow, blue and brown. The purple areas are undeveloped areas and park lands. Manly, the famous surfing beach, is shown in yellow at the top center of the image. Runways from the Sydney Airport are the dark features that extend into Botany Bay in the lower right. Botany Bay is the site where Captain James Cook first landed his ship, Endeavour, in 1770. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on April 20, 1994, onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. The area shown is 33 kilometers by 38kilometers (20 miles by 23 miles) and is centered at 33.9 degrees south latitude, 151.2 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left. The colors are assigned to different radar frequenciesand polarizations as follows: red is L-band, vertically transmittedand horizontally received; green is C-band, vertically transmitted and horizontally received; and blue is C-band, vertically transmittedand received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italianand United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. #####

  20. Space Radar Image of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is a deformation map of the south flank of Kilauea volcano on the big island of Hawaii, centered at 19.5 degrees north latitude and 155.25 degrees west longitude. The map was created by combining interferometric radar data -- that is data acquired on different passes of the space shuttle which are then overlayed to obtain elevation information -- acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar during its first flight in April 1994 and its second flight in October 1994. The area shown is approximately 40 kilometers by 80 kilometers (25 miles by 50 miles). North is toward the upper left of the image. The colors indicate the displacement of the surface in the direction that the radar instrument was pointed (toward the right of the image) in the six months between images. The analysis of ground movement is preliminary, but appears consistent with the motions detected by the Global Positioning System ground receivers that have been used over the past five years. The south flank of the Kilauea volcano is among the most rapidly deforming terrains on Earth. Several regions show motions over the six-month time period. Most obvious is at the base of Hilina Pali, where 10 centimeters (4 inches) or more of crustal deformation can be seen in a concentrated area near the coastline. On a more localized scale, the currently active Pu'u O'o summit also shows about 10 centimeters (4 inches) of change near the vent area. Finally, there are indications of additional movement along the upper southwest rift zone, just below the Kilauea caldera in the image. Deformation of the south flank is believed to be the result of movements along faults deep beneath the surface of the volcano, as well as injections of magma, or molten rock, into the volcano's 'plumbing' system. Detection of ground motions from space has proven to be a unique capability of imaging radar technology. Scientists hope to use deformation data acquired by SIR-C/X-SAR and future imaging

  1. Multistatic synthetic aperture radar image formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, V; Swoboda, J; Yarman, C E; Yazici, B

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we consider a multistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging scenario where a swarm of airborne antennas, some of which are transmitting, receiving or both, are traversing arbitrary flight trajectories and transmitting arbitrary waveforms without any form of multiplexing. The received signal at each receiving antenna may be interfered by the scattered signal due to multiple transmitters and additive thermal noise at the receiver. In this scenario, standard bistatic SAR image reconstruction algorithms result in artifacts in reconstructed images due to these interferences. In this paper, we use microlocal analysis in a statistical setting to develop a filtered-backprojection (FBP) type analytic image formation method that suppresses artifacts due to interference while preserving the location and orientation of edges of the scene in the reconstructed image. Our FBP-type algorithm exploits the second-order statistics of the target and noise to suppress the artifacts due to interference in a mean-square sense. We present numerical simulations to demonstrate the performance of our multistatic SAR image formation algorithm with the FBP-type bistatic SAR image reconstruction algorithm. While we mainly focus on radar applications, our image formation method is also applicable to other problems arising in fields such as acoustic, geophysical and medical imaging.

  2. Gated viewing and high-accuracy three-dimensional laser radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck, Jens; Heiselberg, Henning

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a fast and high-accuracy three-dimensional (3-D) imaging laser radar that can achieve better than 1 mm range accuracy for half a million pixels in less than 1 s. Our technique is based on range-gating segmentation. We combine the advantages of gated viewing with our new fast...

  3. Gated viewing and high-accuracy three-dimensional laser radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck, Jens; Heiselberg, Henning

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a fast and high-accuracy three-dimensional (3-D) imaging laser radar that can achieve better than 1 mm range accuracy for half a million pixels in less than 1 s. Our technique is based on range-gating segmentation. We combine the advantages of gated viewing with our new fast...

  4. Space Radar Image of Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This image of Houston, Texas, shows the amount of detail that is possible to obtain using spaceborne radar imaging. Images such as this -- obtained by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying aboard the space shuttle Endeavor last fall -- can become an effective tool for urban planners who map and monitor land use patterns in urban, agricultural and wetland areas. Central Houston appears pink and white in the upper portion of the image, outlined and crisscrossed by freeways. The image was obtained on October 10, 1994, during the space shuttle's 167th orbit. The area shown is 100 kilometers by 60 kilometers (62 miles by 38 miles) and is centered at 29.38 degrees north latitude, 95.1 degrees west longitude. North is toward the upper left. The pink areas designate urban development while the green-and blue-patterned areas are agricultural fields. Black areas are bodies of water, including Galveston Bay along the right edge and the Gulf of Mexico at the bottom of the image. Interstate 45 runs from top to bottom through the image. The narrow island at the bottom of the image is Galveston Island, with the city of Galveston at its northeast (right) end. The dark cross in the upper center of the image is Hobby Airport. Ellington Air Force Base is visible below Hobby on the other side of Interstate 45. Clear Lake is the dark body of water in the middle right of the image. The green square just north of Clear Lake is Johnson Space Center, home of Mission Control and the astronaut training facilities. The black rectangle with a white center that appears to the left of the city center is the Houston Astrodome. The colors in this image were obtained using the follow radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received); green represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received). Spaceborne Imaging Radar

  5. Digital signal processing techniques and applications in radar image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Bu-Chin

    2008-01-01

    A self-contained approach to DSP techniques and applications in radar imagingThe processing of radar images, in general, consists of three major fields: Digital Signal Processing (DSP); antenna and radar operation; and algorithms used to process the radar images. This book brings together material from these different areas to allow readers to gain a thorough understanding of how radar images are processed.The book is divided into three main parts and covers:* DSP principles and signal characteristics in both analog and digital domains, advanced signal sampling, and

  6. Study on improvement in distance accuracy of the chaos laser radar

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    As one of the in-car radar, a laser radar is widely studied. Since the laser radar has a characteristic that the received signal becomes to be buried in noise with increasing distance, it needs high power laser.Then, a new type oof the chao laser radar has been stuied.Using chaos signal for the transmitted signal,this laser radar is relatively resistant to noise and can simply process because of using only additional process However, a distance resolution of the chaos laser radar is limited ...

  7. Control System of Unstacking Robot by Image-Based Modeling Using Laser Radar%基于激光雷达三维图像建模的机器人拆码垛控制系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏志强; 李兵; 屈玉丰; 沙群

    2013-01-01

    为满足智能化仓储系统对高速自动拆码垛系统的实际需求,给出一种基于激光雷达的机器人拆码垛控制系统,由激光雷达扫描构建周转箱的三维图像,通过建立相应的坐标系统及目标识别算法,计算出周转箱的中心位置坐标和偏转角等信息,并将信息传输给机器人,从而实现机器人拆垛操作.实际应用表明,系统运行稳定可靠,实现了预期的设计目标.%In order to meet the actual requirement for high - speed automatic unstacking and palletizing in intelligent warehouse system, a control system for unstacking robot based on laser radar is given. The three - dimensional image of the containers is established from laser radar scanning data,and the information of center position and the deflection angle of the containers is obtained by target recognition based on the established coordinates. The data information is then sent to the robot , and so the automatic unstacking operation is realized. Actual testing results indicate that the system is stable and reliable. The goal of anticipated design is achieved.

  8. Space Radar Image of Vesuvius, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Mt. Vesuvius, one of the best known volcanoes in the world primarily for the eruption that buried the Roman city of Pompeii, is shown in the center of this radar image. The central cone of Vesuvius is the dark purple feature in the center of the volcano. This cone is surrounded on the northern and eastern sides by the old crater rim, called Mt. Somma. Recent lava flows are the pale yellow areas on the southern and western sides of the cone. Vesuvius is part of a large volcanic zone which includes the Phalagrean Fields, the cluster of craters seen along the left side of the image. The Bay of Naples, on the left side of the image, is separated from the Gulf of Salerno, in the lower left, by the Sorrento Peninsula. Dense urban settlement can be seen around the volcano. The city of Naples is above and to the left of Vesuvius; the seaport of the city can be seen in the top of the bay. Pompeii is located just below the volcano on this image. The rapid eruption in 79 A.D. buried the victims and buildings of Pompeii under several meters of debris and killed more than 2,000 people. Due to the violent eruptive style and proximity to populated areas, Vesuvius has been named by the international scientific community as one of fifteen Decade Volcanoes which are being intensively studied during the 1990s. The image is centered at 40.83 degrees North latitude, 14.53 degrees East longitude. It shows an area 100 kilometers by 55 kilometers (62 miles by 34 miles.) This image was acquired on April 15, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  9. Laser radar technology and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Quebec, Canada, June 3-5, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, James M.; Harney, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on laser radar technology and applications are presented. The topics considered include: eye-safe solid lasers for lidar applications, practical DF laser for ranging applications, ultrafast surface barrier photodetectors, performance analyses for peak-detecting laser radars, multiple scattering for laser beams propagating in a layered atmosphere, laser radar cross section of objects immersed in the earth's atmosphere, measurements of pulse coherence in mode-locked TEA-CO2 lasers, and single longitudinal mode operation of a continuously tunable high pressure TE-CO2. Also discussed are: amplitude-modulated laser system for distance and displacement measurement, minilaser rangefinder, laser docking system radar flight experiment, improved optical resonator for laser radars, design of frequency-stable TEA-CO2 lasers, HgCdTe photodiodes for heterodyne applications, acoustooptic spectrum analyzer for laser radar applications, laser cloud mapper and its applications, scanning lidar bathymeter for water depth measurement, and fluorescence lidar for land and sea remote sensing.

  10. Radar Subsurface Imaging by Phase Shift Migration Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hui; Benedix, Wolf-Stefan; Plettemeier, Dirk; Ciarletti, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the phase shift migration based Syn- thetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is described and applied on radar imaging for dual polarized ground penetrating radar system (GPR). Conventional techniques for SAR imaging focusing use the matched filter concept and convolve the measurement data with a filter impulse response (convolution kernel) which is modified by the range. In fact, conventional techniques for SAR imaging technique can be considered as ray-tracing based SAR imaging technique....

  11. Radar Imaging and Target Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-24

    fast ISAR imaging algorithm, related to my work with Brett Borden, based on a suggestion from Emmanuel Cand~s. 4 Chapter 2 Current Status of Effort...were Lee Potter (Ohio State) , Miijdat 4ýetin (MIT), bf Alan Willsky (MIT), Todd Hale (AFIT), Brian Rigling (Wright State U., a for- mer student of...met Todd Hale and Marshall Greenspan (Norden Systems, Northrup Grum- man); the latter turned out to be on the same departing flight out of Huntsville

  12. Wavelet based hierarchical coding scheme for radar image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Wen; Jiao, Xiaoli; He, Jifeng

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents a wavelet based hierarchical coding scheme for radar image compression. Radar signal is firstly quantized to digital signal, and reorganized as raster-scanned image according to radar's repeated period frequency. After reorganization, the reformed image is decomposed to image blocks with different frequency band by 2-D wavelet transformation, each block is quantized and coded by the Huffman coding scheme. A demonstrating system is developed, showing that under the requirement of real time processing, the compression ratio can be very high, while with no significant loss of target signal in restored radar image.

  13. Radar imaging of solar system ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcke, Leif J.

    We map the planet Mercury and Jupiter's moons Ganymede and Callisto using Earth-based radar telescopes and find that all of these have regions exhibiting high, depolarized radar backscatter and polarization inversion (m c > 1). Both characteristics suggest significant volume scattering from water ice or similar cold-trapped volatiles. Synthetic aperture radar mapping of Mercury's north and south polar regions at fine (6 km) resolution at 3.5 cm wavelength corroborates the results of previous 13 cm investigations of enhanced backscatter and polarization inversion (0.9 caused by simple double-bounce geometries, since the bright, reflective regions do not appear on the radar-facing wall but, instead, in shadowed regions not directly aligned with the radar look direction. Thermal models require the existence of such a layer to preserve ice deposits in craters at other than high polar latitudes. The additional attenuation (factor 1.64 +/- 15%) of the 3.5 cm wavelength data from these experiments over previous 13 cm radar observations is consistent with a range of layer thickness from 0 +/- 11 to 35 +/- 15 cm, depending on the assumed scattering law exponent n. Our 3.5 cm wavelength bistatic aperture synthesis observations of the two outermost Galilean satellites of Jupiter, Ganymede and Callisto, resolve the north-south ambiguity of previous images, and confirm the disk-integrated enhanced backscatter and polarization inversion noted in prior investigations. The direct imaging technique more clearly shows that higher backscatter are as are associated with the terrain that has undergone recent resurfacing, such as the sulci and the impact crater basins. The leading hemispheres of both moons have somewhat higher (20% +/- 5%) depolarized echoes than their trailing hemispheres, suggesting additional wavelength-scale structure in the regolith. Two improvements to existing delay-Doppler techniques enhance data reduction. First, correlation using subsets of the standard

  14. Space Radar Image of Karisoke & Virunga Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is a false-color composite of Central Africa, showing the Virunga volcano chain along the borders of Rwanda, Zaire and Uganda. This area is home to the endangered mountain gorillas. The image was acquired on October 3, 1994, on orbit 58 of the space shuttle Endeavour by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). In this image red is the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received) polarization; green is the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received) polarization; and blue is the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received) polarization. The area is centered at about 2.4 degrees south latitude and 30.8 degrees east longitude. The image covers an area 56 kilometers by 70 kilometers (35 miles by 43 miles). The dark area at the top of the image is Lake Kivu, which forms the border between Zaire (to the right) and Rwanda (to the left). In the center of the image is the steep cone of Nyiragongo volcano, rising 3,465 meters (11,369 feet) high, with its central crater now occupied by a lava lake. To the left are three volcanoes, Mount Karisimbi, rising 4,500 meters (14,800 feet) high; Mount Sabinyo, rising 3,600 meters (12,000 feet) high; and Mount Muhavura, rising 4,100 meters (13,500 feet) high. To their right is Nyamuragira volcano, which is 3,053 meters (10,017 feet) tall, with radiating lava flows dating from the 1950s to the late 1980s. These active volcanoes constitute a hazard to the towns of Goma, Zaire and the nearby Rwandan refugee camps, located on the shore of Lake Kivu at the top left. This radar image highlights subtle differences in the vegetation of the region. The green patch to the center left of the image in the foothills of Karisimbi is a bamboo forest where the mountain gorillas live. The vegetation types in this area are an important factor in the habitat of mountain gorillas. Researchers at Rutgers University in New Jersey and the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund in London will use this data to produce

  15. Comparison of Image Processing Techniques using Random Noise Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    pseudo - random noise . The noise waveforms employed by the radar systems 9 are generally white and Gaussian, that is, the waveform’s power...2010. [5] Hardin, Joshua A. “Information Encoding on a Pseudo Random Noise Radar Waveform”, 2013. [6] Jackson, Julie A. “EENG 668/714 Advanced Radar ...COMPARISON OF IMAGE PROCESSING TECHNIQUES USING RANDOM NOISE RADAR THESIS Jesse Robert B. Cruz, Capt, USAF AFIT-ENG-14-M-22 DEPARTMENT OF THE

  16. Coherent laser radar at 3.6 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Frank; Lasher, Mark

    2002-12-20

    Coherent laser radar systems in the mid-IR wavelength region can have advantages in low-altitude environment because they are less sensitive to scattering, turbulence, and humidity, which can affect shorter- or longer-wavelength system. We describe a coherent laser radar at 3.6 microm based on a single-frequency optical parametric oscillator and demonstrate the system over short ranges outdoors. The system was used to make micro-Doppler measurements from idling trucks that were processed to give surface vibration spectra.

  17. SPace Radar Image of Mt. Pinatubo, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a false color L-band and C-band image of the area around Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines, centered at about 15 degrees north latitude, 120.5 degrees east longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on orbit 78 on April 13, 1994. The false-color composite is made by displaying the L-band HH return in red, the L-band HV return in green and the C-band HV return in blue. The area shown is approximately 45 by 68 kilometers (28 by 42 miles). The main volcanic crater on Mount Pinatubo produced by the June 1991 eruptions, and the steep slopes on the upper flanks of the volcano, are easily seen in this image. The red color on the high slopes show the rougher ash deposited during the 1991 eruption. The dark drainages are the smooth mudflows which continue to flood the river valleys after heavy rain. Radar images such as this one can be used to identify the areas flooded by mudflows, which are difficult to distinguish visually, and to assess the rate at which the erosion and deposition continues. A key aspect of the second SIR-C/X-SAR mission in August 1994 will be to collect a second image of Pinatubo during the summer monsoon season -- new mudflows will have occurred -- and to evaluate the short-term changes. The 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines is well known for its near-global effects on the atmosphere and climate due to the large amount of sulfur dioxide that was injected into the upper atmosphere. What is less widely known is that even today the volcano continues to be a major hazard to the people who have returned to the area around the volcano. Dangerous mudflows (called 'lahars') are often generated by heavy rains, and these can still sweep down river valleys and wash out roads and villages, or bury low lying areas in several meters of mud and volcanic debris. These mudflows will continue to be a severe hazard around Pinatubo for

  18. Space Radar Image of Colombian Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of a little known volcano in northern Colombia. The image was acquired on orbit 80 of space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994, by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). The volcano near the center of the image is located at 5.6 degrees north latitude, 75.0 degrees west longitude, about 100 kilometers (65 miles) southeast of Medellin, Colombia. The conspicuous dark spot is a lake at the bottom of an approximately 3-kilometer-wide (1.9-mile) volcanic collapse depression or caldera. A cone-shaped peak on the bottom left (northeast rim) of the caldera appears to have been the source for a flow of material into the caldera. This is the northern-most known volcano in South America and because of its youthful appearance, should be considered dormant rather than extinct. The volcano's existence confirms a fracture zone proposed in 1985 as the northern boundary of volcanism in the Andes. The SIR-C/X-SAR image reveals another, older caldera further south in Colombia, along another proposed fracture zone. Although relatively conspicuous, these volcanoes have escaped widespread recognition because of frequent cloud cover that hinders remote sensing imaging in visible wavelengths. Four separate volcanoes in the Northern Andes nations ofColombia and Ecuador have been active during the last 10 years, killing more than 25,000 people, including scientists who were monitoring the volcanic activity. Detection and monitoring of volcanoes from space provides a safe way to investigate volcanism. The recognition of previously unknown volcanoes is important for hazard evaluations because a number of major eruptions this century have occurred at mountains that were not previously recognized as volcanoes. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of

  19. 3D Imaging Millimeter Wave Circular Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renyuan; Cao, Siyang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new millimeter wave 3D imaging radar is proposed. The user just needs to move the radar along a circular track, and high resolution 3D imaging can be generated. The proposed radar uses the movement of itself to synthesize a large aperture in both the azimuth and elevation directions. It can utilize inverse Radon transform to resolve 3D imaging. To improve the sensing result, the compressed sensing approach is further investigated. The simulation and experimental result further illustrated the design. Because a single transceiver circuit is needed, a light, affordable and high resolution 3D mmWave imaging radar is illustrated in the paper. PMID:28629140

  20. Integrating Radar Image Data with Google Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Bruce D.; Gibas, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    A public Web site has been developed as a method for displaying the multitude of radar imagery collected by NASA s Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) instrument during its 16-year mission. Utilizing NASA s internal AIRSAR site, the new Web site features more sophisticated visualization tools that enable the general public to have access to these images. The site was originally maintained at NASA on six computers: one that held the Oracle database, two that took care of the software for the interactive map, and three that were for the Web site itself. Several tasks were involved in moving this complicated setup to just one computer. First, the AIRSAR database was migrated from Oracle to MySQL. Then the back-end of the AIRSAR Web site was updated in order to access the MySQL database. To do this, a few of the scripts needed to be modified; specifically three Perl scripts that query that database. The database connections were then updated from Oracle to MySQL, numerous syntax errors were corrected, and a query was implemented that replaced one of the stored Oracle procedures. Lastly, the interactive map was designed, implemented, and tested so that users could easily browse and access the radar imagery through the Google Maps interface.

  1. Application of laser radar to autonomous spacecraft landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleichman, Kurt; Tchoryk, Peter, Jr.; Sampson, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the scenario of an autonomous landing like that required for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission. An application of laser radar for conducting autonomous hazard detection and avoidance is discussed. A trade-study is performed to identify operational and implementation constraints as well as the state of the art in component technology.

  2. Advanced methods in synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragh, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    For over 50 years our world has been mapped and measured with synthetic aperture radar (SAR). A SAR system operates by transmitting a series of wideband radio-frequency pulses towards the ground and recording the resulting backscattered electromagnetic waves as the system travels along some one-dimensional trajectory. By coherently processing the recorded backscatter over this extended aperture, one can form a high-resolution 2D intensity map of the ground reflectivity, which we call a SAR image. The trajectory, or synthetic aperture, is achieved by mounting the radar on an aircraft, spacecraft, or even on the roof of a car traveling down the road, and allows for a diverse set of applications and measurement techniques for remote sensing applications. It is quite remarkable that the sub-centimeter positioning precision and sub-nanosecond timing precision required to make this work properly can in fact be achieved under such real-world, often turbulent, vibrationally intensive conditions. Although the basic principles behind SAR imaging and interferometry have been known for decades, in recent years an explosion of data exploitation techniques enabled by ever-faster computational horsepower have enabled some remarkable advances. Although SAR images are often viewed as simple intensity maps of ground reflectivity, SAR is also an exquisitely sensitive coherent imaging modality with a wealth of information buried within the phase information in the image. Some of the examples featured in this presentation will include: (1) Interferometric SAR, where by comparing the difference in phase between two SAR images one can measure subtle changes in ground topography at the wavelength scale. (2) Change detection, in which carefully geolocated images formed from two different passes are compared. (3) Multi-pass 3D SAR tomography, where multiple trajectories can be used to form 3D images. (4) Moving Target Indication (MTI), in which Doppler effects allow one to detect and

  3. Radar image preprocessing. [of SEASAT-A SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, V. S.; Stiles, J. A.; Holtzman, J. C.; Held, D. N.

    1980-01-01

    Standard image processing techniques are not applicable to radar images because of the coherent nature of the sensor. Therefore there is a need to develop preprocessing techniques for radar images which will then allow these standard methods to be applied. A random field model for radar image data is developed. This model describes the image data as the result of a multiplicative-convolved process. Standard techniques, those based on additive noise and homomorphic processing are not directly applicable to this class of sensor data. Therefore, a minimum mean square error (MMSE) filter was designed to treat this class of sensor data. The resulting filter was implemented in an adaptive format to account for changes in local statistics and edges. A radar image processing technique which provides the MMSE estimate inside homogeneous areas and tends to preserve edge structure was the result of this study. Digitally correlated Seasat-A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery was used to test the technique.

  4. Space Radar Image of Mammoth, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This image is a false-color composite of the Mammoth Mountain area in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, California. The image is centered at 37.6 degrees north latitude and 119.0 degrees west longitude. The area is approximately 11.5 kilometers by 78.3 kilometers (7.2 by 48.7 miles) in size. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard space shuttle Endeavour on its 40th orbit, April 11, 1994. The city of Mammoth Lakes is visible in the bottom right portion of the scene. In this color representation, red is C-band HV-polarization, green is C-band VV-polarization and blue is the ratio of C-band VV to C-band HV. Blue areas are lakes or slopes facing away from the radar illumination. Yellow represents areas of dry, old snow as well as slopes facing directly the radar illumination. At the time of the SIR-C overflight, the sky conditions were partially cloudy, with low and cold air temperatures. Total snow depth is about 1 to 1.5 meters (3 to 5 feet). The current snow accumulation is only about 40 percent of the average for the season. The most recent snowfall in the area covered the entire area with about 30 centimeters (14 inches) of fresh dry snow. Above 3,000 meters (10,000 feet) elevation the snowpack is dry. Below that elevation, the snowpack has a layered structure. Snow hydrologists are using SIR-C/X-SAR data to determine both the quantity of water held by seasonal snowpack and the amount of snow melting. SIR-C/X-SAR radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm)and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, in conjunction with aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those

  5. Space Radar Image of Raco, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    These are two false-color composites of Raco, Michigan, located at the eastern end of Michigan's upper peninsula, west of Sault Ste. Marie and south of Whitefish Bay on Lake Superior. The two images (centered at 46.39 degrees north latitude, 84.88 degrees west longitude) show significant seasonal changes in the mid-latitude region of mixed deciduous and coniferous forests. The images were acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the shuttle Endeavour on the sixth orbit of each mission. In these images, red is L-band (23 cm) with horizontal/vertical polarization; green is C-band (6 cm) with horizontal/vertical polarization; blue is C-band with horizontal/horizontal polarization. The region shown is largely forested and includes a large portion of Hiawatha National Forest, as well as an agricultural region near the bottom of each image. In early April, the area was snow-covered with up to 50 centimeters (19.5 inches) of snow in forest clearings and agricultural fields. Buds had not yet broken on deciduous trees, but the trees were not frozen and sap was generally flowing. Lake Superior, in the upper right, and the small inland lakes were frozen and snow-covered on April 9, 1994. By the end of September, deciduous trees were just beginning to change color after a relatively wet period. Leaf loss was estimated at about 30 percent, depending on the species, and the soil was moist to wet after a heavy rainfall on September 28, 1994. Most agricultural fields were covered with grasses of up to 60 centimeters (23 inches) in height. In the two images the colors are related to the types of land cover (i.e. vegetation type) and the brightness is related to the amount of plant material and its relative moisture content. Significant seasonal changes between early spring and early fall are illustrated by this pair of images. For the agricultural region near the bottom of the images, the change from snow-cover to moist

  6. A low-cost, high-resolution, video-rate imaging optical radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackos, J.T.; Nellums, R.O.; Lebien, S.M.; Diegert, C.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grantham, J.W.; Monson, T. [Air Force Research Lab., Eglin AFB, FL (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a unique type of portable low-cost range imaging optical radar (laser radar or LADAR). This innovative sensor is comprised of an active floodlight scene illuminator and an image intensified CCD camera receiver. It is a solid-state device (no moving parts) that offers significant size, performance, reliability, and simplicity advantages over other types of 3-D imaging sensors. This unique flash LADAR is based on low cost, commercially available hardware, and is well suited for many government and commercial uses. This paper presents an update of Sandia`s development of the Scannerless Range Imager technology and applications, and discusses the progress that has been made in evolving the sensor into a compact, low, cost, high-resolution, video rate Laser Dynamic Range Imager.

  7. Monopulse radar 3-D imaging and application in terminal guidance radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Qin, Guodong; Zhang, Lina

    2007-11-01

    Monopulse radar 3-D imaging integrates ISAR, monopulse angle measurement and 3-D imaging processing to obtain the 3-D image which can reflect the real size of a target, which means any two of the three measurement parameters, namely azimuth difference beam elevation difference beam and radial range, can be used to form 3-D image of 3-D object. The basic principles of Monopulse radar 3-D imaging are briefly introduced, the effect of target carriage changes(including yaw, pitch, roll and movement of target itself) on 3-D imaging and 3-D moving compensation based on the chirp rate μ and Doppler frequency f d are analyzed, and the application of monopulse radar 3-D imaging to terminal guidance radars is forecasted. The computer simulation results show that monopulse radar 3-D imaging has apparent advantages in distinguishing a target from overside interference and precise assault on vital part of a target, and has great importance in terminal guidance radars.

  8. Three-dimensional environment models from airborne laser radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, Ulf; Ahlberg, Simon; Elmqvist, Magnus; Persson, Asa

    2004-09-01

    Detailed 3D environment models for visualization and computer based analyses are important in many defence and homeland security applications, e.g. crisis management, mission planning and rehearsal, damage assessment, etc. The high resolution data from airborne laser radar systems for 3D sensing provide an excellent source of data for obtaining the information needed for many of these models. To utilise the 3D data provided by the laser radar systems however, efficient methods for data processing and environment model construction needs to be developed. In this paper we will present some results on the development of laser data processing methods, including methods for data classification, bare earth extraction, 3D-reconstruction of buildings, and identification of single trees and estimation of their position, height, canopy size and species. We will also show how the results can be used for the construction of detailed 3D environment models for military modelling and simulation applications. The methods use data from discrete return airborne laser radar systems and digital cameras.

  9. Oceanic eddies in synthetic aperture radar images

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrei Yu Ivanov; Anna I Ginzburg

    2002-09-01

    Continuous observations since 1991 by using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) on board the Almaz-1, ERS-1/2, JERS-1, and RADARSAT satellites support the well-known fact that oceanic eddies are distributed worldwide in the ocean. The paper is devoted to an evaluation of the potential of SAR for detection of eddies and vortical motions in the ocean. The classification of typical vortical features in the ocean detected in remote sensing images (visible, infrared, and SAR) is presented as well as available information on their spatial and temporal scales. Examples of the Almaz-1 and ERS-1/2 SAR images showing different eddy types, such as rings, spiral eddies of the open ocean, eddies behind islands and in bays, spin-off eddies and mushroom-like structures (vortex dipoles) are given and discussed. It is shown that a common feature for most of the eddies detected in the SAR images is a broad spectrum of spatial scales, spiral shape and shear nature. It is concluded that the spaceborne SARs give valuable information on ocean eddies, especially in combination with visible and infrared satellite data.

  10. Study on on-line processing of the chaos laser radar using FPGA

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Today, a car industry puts effort into making intelligent car to realize a safe and comfortable car society. As one of the sensing technology, laser radar is widely studied as in-car radar. The received signal in the laser radar becomes to be buried in noise with increasing distance. When the long distance is measured, it needs a high power laser, or the repetitive process that uses multiplication and integration. Therefore, a new type of the chaos laser radar has been studied. This laser rad...

  11. Passive Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging Using Commercial OFDM Communication Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    PASSIVE SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR IMAGING USING COMMERCIAL OFDM COMMUNICATION NETWORKS DISSERTATION José R. Gutiérrez del Arroyo, Major, USAF AFIT...IMAGING USING COMMERCIAL OFDM COMMUNICATION NETWORKS DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force...DISTRIBUTION IS UNLIMITED. AFIT/ DEE/ E G/12-10 PASSIVE SY THETIC APERTURE RADAR IMAGING USI G COMMERCIAL OFDM COMMUNICATIO r ETWORKS Jose R. Gutierrez

  12. Radar Images of the Earth and the World Wide Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, B.; Freeman, A.

    1995-01-01

    A perspective of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a center of planetary exploration, and its involvement in studying the earth from space is given. Remote sensing, radar maps, land topography, snow cover properties, vegetation type, biomass content, moisture levels, and ocean data are items discussed related to earth orbiting satellite imaging radar. World Wide Web viewing of this content is discussed.

  13. Fusing Laser and Radar Data for Enhanced Situation Awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Eliasson, Emanuel

    2010-01-01

    With an increasing traffic intensity the demands on vehicular safety is higher than ever before. Active safety systems that have been developed recent years are a response to that. In this master thesis Sensor Fusion is used to combine information from a laser scanner and a microwave radar in order to get more information about the surroundings in front of a vehicle. The Extended Kalman Filter method has been used to fuse the information from the sensors. The process model consists partly of ...

  14. A high detection probability method for Gm-APD photon counting laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-jing; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Long; Su, Jian-zhong

    2013-08-01

    Since Geiger mode Avalanche Photodiode (GmAPD) device was applied in laser radar system, the performance of system has been enhanced due to the ultra-high sensitivity of GmAPD, even responding a single photon. However, the background noise makes ultra-high sensitive GmAPD produce false alarms, which severely impacts on the detection of laser radar system based on Gm-APD and becomes an urgent problem which needs to be solved. To address this problem, a few times accumulated two-GmAPDs strategy is proposed in this paper. Finally, an experimental measurement is made under the background noise in sunny day. The results show a few times accumulated two- GmAPDs strategy can improve the detection probability and reduce the false alarm probability, and obtain a clear 3D image of target.

  15. Landmine detection and imaging using Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, S.G.; Gravel, D.T.; Mast, J.E.; Warhus, J.P.

    1995-08-07

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed radar and imaging technologies with potential applications in mine detection by the armed forces and other agencies involved in determining efforts. These new technologies use a patented ultra-wideband (impulse) radar technology that is compact, low-cost, and low power. Designated as Micropower hnpulse Radar, these compact, self-contained radars can easily be assembled into arrays to form complete ground penetrating radar imaging systems. LLNL has also developed tomographic reconstruction and signal processing software capable of producing high-resolution 2-D and 3-D images of objects buried in materials like soil or concrete from radar data. Preliminary test results have shown that a radar imaging system using these technologies has the ability to image both metallic and plastic land mine surrogate targets buried in 5 to 10 cm of moist soil. In dry soil, the system can detect buried objects to a depth of 30 cm and more. This report describes our initial test results and plans for future work.

  16. Laser Doppler flowmetry imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Gert E.; Wardell, Karin

    1994-02-01

    A laser Doppler perfusion imager has been developed that makes possible mapping of tissue blood flow over surfaces with extensions up to about 12 cm X 12 cm. The He-Ne laser beam scans the tissue under study throughout 4096 measurement sites. A fraction of the backscattered and Doppler broadened light is detected by a photo diode positioned about 20 cm above the tissue surface. After processing, a signal that scales linearly with perfusion is stored in a computer and a color coded image of the spatial tissue perfusion is shown on a monitor. A full format scan is completed in about 4.5 minutes. Algorithms for calculating perfusion profiles and averages as well as substraction of one image from another, form an integral part of the system data analysis software. The perfusion images can also be exported to other software packages for further processing and analysis.

  17. Ground Object Recognition using Laser Radar Data : Geometric Fitting, Performance Analysis, and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Grönwall, Christna

    2006-01-01

    This thesis concerns detection and recognition of ground object using data from laser radar systems. Typical ground objects are vehicles and land mines. For these objects, the orientation and articulation are unknown. The objects are placed in natural or urban areas where the background is unstructured and complex. The performance of laser radar systems is analyzed, to achieve models of the uncertainties in laser radar data. A ground object recognition method is presented. It handles general,...

  18. Detection performance of laser range-gated imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Li, Xiaofeng; Luo, Jijun; Zhang, Shengxiu; Xu, Yibin

    2010-10-01

    Laser radar is rapidly developing towards very capable sensors for number of applications such as military sensing and guidance, auto collision avoidance, robotic vision and atmospheric sensing. In this paper, the detection performance of non-scanned Laser Rang-gated (LRG) imaging system is studied. In order to compute the detection range of laser active imaging system, the range equation is derived by using laser illuminating model and considering factors which affect system imaging quality. According to the principle of laser radar and the characters of objects and the detectors in special applied setting, it mainly deduced the non-scanned laser radar range equation of the range-gated system, meanwhile, the SNR model of non-scanned LRG imaging system is set up. Then, relationship of the detection probability, the false alarm probability and the signal-to-noise ratio in the non-scanned LRG imaging system are analyzed, the influence factors of system's performance are pointed out, and the solution is proposed. The detection performance simulation software of non-scanned LRG imaging system is designed with MATLAB and the performance of the imaging system is simulated.

  19. Research and development of laser radar for environmental measurement. 2; Kankyo keisokuyo laser radar no kenkyu kaihatsu. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This project was received by Optoelectronic Industry and Technology Development Association from NEDO, and aims to contribute to the improvement of Indonesia's environmental administration through the development of an air pollution observing laser radar (LR) and of an environmental information network system fit for use in the country in cooperation with Indonesian engineers. LRs will be installed at several sites in an urban area where environmental problems are increasingly serious, and a observation network system will be constructed to link the laser radar sites. The observed data will be collected, analyzed, and processed by an observation data processing center for the investigation of the three-dimensional spatial distribution of air pollution to determine the actual state of air pollution over an urban area. The laser radars and the network will be placed in the city of Djakarta. The Indonesian authority responsible for the project is Indonesian Institute of Sciences. In fiscal 1994, part of the equipment (difference absorbing LR) was designed and manufactured, the design of the environmental information network system was developed, and various researches required in this connection were conducted. (NEDO)

  20. Beam Width Robustness of a 670 GHz Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K. B.; Llombart, N.; Dengler, R. J.; Siegel, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    Detection of a replica bomb belt concealed on a mannequin at 4 m standoff range is achieved using a 670 GHz imaging radar. At a somewhat larger standoff range of 4.6 m, the radar's beam width increases substantially, but the through-shirt image quality remains good. This suggests that a relatively modest increase in aperture size over the current design will be sufficient to detect person-borne concealed weapons at ranges exceeding 25 meters.

  1. Spectral Properties of Homogeneous and Nonhomogeneous Radar Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    1987-01-01

    On the basis of a two-dimensional, nonstationary white noisemodel for the complex radar backscatter, the spectral properties ofa one-look synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) system is derived. It isshown that the power spectrum of the complex SAR image is sceneindependent. It is also shown...... that the spectrum of the intensityimage is in general related to the radar scene spectrum by a linearintegral equation, a Fredholm's integral equation of the third kind.Under simplifying assumptions, a closed-form equation giving theradar scene spectrum as a function of the SAR image spectrum canbe derived....

  2. Speckle-free laser imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Many imaging applications require increasingly bright illumination sources, motivating the replacement of conventional thermal light sources with light emitting diodes (LEDs), superluminescent diodes (SLDs) and lasers. Despite their brightness, lasers and SLDs are poorly suited for full-field imaging applications because their high spatial coherence leads to coherent artifacts known as speckle that corrupt image formation. We recently demonstrated that random lasers can be engineered to provide low spatial coherence. Here, we exploit the low spatial coherence of specifically-designed random lasers to perform speckle-free full-field imaging in the setting of significant optical scattering. We quantitatively demonstrate that images generated with random laser illumination exhibit higher resolution than images generated with spatially coherent illumination. By providing intense laser illumination without the drawback of coherent artifacts, random lasers are well suited for a host of full-field imaging applicatio...

  3. Optical identification of sea-mines - Gated viewing three-dimensional laser radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck, Jens

    2005-01-01

    A gated viewing high accuracy mono-static laser radar has been developed for the purpose of improving the optical underwater sea-mine identification handled by the Navy. In the final stage of the sea-mine detection, classification and identification process the Navy applies a remote operated...... vehicle for optical identification of the bottom seamine. The experimental results of the thesis indicate that replacing the conventional optical video and spotlight system applied by the Navy with the gated viewing two- and three-dimensional laser radar can improve the underwater optical sea......-mine identification. The laser radar has also a number of applications on land, for example, face recognition at several hundred meters range. The main components of the laser radar system are a green pulsed laser and a fast gating intensified CCD camera. The laser radar system innovation is a combination...

  4. Coherent Laser Radar Metrology System for Large Scale Optical Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new type of laser radar metrology inspection system is proposed that incorporates a novel, dual laser coherent detection scheme capable of eliminating both...

  5. Coherent Laser Radar Metrology System for Large Scale Optical Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new type of laser radar metrology inspection system is proposed that incorporates a novel, dual laser coherent detection scheme capable of eliminating both...

  6. Development and application of millimeter-wave imaging radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mase, Atsushi; Kogi, Yuichiro; Yamamoto, Akihide; Ohashi, Masamichi; Osako, Shuhei [Kyushu Univ., Advanced Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Bruskin, Leonid G. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Hojo, Hitoshi [Tsukuba Univ., Plasma Research Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    Significant advances in microwave and millimeter wave technology have enabled the development of a new generation of imaging diagnostics in this frequency region. Millimeter wave imaging radar is expected to be one of the most promising diagnostic methods for this purpose. It consists of a frequency-modulated continuous wave or pulsed wave as a probe beam and quasi-optical focusing optics followed by a planar-type detector array. We have started to develop a diagnostic system for the achievement of imaging radar. Representative experimental results obtained with related diagnostic systems are presented. (author)

  7. Modulated laser radar decoding by inter symbol interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuesong; Inoue, Daisuke; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Kagami, Manabu

    2011-03-01

    Pseudo Random Noise (PN) coded laser radar can improve the target detection ability without the demand on high power laser. However, the reflected echoes are generally so weak that they are buried in the thermal noise of the receiver, which raises the problem of choosing an optimal threshold for correctly decoding them since the power of echoes varies from time to time, and the voltage of light generated electrical signal by photo diode (PD) is always positive. In this work, we firstly show the problem we are going to discuss. Then, a novel method basing on Inter Symbol Interference (ISI) is proposed for solving the problem. Next, numerical simulations and experiments are performed to validate the method. Finally, we discuss the obtained results theoretically.

  8. A Texture Analysis of 3D Radar Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deiana, D.; Yarovoy, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a texture feature coding method to be applied to high-resolution 3D radar images in order to improve target detection is developed. An automatic method for image segmentation based on texture features is proposed. The method has been able to automatically detect weak targets which fail

  9. Inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging principles, algorithms and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen , Victor C

    2014-01-01

    Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging: Principles, Algorithms and Applications is based on the latest research on ISAR imaging of moving targets and non-cooperative target recognition (NCTR). With a focus on the advances and applications, this book will provide readers with a working knowledge on various algorithms of ISAR imaging of targets and implementation with MATLAB. These MATLAB algorithms will prove useful in order to visualize and manipulate some simulated ISAR images.

  10. Image quality improvement for underground radar by block migration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Gwangsu; Kawanaka, Akira; Takagi, Mikio

    1993-11-01

    Techniques have been developed which have been imaging optically opaque regions using an electromagnetic wave radar in order to estimate the location of the objects in those regions. One important application of these techniques is the detection of buried pipes and cables. In the case of underground radar, its image quality often becomes low because the nature of the soil is not uniform and an electromagnetic wave is attenuated in soil. Hence, the method which improves the quality of the radar images is required. In this paper, we point out that the quality of underground images can be improved significantly by means of the block migration method. In this method LOT (Lapped Orthogonal Transform) was applied. LOT is a new block transform method in which basis functions overlap in adjacent blocks, and it has a fast computation algorithm. In addition to above, we propose a method of estimating dielectric constant in soil using the processed images. The result of applying the block migration method to the underground radar images are presented. It points out the good capability for the image quality improvement and the application of LOT can improve the influence by blocking and the processing time. Also the dielectric constant in each block can be estimated accurately.

  11. Oil Spill Dectection by Imaging Radars: Challenges and Pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpers, Werner; Zeng, Kan; Tang, DanLing

    2016-08-01

    Criteria for discriminating between radar signatures of oil films and oil-spill look-alikes visible on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the sea surface are critically reviewed. The main challenge in oil spill detection using SAR is to discriminate between mineral oil films and biogenic slicks originating from secretions (exudations) of biota in the water column. The claim that oil spill detection algorithms based on measuring 1) the reduction of the normalized radar cross section (NRCS), 2) the differences in the geometry and shape of the surface films, and 3) the differences in texture have a high success rate is questioned. Furthermore, it is questioned that polarimetric SAR data are of great help for discriminating between mineral oil films and biogenic slicks. However, differences in the statistical behavior of the radar backscattering is expected due to the fact that, other than monomolecular biogenic surface films, mineral oil films can form multi-layers.

  12. The optimal polarizations for achieving maximum contrast in radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, A. A.; Yueh, H. A.; Kong, J. A.; Novak, L. M.; Shin, R. T.

    1988-01-01

    There is considerable interest in determining the optimal polarizations that maximize contrast between two scattering classes in polarimetric radar images. A systematic approach is presented for obtaining the optimal polarimetric matched filter, i.e., that filter which produces maximum contrast between two scattering classes. The maximization procedure involves solving an eigenvalue problem where the eigenvector corresponding to the maximum contrast ratio is an optimal polarimetric matched filter. To exhibit the physical significance of this filter, it is transformed into its associated transmitting and receiving polarization states, written in terms of horizontal and vertical vector components. For the special case where the transmitting polarization is fixed, the receiving polarization which maximizes the contrast ratio is also obtained. Polarimetric filtering is then applies to synthetic aperture radar images obtained from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It is shown, both numerically and through the use of radar imagery, that maximum image contrast can be realized when data is processed with the optimal polarimeter matched filter.

  13. The Shuttle Imaging Radar B (SIR-B) experiment report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Jo Bea; Holt, Benjamin; Richardson, Annie

    1988-01-01

    The primary objective of the SIR-B experiment was to acquire multiple-incidence-angle radar imagery of a variety of Earth's surfaces to better understand the effects of imaging geometry on radar backscatter. A complementary objective was to map extensive regions of particular interest. Under these broad objectives, many specific scientific experiments were defined by the 43 SIR-B Science Team members, including studies in the area of geology, vegetation, radar penetration, oceanography, image analysis, and calibration technique development. Approximately 20 percent of the planned digital data were collected, meeting 40 percent of the scientific objectives. This report is an overview of the SIR-B experiment and includes the science investigations, hardware design, mission scenario, mission operations, events of the actual missions, astronaut participation, data products (including auxiliary data), calibrations, and a summary of the actual coverage. Also included are several image samples.

  14. Radar Image Texture Classification based on Gabor Filter Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Mbainaibeye Jérôme; Olfa Marrakchi Charfi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to design and develop a filter bank for the detection and classification of radar image texture with 4.6m resolution obtained by airborne synthetic Aperture Radar. The textures of this kind of images are more correlated and contain forms with random disposition. The design and the developing of the filter bank is based on Gabor filter. We have elaborated a set of filters applied to each set of feature texture allowing its identification and enhancement in comparison w...

  15. Passive synthetic aperture radar imaging of ground moving targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacks, Steven; Yazici, Birsen

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we present a method for imaging ground moving targets using passive synthetic aperture radar. A passive radar imaging system uses small, mobile receivers that do not radiate any energy. For these reasons, passive imaging systems result in signicant cost, manufacturing, and stealth advantages. The received signals are obtained by multiple airborne receivers collecting scattered waves due to illuminating sources of opportunity such as commercial television, radio, and cell phone towers. We describe a novel forward model and a corresponding ltered-backprojection type image reconstruction method combined with entropy optimization. Our method determines the location and velocity of multiple targets moving at dierent velocities. Furthermore, it can accommodate arbitrary imaging geometries. we present numerical simulations to verify the imaging method.

  16. Radar Interferometric Imaging of Near-Earth Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margot, J. L.; Nolan, M. C.

    1999-09-01

    High resolution imagery and a three-dimensional characterization of Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) can be obtained with ground-based radars. The Arecibo and Goldstone radar systems yield data at spatial resolutions comparable to the highest resolution spacecraft images of asteroids obtained to date. The use of radar interferometry techniques can further improve imaging and shape reconstruction algorithms [1],[2] and may allow direct measurements of the topography of NEAs. A two-element radar interferometer of appropriate baseline provides an observable, the interferometric phase, which can be used to extract three-dimensional information about the target [3], hence giving additional control in shape modeling procedures. The measurement of interferometric phase also opens the possibility of mapping the topography of an asteroid, in a manner similar to that applied recently to the Moon [4]. Simulations show that this is feasible when potential ambiguities in range-Doppler imaging are avoided, for instance when elongated objects are in a favorable orientation. Radar interferometric imaging of 6489 Golevka was attempted during its June 1999 close approach to Earth [5]. The Arecibo 305 m telescope was used to transmit, and the DSN 70 m antenna in Madrid formed the second element of the interferometer. The Arecibo-Madrid baseline defined an ideal fringe pattern for interferometric mapping, but technical difficulties prevented imaging of the Madrid data. Radar interferometry concepts and simulation results will be presented, as well as any new data acquired before the meeting. [1] R. S. Hudson and S. J. Ostro (1994). Science, 263, 940. [2] R. S. Hudson and S. J. Ostro (1995). Science, 270, 84. [3] I. I. Shapiro et al. (1972). Science, 178, 939. [4] J. L. Margot et al. (1999). Science, 284, 1658. [5] J. L. Margot and M. C. Nolan (1999). ACM Meeting, July 26-30, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.

  17. Extended radar observations with the frequency radar domain interferometric imaging (FII) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.; Crochet, M.

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we present high-resolution observations obtained with the Middle and Upper Atmosphere (MU) radar (Shigaraki, Japan, /34.85°N, /136.10°E) using the frequency radar domain interferometric imaging (FII) technique. This technique has recently been introduced for improving the range resolution capabilities of the mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars which are limited by their minimum pulse length. The Fourier-based imaging, the Capon method have been performed with 5 equally spaced frequencies between 46.25 and 46.75MHz and with an initial range resolution of 300m. These results have been compared firstly to results obtained using the frequency domain interferometry (FDI) technique with Δf=0.5MHz and, secondly, to results from a classical Doppler beam swinging (DBS) mode applied with a range resolution of 150m. Thin echoing structures could be tracked owing to the improved radar range resolution and some complex structures possibly related to Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities have been detected. Indeed, these structures appeared within the core of a wind shear and were associated with intense vertical wind fluctuations. Moreover, a well-defined thin echo layer was found in an altitude range located below the height of the wind shear. The radar observations have not been fully interpreted yet because the radar configuration was not adapted for this kind of study and because of the lack of complementary information provided by other techniques when the interesting echoing phenomena occurred. However, the results confirm the high potentialities of the FII technique for the study of atmospheric dynamics at small scales.

  18. Radar Image Texture Classification based on Gabor Filter Bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbainaibeye Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to design and develop a filter bank for the detection and classification of radar image texture with 4.6m resolution obtained by airborne synthetic Aperture Radar. The textures of this kind of images are more correlated and contain forms with random disposition. The design and the developing of the filter bank is based on Gabor filter. We have elaborated a set of filters applied to each set of feature texture allowing its identification and enhancement in comparison with other textures. The filter bank which we have elaborated is represented by a combination of different texture filters. After processing, the selected filter bank is the filter bank which allows the identification of all the textures of an image with a significant identification rate. This developed filter is applied to radar image and the obtained results are compared with those obtained by using filter banks issue from the generalized Gaussian models (GGM. We have shown that Gabor filter developed in this work gives the classification rate greater than the results obtained by Generalized Gaussian model. The main contribution of this work is the generation of the filter banks able to give an optimal filter bank for a given texture and in particular for radar image textures

  19. Logarithmic Laplacian Prior Based Bayesian Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuanghui; Liu, Yongxiang; Li, Xiang; Bi, Guoan

    2016-04-28

    This paper presents a novel Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging (ISAR) algorithm based on a new sparse prior, known as the logarithmic Laplacian prior. The newly proposed logarithmic Laplacian prior has a narrower main lobe with higher tail values than the Laplacian prior, which helps to achieve performance improvement on sparse representation. The logarithmic Laplacian prior is used for ISAR imaging within the Bayesian framework to achieve better focused radar image. In the proposed method of ISAR imaging, the phase errors are jointly estimated based on the minimum entropy criterion to accomplish autofocusing. The maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) are utilized to estimate the model parameters to avoid manually tuning process. Additionally, the fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Hadamard product are used to minimize the required computational efficiency. Experimental results based on both simulated and measured data validate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the traditional sparse ISAR imaging algorithms in terms of resolution improvement and noise suppression.

  20. Laser therapy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laser is used for many medical purposes. Because the laser beam is so small and precise, it enables ... without injuring surrounding tissue. Some uses of the laser are retinal surgery, excision of lesions, and cauterization ...

  1. Space Radar Image of Pinacate Volcanic Field, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image shows the Pinacate Volcanic Field in the state of Sonora, Mexico, about 150 kilometers (93 miles) southeast of Yuma, Arizona. The United States/Mexico border runs across the upper right corner of the image. More than 300 volcanic vents occur in the Pinacate field, including cinder cones that experienced small eruptions as recently as 1934. The larger circular craters seen in the image are a type of volcano known as a 'maar', which erupts violently when rising magma encounters groundwater, producing highly pressurized steam that powers explosive eruptions. The highest elevations in the volcanic field, about 1200 meters (4000 feet), occur in the 'shield volcano' structure shown in bright white, occupying most of the left half of the image. Numerous cinder cones dot the flanks of the shield. The yellow patches to the right of center are newer, rough-textured lava flows that strongly reflect the long wavelength radar signals. Along the left edge of the image are sand dunes of the Gran Desierto. The dark areas are smooth sand and the brighter brown and purple areas have vegetation on the surface. Radar data provide a unique means to study the different types of lava flows and wind-blown sands. This image was acquired by Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 18, 1994. The image is 57 kilometers by 48 kilometers (35 miles by 30 miles) and is centered at 31.7 degrees north latitude, 113.4 degrees West longitude. North is toward the upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian, and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  2. Radar and Laser Sensors for High Frequency Ocean Wave Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C. R.

    2016-02-01

    Experimental measurement of air-sea fluxes invariably take place using shipbourne instrumentation and simultaneous measurement of wave height and direction is desired. A number of researchers have shown that range measuring sensors combined with inertial motion compensation can be successful on board stationary or very slowly moving ships. In order to measure wave characteristics from ships moving at moderate to full speed the sensors are required to operate at higher frequency so as to overcome the Doppler shift caused by ship motion. This work presents results from some preliminary testing of laser, radar and ultrasonic range sensors in the laboratory and on board ship. The characteristics of the individual sensors are discussed and comparison of the wave spectra produced by each is presented.

  3. Fast, High-Resolution Terahertz Radar Imaging at 25 Meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ken B.; Dengler, Robert J.; Llombart, Nuria; Talukder, Ashit; Panangadan, Anand V.; Peay, Chris S.; Siegel, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    We report improvements in the scanning speed and standoff range of an ultra-wide bandwidth terahertz (THz) imaging radar for person-borne concealed object detection. Fast beam scanning of the single-transceiver radar is accomplished by rapidly deflecting a flat, light-weight subreflector in a confocal Gregorian optical geometry. With RF back-end improvements also implemented, the radar imaging rate has increased by a factor of about 30 compared to that achieved previously in a 4 m standoff prototype instrument. In addition, a new 100 cm diameter ellipsoidal aluminum reflector yields beam spot diameters of approximately 1 cm over a 50x50 cm field of view at a range of 25 m, although some aberrations are observed that probably arise from misaligned optics. Through-clothes images of a concealed threat at 25 m range, acquired in 5 seconds, are presented, and the impact of reduced signal-to-noise from an even faster frame rate is analyzed. These results inform the system requirements for eventually achieving sub-second or video-rate THz radar imaging.

  4. Roadside IED detection using subsurface imaging radar and rotary UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yexian; Twumasi, Jones O.; Le, Viet Q.; Ren, Yu-Jiun; Lai, C. P.; Yu, Tzuyang

    2016-05-01

    Modern improvised explosive device (IED) and mine detection sensors using microwave technology are based on ground penetrating radar operated by a ground vehicle. Vehicle size, road conditions, and obstacles along the troop marching direction limit operation of such sensors. This paper presents a new conceptual design using a rotary unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to carry subsurface imaging radar for roadside IED detection. We have built a UAV flight simulator with the subsurface imaging radar running in a laboratory environment and tested it with non-metallic and metallic IED-like targets. From the initial lab results, we can detect the IED-like target 10-cm below road surface while carried by a UAV platform. One of the challenges is to design the radar and antenna system for a very small payload (less than 3 lb). The motion compensation algorithm is also critical to the imaging quality. In this paper, we also demonstrated the algorithm simulation and experimental imaging results with different IED target materials, sizes, and clutters.

  5. Fast high-resolution terahertz radar imaging at 25 meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ken B.; Dengler, Robert J.; Llombart, Nuria; Talukder, Ashit; Panangadan, Anand V.; Peay, Chris S.; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter H.

    2010-04-01

    We report improvements in the scanning speed and standoff range of an ultra-wide bandwidth terahertz (THz) imaging radar for person-borne concealed object detection. Fast beam scanning of the single-transceiver radar is accomplished by rapidly deflecting a flat, light-weight subreflector in a confocal Gregorian optical geometry. With RF back-end improvements also implemented, the radar imaging rate has increased by a factor of about 30 compared to that achieved previously in a 4 m standoff prototype instrument. In addition, a new 100 cm diameter ellipsoidal aluminum reflector yields beam spot diameters of approximately 1 cm over a 50×50 cm field of view at a range of 25 m, although some aberrations are observed that probably arise from misaligned optics. Through-clothes images of concealed pipes at 25 m range, acquired in 5 seconds, are presented, and the impact of reduced signal-to-noise from an even faster frame rate is analyzed. These results inform the requirements for eventually achieving sub-second or video-rate THz radar imaging.

  6. Experimental 0.22 THz Stepped Frequency Radar System for ISAR Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mei Yan; Zhang, Cun Lin; Zhao, Ran; Zhao, Yue Jin

    2014-09-01

    High resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging is demonstrated by using a 0.22 THz stepped-frequency (SF) imaging radar system. The synthesis bandwidth of the terahertz (THz) SF radar is 12 GHz, which are beneficial for high resolution imaging. The resolution of ISAR image can reach centimeter-scale with the use of Range-Doppler algorithm (RDA). Results indicate that high resolution ISAR imaging is realized by using 0.22THz SF radar coupled with turntable scanning, which can provide foundations for further research on high-resolution radar image in the THz band.

  7. Space Radar Image of Manaus region of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    These L-band images of the Manaus region of Brazil were acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. The left image was acquired on April 12, 1994, and the middle image was acquired on October 3, 1994. The area shown is approximately 8 kilometers by 40 kilometers (5 miles by 25 miles). The two large rivers in this image, the Rio Negro (top) and the Rio Solimoes (bottom), combine at Manaus (west of the image) to form the Amazon River. The image is centered at about 3 degrees south latitude and 61 degrees west longitude. North is toward the top left of the images. The differences in brightness between the images reflect changes in the scattering of the radar channel. In this case, the changes are indicative of flooding. A flooded forest has a higher backscatter at L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) than an unflooded river. The extent of the flooding is much greater in the April image than in the October image, and corresponds to the annual, 10-meter (33-foot) rise and fall of the Amazon River. A third image at right shows the change in the April and October images and was created by determining which areas had significant decreases in the intensity of radar returns. These areas, which appear blue on the third image at right, show the dramatic decrease in the extent of flooded forest, as the level of the Amazon River falls. The flooded forest is a vital habitat for fish and floating meadows are an important source of atmospheric methane. This demonstrates the capability of SIR-C/X-SAR to study important environmental changes that are impossible to see with optical sensors over regions such as the Amazon, where frequent cloud cover and dense forest canopies obscure monitoring of floods. Field studies by boat, on foot and in low-flying aircraft by the University of California at Santa Barbara, in collaboration with Brazil's Instituto Nacional de Pesguisas Estaciais, during

  8. Microlocal aspects of bistatic synthetic aperture radar imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnan, Venky P

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the microlocal properties of the linearized forward scattering operator $F$ and the reconstruction operator $F^{*}F$ appearing in bistatic synthetic aperture radar imaging. In our model, the radar source and detector travel along a line a fixed distance apart. We show that $F$ is a Fourier integral operator, and we give the mapping properties of the projections from the canonical relation of $F$, showing that the right projection is a blow-down and the left projection is a fold. We then show that $F^{*}F$ is a singular FIO belonging to the class $I^{3,0}$.

  9. Space Radar Image of Kilauea, Hawaii in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of a false-color image of the eastern part of the Big Island of Hawaii. It was produced using all three radar frequencies -- X-band, C-band and L-band -- from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying on the space shuttle Endeavour, overlaid on a U.S. Geological Survey digital elevation map. Visible in the center of the image in blue are the summit crater (Kilauea Caldera) which contains the smaller Halemaumau Crater, and the line of collapse craters below them that form the Chain of Craters Road. The image was acquired on April 12, 1994 during orbit 52 of the space shuttle. The area shown is approximately 34 by 57 kilometers (21 by 35 miles) with the top of the image pointing toward northwest. The image is centered at about 155.25 degrees west longitude and 19.5 degrees north latitude. The false colors are created by displaying three radar channels of different frequency. Red areas correspond to high backscatter at L-HV polarization, while green areas exhibit high backscatter at C-HV polarization. Finally, blue shows high return at X-VV polarization. Using this color scheme, the rain forest appears bright on the image, while the green areas correspond to lower vegetation. The lava flows have different colors depending on their types and are easily recognizable due to their shapes. The flows at the top of the image originated from the Mauna Loa volcano. Kilauea volcano has been almost continuously active for more than the last 11 years. Field teams that were on the ground specifically to support these radar observations report that there was vigorous surface activity about 400 meters (one-quartermile) inland from the coast. A moving lava flow about 200 meters (650 feet) in length was observed at the time of the shuttle overflight, raising the possibility that subsequent images taken during this mission will show changes in the landscape. Currently, most of the lava that is

  10. Radar Image with Color as Height, Ancharn Kuy, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Ancharn Kuy, Cambodia, was taken by NASA's Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR). The image depicts an area northwest of Angkor Wat. The radar has highlighted a number of circular village mounds in this region, many of which have a circular pattern of rice fields surrounding the slightly elevated site. Most of them have evidence of what seems to be pre-Angkor occupation, such as stone tools and potsherds. Most of them also have a group of five spirit posts, a pattern not found in other parts of Cambodia. The shape of the mound, the location in the midst of a ring of rice fields, the stone tools and the current practice of spirit veneration have revealed themselves through a unique 'marriage' of radar imaging, archaeological investigation, and anthropology.Ancharn Kuy is a small village adjacent to the road, with just this combination of features. The region gets slowly higher in elevation, something seen in the shift of color from yellow to blue as you move to the top of the image.The small dark rectangles are typical of the smaller water control devices employed in this area. While many of these in the center of Angkor are linked to temples of the 9th to 14th Century A.D., we cannot be sure of the construction date of these small village tanks. They may pre-date the temple complex, or they may have just been dug ten years ago!The image dimensions are approximately 4.75 by 4.3 kilometers (3 by 2.7 miles) with a pixel spacing of 5 meters (16.4 feet). North is at top. Image brightness is from the C-band (5.6 centimeters, or 2.2 inches) wavelength radar backscatter, which is a measure of how much energy the surface reflects back toward the radar. Color is used to represent elevation contours. One cycle of color; that is going from blue to red to yellow to green and back to blue again; corresponds to 10 meters (32.8 feet) of elevation change.AIRSAR flies aboard a NASA DC-8 based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. In the TOPSAR

  11. Space Radar Image of Niya ruins, Taklamakan desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This radar image is of an area thought to contain the ruins of the ancient settlement of Niya. It is located in the southwestern corner of the Taklamakan Desert in China's Sinjiang Province. This oasis was part of the famous Silk Road, an ancient trade route from one of China's earliest capitols, Xian, to the West. The image shows a white linear feature trending diagonally from the upper left to the lower right. Scientists believe this newly discovered feature is a man-made canal which presumably diverted river waters toward the settlement of Niya for irrigation purposes. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 106th orbit on April 16, 1994, and is centered at 37.78 degrees north latitude and 82.41 degrees east longitude. The false-color radar image was created by displaying the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in red, the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in green, and the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) return in blue. Areas in mottled white and purple are low-lying floodplains of the Niya River. Dark green and black areas between river courses are higher ridges or dunes confining the water flow. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: the L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by

  12. Design and prototype of radar sensor with Vivaldi linear array for through-wall radar imaging: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Betül; Özdemir, Caner

    2016-10-01

    We present a radar sensor that was designed to detect and image moving objects/targets on the other side of a wall. The radar sensor was composed of a linear array of Vivaldi antenna elements, an radio frequency (RF) switch, a microcontroller unit, and an RF transceiver. For the linear array, a total of eight antenna elements were used as sensors in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configuration in the cross-range axis to improve the resolution in this dimension. Design steps of Vivaldi antenna elements and the entire linear array were presented. After the design, the prototyping procedure and the details of the radar sensor were given. Through-the-wall radar (TWR) imaging experiments were performed for stationary and moving targets using the assembled sensor. The resultant TWR images after these experiments were presented. During the image formation, a back-projection type image focusing algorithm was implemented and applied to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the raw images. The constructed radar images demonstrated that our radar sensor could successfully detect and image both stationary and moving targets on the other side of the wall.

  13. MIMO-OFDM signal optimization for SAR imaging radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudais, J.-Y.; Méric, S.; Riché, V.; Pottier, É.

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates the optimization of the coded orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmitted signal in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) context. We propose to design OFDM signals to achieve range ambiguity mitigation. Indeed, range ambiguities are well known to be a limitation for SAR systems which operates with pulsed transmitted signal. The ambiguous reflected signal corresponding to one pulse is then detected when the radar has already transmitted the next pulse. In this paper, we demonstrate that the range ambiguity mitigation is possible by using orthogonal transmitted wave as OFDM pulses. The coded OFDM signal is optimized through genetic optimization procedures based on radar image quality parameters. Moreover, we propose to design a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) configuration to enhance the noise robustness of a radar system and this configuration is mainly efficient in the case of using orthogonal waves as OFDM pulses. The results we obtain show that OFDM signals outperform conventional radar chirps for range ambiguity suppression and for robustness enhancement in 2 ×2 MIMO configuration.

  14. Forward imaging for obstacle avoidance using ultrawideband synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lam H.; Wong, David C.; Stanton, Brian; Smith, Gregory

    2003-09-01

    In support of the Army vision for increased mobility, survivability, and lethality, we are investigating the use of ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology to enhance unmanned ground vehicle missions. The ability of UWB radar technology to detect objects concealed by foilage could provide an important obstacle avoidance capability for robotic vehicles. This would improve the speed and maneuverability of these vehicles and consequently increase the probability of survivability of U.S. forces. This technology would address the particular challenges that confront robotic vehicles such as large rocks hidden in tall grass and voids such as ditches and bodies of water. ARL has designed and constructed an instrumentation-grade low frequency, UWB synthetic aperture radar for evaluation of the target signatures and underlying phenomenology of stationary tactical targets concealed by foilage and objects buried in the ground. The radar (named BoomSAR) is installed in teh basekt of a 30-ton boom lift and can be operated while the entire boom lift is driven forward slowly, with the boom arm extended as high as 45 m to generate a synthetic aperture. In this paper, we investigate the potential use of the UWB radar in the forward imaging configuration. The paper describes the forward imaging radar and test setup at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. We present imagery of "positive" obstacles such as trees, fences, wires, mines, etc., as well as "negative" obstacles such as ditches. Imagery of small targets such as plastic mines is also included. We provide eletromagnetic simulations of forward SAR imagery of plastic mines and compare that to the measurement data.

  15. Development of Coherent Laser Radar for Space Situational Awareness Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, N.; DiMarcantonio, A.

    2013-09-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is working on an innovative and high performance mobile coherent laser radar (ladar) system known as ExoSPEAR for space situational awareness applications in LEO and beyond. Based on continuously agile pulse doublet technology, the 100 W, nanosecond class, near-IR laser based coherent ladar is being developed for short dwell time measurements of resident space objects (RSOs). ExoSPEAR system is designed to provide rapid and precision tracking of RSOs over very long ranges. The goal is to demonstrate mm-class range resolution, mm/s class velocity resolution and microrad angular resolution with significantly reduced error-covariance in track accuracy. Precise orbit determination would help in advancing functionality of early warning systems for tracking uncooperative targets for planetary protection applications. Furthermore, improvements in resolution of micromotion measurements would enhance our understanding of astrodymanical properties of resident space objects. In this paper, salient features of the evolution and current experimental status of ExoSPEAR ladar architecture will be discussed. Performance simulations illustrating the dependence of range and velocity precision in LEO orbits on ladar power aperture product will be presented. Estimated limits on detectable optical cross sections of RSOs in LEO orbits will be analyzed.

  16. Multifrequency radar imaging of ash plumes: an experiment at Stromboli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnadieu, Franck; Freret-Lorgeril, Valentin; Delanoë, Julien; Vinson, Jean-Paul; Peyrin, Frédéric; Hervier, Claude; Caudoux, Christophe; Van Baelen, Joël; Latchimy, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    the beam, providing additional constraints on particle sizes and sedimentation process from ash clouds. Furthermore, proximal deposits were analyzed by sieving samples collected near the craters and processing data from a laser disdrometer. Ash samples constantly show a unimodal distribution ranging from 44 microns to 1 mm (more rarely 2 mm), with a mode in the range 0.1-0.3 mm. This is expected to be representative of the coarse content of the ash plumes generated by Strombolian explosions at Stromboli, i.e. mainly coarse ash, and will be used to constrain inversions of the radar signals.

  17. Hurricane Rita Track Radar Image with Topographic Overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Animation About the animation: This simulated view of the potential effects of storm surge flooding on Galveston and portions of south Houston was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Although it is protected by a 17-foot sea wall against storm surges, flooding due to storm surges caused by major hurricanes remains a concern. The animation shows regions that, if unprotected, would be inundated with water. The animation depicts flooding in one-meter increments. About the image: The Gulf Coast from the Mississippi Delta through the Texas coast is shown in this satellite image from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) overlain with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and the predicted storm track for Hurricane Rita. The prediction from the National Weather Service was published Sept. 22 at 4 p.m. Central Time, and shows the expected track center in black with the lighter shaded area indicating the range of potential tracks the storm could take. Low-lying terrain along the coast has been highlighted using the SRTM elevation data, with areas within 15 feet of sea level shown in red, and within 30 feet in yellow. These areas are more at risk for flooding and the destructive effects of storm surge and high waves. Data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Geospatial

  18. Error Analysis of Radar Coincidence Imaging in the Presence of Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Qiang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Radar coincidence imaging is a new method for high-resolution staring imaging. First, the mathematical model is constructed. Second, the theoretical error for radar coincidence imaging in the presence of noise is derived using the parametric imaging method. Third, the factors that affect the error are analyzed. Fourth, the sparse reconstruction algorithm is used to perform numerical simulations of radar coincidence imaging with different parameters. Finally, the effects of signal bandwidth, array configuration, size of the imaging unit, and target complexity on image error in the presence of noise are discussed. This study provides the theoretical framework for parameters selection and SNR requirements for radar coincidence imaging systems.

  19. Scanning array radar system for bridge subsurface imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chieh-Ping; Ren, Yu-Jiun; Yu, Tzu Yang

    2012-04-01

    Early damage detection of bridge has been an important issue for modern civil engineering technique. Existing bridge inspection techniques used by State Department of Transportation (DOT) and County DOT include visual inspection, mechanical sounding, rebound hammer, cover meter, electrical potential measurements, and ultrasonics; other NDE techniques include ground penetrating radar (GPR), radiography, and some experimental types of sensors. Radar technology like GPR has been widely used for the bridge structure detection with a good penetration depth using microwave energy. The system to be presented in this paper is a different type of microwave sensing technology. It is focus on the subsurface detection and trying to find out detail information at subsurface (10 cm) with high resolution radar imaging from a flexible standoff distance. Our radar operating frequency is from 8-12 GHz, which is different from most of the current GPR systems. Scanning array antenna system is designed for adjustable beamwidth, preferable scanning area, and low sidelobe level. From the theoretical analysis and experimental results, it is found that the proposed technique can successfully capture the presence of the near-surface anomaly. This system is part of our Multi- Modal Remote Sensing System (MRSS) and provides good imaging correlations with other MRSS sensors.

  20. Limitations of synthetic aperture laser optical feedback imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Glastre, Wilfried; Hugon, Olivier; De Chatellus, Hugues Guillet; Lacot, Eric

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the origin and the effect of amplitude and phase noise on Laser Optical Feedback Imaging (LOFI) associated with Synthetic Aperture (SA) imaging system. Amplitude noise corresponds to photon noise and acts as an additive noise, it can be reduced by increasing the global measurement time. Phase noise can be divided in three families: random, sinusoidal and drift phase noise; we show that it acts as a multiplicative noise. We explain how we can reduce it by making oversampling or multiple measurements depending on its type. This work can easily be extended to all SA systems (Radar, Laser or Terahertz), especially when raw holograms are acquired point by point.

  1. Multiregion level-set partitioning of synthetic aperture radar images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ayed, Ismail; Mitiche, Amar; Belhadj, Ziad

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image segmentation into a given but arbitrary number of gamma homogeneous regions via active contours and level sets. The segmentation of SAR images is a difficult problem due to the presence of speckle which can be modeled as strong, multiplicative noise. The proposed algorithm consists of evolving simple closed planar curves within an explicit correspondence between the interiors of curves and regions of segmentation to minimize a criterion containing a term of conformity of data to a speckle model of noise and a term of regularization. Results are shown on both synthetic and real images.

  2. Space Radar Image of the Lost City of Ubar

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of the region around the site of the lost city of Ubar in southern Oman, on the Arabian Peninsula. The ancient city was discovered in 1992 with the aid of remote sensing data. Archeologists believe Ubar existed from about 2800 B.C. to about 300 A.D. and was a remote desert outpost where caravans were assembled for the transport of frankincense across the desert. This image was acquired on orbit 65 of space shuttle Endeavour on April 13, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). The SIR-C image shown is centered at 18.4 degrees north latitude and 53.6 degrees east longitude. The image covers an area about 50 by 100 kilometers (31 miles by 62 miles). The image is constructed from three of the available SIR-C channels and displays L-band, HH (horizontal transmit and receive) data as red, C-band HH as blue, and L-band HV (horizontal transmit, vertical receive) as green. The prominent magenta colored area is a region of large sand dunes, which are bright reflectors at both L-and C-band. The prominent green areas (L-HV) are rough limestone rocks, which form a rocky desert floor. A major wadi, or dry stream bed, runs across the middle of the image and is shown largely in white due to strong radar scattering in all channels displayed (L and C HH, L-HV). The actual site of the fortress of the lost city of Ubar, currently under excavation, is near the Wadi close to the center of the image. The fortress is too small to be detected in this image. However, tracks leading to the site, and surrounding tracks, appear as prominent, but diffuse, reddish streaks. These tracks have been used in modern times, but field investigations show many of these tracks were in use in ancient times as well. Mapping of these tracks on regional remote sensing images was a key to recognizing the site as Ubar in 1992. This image, and ongoing field investigations, will help shed light on a little known early civilization. Spaceborne

  3. Spectral analysis, digital integration, and measurement of low backscatter in coherent laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, J. M.; Callan, R. D.; Bowdle, D. A.; Rothermel, J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of surface acoustic wave (SAW) spectral analysis and digital integration that has been used previously in coherent CW laser work with CO2 lasers at 10.6 microns is described. Expressions are derived for the signal to noise ratio in the measured voltage spectrum with an approximation for the general case and rigorous treatment for the low signal case. The atmospheric backscatter data accumulated by the airborne LATAS (laser true airspeed) coherent laser radar system are analyzed.

  4. New Algorithms and Sparse Regularization for Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0343 New Algorithms and Sparse Regularization for Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging Laurent Demanet MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF...26-10-2015 2. REPORT TYPE Final Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 14-06-2014 to 14-06-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE New Algorithms and Sparse...method must fail -- at the target detection task. The analysis identifies the algorithms that perform well, and those that don’t, even in the case of

  5. High Resolution 3D Radar Imaging of Comet Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Gim, Y.; Belton, M.; Brophy, J.; Weissman, P. R.; Heggy, E.

    2012-12-01

    Knowing the interiors of comets and other primitive bodies is fundamental to our understanding of how planets formed. We have developed a Discovery-class mission formulation, Comet Radar Explorer (CORE), based on the use of previously flown planetary radar sounding techniques, with the goal of obtaining high resolution 3D images of the interior of a small primitive body. We focus on the Jupiter-Family Comets (JFCs) as these are among the most primitive bodies reachable by spacecraft. Scattered in from far beyond Neptune, they are ultimate targets of a cryogenic sample return mission according to the Decadal Survey. Other suitable targets include primitive NEOs, Main Belt Comets, and Jupiter Trojans. The approach is optimal for small icy bodies ~3-20 km diameter with spin periods faster than about 12 hours, since (a) navigation is relatively easy, (b) radar penetration is global for decameter wavelengths, and (c) repeated overlapping ground tracks are obtained. The science mission can be as short as ~1 month for a fast-rotating JFC. Bodies smaller than ~1 km can be globally imaged, but the navigation solutions are less accurate and the relative resolution is coarse. Larger comets are more interesting, but radar signal is unlikely to be reflected from depths greater than ~10 km. So, JFCs are excellent targets for a variety of reasons. We furthermore focus on the use of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) to rendezvous shortly after the comet's perihelion. This approach leaves us with ample power for science operations under dormant conditions beyond ~2-3 AU. This leads to a natural mission approach of distant observation, followed by closer inspection, terminated by a dedicated radar mapping orbit. Radar reflections are obtained from a polar orbit about the icy nucleus, which spins underneath. Echoes are obtained from a sounder operating at dual frequencies 5 and 15 MHz, with 1 and 10 MHz bandwidths respectively. The dense network of echoes is used to obtain global 3D

  6. Space Radar Image of the Yucatan Impact Crater Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of the southwest portion of the buried Chicxulub impact crater in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. The radar image was acquired on orbit 81 of space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). The image is centered at 20 degrees north latitude and 90 degrees west longitude. Scientists believe the crater was formed by an asteroid or comet which slammed into the Earth more than 65 million years ago. It is this impact crater that has been linked to a major biological catastrophe where more than 50 percent of the Earth's species, including the dinosaurs, became extinct. The 180-to 300-kilometer-diameter (110- to 180-mile)crater is buried by 300 to 1,000 meters (1,000 to 3,000 feet) of limestone. The exact size of the crater is currently being debated by scientists. This is a total power radar image with L-band in red, C-band in green, and the difference between C-band L-band in blue. The 10-kilometer-wide (6-mile) band of yellow and pink with blue patches along the top left (northwestern side) of the image is a mangrove swamp. The blue patches are islands of tropical forests created by freshwater springs that emerge through fractures in the limestone bedrock and are most abundant in the vicinity of the buried crater rim. The fracture patterns and wetland hydrology in this region are controlled by the structure of the buried crater. Scientists are using the SIR-C/X-SAR imagery to study wetland ecology and help determine the exact size of the impact crater. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community

  7. Space Radar Image of Central African Gorilla Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a false-color radar image of Central Africa, showing the Virunga Volcano chain along the borders of Rwanda, Zaire and Uganda. This area is home to the endangered mountain gorillas. This C-band L-band image was acquired on April 12, 1994, on orbit 58 of space shuttle Endeavour by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). The area is centered at about 1.75 degrees south latitude and 29.5 degrees east longitude. The image covers an area 58 kilometers by 178 kilometers (48 miles by 178 miles). The false-color composite is created by displaying the L-band HH return in red, the L-band HV return in green and the C-band HH return in blue. The dark area in the bottom of the image is Lake Kivu, which forms the border between Zaire (to the left) and Rwanda (to the right). The airport at Goma, Zaire is shown as a dark line just above the lake in the bottom left corner of the image. Volcanic flows from the 1977 eruption of Mt. Nyiragongo are shown just north of the airport. Mt. Nyiragongo is not visible in this image because it is located just to the left of the image swath. Very fluid lava flows from the 1977 eruption killed 70 people. Mt. Nyiragongo is currently erupting (August 1994) and will be a target of observation during the second flight of SIR-C/X-SAR. The large volcano in the center of the image is Mt. Karisimbi (4,500 meters or 14,800 feet). This radar image highlights subtle differences in the vegetation and volcanic flows of the region. The faint lines shown in the purple regions are believed to be the result of agriculture terracing by the people who live in the region. The vegetation types are an important factor in the habitat of the endangered mountain gorillas. Researchers at Rutgers University in New Jersey and the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund in London will use this data to produce vegetation maps of the area to aid in their study of the remaining 650 gorillas in the region. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet

  8. Space Radar Image of Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image of Salt Lake City, Utah, illustrates the different land use patterns that are present in the Utah Valley. Salt Lake City lies between the shores of the Great Salt Lake (the dark area on the left side of the image) and the Wasatch Front Range (the mountains in the upper half of the image). The Salt Lake City area is of great interest to urban planners because of the combination of lake, valley and alpine environments that coexist in the region. Much of the southern shore of the Great Salt Lake is a waterfowl management area. The green grid pattern in the right center of the image is Salt Lake City and its surrounding communities. The Salt Lake City airport is visible as the brown rectangle near the center of the image. Interstate Highway 15 runs from the middle right edge to the upper left of the image. The bright white patch east of Interstate 15 is the downtown area, including Temple Square and the state capitol. The University of Utah campus is the yellowish area that lies at the base of the mountains, east of Temple Square. The large reservoir in the lower left center is a mine tailings pond. The semi-circular feature in the mountains at the bottom edge of the image is the Kennecott Copper Mine. The area shown is 60 kilometers by 40 kilometers (37 miles by 25 miles) and is centered at 40.6 degrees north latitude, 112.0 degrees west longitude. North is toward the upper left. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 10, 1994. The colors in this image represent the following radar channels and polarizations: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  9. Three-dimensional radar imaging techniques and systems for near-field applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.

    2016-05-12

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed three-dimensional holographic (synthetic aperture) radar imaging techniques and systems for a wide variety of near-field applications. These applications include radar cross-section (RCS) imaging, personnel screening, standoff concealed weapon detection, concealed threat detection, through-barrier imaging, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and non-destructive evaluation (NDE). Sequentially-switched linear arrays are used for many of these systems to enable high-speed data acquisition and 3-D imaging. In this paper, the techniques and systems will be described along with imaging results that demonstrate the utility of near-field 3-D radar imaging for these compelling applications.

  10. Space Radar Image of Mount Pinatubo Volcano, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    These are color composite radar images showing the area around Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines. The images were acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994 (left image) and October 5,1994 (right image). The images are centered at about 15 degrees north latitude and 120.5 degrees east longitude. Both images were obtained with the same viewing geometry. The color composites were made by displaying the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) in red; the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) in green; and the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) in blue. The area shown is approximately 40 kilometers by 65 kilometers (25 miles by 40 miles). The main volcanic crater on Mount Pinatubo produced by the June 1991 eruptions and the steep slopes on the upper flanks of the volcano are easily seen in these images. Red on the high slopes shows the distribution of the ash deposited during the 1991 eruption, which appears red because of the low cross-polarized radar returns at C and L bands. The dark drainages radiating away from the summit are the smooth mudflows, which even three years after the eruptions continue to flood the river valleys after heavy rain. Comparing the two images shows that significant changes have occurred in the intervening five months along the Pasig-Potrero rivers (the dark area in the lower right of the images). Mudflows, called 'lahars,' that occurred during the 1994 monsoon season filled the river valleys, allowing the lahars to spread over the surrounding countryside. Three weeks before the second image was obtained, devastating lahars more than doubled the area affected in the Pasig-Potrero rivers, which is clearly visible as the increase in dark area on the lower right of the images. Migration of deposition to the east (right) has affected many communities. Newly affected areas included the community

  11. Space Radar Image of Mount Pinatubo Volcano, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    These are color composite radar images showing the area around Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines. The images were acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994 (left image) and October 5,1994 (right image). The images are centered at about 15 degrees north latitude and 120.5 degrees east longitude. Both images were obtained with the same viewing geometry. The color composites were made by displaying the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) in red; the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) in green; and the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) in blue. The area shown is approximately 40 kilometers by 65 kilometers (25 miles by 40 miles). The main volcanic crater on Mount Pinatubo produced by the June 1991 eruptions and the steep slopes on the upper flanks of the volcano are easily seen in these images. Red on the high slopes shows the distribution of the ash deposited during the 1991 eruption, which appears red because of the low cross-polarized radar returns at C and L bands. The dark drainages radiating away from the summit are the smooth mudflows, which even three years after the eruptions continue to flood the river valleys after heavy rain. Comparing the two images shows that significant changes have occurred in the intervening five months along the Pasig-Potrero rivers (the dark area in the lower right of the images). Mudflows, called 'lahars,' that occurred during the 1994 monsoon season filled the river valleys, allowing the lahars to spread over the surrounding countryside. Three weeks before the second image was obtained, devastating lahars more than doubled the area affected in the Pasig-Potrero rivers, which is clearly visible as the increase in dark area on the lower right of the images. Migration of deposition to the east (right) has affected many communities. Newly affected areas included the community

  12. The SUMO Ship Detector Algorithm for Satellite Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harm Greidanus

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Search for Unidentified Maritime Objects (SUMO is an algorithm for ship detection in satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images. It has been developed over the course of more than 15 years, using a large amount of SAR images from almost all available SAR satellites operating in L-, C- and X-band. As validated by benchmark tests, it performs very well on a wide range of SAR image modes (from Spotlight to ScanSAR and resolutions (from 1–100 m and for all types and sizes of ships, within the physical limits imposed by the radar imaging. This paper describes, in detail, the algorithmic approach in all of the steps of the ship detection: land masking, clutter estimation, detection thresholding, target clustering, ship attribute estimation and false alarm suppression. SUMO is a pixel-based CFAR (Constant False Alarm Rate detector for multi-look radar images. It assumes a K distribution for the sea clutter, corrected however for deviations of the actual sea clutter from this distribution, implementing a fast and robust method for the clutter background estimation. The clustering of detected pixels into targets (ships uses several thresholds to deal with the typically irregular distribution of the radar backscatter over a ship. In a multi-polarization image, the different channels are fused. Azimuth ambiguities, a common source of false alarms in ship detection, are removed. A reliability indicator is computed for each target. In post-processing, using the results of a series of images, additional false alarms from recurrent (fixed targets including range ambiguities are also removed. SUMO can run in semi-automatic mode, where an operator can verify each detected target. It can also run in fully automatic mode, where batches of over 10,000 images have successfully been processed in less than two hours. The number of satellite SAR systems keeps increasing, as does their application to maritime surveillance. The open data policy of the EU

  13. Research and development cooperation project on environmental measurement using laser radar in fiscal 1994; Kankyo keisokuyo laser radar no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The paper outlined activities in fiscal 1994 in the R and D cooperation project on a laser radar for environmental measurement. In the activities in fiscal 1994 of `the ODA laser radar development committee,` the committee held four meetings, two field surveys were carried out, and two researchers were invited from Indonesia. In the field survey, the environment in Jakarta city was investigated in terms of changes in population and number of the cars registered. Further, from data collected during 1994-1998 in the central Jakarta city, the following were made clear: the trend of a decrease in SO2, the trend of a rapid increase and an excess of NO2 content over the environmental standard, the status of pollution of which the level is close to the upper limit of the environmental standard of dust, etc. In the meeting of the policy study for the field survey at LIPI headquarters, Japan proposed a system which is constituted of a difference absorption laser radar, two Mie scattering laser radars, and a central processing unit. The sites proposed were studied in cooperation with Indonesia. 40 refs., 65 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. Research cooperation of the development of laser radar for environmental measurements; Kankyo keisokuyo laser radar no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Research and development of the laser radar for measuring the air pollution in urban areas and the environmental information network have been conducted through the cooperation with Indonesian researchers. A measurement system suitable to actual situation of Indonesia has been constructed. In FY 1996, some works have been conducted as in the final fiscal year. To set the laser radar for environmental measurements and to make a plan of measurement research, conditions of air pollution in Indonesia and setting places of systems have been investigated. Opinions for the cooperation research have been exchanged with Indonesian researchers. Actual trends of the environmental measurements technology using laser radar have been surveyed. Indonesian researchers have been invited to learn operation and data processing of the system. One unit of MIE diffusion laser radar system has been designed and fabricated, and an additional data processing program has been made. The system has been delivered to Jakarta and installed. After the adjustment, performance tests have been conducted to complete the construction of the system. 3 refs., 72 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Spaceborne bistatic synthetic aperture imaging radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elachi, C.; Goldstein, R.; Held, D.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of two configurations for a spaceborne bistatic SAR are examined and compared with the properties of a monostatic SAR. The two bistatic configurations considered are a system consisting of an orbiting spaceborne transmitter and a ground receiver and a system consisting of a transmitter on a geostationary satellite and a receiver or receivers on an airborne platform. The properties discussed or analyzed include imaging coordinate system, azimuth and range resolution, azimuth and range ambiguities, and swath width.

  16. An imaging interferometry capability for the EISCAT Svalbard Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Grydeland

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric imaging (aperture synthesis imaging is a technique used by radio astronomers to achieve angular resolution that far surpasses what is possible with a single large aperture. A similar technique has been used for radar imaging studies of equatorial ionospheric phenomena at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. We present plans for adding an interferometric imaging capability to the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR, a capability which will contribute significantly to several areas of active research, including naturally and artificially enhanced ion-acoustic echoes and their detailed relation in space and time to optical phenomena, polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE, and meteor studies.

    Interferometry using the two antennas of the ESR has demonstrated the existence of extremely narrow, field-aligned scattering structures, but having only a single baseline is a severe limitation for such studies. Building additional IS-class antennas at the ESR is not a trivial task. However, the very high scattering levels in enhanced ion-acoustic echoes and PMSE means that a passive receiver antenna of more modest gain should still be capable of detecting these echoes.

    In this paper we present simulations of what an imaging interferometer will be capable of observing for different antenna configurations and brightness distributions, under ideal conditions, using two different image inversion algorithms. We also discuss different antenna and receiver technologies.

  17. Real-time windowing in imaging radar using FPGA technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Escamilla-Hernandez, Enrique

    2005-02-01

    The imaging radar uses the high frequency electromagnetic waves reflected from different objects for estimating of its parameters. Pulse compression is a standard signal processing technique used to minimize the peak transmission power and to maximize SNR, and to get a better resolution. Usually the pulse compression can be achieved using a matched filter. The level of the side-lobes in the imaging radar can be reduced using the special weighting function processing. There are very known different weighting functions: Hamming, Hanning, Blackman, Chebyshev, Blackman-Harris, Kaiser-Bessel, etc., widely used in the signal processing applications. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) offers great benefits like instantaneous implementation, dynamic reconfiguration, design, and field programmability. This reconfiguration makes FPGAs a better solution over custom-made integrated circuits. This work aims at demonstrating a reasonably flexible implementation of FM-linear signal and pulse compression using Matlab, Simulink, and System Generator. Employing FPGA and mentioned software we have proposed the pulse compression design on FPGA using classical and novel windows technique to reduce the side-lobes level. This permits increasing the detection ability of the small or nearly placed targets in imaging radar. The advantage of FPGA that can do parallelism in real time processing permits to realize the proposed algorithms. The paper also presents the experimental results of proposed windowing procedure in the marine radar with such the parameters: signal is linear FM (Chirp); frequency deviation DF is 9.375MHz; the pulse width T is 3.2μs taps number in the matched filter is 800 taps; sampling frequency 253.125*106 MHz. It has been realized the reducing of side-lobes levels in real time permitting better resolution of the small targets.

  18. Image processing for hazard recognition in on-board weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Wallace E. (Inventor); Rand, Timothy W. (Inventor); Uckun, Serdar (Inventor); Ruokangas, Corinne C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of providing weather radar images to a user includes obtaining radar image data corresponding to a weather radar image to be displayed. The radar image data is image processed to identify a feature of the weather radar image which is potentially indicative of a hazardous weather condition. The weather radar image is displayed to the user along with a notification of the existence of the feature which is potentially indicative of the hazardous weather condition. Notification can take the form of textual information regarding the feature, including feature type and proximity information. Notification can also take the form of visually highlighting the feature, for example by forming a visual border around the feature. Other forms of notification can also be used.

  19. Microwave-heating-coupled photoacoustic radar for tissue diagnostic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    An investigation of microwave (MW) heating effects on biotissue for enhancing photoacoustic radar (PAR) signals was conducted. Localized tissue heating generated by MWs was used to improve PAR imaging depth and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Elevated temperatures were measured with thermocouples in ex vivo bovine muscle. The measured temperature rise on the heated spot surface by MWs was in agreement with theoretical predictions. The study showed localized MW heating can increase the photoacoustic imaging depth by 11%, and the SNR by 5% in ex vivo bovine muscle.

  20. Synthetic aperture radar images with composite azimuth resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielek, Timothy P; Bickel, Douglas L

    2015-03-31

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is produced by using all phase histories of a set of phase histories to produce a first pixel array having a first azimuth resolution, and using less than all phase histories of the set to produce a second pixel array having a second azimuth resolution that is coarser than the first azimuth resolution. The first and second pixel arrays are combined to produce a third pixel array defining a desired SAR image that shows distinct shadows of moving objects while preserving detail in stationary background clutter.

  1. Apodized RFI filtering of synthetic aperture radar images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    Fine resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems necessarily require wide bandwidths that often overlap spectrum utilized by other wireless services. These other emitters pose a source of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) to the SAR echo signals that degrades SAR image quality. Filtering, or excising, the offending spectral contaminants will mitigate the interference, but at a cost of often degrading the SAR image in other ways, notably by raising offensive sidelobe levels. This report proposes borrowing an idea from nonlinear sidelobe apodization techniques to suppress interference without the attendant increase in sidelobe levels. The simple post-processing technique is termed Apodized RFI Filtering (ARF).

  2. Underwater laser imaging system (UWLIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLong, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Practical limitations with underwater imaging systems area reached when the noise in the back scattered radiation generated in the water between the imaging system and the target obscures the spatial contrast and resolution necessary for target discovery and identification. The advent of high power lasers operating in the blue-green portion of the visible spectrum (oceanic transmission window) has led to improved experimental illumination systems for underwater imaging. Range-gated and synchronously scanned devices take advantage of the unique temporal and spatial coherence properties of laser radiation, respectively, to overcome the deleterious effects of common volume back scatter.

  3. Logarithmic Laplacian Prior Based Bayesian Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanghui Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging (ISAR algorithm based on a new sparse prior, known as the logarithmic Laplacian prior. The newly proposed logarithmic Laplacian prior has a narrower main lobe with higher tail values than the Laplacian prior, which helps to achieve performance improvement on sparse representation. The logarithmic Laplacian prior is used for ISAR imaging within the Bayesian framework to achieve better focused radar image. In the proposed method of ISAR imaging, the phase errors are jointly estimated based on the minimum entropy criterion to accomplish autofocusing. The maximum a posterior (MAP estimation and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE are utilized to estimate the model parameters to avoid manually tuning process. Additionally, the fast Fourier Transform (FFT and Hadamard product are used to minimize the required computational efficiency. Experimental results based on both simulated and measured data validate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the traditional sparse ISAR imaging algorithms in terms of resolution improvement and noise suppression.

  4. The rotational dynamics of Titan from Cassini RADAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriggiola, Rachele; Iess, Luciano; Stiles, Bryan. W.; Lunine, Jonathan. I.; Mitri, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Between 2004 and 2009 the RADAR instrument of the Cassini mission provided 31 SAR images of Titan. We tracked the position of 160 surface landmarks as a function of time in order to monitor the rotational dynamics of Titan. We generated and processed RADAR observables using a least squares fit to determine the updated values of the rotational parameters. We provide a new rotational model of Titan, which includes updated values for spin pole location, spin rate, precession and nutation terms. The estimated pole location is compatible with the occupancy of a Cassini state 1. We found a synchronous value of the spin rate (22.57693 deg/day), compatible at a 3-σ level with IAU predictions. The estimated obliquity is equal to 0.31°, incompatible with the assumption of a rigid body with fully-damped pole and a moment of inertia factor of 0.34, as determined by gravity measurements.

  5. Shuttle imaging radar A analysis of land use in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Thomas A.; Woodwell, George M.

    1988-01-01

    Over large areas in the tropics, satellite imagery is the principal source of data on the area, current stature, and extent of disturbance of the forests. The information from imagery that covers large areas at low resolution is greatly enhanced when different types of imagery can be compared. The paper presents a comparison of data from Landsat MSS and from the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A) L band HH polarization data for sites in the Amazon Basin. Results indicate that SIR-A backscatter from the undisturbed forest was lower than that from some disturbed areas and from flooded forests and that SIR-A brightness, increases nonlinearly with the Landsat normalized difference vegetation index. It is hypothesized that the brightest radar returns in southern Amazonia are from newly cleared forests that are littered with standing and fallen tree boles that function as corner reflectors; and that backscatter will diminish from disturbed areas over time as fields are burned repeatedly.

  6. Earth resources shuttle imaging radar. [systems analysis and design analysis of pulse radar for earth resources information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A report is presented on a preliminary design of a Synthetic Array Radar (SAR) intended for experimental use with the space shuttle program. The radar is called Earth Resources Shuttle Imaging Radar (ERSIR). Its primary purpose is to determine the usefulness of SAR in monitoring and managing earth resources. The design of the ERSIR, along with tradeoffs made during its evolution is discussed. The ERSIR consists of a flight sensor for collecting the raw radar data and a ground sensor used both for reducing these radar data to images and for extracting earth resources information from the data. The flight sensor consists of two high powered coherent, pulse radars, one that operates at L and the other at X-band. Radar data, recorded on tape can be either transmitted via a digital data link to a ground terminal or the tape can be delivered to the ground station after the shuttle lands. A description of data processing equipment and display devices is given.

  7. A Method Applying Gray Image Superposition to Improve Ranging Accuracy in Planar Array Laser Radar%一种直接应用灰度叠加提高面阵激光雷达测距精度的方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方毅; 张秀达; 胡剑; 王鹏鹏; 严惠民

    2013-01-01

    相比传统的点扫描激光雷达,基于距离选通和增益调制测距原理的面阵成像激光雷达,具有测距速度快的优点.但同时会引起单帧图像信噪比降低.根据成像激光雷达的原理,建立了其在散粒噪声影响下的测距精度模型,基于该精度模型和机载面阵激光雷达成像的特点,提出了一种应用灰度图像配准叠加提高测距精度的方法.对飞机姿态、光源均匀性、叠加帧数等因素在采用该方法时是否对测距精度有影响进行了分析.分析结果表明,图像完全匹配后,飞机姿态对测距精度没有影响,光源均匀性优于40%时对测距精度影响可以忽略,一定叠加帧数内时灰度叠加不会影响目标之间的相对距离.进行了地面动态实验和机载航拍实验,并将此方法应用于图像的校正,实验结果验证了该方法的有效性.%Compared with traditional point-scanning laser radar, the imaging laser radar based on range gating and gain-modulation ranging principles has faster ranging speed, but at the same time, signal noise ratio (SNR) of single-frame image is lower. According to principles of imaging laser radar, the ranging accuracy model under the influence of shot noise is built. Based on the model and the characteristics of airborne imaging laser radar, a new method which employs the techniques of gray image registration and superposition to improve ranging accuracy is put forward. Then the factors, such as the flight attitude, light uniformity and superposition frame number that influence the application of gray registration and superposition, are analyzed theoretically. The results show that flight attitude has no effect on the method and the light uniformity's effect is small when the uniformity is better than 40%. There will not be other errors between the targets when superposition frame number is within a certain range. A ground of dynamic experiments and aerial experiment are conducted to verify the

  8. Integrating radar and laser-based remote sensing techniques for monitoring structural deformation of archaeological monuments

    OpenAIRE

    Tapete D.; Casagli N.; Luzi G.; Fanti R.; Gigli G.; Leva D.

    2013-01-01

    Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (GBInSAR) and Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) were purposely integrated to obtain 3D interferometric radar point clouds to facilitate the spatial interpretation of displacements affecting archaeological monuments. The paper describes the procedure to implement this integrated approach in the real-world situations of surveillance of archaeological and built heritage. Targeted tests were carried out on the case study of the Domus Tiberiana s...

  9. A VLSI Processor Design of Real-Time Data Compression for High-Resolution Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, W.

    1994-01-01

    For the high-resolution imaging radar systems, real-time data compression of raw imaging data is required to accomplish the science requirements and satisfy the given communication and storage constraints. The Block Adaptive Quantizer (BAQ) algorithm and its associated VLSI processor design have been developed to provide a real-time data compressor for high-resolution imaging radar systems.

  10. Determining Tidal Phase Differences from X-Band Radar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kieran; Bell, Paul; Brown, Jennifer; Plater, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Introduction Previous work by Bell et. al. (2016) has developed a method using X-band marine radar to measure intertidal bathymetry, using the waterline as a level over a spring-neap tidal cycle. This has been used in the Dee Estuary to give a good representation of the bathymetry in the area. However, there are some sources of inaccuracy in the method, as a uniform spatial tidal signal is assumed over the entire domain. Motivation The method used by Bell et. al. (2016) applies a spatially uniform tidal signal to the entire domain. This fails to account for fine-scale variations in water level and tidal phase. While methods are being developed to account for small-scale water level variations using high resolution modelling, a method to determine tidal phase variations directly from the radar intensity images could be advantageous operationally. Methods The tidal phase has been computed using two different methods, with hourly averaged images from 2008. In the first method, the cross-correlation between each raw pixel time series and a tidal signal at a number of lags is calculated, and the lag with the highest correlation to the pixel series is recorded. For the second method, the same method of correlation is used on signals generated by tracking movement of buoys, which show up strongly in the radar image as they move on their moorings with the tidal currents. There is a broad agreement between the two methods, but validation is needed to determine the relative accuracy. The phase has also been calculated using a Fourier decomposition, and agrees broadly with the above methods. Work also needs to be done to separate areas where the recorded phase is due to tidal current (mostly subtidal areas) or due to elevation (mostly the wetting/drying signal in intertidal areas), by classifying radar intensities by the phases and amplitudes of the tides. Filtering out signal variations due to wind strength and attenuation of the radar signal will also be applied. Validation

  11. Investigation of Simulating Radar Images Concerning the Multipath Scattering Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Chun-hua; Zhu Guo-qiang

    2004-01-01

    In the composed system of a target and rough surface, the electromagnetic scattering mechanism, especially the multipath scattering, is investigated. Using physical optics double bouncing algorithm, the multipath scattering model of the system has been established. Simulated by a wideband radar signal and based on fractal rough surface. the artificial echo of the target has been obtained in virtue of the established multipath scattering model. By simulating to image the target in one dimension using the artificial echo, two kinds of range profiles are attained. It is found that one is from the target and the other is from the multipath scattering effect.

  12. Hybrid lidar radar receiver for underwater imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetamraju, Madhavi; Gurjar, Rajan; Squillante, Michael; Derderian, Jeffrey P.

    2009-05-01

    In this work, we present research performed to improve the receiver characteristics for underwater imaging applications using the hybrid lidar-radar detection technique. We report the development of the next-generation coherent heterodyne receiver using modulation of the optical receiver's amplifier gain. Significant advantages in the receiver specifications are achieved using a large-area, high gain, low-noise silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) as the photodetector cum frequency mixer-demodulator. We demonstrate that heterodyne detection by gain modulation of APD can be used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, detection sensitivity and bandwidth for the hybrid receiver system.

  13. Minimum description length synthetic aperture radar image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Frédéric; Bertaux, Nicolas; Réfrégier, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    We present a new minimum description length (MDL) approach based on a deformable partition--a polygonal grid--for automatic segmentation of a speckled image composed of several homogeneous regions. The image segmentation thus consists in the estimation of the polygonal grid, or, more precisely, its number of regions, its number of nodes and the location of its nodes. These estimations are performed by minimizing a unique MDL criterion which takes into account the probabilistic properties of speckle fluctuations and a measure of the stochastic complexity of the polygonal grid. This approach then leads to a global MDL criterion without an undetermined parameter since no other regularization term than the stochastic complexity of the polygonal grid is necessary and noise parameters can be estimated with maximum likelihood-like approaches. The performance of this technique is illustrated on synthetic and real synthetic aperture radar images of agricultural regions and the influence of different terms of the model is analyzed.

  14. Verification and validation of the simulated radar image (SRIM) code radar cross section predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Dale A.

    1991-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to verify and validate the Simulated Radar Image (SRIM) Code Version 4.0 monostatic radar cross section (RCS) predictions. SRIM, uses the theory of Physical Optics (PO) to predict backscatter for a user specified aspect angle. Target obscuration and multiple reflections are taken into account by sampling the target with ray tracing. The software verification and validation technique followed in this study entailed comparing the code predictions to closed form PO equations, other RCS prediction software packages, and measured data. The targets analyzed were a sphere, rectangular flat plate, circular flat plate, solid right circular cylinder, dihedral and trihedral corner reflectors, top hat, cone, prolate spheroid, and generic missile. SRIM RCS predictions are shown for each target as a function of frequency, aspect angle, and ray density. Also presented is an automation technique that enables the user to run SRIM sequentially over a range of azimuth angles. The FORTRAN code written by the author for the PO equations is also provided.

  15. Joseph F. Keithley Award For Advances in Measurement Science Lecture: Thermophotonic and Photoacoustic Radar Imaging Methods for Biomedical and Dental Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelis, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    In the first part of this presentation I will introduce thermophotonic radar imaging principles and techniques using chirped or binary-phase-coded modulation, methods which can break through the maximum detection depth/depth resolution limitations of conventional photothermal waves. Using matched-filter principles, a methodology enabling parabolic diffusion-wave energy fields to exhibit energy localization akin to propagating hyperbolic wave-fields has been developed. It allows for deconvolution of individual responses of superposed axially discrete sources, opening a new field: depth-resolved thermal coherence tomography. Several examples from dental enamel caries diagnostic imaging to metal subsurface defect thermographic imaging will be discussed. The second part will introduce the field of photoacoustic radar (or sonar) biomedical imaging. I will report the development of a novel biomedical imaging system that utilizes a continuous-wave laser source with a custom intensity modulation pattern, ultrasonic phased array for signal detection and processing coupled with a beamforming algorithm for reconstruction of photoacoustic correlation images. Utilization of specific chirped modulation waveforms (``waveform engineering'') achieves dramatic signal-to-noise-ratio increase and improved axial resolution over pulsed laser photoacoustics. The talk will conclude with aspects of instrumental sensitivity of the PA Radar to optical contrast using cancerous breast tissue-mimicking phantoms, super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast enhancement agents and in-vivo tissue samples.

  16. IMAGE CONVERSION FOR LASER PYROGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian PETRU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available All previous studies of pyrography have been focussed on colour obtained through modifying the work parameters. This paper analyses colour nuances obtained by laser woodworking by measuring colour changes digitally. The investigated parameter is colour reproduction by laser technology, using different image conversion methods (Halftone Round, Jarvis, and so on. The changes of image reproduction are analysed globally and colour by colour. The results show that the colour nuances are represented to a more and less degree, according to the conversion method selected. To evaluate the aesthetic changes, CIEL*a*b* colour measurements were applied. The results show that laser burning on wood surfaces has a great influence on wood colour. These findings will be useful to develop innovative design possibilities for wood surfaces for furniture and other products.

  17. Laser Doppler Imaging of Microflow

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Michel; Leng, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    We report a pilot study with a wide-field laser Doppler detection scheme used to perform laser Doppler anemometry and imaging of particle seeded microflow. The optical field carrying the local scatterers (particles) dynamic state, as a consequence of momentum transfer at each scattering event, is analyzed in the temporal frequencies domain. The setup is based on heterodyne digital holography, which is used to map the scattered field in the object plane at a tunable frequency with a multipixel detector. We show that wide-field heterodyne laser Doppler imaging can be used for quantitative microflow diagnosis; in the presented study, maps of the first-order moment of the Doppler frequency shift are used as a quantitative and directional estimator of the Doppler signature of particles velocity.

  18. Space Radar Image of Jerusalem and the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This space radar image shows the area surrounding the Dead Sea along the West Bank between Israel and Jordan. This region is of major cultural and historical importance to millions of Muslims, Jews and Christians who consider it the Holy Land. The yellow area at the top of the image is the city of Jericho. A portion of the Dead Sea is shown as the large black area at the top right side of the image. The Jordan River is the white line at the top of the image which flows into the Dead Sea. Jerusalem, which lies in the Judaean Hill Country, is the bright, yellowish area shown along the left center of the image. Just below and to the right of Jerusalem is the town of Bethlehem. The city of Hebron is the white, yellowish area near the bottom of the image. The area around Jerusalem has a history of more than 2,000 years of settlement and scientists are hoping to use these data to unveil more about this region's past. The Jordan River Valley is part of an active fault and rift system that extends from southern Turkey and connects with the east African rift zone. This fault system has produced major earthquakes throughout history and some scientists theorize that an earthquake may have caused the fall of Jericho's walls. The Dead Sea basin is formed by active earthquake faulting and contains the lowest place on the Earth's surface at about 400 meters (1,300 feet) below sea level. It was in caves along the northern shore of the Dead Sea that the Dead Sea Scrolls were found in 1947. The blue and green areas are generally regions of undeveloped hills and the dark green areas are the smooth lowlands of the Jordan River valley. This image is 73 kilometers by 45 kilometers (45 miles by 28 miles) and is centered at 31.7 degrees north latitude, 35.4 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received; green is L-band, horizontally

  19. Radar imaging using electromagnetic wave carrying orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tiezhu; Cheng, Yongqiang; Wang, Hongqiang; Qin, Yuliang; Fan, Bo

    2017-03-01

    The concept of radar imaging based on orbital angular momentum (OAM) modulation, which has the ability of azimuthal resolution without relative motion, has recently been proposed. We investigate this imaging technique further in greater detail. We first analyze the principle of the technique, accounting for its resolving ability physically. The phase and intensity distributions of the OAM-carrying fields produced by phased uniform circular array antenna, which have significant effects on the imaging results, are investigated. The imaging model shows that the received signal has the form of inverse discrete Fourier transform with the use of OAM and frequency diversities. The two-dimensional Fourier transform is employed to reconstruct the target images in the case of large and small elevation angles. Due to the peculiar phase and intensity characteristics, the small elevation is more suitable for practical application than the large one. The minimum elevation angle is then obtained given the array parameters. The imaging capability is analyzed by means of the point spread function. All results are verified through numerical simulations. The proposed staring imaging technique can achieve extremely high azimuthal resolution with the use of plentiful OAM modes.

  20. Passive Multistatic Radar Imaging using an OFDM Based Signal of Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    is still continuing at this time. This current resurgence includes research in the areas of passive bistatic radar (PBR) and bistatic SAR . This... SAR imaging, bistatic /pas- sive radar, OFDM signals, and phase correction techniques explored throughout the research effort are introduced. Chapter...introduction on bistatic radar and the associated geometry differences to the monostatic case. A discussion of SAR imaging and the algorithm of

  1. Research cooperation in the development of laser radar for environmental measurements. Environmental network; Kankyo keisokuyo laser radar no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku. Kankyo network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Among the research cooperation in the development of laser radar for environmental measurements with Indonesia between FY 1993 and FY 1996, results of the research and development of the environmental network are summarized. For the environmental information network, the Tokyo NOC is linked as an Internet connection point in Japan with the Jakarta NOC using an international dedicated line with a capacity of 64 Kbps. The Tokyo NOC is linked with domestic environmental information researchers using Internet. Thus, data stored in the data processing system of laser radar can be exchanged, information in both countries can be exchanged using E-mail, and data can be accumulated. For the research cooperation with Indonesia, research of path control and information relay server, research of effective transmission of data on the network, and research of multimedia communication have been conducted. The multimedia communication, distributed processing, and extension of dedicated line network using PPTP have been also conducted. 39 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Onboard Data Processor for Change-Detection Radar Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yunling; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chien, Steve A.; Saatchi, Sasan S.; Clark, Duane

    2008-01-01

    A computer system denoted a change-detection onboard processor (CDOP) is being developed as a means of processing the digitized output of a synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) apparatus aboard an aircraft or spacecraft to generate images showing changes that have occurred in the terrain below between repeat passes of the aircraft or spacecraft over the terrain. When fully developed, the CDOP is intended to be capable of generating SAR images and/or SAR differential interferograms in nearly real time. The CDOP is expected to be especially useful for understanding some large-scale natural phenomena and/or mitigating natural hazards: For example, it could be used for near-real-time observation of surface changes caused by floods, landslides, forest fires, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, glaciers, and sea ice movements. It could also be used to observe such longer-term surface changes as those associated with growth of vegetation (relevant to estimation of wildfire fuel loads). The CDOP is, essentially, an interferometric SAR processor designed to operate aboard a radar platform.

  3. Laser-radar-based three-dimensional sensor for teaching robot paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekynen, Anssi J.; Kostamovaara, Juha T.; Myllyla, Risto A.

    1995-09-01

    Implementation and test results of a 3D sensor based on time-of-flight (TOF) laser radar are presented. A sensor capable of measuring 3D positions and orientations in a large working space is used for interactive teaching of robot paths and environments. It consists of a pointing device, a laser rangefinder, and a video tracker. The 3D position and orientation of the pointer are obtained by measuring the distance from two separate points on the pointer arm to a tracing receiver and by using the tracking-camera image for detecting the angle of the pointer on the plane that is perpendicular to the optical axis of the tracking system. The rangefinder uses a new active target operating principle, including fiber-coupled transmitters attached to the pointer arm. The distance and angle measurement accuracies were measured to be better than +/- 5 mm and +/- 5 deg in the ranges of 2.3 to 4.7 m and +/- 40 deg, respectively, using ordinary technology. The operating range is likely to be increased and the accuracy enhanced by using the latest state-of-the-art TOF rangefinding technique.

  4. Spatially variant apodization for squinted synthetic aperture radar images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Rubio, Carlos F; Llorente-Romano, Sergio; Burgos-García, Mateo

    2007-08-01

    Spatially variant apodization (SVA) is a nonlinear sidelobe reduction technique that improves sidelobe level and preserves resolution at the same time. This method implements a bidimensional finite impulse response filter with adaptive taps depending on image information. Some papers that have been previously published analyze SVA at the Nyquist rate or at higher rates focused on strip synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This paper shows that traditional SVA techniques are useless when the sensor operates with a squint angle. The reasons for this behaviour are analyzed, and a new implementation that largely improves the results is presented. The algorithm is applied to simulated SAR images in order to demonstrate the good quality achieved along with efficient computation.

  5. Road Extraction and Network Building from Synthetic Aperture Radar Images using A-Priori Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the extraction of road networks from radar images. Three phases can be distinguished: (1) detection of road lines, (2) network building, and (3) network fusion. The method has been demonstrated on two radar images, one urban and one rural. Despite the differences,

  6. Road Extraction and Network Building from Synthetic Aperture Radar Images using A-Priori Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the extraction of road networks from radar images. Three phases can be distinguished: (1) detection of road lines, (2) network building, and (3) network fusion. The method has been demonstrated on two radar images, one urban and one rural. Despite the differences, t

  7. Bispectral methods of signal processing applications in radar, telecommunications and digital image restoration

    CERN Document Server

    Totsky, Alexander V; Kravchenko, Victor F

    2015-01-01

    By studying applications in radar, telecommunications and digital image restoration, this monograph discusses signal processing techniques based on bispectral methods. Improved robustness against different forms of noise as well as preservation of phase information render this method a valuable alternative to common power-spectrum analysis used in radar object recognition, digital wireless communications, and jitter removal in images.

  8. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  9. Factors Affecting Image Quality in Near-field Ultra-wideband Radar Imaging for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Charlotte

    Near-field ultra-wideband radar imaging has potential as a new breast imaging modality. While a number of reconstruction algorithms have been published with the goal of reducing undesired responses or clutter, an in-depth analysis of the dominant sources of clutter has not been conducted. In this thesis, time domain radar image reconstruction is demonstrated to be equivalent to frequency domain synthetic aperture radar. This reveals several assumptions inherent to the reconstruction algorithm related to radial spreading, point source antennas, and the independent summation of point scatterers. Each of these assumptions is examined in turn to determine which has the greatest impact on the resulting image quality and interpretation. In addition, issues related to heterogeneous and dispersive media are addressed. Variations in imaging parameters are tested by observing their influence on the system point spread function. Results are then confirmed by testing on simple and detailed simulation models, followed by data acquired from human volunteers. Recommended parameters are combined into a new imaging operator that is demonstrated to generate results comparable to a more accurate signal model, but with a 50 fold improvement in computational efficiency. Finally, the most significant factor affecting image quality is determined to be the estimate of tissue properties used to form the image.

  10. Determining titan's spin state from cassini radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, B.W.; Kirk, R.L.; Lorenz, R.D.; Hensley, S.; Lee, E.; Ostro, S.J.; Allison, M.D.; Callahan, P.S.; Gim, Y.; Iess, L.; Del Marmo, P.P.; Hamilton, G.; Johnson, W.T.K.; West, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    For some 19 areas of Titan's surface, the Cassini RADAR instrument has obtained synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images during two different flybys. The time interval between flybys varies from several weeks to two years. We have used the apparent misregistration (by 10-30 km) of features between separate flybys to construct a refined model of Titan's spin state, estimating six parameters: north pole right ascension and declination, spin rate, and these quantities' first time derivatives We determine a pole location with right ascension of 39.48 degrees and declination of 83.43 degrees corresponding to a 0.3 degree obliquity. We determine the spin rate to be 22.5781 deg day -1 or 0.001 deg day-1 faster than the synchronous spin rate. Our estimated corrections to the pole and spin rate exceed their corresponding standard errors by factors of 80 and 8, respectively. We also found that the rate of change in the pole right ascension is -30 deg century-1, ten times faster than right ascension rate of change for the orbit normal. The spin rate is increasing at a rate of 0.05 deg day -1 per century. We observed no significant change in pole declination over the period for which we have data. Applying our pole correction reduces the feature misregistration from tens of km to 3 km. Applying the spin rate and derivative corrections further reduces the misregistration to 1.2 km. ?? 2008. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Understanding earthquakes: The key role of radar images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atzori, Simone, E-mail: simone.atzori@ingv.it [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy)

    2013-08-21

    The investigation of the fault rupture underlying earthquakes greatly improved thanks to the spread of radar images. Following pioneer applications in the eighties, Interferometry from Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) gained a prominent role in geodesy. Its capability to measure millimetric deformations for wide areas and the increased data availability from the early nineties, made InSAR a diffused and accepted analysis tool in tectonics, though several factors contribute to reduce the data quality. With the introduction of analytical or numerical modeling, InSAR maps are used to infer the source of an earthquake by means of data inversion. Newly developed algorithms, known as InSAR time-series, allowed to further improve the data accuracy and completeness, strengthening the InSAR contribution even in the study of the inter- and post-seismic phases. In this work we describe the rationale at the base of the whole processing, showing its application to the New Zealand 2010–2011 seismic sequence.

  12. Distributed MIMO Radar for Imaging and High Resolution Target Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    SIMO ) radar systems, based on the BLUE, is provided in [20]. The best achievable accuracy for both configurations is derived. MIMO radar systems with...coherent processing are shown to benefit from higher spatial advantage, compared with SIMO systems. The advantage of the MIMO radar scheme over SIMO

  13. Narrowband radar imaging for precessional targets with specular scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuling; Wei, Xizhang; Peng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Narrowband radar imaging algorithms based on the micro-Doppler (m-D) characteristics of precessional targets will lose efficacy since specular scattering makes the spectrogram discontinuous and unrecognizable. Specular scattering occurs under the condition that the incident angle of wave is perpendicular to the target surface. To image the precessional target under specular scattering, we propose a narrowband imaging algorithm via complex-valued empirical-mode decomposition-time frequency distribution-general Radon transform (CEMD-TFD-GRT) after analyzing the m-D characteristics of specular scattering centers. The CEMD first decomposes the echo into several components according to their spectrums varying from high to low so that the Doppler spectrums suppressed by the specular scattering can be recognized. Then, TFD-GRT is used to extract the parameters of m-D curves from which the positions of scattering centers can be reconstructed. In addition, the computation complexity of CEMD-TFD-GRT is analyzed and the Cramer-Rao low bounds for the coordinates estimation are derived. The experiment results with anechoic chamber data demonstrate that the scattering centers of precessional targets can be imaged with the proposed algorithm even when specular scattering occurs. The noise influence on the proposed algorithm is also presented with the experiments.

  14. Sparse synthetic aperture radar imaging with optimized azimuthal aperture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Cao; WANG MinHang; LIAO GuiSheng; ZHU ShengQi

    2012-01-01

    To counter the problem of acquiring and processing huge amounts of data for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) using traditional sampling techniques,a method for sparse SAR imaging with an optimized azimuthal aperture is presented.The equivalence of an azimuthal match filter and synthetic array beamforming is shown so that optimization of the azimuthal sparse aperture can be converted to optimization of synthetic array beamforming.The azimuthal sparse aperture,which is composed of a middle aperture and symmetrical bilateral apertures,can be obtained by optimization algorithms (density weighting and simulated annealing algorithms,respectively).Furthermore,sparse imaging of spectrum analysis SAR based on the optimized sparse aperture is achieved by padding zeros at null samplings and using a non-uniform Taylor window. Compared with traditional sampling,this method has the advantages of reducing the amount of sampling and alleviating the computational burden with acceptable image quality.Unlike periodic sparse sampling,the proposed method exhibits no image ghosts.The results obtained from airborne measurements demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed method.

  15. An image-based approach for classification of human micro-doppler radar signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivive, Fok Hing Chi; Phung, Son Lam; Bouzerdoum, Abdesselam

    2013-05-01

    With the advances in radar technology, there is an increasing interest in automatic radar-based human gait identification. This is because radar signals can penetrate through most dielectric materials. In this paper, an image-based approach is proposed for classifying human micro-Doppler radar signatures. The time-varying radar signal is first converted into a time-frequency representation, which is then cast as a two-dimensional image. A descriptor is developed to extract micro-Doppler features from local time-frequency patches centered along the torso Doppler frequency. Experimental results based on real data collected from a 24-GHz Doppler radar showed that the proposed approach achieves promising classification performance.

  16. Hierarchical model-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Huang, Haifeng; Dong, Zhen; Wu, Manqing

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar technology, classical image registration methods are incompetent for high-efficiency and high-accuracy masses of real data processing. Based on this fact, we propose a new method. This method consists of two steps: coarse registration that is realized by cross-correlation algorithm and fine registration that is realized by hierarchical model-based algorithm. Hierarchical model-based algorithm is a high-efficiency optimization algorithm. The key features of this algorithm are a global model that constrains the overall structure of the motion estimated, a local model that is used in the estimation process, and a coarse-to-fine refinement strategy. Experimental results from different kinds of simulated and real data have confirmed that the proposed method is very fast and has high accuracy. Comparing with a conventional cross-correlation method, the proposed method provides markedly improved performance.

  17. AM Multipurpose High-Resolution Imaging Topological Radar (ITR): reverse engineering and artworks monitoring and restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarneri, Massimiliano; Bartolini, Luciano; Fornetti, Giorgio; Ferri De Collibus, Mario; De Dominicis, Luigi; Paglia, Emiliano; Poggi, Claudio; Ricci, Roberto

    2005-08-01

    A high resolution Amplitude Modulated Imaging Laser Radar (AM-LR) sensor has recently been developed, aimed to accurately reconstructing 3D digital models of real targets - either single objects or large amplitude complex scenes. The system sounding beam can be swept linearly across the object or circularly around it, by placing the object on a controlled rotating platform. Both intensity and phase shift of the back-scattered light are then collected and processed, providing respectively a shade-free photographic-like picture and accurate range data in the form of a range or depth image, with accuracy depending mainly on the laser modulation frequency. The development of software, suitable for simultaneous 3D rendering of the intensity and absolute distance data collected by the ITR, constitutes one of the main objectives of the research activity, whatever is the application pursued. In fact, high resolution AM-LR systems have a great interest for their potentials in accurate 3D imaging of valuable objects which must be preserved in digital archives. Examples range from artwork monitoring, cataloguing and restoration from sparse fragments, to medicine for non-hazardous diagnostics and fast design of bio-compatible prostheses, to microtechnology in the miniaturization of macro-components (plastic prototypes, quality control). Several meaningful results of measurements executed in various important European archaeological sites, in particular Santa Maria Antiqua church situated in Fori Imperiali area in Rome and Costanza (Romania), involving 3D color mapped representation are also presented.

  18. Co-registered Frequency-Domain Photoacoustic Radar and Ultrasound System for Subsurface Imaging in Turbid Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Frequency-domain photoacoustic radar (FD-PAR) imaging of absorbers in turbid media and their comparison and/or validation as well as co-registration with their corresponding ultrasound (US) images are demonstrated in this paper. Also presented are the FD-PAR tomography and the effects of reducing the number of scan lines (or angles) on image quality, resolution, and contrast. The FD-PAR modality uses intensity-modulated (coded) continuous wave laser sources driven by frequency-swept (chirp) waveforms. The spatial cross-correlation function between the PA response and the reference signal used for laser source modulation produces the reconstructed image. Live animal testing is demonstrated, and images of comparable signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and spatial resolution were obtained. Various image improvement techniques to further reduce absorber spread and artifacts in the images such as normalization, filtering, and amplification were also investigated. The co-registered image produced from the combined US and PA images provides more information than both images independently. The significance of this work lies in the fact that achieving PA imaging functionality on a commercial ultrasound instrument could accelerate its clinical acceptance and use. This work is aimed at functional PA imaging of small animals in vivo.

  19. APPLICATION OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL WAVELET TRANSFORM IN NEAR-SHORE X-BAND RADAR IMAGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xiang-bo; YAN Yi-xin; ZHANG Wei

    2011-01-01

    Among existing remote sensing applications, land-based X-band radar is an effective technique to monitor the wave fields,and spatial wave information could be obtained from the radar images.Two-dimensional Fourier Transform (2-D FT) is the common algorithm to derive the spectra of radar images.However, the wave field in the nearshore area is highly non-homogeneous due to wave refraction, shoaling, and other coastal mechanisms.When applied in nearshore radar images, 2-D FT would lead to ambiguity of wave characteristics in wave number domain.In this article, we introduce two-dimensional Wavelet Transform (2-D WT) to capture the non-homogeneity of wave fields from nearshore radar images.The results show that wave number spectra by 2-D WT at six parallel space locations in the given image clearly present the shoaling of nearshore waves.Wave number of the peak wave energy is increasing along the inshore direction, and dominant direction of the spectra changes from South South West (SSW) to West South West (WSW).To verify the results of2-D WT, wave shoaling in radar images is calculated based on dispersion relation.The theoretical calculation results agree with the results of 2-D WT on the whole.The encouraging performance of 2-D WT indicates its strong capability of revealing the non-homogeneity of wave fields in nearshore X-band radar images.

  20. Distinguishing ability analysis of compressed sensing radar imaging based on information theory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai; Zhang, Bingchen; Lin, Yueguan; Hong, Wen; Wu, Yirong

    2011-11-01

    Recent theory of compressed sensing (CS) has been widely used in many application areas. In this paper, we mainly concentrate on the CS in radar and analyze the distinguishing ability of CS radar image based on information theory model. The information content contained in the CS radar echoes is analyzed by simplifying the information transmission channel as a parallel Gaussian channel, and the relationship among the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the echo signal, the number of required samples, the length of the sparse targets and the distinguishing level of the radar image is gotten. Based on this result, we introduced the distinguishing ability of the CS radar image and some of its properties are also gotten. Real IECAS advanced scanning two-dimensional railway observation (ASTRO) data experiment demonstrates our conclusions.

  1. Investigation of laser radar systems based on mid-infrared semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybaltowski, Adam

    This dissertation deals with the possibility of utilizing mid-infrared semiconductor lasers in systems of optical remote sensing with range resolution, called laser radar or lidar. The main subject investigated in this dissertation is two-fold: firstly, an analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and related maximum sensing range calculations in this type of lidar based on available system components, and---secondly---improvements in the Random-Modulation Continuous-Wave (RM-CW) lidar technique to better utilize available mid-infrared semiconductor lasers. As far as the SNR analysis is concerned, an appropriate framework has been constructed to analyze post-demodulation noise in mid-infrared direct-detection RM-CW lidar. It is based on a generalization of the Wiener-Khintchine theorem; noise is assumed to be additive, stationary, and have an arbitrary power spectrum. This is in contrast to the SNR analysis in the literature on this subject, which is inadequate for mid-infrared RM-CW lidar as it only considers Poissonian fluctuations of the number of detected photons. In addition to regular SNR analysis, the framework derived in this dissertation allows treatment of singularities such as demodulation with an unbalanced sequence in 1/f noise. To calculate maximum lidar sensing range, the following detection limits have been considered: signal shot noise, background blackbody radiation shot noise based on the Background-Limited Photodetection (BLIP) detectivity limit, and minimum-size detector noise given by diffraction-limited focusing. The latter is found to be of greatest practical interest. Furthermore, a lidar figure of merit has been introduced, and all quantities related to lidar performance and its detection limits have been presented graphically. Since pseudo-random sequences discussed in the literature have been found highly non-optimal for most applications of RM-CW lidar, a framework for the construction of new pseudo-random sequences of desired

  2. Quantitative comparisons of radar image, scatterometer, and surface roughness data from Pisgah Crater, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, T. G.; Engheta, N.

    1983-01-01

    The relationships between radar image brightness and backscatter coefficient, between the backscatter coefficient and surface roughness, and between surface roughness and geology, must be established in order to satisfy criteria for the quantitative use of radar images. Attention is presently given to the merits of calibrated radar images and scatterometers as sources of the backscatter coefficient, theories that yield the coefficient on the basis of known surface roughness (and vice versa), and the geologic interpretation of surface roughness and backscatter signatures. These considerations are discussed in the case of the Pisgah Crater and lava field in the Mojave Desert of California.

  3. Detecting Weather Radar Clutter by Information Fusion With Satellite Images and Numerical Weather Prediction Model Output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøvith, Thomas; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2006-01-01

    A method for detecting clutter in weather radar images by information fusion is presented. Radar data, satellite images, and output from a numerical weather prediction model are combined and the radar echoes are classified using supervised classification. The presented method uses indirect...... information on precipitation in the atmosphere from Meteosat-8 multispectral images and near-surface temperature estimates from the DMI-HIRLAM-S05 numerical weather prediction model. Alternatively, an operational nowcasting product called 'Precipitating Clouds' based on Meteosat-8 input is used. A scale...

  4. The influence of sensor and flight parameters on texture in radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, V. S.; Shanmugan, K. S.; Holtzman, J. C.

    Texture is known to be important in the analysis of radar images for geologic applications. It was previously shown that texture features derived from the grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) can be used to separate large scale texture in radar images. The influence of sensor parameters, specifically the spatial and radiometric resolution and flight parameters, i.e., the orientation of the surface structure relative to the sensor, on the ability to classify texture based on the GLCM features is investigated. It was found that changing these sensor and flight parameters greatly affects the usefulness of the GLCM for classifying texture on radar images.

  5. Novel eye-safe line scanning 3D laser-radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, B.; Kern, Tobias; Hammer, Marcus; Schwanke, Ullrich; Nowak, Heinrich

    2014-10-01

    Today, the civil market provides quite a number of different 3D-Sensors covering ranges up to 1 km. Typically these sensors are based on single element detectors which suffer from the drawback of spatial resolution at larger distances. Tasks demanding reliable object classification at long ranges can be fulfilled only by sensors consisting of detector arrays. They ensure sufficient frame rates and high spatial resolution. Worldwide there are many efforts in developing 3D-detectors, based on two-dimensional arrays. This paper presents first results on the performance of a recently developed 3D imaging laser radar sensor, working in the short wave infrared (SWIR) at 1.5 μm. It consists of a novel Cadmium Mercury Telluride (CMT) linear array APD detector with 384x1 elements at a pitch of 25 μm, developed by AIM Infrarot Module GmbH. The APD elements are designed to work in the linear (non-Geiger) mode. Each pixel will provide the time of flight measurement, and, due to the linear detection mode, allowing the detection of three successive echoes. The resolution in depth is 15 cm, the maximum repetition rate is 4 kHz. We discuss various sensor concepts regarding possible applications and their dependence on system parameters like field of view, frame rate, spatial resolution and range of operation.

  6. Noise Temperature Characteristics and Gain-control of Avalanche Photodiodes for Laser Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xi-ping; SHANG Hong-Bo; BAI Ji-yuan; YANG Shuang; WANG Li-na

    2008-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes(APDs) are promising light sensors with high quantum efficiency and low noise. It has been extensively used in radiation detection, laser radar and other weak signal detection fields. Unlike other photodiodes, APD is a very sensitive light detector with very high internal gain. The basic theory shows that the gain of APD is related to the temperature. The internal gain fluctuates with the variation of temperature. Investigated was the influence of the variation of the gain induced by the fluctuation of temperature on the output from APD for a very weak laser pulse input in laser radar. An active reverse-biased voltage compensation method is used to stabilize the gain of APD. An APD model is setup to simulate the detection of light pulse signal. The avalanche process, various noises and temperature's effect are all included in the model. Our results show that for the detection of weak light signal such as in laser radar, even a very small fluctuation of temperature could cause a great effect on APD's gain. The results show that the signal-to-noise ratio of the APD's output could be improved effectively with the active gain-control system.

  7. Moving target imaging using ultrawideband synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hanwei; Liang, Diannong; Wan, Yan; Huang, Xiaotao; Dong, Zhen

    2003-09-01

    Moving Target High Resolution Imaging of Foliage Penetrate Ultra-Wide Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (FOPEN UWB SAR) is of great significance for battlefield awareness of concealed target. Great range migration and strong clutter make moving target detection and imaging difficult, especially the Signal to Clutter Ration(SCR) some times is so low that the moving targets is invisible in FOPEN UWB SAR imagery. To improve SCR, the clean technique is used in range compressed data domain. The clean technique and data reconstruction help single channel of FOPEN UWB SAR suppress strong tree clutter and stationary target signal from region of interest. A new definition called General Key-Stone Transform is given, which can correct any order of range migration. FOPEN UWB SAR has long integrated time. The plane and target moving in long time lead to complex range migration. To obtain high resolution imagery of moving target, General Key-Stone transform are applied to remove the range migration and realize multiple moving target data segment. Both General Key-Stone Transform and Clean Technique are applied in real data processing of FOPEN UWB SAR. The result shows that multiple moving targets in the trees are clearly detected and high resolution imagery is formed.

  8. SIR-A radar images of sand dunes and volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, R.; Elachi, C.; Evans, D.

    1982-01-01

    Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A) synthetic aperture radar images of sand dunes and volcanic fields are presented and preliminary interpretation provided. The SIR-A images are compared with Seasat images where available. Unvegetated sand dunes are recorded as black areas on SIR-A images due to the specular reflection away from the sensor at the SIR-A incidence angle. Even a very small amount of vegetation provides some backscatter, however. Interdune areas frequently contain rough lag gravels which outline the dunes. Lava flows are typically very rough surfaces which are bright areas on radar images. Cinder cones are smooth and therefore black on the image unless they have a blocky crater rim at the SIR-A incidence angle. Ash dunes and ash fields are smooth and imaged as dark areas.

  9. Ground Observation and Correction of P-band Radar Imaging Ionospheric Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ning

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available For high resolution space-borne P-band SAR system, ionospheric effects could cause serious phase errors. These errors are causally related to the radar frequency and the TEC of ionosphere and make the image quality degraded. To guarantee the image quality, the ionosphere errors must be emended. Based on the mismatched filter model caused by ionosphere, it is pointed out that accurate ionosphere TEC is the key for phase error correction, a high precision ionosphere TEC measurement method is further put forward by using the phase errors of SAR echoes, which is validated by processing the data of a ground based P-band radar with well focused radar image of the international space station obtained. The results indicate that the method can effectively increase the accuracy of ionosphere TEC estimation, and thus improve the radar imaging quality, it is applicable to low frequency space-borne SAR systems for reducing the ionosphere effects.

  10. 新型多普勒成像激光雷达原理设计与仿真%Schematic design and simulation of new Doppler imaging laser radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜成昊; 杨进华; 张丽娟; 李祥

    2014-01-01

    采用相干多普勒测量手段获取目标面型变化信息具有明显的优势。基于激光多普勒效应,设计一套多普勒成像激光雷达实验系统,同时引入APFFT全相位测相处理思路对外差信号进行时频分析,抑制频谱泄露,减小噪声对测量结果的影响,获取高测量精度信号时频曲线。在MATLAB软件simulink交互式仿真集成环境中进行过程仿真,证明其可以实现对扫描空间高分辨率、高精度的成像。实验结果表明:该系统能够较好还原被测目标表面特性,为激光雷达实现对目标高分辨率与高灵敏度成像提出新的解决思路。%The means of coherent Doppler has obvious advantages to obtain the target range change. Based on laser Doppler effect, designed a set of imaging Doppler lidar experimental system. Introduction all phase measurement phase treatment consideration to do time-frequency analysis for heterodyne signal, restraining spectral leakage and reducing the impact of noise on the measurement results, a high measurement accuracy signal frequency curve will be acquired. The process simulation in the simulink interactive simulation integration environment which comes with MATLAB software, to prove it can achieve higher resolution, high precision imaging for scan space. The experimental results show that the system was able to restore the surface of target feature preferably. It plays a promoting role in high-resolution and high-sensitivity imaging of the target for lidar.

  11. Radar Imaging of Volcanic Fields and Sand Dune Fields: Implications for VOIR

    OpenAIRE

    Elachi, C.; Blom, R; Daily, M.; Farr, T; Saunders, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    A number of volcanic fields and sand dune fields in the western part of North America were studied using aircraft and Seasat synthetic aperture radar images and LANDSAT images. The capability of radars with different characteristics (i.e., frequency, polarization and look angles was assessed to identify and map different volcanic features, lava flows and sand dune types. It was concluded that: (1) volcanic features which have a relatively large topographic expression (i.e., cinder cones, coll...

  12. Research and development cooperation project on environmental measurement using laser radar in fiscal 1993; Kankyo keisokuyo laser radar no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    As one of the international research cooperation projects, the research cooperation in developing laser radar for environment measurement started between Japan and Indonesia. The project is scheduled to be carried out in a 4-year plan starting fiscal 1993. In fiscal 1993, conducted were negotiations with Indonesia on its implementation and a field survey. Between January 6 and 15, 1994, the first field survey was made in terms of topography, climate, road network and traffic situation of Jakarta city, and the proposed sites for installation were reported. The paper also introduced the reception system on the Indonesian side and a request for technical learning through stay in Japan. The second field survey was conducted between February 27 and March 6, 1994. Indonesia requested that they want to make laser radar observation not only for the local area, but the one that covers industrial areas, central urban areas and residential areas. Incidentally, there was an opinion that it is important to elucidate the pollution mechanism. 19 refs., 43 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Pulsed Raman fiber laser and multispectral imaging in three dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Joachim F.; Busck, Jens; Heiselberg, Henning

    2006-01-01

    Raman scattering in single-mode optical fibers is exploited to generate multispectral light from a green nanolaser with high pulse repetition rate. Each pulse triggers a picosecond camera and measures the distance by time-of-flight in each of the 0.5 Mpixels. Three-dimensional images are then con......Raman scattering in single-mode optical fibers is exploited to generate multispectral light from a green nanolaser with high pulse repetition rate. Each pulse triggers a picosecond camera and measures the distance by time-of-flight in each of the 0.5 Mpixels. Three-dimensional images...... are then constructed with submillimeter accuracy for all visible colors. The generation of a series of Stokes peaks by Raman scattering in a Si fiber is discussed in detail and the laser radar technique is demonstrated. The data recording takes only a few seconds, and the high accuracy 3D color imaging works at ranges...

  14. Maximum detection range limitation of pulse laser radar with Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hanjun; Xu, Benlian; Xu, Huigang; Chen, Jingbo; Fu, Yadan

    2015-05-01

    When designing and evaluating the performance of laser radar system, maximum detection range achievable is an essential parameter. The purpose of this paper is to propose a theoretical model of maximum detection range for simulating the Geiger-mode laser radar's ranging performance. Based on the laser radar equation and the requirement of the minimum acceptable detection probability, and assuming the primary electrons triggered by the echo photons obey Poisson statistics, the maximum range theoretical model is established. By using the system design parameters, the influence of five main factors, namely emitted pulse energy, noise, echo position, atmospheric attenuation coefficient, and target reflectivity on the maximum detection range are investigated. The results show that stronger emitted pulse energy, lower noise level, more front echo position in the range gate, higher atmospheric attenuation coefficient, and higher target reflectivity can result in greater maximum detection range. It is also shown that it's important to select the minimum acceptable detection probability, which is equivalent to the system signal-to-noise ratio for producing greater maximum detection range and lower false-alarm probability.

  15. Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar Image Classification by a Hybrid Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamran Ullah Khan; YANG Jian

    2007-01-01

    Different methods proposed so far for accurate classification of land cover types in polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image are data specific and no general method is available. A novel hybrid framework for this classification was developed in this work. A set of effective features derived from the coherence matrix of polarimetric SARdata was proposed.Constituents of the feature set are wavelet,texture,and nonlinear features.The proposed feature set has a strong discrimination power. A neural network was used as the classification engine in a unique way. By exploiting the speed of the conjugate gradient method and the convergence rate of the Levenberg-Marquardt method (near the optimal point), an overall speed up of the classification procedure was achieved. Principal component analysis(PCA)was used to shrink the dimension of the feature vector without sacrificing much of the classification accuracy. The proposed approach is compared with the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE)based on the complex Wishart distribution and the results show the superiority of the proposed method,with the average classification accuracy by the proposed method(95.4%)higher than that of the MLE(93.77%). Use of PCA to reduce the dimensionality of the feature vector helps reduce the memory requirements and computational cost, thereby enhancing the speed of the process.

  16. Microwave Imaging Radar Reflectometer System Utilizing Digital Beam Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fengqi; Li, Meijiao; Domier, Calvin W.; Liu, Xiaoguang; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.

    2016-10-01

    Microwave Imaging Reflectometry is a radar-like technique developed to measure the electron density fluctuations in fusion plasmas. Phased Antenna Arrays can serve as electronically controlled ``lenses'' that can generate the required wavefronts by phase shifting and amplitude scaling, which is being realized in the digital domain with higher flexibility and faster processing speed. In the transmitter, the resolution of the phase control is 1.4 degrees and the amplitude control is 0.5 dB/ step. A V-band double-sided, printed bow tie antenna which exhibits 49% bandwidth (46 - 76 GHz) is employed. The antenna is fed by a microstrip transmission line for easy impedance matching. The simple structure and the small antenna are suitable for low cost fabrication, easy circuit integration, and phased antenna array multi-frequency applications. In the receiver part, a sub-array of 32 channels with 200 mil spacing is used to collect the scattered reflected signal from one unit spot on the plasma cutoff surface. Pre-amplification is used to control the noise level of the system and wire bondable components are used to accommodate the small spacing between each channel. After down converting, base band signals are digitized and processed in an FPGA module. U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-99ER54531.

  17. Detection probabilities for photon-counting avalanche photodiodes applied to a laser radar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Markus

    2005-08-20

    Arrays of photon-counting avalanche photodiodes with time-resolved readout can improve the performance of three-dimensional laser radars. A comparison of the detection and false-alarm probabilities for detectors in linear mode and in Geiger mode is shown. With low background radiation their performance is comparable. It is shown that in both cases it will be necessary to process several laser shots of the same scene to improve detection and reduce the false-alarm rate. Additional calculations show that the linear mode detector is much better at detecting targets behind semitransparent obscurations such as vegetation and camouflage nets.

  18. Radar-Interferometric Asteroid Imaging Using a Flexible Software Correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, G.; Campbell, D. B.; Treacy, R.; Nolan, M. C.

    2005-12-01

    We've developed a technique to use a radio interferometer to image near earth objects (NEOs) during their close Earth approach when they can be illuminated by a ground-based radar system. There is great potential for this technique to yield detailed information that is complementary to other observational methods. We are using the NAIC's Arecibo Observatory's 1 MW 13 cm radar transmitter with the NRAO's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) as the receiving instrument. The VLBA, with antenna spacings of several thousands of kilometers, has a potential resolution on the order of milli-arcseconds; a couple of orders of magnitude smaller than typical ground-based telescopic observations, and sufficient to determine the gross shapes and orientations of spin vectors. Milli-arcsecond astrometry of these quickly moving objects can greatly improve their orbits and extend the span over which future Earth encounters can be predicted. The VLBA hardware correlator limits the frequency resolution and complicates incorporating a model of the near-field geometry. Typical target bandwidths are ˜1 Hz while the correlator's narrowest resolution is 120 Hz. To avoid these difficulties a specialized computer interface was designed to transfer the raw data to commercial PCs. We can now use this system to obtain the individual antenna data streams and subsequently correlate them in software, bypassing the hardware correlator entirely. Software processing permits synthesis of narrower frequency bins, plus easier access for iterations to improve the near field model or correct a poor ephemeris a posteriori. This system could also be used to achieve high time resolution on strong sources. We have recently used this system to observe near Earth asteroid (25143) Itokawa, a sub-kilometer sized object that passed within 0.013 AU of the Earth and is the target of the Japanese Hayabusa mission. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the NSF operated under cooperative agreement by

  19. Pseudo-random noise-continuous-wave laser radar for surface and cloud measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthey, Renaud; Mitev, Valentin

    2005-03-01

    Laser radar (lidar) application may require an instrument with compact size, long life of the components, low consumption and eye-safety. One possibility to achieve these features is to use a continuous-wave (cw) diode laser as lidar transmitter. A practical way to perform range-resolved measurements with a cw laser diode is the pseudo-random noise (PRN) modulation. This paper presents a compact PRN-cw lidar, using a 370-mW cw diode laser and an APD as detector. Daytime measurements of cloud base and topographic surface are demonstrated with the PRN-cw lidar technique, where the range detection exceeds 2 km. The detection of the topographic surface is performed with integration time of some tens of milliseconds during daytime and some tens of microseconds during night-time.

  20. Atmospheric pressure femtosecond laser imaging mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Yves; Gunaratne, Tissa C.; Dantus, Marcos

    2009-02-01

    We present a novel imaging mass spectrometry technique that uses femtosecond laser pulses to directly ionize the sample. The method offers significant advantages over current techniques by eliminating the need of a laser-absorbing sample matrix, being suitable for atmospheric pressure sampling, and by providing 10μm resolution, as demonstrated here with a chemical image of vegetable cell walls.

  1. Comparing helicopter-borne profiling radar with airborne laser scanner data for forest structure estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, Livia; Hollaus, Markus; Pfeifer, Norbert; Chen, Yuwei; Karjalainen, Mika; Hakala, Teemu; Hyyppä, Juha; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Forests are complex ecosystems that show substantial variation with respect to climate, management regime, stand history, disturbance, and needs of local communities. The dynamic processes of growth and disturbance are reflected in the structural components of forests that include the canopy vertical structure and geometry (e.g. size, height, and form), tree position and species diversity. Current remote-sensing systems to measure forest structural attributes include passive optical sensors and active sensors. The technological capabilities of active remote sensing like the ability to penetrate the vegetation and provide information about its vertical structure has promoted an extensive use of LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) and radar (RAdio Detection And Ranging) system over the last 20 years. LiDAR measurements from aircraft (airborne laser scanning, ALS) currently represents the primary data source for three-dimensional information on forest vertical structure. Contrary, despite the potential of radar remote sensing, their use is not yet established in forest monitoring. In order to better understand the interaction of pulsed radar with the forest canopy, and to increase the feasibility of this system, the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute has developed a helicopter-borne profiling radar system, called TomoRadar. TomoRadar is capable of recording a canopy-penetrating profile of forests. To georeference the radar measurements the system was equipped with a global navigation satellite system and an inertial measurement unit with a centimeter level accuracy of the flight trajectory. The TomoRadar operates at Ku-band, (wave lengths λ 1.5cm) with two separated parabolic antennas providing co- and cross-polarization modes. The purpose of this work is to investigate the capability of the TomoRadar system, for estimating the forest vertical profile, terrain topography and tree height. We analysed 600 m TomoRadar crosspolarized (i.e. horizontal - vertical

  2. Reach on laser imaging technology to terminal guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xue-chun; Jin, Guang-yong; Wu, Zhi-chao; Ling, Ming; Liang, Zhu

    2009-07-01

    The development of range-imaging devices is motivated by various ground and space applications. Tasks in space missions include docking, rendezvous, manipulating robotic arms, landing and autonomous rover applications, sample identification and surface mapping. The ground applications include the guidance of vehicles, robotic and manipulator arms, and other autonomous or teleoperated machines, as well as surface or construction model generation. Without the scanner devices, scannerless imaging lidars have the characteristic of high frame rate, wide field of view and high reliability,which can be successful used in terminal guidance. Diode pumped laser radar with high repetition rate is studied in this paper. A bistatic system is set up and a high speed signal processor for the system is researched. In a conceptual sense, the imaging lidar has two parts, a transmitter and a receiver. Their field of views overlap throughout the measuring range.The imaging lidar operates as follows. Based on principle of pulsed time-of-flight (TOF) laser range finding, the solid-state laser diode-pumped laser produces short laser pulses, which though the expanded lens, then reach the target. The back reflected light is collected with a receiver lens and fed through optical fibres to discrete avalanche photo diodes (APDs). When a received pulse is detected by the comparator a time to digital converter (TDC) stops counting and a time interval, corresponding to the range, is produced. The precision of a single measurement is about +/-4.0cm, but better precision is achieved by averaging. Information about the reflectivity of the target is gathered by recording the amplitude of the received pulse. Range images with the lidar prototype were taken indoors, the measuring distance was about 14m.

  3. Impulse radar imaging system for concealed object detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podd, F. J. W.; David, M.; Iqbal, G.; Hussain, F.; Morris, D.; Osakue, E.; Yeow, Y.; Zahir, S.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    Electromagnetic systems for imaging concealed objects at checkpoints typically employ radiation at millimetre and terahertz frequencies. These systems have been shown to be effective and provide a sufficiently high resolution image. However there are difficulties and current electromagnetic systems have limitations particularly in accurately differentiating between threat and innocuous objects based on shape, surface emissivity or reflectivity, which are indicative parameters. In addition, water has a high absorption coefficient at millimetre wavelength and terahertz frequencies, which makes it more difficult for these frequencies to image through thick damp clothing. This paper considers the potential of using ultra wideband (UWB) in the low gigahertz range. The application of this frequency band to security screening appears to be a relatively new field. The business case for implementing the UWB system has been made financially viable by the recent availability of low-cost integrated circuits operating at these frequencies. Although designed for the communication sector, these devices can perform the required UWB radar measurements as well. This paper reports the implementation of a 2 to 5 GHz bandwidth linear array scanner. The paper describes the design and fabrication of transmitter and receiver antenna arrays whose individual elements are a type of antipodal Vivaldi antenna. The antenna's frequency and angular response were simulated in CST Microwave Studio and compared with laboratory measurements. The data pre-processing methods of background subtraction and deconvolution are implemented to improve the image quality. The background subtraction method uses a reference dataset to remove antenna crosstalk and room reflections from the dataset. The deconvolution method uses a Wiener filter to "sharpen" the returned echoes which improves the resolution of the reconstructed image. The filter uses an impulse response reference dataset and a signal

  4. Moving target detection in foliage using along track monopulse synthetic aperture radar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumekh, M

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for detecting moving targets embedded in foliage from the monostatic and bistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data obtained via two airborne radars. The two radars, which are mounted on the same aircraft, have different coordinates in the along track (cross-range) domain. However, unlike the interferometric SAR systems used for topographic mapping, the two radars possess a common range and altitude (i.e., slant range). The resultant monopulse SAR images are used to construct difference and interferometric images for moving target detection. It is shown that the signatures of the stationary targets are weakened in these images. Methods for estimating a moving target's motion parameters are discussed. Results for an ultrawideband UHF SAR system are presented.

  5. Three-dimensional ground penetrating radar imaging using multi-frequency diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, J.E.; Johansson, E.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    In this talk we present results from a three-dimensional image reconstruction algorithm for impulse radar operating in monostatic pule-echo mode. The application of interest to us is the nondestructive evaluation of civil structures such as bridge decks. We use a multi-frequency diffraction tomography imaging technique in which coherent backward propagations of the received reflected wavefield form a spatial image of the scattering interfaces within the region of interest. This imaging technique provides high-resolution range and azimuthal visualization of the subsurface region. We incorporate the ability to image in planarly layered conductive media and apply the algorithm to experimental data from an offset radar system in which the radar antenna is not directly coupled to the surface of the region. We present a rendering in three-dimensions of the resulting image data which provides high-detail visualization.

  6. Synthetic aperture radar image processing techniques for damage detection of FRP-concrete systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzuyang

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic imaging enables researchers and engineers to assess the surface and subsurface condition of concrete structures using radar and microwave sensors. Among existing radar imaging methods, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging offers flexible resolution for various purposes in condition assessment. In this paper, two novel SAR image processing techniques are reported for the subsurface condition assessment of FRP(fiber reinforced polymer)-strengthened concrete systems; mathematical morphology (MM) and the K-R-I transform. Glass FRP (GFRP) and carbon CFRP (CFRP) strengthened concrete cylinders are used as examples. From our experimental results, it is found that both techniques are capable of quantifying SAR images for condition assessment. It is also found that Euler's number and the coefficient of correlation of K-R-I curves of SAR images can be used for monitoring subsurface changes in FRP-concrete systems.

  7. Impact of frequency and polarization diversity on a terahertz radar's imaging performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ken B.; Dengler, Robert J.; Llombart, Nuria

    2011-05-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's 675 GHz, 25 m standoff imaging radar can achieve >1 Hz real time frame rates over 40x40 cm fields of view for rapid detection of person-borne concealed weapons. In its normal mode of operation, the radar generates imagery based solely on the time-of-flight, or range, between the radar and target. With good clothing penetration at 675 GHz, a hidden object will be detectable as an anomaly in the range-to-surface profile of a subject. Here we report on results of two modifications in the radar system that were made to asses its performance using somewhat different detection approaches. First, the radar's operating frequency and bandwidth were cut in half, to 340 GHz and 13 GHz, where there potential system advantages include superior transmit power and clothing penetration, as well as a lower cost of components. In this case, we found that the twofold reduction in range and cross-range resolution sharply limited the quality of through-clothes imagery, although some improvement is observed for detection of large targets concealed by very thick clothing. The second radar modification tested involved operation in a fully polarimetric mode, where enhanced image contrast might occur between surfaces with different material or geometric characteristics. Results from these tests indicated that random speckle dominates polarimetric power imagery, making it an unattractive approach for contrast improvement. Taken together, the experiments described here underscore the primary importance of high resolution imaging in THz radar applications for concealed weapons detection.

  8. Adaptive high-frequency information fusion algorithm of radar and optical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiding; Qin, Shuai

    2011-12-01

    An adaptive High-frequency Information Fusion Algorithm of Radar and Optical Images is proposed in this paper, in order to improve the resolution of the radar image and reserve more radar information. Firstly, Hough Transform is adopted in the process of low-resolution radar image and high-resolution optical image registration. The implicit linear information is extracted from two different heterogeneous images for better result. Then NSCT transform is used for decomposition and fusion. In different decomposition layers or in the same layer with different directions, fusion rules are adaptive for the high-frequency information of images. The ratio values of high frequency information entropy, variance, gradient and edge strength are calculated after NSCT decomposition. High frequency information entropy, variance, gradient or edge strength, which has the smallest ratio value, is selected as an optimal rule for regional fusion. High-frequency information of radar image could be better retained, at the same time the low-frequency information of optical image also could be remained. Experimental results showed that our approach performs better than those methods with single fusion rule.

  9. Acoustic micro-Doppler radar for human gait imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaonian; Pouliquen, Philippe O; Waxman, Allen; Andreou, Andreas G

    2007-03-01

    A portable acoustic micro-Doppler radar system for the acquisition of human gait signatures in indoor and outdoor environments is reported. Signals from an accelerometer attached to the leg support the identification of the components in the measured micro-Doppler signature. The acoustic micro-Doppler system described in this paper is simpler and offers advantages over the widely used electromagnetic wave micro-Doppler radars.

  10. Radar image processing module development program, phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of using charge coupled devices in an IPM for processing synthetic aperture radar signals onboard the NASA Convair 990 (CV990) aircraft was demonstrated. Radar data onboard the aircraft was recorded and processed using a CCD sampler and digital tape recorder. A description of equipment and testing was provided. The derivation of the digital presum filter was documented. Photographs of the sampler/tape recorder, real time display and circuit boards in the IPM were also included.

  11. Informational Analysis for Compressive Sampling in Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxiong Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sampling or compressed sensing (CS works on the assumption of the sparsity or compressibility of the underlying signal, relies on the trans-informational capability of the measurement matrix employed and the resultant measurements, operates with optimization-based algorithms for signal reconstruction and is thus able to complete data compression, while acquiring data, leading to sub-Nyquist sampling strategies that promote efficiency in data acquisition, while ensuring certain accuracy criteria. Information theory provides a framework complementary to classic CS theory for analyzing information mechanisms and for determining the necessary number of measurements in a CS environment, such as CS-radar, a radar sensor conceptualized or designed with CS principles and techniques. Despite increasing awareness of information-theoretic perspectives on CS-radar, reported research has been rare. This paper seeks to bridge the gap in the interdisciplinary area of CS, radar and information theory by analyzing information flows in CS-radar from sparse scenes to measurements and determining sub-Nyquist sampling rates necessary for scene reconstruction within certain distortion thresholds, given differing scene sparsity and average per-sample signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs. Simulated studies were performed to complement and validate the information-theoretic analysis. The combined strategy proposed in this paper is valuable for information-theoretic orientated CS-radar system analysis and performance evaluation.

  12. Change detection in synthetic aperture radar images based on image fusion and fuzzy clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Maoguo; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Ma, Jingjing

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents an unsupervised distribution-free change detection approach for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images based on an image fusion strategy and a novel fuzzy clustering algorithm. The image fusion technique is introduced to generate a difference image by using complementary information from a mean-ratio image and a log-ratio image. In order to restrain the background information and enhance the information of changed regions in the fused difference image, wavelet fusion rules based on an average operator and minimum local area energy are chosen to fuse the wavelet coefficients for a low-frequency band and a high-frequency band, respectively. A reformulated fuzzy local-information C-means clustering algorithm is proposed for classifying changed and unchanged regions in the fused difference image. It incorporates the information about spatial context in a novel fuzzy way for the purpose of enhancing the changed information and of reducing the effect of speckle noise. Experiments on real SAR images show that the image fusion strategy integrates the advantages of the log-ratio operator and the mean-ratio operator and gains a better performance. The change detection results obtained by the improved fuzzy clustering algorithm exhibited lower error than its preexistences.

  13. Classification of Ground Objects Using Laser Radar Data

    OpenAIRE

    Brandin, Martin; Hamrén, Roger

    2003-01-01

    Accurate 3D models of natural environments are important for many modelling and simulation applications, for both civilian and military purposes. When building 3D models from high resolution data acquired by an airborne laser scanner it is de-sirable to separate and classify the data to be able to process it further. For example, to build a polygon model of a building the samples belonging to the building must be found. In this thesis we have developed, implemented (in IDL and ENVI), and eval...

  14. Estimating the Effective Permittivity for Reconstructing Accurate Microwave-Radar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Benjamin R.; Okoniewski, Michal; Fear, Elise C.

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a method for estimating the optimal effective permittivity for reconstructing microwave-radar images. Using knowledge of how microwave-radar images are formed, we identify characteristics that are typical of good images, and define a fitness function to measure the relative image quality. We build a polynomial interpolant of the fitness function in order to identify the most likely permittivity values of the tissue. To make the estimation process more efficient, the polynomial interpolant is constructed using a locally and dimensionally adaptive sampling method that is a novel combination of stochastic collocation and polynomial chaos. Examples, using a series of simulated, experimental and patient data collected using the Tissue Sensing Adaptive Radar system, which is under development at the University of Calgary, are presented. These examples show how, using our method, accurate images can be reconstructed starting with only a broad estimate of the permittivity range. PMID:27611785

  15. Analysis of the Gran Desierto, Pinacte Region, Sonora, Mexico, via shuttle imaging radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, R.; Christensen, P. R.; Mchone, J. F.; Asmerom, Y.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The radar discriminability of geolian features and their geological setting as imaged by the SIR-A experiment is examined. The Gran Desierto and Pincate volcanio field of Sonora, Mexico was used to analyze the radar characteristics of the interplay of aeolian features and volcano terrain. The area in the Gran Desierto covers 4000 sq. km. and contains sand dunes of several forms. The Pincate volcanio field covers more than 2.000 sq. km. and consists primarily of basaltic lavas. Margins of the field, especially on the western and northern sides, include several maar and maar-like craters; thus obtaining information on their radar characteristics for comparison with impact craters.

  16. MEASURING SEA ICE DRIFT VIA CROSS-CORRELATION OF RADAR ICE IMAGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN He-quan; SHEN Yong-ming; Qiu Da-hong

    2004-01-01

    The motion of sea ice has a great effect on winter navigation, and oil field exploration in the Bohai Sea. It is very important to measure the ice drift accurately and efficiently. As a practical technique, radar imagery has been used for sea ice monitoring and forecasting for a long time. Combining with the radar imagery and cross-correlation technique, a new measurement method based on the cross-correlation of radar ice images is specified in this paper to obtain full field measurement of sea ice drift. The theory and fast implementation of cross-correlation are presented briefly in the paper, including the filtering method to modify the invalid vectors. To show deeply the validity of the present method, the velocity maps of sea ice drift are provided in the paper, which are calculated from the radar images grabbed in the Liaodong Gulf. The comparison with the traditional tracing method is also conducted.

  17. Water detection in thermal insulating materials by high resolution imaging with holographic radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capineri, L.; Falorni, P.; Becthel, T.; Ivashov, S.; Razevig, V.; Zhuravlev, A.

    2017-01-01

    The present research is aimed at the application of high resolution holographic images for the detection and characterization of low water content (0.2-1 g) water patches in insulating materials. The images acquired with manual scanning with high frequency (7 GHz) holographic radar with I/Q outputs are compared with a high speed electromechanical scanner with 4 GHz holographic radar. Small patches of the order of 22 mm  ×  22 mm buried at 18 mm into insulating materials with a low dielectric constant, have been accurately reconstructed with the high frequency holographic radar but they can also be detected with the lower frequency holographic radar at even greater depths.

  18. Characterizing detection thresholds using extreme value theory in compressive noise radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Mahesh C.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Rangaswamy, Muralidhar

    2013-05-01

    An important outcome of radar signal processing is the detection of the presence or absence of target reflections at each pixel location in a radar image. In this paper, we propose a technique based on extreme value theory for characterizing target detection in the context of compressive sensing. In order to accurately characterize target detection in radar systems, we need to relate detection thresholds and probabilities of false alarm. However, when convex optimization algorithms are used for compressive radar imaging, the recovered signal may have unknown and arbitrary probability distributions. In such cases, we resort to Monte Carlo simulations to construct empirical distributions. Computationally, this approach is impractical for computing thresholds for low probabilities of false alarm. We propose to circumvent this problem by using results from extreme-value theory.

  19. Emulation of Forward-looking Radar Technology for Threat Detection in Rough Terrain Environments: A Scattering and Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    ground -based, ultra-wideband (UWB) radars with the capability to simultaneously penetrate the ground , and image concealed landmines and improvised...electromagnetic, ground - penetrating radar , rough terrain, target detection, time-reversal imaging 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...developed at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL)—is the low-frequency, UWB synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE), imaging ground - penetrating radar

  20. An operational theory of laser-radar selenodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildey, R.L.; Schlier, R.E.; Hull, J.A.; Larson, G.

    1967-01-01

    A theory of the utilization of laser techniques for ranging from the Earth to the Moon for the purpose of providing control points on the lunar surface at which the figure of the Moon is measured to an accuracy at least an order of magnitude better than that of the present astrometric measurements is presented. This, in turn, increases the accuracy of the horizontal selenocentric coordinates of topographical features measured by present astrometric methods. The improvement in the vertical and horizontal coordinates of control points in the Apollo landing zone will aid in the analysis of Unmanned Lunar Orbiter photographs for the selection of Apollo landing sites. The present discussion proposes the means of obtaining the ground control upon which the Orbiter photogrammetry is to be fastened. In addition, a technique of combining Goldstone tracking data to show where the resulting lunar figure is positioned relative to the Moon's center of mass is presented. If corner reflectors are placed on the lunar surface, as suggested by many members of the scientific community, or on a lunar orbiting vehicle, one or more Earth-based laser ranging systems are essential. These reflectors will give enough enhancement in return signal to allow for an additional increase in range accuracy of one to two orders of magnitude. In addition to the primary data on the figure of the Moon, a number of other measurements of scientific importance are then readily obtainable. As far as the measurement of control points is concerned, however, the use of corner reflectors is not essential for the success of this project. Questions regarding the influence on the present shape of the Moon of the frozen tide, isostasy, and past impacts of large asteroids appear in large part answerable through the data which are indicated to be obtainable under the present theory. ?? 1967.

  1. SIMULATION STUDY OF IMAGING OF UNDERWATER BOTTOM TOPOGRAPHY BY SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Interaction between current and underwater bottom topography modulates roughness of the sea surface, which in turn yields variation of the radar scattering echo. By using the mechanism, this paper presents a simulation model for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging of underwater bottom topography. The numerical simulations experiments were made using the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) and analytical expression theory of SAR Image in Mischief sea area. It is concluded that the SAR image is better visual when water depth of underwater bottom topography is shallow or gradient of underwater bottom topography is high.

  2. Polarimetric analysis of radar backscatter from ground-based scatterometers and wheat biomass monitoring with advanced synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Tong, Ling; Li, Yuxia; Chen, Yan; Tan, Longfei; Guo, Caizheng

    2016-04-01

    This article presents an analysis of the scattering measurements for an entire wheat growth cycle by ground-based scatterometers at a frequency of 5.3 GHz. Since wheat ears are related to wheat growth and yield, the radar backscatter of wheat was analyzed at two different periods, i.e., with and without wheat ears. Simultaneously, parameters such as wheat and soil characteristics as well as volume scattering and soil scattering were analyzed for the two periods during the entire growth cycle. Wheat ears have been demonstrated to have a great influence on radar backscatter; therefore, a modified version of water-cloud model used for retrieving biomass should consider the effect of wheat ears. This work presents two retrieval models based on the water-cloud model and adopts the advanced integral equation model to simulate the soil backscatter before the heading stage and the backscatter from the layer under wheat ears after the heading stage. The research results showed that the biomass retrieved from the advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) images to agree well with the data measured in situ after setting the modified water-cloud model for the growth stages with ears. Furthermore, it was concluded that wheat ears should form an essential component of theoretical modeling as they influence the final yield.

  3. Laser bistatic two-dimensional scattering imaging simulation of lambert cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanjun; Zhu, Chongyue; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with the laser bistatic two-dimensional scattering imaging simulation of lambert cone. Two-dimensional imaging is called as planar imaging. It can reflect the shape of the target and material properties. Two-dimensional imaging has important significance for target recognition. The expression of bistatic laser scattering intensity of lambert cone is obtained based on laser radar eauqtion. The scattering intensity of a micro-element on the target could be obtained. The intensity is related to local angle of incidence, local angle of scattering and the infinitesimal area on the cone. According to the incident direction of laser, scattering direction and normal of infinitesimal area, the local incidence angle and scattering angle can be calculated. Through surface integration and the introduction of the rectangular function, we can get the intensity of imaging unit on the imaging surface, and then get Lambert cone bistatic laser two-dimensional scattering imaging simulation model. We analyze the effect of distinguishability, incident direction, observed direction and target size on the imaging. From the results, we can see that the scattering imaging simulation results of the lambert cone bistatic laser is correct.

  4. Integration of differential global positioning system with ultrawideband synthetic aperture radar for forward imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David C.; Bui, Khang; Nguyen, Lam H.; Smith, Gregory; Ton, Tuan T.

    2003-09-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), as part of a customer and mission-funded exploratory development program, has been evaluating low-frequency, ultra-wideband (UWB) imaging radar for forward imaging to support the Army's vision for increased mobility and survivability of unmanned ground vehicle missions. As part of the program to improve the radar system and imaging capability, ARL has incorporated a differential global positioning system (DGPS) for motion compensation into the radar system. The use of DGPS can greatly increase positional accuracy, thereby allowing us to improve our ability to focus better images for the detection of small targets such as plastic mines and other concealed objects buried underground. The ability of UWB radar technology to detect concealed objects could provide an important obstacle avoidance capability for robotic vehicles, which would improve the speed and maneuverability of these vehicles and consequently increase the survivability of the U.S. forces. This paper details the integration and discusses the significance of integrating a DGPS into the radar system for forward imaging. It also compares the difference between DGPS and the motion compensation data collected by the use of the original theodolite-based system.

  5. Multihit mode direct-detection laser radar system using a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Min Seok; Kong, Hong Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Hong, Keun Ho; Kim, Byung Wook; Park, Dong Jo

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, a direct-detection laser radar system that uses a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) of relatively short dead time (45 ns) is described. A passively Q-switched microchip laser is used as a laser source and a compact peripheral component interconnect system, which includes a time-to-digital converter (TDC), is set up for fast signal processing. With both the GAPD and the TDC functioning multistop acquisition, the system operates in a multihit mode. The software for the three-dimensional visualization and an algorithm for the removal of noise are developed. It is shown that the single-shot precision of the system is approximately 10 cm (sigma) and the precision is improved by increasing the number of laser pulses to be averaged so that the precision of approximately 1 cm (sigma) was acquired with more than 150 laser pulses scattered from the target. The accuracy of the system is measured to be 12 cm when the energy of the emitted laser pulse varies with a factor of 7.

  6. Simulation of laser bistatic two-dimensional scattering imaging about lambertian cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanjun; Li, Lang; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the simulation of laser bi-static scattering imaging about lambertian cylinders. Two-dimensional imaging of a target can reflect the shape of the target and material property on the surface of the target. Two-dimensional imaging has important significance for target recognition. Simulations results of laser bi-static two-dimensional scattering imaging of some cylinders are given. The laser bi-static scattering imaging of cylinder, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. The scattering direction of laser bi-static scattering imaging is arbitrary direction. The scattering direction of backward two-dimensional scattering imaging is at opposite direction of the incident direction of laser. The backward two-dimensional scattering imaging is special case of bi-static two dimensional scattering imaging. The scattering intensity of a micro-element on the target could be obtained based on the laser radar equation. The intensity is related to local angle of incidence, local angle of scattering and the infinitesimal area on the surface of cylinder. According to the incident direction of incident laser and normal of infinitesimal area, the local incidence angle can be calculated. According to the scattering direction and normal of infinitesimal area, the local angle of scattering can be calculated. Through surface integration and the introduction of the rectangular function, we can get the intensity of imaging unit on the imaging surface, and then get mathematical model of bi-static laser two dimensional scattering imaging about lambert cylinder. From the results given, one can see that the simulation results of laser bi-static scattering about lambert cylinder is correct.

  7. Wavefront curvature limitations and compensation to polar format processing for synthetic aperture radar images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-01-01

    Limitations on focused scene size for the Polar Format Algorithm (PFA) for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation are derived. A post processing filtering technique for compensating the spatially variant blurring in the image is examined. Modifications to this technique to enhance its robustness are proposed.

  8. Basics of Polar-Format algorithm for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a background to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation using the Polar Format (PFA) processing algorithm. This is meant to be an aid to those tasked to implement real-time image formation using the Polar Format processing algorithm.

  9. Tomographic imaging with ultra-wideband noise radar using time-domain data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Jung; Narayanan, Ram M.; Rangaswamy, Muralidhar

    2013-05-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of using a noise waveform in an ultra-wideband (UWB) radar system for two-dimensional tomographic imaging of a stationary object with a multistatic tomographic geometry. Multiple UWB transmitters and receivers are positioned along each side of the imaging area. We perform several numerical simulations in time-domain, and the successful imaging of the target is achieved by visual inspection of the formed images.

  10. Acousto-optic laser optical feedback imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquin, Olivier; Lacot, Eric; Hugon, Olivier; De Chatellus, Hugues Guillet; François, Ramaz

    2012-01-01

    We present a photon noise and diffraction limited imaging method combining the imaging laser and ultrasonic waves. The laser optical feedback imaging (LOFI) technique is an ultrasensitive imaging method for imaging objects through or embedded within a scattering medium. However, LOFI performances are dramatically limited by parasitic optical feedback occurring in the experimental setup. In this work, we have tagged the ballistic photons by an acousto-optic effect in order to filter the parasitic feedback effect and to reach the theoretical and ultimate sensitivity of the LOFI technique. We present the principle and the experimental setup of the acousto-optic laser optical feedback imaging (AO-LOFI) technique, and we demonstrate the suppression of the parasitic feedback.

  11. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuenschel, E. [Mirage Systems, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This report describes the development of a system known as 3-D SISAR. This system consists of a ground penetrating radar with software algorithms designed for the detection, location, and identification of buried objects in the underground hazardous waste environments at DOE storage sites.

  12. Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging of Buried Metallic Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polat, A. Burak; Meincke, Peter

    2001-01-01

    During the past decade there has been considerable research on ground penetrating radar (GPR) tomography for detecting objects such as pipes, cables, mines and barrels buried under the surface of the Earth. While the earlier researches were all based on the assumption of a homogeneous background...

  13. Three-dimensional Radar Imaging of a Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Semicontrolled Conditions. IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters January 2011, 8, 123–127. 4. Wang, Z.; Fathy, A. Advanced System Level...24. Skolnik, M. I. Introduction to Radar Systems; McGraw Hill: New York, 2001. 25. Gandhi , P. P.; Kassam, S. A. Analysis of CFAR Processors in

  14. Single-frequency mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator source for coherent laser radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, F; Poirier, P; Arbore, M A

    2001-11-15

    We report on the design and characterization of a highly coherent mid-IR source at 3.57mum based on a single-frequency optical parametric oscillator. Detailed frequency and amplitude noise spectra have been measured. The rms intensity noise from 1.2 to 1000 Hz was 0.03%, and a rms frequency drift of 8 kHz in 1 ms was observed. We have also demonstrated the utility of this source for coherent laser radar applications by measuring micro-Doppler spectra from vibrating targets.

  15. 220GHz wideband 3D imaging radar for concealed object detection technology development and phenomenology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Duncan A.; Macfarlane, David G.; Bryllert, Tomas

    2016-05-01

    We present a 220 GHz 3D imaging `Pathfinder' radar developed within the EU FP7 project CONSORTIS (Concealed Object Stand-Off Real-Time Imaging for Security) which has been built to address two objectives: (i) to de-risk the radar hardware development and (ii) to enable the collection of phenomenology data with ~1 cm3 volumetric resolution. The radar combines a DDS-based chirp generator and self-mixing multiplier technology to achieve a 30 GHz bandwidth chirp with such high linearity that the raw point response is close to ideal and only requires minor nonlinearity compensation. The single transceiver is focused with a 30 cm lens mounted on a gimbal to acquire 3D volumetric images of static test targets and materials.

  16. Design and Implementation of a FPGA and DSP Based MIMO Radar Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The work presented in this paper is aimed at the implementation of a real-time multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO imaging radar used for area surveillance. In this radar, the equivalent virtual array method and time-division technique are applied to make 16 virtual elements synthesized from the MIMO antenna array. The chirp signal generater is based on a combination of direct digital synthesizer (DDS and phase locked loop (PLL. A signal conditioning circuit is used to deal with the coupling effect within the array. The signal processing platform is based on an efficient field programmable gates array (FPGA and digital signal processor (DSP pipeline where a robust beamforming imaging algorithm is running on. The radar system was evaluated through a real field experiment. Imaging capability and real-time performance shown in the results demonstrate the practical feasibility of the implementation.

  17. Sparse Scenario Imaging for Active Radar in the Forward-Looking Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The resolution of multiple targets at the same range cell but different angles in the forward-looking direction is of great trouble for active radar. Based on compressive sensing (CS framework, a sparse scenario imaging approach using joint angle-Doppler representation basis is proposed, which employs multisensor and single-receiver channel hardware architecture. Firstly, the joint angle-Doppler representation basis is formulated using the Doppler dictionary, and then the radar returns during multiple pulse repetition periods are modeled as the measurements with respect to a stationary sparse target scenario via the joint representation basis; in the end, the image of sparse target scenario is recovered using the single-receiver echoes. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can provide an image of the spatial sparse scenario at the same range for active radar in the forward-looking direction.

  18. Improved Reconstruction of Radio Holographic Signal for Forward Scatter Radar Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Cheng; Liu, Changjiang; Wang, Rui; Zeng, Tao

    2016-05-07

    Forward scatter radar (FSR), as a specially configured bistatic radar, is provided with the capabilities of target recognition and classification by the Shadow Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (SISAR) imaging technology. This paper mainly discusses the reconstruction of radio holographic signal (RHS), which is an important procedure in the signal processing of FSR SISAR imaging. Based on the analysis of signal characteristics, the method for RHS reconstruction is improved in two parts: the segmental Hilbert transformation and the reconstruction of mainlobe RHS. In addition, a quantitative analysis of the method's applicability is presented by distinguishing between the near field and far field in forward scattering. Simulation results validated the method's advantages in improving the accuracy of RHS reconstruction and imaging.

  19. DBS imaging and GMTI in a wideband airborne mechanic scanning radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan-ping; XING Meng-dao; BAO Zheng

    2006-01-01

    A principle for choosing the coherent integration number and an improved Doppler beam sharpening (DBS)imaging algorithm for mechanic scanning radar are presented in this paper.By compensating the range migration in wideband airborne mechanic scanning radar,the proposed DBS imaging algorithm can efficiently improve the resolution of a DBS image.In addition,based on the characteristic that the echo from the moving target will be modulated by the antenna pattern,a novel method used to locate the moving target is also presented,which begins with the sub-aperture moving target detection followed by the sliding window detection.Proper location can be achieved by using this method.Finally,the results on real radar data are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of these proposed methods.

  20. Improved Reconstruction of Radio Holographic Signal for Forward Scatter Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Forward scatter radar (FSR, as a specially configured bistatic radar, is provided with the capabilities of target recognition and classification by the Shadow Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (SISAR imaging technology. This paper mainly discusses the reconstruction of radio holographic signal (RHS, which is an important procedure in the signal processing of FSR SISAR imaging. Based on the analysis of signal characteristics, the method for RHS reconstruction is improved in two parts: the segmental Hilbert transformation and the reconstruction of mainlobe RHS. In addition, a quantitative analysis of the method’s applicability is presented by distinguishing between the near field and far field in forward scattering. Simulation results validated the method’s advantages in improving the accuracy of RHS reconstruction and imaging.

  1. IoSiS: a radar system for imaging of satellites in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirousek, M.; Anger, S.; Dill, S.; Schreiber, E.; Peichl, M.

    2017-05-01

    Space debris nowadays is one of the main threats for satellite systems especially in low earth orbit (LEO). More than 700,000 debris objects with potential to destroy or damage a satellite are estimated. The effects of an impact often are not identifiable directly from ground. High-resolution radar images are helpful in analyzing a possible damage. Therefor DLR is currently developing a radar system called IoSiS (Imaging of Satellites in Space), being based on an existing steering antenna structure and our multi-purpose high-performance radar system GigaRad for experimental investigations. GigaRad is a multi-channel system operating at X band and using a bandwidth of up to 4.4 GHz in the IoSiS configuration, providing fully separated transmit (TX) and receive (RX) channels, and separated antennas. For the observation of small satellites or space debris a highpower traveling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) is mounted close to the TX antenna feed. For the experimental phase IoSiS uses a 9 m TX and a 1 m RX antenna mounted on a common steerable positioner. High-resolution radar images are obtained by using Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) techniques. The guided tracking of known objects during overpass allows here wide azimuth observation angles. Thus high azimuth resolution comparable to the range resolution can be achieved. This paper outlines technical main characteristics of the IoSiS radar system including the basic setup of the antenna, the radar instrument with the RF error correction, and the measurement strategy. Also a short description about a simulation tool for the whole instrument and expected images is shown.

  2. Radar model fusion of asteroid (4179) Toutatis via its optical images observed by Chang'e-2 probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Xiao, Ting; Liu, Peng; Sun, Lei; Huang, Jiangchuan; Tang, Xianglong

    2016-06-01

    Asteroid (4179) Toutatis has been modeling by ground-based radar observations until Dec 13th, 2012, when distinct optical images of Toutatis were captured during the Chang'e-2 flyby at the shortest distance for the first time. The surface details on Toutatis in the optical images are abundant enough to reinforce the radar model descriptions. Under this context, we customized a method of frequency domain data fusion, which combines the topography information of radar model and the 3rd dimension information estimated from optical image by shape from shading algorithm, and gave out a new Toutatis' radar model. A model with abundant surface characteristics had been resulted.

  3. Real-time implementation of frequency-modulated continuous-wave synthetic aperture radar imaging using field programmable gate array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Yinghui; Li, Yachao; Hu, Guibin; Xing, Mengdao

    2015-06-01

    A new miniature linear frequency-modulated continuous-wave radar which mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle is presented. It allows the accomplishment of high resolution synthetic aperture radar imaging in real-time. Only a Kintex-7 field programmable gate array from Xilinx is utilized for whole signal processing of sophisticated radar imaging algorithms. The proposed hardware architecture achieves remarkable improvement in integration, power consumption, volume, and computing performance over its predecessor designs. The realized design is verified by flight campaigns.

  4. Two Decades of Elevation Changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet from Radar and Laser Altimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg Sorensen, L.; Forsberg, R.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Meister, R.; Simonsen, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet has been mapped by radar altimetry since the launch of ERS-1 in 1991, which was followed by ERS-2, Envisat and currently CryoSat-2. For the period 2003-2009 the ice sheet topography was also mapped by laser altimetry by the ICESat mission. Here, we apply suitable elevation change algorithms to radar data from ERS-1, ERS-2, Envisat, and CryoSat-2 data, with the goal to derive continuous, ice sheet-wide elevation changes for the period 1992 to 2015. This analysis has been made possible through the recent release of data from the REAPER project, in which ERS-1 and ERS-2 radar have been reprocessed in a consistent way to that used for Envisat data. Over this 23-year period, the pattern of elevation changes varies significantly. Whilst thickening and thinning can both be observed during different periods, the overall trend of the elevation of the ice sheet is negative, i.e. an overall lowering can be seen during the two decades studied. This work is part of the ESA Greenland Ice Sheet CCI project. We compare elevation changes derived from radar and laser altimetry (2003-09) and find a complex pattern of difference between the two sensor types, and we explain how some of this pattern can be explained by changes in firn compaction and accumulation rates, obtained from a regional climate model and an offline firn model. Also we show how this pattern changes if using differently retracked Envisat data. A special focus will be on results obtained from the CryoSat-2 measurements that provide radar heights of unprecedented coverage and resolution. Here we present the results of a validation exercise carried out as part of the ESA-funded CryoVAL-LI project in which the accuracy of the CryoSat-2 measurements of land ice is assessed. The results presented here signify an important milestone in measuring the surface elevation of the ice sheet: providing us with an insight into past as well as recent changes, providing up-to-date information on the behaviour

  5. The accuracy of satellite radar altimeter data over the Greenland ice sheet determined from airborne laser data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bamber, J.L.; Ekholm, Simon; Krabill, W.

    1998-01-01

    The 336 days of the geodetic phase of ERS-1 provides dense coverage, by satellite radar altimetry, of the whole of the Greenland ice sheet. These data have been used to produce a digital elevation model of the ice sheet. The errors present in the altimeter data were investigated via a comparison...... with airborne laser altimeter data an absolute accuracy typically in the range 2-10 cm +/- 10 cm. Comparison of differences between the radar and laser derived elevations, showed a correlation with surface slope. The difference between the two data sets ranged from 84 cm +/- 79 cm for slopes below 0.1 degrees...

  6. Integrated multi-channel receiver for a pulsed time-of-flight laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Liu, Ruqing; Zhu, Jingguo

    2015-04-01

    An integrated multi-channel receiver for a pulsed time-of-flight (TOF) laser rangefinder has been designed in this paper. The receiver chip as an important component of the laser radar device has been implemented in a 0.18um CMOS process. It consists of sixteen channels and every channel includes preamplifier, amplifier stages, high-pass filter and a timing discriminator which contains a timing comparator and a noise comparator. Each signal paths is independent of other channels. Based on the simulations, the bandwidth and transimpedance of the amplifier channel are 652MHz, 99dBΩ. Under the simulation condition of TT corner and 27°C, the propagation delay of the discriminator is 2.15ns and the propagation delay dispersion is 223ps. The power consumption during continuous measurement is 810mW, and the operating temperature range of the device is -10~60°C.

  7. Analysis of influential factors on a space target's laser radar cross-section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi; Sun, Huayan; Guo, Huichao

    2014-03-01

    This paper utilises the idea of theoretical analysis to introduce a fast and visual laser radar cross-section (LRCS) calculation method for space targets that is implemented with OpenGL. We chose the cube, cylinder and cone as targets based on the general characteristics of satellite shapes. The four-parameter mono-station BRDF is used, and we assume the surface materials are either purely diffuse, purely specular or mixed. The degree of influence on a target's total LRCS of the target's shape and size and the surface materials' BRDF are described. We describe the general laws governing influential factors by comparing simulated results. These conclusions can provide a reference for new research directions and methods to determine a target's laser scattering characteristics.

  8. Experimental results and analysis of sparse microwave imaging from spaceborne radar raw data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG ChengLong; ZHANG BingChen; ZHANG Zhe; HONG Wen; WU YiRong

    2012-01-01

    Sparse microwave imaging is a novel radar framework aiming to bring revolutions to the microwave imaging according to the theory of sparse signal processing. As compressive sensing (CS) is introduced to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging in recent years,the current SAR sparse imaging methods have shown their advantages over the traditional matched filtering methods.However,the requirement for these methods to process the compressed range data results in the increase of the hardware complexity.So the SAR sparse imaging method that directly uses the raw data is needed.This paper describes the method of SAR sparse imaging with raw data directly,presents the analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the echo signal by combining the traditional radar equation with the compressive sensing theory,and provides the tests on 2-D simulated SAR data.The simulation results demonstrate the validity of the SNR analysis,and the good performance of the proposed method while a large percentage of the raw data is dropped. An experiment with RadarSat-1 raw data is also carried out to show the feasibility of processing the real SAR data via the method proposed in this paper.Our method is helpful for designing new SAR systems.

  9. Co-registration of ultrasound and frequency-domain photoacoustic radar images and image improvement for tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Choi, Sung soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the co-registration of ultrasound (US) and frequency domain photoacoustic radar (FD-PAR) images with significant image improvement from applying image normalization, filtering and amplification techniques. Achieving PA imaging functionality on a commercial Ultrasound instrument could accelerate clinical acceptance and use. Experimental results presented demonstrate live animal testing and show enhancements in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast and spatial resolution. The co-registered image produced from the US and phase PA images, provides more information than both images independently.

  10. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar imaging for arbitrary flight trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarman, Can Evren; Yazici, Birsen; Cheney, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analytic, filtered backprojection (FBP) type inversion method for bistatic synthetic aperture radar (BISAR). We consider a BISAR system where a scene of interest is illuminated by electromagnetic waves that are transmitted, at known times, from positions along an arbitrary, but known, flight trajectory and the scattered waves are measured from positions along a different flight trajectory which is also arbitrary, but known. We assume a single-scattering model for the radar data, and we assume that the ground topography is known but not necessarily flat. We use microlocal analysis to develop the FBP-type reconstruction method. We analyze the computational complexity of the numerical implementation of the method and present numerical simulations to demonstrate its performance.

  11. SHUTTLE IMAGING RADAR: PHYSICAL CONTROLS ON SIGNAL PENETRATION AND SUBSURFACE SCATTERING IN THE EASTERN SAHARA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, Gerald G.; McCauley, John F.; Breed, Carol S.; Olhoeft, Gary R.

    1986-01-01

    It is found that the Shuttle Imaging Radar A (SIR-A) signal penetration and subsurface backscatter within the upper meter or so of the sediment blanket in the Eastern Sahara of southern Egypt and northern Sudan are enhanced both by radar sensor parameters and by the physical and chemical characteristics of eolian and alluvial materials. The near-surface stratigraphy, the electrical properties of materials, and the types of radar interfaces found to be responsible for different classes of SIR-A tonal response are summarized. The dominant factors related to efficient microwave signal penetration into the sediment blanket include 1) favorable distribution of particle sizes, 2) extremely low moisture content and 3) reduced geometric scattering at the SIR-A frequency (1. 3 GHz). The depth of signal penetration that results in a recorded backscatter, called radar imaging depth, was documented in the field to be a maximum of 1. 5 m, or 0. 25 times the calculated skin depth, for the sediment blanket. The radar imaging depth is estimated to be between 2 and 3 m for active sand dune materials.

  12. Automated Detection of Contaminated Radar Image Pixels in Mountain Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liping; Qin XU; Pengfei ZHANG; Shun LIU

    2008-01-01

    In mountain areas,radar observations are often contaminated(1)by echoes from high-speed moving vehicles and(2)by point-wise ground clutter under either normal propagation(NP)or anomalous propa-gation(AP)conditions.Level II data are collected from KMTX(Salt Lake City,Utah)radar to analyze these two types of contamination in the mountain area around the Great Salt Lake.Human experts provide the"ground truth"for possible contamination of either type on each individual pixel.Common features are then extracted for contaminated pixels of each type.For example,pixels contaminated by echoes from high-speed moving vehicles are characterized by large radial velocity and spectrum width.Echoes from a moving train tend to have larger velocity and reflectivity but smaller spectrum width than those from moving vehicles on highways.These contaminated pixels are only seen in areas of large terrain gradient(in the radial direction along the radar beam).The same is true for the second type of contamination-point-wise ground clutters.Six quality control(QC)parameters are selected to quantify the extracted features.Histograms are computed for each QC parameter and grouped for contaminated pixels of each type and also for non-contaminated pixels.Based on the computed histograms,a fuzzy logical algorithm is developed for automated detection of contaminated pixels.The algorithm is tested with KMTX radar data under different(clear and rainy)weather conditions.

  13. Simulations of Aperture Synthesis Imaging Radar for the EISCAT_3D Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Hoz, C.; Belyey, V.

    2012-12-01

    EISCAT_3D is a project to build the next generation of incoherent scatter radars endowed with multiple 3-dimensional capabilities that will replace the current EISCAT radars in Northern Scandinavia. Aperture Synthesis Imaging Radar (ASIR) is one of the technologies adopted by the EISCAT_3D project to endow it with imaging capabilities in 3-dimensions that includes sub-beam resolution. Complemented by pulse compression, it will provide 3-dimensional images of certain types of incoherent scatter radar targets resolved to about 100 metres at 100 km range, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio. This ability will open new research opportunities to map small structures associated with non-homogeneous, unstable processes such as aurora, summer and winter polar radar echoes (PMSE and PMWE), Natural Enhanced Ion Acoustic Lines (NEIALs), structures excited by HF ionospheric heating, meteors, space debris, and others. To demonstrate the feasibility of the antenna configurations and the imaging inversion algorithms a simulation of synthetic incoherent scattering data has been performed. The simulation algorithm incorporates the ability to control the background plasma parameters with non-homogeneous, non-stationary components over an extended 3-dimensional space. Control over the positions of a number of separated receiving antennas, their signal-to-noise-ratios and arriving phases allows realistic simulation of a multi-baseline interferometric imaging radar system. The resulting simulated data is fed into various inversion algorithms. This simulation package is a powerful tool to evaluate various antenna configurations and inversion algorithms. Results applied to realistic design alternatives of EISCAT_3D will be described.

  14. Information extraction and transmission techniques for spaceborne synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, V. S.; Yurovsky, L.; Watson, E.; Townsend, K.; Gardner, S.; Boberg, D.; Watson, J.; Minden, G. J.; Shanmugan, K. S.

    1984-01-01

    Information extraction and transmission techniques for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery were investigated. Four interrelated problems were addressed. An optimal tonal SAR image classification algorithm was developed and evaluated. A data compression technique was developed for SAR imagery which is simple and provides a 5:1 compression with acceptable image quality. An optimal textural edge detector was developed. Several SAR image enhancement algorithms have been proposed. The effectiveness of each algorithm was compared quantitatively.

  15. A Multi-Frequency Wide-Swath Spaceborne Cloud and Precipitation Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lihua; Racette, Paul; Heymsfield, Gary; McLinden, Matthew; Venkatesh, Vijay; Coon, Michael; Perrine, Martin; Park, Richard; Cooley, Michael; Stenger, Pete; hide

    2016-01-01

    Microwave and millimeter-wave radars have proven their effectiveness in cloud and precipitation observations. The NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey (DS) Aerosol, Cloud and Ecosystems (ACE) mission calls for a dual-frequency cloud radar (W band 94 GHz and Ka-band 35 GHz) for global measurements of cloud microphysical properties. Recently, there have been discussions of utilizing a tri-frequency (KuKaW-band) radar for a combined ACE and Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) follow-on mission that has evolved into the Cloud and Precipitation Process Mission (CaPPM) concept. In this presentation we will give an overview of the technology development efforts at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and at Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems (NGES) through projects funded by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). Our primary objective of this research is to advance the key enabling technologies for a tri-frequency (KuKaW-band) shared-aperture spaceborne imaging radar to provide unprecedented, simultaneous multi-frequency measurements that will enhance understanding of the effects of clouds and precipitation and their interaction on Earth climate change. Research effort has been focused on concept design and trade studies of the tri-frequency radar; investigating architectures that provide tri-band shared-aperture capability; advancing the development of the Ka band active electronically scanned array (AESA) transmitreceive (TR) module, and development of the advanced radar backend electronics.

  16. Evaluation of multifrequency range imaging technique implemented on the Chung-Li VHF atmospheric radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jenn-Shyong; Tsai, Shih-Chiao; Su, Ching-Lun; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    2016-05-01

    The multifrequency range imaging technique (RIM) has been implemented on the Chung-Li VHF array radar since 2008 after its renovation. This study made a more complete examination and evaluation of the RIM technique to facilitate the performance of the radar for atmospheric studies. RIM experiments with various radar parameters such as pulse length, pulse shape, receiver bandwidth, transmitter frequency set, and so on were conducted. The radar data employed for the study were collected from 2008 to 2013. It has been shown that two factors, the range/time delay of the signal traveling in the media and the standard deviation of Gaussian-shaped range-weighting function, play crucial roles in ameliorating the RIM-produced brightness (or power distribution); the two factors are associated with some radar parameters and system characteristics. The range/time delay of the signal was found to increase with time; moreover, it was slightly different for the echoes from the atmosphere with and without the presence of significant precipitation. A procedure of point-by-point correction of range/time delay was thus executed for the presence of precipitation to minimize the bogus brightness discontinuity at range gate boundaries. With the RIM technique, the Chung-Li VHF radar demonstrates its first successful observation of double-layer structures as well as their temporal and spatial variations with time.

  17. Distortion effects in a switch array UWB radar for time-lapse imaging of human heartbeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovoll, Sverre; Berger, Tor; Aardal, Åyvind; Lande, Tor S.; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a major cause of deaths all over the world. Microwave radar can be an alternative sensor for heart diagnostics and monitoring in modern healthcare that aids early detection of CVD symptoms. In this paper measurements from a switch array radar system are presented. This UWB system operates below 3 GHz and does time-lapse imaging of the beating heart inside the human body. The array consists of eight fat dipole elements. With a switch system, every possible sequence of transmit/receive element pairs can be selected to build a radar image from the recordings. To make the radar waves penetrate the human tissue, the antenna array is placed in contact with the body. Removal of the direct signal leakage through the antennas and body surface are done by high-pass (HP) filtering of the data prior to image processing. To analyze the results, measurements of moving spheres in air and simulations are carried out. We see that removal of the direct signal introduces amplitude distortion in the images. In addition, the effect of small target motion between the collection times of data from the individual elements is analyzed. With low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) this motion will distort the image. By using data from real measurements of heart motion in simulations, we analyze how the PRF and the antenna geometry influence this distortions.

  18. A coherent through-wall MIMO phased array imaging radar based on time-duplexed switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingchao; Chetty, Kevin; Brennan, Paul; Lok, Lai Bun; Ritchie, Matthiew; Woodbridge, Karl

    2017-05-01

    Through-the-Wall (TW) radar sensors are gaining increasing interest for security, surveillance and search and rescue applications. Additionally, the integration of Multiple-Input, Multiple-Output (MIMO) techniques with phased array radar is allowing higher performance at lower cost. In this paper we present a 4-by-4 TW MIMO phased array imaging radar operating at 2.4 GHz with 200 MHz bandwidth. To achieve high imaging resolution in a cost-effective manner, the 4 Tx and 4 Rx elements are used to synthesize a uniform linear array (ULA) of 16 virtual elements. Furthermore, the transmitter is based on a single-channel 4-element time-multiplexed switched array. In transmission, the radar utilizes frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) waveforms that undergo de-ramping on receive to allow digitization at relatively low sampling rates, which then simplifies the imaging process. This architecture has been designed for the short-range TW scenarios envisaged, and permits sufficient time to switch between antenna elements. The paper first outlines the system characteristics before describing the key signal processing and imaging algorithms which are based on traditional Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) processing. These techniques are implemented in LabVIEW software. Finally, we report results from an experimental campaign that investigated the imaging capabilities of the system and demonstrated the detection of personnel targets. Moreover, we show that multiple targets within a room with greater than approximately 1 meter separation can be distinguished from one another.

  19. Intraframe compression of radar image sequences for ship traffic control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreadis, Alessandro; Benelli, Giuliano; Garzelli, Andrea; Susini, S.

    1996-09-01

    In this paper, an intraframe scheme for high compression of X-band radar images for ship traffic control is proposed. We used a proprietary radar simulator which generates maritime scenarios as seen by one or more radar sites. We propose a modified adaptive discrete cosine transform (MADCT) scheme which allows us to classify each 8 by 8 image block by means of a threshold criterion based on ac and dc activity. The strategy of transmission of the DCT coefficients, the recovering process of blocks incorrectly discarded, and the bit-allocation phase have been properly designed to fit with the particular application. Accurate experimental results, in terms of PSNR and compression ratio, prove the superiority of the novel scheme with respect to standard coding techniques.

  20. Laser Field Imaging Through Fourier Transform Heterodyne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.; Olivas, N.L.; Galbraith, A.E.; Strauss, C.E.; Grubler, A.C.

    1999-04-05

    The authors present a detection process capable of directly imaging the transverse amplitude, phase, and Doppler shift of coherent electromagnetic fields. Based on coherent detection principles governing conventional heterodyned RADAR/LADAR systems, Fourier Transform Heterodyne incorporates transverse spatial encoding of the reference local oscillator for image capture. Appropriate selection of spatial encoding functions allows image retrieval by way of classic Fourier manipulations. Of practical interest: (1) imaging may be accomplished with a single element detector/sensor requiring no additional scanning or moving components, (2) as detection is governed by heterodyne principles, near quantum limited performance is achievable, (3) a wide variety of appropriate spatial encoding functions exist that may be adaptively configured in real-time for applications requiring optimal detection, and (4) the concept is general with the applicable electromagnetic spectrum encompassing the RF through optical.

  1. Non-Cooperative Target Imaging and Parameter Estimation with Narrowband Radar Echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-mao Yeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the rotating target imaging and parameter estimation with narrowband radar echoes, which is essential for radar target recognition. First, a two-dimensional (2D imaging model with narrowband echoes is established in this paper, and two images of the target are formed on the velocity-acceleration plane at two neighboring coherent processing intervals (CPIs. Then, the rotating velocity (RV is proposed to be estimated by utilizing the relationship between the positions of the scattering centers among two images. Finally, the target image is rescaled to the range-cross-range plane with the estimated rotational parameter. The validity of the proposed approach is confirmed using numerical simulations.

  2. Sparsity Aware Adaptive Radar Sensor Imaging in Complex Scattering Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-15

    radar under compound Gaussian clutter using variational Bayesian inference; 2) The development of range and Doppler estimation method using weighted OFDM...complex Gaussian inverse Gamma (CGIG) distri- bution q(x, σ2a) ∝ p0(x, σ2a)(1/σ2a)Ne− ∑N t=1 |yt−Φtx|2/σ2a⟨1/ut⟩q(ut) (1.24) Note that the functional form...that the unknown parameter is a linear function of the observations and follows a Gaussian distribution. Note that ML and Bayesian algorithms usually

  3. Comparison of MESSENGER Optical Images with Thermal and Radar Data for the Surface of MERCURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, D. T.; Coman, E. I.; Chabot, N. L.; Izenberg, N. R.; Harmon, J. K.; Neish, C.

    2010-12-01

    Images collected by the MESSENGER spacecraft during its three Mercury flybys cover nearly the entire surface of the planet that was not imaged by Mariner 10. The MESSENGER data now allow us to observe features at optical wavelengths that were previously known only through remote sensing in other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. For example, the Mariner 10 infrared (IR) radiometer made measurements along a track on the night side of Mercury during the spacecraft's first encounter in 1974. Analysis of the IR radiometer data identified several thermal anomalies that we have correlated to craters with extensive rays or ejecta deposits, including Xiao Zhao and Eminescu. The thermal properties are consistent with a greater exposure of bare rock (exposed in steep walls or as boulders and cobbles) in and around these craters compared with the lower-thermal-inertia, finer-grained regolith of the surrounding older surface. The portion of Mercury not viewed by Mariner 10 has also been imaged by Earth-based radar. The radar backscatter gives information on the wavelength-scale surface roughness. Arecibo S-band (12.6-cm wavelength) radar observations have produced images of Eminescu and also revealed two spectacular rayed craters (Debussy and Hokusai) that have since been imaged by MESSENGER. We are examining radial profiles for these craters, extracted from both the radar images and MESSENGER narrow-angle camera mosaics, that extend from the crater center outwards to a distance of several crater diameters. Comparison of optical and radar profiles for the craters, as well as similar profiles for lunar craters, can provide insight into ejecta deposition, the effect of surface gravity on the cratering process, and space weathering.

  4. HF Radar Signal Processing Based on Tomographic Imaging and CS Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the application of a spotlight-mode synthetic aperture radar (SAR imaging technique to the problem of high probablity target detection in high frequency (HF radar system, attempting to improve its spatial resolution. The effects of finite aperture on resolution, sampling constraints and reconstruction over a complete angular range of 360 degrees are discussed. A Convolution Back Projection (CBP algorithm has been applied to image reconstruction. In order to solve the range limitation of aspect angle with one radar-carrying platform, we collect data over a larger azimuthal range by making multi-aspect observations. Each straight line is a sub aperture over which we can perform the CBP algorithm. When we demand higher resolution for stationary target, it will cause blur with longer data acquisition time. Thus the application of the traditional imaging algorithm is limited. Compressed Sensing (CS has recently attracted much interest as it can reduce the number of samples without compromising the imaging quality. Within this motivation, we discuss the applicability of CS and present the application constraint for HF radar system.

  5. MONO-PULSE RADAR 3-D IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR TARGET IN STEPPED TRACKING MODE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Tao; Ma Changzheng; Zhang Qun; Zhang Shouhong

    2002-01-01

    A method for mono-pulse radar 3-D imaging in stepped tracking mode is presented and the amplitude linear modulation of error signals in stepped tracking mode is analyzed with its compensation method followed, so the problem of precisely tracking of target is solved. Finally the validity of these methods is proven by the simulation results.

  6. MONO-PULSE RADAR 3-D IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR TARGET IN STEPPED TRACKING MODE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A method for mono-pulse radar 3-D imaging in stepped tracking mode is presented and the amplitude linear modulation of error signals in stepped tracking mode is analyzed with its compensation method followes,so the problem of precisely tracking of target is solved.Finally the validity of these methods is proven by the simulation results.

  7. Quantitative phase-filtered wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic radar tumor hypoxia imaging toward early cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Soo Sean Choi, Sung; Mandelis, Andreas; Shi, Wei; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-10-19

    Overcoming the limitations of conventional linear spectroscopy used in multispectral photoacoustic imaging, wherein a linear relationship is assumed between the absorbed optical energy and the absorption spectra of the chromophore at a specific location, is crucial for obtaining accurate spatially-resolved quantitative functional information by exploiting known chromophore-specific spectral characteristics. This study introduces a non-invasive phase-filtered differential photoacoustic technique, wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic radar (WM-DPAR) imaging that addresses this issue by eliminating the effect of the unknown wavelength-dependent fluence. It employs two laser wavelengths modulated out-of-phase to significantly suppress background absorption while amplifying the difference between the two photoacoustic signals. This facilitates pre-malignant tumor identification and hypoxia monitoring, as minute changes in total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygenation are detectable. The system can be tuned for specific applications such as cancer screening and SO2 quantification by regulating the amplitude ratio and phase shift of the signal. The WM-DPAR imaging of a head and neck carcinoma tumor grown in the thigh of a nude rat demonstrates the functional PA imaging of small animals in vivo. The PA appearance of the tumor in relation to tumor vascularity is investigated by immunohistochemistry. Phase-filtered WM-DPAR imaging is also illustrated, maximizing quantitative SO2 imaging fidelity of tissues. Oxygenation levels within a tumor grown in the thigh of a nude rat using the two-wavelength phase-filtered differential PAR method.

  8. Research and development cooperation project on environmental measurement using laser radar in fiscal 1995 (environmental network); Kankyo keisokuyo laser radar no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku (kankyo network)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    As a part of the cooperative work with Indonesia of R and D of a laser radar for environmental measurement, the paper described the development of an environmental network. The field survey was conducted in April, July and December 1995 and in March 1996. For the investigational research, five meetings of the committee and four times of group work were held. The Asian environmental network was studied in terms of its arrangement, operation and management, and the overall network/path control design were being prepared. To make the persons concerned abroad and in Japan understood the APEC Osaka Conference held in November 1995, a homepage APEC `95 Kansai was opened using WWW (World Wide Web, a decentralized hyper media system which can dispatch information to the whole world by network using hyper text). Moreover, in connection with this, a homepage was opened of CICC (Center of the International Cooperation for Computerization, a center controlling the whole Asian environmental information network system where E-mail and data are exchangeable with Indonesia via Tokyo NOC (Network Operation Center)). 49 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Research and development cooperation project on environmental measurement using laser radar (environmental network) in fiscal 1993; Kankyo keisokuyo laser radar no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku (kankyo network)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    For the purpose of contributing to the research cooperation project on the development of a laser radar for environmental measurement, the paper surveyed the present and future trend of the environment related information network in Indonesia. The survey was conducted in terms of a name of the network, the main administration body, the number of users, the utilization status, the use protocol, details of service, domestic mode installation sites and the main administration body, accounting system, types of the network used, reliability and stability of network, limitations on the use and details of the limitation, etc. The plan for expanding telecommunication equipment is being advanced in a very quick tempo. However, there are many problems in digitalization, and it is feared that the plan will be delayed. As to telecommunication quality and connection quality, the telecommunication completion rate, SCR, is very low, approximately 24% on average, which is equal to that around 1990 in Japan. The business service for users is all bureaucratic since they have a lot of applications for the installation piling up with no exception to the rule of developing countries. 23 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Comparison of space borne radar altimetry and airborne laser altimetry over sea ice in the Fram Strait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giles, K.A.; Hvidegaard, Sine Munk

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the first comparison of satellite radar and airborne laser altimetry over sea ice. In order to investigate the differences between measurements from the two different instruments we explore the statistical properties of the data and determine reasonable scales in space and ti...

  11. Comparison of Surface Elevation Changes of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets from Radar and Laser Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Brenner, Anita C.; Barbieri, Kristine; DiMarzio, John P.; Li, Jun; Robbins, John; Saba, Jack L.; Yi, Donghui

    2012-01-01

    A primary purpose of satellite altimeter measurements is determination of the mass balances of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets and changes with time by measurement of changes in the surface elevations. Since the early 1990's, important measurements for this purpose have been made by radar altimeters on ERS-l and 2, Envisat, and CryoSat and a laser altimeter on ICESat. One principal factor limiting direct comparisons between radar and laser measurements is the variable penetration depth of the radar signal and the corresponding location of the effective depth of the radar-measured elevation beneath the surface, in contrast to the laser-measured surface elevation. Although the radar penetration depth varies significantly both spatially and temporally, empirical corrections have been developed to account for this effect. Another limiting factor in direct comparisons is caused by differences in the size of the laser and radar footprints and their respective horizontal locations on the surface. Nevertheless, derived changes in elevation, dHldt, and time-series of elevation, H(t), have been shown to be comparable. For comparisons at different times, corrections for elevation changes caused by variations in the rate offrrn compaction have also been developed. Comparisons between the H(t) and the average dH/dt at some specific locations, such as the Vostok region of East Antarctic, show good agreement among results from ERS-l and 2, Envisat, and ICESat. However, Greenland maps of dHidt from Envisat and ICESat for the same time periods (2003-2008) show some areas of significant differences as well as areas of good agreement. Possible causes of residual differences are investigated and described.

  12. Imaging and EISCAT radar measurements of an auroral prebreakup event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Safargaleev

    Full Text Available The results of coordinated EISCAT and TV-camera observations of a prebreakup event on 15 November 1993 have been considered. The variations of the luminosity of two parallel auroral arcs, plasma depletion on the poleward edge of one of these arcs as well as electron and ion temperatures in front of a westward travelling surge were studied. It was found that a short-lived brightening of a weak zenith arc before an auroral breakup was accompanied by fading of an equatorial arc and, vice versa. A plasma depletion in the E region was detected by the EISCAT radar on the poleward edge of the zenith arc just before the auroral breakup. The plasma depletion was associated with an enhancement of ion (at the altitudes of 150–200 km and electron (in E region temperatures. During its occurrence, the electric field in the E-region was extremely large (~150 mV/m. A significant increase in ion temperature was also observed 1 min before the arrival of a westward travelling surge (WTS at the radar zenith. This was interpreted as the existence of an extended area of enhanced electric field ahead of the WTS.

  13. Space Radar Image of the Silk route in Niya, Taklamak, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This composite image is of an area thought to contain the ruins of the ancient settlement of Niya. It is located in the southwest corner of the Taklamakan Desert in China's Sinjiang Province. This region was part of some of China's earliest dynasties and from the third century BC on was traversed by the famous Silk Road. The Silk Road, passing east-west through this image, was an ancient trade route that led across Central Asia's desert to Persia, Byzantium and Rome. The multi-frequency, multi-polarized radar imagery was acquired on orbit 106 of the space shuttle Endeavour on April 16, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar. The image is centered at 37.78 degrees north latitude and 82.41 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 35 kilometers by 83 kilometers (22 miles by 51 miles). The image is a composite of an image from an Earth-orbiting satellite called Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre (SPOT)and a SIR-C multi-frequency, multi-polarized radar image. The false-color radar image was created by displaying the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in red, the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in green, and the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) return in blue. The prominent east/west pink formation at the bottom of the image is most likely a ridge of loosely consolidated sedimentary rock. The Niya River -- the black feature in the lower right of the French satellite image -- meanders north-northeast until it clears the sedimentary ridge, at which point it abruptly turns northwest. Sediment and evaporite deposits left by the river over millennia dominate the center and upper right of the radar image (in light pink). High ground, ridges and dunes are seen among the riverbed meanderings as mottled blue. Through image enhancement and analysis, a new feature probably representing a man-made canal has been discovered and mapped. Spaceborne Imaging Radar

  14. Space Radar Image of the Silk route in Niya, Taklamak, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This composite image is of an area thought to contain the ruins of the ancient settlement of Niya. It is located in the southwest corner of the Taklamakan Desert in China's Sinjiang Province. This region was part of some of China's earliest dynasties and from the third century BC on was traversed by the famous Silk Road. The Silk Road, passing east-west through this image, was an ancient trade route that led across Central Asia's desert to Persia, Byzantium and Rome. The multi-frequency, multi-polarized radar imagery was acquired on orbit 106 of the space shuttle Endeavour on April 16, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar. The image is centered at 37.78 degrees north latitude and 82.41 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 35 kilometers by 83 kilometers (22 miles by 51 miles). The image is a composite of an image from an Earth-orbiting satellite called Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre (SPOT)and a SIR-C multi-frequency, multi-polarized radar image. The false-color radar image was created by displaying the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in red, the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in green, and the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) return in blue. The prominent east/west pink formation at the bottom of the image is most likely a ridge of loosely consolidated sedimentary rock. The Niya River -- the black feature in the lower right of the French satellite image -- meanders north-northeast until it clears the sedimentary ridge, at which point it abruptly turns northwest. Sediment and evaporite deposits left by the river over millennia dominate the center and upper right of the radar image (in light pink). High ground, ridges and dunes are seen among the riverbed meanderings as mottled blue. Through image enhancement and analysis, a new feature probably representing a man-made canal has been discovered and mapped. Spaceborne Imaging Radar

  15. A composite scanning method and experiment of laser radar%一种激光雷达复合式扫描方法及试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马辰昊; 付跃刚; 宫平; 欧阳名钊; 张书瀚

    2015-01-01

    In traditional laser radar system, the imaging is influenced by repetition rate of selected solid-state laser as well as scanning bandwidth and scanning precision in the laser scanning system. In order to improve the scanning bandwidth and precision, DFB high-repetition-rate semiconductor laser which was amplified by EDFA was adopted as the laser source firstly. Secondly, a two-stage composite laser scanning method had been proposed with combination of PZT and galvanometer. PZT got on meticulous scanning in small areas, then galvanometer was used to deflect and finish coarse scanning on the PZT scanning field and receiving the field. The scanning accuracy had been raised and the scanning field of laser radar had been expanded simultaneously. At last, azimuth of composite scanning laser radar is ±99 mrad, pitch angle is ±49.5 mrad. Angular resolution can measure up to 0.1 mrad, and the ranging precision can reach 0.159 m.%传统激光雷达系统中,固态激光光源的重复频率和扫描系统的扫描带宽、精度均制约着系统成像.为提高激光雷达的成像精度,首先,在激光光源上采用经EDFA放大后的DFB高重频激光光源.其次,提出了一种PZT与振镜相结合的两级复合式激光扫描方法,利用PZT对小视场范围进行精细扫描,利用振镜对 PZT 的扫描视场和接收视场进行偏转完成粗扫描,在提高激光雷达扫描精度的同时拥有较大的扫描视场.最后,经试验所设计的复合式扫描激光雷达的方位角为±99 mrad,俯仰角为±49.5 mrad,角分辨率达到0.1 mrad,测距精度达到0.159 m.

  16. RADAR PPI Scope Overlay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — RADAR PPI Scope Overlays are used to position a RADAR image over a station at the correct resolution. The archive maintains several different RADAR resolution types,...

  17. An information theory characterization of radar images and a new definition for radiometric resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, V. S.; Shanmugan, K. S.; Holtzman, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The noise properties of the radar image formation process are used in the present modeling of a communication channel in which the desired target properties are the information transmitted, and the final image represents the received signal. The average information rate over this communication channel is calculated together with appropriate bounds and approximations, and is found to be small on a per-sample basis. As a result, many samples must be averaged to allow for the discrimination, or classification, of several levels of target reflectivity. These information rate properties are consistent with known results concerning target detection and image quality in speckle, and the rate is applicable to the definition of radar image radiometric resolution. Radiometric resolution is functionally related to the degree of noncoherent averaging performed by the sensor.

  18. Radar imaging of volcanic fields and sand dune fields: Implications for VOIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elachi, C.; Blom, R.; Daily, M.; Farr, T.; Saunders, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    A number of volcanic fields and sand dune fields in the western part of North America were studied using aircraft and Seasat synthetic aperture radar images and LANDSAT images. The capability of radars with different characteristics (i.e., frequency, polarization and look angles was assessed to identify and map different volcanic features, lava flows and sand dune types. It was concluded that: (1) volcanic features which have a relatively large topographic expression (i.e., cinder cones, collapse craters, calderas, etc.) are easily identified; (2) lava flows of different ages can be identified, particularly on the L-band images; and (3) sand dunes are clearly observed and their extent and large scale geometric characteristics determined, provided the proper imaging geometry exists.

  19. IFP V4.0:a polar-reformatting image formation processor for synthetic aperture radar.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2005-09-01

    IFP V4.0 is the fourth generation of an extraordinarily powerful and flexible image formation processor for spotlight mode synthetic aperture radar. It has been successfully utilized in processing phase histories from numerous radars and has been instrumental in the development of many new capabilities for spotlight mode SAR. This document provides a brief history of the development of IFP, a full exposition of the signal processing steps involved, and a short user's manual for the software implementing this latest iteration.

  20. A Huygens Surface Approach to Antenna Implementation in Near-Field Radar Imaging System Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    critical geometrical details; re- casting the FDTD update equations on a grid conformal to a curvilinear coordinate system (e.g., cylindrical); and...Imaging System Simulations by Traian Dogaru and DaHan Liao Approved for public release; distribution unlimited...A Huygens Surface Approach to Antenna Implementation in Near-Field Radar Imaging System Simulations by Traian Dogaru and DaHan Liao Sensors

  1. Algorithm of the Radar Imaging by Using the Wideband Signals with the Distorted Signal Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia V. Zhulina

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The problem of restoring an image by its Fourier transform is considered when the Fourier transform contains phase distortions. The nature of these distortions and their values are arbitrary. The criterion for the quality of the phase distortion estimates is suggested. It can be used to select the image which is mostly like the true one. The nature of the true image is also arbitrary. The only condition for the true image is that it is real and positive for all the points of the restored area. The other condition for the task is that the recovered image is calculated as the absolute value of the inverse Fourier transform. The algorithm for the search of the compensating phases satisfying the criterion is not considered for the general case; however, the task of the radar imaging based on the wideband signal and the time synthesis of the aperture is treated in detail. The physical basis for the task is a wideband pulse radar signal reflected by a moving object. As a result, a two-dimensional aperture is synthesized along the range, due to the super resolution, and along the velocity, according to the motion of the object. The radar signals are received by a single receiver. The image is reconstructed on the basis of these signals by using the maximum likelihood technique. The method uses the coherent processing of the signals. In practice, the coherence can be destroyed (due to some atmospheric turbulence or equipment instability, due to some inaccuracy in defining the motion. We assume that the objects to be observed are located at the far zone. For this task and on the basis of the suggested criterion, we develop an approximate algorithm for searching the best compensating phases in the radar signal. The quality of the images is tested with the help of simulation.

  2. Long-range laser-illuminated imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, David C.; Browne, Stephen L.; Sandven, Steven C.; Gonglewski, John D.; Gallegos, Joe; Shilko, Michael L., Sr.

    2000-11-01

    We demonstrate the utility of laser illuminated imaging for clandestine night time surveillance from a simulated airborne platform at standoff ranges in excess 20 km. In order to reduce the necessary laser per pulse energy required for illumination at such long ranges, and to mitigate atmospheric turbulence effects on image resolution, we have investigated a unique multi-frame post-processing technique. It is shown that in the presence of atmospheric turbulence and coherent speckle effects, this approach can produce superior results to conventional scene flood illumination.

  3. Airborne and spaceborne radar images for geologic and environmental mapping in the Amazon rain forest, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, John P.; Hurtak, James J.

    1986-01-01

    Spaceborne and airborne radar image of portions of the Middle and Upper Amazon basin in the state of Amazonas and the Territory of Roraima are compared for purposes of geological and environmental mapping. The contrasted illumination geometries and imaging parameters are related to terrain slope and surface roughness characteristics for corresponding areas that were covered by each of the radar imaging systems. Landforms range from deeply dissected mountain and plateau with relief up to 500 m in Roraima, revealing ancient layered rocks through folded residual mountains to deeply beveled pediplain in Amazonas. Geomorphic features provide distinct textural signatures that are characteristic of different rock associations. The principle drainages in the areas covered are the Rio Negro, Rio Branco, and the Rio Japura. Shadowing effects and low radar sensitivity to subtle linear fractures that are aligned parallel or nearly parallel to the direction of radar illumination illustrate the need to obtain multiple coverage with viewing directions about 90 degrees. Perception of standing water and alluvial forest in floodplains varies with incident angle and with season. Multitemporal data sets acquired over periods of years provide an ideal method of monitoring environmental changes.

  4. Arecibo and Goldstone Radar Imaging of Near-Earth Asteroid 2005 WC1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Benner, Lance A. M.; Brozovic, Marina; Jao, Joseph S.; Giorgini, Jon D.; Slade, Martin A.; Jurgens, Raymond F.; Nolan, Michael C.; Howell, Ellen S.; Taylor, Patrick A.

    2016-10-01

    We report radar observations of near-Earth asteroid 2005 WC1 that were obtained at Arecibo (2380 MHz, 13 cm) and Goldstone (8560 MHz, 3.5 cm) on 2005 December 14-15 during the asteroid's approach within 0.020 au (7.7 lunar distances). The asteroid was a strong radar target and we obtained a sequence of delay-Doppler images with resolutions as fine as 7.5 m/pixel. The radar images reveal an angular object with several pronounced facets, radar-dark regions, and an estimated diameter of ~0.4 km. The rotation of the facets in the images gives a rotation period of 2.57 h that is consistent with the estimate of 2.582 h ± 0.002 h reported by Miles et al. (private communication). 2005 WC1 has a circular polarization ratio of 1.12 ± 0.02 that is one of the highest values known, suggesting a structurally-complex near-surface at centimeter decimeter spatial scales. This work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA.

  5. Mapping of sea ice and measurement of its drift using aircraft synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leberl, F.; Bryan, M. L.; Elachi, C.; Farr, T.; Campbell, W.

    1979-01-01

    Side-looking radar images of Arctic sea ice were obtained as part of the Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment. Repetitive coverages of a test site in the Arctic were used to measure sea ice drift, employing single images and blocks of overlapping radar image strips; the images were used in conjunction with data from the aircraft inertial navigation and altimeter. Also, independently measured, accurate positions of a number of ground control points were available. Initial tests of the method were carried out with repeated coverages of a land area on the Alaska coast (Prudhoe). Absolute accuracies achieved were essentially limited by the accuracy of the inertial navigation data. Errors of drift measurements were found to be about + or - 2.5 km. Relative accuracy is higher; its limits are set by the radar image geometry and the definition of identical features in sequential images. The drift of adjacent ice features with respect to one another could be determined with errors of less than + or - 0.2 km.

  6. High-power pulsed diode laser for automotive scanning radar sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuji; Matsushita, Noriyuki; Kato, Hisaya; Abe, Katsunori; Atsumi, Kinya

    2000-02-01

    High performance pulsed AlGaAs/GaAs wide stripe diode laser has been developed for the automotive distance-measuring scanning radar sensor. The laser diode is required high output power of 15 W and a long time reliability in spite of being used in a harsh environment such as wide temperature range, mechanical vibrations at the front bumper and so on. The device is designed by employing a multiple quantum well structure as an active layer for high output power with low drive current and high temperature operations. Moreover we reduce catastrophic optical damage power level and control the beam divergence angle by introducing optimized optical waveguide layers. In the chips bonding part, we developed a new thin film Au-Sn-Ni solder system. The bonding temperature can be lowered by using this system, whereby the thermal damage to the laser diode can be reduced. Furthermore, highly stable bonding is carried out by improving wetting ability in this system. We have achieved more than 22 W light output power at 20A pulse current under room temperature and more than 16 W light output power under 90 degrees Celsius. High reliability over 10,000 hours is performed for automotive use under pulsed operation at 90 degrees Celsius, 50 ns pulse width, 8 kHz frequency and 15 W light output power.

  7. Feature Understanding and Target Detection for Sparse Microwave Synthetic Aperture Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zenghui

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sparse microwave imaging using sparse priors of observed scenes in space, time, frequency, or polarization domain and echo data with sampling rate smaller than the traditional Nyquist rate as well as optimization algorithms for reconstructing the microwave images of observed scenes has many advantages over traditional microwave imaging systems. In sparse microwave imaging, image acquisition and representation vary; therefore, new feature analysis and cognitive interpretation theories and methods should be developed based on current research results. In this study, we analyze the statistical properties of sparse Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images and changes in point, line and regional features induced by sparse reconstruction. For SAR images recovered by the spatial sparse model, the statistical distribution degrades, whereas points and lines can be accurately extracted by low sampling rates. Furthermore, the target detection method based on sparse SAR images is studied. Owing to a weak background noise, target detection is easier using sparse SAR images than traditional ones.

  8. Radar Images And Shape Model Of A Triple Asteroid (136617) 1994CC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozovic, Marina; Benner, L. A. M.; Nolan, M. C.; Howell, E. S.; Magri, C.; Giorgini, J. D.; Taylor, P. A.; Margot, J. L.; Busch, M. W.; Shepard, M. K.; Scheeres, D. J.; Carter, L. M.

    2010-10-01

    We report radar observations and shape modeling of asteroid (136617) 1994CC, which is only the second triple system known in the near-Earth population, after (153591) 2001 SN263. This object was observed at Goldstone (8560 MHz, 3.5 cm) and Arecibo (2380 MHz, 12.6 cm) from June 12 to June 21, 2009. The radar images and subsequent shape modeling reveal that the primary is 600 m in diameter with a shape that closely resembles that of 1999 KW4 Alpha. The secondary is 130 m in diameter and appears to be in a synchronous orbit with a period of 30 hours. The tertiary satellite is 90 m in diameter and has an orbital period of 9 days. Its semimajor axis of 20 primary radii is the largest discovered so far among near-Earth multiple systems. Among the 37 NEA binary or ternary systems currently known, 80% have been observed by radar and 2/3 were discovered by radar. Since January 1999, 17% of radar-detected NEAs with diameters greater than 200 m have been found to be multiple systems.

  9. Segmentation of synthetic aperture radar image using multiscale information measure-based spectral clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haixia Xu; Zheng Tian; Mingtao Ding

    2008-01-01

    @@ A multiscale information measure (MIM), calculable from per-pixel wavelet coefficients, but relying on global statistics of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image, is proposed. It fully exploits the variations in speckle pattern when the image resolution varies from course to fine, thus it can capture the intrinsic texture of the scene backscatter and the texture due to speckle simultaneously. Graph spectral segmentation methods based on MIM and the usual similarity measure are carried out on two real SAR images.Experimental results show that MIM can characterize texture information of SAR image more effectively than the commonly used similarity measure.

  10. A high sensitive 66 dB linear dynamic range receiver for 3-D laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Hao; Zhu, Zhangming

    2017-08-01

    This study presents a CMOS receiver chip realized in 0.18 μm standard CMOS technology and intended for high precision 3-D laser radar. The chip includes an adjustable gain transimpedance pre-amplifier, a post-amplifier and two timing comparators. An additional feedback is employed in the regulated cascode transimpedance amplifier to decrease the input impedance, and a variable gain transimpedance amplifier controlled by digital switches and analog multiplexer is utilized to realize four gain modes, extending the input dynamic range. The measurement shows that the highest transimpedance of the channel is 50 k {{Ω }}, the uncompensated walk error is 1.44 ns in a wide linear dynamic range of 66 dB (1:2000), and the input referred noise current is 2.3 pA/\\sqrt{{Hz}} (rms), resulting in a very low detectable input current of 1 μA with SNR = 5.

  11. Gated viewing laser imaging with compressive sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wu, Lei; Wang, Xingbin; Dang, Ersheng

    2012-05-10

    We present a prototype of gated viewing laser imaging with compressive sensing (GVLICS). By a new framework named compressive sensing, it is possible for us to perform laser imaging using a single-pixel detector where the transverse spatial resolution is obtained. Moreover, combining compressive sensing with gated viewing, the three-dimensional (3D) scene can be reconstructed by the time-slicing technique. The simulations are accomplished to evaluate the characteristics of the proposed GVLICS prototype. Qualitative analysis of Lissajous-type eye-pattern figures indicates that the range accuracy of the reconstructed 3D images is affected by the sampling rate, the image's noise, and the complexity of the scenes.

  12. Synthetic aperture radar imaging algorithm customized for programmable optronic processor in the application of full-scene synthetic aperture radar image formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Hui; Gao, Yesheng; Zhu, Bingqi; Wang, Kaizhi; Liu, Xingzhao

    2015-01-01

    With the high programmability of a spatial light modulator (SLM), a newly developed synthetic aperture radar (SAR) optronic processor is capable of focusing SAR data with different parameters. The embedded SLM, encoding SAR data into light signal in the processor, has a limited loading resolution of 1920×1080. When the dimension of processed SAR data increases to tens of thousands in either range or azimuth direction, SAR data should be input and focused block by block. And then, part of the imaging results is mosaicked to offer a full-scene SAR image. In squint mode, however, Doppler centroid will shift signal spectrum in the azimuth direction and make phase filters, loaded by another SLM, unable to cover the entire signal spectrum. It brings about a poor imaging result. Meanwhile, the imaging result, shifted away from the center of light output, will cause difficulties in subsequent image mosaic. We present an SAR image formation algorithm designed to solve these problems when processing SAR data of a large volume in low-squint case. It could not only obtain high-quality imaging results, but also optimize the subsequent process of image mosaic with optimal system cost and efficiency. Experimental results validate the performance of this proposed algorithm in optical full-scene SAR imaging.

  13. Noise analysis for near field 3-D FM-CW radar imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.

    2015-06-19

    Near field radar imaging systems are used for several applications including concealed weapon detection in airports and other high-security venues. Despite the near-field operation, phase noise and thermal noise can limit the performance in several ways including reduction in system sensitivity and reduction of image dynamic range. In this paper, the effects of thermal noise, phase noise, and processing gain are analyzed in the context of a near field 3-D FM-CW imaging radar as might be used for concealed weapon detection. In addition to traditional frequency domain analysis, a time-domain simulation is employed to graphically demonstrate the effect of these noise sources on a fast-chirping FM-CW system.

  14. Progress on Ultra-Wideband (UWB Multi-Antenna radar imaging for MIGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yedlin Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress on the development of the multi-channel, ground penetrating radar imaging system is presented from hardware and software perspectives. A new exponentially tapered slot antenna, with an operating bandwidth from 100 MHz to 1.5 GHz was fabricated and tested using the eight-port vector network analyzer, designed by Rhode and Schwarz Incorporated for this imaging project. An eight element antenna array mounted on two carts with automatic motor drive, was designed for optimal common midpoint (CMP data acquisition. Data acquisition scenarios were tested using the acoustic version of the NORSAR2D seismic ray-tracing software. This package enables the synthesis and analysis of multi-channel, multi-offset data acquisitions comprising more than a hundred thousand traces. Preliminary processing is in good agreement with published bistatic ground-penetrating radar images obtained in the tunnels of the Low-noise Underground Laboratory (LSBB at Rustrel, France.

  15. 跟踪雷达的ISAR成像技术%ISAR Imaging Technology of Tracking Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高环

    2015-01-01

    ISAR imaging technology of tracking radar is presented in this paper, the specialty of the tracking radar imaging is analyzed and the motion compensation, range-walk correction and orientation imaging are deeply studied. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method by data processing is verified.%本文对跟踪雷达的ISAR成像技术进行了研究。对跟踪雷达的成像特殊性进行了分析,并对成像中涉及的运动补偿、距离走动校正以及方位成像进行了深入研究,最后通过数据处理对所提方法的有效性进行了验证。

  16. Radar Determination of Fault Slip and Location in Partially Decorrelated Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jay; Glasscoe, Margaret; Donnellan, Andrea; Stough, Timothy; Pierce, Marlon; Wang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Faced with the challenge of thousands of frames of radar interferometric images, automated feature extraction promises to spur data understanding and highlight geophysically active land regions for further study. We have developed techniques for automatically determining surface fault slip and location using deformation images from the NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), which is similar to satellite-based SAR but has more mission flexibility and higher resolution (pixels are approximately 7 m). This radar interferometry provides a highly sensitive method, clearly indicating faults slipping at levels of 10 mm or less. But interferometric images are subject to decorrelation between revisit times, creating spots of bad data in the image. Our method begins with freely available data products from the UAVSAR mission, chiefly unwrapped interferograms, coherence images, and flight metadata. The computer vision techniques we use assume no data gaps or holes; so a preliminary step detects and removes spots of bad data and fills these holes by interpolation and blurring. Detected and partially validated surface fractures from earthquake main shocks, aftershocks, and aseismic-induced slip are shown for faults in California, including El Mayor-Cucapah (M7.2, 2010), the Ocotillo aftershock (M5.7, 2010), and South Napa (M6.0, 2014). Aseismic slip is detected on the San Andreas Fault from the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, in regions of highly patterned partial decorrelation. Validation is performed by comparing slip estimates from two interferograms with published ground truth measurements.

  17. Radar Determination of Fault Slip and Location in Partially Decorrelated Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jay; Glasscoe, Margaret; Donnellan, Andrea; Stough, Timothy; Pierce, Marlon; Wang, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Faced with the challenge of thousands of frames of radar interferometric images, automated feature extraction promises to spur data understanding and highlight geophysically active land regions for further study. We have developed techniques for automatically determining surface fault slip and location using deformation images from the NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), which is similar to satellite-based SAR but has more mission flexibility and higher resolution (pixels are approximately 7 m). This radar interferometry provides a highly sensitive method, clearly indicating faults slipping at levels of 10 mm or less. But interferometric images are subject to decorrelation between revisit times, creating spots of bad data in the image. Our method begins with freely available data products from the UAVSAR mission, chiefly unwrapped interferograms, coherence images, and flight metadata. The computer vision techniques we use assume no data gaps or holes; so a preliminary step detects and removes spots of bad data and fills these holes by interpolation and blurring. Detected and partially validated surface fractures from earthquake main shocks, aftershocks, and aseismic-induced slip are shown for faults in California, including El Mayor-Cucapah (M7.2, 2010), the Ocotillo aftershock (M5.7, 2010), and South Napa (M6.0, 2014). Aseismic slip is detected on the San Andreas Fault from the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, in regions of highly patterned partial decorrelation. Validation is performed by comparing slip estimates from two interferograms with published ground truth measurements.

  18. Radar imaging, shape modeling, and Yarkovsky drift of near-Earth asteroid 1566 Icarus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Adam; Margot, Jean-Luc; Verma, Ashok Kumar; Taylor, Patrick A.

    2016-10-01

    Near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 1566 Icarus ( a=1.08 au, e=0.83, i=22.8 degrees) made a rare close approach to Earth in June 2015 at 22 lunar distances (LD). Its detection during the 1968 approach (16 LD) was the first in the history of asteroid radar astronomy. The next approach in 1996 (40 LD) did not yield radar images. We provide the results of analyses of the first radar images obtained of 1566 Icarus during the 2015 close approach. These data suggest that this object is 1.77+-0.3 km in diameter, which is larger than previously thought, and has strongly specular surface scattering behavior. We also provide constraints on 1566 Icarus' spin pole orientation. Finally, we present the first use of our Integration and Determination of Orbits System (IDOS) for the generation of radar predictions, and we demonstrate its ability to measure subtle perturbations on NEA orbits by measuring 1566 Icarus' orbit-averaged drift in semi-major axis (-5.8+-0.5 x 10^-4 AU/Myr).

  19. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar imaging using ultraNarrowband continuous waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Yazici, Birsen

    2012-08-01

    We consider synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging using ultra-narrowband continuous waveforms (CW). Due to the high Doppler resolution of CW signals, we refer to this imaging modality as Doppler Synthetic Aperture Radar (DSAR). We present a novel model and an image formation method for the bistatic DSAR for arbitrary imaging geometries. Our bistatic DSAR model is formed by correlating the translated version of the received signal with a scaled or frequencyshifted version of the transmitted CW signal over a finite time window. High frequency analysis of the resulting model shows that the correlated signal is the projections of the scene reflectivity onto the bistatic iso-Doppler curves. We next use microlocal techniques to develop a filtered-backprojection (FBP) type image reconstruction method. The FBP inversion results in backprojection of the correlated signal onto the bistatic iso- Doppler curves as opposed to the bistatic iso-range curves, performed in the traditional wideband SAR imaging. We show that our method takes advantage of the velocity, as well as the acceleration of the antennas in certain directions to form a high resolution SAR image. Our bistatic DSAR imaging method is applicable for arbitrary flight trajectories, nonflat topography, and can accommodate system related parameters. We present resolution analysis and extensive numerical experiments to demonstrate the performance of our imaging method.

  20. Science Results from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR): Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Diane L. (Editor); Plaut, Jeffrey (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is the most advanced imaging radar system to fly in Earth orbit. Carried in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Endeavour in April and October of 1994, SIR-C/X-SAR simultaneously recorded SAR data at three wavelengths (L-, C-, and X-bands; 23.5, 5.8, and 3.1 cm, respectively). The SIR-C/X-SAR Science Team consists of 53 investigator teams from more than a dozen countries. Science investigations were undertaken in the fields of ecology, hydrology, ecology, and oceanography. This report contains 44 investigator team reports and several additional reports from coinvestigators and other researchers.

  1. Enhanced Radar Imaging in Uncertain Environment: A Descriptive Experiment Design Regularization Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy Shkvarko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A new robust technique for high-resolution reconstructive imaging is developed as required for enhanced remote sensing (RS with imaging array radar or/and synthetic aperture radar (SAR operating in an uncertain RS environment. The operational scenario uncertainties are associated with the unknown statistics of perturbations of the signal formation operator (SFO in turbulent medium, imperfect array calibration, finite dimensionality of measurements, uncontrolled antenna vibrations, and random carrier trajectory deviations in the case of SAR. We propose new descriptive experiment design regularization (DEDR approach to treat the uncertain radar image enhancement/reconstruction problems. The proposed DEDR incorporates into the minimum risk (MR nonparametric estimation strategy the experiment design-motivated operational constraints algorithmically coupled with the worst-case statistical performance (WCSP optimization-based regularization. The MR objective functional is constrained by the WCSP information, and the robust DEDR image reconstruction operator applicable to the scenarios with the low-rank uncertain estimated data correlation matrices is found. We report and discuss some simulation results related to enhancement of the uncertain SAR imagery indicative of the significantly increased performance efficiency gained with the developed approach.

  2. Outside scene obscuration by a millimeter-wave radar image presented on a HUD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntoon, Richard B.; Rand, Timothy W.; Lapis, Mary Beth

    1995-06-01

    We investigated whether a raster image on a Head-Up Display (HUD) might interfere with runway recognition during a low-visibility (CAT II and IIIa) approach. The primary reason for incorporating a HUD into the flight deck is to allow the pilot to observe instrument information while maintaining a view of the outside scene. The raster image could, however, obscure the outside scene, leaving the pilot unaware that the approach or runway lights are visible. In our HUD lab, twenty-one subjects were asked to observe a simulated outside scene through a HUD and indicate when they first saw runway approach lights. Each subject was presented 12 data runs with a simulated 35-GHz raster radar image and stroke symbology simultaneously presented on the HUD, and 12 data runs with only stroke symbology on the HUD. Each run was conducted under simulated fog conditions of either 700-ft Runway Visual Range (RVR) or 1200-ft RVR. We found that the presence of the radar image decreased the recognition range by 24 percent (z equals 5.71, p < 0.001). Subjective comments by the study participants show that the radar serves as a valuable aid in confirming flight path alignment with the runway under low-visibility conditions.

  3. Performance of laser based optical imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhrupesh S.; Banerjee, Arup; Vora, Anup; Biswas, Amiya; Patel, Naimesh; Kurulkar, Amit; Dutt, Ashutosh

    2016-05-01

    Day night imaging application requires high dynamic range optical imaging system to detect targets of interest covering mid-day (>32000 Lux)[1], and moonless night ( 1mLux)[1] under clear sky- (visibility of >10km, atmospheric loss of 500m, atmospheric loss of >15dB/Km) conditions. Major governing factors for development of such camera systems are (i) covert imaging with ability to identify the target, (ii) imaging irrespective to the scene background, (iii) reliable operation , (iv) imaging capabilities in inclement weather conditions, (v) resource requirement vs availability power & mass, (vi) real-time data processing, (vii) self-calibration, and (viii) cost. Identification of optimum spectral band of interest is most important to meet these requirements. Conventional detection systems sensing in MWIR and LWIR band has certain draw backs in terms of target detection capabilities, susceptibility to background and huge thermo-mechanical resource requirement. Alternatively, range gated imaging camera system sensing in NIR/SWIR spectrum has shown significant potential to detect wide dynamic range targets. ToF Camera configured in NIR band has certain advantages in terms of Focal Plane Assembly (FPA) development with large format detectors and thermo-mechanical resource requirement compared to SWIR band camera configuration. In past, ToF camera systems were successfully configured in NIR spectrum using silicon based Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD), Intensifier CCD (ICCD) along with Gating device and pulsed laser source having emission in between 800nm to 900nm. However, these systems have a very low dynamic range and not suitable for clear sky mid-day conditions. Recently silicon based scientific grade CMOS image sensors have shown significant improvement in terms of high NIR responsivity and available in bigger formats (5MP or more), adequate Full well capacity for day time imaging (>30Ke), very low readout noise (<2e) required for night imaging and higher frame

  4. Survey of Study on Internal Waves Detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jin-song

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Internal Waves (IWs detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR image has received considerable attentions in the area of marine remote sensing and has already become one of the most important marine applications of SAR. Typical research results at home and abroad are reviewed. Three areas of researches are introduced and summarized, including parameter inversion method of IWs, the effect of different SAR parameter and wind field conditions on IWs imaging, the 2-dimentional SAR imaging simulation of IWs.

  5. Error Ellipsoid Analysis for the Diameter Measurement of Cylindroid Components Using a Laser Radar Measurement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhengchun; Wu, Zhaoyong; Yang, Jianguo

    2016-05-19

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) data in the industrial measurement field is becoming increasingly popular because of the rapid development of laser scanning techniques based on the time-of-flight principle. However, the accuracy and uncertainty of these types of measurement methods are seldom investigated. In this study, a mathematical uncertainty evaluation model for the diameter measurement of standard cylindroid components has been proposed and applied to a 3D laser radar measurement system (LRMS). First, a single-point error ellipsoid analysis for the LRMS was established. An error ellipsoid model and algorithm for diameter measurement of cylindroid components was then proposed based on the single-point error ellipsoid. Finally, four experiments were conducted using the LRMS to measure the diameter of a standard cylinder in the laboratory. The experimental results of the uncertainty evaluation consistently matched well with the predictions. The proposed uncertainty evaluation model for cylindrical diameters can provide a reliable method for actual measurements and support further accuracy improvement of the LRMS.

  6. Simulation of a laser radar to improve visiblity measurements in dense fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streicher, Juergen

    1992-12-01

    Lidar is the short form of light detection and ranging. The first application of a lidar system was, as in the radar technique, the determination of the distance to large-sized particles (target recognition). Nowadays, it is of more interest to measure the structure of the atmosphere in far distances (remote sensing) to get, for example, information about the mass concentration of the industrial pollution or the visibility conditions in dense fog. In this case the action and reaction of the laser light with the particles is made by very small and different scatterers (molecules, atoms, or aerosols) and, therefore, extremely complex. A simulation program that helps to determine the visibility with a lidar has been developed to present the effects of the components of the system (laser, transmitter, receiver) as well as the parameters of the atmosphere (inhomogeneities, fog, clouds) in a convenient way. A change in any parameter is taken into account instantaneously, so this program can be called an almost real time simulator. A computer with a graphic user interface was chosen to realize this as simply as possible: The Commodore Amiga. The simulation is written in `C' to get the best performance for the calculations.

  7. The design and development of two-failure tolerant mechanisms for the Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR-B) antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presas, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance requirements, design constraints, and design qualification status of the mechanisms necessary to restrain, deploy, and stow the Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR) B antenna experiment on the Shuttle Orbiters are described.

  8. A SEMI-RIGOROUS SENSOR MODEL FOR PRECISION GEOMETRIC PROCESSING OF MINI-RF BISTATIC RADAR IMAGES OF THE MOON

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    R. L. Kirk; J. M. Barrett; D. E. Wahl; I. Erteza; C. V. Jackowatz; D. A. Yocky; S. Turner; D. B. J. Bussey; G. W. Paterson

    2016-01-01

    The spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instruments known as Mini-RF were designed to image shadowed areas of the lunar poles and assay the presence of ice deposits by quantitative polarimetry...

  9. A frequency domain radar interferometric imaging (FII) technique based on high-resolution methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.; Helal, D.; Crochet, M.

    2001-01-01

    In the present work, we propose a frequency-domain interferometric imaging (FII) technique for a better knowledge of the vertical distribution of the atmospheric scatterers detected by MST radars. This is an extension of the dual frequency-domain interferometry (FDI) technique to multiple frequencies. Its objective is to reduce the ambiguity (resulting from the use of only two adjacent frequencies), inherent with the FDI technique. Different methods, commonly used in antenna array processing, are first described within the context of application to the FII technique. These methods are the Fourier-based imaging, the Capon's and the singular value decomposition method used with the MUSIC algorithm. Some preliminary simulations and tests performed on data collected with the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar (Shigaraki, Japan) are also presented. This work is a first step in the developments of the FII technique which seems to be very promising.

  10. BOREAS AFM-6 NOAA/ETL 35 GHz Cloud/Turbulence Radar GIF Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martner, Brooks E.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 35-GHz cloud-sensing radar in the Northern Study Area (NSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 16 Jul 1994 to 08 Aug 1994. This data set contains a time series of GIF images that show the structure of the lower atmosphere. The NOAA/ETL 35-GHz cloud/turbulence radar GIF images are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  11. Ultra-wideband Radar Methods and Techniques of Medical Sensing and Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulson, C N; Chang, J T; Romero, C E; Watson, J; Pearce, F J; Levin, N

    2005-10-07

    Ultra-wideband radar holds great promise for a variety of medical applications. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using ultra-wideband sensors for detection of internal injuries, monitoring of respiratory and cardiac functions, and continuous non-contact imaging of the human body. Sensors are low-power, portable, and do not require physical contact with the patient. They are ideal for use by emergency responders to make rapid diagnosis and triage decisions. In the hospital, vital signs monitoring and imaging application could improve patient outcomes. In this paper we present an overview of ultra-wideband radar technology, discuss key design tradeoffs, and give examples of ongoing research in applying ultra-wideband technology to the medical field.

  12. Airborne radar imaging of subaqueous channel evolution in Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, John B.; Ayoub, Francois; Jones, Cathleen E.; Lamb, Michael P.; Holt, Benjamin; Wagner, R. Wayne; Coffey, Thomas S.; Chadwick, J. Austin; Mohrig, David

    2016-05-01

    Shallow coastal regions are among the fastest evolving landscapes but are notoriously difficult to measure with high spatiotemporal resolution. Using Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) data, we demonstrate that high signal-to-noise L band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can reveal subaqueous channel networks at the distal ends of river deltas. Using 27 UAVSAR images collected between 2009 and 2015 from the Wax Lake Delta in coastal Louisiana, USA, we show that under normal tidal conditions, planform geometry of the distributary channel network is frequently resolved in the UAVSAR images, including ~700 m of seaward network extension over 5 years for one channel. UAVSAR also reveals regions of subaerial and subaqueous vegetation, streaklines of biogenic surfactants, and what appear to be small distributary channels aliased by the survey grid, all illustrating the value of fine resolution, low noise, L band SAR for mapping the nearshore subaqueous delta channel network.

  13. Radar Imaging of Spheres in 3D using MUSIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D H; Berryman, J G

    2003-01-21

    We have shown that multiple spheres can be imaged by linear and planar EM arrays using only one component of polarization. The imaging approach involves calculating the SVD of the scattering response matrix, selecting a subset of singular values that represents noise, and evaluating the MUSIC functional. The noise threshold applied to the spectrum of singular values for optimal performance is typically around 1%. The resulting signal subspace includes more than one singular value per sphere. The presence of reflections from the ground improves height localization, even for a linear array parallel to the ground. However, the interference between direct and reflected energy modulates the field, creating periodic nulls that can obscure targets in typical images. These nulls are largely eliminated by normalizing the MUSIC functional with the broadside beam pattern of the array. The resulting images show excellent localization for 1 and 2 spheres. The performance for the 3 sphere configurations are complicated by shadowing effects and the greater range of the 3rd sphere in case 2. Two of the three spheres are easily located by MUSIC but the third is difficult to distinguish from other local maxima of the complex imaging functional. Improvement is seen when the linear array is replace with a planar array, which increases the effective aperture height. Further analysis of the singular values and their relationship to modes of scattering from the spheres, as well as better ways to exploit polarization, should improve performance. Work along these lines is currently being pursued by the authors.

  14. Method for providing a polarization filter for processing synthetic aperture radar image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Pascale C. (Inventor); vanZyl, Jakob J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polarization filter can maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of a polarimetric SAR and help discriminate between targets or enhance image features, e.g., enhance contract between different types of target. The method disclosed is based on the Stokes matrix/Stokes vector representation, so the targets of interest can be extended targets, and the method can also be applied to the case of bistatic polarimetric radars.

  15. An Algorithm for Surface Current Retrieval from X-band Marine Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengxi Shen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel current inversion algorithm from X-band marine radar images is proposed. The routine, for which deep water is assumed, begins with 3-D FFT of the radar image sequence, followed by the extraction of the dispersion shell from the 3-D image spectrum. Next, the dispersion shell is converted to a polar current shell (PCS using a polar coordinate transformation. After removing outliers along each radial direction of the PCS, a robust sinusoidal curve fitting is applied to the data points along each circumferential direction of the PCS. The angle corresponding to the maximum of the estimated sinusoid function is determined to be the current direction, and the amplitude of this sinusoidal function is the current speed. For validation, the algorithm is tested against both simulated radar images and field data collected by a vertically-polarized X-band system and ground-truthed with measurements from an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP. From the field data, it is observed that when the current speed is less than 0.5 m/s, the root mean square differences between the radar-derived and the ADCP-measured current speed and direction are 7.3 cm/s and 32.7°, respectively. The results indicate that the proposed procedure, unlike most existing current inversion schemes, is not susceptible to high current speeds and circumvents the need to consider aliasing. Meanwhile, the relatively low computational cost makes it an excellent choice in practical marine applications.

  16. Radar Landmass Simulation Computer Programming (Interim Report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    RADAR SCANNING, TERRAIN), (*NAVAL TRAINING, RADAR OPERATORS), (*FLIGHT SIMULATORS, TERRAIN AVOIDANCE), (* COMPUTER PROGRAMMING , INSTRUCTION MANUALS), PLAN POSITION INDICATORS, REAL TIME, DISPLAY SYSTEMS, RADAR IMAGES, SIMULATION

  17. Geometric ortho-rectification and generation of sigma(0) image products from multiple incidence synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curlander, James; Leberl, Franz; Kruse, Fred

    1992-01-01

    The results of the first phase of a cooperative effort in geometric orthorectification and generation of sigma(0) images of multiple incidence SAR images are presented. The geometric accuracy of the final image products is approximately 18 m or 1.5 pixels. A method for registering radar imagery collected from an airborne platform to an existing digital elevation model despite the effects of unmodeled variations in the flight path of the platform is demonstrated. The results indicate the requirements for a more detailed digital elevation model.

  18. Object Hierarchy-based Supervised Characterisation ofSynthetic Aperture Radar Sensor Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ish Rishabh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of supervised characterisation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR satellite imageshas been discussed in which simple object shape features of satellite images have been usedto classify and describe the terrain types. This scheme is based on a multilevel approach inwhich objects of interest are first segmented out from the image and subsequently characterisedbased on their shape features. Once all objects have been characterised, the entire image canbe characterised. Emphasis has been laid on the hierarchical information extraction from theimage which enables greater flexibility in characterising the image and is not restricted to mereclassification. The paper also describes a method for giving relative importance among features,i.e., to give more weights to those features that are better than others in distinguishing betweencompeting classes. A method of comparing two SAR sensor images based on terrain elementspresent in the images has also been described here.

  19. Dynamic Experiment Design Regularization Approach to Adaptive Imaging with Array Radar/SAR Sensor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Santos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider a problem of high-resolution array radar/SAR imaging formalized in terms of a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem of nonparametric estimation of the power spatial spectrum pattern (SSP of the random wavefield scattered from a remotely sensed scene observed through a kernel signal formation operator and contaminated with random Gaussian noise. First, the Sobolev-type solution space is constructed to specify the class of consistent kernel SSP estimators with the reproducing kernel structures adapted to the metrics in such the solution space. Next, the “model-free” variational analysis (VA-based image enhancement approach and the “model-based” descriptive experiment design (DEED regularization paradigm are unified into a new dynamic experiment design (DYED regularization framework. Application of the proposed DYED framework to the adaptive array radar/SAR imaging problem leads to a class of two-level (DEED-VA regularized SSP reconstruction techniques that aggregate the kernel adaptive anisotropic windowing with the projections onto convex sets to enforce the consistency and robustness of the overall iterative SSP estimators. We also show how the proposed DYED regularization method may be considered as a generalization of the MVDR, APES and other high-resolution nonparametric adaptive radar sensing techniques. A family of the DYED-related algorithms is constructed and their effectiveness is finally illustrated via numerical simulations.

  20. Range imaging observations of PMSE using the EISCAT VHF radar: Phase calibration and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Fernandez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel phase calibration technique for use with the multiple-frequency Range IMaging (RIM technique is introduced based on genetic algorithms. The method is used on data collected with the European Incoherent SCATter (EISCAT VHF radar during a 2002 experiment with the goal of characterizing the vertical structure of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE over northern Norway. For typical Doppler measurements, the initial phases of the transmitter and receiver are not required to be the same. The EISCAT receiver systems exploit this fact, allowing a multi-static configuration. However, the RIM method relies on the small phase differences between closely spaced frequencies. As a result, the high-resolution images produced by the RIM method can be significantly degraded if not properly calibrated. Using an enhanced numerical radar simulator, in which data from multiple sampling volumes are simultaneously generated, the proposed calibration method is validated. Subsequently, the method is applied to preliminary data from the EISCAT radar, providing first results of RIM images of PMSE. Data using conventional analysis techniques, and confirmed by RIM, reveal an often-observed double-layer structure with higher stability in the lower layer. Moreover, vertical velocity oscillations exhibit a clear correlation with the apparent motion of the layers shown in the echo power plots.

  1. Autofocus correction of excessive migration in synthetic aperture radar images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2004-09-01

    When residual range migration due to either real or apparent motion errors exceeds the range resolution, conventional autofocus algorithms fail. A new migration-correction autofocus algorithm has been developed that estimates the migration and applies phase and frequency corrections to properly focus the image.

  2. Radar imaging of binary near-Earth asteroid (357439) 2004 BL86

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Lance A. M.; Brozovic, Marina; Giorgini, Jon D.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Howell, Ellen S.; Busch, Michael W.; Nolan, Michael C.; Jao, Joseph S.; Lee, Clement G.; Ford, H. Alyson; Ghigo, Frank D.

    2015-11-01

    We report radar imaging of near-Earth asteroid 2004 BL86 obtained at Goldstone, Arecibo, Green Bank, and elements of the Very Long Baseline Array between 2015 January 26-31. 2004 BL86 approached within 0.0080 au on January 26, the closest known approach by any object with an absolute magnitude brighter than ~19 until 2027. Prior to the encounter, virtually nothing was known about its physical properties other than its absolute magnitude of 19, which suggested a diameter within a factor of two of 500 m. 2004 BL86 was a very strong radar target that provided an outstanding opportunity for radar imaging and physical characterization. Delay-Doppler images with range resolutions as fine as 3.75 m placed thousands of pixels on the object and confirmed photometric results reported by Pravec et al. (2015, CBET 4063) that 2004 BL86 is a binary system. During the observations, the asteroid moved more than 90 deg and provided a range of viewing geometries. The bandwidth was relatively narrow on Jan. 26, reached a maximum on Jan. 27, and then narrowed on Jan. 28, a progression indicating that the subradar latitude moved across the equator during those days. The images reveal a rounded primary with an equatorial diameter of ~350 m, evidence for ridges, possible boulders, and a pronounced angular feature ~100 m in diameter near one of the poles. Images from Jan. 26 show arcs of radar-bright pixels on the approaching and receding limbs that extend well behind the trailing edge in the middle of the echo. This is the delay-Doppler signature of an oblate shape seen at least a few tens of degrees off the equator. A rough estimate for the diameter of the secondary is ~70 m and its narrow bandwidth is consistent with the 14-h orbital period reported by Pravec et al. (2015). The images are suitable for 3D shape, pole, orbit, and mass estimation. The observations utilized new data taking equipment at Green Bank to receive X-band (8560 MHz, 3.5 cm) transmissions from the 70 m DSS-14

  3. Characterization of space-time rainfall patterns over Switzerland based on high-resolution radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Lionel; Mariethoz, Gregoire; Vrac, Mathieu

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall is generated by diverse and complex processes that produce rain fields with a large variability of patterns. High-resolution measurements of rainfall, provided for instance by networks of terrestrial weather radars, allow observing the spatial variability of rainfall patterns and its temporal evolution. The characterization of these space-time rainfall patterns is important for both the understanding of rain generation processes and the study of environmental impacts of rainfall on hydrology, erosion or plants growth, among others. Here we propose to study rainfall patterns using image processing methods on high-resolution radar images (1km x 1km x 1min) over Switzerland. The time series of radar images is first segmented in rain events. Then, the spatial structure of each rain event is characterized by computing statistics over several geometrical indices extracted from radar images, by adapting to the context of mid-latitude rainfalls the indices proposed by Aghakouchak, Nasrollahi et al. (2011) and Zick and Matyas (2016) for tropical rainfall characterization. Finally, the dynamics of rainfall patterns is characterized by estimating rain advection through image correlation, and by quantifying the temporal morphing of spatial patterns in a Lagrangian reference frame, where radar images are re-projected to cancel out rain advection. Two years of data (2015 - 2016) are used to investigate the variability of rainfall patterns over Switzerland. Typical values of the indicators measuring rainfall patterns and their dynamics are extracted for different areas, namely the Jura Mountain, the Swiss Plateau and the Alps. These measures of rainfall variability could be subsequently used to parameterize local weather generators or to investigate the relationships between rainfall patterns and atmospheric synoptic conditions. References: Aghakouchak, A., N. Nasrollahi, J. Li, B. Imam and S. Sorooshian (2011). "Geometrical Characterization of Precipitation Patterns

  4. Planetary Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  6. Laser image denoising technique based on multi-fractal theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lin; Sun, Huayan; Tian, Weiqing; Wang, Shuai

    2014-02-01

    The noise of laser images is complex, which includes additive noise and multiplicative noise. Considering the features of laser images, the basic processing capacity and defects of the common algorithm, this paper introduces the fractal theory into the research of laser image denoising. The research of laser image denoising is implemented mainly through the analysis of the singularity exponent of each pixel in fractal space and the feature of multi-fractal spectrum. According to the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the processed image, the laser image processing technique based on fractal theory not only effectively removes the complicated noise of the laser images obtained by range-gated laser active imaging system, but can also maintains the detail information when implementing the image denoising processing. For different laser images, multi-fractal denoising technique can increase SNR of the laser image at least 1~2dB compared with other denoising techniques, which basically meet the needs of the laser image denoising technique.

  7. Investigation on Beamspace Multiple-Input Multiple-Output Synthetic Aperture Radar Data Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Mo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO technique can improve the high-resolution wide-swath imaging capacity of synthetic aperture radar (SAR systems. Beamspace MIMO-SAR utilizes multiple subpulses transmitted with different time delays by different transmit beams to obtain more spatial diversities based on the relationship between the time delay and the elevation angle in the side-looking radar imaging geometry. This paper presents a beamspace MIMO-SAR imaging approach, which takes advantage of real time digital beamforming (DBF with null steering in elevation and azimuth multichannel raw data reconstruction. Echoes corresponding to different subpulses in the same subswath are separated by DBF with null steering onboard, while echoes received and stored by different azimuth channels are reconstructed by multiple Doppler reconstruction filters on the ground. Afterwards, the resulting MIMO-SAR raw data could be equivalent to the raw data of the single-channel burst mode, and classical burst mode imaging algorithms could be adopted to obtain final focused SAR images. Simulation results validate the proposed imaging approach.

  8. Laser Imaging Systems For Computer Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, Ionel V.; Ionescu-Pallas, Nicholas; Popa, Dragos; Apostol, Ileana; Vlad, Adriana; Capatina, V.

    1989-05-01

    The computer vision is becoming an essential feature of the high level artificial intelligence. Laser imaging systems act as special kind of image preprocessors/converters enlarging the access of the computer "intelligence" to the inspection, analysis and decision in new "world" : nanometric, three-dimensionals(3D), ultrafast, hostile for humans etc. Considering that the heart of the problem is the matching of the optical methods and the compu-ter software , some of the most promising interferometric,projection and diffraction systems are reviewed with discussions of our present results and of their potential in the precise 3D computer vision.

  9. Use of 3D laser radar for navigation of unmanned aerial and ground vehicles in urban and indoor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uijt de Haag, Maarten; Venable, Don; Smearcheck, Mark

    2007-04-01

    This paper discusses the integration of Inertial measurements with measurements from a three-dimensional (3D) imaging sensor for position and attitude determination of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and autonomous ground vehicles (AGV) in urban or indoor environments. To enable operation of UAVs and AGVs at any time in any environment a Precision Navigation, Attitude, and Time (PNAT) capability is required that is robust and not solely dependent on the Global Positioning System (GPS). In urban and indoor environments a GPS position capability may not only be unavailable due to shadowing, significant signal attenuation or multipath, but also due to intentional denial or deception. Although deep integration of GPS and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) data may prove to be a viable solution an alternative method is being discussed in this paper. The alternative solution is based on 3D imaging sensor technologies such as Flash Ladar (Laser Radar). Flash Ladar technology consists of a modulated laser emitter coupled with a focal plane array detector and the required optics. Like a conventional camera this sensor creates an "image" of the environment, but producing a 2D image where each pixel has associated intensity vales the flash Ladar generates an image where each pixel has an associated range and intensity value. Integration of flash Ladar with the attitude from the IMU allows creation of a 3-D scene. Current low-cost Flash Ladar technology is capable of greater than 100 x 100 pixel resolution with 5 mm depth resolution at a 30 Hz frame rate. The proposed algorithm first converts the 3D imaging sensor measurements to a point cloud of the 3D, next, significant environmental features such as planar features (walls), line features or point features (corners) are extracted and associated from one 3D imaging sensor frame to the next. Finally, characteristics of these features such as the normal or direction vectors are used to compute the platform position and attitude

  10. Multibeam single frequency synthetic aperture radar processor for imaging separate range swaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A single-frequency multibeam synthetic aperture radar for large swath imaging is disclosed. Each beam illuminates a separate ""footprint'' (i.e., range and azimuth interval). The distinct azimuth intervals for the separate beams produce a distinct Doppler frequency spectrum for each beam. After range correlation of raw data, an optical processor develops image data for the different beams by spatially separating the beams to place each beam of different Doppler frequency spectrum in a different location in the frequency plane as well as the imaging plane of the optical processor. Selection of a beam for imaging may be made in the frequency plane by adjusting the position of an aperture, or in the image plane by adjusting the position of a slit. The raw data may also be processed in digital form in an analogous manner.

  11. 3D imaging by fast deconvolution algorithm in short-range UWB radar for concealed weapon detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelyev, T.; Yarovoy, A.

    2013-01-01

    A fast imaging algorithm for real-time use in short-range (ultra-wideband) radar with synthetic or real-array aperture is proposed. The reflected field is presented here as a convolution of the target reflectivity and point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system. To obtain a focused 3D image, t

  12. 3D imaging by fast deconvolution algorithm in short-range UWB radar for concealed weapon detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelyev, T.; Yarovoy, A.

    2013-01-01

    A fast imaging algorithm for real-time use in short-range (ultra-wideband) radar with synthetic or real-array aperture is proposed. The reflected field is presented here as a convolution of the target reflectivity and point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system. To obtain a focused 3D image,

  13. LISP: a laser imaging simulation package for developing and testing laser vision systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kung C.

    1993-01-01

    The difficulties commonly encountered in developing laser imaging technologies are: (1) high cost of the laser system, and (2) time and cost involved in modeling and maneuvering a physical environment for the desired scenes. In contrast to the real imaging systems, computer generated laser images provide researchers with fast, accurate, cost-effective data for testing and developing algorithms. The laser imaging simulation package (LISP) described in this paper provides an interactive solid modeler that allows users to construct the artificial environment by various solid modelling techniques. Two fast ray tracing algorithms were developed and discussed in this paper for generating the near realistic laser data of any desired scene. These computer generated laser data facilitates the researchers in developing laser imaging algorithms. Thus, LISP not only provides an ideal testbed for developing and testing algorithms, but also an opportunity to explore the limitation of laser imaging applications.

  14. Signal processing techniques for forward imaging using ultrawideband synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lam H.; Ton, Tuan T.; Wong, David C.; Ressler, Marc A.

    2003-09-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), as part of a customer and mission-funded exploratory development program, has been developing a prototype of low-frequency, ultra-wideband (UWB) forward-imaging synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to support the U.S. Army's vision for increased mobility and survivability of unmanned ground vehicle missions. The ability of the UWB radar technology to detect objects under foilage could provide an important obstacle-avoidance capability for robotic vehicles, which could improve the speed and maneuverability of these vehicles and consequently increase the survivability of the U.S. forces. In a recent experiment at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), we exercised the UWB SAR radar in forward-looking mode and collected data to support the investigation. This paper discusses the signal processing algorithms and techniques that we developed and applied to the recent UWB SAR forward-looking data. The algorithms include motion data processing, self-interference signal (SIR) removal, radio frequency interference (RFI) signal removal, forward-looking image formation, and visualization techniques. We present forward-loking SAR imagery and also volumetric imagery of some targets.

  15. High Resolution Turntable Radar Imaging via Two Dimensional Deconvolution with Matrix Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinfei; Xia, Jie; Yin, Zhiping; Chen, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    Resolution is the bottleneck for the application of radar imaging, which is limited by the bandwidth for the range dimension and synthetic aperture for the cross-range dimension. The demand for high azimuth resolution inevitably results in a large amount of cross-range samplings, which always need a large number of transmit-receive channels or a long observation time. Compressive sensing (CS)-based methods could be used to reduce the samples, but suffer from the difficulty of designing the measurement matrix, and they are not robust enough in practical application. In this paper, based on the two-dimensional (2D) convolution model of the echo after matched filter (MF), we propose a novel 2D deconvolution algorithm for turntable radar to improve the radar imaging resolution. Additionally, in order to reduce the cross-range samples, we introduce a new matrix completion (MC) algorithm based on the hyperbolic tangent constraint to improve the performance of MC with undersampled data. Besides, we present a new way of echo matrix reconstruction for the situation that only partial cross-range data are observed and some columns of the echo matrix are missing. The new matrix has a better low rank property and needs just one operation of MC for all of the missing elements compared to the existing ways. Numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:28282904

  16. Change Detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar Images Based on Deep Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Maoguo; Zhao, Jiaojiao; Liu, Jia; Miao, Qiguang; Jiao, Licheng

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel change detection approach for synthetic aperture radar images based on deep learning. The approach accomplishes the detection of the changed and unchanged areas by designing a deep neural network. The main guideline is to produce a change detection map directly from two images with the trained deep neural network. The method can omit the process of generating a difference image (DI) that shows difference degrees between multitemporal synthetic aperture radar images. Thus, it can avoid the effect of the DI on the change detection results. The learning algorithm for deep architectures includes unsupervised feature learning and supervised fine-tuning to complete classification. The unsupervised feature learning aims at learning the representation of the relationships between the two images. In addition, the supervised fine-tuning aims at learning the concepts of the changed and unchanged pixels. Experiments on real data sets and theoretical analysis indicate the advantages, feasibility, and potential of the proposed method. Moreover, based on the results achieved by various traditional algorithms, respectively, deep learning can further improve the detection performance.

  17. From Matched Spatial Filtering towards the Fused Statistical Descriptive Regularization Method for Enhanced Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkvarko Yuriy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We address a new approach to solve the ill-posed nonlinear inverse problem of high-resolution numerical reconstruction of the spatial spectrum pattern (SSP of the backscattered wavefield sources distributed over the remotely sensed scene. An array or synthesized array radar (SAR that employs digital data signal processing is considered. By exploiting the idea of combining the statistical minimum risk estimation paradigm with numerical descriptive regularization techniques, we address a new fused statistical descriptive regularization (SDR strategy for enhanced radar imaging. Pursuing such an approach, we establish a family of the SDR-related SSP estimators, that encompass a manifold of existing beamforming techniques ranging from traditional matched filter to robust and adaptive spatial filtering, and minimum variance methods.

  18. Investigation of horizontal structures at mesospheric altitudes using coherent radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S.; Stober, G.; Schult, C.; Zecha, M.; Latteck, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) in Northern Norway (69.30°N, 16.04°E) was used to perform interferometric observations of Polar Mesosperic Summer Echoes (PMSE) in June 2012. Coherent Radar Imaging (CRI) using Capon's method was applied allowing a high spatial resolution. The algorithm was validated by simulation and trajectories of meteor head echoes. Both data sets show a good correspondence with the algorithm. Using this algorithm, the aspect sensitivity of PMSE was analysed in a case study, making use of the capability of CRI to resolve the pattern within the beam volume. No correction of the beam pattern was made yet. It was found in this case study, that no large variations in the scattering width and the scattering center occured apart from a very short period of time at the upper edge of the PMSE.

  19. Image registration of interferometric inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging system based on joint respective window sampling and modified motion compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Biao; Shi, Si; Liu, Yang; Xu, Shiyou; Chen, Zengping

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new image registration method based on joint respective window sampling (RWS) and modified motion compensation (MMC) in an interferometric inverse synthetic aperture radar (InISAR) imaging system using two antennas. The causation and quantitative analysis of the offset between two ISAR images of different antennas along the baseline are analyzed. In the proposed method, the RWS method, according to the measured distance between the target and different antennas, compensates the offset in the range direction. The MMC method is adopted to eliminate the offset in the Doppler direction. Simulation results demonstrate that the offset between the two ISAR images can be compensated effectively, consequently achieving a high-quality three-dimensional InISAR image.

  20. Verification measurements of the Karoo Array timing system: a laser radar based time transfer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebrits, R.; Bauermeister, E.; Gamatham, R.; Adams, G.; Malan, J. A.; Burger, J. P.; Kapp, F.; Gibbon, T.; Kriel, H.; Abbott, T.

    2016-02-01

    An optical fiber based laser radar time transfer system has been developed for the 64-dish MeerKAT radiointerferometer telescope project to provide accurate atomic time to the receivers of the telescope system. This time transfer system is called the Karoo Array Timing System (KATS). Calibration of the time transfer system is essential to ensure that time is accurately transferred to the digitisers that form part of the receivers. Frequency domain reflectometry via vector network analysers is also used to verify measurements taken using time interval counters. This paper details the progress that is made in the verification measurements of the system in order to ensure that time, accurate to within a few nanoseconds of the Universal Coordinated Time (UTC, is available at the point where radio signals from astronomical sources are received. This capability enables world class transient and timing studies with a compact radio interferometer, which has inherent advantages over large single dish radio-telescopes, in observing the transient sky.

  1. Developments in target micro-Doppler signatures analysis: radar imaging, ultrasound and through-the-wall radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Carmine; Balleri, Alessio; Woodbridge, Karl; Soraghan, John J.

    2013-12-01

    Target motions, other than the main bulk translation of the target, induce Doppler modulations around the main Doppler shift that form what is commonly called a target micro-Doppler signature. Radar micro-Doppler signatures are generally both target and action specific and hence can be used to classify and recognise targets as well as to identify possible threats. In recent years, research into the use of micro-Doppler signatures for target classification to address many defence and security challenges has been of increasing interest. In this article, we present a review of the work published in the last 10 years on emerging applications of radar target analysis using micro-Doppler signatures. Specifically we review micro-Doppler target signatures in bistatic SAR and ISAR, through-the-wall radar and ultrasound radar. This article has been compiled to provide radar practitioners with a unique reference source covering the latest developments in micro-Doppler analysis, extraction and mitigation techniques. The article shows that this research area is highly active and fast moving and demonstrates that micro-Doppler techniques can provide important solutions to many radar target classification challenges.

  2. Digital Elevation Models of Greenland based on combined radar and laser altimetry as well as high-resolution stereoscopic imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinsen, J. F.; Smith, B. E.; Sandberg Sorensen, L.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Simonsen, S. B.; Forsberg, R.

    2015-12-01

    A number of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Greenland exist, each of which are applicable for different purposes. This study presents two such DEMs: One developed by merging contemporary radar and laser altimeter data, and one derived from high-resolution stereoscopic imagery. All products are made freely available. The former DEM covers the entire Greenland. It is specific to the year 2010, providing it with an advantage over previous models suffering from either a reduced spatial/ temporal data coverage or errors from surface elevation changes (SEC) occurring during data acquisition. Radar data are acquired with Envisat and CryoSat-2, and laser data with the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite, the Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor, and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Correcting radar data for errors from slope effects and surface penetration of the echoes, and merging these with laser data, yields a DEM capable of resolving both surface depressions as well as topographic features at higher altitudes. The spatial resolution is 2 x 2 km, making the DEM ideal for application in surface mass balance studies, SEC detection from radar altimetry, or for correcting such data for slope-induced errors. The other DEM is developed in a pilot study building the expertise to map all ice-free parts of Greenland. The work combines WorldView-2 and -3 as well as GeoEye1 imagery from 2014 and 2015 over the Disko, Narsaq, Tassilaq, and Zackenberg regions. The novelty of the work is the determination of the product specifications after elaborate discussions with interested parties from government institutions, the tourist industry, etc. Thus, a 10 m DEM, 1.5 m orthophotos, and vector maps are produced. This opens to the possibility of using orthophotos with up-to-date contour lines or for deriving updated coastlines to aid, e.g., emergency management. This allows for a product development directly in line with the needs of parties with specific interests in Greenland.

  3. Lacunarity analysis of spaceborne radar image texture for rock unit discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Pinliang

    Fractal geometry has led to new understanding of many natural objects and phenomena. As a scale-dependent measure, lacunarity can be used to discriminate different textures that may not be differentiated by fractal dimension. Based on a differential box counting method and a gliding-box algorithm, a new lacunarity estimation method is developed for texture analysis of digital images, and a "Lacunarity Analysis" extension built for ArcView (ESRI) geographical information system software. To reveal the directional properties of textures, the directionality of lacunarity is also defined. The new lacunarity measure is evaluated through quantitative comparison with the Voss lacunarity, the binary lacunarity, the grey level cooccurrence matrix (GLCM) based texture measures (homogeneity, contrast, dissimilarity, entropy), the fractal dimension, and the min-max operator using Brodatz textures. The results from Brodatz textures suggest that the new lacunarity estimation method for grey-scale images provides more accurate texture measurements than the above-mentioned fractal-based and statistical texture measures. In comparison with the Voss lacunarity, the fractal dimension, and the GLCM-based texture measures, the new lacunarity measure is then applied to dual-band (L and C) and dual-polarization (HH and HV) Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-C), and C-band HH polarization Radarsat images of two imaging modes for rock unit discrimination in a study area between California and Arizona, USA. Using textural analysis of 36 SIR-C and Radarsat sub-images and classification accuracy assessment of the combined Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images and spaceborne radar textural feature images, it has been demonstrated that the new lacunarity measure outperformed other texture measures in comparison, and the L-band HH polarization SIR-C image provides more textural information of the rock units compared with the Radarsat and other SIR-C radar images used in this study. The study shows that

  4. Filtering and segmentation of the Cassini synthetic aperture radar images on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsolis, E.; Bampasidis, G.; Solomonidou, A.; Coustenis, A.; Hirtzig, M.

    2011-10-01

    A filtering technique is applied to obtain the restored synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. One of the major problems hampering the derivation of meaningful texture information from SAR imagery is the speckle noise. It overlays "real" structures and causes gray value variations even in homogeneous parts of the image. Our method, the TSPR (total sum preserving regularization) filter, is based on probabilistic methods and regards an image as a random element drawn from a prespecified set of possible images optimized by a synchronous local iterative method. The despeckle filter can be used as intermediate stage for the extraction of meaningful regions that correspond to structural units in the scene or distinguish objects of interest like lakes, drainage networks, equatorial dunes or impact craters, where different textures appear.

  5. RPC Modeling For Spaceborne SAR And Its Application In Radar Image Geocoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaohong; He, Xueyan; Zhang, Lu; Balz, Timo; Liao, Mingsheng

    2010-10-01

    The Rational Polynomial Coefficient (RPC) model is a typical replacement sensor model which relates image coordinates and object coordinates through rational polynomial functions. This paper investigates the methodology of RPC modeling for spaceborne SAR and its application in radar image geocoding. A hybrid approach is proposed to combine the L-curve and the IMCCV (Iteration method by correcting characteristic value) methods for RPC modeling. Experimental results show that the hybrid approach is superior to traditional methods in terms of both fitting accuracy and computation time cost. The results of different settings in RPC modeling will be shown. To ensure high accuracy of image geocoding, an additional mathematical transformation is used to remove the systematic errors in the RPC model. An Envisat ASAR image is used as experimental data to verify the application.

  6. A New Spaceborne Burst Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging Mode for Wide Swath Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR burst mode named “Extended Terrain Observation by Progressive Scans (ETOPS” for wide swath imaged coverage. This scheme extends the imaging performance of the conventional Terrain Observation by Progressive Scans (TOPS mode with a very limited azimuth beam steering capability. Compared with the TOPS mode with the same azimuth beam steering range for the same swath width, a finer azimuth resolution could be obtained. With the same system parameters, examples of four burst SAR imaging modes named ScanSAR, TOPS, inverse TOPS (ITOPS and ETOPS are given, and their corresponding system performances are analyzed and compared. Simulation results show that the proposed ETOPS mode could obtain a better high-resolution wide-swath imaging performance under the same conditions.

  7. Detection of Fiber Layer-Up Lamination Order of CFRP Composite Using Thermal-Wave Radar Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Junyan; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Gong, Jinlong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, thermal-wave radar imaging (TWRI) is used as a nondestructive inspection method to evaluate carbon-fiber-reinforced-polymer (CFRP) composite. An inverse methodology that combines TWRI with numerical optimization technique is proposed to determine the fiber layer-up lamination sequences of anisotropic CFRP composite. A 7-layer CFRP laminate [0°/45°/90°/0°]_{{s}} is heated by a chirp-modulated Gaussian laser beam, and then finite element method (FEM) is employed to calculate the temperature field of CFRP laminates. The phase based on lock-in correlation between reference chirp signal and the thermal-wave signal is performed to obtain the phase image of TWRI, and the least square method is applied to reconstruct the cost function that minimizes the square of the difference between the phase of TWRI inspection and numerical calculation. A hybrid algorithm that combines the simulation annealing with Nelder-Mead simplex research method is employed to solve the reconstructed cost function and find the global optimal solution of the layer-up sequences of CFRP composite. The result shows the feasibility of estimating the fiber layer-up lamination sequences of CFRP composite with optimal discrete and constraint conditions.

  8. A comparison of traffic estimates of nocturnal flying animals using radar, thermal imaging, and acoustic recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Kyle G; Shriver, W Gregory; Buler, Jeffrey J

    2015-03-01

    There are several remote-sensing tools readily available for the study of nocturnally flying animals (e.g., migrating birds), each possessing unique measurement biases. We used three tools (weather surveillance radar, thermal infrared camera, and acoustic recorder) to measure temporal and spatial patterns of nocturnal traffic estimates of flying animals during the spring and fall of 2011 and 2012 in Lewes, Delaware, USA. Our objective was to compare measures among different technologies to better understand their animal detection biases. For radar and thermal imaging, the greatest observed traffic rate tended to occur at, or shortly after, evening twilight, whereas for the acoustic recorder, peak bird flight-calling activity was observed just prior to morning twilight. Comparing traffic rates during the night for all seasons, we found that mean nightly correlations between acoustics and the other two tools were weakly correlated (thermal infrared camera and acoustics, r = 0.004 ± 0.04 SE, n = 100 nights; radar and acoustics, r = 0.14 ± 0.04 SE, n = 101 nights), but highly variable on an individual nightly basis (range = -0.84 to 0.92, range = -0.73 to 0.94). The mean nightly correlations between traffic rates estimated by radar and by thermal infrared camera during the night were more strongly positively correlated (r = 0.39 ± 0.04 SE, n = 125 nights), but also were highly variable for individual nights (range = -0.76 to 0.98). Through comparison with radar data among numerous height intervals, we determined that flying animal height above the ground influenced thermal imaging positively and flight call detections negatively. Moreover, thermal imaging detections decreased with the presence of cloud cover and increased with mean ground flight speed of animals, whereas acoustic detections showed no relationship with cloud cover presence but did decrease with increased flight speed. We found sampling methods to be positively correlated when comparing mean nightly

  9. Automated two- and three-dimensional, fine-resolution radar imaging of rigid targets with arbitrary unknown motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuff, Mark A.; Sullivan, Richard C., Jr.; Thelen, Brian J.; Werness, Susan A.

    1994-06-01

    An automated system for the SAR/ISAR imaging of rigid bodies which are undergoing arbitrarily complicated unknown motions is being developed. This system determines, from only the radar data, all observable parameters of motion, on a pulse by pulse basis. The approach makes it possible to: (1) exploit any type of relative motion: translational, rotational, two dimensional, three dimensional, deterministic, or stochastic; no prior parametric assumptions on the functional form of the motion are required; (2) require only the radar data; no ancillary motion measurement system on either the radar platform or on the target is required; (3) automatically provide all the motion information needed to form correctly scaled images, without cross range scale ambiguities; (4) make full use of all the radar data; no signals returning from a target are discarded; and (5) require a known computation time, which is not signal dependent, as all iterative processes used have known, guaranteed convergence rates.

  10. Phase Error Correction for Approximated Observation-Based Compressed Sensing Radar Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Liu, Falin; Zhou, Chongbin; Lv, Yuanhao; Hu, Jingqiu

    2017-03-17

    Defocus of the reconstructed image of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) occurs in the presence of the phase error. In this work, a phase error correction method is proposed for compressed sensing (CS) radar imaging based on approximated observation. The proposed method has better image focusing ability with much less memory cost, compared to the conventional approaches, due to the inherent low memory requirement of the approximated observation operator. The one-dimensional (1D) phase error correction for approximated observation-based CS-SAR imaging is first carried out and it can be conveniently applied to the cases of random-frequency waveform and linear frequency modulated (LFM) waveform without any a priori knowledge. The approximated observation operators are obtained by calculating the inverse of Omega-K and chirp scaling algorithms for random-frequency and LFM waveforms, respectively. Furthermore, the 1D phase error model is modified by incorporating a priori knowledge and then a weighted 1D phase error model is proposed, which is capable of correcting two-dimensional (2D) phase error in some cases, where the estimation can be simplified to a 1D problem. Simulation and experimental results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method in the presence of 1D phase error or weighted 1D phase error.

  11. Martian CAT scan: Three-dimensional imaging of Planum Boreum with Shallow Radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzig, N. E.; Foss, F. J., II; Campbell, B. A.; Phillips, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    We present a preliminary three-dimensional (3-D) subsurface volume created from Shallow Radar (SHARAD) observations of Planum Boreum, the 3-km-high mound of icy layered deposits in the north polar region of Mars. Our goal is to achieve a better understanding of the nature and timing of the layered deposits and their relationship to climatological cycles by enabling the mapping of subsurface radar returns in regions presently obfuscated by highly variable surface topography and complex subsurface structures. In the medical field, computed axial tomography (CAT scan) involves taking a series of 2-D X-ray images around an axis of rotation and applying geometric processing to generate a 3-D image of a body's interior. Similarly, SHARAD has taken over 2500 2-D radar images (radargrams) on passes of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) across the north polar region of Mars, and we have used a subset of those radargrams to develop a means of generating 3-D images of the polar layered deposits. While the sets of radargrams over both polar regions have been very fruitful scientifically (e.g., Putzig et al., 2009, Icarus 204, 443-457; Holt et al., 2010, Nature 465, 450-453; Phillips et al., 2011, Science 332, 838-841), examination of 3-D subsurface structures has been restricted to identifying and tracing those structures on the radargrams and then "connecting the dots" by interpolation. Identification and tracing of structures is limited to the trajectories of MRO's nadir track and is hampered by "clutter," or signals returned from off-nadir surface or subsurface features that often interfere with signals returned from nadir. Clutter becomes a severe impediment to structure interpretation in areas of high topographic variability, such as the trough-rich regions of Planum Boreum. Given a sufficient number of observations from a range of lateral offsets, radar signals from nadir and off-nadir can be distinguished within a 3-D volume, and off-nadir clutter can be repositioned

  12. Precision Near-Field Reconstruction in the Time Domain via Minimum Entropy for Ultra-High Resolution Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwoong Yu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high resolution (UHR radar imaging is used to analyze the internal structure of objects and to identify and classify their shapes based on ultra-wideband (UWB signals using a vector network analyzer (VNA. However, radar-based imaging is limited by microwave propagation effects, wave scattering, and transmit power, thus the received signals are inevitably weak and noisy. To overcome this problem, the radar may be operated in the near-field. The focusing of UHR radar signals over a close distance requires precise geometry in order to accommodate the spherical waves. In this paper, a geometric estimation and compensation method that is based on the minimum entropy of radar images with sub-centimeter resolution is proposed and implemented. Inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR imaging is used because it is applicable to several fields, including medical- and security-related applications, and high quality images of various targets have been produced to verify the proposed method. For ISAR in the near-field, the compensation for the time delay depends on the distance from the center of rotation and the internal RF circuits and cables. Required parameters for the delay compensation algorithm that can be used to minimize the entropy of the radar images are determined so that acceptable results can be achieved. The processing speed can be enhanced by performing the calculations in the time domain without the phase values, which are removed after upsampling. For comparison, the parameters are also estimated by performing random sampling in the data set. Although the reduced data set contained only 5% of the observed angles, the parameter optimization method is shown to operate correctly.

  13. Multipath exploitation in through-wall radar imaging via point spread functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlur, Pawan; Alli, Giovanni; Nuzzo, Luigia

    2013-12-01

    Due to several sources of multipath in through-wall radar sensing, such as walls, floors, and ceilings, there could exist multipath ghosts associated with a few genuine targets in the synthetic aperture beamformed image. The multipath ghosts are false positives and therefore confusable with genuine targets. Here, we develop a multipath exploitation technique using point spread functions, which associate and map back the multipath ghosts to their genuine targets, thereby increasing the effective signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) at the genuine target locations. To do so, we first develop a multipath model advocating the Householder transformation, which permits modeling multiple reflections at multiple walls, and also allows for unconventional room/building geometries. Second, closed-form solutions of the multipath ghost locations assuming free space propagation are derived. Third, a nonlinear least squares optimization is formulated and initialized with these free space solutions to localize the multipath ghosts in through-wall radar sensing. The exploitation approach is general and does not require a priori assumptions on the number of targets. The free space multipath ghost locations and exploitation technique derived here may be used as is for multipath exploitation in urban canyons via synthetic aperture radar. Analytical expressions quantifying the SCR gain after multipath exploitation are derived. The analysis is validated with experimental EM results using finite-difference time-domain simulations.

  14. Aspect sensitivity measurements of polar mesosphere summer echoes using coherent radar imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Chilson

    Full Text Available The Esrange VHF radar (ESRAD, located in northern Sweden (67.88° N, 21.10° E, has been used to investigate polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. During July and August of 1998, coherent radar imaging (CRI was used to study the dynamic evolution of PMSE with high temporal and spatial resolution. A CRI analysis provides an estimate of the angular brightness distribution within the radar’s probing volume. The brightness distribution is directly related to the radar reflectivity. Consequently, these data are used to investigate the aspect sensitivity of PMSE. In addition to the CRI analysis, the full correlation analysis (FCA is used to derive estimates of the prevailing three-dimensional wind associated with the observed PMSE. It is shown that regions within the PMSE with enhanced aspect sensitivity have a correspondingly high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Although this relationship has been investigated in the past, the present study allows for an estimation of the aspect sensitivity independent of the assumed scattering models and avoids the complications of comparing echo strengths from vertical and off-vertical beams over large horizontal separations, as in the Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS method. Regions of enhanced aspect sensitivity were additionally shown to correlate with the wave-perturbation induced downward motions of air parcels embedded in the PMSE.

    Key words. Ionosphere (polar ionosphere Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics Radio Science (Interferometry

  15. Geometric considerations of polar mesospheric summer echoes in tilted beams using coherent radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S.; Stober, G.; Chau, J. L.; Latteck, R.

    2014-11-01

    We present observations of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) using the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System in Northern Norway (69.30° N, 16.04° E). The radar is able to resolve PMSE at high spatial and temporal resolution and to perform pulse-to-pulse beam steering. In this experiment, 81 oblique beam directions were used with off-zenith angles up to 25°. For each beam pointing direction and range gate, coherent radar imaging was applied to determine the mean backscatter location. The location of the mean scatterer in the beam volume was calculated by the deviation from the nominal off-zenith angle of the brightest pixel. It shows that in tilted beams with an off-zenith angle greater than 5°, structures appear at the altitudinal edges of the PMSE layer. Our results indicate that the mean influence of the location of the maximum depends on the tilt of the beam and on the observed area of the PMSE layer. At the upper/lower edge of the PMSE layer, the mean backscatter has a greater/smaller off-zenith angle than the nominal off-zenith angle. This effect intensifies with greater off-zenith beam pointing direction, so the beam filling factor plays an important role in the observation of PMSE layers for oblique beams.

  16. Digital processing considerations for extraction of ocean wave image spectra from raw synthetic aperture radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaie, I. J.; Dias, A. R.; Darling, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The digital processing requirements of several algorithms for extracting the spectrum of a detected synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image from the raw SAR data are described and compared. The most efficient algorithms for image spectrum extraction from raw SAR data appear to be those containing an intermediate image formation step. It is shown that a recently developed compact formulation of the image spectrum in terms of the raw data is computationally inefficient when evaluated directly, in comparison with the classical method where matched-filter image formation is an intermediate result. It is also shown that a proposed indirect procedure for digitally implementing the same compact formulation is somewhat more efficient than the classical matched-filtering approach. However, this indirect procedure includes the image formation process as part of the total algorithm. Indeed, the computational savings afforded by the indirect implementation are identical to those obtained in SAR image formation processing when the matched-filtering algorithm is replaced by the well-known 'dechirp-Fourier transform' technique. Furthermore, corrections to account for slant-to-ground range conversion, spherical earth, etc., are often best implemented in the image domain, making intermediate image formation a valuable processing feature.

  17. Exact spectrum of non-linear chirp scaling and its application in geosynchronous synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-linear chirp scaling (NLCS is a feasible method to deal with time-variant frequency modulation (FM rate problem in synthetic aperture radar (SAR imaging. However, approximations in derivation of NLCS spectrum lead to performance decline in some cases. Presented is the exact spectrum of the NLCS function. Simulation with a geosynchronous synthetic aperture radar (GEO-SAR configuration is implemented. The results show that using the presented spectrum can significantly improve imaging performance, and the NLCS algorithm is suitable for GEO-SAR imaging after modification.

  18. Evaluation of second-order texture parameters for sea ice classification from radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokr, Mohammed E.

    1991-06-01

    With the advent of airborne and spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems, sea ice classification from SAR images has become an important research subject. Since gray tone alone has proven to be of limited capability in differentiating ice types, texture has naturally become an attractive avenue to explore. Accordingly, performance of texture quantification parameters as related to their ability to discriminate ice types has to be examined. SAR image appearance depends on radar parameters involved in the image construction procedures from the doppler history record. Therefore the feasibility of using universal texture/ice type relationships that hold for all combinations of radar parameters also has to be investigated. To that end, imagery data from three different SAR systems were used in this study. Five conventional texture parameters, derived from the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), were examined. Two of them were modified to ensure their invariant character under linear gray tone transformations. Results indicated that all parameters were highly correlated. The parameters did not, in general, vary with the computational variables used in generating co-occurrence matrices. Ice types can be identified uniquely by the mean value of any texture parameter. The relatively high variability of texture parameters, however, confuses ice discrimination, particularly of smoother ice types. Ice classification was conducted using a per-pixel maximum likelihood supervised scheme. When texture was combined with gray tone, the overall average classification accuracy was improved. Texture was successful in improving the classification accuracy of multiyear ice but was less promising in discriminating first-season ice types. The best two GLCM texture parameters, according to the computed overall average classification accuracies, were the inverse difference moment and the entropy. A brief description of GLCM texture parameters as related to ice's physical

  19. Searching for Water Ice at the Lunar North Pole Using High-Resolution Images and Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J. L.; Lawrence, S. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Speyerer, E. J.; Denevi, B. W.

    2017-01-01

    Permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) at the lunar poles are potential reservoirs of frozen volatiles, and are therefore high-priority exploration targets. PSRs trap water and other volatiles because their annual maximum temperatures (40-100K) are lower than the sublimation temperatures of these species (i.e. H2O approx.104K). Previous studies using various remote sensing techniques have not been able to definitively characterize the distribution or abundance of ice in lunar PSRs. The purpose of this study is to search for signs of ice in PSRs using two complimentary remote sensing techniques: radar and visible images.

  20. Enhanced radar imaging of object with extrapolation of Fourier transform of space-limited reflectivity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi-Gong; Corsini, G.; Dalle Mese, E.

    The method of extrapolation of frequency data based on the finite size property of the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm is used to address the problem of radar image enhancement. The rate of convergence of the algorithm and the behavior of noise-affected data are discussed. Simulation results show that the convergence rate can be very slow, depending on the ratio of the amount of extrapolated data to that of observed data. This behavior is due to the eigenvalues of the system matrix close to 1.

  1. Low velocity target detection based on time-frequency image for high frequency ground wave radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Songhua; WU Shicai; WEN Biyang

    2007-01-01

    The Doppler spectral broadening resulted from non-stationary movement of target and radio-frequency interference will decrease the veracity of target detection by high frequency ground wave(HEGW)radar.By displaying the change of signal energy on two dimensional time-frequency images based on time-frequency analysis,a new mathematical morphology method to distinguish target from nonlinear time-frequency curves is presented.The analyzed results from the measured data verify that with this new method the target can be detected correctly from wide Doppler spectrum.

  2. A class of singular Fourier integral operators in synthetic aperture radar imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Ambartsoumian, G; Krishnan, V P; Nolan, C; Quinto, E T

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the microlocal properties of the linearized forward scattering operator $F$ and the normal operator $F^{*}F$ (where $F^{*}$ is the $L^{2}$ adjoint of $F$) which arises in Synthetic Aperture Radar imaging for the common midpoint acquisition geometry. When $F^{*}$ is applied to the scattered data, artifacts appear. We show that $F^{*}F$ can be decomposed as a sum of four operators, each belonging to a class of distributions associated to two cleanly intersecting Lagrangians, $I^{p,l} (\\Lambda_0, \\Lambda_1)$, thereby explaining the latter artifacts.

  3. An Entropy-Based Propagation Speed Estimation Method for Near-Field Subsurface Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pistorius Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last forty years, Subsurface Radar (SR has been used in an increasing number of noninvasive/nondestructive imaging applications, ranging from landmine detection to breast imaging. To properly assess the dimensions and locations of the targets within the scan area, SR data sets have to be reconstructed. This process usually requires the knowledge of the propagation speed in the medium, which is usually obtained by performing an offline measurement from a representative sample of the materials that form the scan region. Nevertheless, in some novel near-field SR scenarios, such as Microwave Wood Inspection (MWI and Breast Microwave Radar (BMR, the extraction of a representative sample is not an option due to the noninvasive requirements of the application. A novel technique to determine the propagation speed of the medium based on the use of an information theory metric is proposed in this paper. The proposed method uses the Shannon entropy of the reconstructed images as the focal quality metric to generate an estimate of the propagation speed in a given scan region. The performance of the proposed algorithm was assessed using data sets collected from experimental setups that mimic the dielectric contrast found in BMI and MWI scenarios. The proposed method yielded accurate results and exhibited an execution time in the order of seconds.

  4. A mm-Wave 2D Ultra-Wideband Imaging Radar for Breast Cancer Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Moscato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the preliminary design of a mm-wave ultra-wideband (UWB radar for breast cancer detection. A mass screening of women for breast cancer is essential, as the early diagnosis of the tumour allows best treatment outcomes. A mm-wave UWB radar could be an innovative solution to achieve the high imaging resolution required without risks for the patient. The 20–40 GHz frequency band used in the system proposed in this work guarantees high cross/range resolution performances. The developed preliminary architecture employs two monomodal truncated double-ridge waveguides that act as antennas; these radiators are shifted by microstep actuators to form a synthetic linear aperture. The minimum antenna-to-antenna distance achievable, the width of the synthetic aperture, and the minimum frequency step determine the performance of the 2D imaging system. Measures are performed with a mm-wave vector network analyzer driven by an automatic routine, which controls also the antennas shifts. The scattering matrix is then calibrated and the delay-multiply-and-sum (DMAS algorithm is applied to elaborate a high-resolution 2D image of the targets. Experimental results show that 3 mm cross and 8 mm range resolutions were achieved, which is in line with theoretical expectations and promising for future developments.

  5. Change Detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar Images Using a Multiscale-Driven Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaniyi A. Ajadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the significant progress that was achieved throughout the recent years, to this day, automatic change detection and classification from synthetic aperture radar (SAR images remains a difficult task. This is, in large part, due to (a the high level of speckle noise that is inherent to SAR data; (b the complex scattering response of SAR even for rather homogeneous targets; (c the low temporal sampling that is often achieved with SAR systems, since sequential images do not always have the same radar geometry (incident angle, orbit path, etc.; and (d the typically limited performance of SAR in delineating the exact boundary of changed regions. With this paper we present a promising change detection method that utilizes SAR images and provides solutions for these previously mentioned difficulties. We will show that the presented approach enables automatic and high-performance change detection across a wide range of spatial scales (resolution levels. The developed method follows a three-step approach of (i initial pre-processing; (ii data enhancement/filtering; and (iii wavelet-based, multi-scale change detection. The stand-alone property of our approach is the high flexibility in applying the change detection approach to a wide range of change detection problems. The performance of the developed approach is demonstrated using synthetic data as well as a real-data application to wildfire progression near Fairbanks, Alaska.

  6. Analysis and application of wavelet transform in target imaging and detection of stepped frequency MMW radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Bin; Quan Taifan; Wang Jinrong

    2005-01-01

    The imaging and target detection methods for stepped frequency signal based on the wavelet transform and its power spectrum are investigated. Not only an imaging and target detection algorithm for stepped frequency signal based on the wavelet transform, but also its respective power spectrum are proposed. The multisampling property of stepped frequency signal is studied and wavelet transform is well suited for analyzing the signal. After multisampling property of stepped frequency signal being studied, it is shown that the wavelet transform is appropriate to analyze the signal. Based on the theory, the wavelet power spectrum analysis is applied to obtain the target range profile and the binary wavelet transform is used to perform target detection. To determine a suitable wavelet scaling for imaging of range profile' s MMW radar, the distance resolution △R technique is proposed. The effectiveness of this new method is evaluated using simulated noisy radar signal. Results show that the proposed method can bring out the exactness and low computational complexity of this method.

  7. Imaging approach for airborne stepped-frequency synthetic aperture radar in the squinted mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rengli; Wang, Yanfei

    2017-01-01

    For synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging, a stepped-frequency chirp signal is widely used to obtain ultrahigh range resolution. There are mainly two challenges in the stepped-frequency SAR imaging. One is the subbands synthesis, and the other is the estimation and compensation of amplitude and phase errors of the subbands caused by the radar system and the propagation. An imaging approach for the airborne squinted sliding-spotlight SAR with stepped-frequency chirps is proposed to achieve ultrahigh two-dimensional (2-D) resolution. Due to the squint angle, a Doppler centroid shift is introduced and then a modified space-variant compensation method for the range difference between the subbands is realized via multiplying a phase ramp in the 2-D frequency domain. Moreover, a range-dependent phase gradient autofocus algorithm based on raw data is proposed to estimate and compensate the residual phase error after the internal calibration. Afterward, the frequency-domain synthetic bandwidth method is used to complete the bandwidth synthesis. Finally, the extended Omega-K algorithm is applied to focus the synthesized data. The simulation results and the real data processing results prove the validity of the proposed approach.

  8. Mapping Palaeohydrography in Deserts: Contribution from Space-Borne Imaging Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Paillou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR has the capability to image subsurface features down to several meters in arid regions. A first demonstration of this capability was performed in the Egyptian desert during the early eighties, thanks to the first Shuttle Imaging Radar mission. Global coverage provided by recent SARs, such as the Japanese ALOS/PALSAR sensor, allowed the mapping of vast ancient hydrographic systems in Northern Africa. We present a summary of palaeohydrography results obtained using PALSAR data over large deserts such as the Sahara and the Gobi. An ancient river system was discovered in eastern Lybia, connecting in the past the Kufrah oasis to the Mediterranean Sea, and the terminal part of the Tamanrasett river was mapped in western Mauritania, ending with a large submarine canyon. In southern Mongolia, PALSAR images combined with topography analysis allowed the mapping of the ancient Ulaan Nuur lake. We finally show the potentials of future low frequency SAR sensors by comparing L-band (1.25 GHz and P-band (435 MHz airborne SAR acquisitions over a desert site in southern Tunisia.

  9. Evidence of hydrocarbon pollution in soil exploiting satellite optical and radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Galvan-Pineda, J.; Espinosa-Hernandez, A.; Jimenez-Escalona, J. C.; Ramos-Rodriguez, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Oil spills are one of the most important sources of hydrocarbon pollution in soils of areas near centers of extraction, storage or transportation of petroleum products. These spills or leaks can occur arising from deficient maintenance of facilities or accidents. The effects of these spills can spread for kilometers affecting large areas. This has a strong impact on the local ecosystem disturbing the flora and fauna. In costal tourist areas, this type of contaminants represents significant health risks for visitors and therefore, economic losses for the place. For this reason, it is very important to know and identify the areas affected by this type of pollution in order to create action plans for remediation of the ecosystem. Due to the large land extensions that can cover such disasters, satellite images become a valuable tool because of their large spatial coverage. Nowadays, different satellite techniques have been developed to recognize land affected by the presence of hydrocarbons. In the optical spectrum, optical sensing imagery (e.g. Landsat, SPOT, MODIS, etc.) has been widely used. However, these techniques have the intrinsic limitation in scenes with vegetation cover. In contrast, techniques exploiting radar images are still rare. The type of signal that is detected by the radar provides information even in areas with vegetation cover. The radar signal interacts with the vegetation and soil collecting information about the dielectric properties of the soil. This study identifies zones of contaminated soil by using the synergy of optical and radar images. This site of study is located in Paraiso, Tabasco, in Southern Mexico (18°27'N 93°32'W). The region is composed of coastal and tropical forest ecosystems and includes the Port Dos Bocas. The Port Dos Bocas has its points of extractions 130m away from the coast. The annual activities report 10 millions of tons of hydrocarbons transported using around 5500 ships. The methodology presented in this paper

  10. Micro-motion Signature Extraction Method for Wideband Radar Based on Complex Image OMP Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Ying

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to extract the micro-motion signatures in condition of Migration Through Range Cells (MTRC of micro-motional scatterers and azimuthal undersampling in wideband radar, a method based on the Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP decomposition of the complex image is proposed. By making use of the amplitude and phase information of “range-slow-time image”, a set of micro-Doppler signal atoms is constructed in the complex image space. The OMP algorithm in vector space is then extend to the complex image space to obtain the micro-motion parameters. Simulations demonstrate the proposed method can extract the micro-motion signatures when MTRC of micro-motional scatterers is occurred, and can also work well when the sampling rate is lower than the Nyquist sampling rate.

  11. Sparse Recovery for Bistatic MIMO Radar Imaging in the Presence of Array Gain Uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A sparse recovery based transmit-receive angle imaging scheme is proposed for bistatic multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO radar. The redundancy of the transmit and receive angles in the same range cell is exploited to construct the sparse model. The imaging is then performed by compressive sensing method with consideration of both the transmit and receive array gain uncertainties. An additional constraint is imposed on the inverse of the transmit and receive array gain errors matrices to make the optimization problem of the CS solvable. The image of the targets can be reconstructed using small number of snapshots in the case of large array gain uncertainties. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  12. Mathematical morphology for automated analysis of remotely sensed objects in radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daida, Jason M.; Vesecky, John F.

    1991-01-01

    A symbiosis of pyramidal segmentation and morphological transmission is described. The pyramidal segmentation portion of the symbiosis has resulted in low (2.6 percent) misclassification error rate for a one-look simulation. Other simulations indicate lower error rates (1.8 percent for a four-look image). The morphological transformation portion has resulted in meaningful partitions with a minimal loss of fractal boundary information. An unpublished version of Thicken, suitable for watersheds transformations of fractal objects, is also presented. It is demonstrated that the proposed symbiosis works with SAR (synthetic aperture radar) images: in this case, a four-look Seasat image of sea ice. It is concluded that the symbiotic forms of both segmentation and morphological transformation seem well suited for unsupervised geophysical analysis.

  13. All-weather volume imaging of the boundary layer and troposphere using the MU radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Worthington

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the first volume-imaging radar that can run in any weather, revealing the turbulent three-dimensional structure and airflow of convective cells, rain clouds, breaking waves and deep convection as they evolve and move. Precipitation and clear air can be volume-imaged independently. Birds are detected as small high-power echoes moving near horizontal, at different speeds and directions from background wind. The volume-imaging method could be used to create a real-time virtual-reality view of the atmosphere, in effect making the invisible atmosphere visible in any weather.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (convective processes, turbulence – Radio science (instruments and techniques

  14. Synthetic aperture radar image correlation by use of preprocessing for enhancement of scattering centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, J; Gianino, P D; Woods, C L

    2000-10-15

    We demonstrate that a significant improvement can be obtained in the recognition of complicated synthetic aperture radar images taken from the Moving and Stationary Target Acquisitions and Recognition database. These images typically have a low number of scattering centers and high noise. We first preprocess the images and the templates formed from them so that their scattering centers are enhanced. Our technique can produce high-quality performance in several correlation criteria. For realistic automatic target recognition systems, our approach should make it easy to implement optical recognition systems with binarized data for many different types of correlation filter and should have a great effect on feeding data-compressed (binarized) information into either digital or optical processors.

  15. A Directional Antenna in a Matching Liquid for Microwave Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed I. Latif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The detailed design equations and antenna parameters for a directional antenna for breast imaging are presented in this paper. The antenna was designed so that it could be immersed in canola oil to achieve efficient coupling of the electromagnetic energy to the breast tissue. Ridges were used in the horn antenna to increase the operating bandwidth. The antenna has an exponentially tapered section for impedance matching. The double-ridged horn antenna has a wideband performance from 1.5 GHz to 5 GHz (3.75 GHz or 110% of impedance bandwidth, which is suitable for breast microwave radar imaging. The fabricated antenna was tested and compared with simulated results, and similar bandwidths were obtained. Experiments were conducted on breast phantoms using these antennas, to detect a simulated breast lesion. The reconstructed image from the experiments shows distinguishable tumor responses indicating promising results for successful breast cancer detection.

  16. Laser imaging in liquid-liquid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, M. I. I. Zainal; Park, Kyeong H.; Voulgaropoulos, Victor; Chinaud, Maxime; Angeli, Panagiota

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the flow patterns formed during the horizontal flow of two immiscible liquids are studied. The pipe is made from acrylic, has an ID of 26 mm and a length of 4 m. A silicone oil (5cSt) and a water/glycerol mixture are used as test fluids. This set of liquids is chosen to match the refractive indices of the phases and enable laser based flow pattern identification. A double pulsed Nd:Yag laser was employed (532mm) with the appropriate optics to generate a laser sheet at the middle of the pipe. The aqueous phase was dyed with Rhodamine 6G, to distinguish between the two phases. Experiments were carried out for mixture velocities ranging from 0.15 to 2 m/s. Different inlet designs were used to actuate flow patterns in a controlled way and observe their development downstream the test section. A static mixer produced dispersed flow at the inlet which separated downstream due to enhanced coalescence. On the other hand, the use of a cylindrical bluff body at the inlet created non-linear interfacial waves in initially stratified flows from which drops detached leading to the transition to dispersed patterns. From the detailed images important flow parameters were measured such as wave characteristics and drop size. Project funded under the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Programme Grant MEMPHIS.

  17. Assimilation of Wave Imaging Radar Observations for Real-time Wave-by-Wave Forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Alexandra [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Haller, Merrick; Walker, David [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lynett, Pat [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-08-29

    This project addressed Topic 3: “Wave Measurement Instrumentation for Feed Forward Controls” under the FOA number DE-FOA-0000971. The overall goal of the program was to develop a phase-resolving wave forecasting technique for application to the active control of Wave Energy Conversion (WEC) devices. We have developed an approach that couples a wave imaging marine radar with a phase-resolving linear wave model for real-time wave field reconstruction and forward propagation of the wave field in space and time. The scope of the project was to develop and assess the performance of this novel forecasting system. Specific project goals were as follows: Develop and verify a fast, GPU-based (Graphical Processing Unit) wave propagation model suitable for phase-resolved computation of nearshore wave transformation over variable bathymetry; Compare the accuracy and speed of performance of the wave model against a deep water model in their ability to predict wave field transformation in the intermediate water depths (50 to 70 m) typical of planned WEC sites; Develop and implement a variational assimilation algorithm that can ingest wave imaging radar observations and estimate the time-varying wave conditions offshore of the domain of interest such that the observed wave field is best reconstructed throughout the domain and then use this to produce model forecasts for a given WEC location; Collect wave-resolving marine radar data, along with relevant in situ wave data, at a suitable wave energy test site, apply the algorithm to the field data, assess performance, and identify any necessary improvements; and Develop a production cost estimate that addresses the affordability of the wave forecasting technology and include in the Final Report. The developed forecasting algorithm (“Wavecast”) was evaluated for both speed and accuracy against a substantial synthetic dataset. Early in the project, performance tests definitively demonstrated that the system was capable of

  18. Frequency-modulated continuous-wave laser radar using dual vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes for real-time measurements of distance and radial velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuma, Seiichi

    2017-02-01

    A frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) laser radar capable of real-time displaying the distance to a target object and its radial velocity as their corresponding frequency spectra is developed. The system employs a pair of oppositely frequency-swept vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes (VCSELs). This makes possible simultaneous detection of beat signals induced by the increment (up-ramp) and decrement (down-ramp) in laser frequencies. By mixing these two beat signals, their sum and difference frequencies are directly obtained without arithmetic processing such as averaging and subtraction. Results of the test experiments adopting axially moving block gauges as target objects show that both the distance and given velocities are accurately determined from the spectrum of the frequency mixer.

  19. New Radar Altimeter Missions are Providing a Dramatically Sharper Image of Global Marine Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, D. T.; Müller, D.; Garcia, E.; Matthews, K. J.; Smith, W. H. F.; Zaron, E.; Zhang, S.; Bassett, D.; Francis, R.

    2015-12-01

    Marine gravity, derived from satellite radar altimetry, is a powerful tool for mapping tectonic structures, especially in the deep ocean basins where the topography remains unmapped by ships or is buried by thick sediment. The ability to infer seafloor tectonics from space was first demonstrated in 1978 using Seasat altimeter data but the spatial coverage was incomplete because of the short three-month lifetime of the satellite. Most ocean altimeters have repeat ground tracks with spacings of hundreds of kilometers so they do not resolve tectonic structures. Adequate altimeter coverage became available in 1995 when the United States Navy declassified the Geosat radar altimeter data and the ERS-1 altimeter completed a 1-year mapping phase. These mid-1990's altimeter-derived images of the ocean basins remained static for 15 years because there were no new non-repeat altimeter missions. This situation changed dramatically in 2010 when CryoSat-2, with its advanced radar altimeter, was launched into a non-repeat orbit and continues to collect data until perhaps 2020. In addition the Jason-1 altimeter was placed into a 14-month geodetic phase at the end of its lifetime. More recently the 1.5 times higher precision measurements from the AltiKa altimeter aboard the SARAL spacecraft began to drift away from its 35-day repeat trackline. The Chinese HY-2 altimeter is scheduled to begin a dense mapping phase in early 2016. Moreover in 2020 we may enjoy significantly higher resolution maps of the ocean basins from the planned SWOT altimeter mission with its advanced swath mapping ability. All of this new data will provide a much sharper image of the tectonics of the deep ocean basins and continental margins. During this talk we will tour of the new tectonic structures revealed by CryoSat-2 and Jason-1 and speculate on the tectonic views of the ocean basins in 2020 and beyond.

  20. Speckle-reducing scale-invariant feature transform match for synthetic aperture radar image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianmin; Li, Bo; Xu, Qizhi

    2016-07-01

    The anisotropic scale space (ASS) is often used to enhance the performance of a scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm in the registration of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The existing ASS-based methods usually suffer from unstable keypoints and false matches, since the anisotropic diffusion filtering has limitations in reducing the speckle noise from SAR images while building the ASS image representation. We proposed a speckle reducing SIFT match method to obtain stable keypoints and acquire precise matches for the SAR image registration. First, the keypoints are detected in a speckle reducing anisotropic scale space constructed by the speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion, so that speckle noise is greatly reduced and prominent structures of the images are preserved, consequently the stable keypoints can be derived. Next, the probabilistic relaxation labeling approach is employed to establish the matches of the keypoints then the correct match rate of the keypoints is significantly increased. Experiments conducted on simulated speckled images and real SAR images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Characterization of Synthetic Aperture Radar Image Features of the Ocean as a Function of Wind Speed and High Frequency Radar Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    the next sections, the method to obtain surface currents from CODAR-type HF radar is described. The process of attaining calibrated and geocoded SAR...n.d.). It’s not the same as geocoding , but does allow the user to have a reasonable interpretation of the SAR image before taking further steps...of a scene and the tilt of the satellite sensor (NEST User Manual, n.d.). The final product is a geocoded image in the projection chosen by the

  2. Exposure Limits in Ophthalmic Imaging with Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roque, S.S.L.T.; Bicho, S.A.A. [IBILI-Biomedical Institute for Research on Light and Image, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Azinhaga de Santa Comba, Celas 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Morgado, A.M.L.S. [IBILI-Biomedical Institute for Research on Light and Image, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Azinhaga de Santa Comba, Celas 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Coimbra, Rua Larga da Universidade, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2009-05-15

    We present an analysis of the exposure to laser radiation resulting from the use of scanning laser ophthalmoscopes in ophthalmic imaging of the ocular fundus. Exposures limits are determined, based on the IEC/EN 60825-1 standard. These limits are applied on the safety analysis of a commercial scanning laser ophthalmoscope. (author)

  3. On the combined use of radar systems for multi-scale imaging of transport infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, I.; Bavusi, M.; Loperte, A.; Crocco, L.; Soldovieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) systems are worth to be considered as in situ non invasive diagnostic tools capable of assessing stability and integrity of transport infrastructures. As a matter of fact, by exploiting the interactions among probing electromagnetic waves and hidden objects, they provide images of the inner status of the spatial region under test from which infer risk factors, such as deformations and oxidization of the reinforcement bars as well as water infiltrations, crack and air gaps. With respect to the assessment of concrete infrastructures integrity, the reconstruction capabilities of GPR systems have been widely investigated [1,2]. However, the demand for diagnostic tools capable of providing detailed and real time information motivates the design and the performance evaluation of novel technologies and data processing methodologies aimed not only to effectively detect hidden anomalies but also to estimate their geometrical features. In this framework, this communication aims at investigating the advantages offered by the joint use of two GPR systems both of them equipped with a specific tomographic imaging approach. The first considered system is a time domain GPR equipped with a 1.5GHz shielded antenna, which is suitable for quick and good resolution surveys of the shallower layers of the structure. As second system, the holographic radar Rascan-4/4000 [3,4] is taken into account, due to its capability of providing holograms of hidden targets from the amplitude of the interference signal arising between the backscattered field and a reference signal. The imaging capabilities of both the GPR tools are enhanced by means of model based data processing approaches, which afford the imaging as a linear inverse scattering problem. Mathematical details on the inversion strategies will be provided at the conference. The combined use of the above GPR systems allows to perform multi-resolution surveys of the region under test, whose aim is, first of

  4. Fish embryo multimodal imaging by laser Doppler digital holography

    CERN Document Server

    Verrier, Nicolas; Picart, Pascal; Gross, Michel

    2015-01-01

    A laser Doppler imaging scheme combined to an upright microscope is proposed. Quantitative Doppler imaging in both velocity norm and direction, as well as amplitude contrast of either zebrafish flesh or vasculature is demonstrated.

  5. Through-wall imaging and characterization of human activity using ultrawideband (UWB) random noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chieh-Ping; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2005-05-01

    Recent terrorist activities and law-enforcement situations involving hostage situations underscore the need for effective through-wall imaging. Current building interior imaging systems are based on short-pulse waveforms, which require specially designed antennas to subdue unwanted ringing. In addition, periodically transmitted pulses of energy are easily recognizable by the intelligent adversary who may employ appropriate countermeasures to confound detection. A coherent polarimetric random noise radar architecture is being developed based on UWB technology and software defined radio, which has great promise in its ability to covertly image obscured targets. The main advantages of the random noise radar lie in two aspects: first, random noise waveform has an ideal "thumbtack" ambiguity function, i.e., its down range and cross range resolution can be separately controlled, thus providing unambiguous high resolution imaging at any distance; second, random noise waveform is inherently low probability of intercept (LPI) and low probability of detection (LPD), i.e., it is immune from detection, jamming, and interference. Thus, it is an ideal candidate sensor for covert imaging of obscured regions in hostile environments. The coherency in the system can be exploited to field a fully-polarimetric system that can take advantage of polarization features in target recognition. Moving personnel can also be detected using Doppler processing. Simulation studies are used to analyze backscattered signals from the walls, and humans and other targets behind the walls. Real-time data processing shows human activity behind the wall and human target tracking. The high resolution provides excellent multipath and clutter rejection.

  6. Radar Imaging and Physical Characterization of Near-Earth Asteroid (162421) 2000 ET70

    CERN Document Server

    Naidu, Shantanu P; Busch, Michael W; Taylor, Patrick A; Nolan, Michael C; Howell, Ellen S; Brozovic, Marina; Benner, Lance A M; Giorgini, Jon D; Magri, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    We observed near-Earth asteroid (162421) 2000 ET70 using the Arecibo and Goldstone radar systems over a period of 12 days during its close approach to the Earth in February 2012. We obtained continuous wave spectra and range-Doppler images with range resolutions as fine as 15 m. Inversion of the radar images yields a detailed shape model with an effective resolution of 100 m. The asteroid has overall dimensions of 2.6 km X 2.2 km X 2.1 km and a surface rich with kilometer-scale ridges and concavities. It is a principal axis rotator and spins in a retrograde manner with a spin period of 8.96 +/- 0.02 hours. In terms of gravitational slopes evaluated at scales of 100 m, the surface seems mostly relaxed with over 99% of the surface having slopes less than 30 degrees, but there are some outcrops at the north pole that may have steeper slopes. Our precise measurements of the range and velocity of the asteroid, combined with optical astrometry, enables reliable trajectory predictions for this potentially hazardous ...

  7. Radar imaging and physical characterization of near-Earth Asteroid (162421) 2000 ET70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Shantanu P.; Margot, Jean-Luc; Busch, Michael W.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Nolan, Michael C.; Brozovic, Marina; Benner, Lance A. M.; Giorgini, Jon D.; Magri, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    We observed near-Earth Asteroid (162421) 2000 ET70 using the Arecibo and Goldstone radar systems over a period of 12 days during its close approach to the Earth in February 2012. We obtained continuous wave spectra and range-Doppler images with range resolutions as fine as 15 m. Inversion of the radar images yields a detailed shape model with an effective spatial resolution of 100 m. The asteroid has overall dimensions of 2.6 km × 2.2 km × 2.1 km (5% uncertainties) and a surface rich with kilometer-scale ridges and concavities. This size, combined with absolute magnitude measurements, implies an extremely low albedo (∼2%). It is a principal axis rotator and spins in a retrograde manner with a sidereal spin period of 8.96 ± 0.01 h. In terms of gravitational slopes evaluated at scales of 100 m, the surface seems mostly relaxed with over 99% of the surface having slopes less than 30°, but there are some outcrops at the north pole that may have steeper slopes. Our precise measurements of the range and velocity of the asteroid, combined with optical astrometry, enables reliable trajectory predictions for this potentially hazardous asteroid in the interval 460-2813.

  8. Imaging radar observations of Farley Buneman waves during the JOULE II experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Vector electric fields and associated E×B drifts measured by a sounding rocket in the auroral zone during the NASA JOULE II experiment in January 2007, are compared with coherent scatter spectra measured by a 30 MHz radar imager in a common volume. Radar imaging permits precise collocation of the spectra with the background electric field. The Doppler shifts and spectral widths appear to be governed by the cosine and sine of the convection flow angle, respectively, and also proportional to the presumptive ion acoustic speed. The neutral wind also contributes to the Doppler shifts. These findings are consistent with those from the JOULE I experiment and also with recent numerical simulations of Farley Buneman waves and instabilities carried out by Oppenheim et al. (2008. Simple linear analysis of the waves offers some insights into the spectral moments. A formula relating the spectral width to the flow angle, ion acoustic speed, and other ionospheric parameters is derived.

  9. Imaging radar observations and nonlocal theory of large-scale plasma waves in the equatorial electrojet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    Full Text Available Large-scale (l ~ 1 km waves in the daytime and night-time equatorial electrojet are studied using coherent scatter radar data from Jicamarca. Images of plasma irregularities within the main beam of the radar are formed using interferometry with multiple baselines. These images are analyzed according to nonlocal gradient drift instability theory and are also compared to nonlinear computer simulations carried out recently by Ronchi et al. (1991 and Hu and Bhattacharjee (1999. In the daytime, the large-scale waves assume a non-steady dynamical equilibrium state characterized by the straining and destruction of the waves by shear and diffusion followed by spontaneous regeneration as predicted by Ronchi et al. (1991. At night, when steep plasma density gradients emerge, slowly propagating large-scale vertically extended waves predominate. Eikonal analysis suggests that these waves are trapped (absolutely unstable or are nearly trapped (convectively unstable and are able to tunnel between altitude regions which are locally unstable. Intermediate-scale waves are mainly transient (convectively stable but can become absolutely unstable in narrow altitude bands determined by the background density profile. These characteristics are mainly consistent with the simulations presented by Hu and Bhattacharjee (1999. A new class of large-scale primary waves is found to occur along bands that sweep westward and downward from high altitudes through the E-region at twilight.

    Key words. Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere; ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities

  10. Comparative study of autodyne and heterodyne laser interferometry for imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lacot, Eric; Roussely, Grégoire; Hugon, Olivier; De Chatellus, Hugues Guillet

    2014-01-01

    For given laser output power, object under investigation and photodiode noise level, we have theoretically compared the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of a heterodyne scanning imager based on a Michelson interferometer and of an autodyne setup based on the Laser Optical Feedback Imaging (LOFI) technique. In both cases, the image is obtained point by point. In the heterodyne configuration, the beating between the reference beam and the signal beam is realized outside the laser cavity (i.e. directly on the detector), while in the autodyne configuration, the wave beating takes place inside the laser cavity and therefore is indirectly detected. In the autodyne configuration, where the laser relaxation oscillations play a leading role, we have compared 1D scans obtained by numerical simulations with different lasers dynamical parameters. Finally we have determined the best laser for LOFI applications and the experimental conditions for which the LOFI detection setup (autodyne interferometer) is competitive comparing ...

  11. 3D laser imaging for concealed object identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berechet, Ion; Berginc, Gérard; Berechet, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    This paper deals with new optical non-conventional 3D laser imaging. Optical non-conventional imaging explores the advantages of laser imaging to form a three-dimensional image of the scene. 3D laser imaging can be used for threedimensional medical imaging, topography, surveillance, robotic vision because of ability to detect and recognize objects. In this paper, we present a 3D laser imaging for concealed object identification. The objective of this new 3D laser imaging is to provide the user a complete 3D reconstruction of the concealed object from available 2D data limited in number and with low representativeness. The 2D laser data used in this paper come from simulations that are based on the calculation of the laser interactions with the different interfaces of the scene of interest and from experimental results. We show the global 3D reconstruction procedures capable to separate objects from foliage and reconstruct a threedimensional image of the considered object. In this paper, we present examples of reconstruction and completion of three-dimensional images and we analyse the different parameters of the identification process such as resolution, the scenario of camouflage, noise impact and lacunarity degree.

  12. Automatic Focusing for a 675 GHz Imaging Radar with Target Standoff Distances from 14 to 34 Meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Adrian; Cooper, Ken B.; Dengler, Robert J.; Llombart, Nuria; Siegel, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper dicusses the issue of limited focal depth for high-resolution imaging radar operating over a wide range of standoff distances. We describe a technique for automatically focusing a THz imaging radar system using translational optics combined with range estimation based on a reduced chirp bandwidth setting. The demonstarted focusing algorithm estimates the correct focal depth for desired targets in the field of view at unknown standoffs and in the presence of clutter to provide good imagery at 14 to 30 meters of standoff.

  13. Feature-enhanced synthetic aperture radar image formation based on nonquadratic regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, M; Karl, W C

    2001-01-01

    We develop a method for the formation of spotlight-mode synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images with enhanced features. The approach is based on a regularized reconstruction of the scattering field which combines a tomographic model of the SAR observation process with prior information regarding the nature of the features of interest. Compared to conventional SAR techniques, the method we propose produces images with increased resolution, reduced sidelobes, reduced speckle and easier-to-segment regions. Our technique effectively deals with the complex-valued, random-phase nature of the underlying SAR reflectivities. An efficient and robust numerical solution is achieved through extensions of half-quadratic regularization methods to the complex-valued SAR problem. We demonstrate the performance of the method on synthetic and real SAR scenes.

  14. Persistent scatterers detection on synthetic aperture radar images acquired by Sentinel-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dǎnişor, Cosmin; Popescu, Anca; Datcu, Mihai

    2016-12-01

    Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PS-InSAR) has become a popular method in remote sensing because of its capability to measure terrain deformations with very high accuracy. It relies on multiple Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) acquisitions, to monitor points with stable proprieties over time, called Persistent Scatterers (PS)[1]. These points are unaffected by temporal decorrelation, therefore by analyzing their interferometric phase variation we can estimate the scene's deformation rates within a given time interval. In this work, we apply two incoherent detection algorithms to identify Persistent Scatterers candidates in the city of Focșani, Romania. The first method studies the variation of targets' intensities along the SAR acquisitions and the second method analyzes the spectral proprieties of the scatterers. The algorithms were implemented on a dataset containing 11 complex images of the region covering Buzău, Brăila and Focșani cities. Images were acquired by Sentinel-1 satellite in a time span of 5 months, from October 2014 to February 2015. The processing chain follows the requirements imposed by the new C-band SAR images delivered by the Sentinel-1 satellite (launched in April 2014) imaging in Interferometric Wide (IW) mode. Considering the particularities of the TOPS (Terrain Observation with Progressive Scans in Azimuth) imaging mode[2], special requirements had to be considered for pre-processing steps. The PS detection algorithms were implemented in Gamma RS program, a software which contains various function packages dedicated to SAR images focalization, analysis and processing.

  15. A fast level set method for synthetic aperture radar ocean image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Bo; Li, Hongga

    2009-01-01

    Segmentation of high noise imagery like Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is still one of the most challenging tasks in image processing. While level set, a novel approach based on the analysis of the motion of an interface, can be used to address this challenge, the cell-based iterations may make the process of image segmentation remarkably slow, especially for large-size images. For this reason fast level set algorithms such as narrow band and fast marching have been attempted. Built upon these, this paper presents an improved fast level set method for SAR ocean image segmentation. This competent method is dependent on both the intensity driven speed and curvature flow that result in a stable and smooth boundary. Notably, it is optimized to track moving interfaces for keeping up with the point-wise boundary propagation using a single list and a method of fast up-wind scheme iteration. The list facilitates efficient insertion and deletion of pixels on the propagation front. Meanwhile, the local up-wind scheme is used to update the motion of the curvature front instead of solving partial differential equations. Experiments have been carried out on extraction of surface slick features from ERS-2 SAR images to substantiate the efficacy of the proposed fast level set method.

  16. Semiconductor Laser Multi-Spectral Sensing and Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Q. Le

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-spectral laser imaging is a technique that can offer a combination of the laser capability of accurate spectral sensing with the desirable features of passive multispectral imaging. The technique can be used for detection, discrimination, and identification of objects by their spectral signature. This article describes and reviews the development and evaluation of semiconductor multi-spectral laser imaging systems. Although the method is certainly not specific to any laser technology, the use of semiconductor lasers is significant with respect to practicality and affordability. More relevantly, semiconductor lasers have their own characteristics; they offer excellent wavelength diversity but usually with modest power. Thus, system design and engineering issues are analyzed for approaches and trade-offs that can make the best use of semiconductor laser capabilities in multispectral imaging. A few systems were developed and the technique was tested and evaluated on a variety of natural and man-made objects. It was shown capable of high spectral resolution imaging which, unlike non-imaging point sensing, allows detecting and discriminating objects of interest even without a priori spectroscopic knowledge of the targets. Examples include material and chemical discrimination. It was also shown capable of dealing with the complexity of interpreting diffuse scattered spectral images and produced results that could otherwise be ambiguous with conventional imaging. Examples with glucose and spectral imaging of drug pills were discussed. Lastly, the technique was shown with conventional laser spectroscopy such as wavelength modulation spectroscopy to image a gas (CO. These results suggest the versatility and power of multi-spectral laser imaging, which can be practical with the use of semiconductor lasers.

  17. Airborne laser scan data: a valuable tool with which to infer weather radar partial beam blockage in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonini, Roberto; Moisseev, Dmitri; Chandrasekar, Venkatachalam

    2016-10-01

    High-spatial-resolution weather radar observations are of primary relevance for hydrological applications in urban areas. However, when weather radars are located within metropolitan areas, partial beam blockages and clutter by buildings can seriously affect the observations. Standard simulations with simple beam propagation models and digital elevation models (DEMs) are usually not able to evaluate buildings' contribution to partial beam blockages. In recent years airborne laser scanners (ALSs) have evolved to the state-of-the-art technique for topographic data acquisition. Providing small footprint diameters (10-30 cm), ALS data allow accurate reconstruction of buildings and forest canopy heights. Analyzing the three weather C-band radars located in the metropolitan area of Helsinki, Finland, the present study investigates the benefits of using ALS data for quantitative estimations of partial beam blockages. The results obtained applying beam standard propagation models are compared with stratiform 24 h rainfall accumulation to evaluate the effects of partial beam blockages due to constructions and trees. To provide a physical interpretation of the results, the detailed analysis of beam occultations is achieved by open spatial data sets and open-source geographic information systems.

  18. Advanced Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Imaging Radar (InSAR) for Dune Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havivi, Shiran; Amir, Doron; Schvartzman, Ilan; August, Yitzhak; Mamman, Shimrit; Rotman, Stanely R.; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2016-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available lose particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970s, remote sensing imagery, both optical and radar, have been used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two or more images. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR methods. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This work aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the coherence change detection method was used, in order to identify dune stability or instability and the dune activity level. The Nitzanim-Ashdod coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of

  19. New Approaches For Asteroid Spin State and Shape Modeling From Delay-Doppler Radar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissi, Chedy; Lamee, Mehdi; Mosiane, Olorato; Vassallo, Corinne; Busch, Michael W.; Greenberg, Adam; Benner, Lance A. M.; Naidu, Shantanu P.; Duong, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Delay-Doppler radar imaging is a powerful technique to characterize the trajectories, shapes, and spin states of near-Earth asteroids; and has yielded detailed models of dozens of objects. Reconstructing objects' shapes and spins from delay-Doppler data is a computationally intensive inversion problem. Since the 1990s, delay-Doppler data has been analyzed using the SHAPE software. SHAPE performs sequential single-parameter fitting, and requires considerable computer runtime and human intervention (Hudson 1993, Magri et al. 2007). Recently, multiple-parameter fitting algorithms have been shown to more efficiently invert delay-Doppler datasets (Greenberg & Margot 2015) - decreasing runtime while improving accuracy. However, extensive human oversight of the shape modeling process is still required. We have explored two new techniques to better automate delay-Doppler shape modeling: Bayesian optimization and a machine-learning neural network.One of the most time-intensive steps of the shape modeling process is to perform a grid search to constrain the target's spin state. We have implemented a Bayesian optimization routine that uses SHAPE to autonomously search the space of spin-state parameters. To test the efficacy of this technique, we compared it to results with human-guided SHAPE for asteroids 1992 UY4, 2000 RS11, and 2008 EV5. Bayesian optimization yielded similar spin state constraints within a factor of 3 less computer runtime.The shape modeling process could be further accelerated using a deep neural network to replace iterative fitting. We have implemented a neural network with a variational autoencoder (VAE), using a subset of known asteroid shapes and a large set of synthetic radar images as inputs to train the network. Conditioning the VAE in this manner allows the user to give the network a set of radar images and get a 3D shape model as an output. Additional development will be required to train a network to reliably render shapes from delay

  20. Burn imaging with a whole field laser Doppler perfusion imager based on a CMOS imaging array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herpt, Heleen; Draijer, Matthijs; Hondebrink, Erwin; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne; Beerthuizen, Gerard; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2010-01-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) has been proven to be a useful tool in predicting the burn wound outcome in an early stage. A major disadvantage of scanning beam LDPI devices is their slow scanning speed, leading to patient discomfort and imaging artifacts. We have developed the Twente Optica

  1. Burn imaging with a whole field laser Doppler perfusion imager based on a CMOS imaging array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herpt, Heleen; Draijer, Matthijs; Hondebrink, Erwin; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne; Beerthuizen, Gerard; van Leeuwen, Ton; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2010-01-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) has been proven to be a useful tool in predicting the burn wound outcome in an early stage. A major disadvantage of scanning beam LDPI devices is their slow scanning speed, leading to patient discomfort and imaging artifacts. We have developed the Twente

  2. A neural network for enhancing boundaries and surfaces in synthetic aperture radar images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingolla, Ennio; Ross, William; Grossberg, Stephen

    1999-04-01

    A neural network system for boundary segmentation and surface representation, inspired by a new local-circuit model of visual processing in the cerebral cortex, is used to enhance images of range data gathered by a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor. Boundary segmentation is accomplished by an improved Boundary Contour System (BCS) model which completes coherent boundaries that retain their sensitivity to image contrasts and locations. A Feature Contour System (FCS) model compensates for local contrast variations and uses the compensated signals to diffusively fill-in surface regions within the BCS boundaries. Image noise pixels that are not supported by BCS boundaries are hereby eliminated. More generally, BCS/FCS processing normalizes input dynamic range, reduces noise, and enhances contrasts between surface regions. BCS/FCS processing hereby makes structures such as motor vehicles, roads, and buildings more salient to human observers than in original imagery. The new BCS model improves image enhancement with significant reductions in processing time and complexity over previous BCS applications. The new system also outperforms several established techniques for image enhancement.

  3. A despeckle filter for the Cassini synthetic aperture radar images of Titan's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Bampasidis, Georgios; Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena

    2012-02-01

    Cassini synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, reveal surface features with shapes ranging from quasi-circular to more complex ones, interpreted as liquid hydrocarbon deposits assembled in the form of lakes or seas. One of the major problems hampering the derivation of meaningful texture information from SAR imagery is the speckle noise. It overlays real structures and causes gray value variations even in homogeneous parts of the image. We propose a filtering technique which can be applied to obtain restored SAR images. Our technique is based on probabilistic methods and regards an image as a random element drawn from a prespecified set of possible images. The despeckle filter can be used as an intermediate step for the extraction of regions of interest, corresponding to structured units in a given area or distinct objects of interest, such as lake-like features on Titan. This tool can therefore be used, among other, to study seasonal surficial changes of Titan's polar regions. In this study we also present a segmentation technique that allows us to separate the lakes from the local background.

  4. Power versus performance tradeoffs of GPU-accelerated backprojection-based synthetic aperture radar image formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Ricardo; Arunagiri, Sarala; Teller, Patricia J.; Park, Song J.; Nguyen, Lam H.; Deroba, Joseph C.; Shires, Dale

    2011-06-01

    The continuing miniaturization and parallelization of computer hardware has facilitated the development of mobile and field-deployable systems that can accommodate terascale processing within once prohibitively small size and weight constraints. General-purpose Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are prominent examples of such terascale devices. Unfortunately, the added computational capability of these devices often comes at the cost of larger demands on power, an already strained resource in these systems. This study explores power versus performance issues for a workload that can take advantage of GPU capability and is targeted to run in field-deployable environments, i.e., Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Specifically, we focus on the Image Formation (IF) computational phase of SAR, often the most compute intensive, and evaluate two different state-of-the-art GPU implementations of this IF method. Using real and simulated data sets, we evaluate performance tradeoffs for single- and double-precision versions of these implementations in terms of time-to-solution, image output quality, and total energy consumption. We employ fine-grain direct-measurement techniques to capture isolated power utilization and energy consumption of the GPU device, and use general and radarspecific metrics to evaluate image output quality. We show that double-precision IF can provide slight image improvement to low-reflective areas of SAR images, but note that the added quality may not be worth the higher power and energy costs associated with higher precision operations.

  5. Subsurface old drainage detection and paleoenvironment analysis using spaceborne radar images in Alxa Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭华东; 刘浩; 王心源; 邵芸; 孙岩

    2000-01-01

    For geological and environmental research in an arid area, a unique advantage of radar remote sensing is that radar wave can penetrate a certain layer of dry sand (a few centimeters to meters thick) to reach the buried bedrock. The penetration capability is able to reveal the subsurface geological structure and old drainage paths. Based on the analysis of SIR-A, SIR-B, SIR-C, Radarsat ScanSAR, Landsat MSS and Landsat TM images acquired on different dates and the investigations made in several field trips in Alxa Plateau of Inner Mongolia, a number of old river valley and lake basins buried by wind-blown sand were recognized. Two parallel old drainage systems in the north and middle of the study area are delineated. The study suggests that the moving sand belts mainly follow the old drainage courses. This study also establishes a preliminary drainage evolution model for an area of about 300 000 km2 since the Tertiary, and finds that the Alxa Plateau was once an area with many rivers and lakes with a warm

  6. Subsurface old drainage detection and paleoenvironment analysis using spaceborne radar images in Alxa Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    For geological and environmental research in an arid area, a unique advantage of radar remote sensing is that radar wave can penetrate a certain layer of dry sand (a few centimeters to meters thick) to reach the buried bedrock. The penetration capability is able to reveal the subsurface geological structure and old drainage paths. Based on the analysis of SIR-A, SIR-B, SIR-C, Radarsat ScanSAR, Landsat MSS and Landsat TM images acquired on different dates and the investigations made in several field trips in Alxa Plateau of Inner Mongolia, a number of old river valley and lake basins buried by wind-blown sand were recognized. Two parallel old drainage systems in the north and middle of the study area are delineated. The study suggests that the moving sand belts mainly follow the old drainage courses. This study also establishes a preliminary drainage evolution model for an area of about 300 000 km2 since the Tertiary, and finds that the Alxa Plateau was once an area with many rivers and lakes with a warm and humid climate. The relief reversion caused by neotectonic movement since "Qinghai-Tibet movement" is also analyzed.

  7. A new approach to dual-band polarimetric radar remote sensing image classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Junyi; YANG Jian; PENG Yingning

    2005-01-01

    It is very important to efficiently represent the target scattering characteristics in applications of polarimetric radar remote sensing. Three probability mass functions are introduced in this paper for target representation: using similarity parameters to describe target average scattering mechanism, using the eigenvalues of a target coherency matrix to describe target scattering randomness, and using radar received power to describe target scattering intensity. The concept of cross-entropy is employed to measure the difference between two scatterers based on the probability mass functions. Three parts of difference between scatterers are measured separately as the difference of average scattering mechanism, the difference of scattering randomness and the difference of scattering intensity, so that the usage of polarimetric data can be highly efficient and flexible. The supervised/unsupervised image classification schemes and their simplified versions are established based on the minimum cross-entropy principle. They are demonstrated to have better classification performance than the maximum likelihood classifier based on the Wishart distribution assumption, both in supervised and in unsupervised classification.

  8. HERMES: a high-speed radar imaging system for inspection of bridge decks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, S.G.

    1996-10-26

    Corrosion of rebar in concrete bridges causes subsurface cracks and is a major cause of structural degradation that necessitates repair or replacement. Early detection of corrosion effects can limit the location and extent of necessary repairs, while providing long-term information about the infrastructure status. Most current detection methods, however, are destructive of the road surface and require closing or restricting traffic while the tests are performed. A ground-penetrating radar imaging system has been designed and developed that will perform the nondestructive evaluation of road-bed cracking at traffic speeds; i.e., without the need to restrict traffic flow. The first-generation system (called the HERMES bridge inspector), consists of an offset-linear array of 64 impulse radar transceivers and associated electronics housed in a trailer. Computers in the trailer and in the towing vehicle control the data acquisition, processing, and display. Cross-road resolution is three centimeters at up to 30 cm in depth, while down-road resolution depends on speed; 3 cm below 20 mph up to 8 cm at 50 mph. A two-meter- wide path is inspected on each pass over the roadway. This paper, describes the design of this system, shows preliminary results, and lays out its deployment schedule.

  9. Retrieval of Both Soil Moisture and Texture Using one configuration TerraSAR-X radar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zribi, M., Sr.; Gorrab, A.; Baghdadi, N.; Lili-Chabaane, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to propose a methodology combing multi-temporal X-band SAR images (TerraSAR-X) with continuous ground thetaprobe measurements, for the retrieval of surface soil moisture and texture at a high spatial resolution. Our analysis is based on seven radar images acquired at a 36° incidence angle in the HH polarization, over a semi-arid site in Tunisia (North Africa). All ground measurements of surface soil parameters were carried out over several bare soil reference fields located at the Kairouan site. Between November 2013 and January 2014 (three months), ground campaigns were carried out at the same time as the seven satellite acquisitions. The soil moisture estimations are based on an empirical change detection approach using TerraSAR-X data and ground auxiliary thetaprobe network measurements. Two assumptions were tested: (1) roughness variations during the three-month radar acquisition campaigns were not accounted for; (2) a simple correction for temporal variations in roughness was included. For the two considered approaches, the soil moisture estimations were validated using ground measurements acquired over fifteen test fields, under different moisture conditions. These comparisons lead to a volumetric moisture RMSE equal to 3.8% and 3.3%, and a bias equal to 0.5% and 0.3%, respectively. By considering the estimated temporal dynamics of soil moisture, a methodology is proposed for the retrieval of clay and sand content (expressed as percentages) in soil. Two empirical relationships were established between the mean moisture values retrieved from the seven acquired radar images and the two soil texture components over 36 test fields. Validation of the proposed approach was carried out over a second set of 34 fields, showing that highly accurate clay estimations can be achieved. For clay and sand, we retrieve an rms error equal to 10.8% (equivalent to 108 g/kg) and 18.6% (equivalent to 186 g/kg), respectively. Maps of soil moisture, clay

  10. A Dual Polarization, Active, Microstrip Antenna for an Orbital Imaging Radar System Operating at L-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kenneth C.; Huang, John

    2000-01-01

    A highly successful Earth orbiting synthetic antenna aperture radar (SAR) system, known as the SIR-C mission, was carried into orbit in 1994 on a U.S. Shuttle (Space Transportation System) mission. The radar system was mounted in the cargo bay with no need to fold, or in any other way reduce the size of the antennas for launch. Weight and size were not limited for the L-Band, C-Band, and X-Band radar systems of the SIR-C radar imaging mission; the set of antennas weighed 10,500 kg, the L-Band antenna having the major share of the weight. This paper treats designing an L-Band antenna functionally similar to that used for SIR-C, but at a fraction of the cost and at a weight in the order of 250 kg. Further, the antenna must be folded to fit into the small payload shroud of low cost booster rocket systems. Over 31 square meters of antenna area is required. This low weight, foldable, electronic scanning antenna is for the proposed LightSAR radar system which is to be placed in Earth orbit on a small, dedicated space craft at the lowest possible cost for an efficient L- Band radar imaging system. This LightSAR spacecraft radar is to be continuously available for at least five operational years, and have the ability to map or repeat-map any area on earth within a few days of any request. A microstrip patch array, with microstrip transmission lines heavily employed in the aperture and in the corporate feed network, was chosen as the low cost approach for this active dual-polarization, 80 MHz (6.4%) bandwidth antenna design.

  11. Integration of speckle de-noising and image segmentation using Synthetic Aperture Radar image for flood extent extraction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Senthilnath; H Vikram Shenoy; Ritwik Rajendra; S N Omkar; V Mani; P G Diwakar

    2013-06-01

    Flood is one of the detrimental hydro-meteorological threats to mankind. This compels very efficient flood assessment models. In this paper, we propose remote sensing based flood assessment using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image because of its imperviousness to unfavourable weather conditions. However, they suffer from the speckle noise. Hence, the processing of SAR image is applied in two stages: speckle removal filters and image segmentation methods for flood mapping. The speckle noise has been reduced with the help of Lee, Frost and Gamma MAP filters. A performance comparison of these speckle removal filters is presented. From the results obtained, we deduce that the Gamma MAP is reliable. The selected Gamma MAP filtered image is segmented using Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and Mean Shift Segmentation (MSS). The GLCM is a texture analysis method that separates the image pixels into water and non-water groups based on their spectral feature whereas MSS is a gradient ascent method, here segmentation is carried out using spectral and spatial information. As test case, Kosi river flood is considered in our study. From the segmentation result of both these methods are comprehensively analysed and concluded that the MSS is efficient for flood mapping.

  12. Laser radar studies: A study of the feasibility of remote measurement of atmospheric density and turbidity by means of rotational Raman scattering of laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, N.; Schotland, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A remote sensing technique is described which utilizes elastic scattering and rotational Raman scattering of laser light in the atmosphere to obtain soundings of turbidity, transmissivity and density. A scheme is devised whereby, through selective weighting of the rotational Raman lines, the effect of atmospheric temperature structure may be eliminated. The close spectral proximity of the elastic and Raman-scattered signals, combined with the fact that the Raman scattering is quite weak, produces special requirements for the spectroscopic and light-gathering components of a rotational Raman laser radar system. These requirements are investigated. A computation of typical signal-to-noise ratios is made. It is shown that daytime signal-to-noise ratios greater than 10 db are to be expected for observation heights of 5 km and below. For nighttime work, 10 db signal-to-noise ratios are achievable to altitudes as high as 15 km.

  13. Military Hydrology. Report 16. Assessment of Shuttle Imaging Radar and Landsat Imagery for Ground-Water Exploration and Arid Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    Representative. The work unit was conducted under the general supervision of Mr. Malcolm P. Keown , Chief, ECG; Dr. Victor E. LaGarde III, Chief, ESD; and Dr. John...MacDonald, H. C., Martin -Kaye, P., and Sabins, F. 1982. "Shuttle Imaging Radar Experiment," Science, Vol 218, pp 996-1003. Elachi, C., Roth, L. E

  14. A forward model for ground penetrating radar imaging of buried perfect electric conductors within the physical optics approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polat, Burak; Meincke, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A forward model for ground penetrating radar imaging of buried 3-D perfect electric conductors is addressed within the framework of diffraction tomography. The similarity of the present forward model derived within the physical optics approximation with that derived within the first Born...

  15. Texture-Analysis-Incorporated Wind Parameters Extraction from Rain-Contaminated X-Band Nautical Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a method for extracting wind parameters from rain-contaminated X-band nautical radar images is presented. The texture of the radar image is first generated based on spatial variability analysis. Through this process, the rain clutter in an image can be removed while the wave echoes are retained. The number of rain-contaminated pixels in each azimuthal direction of the texture is estimated, and this is used to determine the azimuthal directions in which the rain-contamination is negligible. Then, the original image data in these directions are selected for wind direction and speed retrieval using the modified intensity-level-selection-based wind algorithm. The proposed method is applied to shipborne radar data collected from the east Coast of Canada. The comparison of the radar results with anemometer data shows that the standard deviations of wind direction and speed using the rain mitigation technique can be reduced by about 14.5° and 1.3 m/s, respectively.

  16. The Rationale for a New High-resolution Imaging Radar Mission to Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, R. R.; Sharpton, V. L.; Gens, R.; Ghent, R. R.; Gilmore, M. S.; Grimm, R. E.; Johnson, C. L.; McGovern, P. J.; Meyer, F.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Plaut, J. J.; Sandwell, D. T.; Simons, M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    Magellan, NASA’s last geoscience mission to Venus, provided synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images at ~100-m resolution, topography at ~10-km resolution, and the gravity field at ~300-km resolution. Although that mission provided a major advance in our understanding of the planet, basic questions about the geologic history of Venus remain unresolved. For example, hypotheses on the planet’s surface evolution range from uniformitarian to catastrophic, and assessments of current geologic activity range from earth-comparable levels of volcanic and tectonic activity to a surface shaped only by occasional impact and eolian processes. It is now feasible to send a mission to Venus that could provide SAR imaging at 1-5-m resolution; topography with tens-of-meters spatial resolution by utilizing interferometric SAR (InSAR) and stereo radargrammetry; and surface deformation at centimeter-scale vertical resolution through InSAR. Such a mission would substantially further our understanding of Venus by means of: (1) assessing the fundamental framework of the planet's geologic history (e.g., catastrophic change, slow evolution, uniformitarian) by imaging key stratigraphic contacts; (2) expanding the global framework of geomorphic unit types and relative stratigraphy with reconnaissance surveys of large geographic provinces; (3) directly detecting volcanic and tectonic activity through imaging of flows and fault-related activities (e.g., landslides) that occur between imaging passes; (4) monitoring present-day volcanic and tectonic activity with repeat-pass InSAR deformation studies; (5) constraining the nature of Venusian geologic volcanic and tectonic processes, and their relationship to mantle convective processes; (6) understanding the role of eolian processes in modifying the surface and the use of eolian features as stratigraphic markers (e.g., parabolic features) through detailed examination; (7) constraining Venusian impact processes, particularly the role of the

  17. Optimal waveform-based clutter suppression algorithm for recursive synthetic aperture radar imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Binqi; Gao, Yesheng; Wang, Kaizhi; Liu, Xingzhao

    2016-04-01

    A computational method for suppressing clutter and generating clear microwave images of targets is proposed in this paper, which combines synthetic aperture radar (SAR) principles with recursive method and waveform design theory, and it is suitable for SAR for special applications. The nonlinear recursive model is introduced into the SAR operation principle, and the cubature Kalman filter algorithm is used to estimate target and clutter responses in each azimuth position based on their previous states, which are both assumed to be Gaussian distributions. NP criteria-based optimal waveforms are designed repeatedly as the sensor flies along its azimuth path and are used as the transmitting signals. A clutter suppression filter is then designed and added to suppress the clutter response while maintaining most of the target response. Thus, with fewer disturbances from the clutter response, we can generate the SAR image with traditional azimuth matched filters. Our simulations show that the clutter suppression filter significantly reduces the clutter response, and our algorithm greatly improves the SINR of the SAR image based on different clutter suppression filter parameters. As such, this algorithm may be preferable for special target imaging when prior information on the target is available.

  18. Off-Grid Radar Coincidence Imaging Based on Variational Sparse Bayesian Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radar coincidence imaging (RCI is a high-resolution staring imaging technique motivated by classical optical coincidence imaging. In RCI, sparse reconstruction methods are commonly used to achieve better imaging result, while the performance guarantee is based on the general assumption that the scatterers are located at the prediscretized grid-cell centers. However, the widely existing off-grid problem degrades the RCI performance considerably. In this paper, an algorithm based on variational sparse Bayesian learning (VSBL is developed to solve the off-grid RCI. Applying Taylor expansion, the unknown true dictionary is approximated accurately to a linear model. Then target reconstruction is reformulated as a joint sparse recovery problem that recovers three groups of sparse coefficients over three known dictionaries with the constraint of the common support shared by the groups. VSBL is then applied to solve the problem by assigning appropriate priors to the three groups of coefficients. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that the algorithm can achieve outstanding reconstruction performance and yield superior performance both in suppressing noise and in adapting to off-grid error.

  19. An extended chirp scaling algorithm for spaceborne sliding spotlight synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Jiao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A system impulse response with low sidelobes is critical in synthetic aperture radar (SAR images because sidelobes contribute to noise and interfere with nearby scatterers. However, the conventional tricks of sidelobe suppression are unable to be exactly applied to the case of spaceborne sliding spotlight SAR due to great azimuth shifts in both time and frequency domains. In this paper, an extended chirp scaling algorithm is presented for spaceborne sliding spotlight SAR data imaging. The proposed algorithm firstly uses the spectral analysis (SPECAN technique to avoid the azimuth spectrum folding effect and then employs the chirp scaling (CS algorithm to achieve data focusing, i.e., the so-called two-step approach. To suppress the sidelobe level, an efficient strategy for the azimuth spectral weighting which only involves matrix multiplications and short fast Fourier transformations (FFTs is proposed, which is a post-process executed on the focused SAR image and particularly simple to be implemented. The SAR image processed by the proposed extended CS algorithm is very precise and perfectly phase-preserving. In the end, computer simulation results verify the analysis and confirm the validity of the proposed algorithm.

  20. An extended chirp scaling algorithm for spaceborne sliding spotlight synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Jiao; Xu Youshuan; Fu Longsheng

    2014-01-01

    A system impulse response with low sidelobes is critical in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images because sidelobes contribute to noise and interfere with nearby scatterers. However, the conventional tricks of sidelobe suppression are unable to be exactly applied to the case of space-borne sliding spotlight SAR due to great azimuth shifts in both time and frequency domains. In this paper, an extended chirp scaling algorithm is presented for spaceborne sliding spotlight SAR data imaging. The proposed algorithm firstly uses the spectral analysis (SPECAN) technique to avoid the azimuth spectrum folding effect and then employs the chirp scaling (CS) algorithm to achieve data focusing, i.e., the so-called two-step approach. To suppress the sidelobe level, an efficient strategy for the azimuth spectral weighting which only involves matrix multiplications and short fast Fourier transformations (FFTs) is proposed, which is a post-process executed on the focused SAR image and particularly simple to be implemented. The SAR image processed by the proposed extended CS algorithm is very precise and perfectly phase-preserving. In the end, computer simulation results verify the analysis and confirm the validity of the proposed algorithm.

  1. Tomographic airborne ground penetrating radar imaging: Achievable spatial resolution and on-field assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Crocco, Lorenzo; Krellmann, Yvonne; Triltzsch, Gunnar; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) airborne systems are gaining an increasing attention as effective monitoring tools capable of underground investigation of wide areas. With respect to this frame, the paper deals with a reconstruction approach specifically designed to image buried targets from airborne gathered scattered field data. The role of the measurement configuration is investigated in order to address the practical problem of how multi-monostatic and multi-frequency data should be gathered, in terms of synthetic aperture length and frequency range, and how the available data affect the achievable reconstruction capabilities. Such an analysis allows us to evaluate the performance of the reconstruction approach in terms of transversal and depth resolution limits. Finally, an experimental validation of the approach is performed by processing real data.

  2. Parameters estimation of sinusoidal frequency modulation signal with application in synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Zhaofa; Zhao, Bin; Xu, Liang

    2016-04-01

    A method for estimating the parameters of the sinusoidal frequency modulation (SFM) signal is presented in this paper. Based on the modified discrete sinusoid frequency modulation transform (DSFMT), the SFM signal can be transformed into the DSFMT domain where it is energy-concentrated and then the parameters can be estimated by the global maximum. To search for the location of the global maximum with less computational load, particle swarm optimization is used in this paper. Then the algorithm is used in the synthetic aperture radar imaging with high frequency vibration of the platform, and the focus performance can be improved significantly. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the method proposed in this paper.

  3. Validation of Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI) Ionospheric Tomography using ALTAIR Incoherent Scatter Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymond, K.; Nicholas, A. C.; Budzien, S. A.; Stephan, A. W.; Coker, C.; Hei, M. A.; Groves, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI) instruments are ultraviolet limb scanning sensors flying on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites. The SSULIs observe the 80-170 nanometer wavelength range covering emissions at 91 and 136 nm, which are produced by radiative recombination of the ionosphere. We invert these emissions tomographically using newly developed algorithms that include optical depth effects due to pure absorption and resonant scattering. We present the details of our approach including how the optimal altitude and along-track sampling were determined and the newly developed approach we are using for regularizing the SSULI tomographic inversions. Finally, we conclude with validations of the SSULI inversions against ALTAIR incoherent scatter radar measurements and demonstrate excellent agreement between the measurements.

  4. Statistical-physical model for foliage clutter in ultra-wideband synthetic aperture radar images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amit; Chellappa, Rama

    2003-01-01

    Analyzing foliage-penetrating (FOPEN) ultra-wideband synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images is a challenging problem owing to the noisy and impulsive nature of foliage clutter. Indeed, many target-detection algorithms for FOPEN SAR data are characterized by high false-alarm rates. In this work, a statistical-physical model for foliage clutter is proposed that explains the presence of outliers in the data and suggests the use of symmetric alpha-stable (SalphaS) distributions for accurate clutter modeling. Furthermore, with the use of general assumptions of the noise sources and propagation conditions, the proposed model relates the parameters of the SalphaS model to physical parameters such as the attenuation coefficient and foliage density.

  5. Adaptive-neighborhood speckle removal in multitemporal synthetic aperture radar images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuc, M; Bolon, P; Trouve, E; Buzuloiu, V; Rudant, J P

    2001-11-10

    We present a new method for multitemporal synthetic aperture radar image filtering using three-dimensional (3D) adaptive neighborhoods. The method takes both spatial and temporal information into account to derive the speckle-free value of a pixel. For each pixel individually, a 3D adaptive neighborhood is determined that contains only pixels belonging to the same distribution as the current pixel. Then statistics computed inside the established neighborhood are used to derive the filter output. It is shown that the method provides good results by drastically reducing speckle over homogeneous areas while retaining edges and thin structures. The performances of the proposed method are compared in terms of subjective and objective measures with those given by several classical speckle-filtering methods.

  6. Synoptic Analysis of Heavy Rainfall and Flood Observed in Izmir on 20 May 2015 Using Radar and Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsar, Ercument

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a meteorological analysis is conducted on the sudden and heavy rainfall that occurred in Izmir on May 20, 2015. The barotropic model that is observed in upper carts is shown in detail. We can access the data of and analyze the type, severity and amount of many meteorological parameters using the meteorological radars that form a remote sensing system. The one field that uses the radars most intensively is rainfall. Images from the satellite and radar systems are used in the meteorological analysis of the heavy rainfall that occurred in Izmir on 20 May 2015, and the development of the system that led to this rainfall is shown. In this study, data received from Bornova Automatic Meteorological Observation Station (OMGI), which is under the management of Meteorology General Directorate (MGM), Izmir 2. Regional Directorate; satellite images; Radar PPI (Plan Position Indicator) and Radar MAX (Maximum Display) images are evaluated. In addition, synoptic situation, outputs of numerical estimation models, indices calculated from Skew T Log-P diagram are shown. All these results are mapped and analyzed. At the end of these analyses, it is found that this sudden rainfall had developed according to the frontal system motion. A barotropic model occurred on the day of the rainfall over the Aegean Region. As a result of the rainfall that happened in Izmir at 12.00 UTC (Universal Coordinated Time), the May month rainfall record for the last 64 years is achieved with a rainfall amount of 67.7 mm per meter square. Keywords: Izmir, barotropic model, heavy rainfall, radar, synoptic analysis

  7. Ultra-Wideband Indoor Channel Modelling Using Ray-Tracing Software for through-the-Wall Imaging Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Lièbe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new software for design of through-the-wall imaging radars. The first part describes the evolution of a ray tracing simulator, originally designed for propagation of narrowband signals, and then for ultra-wideband signals. This simulator allows to obtain temporal channel response to a wide-band emitter (3 GHz to 10 GHz. An experimental method is also described to identify the propagation paths. Simulation results are compared to propagation experiments under the same conditions. Different configurations are tested and then discussed. Finally, a configuration of through-the-wall imaging radar is proposed, with different antennas patterns and different targets. Simulated images will be helpful for understanding the experiment obtained images.

  8. Principle and experimental results of ultra-wideband noise radar imaging of a cylindrical conducting object using diffraction tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Jung; Asmuth, Mark A.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Rangaswamy, Muralidhar

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the principle, simulation, and experiment results of tomographic imaging of a cylindrical conducting object using random noise waveforms are presented. Theoretical analysis of scattering and the image reconstruction technique are developed based on physical optics approximation and Fourier diffraction tomography, respectively. The bistatic radar system is designed to transmit band-limited ultra-wideband (UWB) random noise waveforms at a fixed position, and a linear scanner allows a single receiving antenna to move along a horizontal axis for backward scattering measurement in the frequency range from 3-5 GHz. The reconstructed tomographic image of the rotating cylindrical conducting object based on experimental results are seen to be in good agreement with the simulation results, which demonstrates the capability of UWB noise radar for complete two-dimensional tomographic image reconstruction of a cylindrical conducting object.

  9. Detection of UXO contaminated land fields using hidden Markov models in the SAR images generated by airborne radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damarla, Thyagaraju; Nguyen, Lam H.; Ranney, Kenneth I.

    2001-08-01

    We present an algorithm based on hidden Markov models (HMM) to detect several types of unexploded ordinance (UXO). We use the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images simulated for 155 mm artillery shell, 2.75 in rocket and 105 mm mortar to generate the codebook. The algorithm is used on the data collected at Yuma Proving ground (YPG). YPG is seeded with several types of UXOs for testing purposes. The data is collected using an ultra wideband SAR mounted on a telescoping boom to simulate the airborne radar. The algorithm has detected all the targets for which it is trained for and it also detected other UXOs that are similar in shape.

  10. Imaging Buried Culverts Using Ground Penetrating Radar: Comparing 100 MHZ Through 1 GHZ Antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Aziz, A.; Stewart, R. R.; Green, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    *Aziz, A A aabdulaziz@uh.edu Allied Geophysical Lab, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, TX, USA Stewart, R R rrstewart@uh.edu Allied Geophysical Lab, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, TX, USA *Green, S L slgreen@yahoo.com Allied Geophysical Lab, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, TX, USA A 3D ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, using three different frequency antennae, was undertaken to image buried steel culverts at the University of Houston's La Marque Geophysical Observatory 30 miles south of Houston, Texas. The four culverts, under study, support a road crossing one of the area's bayous. A 32 m by 4.5 m survey grid was designed on the road above the culverts and data were collected with 100 MHz, 250 MHz, and 1 GHz antennae. We used an orthogonal acquisition geometry for the three surveys. Inline sampling was from 1.0 cm to 10 cm (from 1 GHz to 100 MHz antenna) with inline and crossline spacings ranging from 0.2 m to 0.5 m. We used an initial velocity of 0.1 m/ns (from previous CMP work at the site) for the display purposes. The main objective of the study was to analyze the effect of different frequency antennae on the resultant GPR images. We are also interested in the accuracy and resolution of the various images, in addition to developing an optimal processing flow.The data were initially processed with standard steps that included gain enhancement, dewow and temporal-filtering, background suppression, and 2D migration. Various radar velocities were used in the 2D migration and ultimately 0.12 m/ns was used. The data are complicated by multipathing from the surface and between culverts (from modeling). Some of this is ameliorated via deconvolution. The top of each of the four culverts was evident in the GPR images acquired with the 250 MHz and 100 MHz antennas. For 1 GHz, the top of the culvert was not clear due to the signal's attenuation. The 250 MHz

  11. Coherent fiber supercontinuum laser for nonlinear biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Haohua; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2012-12-01

    Nonlinear biomedical imaging has not benefited from the well-known techniques of fiber supercontinuum generation for reasons such as poor coherence (or high noise), insufficient controllability, low spectral power intensity, and inadequate portability. Fortunately, a few techniques involving nonlinear fiber optics and femtosecond fiber laser development have emerged to overcome these critical limitations. These techniques pave the way for conducting point-of-care nonlinear biomedical imaging by a low-maintenance cost-effective coherent fiber supercontinuum laser, which covers a broad emission wavelength of 350-1700 nm. A prototype of this laser has been demonstrated in label-free multimodal nonlinear imaging of cell and tissue samples.

  12. Semiconductor defect metrology using laser-based quantitative phase imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renjie; Edwards, Chris; Popescu, Gabriel; Goddard, Lynford

    2015-03-01

    A highly sensitive laser-based quantitative phase imaging tool, using an epi-illumination diffraction phase microscope, has been developed for silicon wafer defect inspection. The first system used a 532 nm solid-state laser and detected 20 nm by 100 nm by 110 nm defects in a 22 nm node patterned silicon wafer. The second system, using a 405 nm diode laser, is more sensitive and has enabled detection of 15 nm by 90 nm by 35 nm defects in a 9 nm node densely patterned silicon wafer. In addition to imaging, wafer scanning and image-post processing are also crucial for defect detection.

  13. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Transient laser-induced thermochemical processes on metal surfaces and their visualisation with a laser image amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokoshev, V. G.; Galkin, A. F.; Klimovskii, Ivan I.; Danilov, S. Yu; Abramov, D. V.; Arakelyan, S. M.

    1998-04-01

    Laser oxidation of metals and alloys (steel, copper, brass, titanium, etc.) was investigated with a laser image amplifier based on a Cu laser making use of computer image processing. A method was developed for measuring the growth of an oxide film by recording the motion of interference minima (maxima) of the reflectivity for copper laser radiation when the oxide distribution was nonuniform. The results were compared with theoretical models.

  14. Random laser illumination: an ideal source for biomedical polarization imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Mariana T.; Lotay, Amrit S.; Kenny, Fiona M.; Girkin, John M.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-03-01

    Imaging applications increasingly require light sources with high spectral density (power over spectral bandwidth. This has led in many cases to the replacement of conventional thermal light sources with bright light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers and superluminescent diodes. Although lasers and superluminescent diodes appear to be ideal light sources due to their narrow bandwidth and power, however, in the case of full-field imaging, their spatial coherence leads to coherent artefacts, such as speckle, that corrupt the image. LEDs, in contrast, have lower spatial coherence and thus seem the natural choice, but they have low spectral density. Random Lasers are an unconventional type of laser that can be engineered to provide low spatial coherence with high spectral density. These characteristics makes them potential sources for biological imaging applications where specific absorption and reflection are the characteristics required for state of the art imaging. In this work, a Random Laser (RL) is used to demonstrate speckle-free full-field imaging for polarization-dependent imaging in an epi-illumination configuration. We compare LED and RL illumination analysing the resulting images demonstrating that the RL illumination produces an imaging system with higher performance (image quality and spectral density) than that provided by LEDs.

  15. ESA CryoVEx 2014 - Airborne ASIRAS radar and laser scanner measurements during 2014 CryoVEx campaign in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidegaard, S. M.; Nielsen, J. E.; Sørensen, L. Sandberg;

    This report outlines the airborne field operations with the ESA airborne Ku‐band interferometric radar (ASIRAS), coincident airborne laser scanner (ALS) and vertical photography to acquire data over sea‐ and land ice along validation sites and CryoSat‐2 ground tracks. The airborne campaign was co...

  16. Synthetic aperture radar imaging based on attributed scatter model using sparse recovery techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏伍各; 王宏强; 阳召成

    2014-01-01

    The sparse recovery algorithms formulate synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging problem in terms of sparse representation (SR) of a small number of strong scatters’ positions among a much large number of potential scatters’ positions, and provide an effective approach to improve the SAR image resolution. Based on the attributed scatter center model, several experiments were performed with different practical considerations to evaluate the performance of five representative SR techniques, namely, sparse Bayesian learning (SBL), fast Bayesian matching pursuit (FBMP), smoothed l0 norm method (SL0), sparse reconstruction by separable approximation (SpaRSA), fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm (FISTA), and the parameter settings in five SR algorithms were discussed. In different situations, the performances of these algorithms were also discussed. Through the comparison of MSE and failure rate in each algorithm simulation, FBMP and SpaRSA are found suitable for dealing with problems in the SAR imaging based on attributed scattering center model. Although the SBL is time-consuming, it always get better performance when related to failure rate and high SNR.

  17. Image segmentation techniques for improved processing of landmine responses in ground-penetrating radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrione, Peter A.; Collins, Leslie

    2007-04-01

    As ground penetrating radar sensor phenomenology improves, more advanced statistical processing approaches become applicable to the problem of landmine detection in GPR data. Most previous studies on landmine detection in GPR data have focused on the application of statistics and physics based prescreening algorithms, new feature extraction approaches, and improved feature classification techniques. In the typical framework, prescreening algorithms provide spatial location information of anomalous responses in down-track / cross-track coordinates, and feature extraction algorithms are then tasked with generating low-dimensional information-bearing feature sets from these spatial locations. However in time-domain GPR, a significant portion of the data collected at prescreener flagged locations may be unrelated to the true anomaly responses - e.g. ground bounce response, responses either temporally "before" or "after" the anomalous response, etc. The ability to segment the information-bearing region of the GPR image from the background of the image may thus provide improved performance for feature-based processing of anomaly responses. In this work we will explore the application of Markov random fields (MRFs) to the problem of anomaly/background segmentation in GPR data. Preliminary results suggest the potential for improved feature extraction and overall performance gains via application of image segmentation approaches prior to feature extraction.

  18. On the convergence of the phase gradient autofocus algorithm for synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging is a class of coherent range and Doppler signal processing techniques applied to remote sensing. The aperture is synthesized by recording and processing coherent signals at known positions along the flight path. Demands for greater image resolution put an extreme burden on requirements for inertial measurement units that are used to maintain accurate pulse-to-pulse position information. The recently developed Phase Gradient Autofocus algorithm relieves this burden by taking a data-driven digital signal processing approach to estimating the range-invariant phase aberrations due to either uncompensated motions of the SAR platform or to atmospheric turbulence. Although the performance of this four-step algorithm has been demonstrated, its convergence has not been modeled mathematically. A new sensitivity study of algorithm performance is a necessary step towards this model. Insights that are significant to the application of this algorithm to both SAR and to other coherent imaging applications are developed. New details on algorithm implementation identify an easily avoided biased phase estimate. A new algorithm for defining support of the point spread function is proposed, which promises to reduce the number of iterations required even for rural scenes with low signal-to-clutter ratios.

  19. Bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging of Moving Targets using Ultra-Narrowband Continuous Waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ling

    2013-01-01

    We consider a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system that uses ultra-narrowband continuous waveforms (CW) as an illumination source. Such a system has many practical advantages, such as the use of relatively simple, low-cost and low-power transmitters, and in some cases, using the transmitters of opportunity, such as TV, radio stations. Additionally, ultra-narrowband CW signals are suitable for motion estimation due to their ability to acquire high resolution Doppler information. In this paper, we present a novel synthetic aperture imaging method for moving targets using a bi-static SAR system transmitting ultra-narrowband continuous waveforms. Our method exploits the high Doppler resolution provided by ultra-narrowband CW signals to image both the scene reflectivity and to determine the velocity of multiple moving targets. Starting from the first principle, we develop a novel forward model based on the temporal Doppler induced by the movement of antennas and moving targets. We form the reflectivity image of t...

  20. Independent feature subspace iterative optimization based fuzzy clustering for synthetic aperture radar image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hang; Xu, Luping; Feng, Dongzhu; He, Xiaochuan

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image segmentation is investigated from feature extraction to algorithm design, which is characterized by two aspects: (1) multiple heterogeneous features are extracted to describe SAR images and the corresponding similarity measures are developed independently to avoid the mutual influences between different features in order to enhance the discriminability of the final similarity between objects. (2) A method called fuzzy clustering based on independent subspace iterative optimization (FCISIO) is proposed. FCISIO integrates multiple features into an objective function which is then iteratively optimized in each feature subspace to obtain final segmentation results. This strategy can protect the distribution structures of the data points in each feature subspace, which realizes an effective way to integrate multiple features of different properties. In order to improve the computation speed and the accuracy of feature description for FCISIO, we design a region merging algorithm before FCISIO which can use many kinds of information to quickly merge regions inside the true segments. Experiments on synthetic and real SAR images show that the proposed method is effective and robust and can obtain good segmentation results with a very short running time.

  1. Research on synthetic aperture radar imaging technology of one-dimensional layered rough surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Wei-Jie; Tong Chuang-Ming

    2013-01-01

    A quick and exact imaging method for one-dimensional layered rough surfaces is proposed in this paper to study the scattering characteristics of a layered medium that exists widely in nature.The boundary integral equations of layered rough surfaces are solved by using the propagation-inside-layer expansion combined with the forward and backward spectral acceleration method (PILE+FB-SA),and the back scattering data are obtained.Then,a conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging procedure called back projection method is used to generate a two-dimensional (2D) image of the layered rough surfaces.Combined with the relative dielectric permittivity of realistic soil,the random rough surfaces with Gauss spectrum are used to simulate the layered medium with rough interfaces.Since the back scattering data are computed by using the fast numerical method,this method can be used to study layered rough surfaces with any parameter,which has a great application value in the detection and remote sensing areas.

  2. Parameter estimation and imaging of moving targets in bistatic synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Huang, Puming; Yang, Zhimei; Lin, Chenchen

    2016-01-01

    In high-resolution bistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems, parameter estimation is essential to moving target imaging quality. However, precise parameters are difficult to obtain without priori information due to the relative along-track and across-track velocities between the moving target and platforms that change with time. A parameter estimation and imaging approach for moving targets is proposed. First, slant range and relative velocities expression are deduced based on the geometry of bistatic SAR model with one stationary configuration. Then, range curvature term are compensated skillfully by fitting the range-compressed curve in two-dimensional time domain, meanwhile, the initial estimated range walk slope can be achieved. Finally, precise Doppler centroid is estimated through searching for the maximum contrast with folding search algorithm, which is giving consideration to both searching precision and computational complexity. Thus, the proposed algorithm provides an effective way for parameter estimation and imaging of moving target without prior information and interpolation operation. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Combined Use of Multi-Temporal Optical and Radar Satellite Images for Grassland Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Dusseux

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the ability of optical images, SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar images and the combination of both types of data to discriminate between grasslands and crops in agricultural areas where cloud cover is very high most of the time, which restricts the use of visible and near-infrared satellite data. We compared the performances of variables extracted from four optical and five SAR satellite images with high/very high spatial resolutions acquired during the growing season. A vegetation index, namely the NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and two biophysical variables, the LAI (Leaf Area Index and the fCOVER (fraction of Vegetation Cover were computed using optical time series and polarization (HH, VV, HV, VH. The polarization ratio and polarimetric decomposition (Freeman–Durden and Cloude–Pottier were calculated using SAR time series. Then, variables derived from optical, SAR and both types of remotely-sensed data were successively classified using the Support Vector Machine (SVM technique. The results show that the classification accuracy of SAR variables is higher than those using optical data (0.98 compared to 0.81. They also highlight that the combination of optical and SAR time series data is of prime interest to discriminate grasslands from crops, allowing an improved classification accuracy.

  4. A method for automated snow avalanche debris detection through use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, H.; Eckerstorfer, M.; Malnes, E.; Larsen, Y.; Hindberg, H.

    2016-11-01

    Avalanches are a natural hazard that occur in mountainous regions of Troms County in northern Norway during winter and can cause loss of human life and damage to infrastructure. Knowledge of when and where they occur especially in remote, high mountain areas is often lacking due to difficult access. However, complete, spatiotemporal avalanche activity data sets are important for accurate avalanche forecasting, as well as for deeper understanding of the link between avalanche occurrences and the triggering snowpack and meteorological factors. It is therefore desirable to develop a technique that enables active mapping and monitoring of avalanches over an entire winter. Avalanche debris can be observed remotely over large spatial areas, under all weather and light conditions by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellites. The recently launched Sentinel-1A satellite acquires SAR images covering the entire Troms County with frequent updates. By focusing on a case study from New Year 2015 we use Sentinel-1A images to develop an automated avalanche debris detection algorithm that utilizes change detection and unsupervised object classification methods. We compare our results with manually identified avalanche debris and field-based images to quantify the algorithm accuracy. Our results indicate that a correct detection rate of over 60% can be achieved, which is sensitive to several algorithm parameters that may need revising. With further development and refinement of the algorithm, we believe that this method could play an effective role in future operational monitoring of avalanches within Troms and has potential application in avalanche forecasting areas worldwide.

  5. Radar Coincidence Imaging for Off-Grid Target Using Frequency-Hopping Waveforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radar coincidence imaging (RCI is a high-resolution staring imaging technique without the limitation of the target relative motion. To achieve better imaging performance, sparse reconstruction is commonly used. While its performance is based on the assumption that the scatterers are located at the prediscretized grid-cell centers, otherwise, off-grid emerges and the performance of RCI degrades significantly. In this paper, RCI using frequency-hopping (FH waveforms is considered. The off-grid effects are analyzed, and the corresponding constrained Cramér-Rao bound (CCRB is derived based on the mean square error (MSE of the “oracle” estimator. For off-grid RCI, the process is composed of two stages: grid matching and off-grid error (OGE calibration, where two-dimension (2D band-excluded locally optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (BLOOMP and alternating iteration minimization (AIM algorithms are proposed, respectively. Unlike traditional sparse recovery methods, BLOOMP realizes the recovery in the refinement grids by overwhelming the shortages of coherent dictionary and is robust to noise and OGE. AIM calibration algorithm adaptively adjusts the OGE and, meanwhile, seeks the optimal target reconstruction result.

  6. Subsurface Imaging by UWB Radar: Application to Humanitarian Demining in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Motoyuki

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has been widely used applications which include detection of subsurface facilities, concrete inspection and archaeology. Among these applications, humanitarian demining is still difficult task. Since 2002, we have developed a new hand-held land mine detection dual-sensor ALIS. ALIS is equipped with a metal detector and a GPR, and it has a sensor tracking system, which can record the GPR and Metal detector signal with its location. ALIS can process the data and is used for image re-construction by migration processing. ALIS is the only one mine detection system in the world which can visualize the GPR image by hand scanning. We found that the migration processing can reduce the clutter and gives us clear images of buried mines. After several tests of ALIS in mine affected courtiers, operation of ALIS in mine fields in Cambodia started in summer 2009. Two sets of ALIS have been operated in Cambodia and more than 77 antipersonnel mines have been detected and 137,000m2 farmland was cleaned.

  7. VHF volume-imaging radar observation of aspect-sensitive scatterers tilted in mountain waves above a convective boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Worthington

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Thin stable atmospheric layers cause VHF radars to receive increased echo power from near zenith. Layers can be tilted from horizontal, for instance by gravity waves, and the direction of VHF "glinting" is measurable by spatial domain interferometry or many-beam Doppler beam swinging (DBS. This paper uses the Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar, Shigaraki, Japan as a volume-imaging radar with 64-beam DBS, to show tilting of layers and air flow in mountain waves. Tilt of aspect-sensitive echo power from horizontal is nearly parallel to air flow, as assumed in earlier measurements of mountain-wave alignment. Vertical-wind measurements are self-consistent from different beam zenith angles, despite the combined effects of aspect sensitivity and horizontal-wind gradients.

  8. Laser-jamming analysis of combined fiber lasers to imaging CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Xu; Shanghong, Zhao; Rui, Hou; Xiaoliang, Li; Jili, Wu; Yunxia, Li; Wen, Meng; Yanhui, Ni; Lihua, Ma

    2009-07-01

    To complete a successful laser jamming to imaging charge coupled device (CCD) based on combined fiber lasers, the interactions between CCD and combined fiber lasers were analyzed in detail. The saturation and crosstalk thresholds of CCD were achieved, which are lower than 10 mW/cm 2. Through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations, the thermal processes under single pulse, multi-pulses and continuous laser irradiations were developed. The simulation results have proved the possibility of hard damage caused by multi-pulses and continuous laser irradiations. The combined fiber lasers is suitable to deploy optical saturation jamming at present. The further applications of combined fiber lasers need a more powerful laser source and a more accurate tracking and pointing system.

  9. Imaging Cracks by Laser Excited Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, J.; Kervalishvili, G. N.; Maierhofer, Ch.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2010-02-01

    During the last years active thermography is increasingly used in a number of NDT problems in production and maintenance. In this work we focus on the detection of vertical cracks starting at the surface, which is an important indication of structural failure. By using local thermal excitation it is possible to image anisotropies in the lateral diffusivity by recording the temporal temperature data with an infrared camera. The regional transient behaviour of temperature distribution then can provide quantitative information of the crack parameter. In doing so, we present an advanced technique for the determination of the crack depth. The experimental set-up is based on an Nd:YAG laser. The beam is focused on the test sample by using an optical scanner to create the required lateral heat flow. The time resolved temperature distribution is recorded with an infrared camera (InSb FPA, 3 to 5 μm) providing a frame rate of up to 500 Hz. In addition we report on numerical simulation to investigate the concept of local heat excitation for a quantitative estimation of crack parameters. The modeling also includes the influence of surface to surface radiation inside the crack. We obtained a good consistency between experimental and theoretical data.

  10. High speed perfusion imaging based on laser speckle fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draijer, Matthijs Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Noninvasive methods to visualize blood flow in tissue are important in the clinical environment. Most methods use dynamic speckles to measure the level of perfusion. The most well-known techniques based on these speckle patterns are laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) and laser speckle contrast a

  11. Measurement of depth of burns by laser Doppler perfusion imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droog, E.J.; Droog, E.J.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Sjöberg, F.

    2001-01-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI), is a further development in laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Its advantage is that it enables assessment of microvascular blood flow in a predefined skin area rather than, as for LDF, in one place. In many ways this method seems to be more promising than LDF in

  12. Range-Gated Laser Stroboscopic Imaging for Night Remote Surveillance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-Wei; ZHOU Yan; FAN Song-Tao; HE Jun; LIU Yu-Liang

    2010-01-01

    @@ For night remote surveillance,we present a method,the range-gated laser stroboscopic imaging(RGLSI),which uses a new kind of time delay integration mode to integrate target signals so that night remote surveillance can be realized by a low-energy illuminated laser.The time delay integration in this method has no influence on the video frame rate.

  13. Measurement of depth of burns by laser Doppler perfusion imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droog, E.J.; Steenbergen, W.; Sjöberg, F.

    2001-01-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI), is a further development in laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Its advantage is that it enables assessment of microvascular blood flow in a predefined skin area rather than, as for LDF, in one place. In many ways this method seems to be more promising than LDF in

  14. Rapid Assessment of Earthquakes with Radar and Optical Geodetic Imaging and Finite Fault Models (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, E. J.; Sladen, A.; Simons, M.; Rosen, P. A.; Yun, S.; Li, Z.; Avouac, J.; Leprince, S.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquake responders need to know where the earthquake has caused damage and what is the likely intensity of damage. The earliest information comes from global and regional seismic networks, which provide the magnitude and locations of the main earthquake hypocenter and moment tensor centroid and also the locations of aftershocks. Location accuracy depends on the availability of seismic data close to the earthquake source. Finite fault models of the earthquake slip can be derived from analysis of seismic waveforms alone, but the results can have large errors in the location of the fault ruptures and spatial distribution of slip, which are critical for estimating the distribution of shaking and damage. Geodetic measurements of ground displacements with GPS, LiDAR, or radar and optical imagery provide key spatial constraints on the location of the fault ruptures and distribution of slip. Here we describe the analysis of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and sub-pixel correlation (or pixel offset tracking) of radar and optical imagery to measure ground coseismic displacements for recent large earthquakes, and lessons learned for rapid assessment of future events. These geodetic imaging techniques have been applied to the 2010 Leogane, Haiti; 2010 Maule, Chile; 2010 Baja California, Mexico; 2008 Wenchuan, China; 2007 Tocopilla, Chile; 2007 Pisco, Peru; 2005 Kashmir; and 2003 Bam, Iran earthquakes, using data from ESA Envisat ASAR, JAXA ALOS PALSAR, NASA Terra ASTER and CNES SPOT5 satellite instruments and the NASA/JPL UAVSAR airborne system. For these events, the geodetic data provided unique information on the location of the fault or faults that ruptured and the distribution of slip that was not available from the seismic data and allowed the creation of accurate finite fault source models. In many of these cases, the fault ruptures were on previously unknown faults or faults not believed to be at high risk of earthquakes, so the area and degree of

  15. Synthetic range profiling, ISAR imaging of sea vessels and feature extraction, using a multimode radar to classify targets: initial results from field trials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abdul Gaffar, MY

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available -based classification of small to medium sized sea vessels in littoral condition. The experimental multimode radar is based on an experimental tracking radar that was modified to generate SRP and ISAR images in both search and tracking modes. The architecture...

  16. Using high-resolution radar images to determine vegetation cover for soil erosion assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargiel, D; Herrmann, S; Jadczyszyn, J

    2013-07-30

    Healthy soils are crucial for human well-being. Because soils are threatened worldwide, politicians recognize the need for soil protection. For example, the European Commission has launched the Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection, which requests the European member states to identify high risk areas for soil degradation. Most states use the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) to assess soil erosion risk at the national scale. The USLE includes different factors, one of them is the vegetation cover and management factor (C factor). Modern satellite-based radar sensors now provide highly accurate vegetation cover data, enabling opportunities to improve the accuracy of the C factor. The presented study proves the suitability for C factor determination based on a multi-temporal classification of high-resolution radar images. Further USLE factors were derived from existing data sources (meteorological data, soil maps, digital elevation model) to conduct an USLE-based soil erosion assessment. The resulting map illustrates a qualitative assessment for soil erosion risk within a plot of about 7*12 km in an agricultural region in Poland that is very susceptible to soil erosion processes. A high erosion risk of more than 10 tonnes per ha and year was assessed to occur on 13.6% (646 ha) of the agricultural areas within the investigated plot. Further 7.8% (372 ha) of agricultural land is threaten by a medium risk of 5-10 tonnes per ha and year. Such a spatial information about areas of high or medium soil erosion risk are crucial for the development of strategies for the protection of soils.

  17. Ground Penetrating Radar at Alcatraz Island: Imaging Civil-War Era Fortifications Beneath the Recreation Yard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M. E.; de Smet, T. S.; Warden, R.; Komas, T.; Hagin, J.

    2013-12-01

    As part of a cultural resources assessment and historical preservation project supported by the U.S. National Park Service, GPR surveys using 200 MHz antennas, with ~3.0 m depth of penetration and ~0.1 m lateral and vertical resolution, were conducted by our team in June 2012 over the recreation yard and parade ground at historic Alcatraz Island in order to image the underlying buried Civil War-era fortifications. The recreation yard at the Alcatraz high-security federal penitentiary served as a secure outdoor facility where the prisoners could take exercise. The facility, enclosed by a high perimeter wall and sentry walk, included basketball courts, a baseball diamond, and bleacher-style seating. The site previously consisted of coastal batteries built by the U.S. Army in the early to mid 1850's. As the need for harbor defense diminished, the island was converted into a military prison during the 1860's. In 1933, the military prison was transferred to federal control leading to the establishment of the high-security penitentiary. The rec yard was constructed in 1908-1913 directly over existing earthen fortifications, namely a trio of embankments known as 'traverses I, J, and K.' These mounds of earth, connected by tunnels, were in turn built over concrete and brick magazines. The processed GPR sections show good correlations between radar reflection events and the locations of the buried fortification structures derived from historical map analysis. A 3-D data cube was constructed and two of the cut-away perspective views show that traverse K, in particular, has a strong radar signature.

  18. Laser Imaging Video Camera Sees Through Fire, Fog, Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Under a series of SBIR contracts with Langley Research Center, inventor Richard Billmers refined a prototype for a laser imaging camera capable of seeing through fire, fog, smoke, and other obscurants. Now, Canton, Ohio-based Laser Imaging through Obscurants (LITO) Technologies Inc. is demonstrating the technology as a perimeter security system at Glenn Research Center and planning its future use in aviation, shipping, emergency response, and other fields.

  19. Application of Multifractal Analysis to Segmentation of Water Bodies in Optical and Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellite Images

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Victor Manuel San

    2016-01-01

    A method for segmenting water bodies in optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite images is proposed. It makes use of the textural features of the different regions in the image for segmentation. The method consists in a multiscale analysis of the images, which allows us to study the images regularity both, locally and globally. As results of the analysis, coarse multifractal spectra of studied images and a group of images that associates each position (pixel) with its corresponding value of local regularity (or singularity) spectrum are obtained. Thresholds are then applied to the multifractal spectra of the images for the classification. These thresholds are selected after studying the characteristics of the spectra under the assumption that water bodies have larger local regularity than other soil types. Classifications obtained by the multifractal method are compared quantitatively with those obtained by neural networks trained to classify the pixels of the images in covered against uncovered b...

  20. Selective Synthetic Aperture Radar and Panchromatic Image Fusion by Using the à Trous Wavelet Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcef Chibani

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic aperture radar (SAR imaging sensor presents an important advantage for the earth change observation independently of weather conditions. However, the SAR image provides an incomplete information (as roads of the observed scene leading thus to an ambiguous interpretation. In order to compensate the lack of features, the high spatial resolution panchromatic (P image is often used as a complementary data for improving the quality of the SAR image. The concept is based on the extraction of features (details from the P image in order to incorporate into the SAR image. Therefore, we propose an approach based on the use of the à trous wavelet decomposition (ATWD for extracting features from the P image. Experimental results show that the SAR-P composite image allows a better detection of lines, edges, and field boundaries.