WorldWideScience

Sample records for laser plasma ablation

  1. Diagnostics of laser ablated plasma plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    The effect of an ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of laser ablated plasmas has been studied for two systems by exploiting different diagnostic techniques. First, the dynamics of a MgB2 laser produced plasma plume in an Ar atmosphere has been investigated by space-and time-resolved optical...... of the laser ablated plasma plume propagation in a background gas. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V All rights reserved....

  2. Plasma dynamics from laser ablated solid lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    b; 52.25.-b; 52.70.-m. 1. Introduction. Pulsed laser ablation of a solid sample generates a dense plasma emission in the shape of ... The multichannel analyser plate of the ICCD was gated for as less as 4 ns using ... to explain the atomic collision processes [4]. .... Within duration of laser pulse, there occurs laser-solid interac-.

  3. Spectrum diagnoses of laser plasma in 'ablation mode' laser propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ling; Tang Zhiping; Tong Huifeng; Su Maogen; Xue Simin

    2007-01-01

    The propellant materials (LY12 aluminium, No.45 steel, H62 brass, graphite, polyvinyl chloride, polyoxymethylene) in laser propulsion are ablated by a Nd: YAG laser (1.06 μm, 10 ns). The space-resolved and the power density-depended emission spectrums of aluminum and copper plasma are recorded and analyzed. Under the local thermo equilibrium assumption, the electronic temperature and density as well as the average intensity of ionization from the relative intensity of characteristic spectrum for aluminum are obtained. Their dependence on laser power-density and spatial variation are also investigated. The ablation imagines (the ejected plumes) of the six materials in vacuum are obtained and discussed by using a B shutter camera. (authors)

  4. Development of laser ablation plasma by anisotropic self-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohnishi Naofumi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a method for reproducing an accurate solution of low-density ablation plasma by properly treating anisotropic radiation. Monte-Carlo method is employed for estimating Eddington tensor with limited number of photon samples in each fluid time step. Radiation field from ablation plasma is significantly affected by the anisotropic Eddington tensor. Electron temperature around the ablation surface changes with the radiation field and is responsible for the observed emission. An accurate prediction of the light emission from the laser ablation plasma requires a careful estimation of the anisotropic radiation field.

  5. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong [Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-101, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Tang Zhiping [CAS Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  6. Langmuir probe study of plasma expansion in pulsed laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.N.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Langmuir probes were used to monitor the asymptotic expansion of the plasma produced by the laser ablation of a silver target in a vacuum. The measured angular and temporal distributions of the ion flux and electron temperature were found to be in good agreement with the self-similar isentropic...... and adiabatic solution of the gas dynamics equations describing the expansion. The value of the adiabatic index gamma was about 1.25, consistent with the ablation plume being a low temperature plasma....

  7. Angular distribution of laser ablation plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Dabrowski, R.; Okamura, M.

    2010-01-01

    An expansion of a laser induced plasma is fundamental and important phenomena in a laser ion source. To understand the expanding direction, an array of Langmuir probes were employed. The chosen ion for the experiment was Ag 1+ which was created by a second harmonics of a Nd-YAG laser. The obtained angular distribution was about ±10 degree. This result also indicates a proper positioning of a solenoid magnet which enhances ion beam current.

  8. Ion extraction from positively biased laser-ablation plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isono, Fumika; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Jun; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Ions were extracted through a grounded grid from a positively biased laser-ablation plasma and the behaviors were investigated. Since the plasma was positively biased against the grounded wall, we could extract the ions without insulated gap. We confirmed formation of a virtual anode when we increased the distance between the grid and the ion collector. Results also indicated that when the ion flux from the ablation plasma exceeded a critical value, the current was strongly suppressed to the space charge limited level due to the formation of virtual anode.

  9. Filamented plasmas in laser ablation of solids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Davies, J.R.; Fajardo, M.; Kozlová, Michaela; Mocek, Tomáš; Polan, Jiří; Rus, Bedřich

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2009), 035013/1-035013/12 ISSN 0741-3335 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 12843 - TUIXS Grant - others:FCT(PT) POCI/FIS/59563/2004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : magneto-hydrodynamic modelling * perturbation * filaments * x-ray * plasma Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.409, year: 2009

  10. Laser ablated copper plasmas in liquid and gas ambient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-05-01

    The dynamics of copper ablated plasma plumes generated using laser ablation of copper targets in both liquid (de-ionized water) and gas (air) ambients is reported. Using time and space resolved visible emission spectroscopy (450-650 nm), the plasma plumes parameters are investigated. The electron density (ne) determined using Stark broadening of the Cu I (3d104d1 2D3/2-3d104p1 2P3/2 at 521.8 nm) line is estimated and compared for both plasma plumes. The electron temperature (Te) was estimated using the relative line emission intensities of the neutral copper transitions. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectral analysis of the ablated copper surface indicated abundance of spherical nanoparticles in liquid while those in air are amalgamates of irregular shapes. The nanoparticles suspended in the confining liquid form aggregates and exhibit a surface plasmon resonance at ˜590 nm.

  11. Frequency mixing in boron carbide laser ablation plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oujja, M.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Sanz, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Martín, M.; de Nalda, R.; Castillejo, M.

    2015-05-01

    Nonlinear frequency mixing induced by a bichromatic field (1064 nm + 532 nm obtained from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser) in a boron carbide (B4C) plasma generated through laser ablation under vacuum is explored. A UV beam at the frequency of the fourth harmonic of the fundamental frequency (266 nm) was generated. The dependence of the efficiency of the process as function of the intensities of the driving lasers differs from the expected behavior for four-wave mixing, and point toward a six-wave mixing process. The frequency mixing process was strongly favored for parallel polarizations of the two driving beams. Through spatiotemporal mapping, the conditions for maximum efficiency were found for a significant delay from the ablation event (200 ns), when the medium is expected to be a low-ionized plasma. No late components of the harmonic signal were detected, indicating a largely atomized medium.

  12. Evolution of plasma double layers in laser-ablation plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurlui, S.; Sanduloviciu, M.; Mihesan, C.; Ziskind, M.; Focsa, C.

    2005-01-01

    The double layers (DLs) are one of the most complex problems of the plasma physics. These layers are apparently important not only in laboratory plasmas and laser-ablation plasma plumes but also in natural phenomena, e.g. the aurora and fire balls.This work studies the dynamics of the double layers in a laser ablation plume from different targets irradiated by a Nd: YAG 10 ns pulsed laser. The plasma formation was studied by means of both Langmuir probe and mass spectrometry methods using an experimental set-up developed for the study of environmental or technological interest samples. The ionic current distribution in plasma plume formation was recorded in different experimental conditions. We have found that it depends on the laser energy, the pressure of the buffer gas and the probe position. The periodical oscillations recorded in different experimental conditions prove that these plasma formations (DLs) are local physical systems able to accumulate and release energy. Acting as storing and releasing energy elements, the DLs can sustain periodical or non-periodical variations of the current or of the other global parameters of the plasma. (author)

  13. Spectroscopic analysis of coal plasma emission produced by laser ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Vera-Londoño, Liliana Patricia; Pérez-Taborda, Jaime Andrés; Riascos-Landázuri, Henry

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of plasma produced by laser ablation using 1,064 nm of laser radiation from a Q-switched Nd:YAG on coal mineral samples under air ambient, was performed. The emission of molecular band systems such as C2 Swan System , the First Negative System N2 (Band head at 501.53 nm) and different emission lines were investigated using the optical emission spectroscopy technique. The C2 molecular spectra (Swan band) were analyzed to determine vibrational temperature (0.62 eV). The density and ...

  14. Laser ablated copper plasmas in liquid and gas ambient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Thareja, Raj K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2013-05-15

    The dynamics of copper ablated plasma plumes generated using laser ablation of copper targets in both liquid (de-ionized water) and gas (air) ambients is reported. Using time and space resolved visible emission spectroscopy (450-650 nm), the plasma plumes parameters are investigated. The electron density (n{sub e}) determined using Stark broadening of the Cu I (3d{sup 10}4d{sup 1} {sup 2}D{sub 3/2}-3d{sup 10}4p{sup 1} {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} at 521.8 nm) line is estimated and compared for both plasma plumes. The electron temperature (T{sub e}) was estimated using the relative line emission intensities of the neutral copper transitions. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectral analysis of the ablated copper surface indicated abundance of spherical nanoparticles in liquid while those in air are amalgamates of irregular shapes. The nanoparticles suspended in the confining liquid form aggregates and exhibit a surface plasmon resonance at ∼590 nm.

  15. Characteristics of Droplets Ejected from Liquid Propellants Ablated by Laser Pulses in Laser Plasma Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Zhiyuan; Gao Hua; Fan Zhenjun; Xing Jie

    2014-01-01

    The angular distribution and pressure force of droplets ejected from liquid water and glycerol ablated by nanosecond laser pulses are investigated under different viscosities in laser plasma propulsion. It is shown that with increasing viscosity, the distribution angles present a decrease tendency for two liquids, and the angular distribution of glycerol is smaller than that of water. A smaller distribution leads to a higher pressure force generation. The results indicate that ablation can be controlled by varying the viscosity of liquid propellant in laser plasma propulsion

  16. Time-resolved diagnostics of excimer laser-generated ablation plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geohegan, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    Characteristics of laser plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin films are examined with four in situ diagnostic techniques: Optical emission spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, ion probe studies, and gated ICCD (intensified charge-coupled-device array) fast photography. These four techniques are complementary and permit simultaneous views of the transport of ions, excited states, ground state neutrals and ions, and hot particulates following KrF laser ablation of YBCO, BN, graphite and Si in vacuum and background gases. The implementation and advantages of the four techniques are first described in order to introduce the key features of laser plasmas for pulsed laser deposition. Aspects of the interaction of the ablation plume with background gases (i.e., thermalization, attenuation, shock formation) and the collision of the plasma plume with the substrate heater are then summarized. The techniques of fast ICCD photography and gated photon counting are then applied to investigate the temperature, velocity, and spatial distribution of hot particles generated during KrF ablation of YBCO, BN, Si and graphite. Finally, key features of fast imaging of the laser ablation of graphite into high pressure rare gases are presented in order to elucidate internal reflected shocks within the plume, redeposition of material on a surface, and formation of hot nanoparticles within the plume.

  17. Time-resolved diagnostics of excimer laser-generated ablation plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geohegan, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    Characteristics of laser plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin films are examined with four in situ diagnostic techniques: Optical emission spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, ion probe studies, and gated ICCD (intensified charge-coupled-device array) fast photography. These four techniques are complementary and permit simultaneous views of the transport of ions, excited states, ground state neutrals and ions, and hot particulates following KrF laser ablation of YBCO, BN, graphite and Si in vacuum and background gases. The implementation and advantages of the four techniques are first described in order to introduce the key features of laser plasmas for pulsed laser deposition. Aspects of the interaction of the ablation plume with background gases (i.e., thermalization, attenuation, shock formation) and the collision of the plasma plume with the substrate heater are then summarized. The techniques of fast ICCD photography and gated photon counting are then applied to investigate the temperature, velocity, and spatial distribution of hot particles generated during KrF ablation of YBCO, BN, Si and graphite. Finally, key features of fast imaging of the laser ablation of graphite into high pressure rare gases are presented in order to elucidate internal reflected shocks within the plume, redeposition of material on a surface, and formation of hot nanoparticles within the plume

  18. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.lippert@psi.ch [General Energy Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Döbeli, Max [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-10-28

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially {sup 18}O substituted La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  19. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Döbeli, Max; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially 18O substituted La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  20. Time resolved measurement of laser-ablated particles by LAPXAS (Laser Plasma Soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Atsumi; Yoda, Osamu; Murakami, Kouichi

    1999-01-01

    The time- and spatially-resolved properties of laser ablated carbon, boron and silicon particles were measured by LAPXAS (Laser Plasma Soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy). The maximum speed of positively charged ions is higher than those of neutral atoms and negatively charged ions. The spatial distributions of the laser-ablated particles in the localized rare gas environment were measured. In helium gas environment, by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume depressed the ablation plume. There is no formation of silicon clusters till 15 μs after laser ablation in the argon gas environment. (author)

  1. The influence of laser-particle interaction in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Helmut; Loper, Kristofer H.; Hahn, David W.; Niemax, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Particles produced by previous laser shots may have significant influence on the analytical signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma (LA-ICP) spectrometry if they remain close to the position of laser sampling. The effects of these particles on the laser-induced breakdown event are demonstrated in several ways. LIBS-experiments were conducted in an ablation cell at atmospheric conditions in argon or air applying a dual-pulse arrangement with orthogonal pre-pulse, i.e., plasma breakdown in a gas generated by a focussed laser beam parallel and close to the sample surface followed by a delayed crossing laser pulse in orthogonal direction which actually ablates material from the sample and produces the LIBS plasma. The optical emission of the LIBS plasma as well as the absorption of the pre-pulse laser was measured. In the presence of particles in the focus of the pre-pulse laser, the plasma breakdown is affected and more energy of the pre-pulse laser is absorbed than without particles. As a result, the analyte line emission from the LIBS plasma of the second laser is enhanced. It is assumed that the enhancement is not only due to an increase of mass ablated by the second laser but also to better atomization and excitation conditions favored by a reduced gas density in the pre-pulse plasma. Higher laser pulse frequencies increase the probability of particle-laser interaction and, therefore, reduce the shot-to-shot line intensity variation as compared to lower particle loadings in the cell. Additional experiments using an aerosol chamber were performed to further quantify the laser absorption by the plasma in dependence on time both with and without the presence of particles. The overall implication of laser-particle interactions for LIBS and LA-ICP-MS/OES are discussed.

  2. The influence of laser-particle interaction in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Helmut; Loper, Kristofer H.; Hahn, David W.; Niemax, Kay

    2011-02-01

    Particles produced by previous laser shots may have significant influence on the analytical signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma (LA-ICP) spectrometry if they remain close to the position of laser sampling. The effects of these particles on the laser-induced breakdown event are demonstrated in several ways. LIBS-experiments were conducted in an ablation cell at atmospheric conditions in argon or air applying a dual-pulse arrangement with orthogonal pre-pulse, i.e., plasma breakdown in a gas generated by a focussed laser beam parallel and close to the sample surface followed by a delayed crossing laser pulse in orthogonal direction which actually ablates material from the sample and produces the LIBS plasma. The optical emission of the LIBS plasma as well as the absorption of the pre-pulse laser was measured. In the presence of particles in the focus of the pre-pulse laser, the plasma breakdown is affected and more energy of the pre-pulse laser is absorbed than without particles. As a result, the analyte line emission from the LIBS plasma of the second laser is enhanced. It is assumed that the enhancement is not only due to an increase of mass ablated by the second laser but also to better atomization and excitation conditions favored by a reduced gas density in the pre-pulse plasma. Higher laser pulse frequencies increase the probability of particle-laser interaction and, therefore, reduce the shot-to-shot line intensity variation as compared to lower particle loadings in the cell. Additional experiments using an aerosol chamber were performed to further quantify the laser absorption by the plasma in dependence on time both with and without the presence of particles. The overall implication of laser-particle interactions for LIBS and LA-ICP-MS/OES are discussed.

  3. Characterization of ablated species in laser-induced plasma plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Hideki; Sakka, Tetsuo; Ogata, Yukio H.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma electron density and atomic population densities in the plasma plume produced by a laser ablation of aluminum metal were determined in various ambient gases at relatively high pressures. The method is based on the fit of a spectral line profile of Al(I) 2 P (convolutionsign) - 2 S emission to the theoretical spectrum obtained by one-dimensional radiative transfer calculation. The electron density was higher for a higher ambient gas pressure, suggesting the confinement of the plume by an ambient gas. The electron density also depends on the type of ambient gases, i.e., it increased in the order He 4 2 4 , while the atomic population density is almost independent of the type of ambient species and pressure. The population densities of the upper and lower levels of the transition were compared, and the ratio between their spatial distribution widths was calculated. These results provide valuable information regarding the confinement of the plume by the ambient gas and give insight into the time evolution of the plume

  4. Laser pulse guiding and electron acceleration in the ablative capillary discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameshima, T.; Kotaki, H.; Kando, M.; Daito, I.; Kawase, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Homma, T.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Chen, L. M.; Kondo, S.; Bobrova, N. A.; Sasorov, P. V.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2009-01-01

    The results of experiments are presented for the laser electron acceleration in the ablative capillary discharge plasma. The plasma channel is formed by the discharge inside the ablative capillary. The intense short laser pulse is guided over a 4 cm length. The generated relativistic electrons show both the quasimonoenergetic and quasi-Maxwellian energy spectra, depending on laser and plasma parameters. The analysis of the inner walls of the capillaries that underwent several tens of shots shows that the wall deformation and blistering resulted from the discharge and laser pulse effects.

  5. Particle size determination of silver nanoparticles generated by plasma laser ablation using a deconvolution method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Picciotto, A.; Torrisi, L.; Margarone, Daniele; Bellutti, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 165, 6-10 (2010), s. 706-712 ISSN 1042-0150. [International Workshop on Pulsed Plasma Laser Ablation (PPLA)/4./. Monte Pieta, Messina, 18.06.2009-20.06.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : nanoparticles * plasma * laser ablation * surface plasmon resonance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.660, year: 2010

  6. Molecular signatures in femtosecond laser-induced organic plasmas: comparison with nanosecond laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Jorge; Moros, Javier; Laserna, J Javier

    2016-01-28

    During the last few years, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has evolved significantly in the molecular sensing area through the optical monitoring of emissions from organic plasmas. Large efforts have been made to study the formation pathways of diatomic radicals as well as their connections with the bonding framework of molecular solids. Together with the structural and chemical-physical properties of molecules, laser ablation parameters seem to be closely tied to the observed spectral signatures. This research focuses on evaluating the impact of laser pulse duration on the production of diatomic species that populate plasmas of organic materials. Differences in relative intensities of spectral signatures from the plasmas of several organic molecules induced in femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) ablation regimes have been studied. Beyond the abundance and origin of diatomic radicals that seed the plasma, findings reveal the crucial role of the ablation regime in the breakage pattern of the molecule. The laser pulse duration dictates the fragments and atoms resulting from the vaporized molecules, promoting some formation routes at the expense of other paths. The larger amount of fragments formed by fs pulses advocates a direct release of native bonds and a subsequent seeding of the plasma with diatomic species. In contrast, in the ns ablation regime, the atomic recombinations and single displacement processes dominate the contribution to diatomic radicals, as long as atomization of molecules prevails over their progressive decomposition. Consequently, fs-LIBS better reflects correlations between strengths of emissions from diatomic species and molecular structure as compared to ns-LIBS. These new results entail a further step towards the specificity in the analysis of molecular solids by fs-LIBS.

  7. Modeling CO2 laser ablation impulse of polymers in vapor and plasma regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.

    2009-01-01

    An improved model for CO 2 laser ablation impulse in polyoxymethylene and similar polymers is presented that describes the transition effects from the onset of vaporization to the plasma regime in a continuous fashion. Several predictions are made for ablation behavior.

  8. Plasma luminescence feedback control system for precise ultrashort pulse laser tissue ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beop-Min; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Gold, David M.; Darrow, Christopher B.; Marion, John E., II; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    1998-05-01

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue without damaging nearby soft tissue using an ultrashort pulse laser. Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so bone tissue is selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  9. Double pulse laser ablation and plasma: Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babushok, V.I.; DeLucia, F.C.; Gottfried, J.L.; Munson, C.A.; Miziolek, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    A review of recent results of the studies of double laser pulse plasma and ablation for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy applications is presented. The double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy configuration was suggested with the aim of overcoming the sensitivity shortcomings of the conventional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. Several configurations have been suggested for the realization of the double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique: collinear, orthogonal pre-spark, orthogonal pre-heating and dual pulse crossed beam modes. In addition, combinations of laser pulses with different wavelengths, different energies and durations were studied, thus providing flexibility in the choice of wavelength, pulse width, energy and pulse sequence. The double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy approach provides a significant enhancement in the intensity of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy emission lines up to two orders of magnitude greater than a conventional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The double pulse technique leads to a better coupling of the laser beam with the plasma plume and target material, thus providing a more temporally effective energy delivery to the plasma and target. The experimental results demonstrate that the maximum effect is obtained at some optimum separation delay time between pulses. The optimum value of the interpulse delay depends on several factors, such as the target material, the energy level of excited states responsible for the emission, and the type of enhancement process considered. Depending on the specified parameter, the enhancement effects were observed on different time scales ranging from the picosecond time level (e.g., ion yield, ablation mass) up to the hundred microsecond level (e.g., increased emission intensity for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of submerged metal target in water). Several suggestions have been proposed to explain

  10. Impacts of Ambient and Ablation Plasmas on Short- and Ultrashort-Pulse Laser Processing of Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda M. Bulgakova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that more than five decades have passed since the invention of laser, some topics of laser-matter interaction still remain incompletely studied. One of such topics is plasma impact on the overall phenomenon of the interaction and its particular features, including influence of the laser-excited plasma re-radiation, back flux of energetic plasma species, and massive material redeposition, on the surface quality and processing efficiency. In this paper, we analyze different plasma aspects, which go beyond a simple consideration of the well-known effect of plasma shielding of laser radiation. The following effects are considered: ambient gas ionization above the target on material processing with formation of a “plasma pipe”; back heating of the target by both laser-driven ambient and ablation plasmas through conductive and radiative heat transfer; plasma chemical effects on surface processing including microstructure growth on liquid metals; complicated dynamics of the ablation plasma flow interacting with an ambient gas that can result in substantial redeposition of material around the ablation spot. Together with a review summarizing our main to-date achievements and outlining research directions, we present new results underlining importance of laser plasma dynamics and photoionization of the gas environment upon laser processing of materials.

  11. UV and IR laser ablation for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.R.; Koppenaal, D.W.; Farmer, O.T.

    1993-06-01

    Laser ablation particle plume compositions are characterized using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS). This study evaluates the mass response characteristics peculiar to ICP/MS detection as a function of laser fluence and frequency. Evaluation of the ICP/MS mass response allows deductions to be made concerning how representative the laser ablation produced particle plume composition is relative to the targeted sample. Using a black glass standard, elemental fractionation was observed, primarily for alkalis and other volatile elements. The extent of elemental fractionation between the target sample and the sampled plume varied significantly as a function of laser fluences and IR and UV laser frequency

  12. Study of plasma parameters influencing fractionation in laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäckle, M.; Merten, D.

    2010-12-01

    Methods permitting to test the influence of the matrix as well as of its local and temporal distribution on the plasma conditions in laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are developed. For this purpose, the MS interface is used as plasma probe allowing to investigate the average plasma condition within the ICP zone observed in terms of temporal and spatial distribution of the matrix. Inserted matrix particles, particularly when being atomized and ionized, can cause considerable changes in both electron density and plasma temperature thus influencing the ionization equilibrium of the individual analytes. In this context, the plasma probe covers a region of the plasma for which no local thermodynamic equilibrium can be assumed. The differences in temperature, identified within the region of the plasma observed, amounted up to 3000 K. While in the central region conditions were detected that would not allow efficient atomization and ionization of the matrix, these conditions improve considerably towards the margin of the area observed. Depending on the nature as well as on the temporally and locally variable density of the matrix, this can lead to varying intensity ratios of the analytes and explain fractionation effects. By means of a derived equation it is shown that the deviation of the intensity ratio from the concentration ratio turns out to be more serious the higher the difference of the ionization potential of the analytes observed, the lower the plasma temperature and the higher the matrix concentration within the area observed.

  13. Initiation of an early-stage plasma during picosecond laser ablation of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Samuel S.; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2000-01-01

    Picosecond time-resolved images of plasma initiation were recorded during pulsed-laser ablation of metal targets in an air atmosphere. An early-stage plasma was observed to form before the release of a material vapor plume. Close to the target surface, interferometry measurements indicate that the early-stage plasma has an electron number density on the order of 10 20 cm -3 . The longitudinal expansion of the ionization front for this plasma has a velocity 10 9 cm/s, during the laser pulse. In contrast, a material--vapor plume forms approximately 200 ps after the laser pulse, and it moves away from the target at 10 6 cm/s. The experimental observations of the early-stage plasma were simulated by using a theoretical model based on a two-fluids description of laser plasmas. The results indicate that the initiation of the plasma is due to air breakdown assisted by electron emission from the target

  14. Impacts of ambient and ablation plasmas on short- and ultrashort-pulse laser processing of surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Panchenko, A.N.; Zhukov, V.P.; Kudryashov, S.I.; Pereira, A.; Marine, W.; Mocek, Tomáš; Bulgakov, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2014), s. 1344-1372 ISSN 2072-666X R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0143 Grant - others:HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027; OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : pulsed laser ablation * laser material processing * laser plasma * ambient gas breakdown * material redeposition * plasma pipe formation * microstructures Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.269, year: 2014

  15. Harmonic generation by atomic and nanoparticle precursors in a ZnS laser ablation plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oujja, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Nalda, R. de; Castillejo, M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Plume species in infrared ns laser ablation of ZnS studied by low-order harmonic generation. • Different spatiotemporal properties of harmonics from atoms and nanoparticles. • Results compared with calculations of optical frequency up-conversion in perturbative regime. - Abstract: Harmonic generation of a driving laser propagating across a laser ablation plasma serves for the diagnosis of multicomponent plumes. Here we study the contribution of atomic and nanoparticle precursors to the generation of coherent ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet light as low-order harmonics of the fundamental emission (1064 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in a nanosecond infrared ZnS laser ablation plasma. Odd harmonics from the 3rd up to the 9th order (118.2 nm) have been observed with distinct temporal and spatial characteristics which were determined by varying the delay between the ablation and driving nanosecond pulses and by spatially scanning the plasma with the focused driving beam propagating parallel to the target. At short distances from the target surface (≤1 mm), the harmonic intensity displays two temporal components peaked at around 250 ns and 10 μs. While the early component dies off quickly with increasing harmonic order and vanishes for the 9th order, the late component is notably intense for the 7th harmonic and is still clearly visible for the 9th. Spectral analysis of spontaneous plume emissions help to assign the origin of the two components. While the early plasma component is mainly constituted by neutral Zn atoms, the late component is mostly due to nanoparticles, which upon interaction with the driving laser are subject to breakup and ionization. With the aid of calculations of the phase matching integrals within the perturbative model of optical harmonic generation, these results illustrate how atom and nanoparticle populations, with differing temporal and spatial distributions within the ablation plasma, contribute to the nonlinear

  16. Opacity and atomic analysis of double pulse laser ablated Li plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Kumar, Ajai

    2014-09-01

    Opacity effects for neutral and ionic emission lines of lithium have been investigated by Atomic Data Analysis Structure (ADAS). Line ratios and opacity corrected photon emissivity coefficients are calculated over a wide range of electron temperatures and densities. The experimentally measured temporal evolution of the line profiles of the over dense Li plasma formed in the double pulse laser ablation experiment have been explained using the ADAS analysis and the plasma parameters of the plasma plume under consideration have been estimated. These results could be projected as a diagnostic tool to estimate plasma parameters of an over dense lithium plasma.

  17. Controlling laser ablation plasma with external electrodes. Application to sheath dynamics study and beam physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isono, Fumika; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Jun; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The potential of laser ablation plasma was controlled successfully by using external ring electrodes. We found that an electron sheath is formed at the plasma boundary, which plays an important role in the potential formation. When the positively biased plasma reaches a grounded grid, electrons in the plasma are turned away and ions are accelerated, which leads to the formation of a virtual anode between the grid and an ion probe. We think that this device which can raise the plasma potential up to order of kV can be applied to the study of sheath dynamics and to a new type of ion beam extraction. (author)

  18. Behaviour of a planar Langmuir probe in a laser ablation plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doggett, B.; Budtz-Joergensen, C.; Lunney, J.G.; Sheerin, P.; Turner, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated some aspects of the behaviour of planar Langmuir probes in the supersonic plasma flow produced by laser ablation of solid materials in vacuum. The ablation was done using a 26 ns, 248 nm excimer laser, irradiating a silver target at 1 J cm -2 . We have compared the behaviour of the probe when it is orientated perpendicular and parallel to the plasma flow. In particular, we have shown that it is possible to adapt an analytical model, developed for plasma immersion ion implantation, to quantitatively describe the variation of the ion current with probe bias for the case when the plasma flow is along the probe surface. The electron temperature was also measured

  19. Fluorescence imaging of ion distributions in an inductively coupled plasma with laser ablation sample introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, Lance M.; Ellis, Wade C.; Jones, Derick D.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution images of the spatial distributions of Sc II, Ca II, and Ba II ion densities in the 10 mm upstream from the sampling cone in a laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS) were obtained using planar laser induced fluorescence. Images were obtained for each analyte as a function of the carrier gas flow rate with laser ablation (LA) sample introduction and compared to images with solution nebulization (SN) over the same range of flow rates. Additionally, images were obtained using LA at varying fluences and with varying amounts of helium added to a constant flow of argon gas. Ion profiles in SN images followed a pattern consistent with previous work: increasing gas flow caused a downstream shift in the ion profiles. When compared to SN, LA led to ion profiles that were much narrower radially and reached a maximum near the sampling cone at higher flow rates. Increasing the fluence led to ions formed in the ICP over greater axial and radial distances. The addition of He to the carrier gas prior to the ablation cell led to an upstream shift in the position of ionization and lower overall fluorescence intensities. - Highlights: • We map distributions of analytes in the ICP using laser ablation sample introduction. • We compare images from laser ablation with those from a pneumatic nebulizer. • We document the effects of water added to the laser ablation aerosol. • We compare distributions from a metal to those from crystalline solids. • We document the effect of laser fluence on ion distributions

  20. 0.56 GeV laser electron acceleration in ablative-capillary-discharge plasma channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameshima, Takashi; Kurokawa, Shin-ichi; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Hong Wei; Wen Xianlun; Wu Yuchi; Tang Chuanming; Zhu Qihua; Gu Yuqiu; Zhang Baohan; Peng Hansheng; Sugiyama, Kiyohiro; Chen, Liming; Tajima, Toshiki; Kumita, Tetsuro

    2008-01-01

    A high-quality electron beam with a central energy of 0.56 GeV, an energy spread of 1.2% rms, and a divergence of 0.59 mrad rms was produced by means of a 4 cm ablative-capillary-discharge plasma channel driven by a 3.8 J27 fs laser pulse. This is the first demonstration of electron acceleration with an ablative capillary discharge wherein the capillary is stably operated in vacuum with a simple system triggered by a laser pulse. This result of the generation of a high-quality beam provides the prospects to realize a practical accelerator based on laser-plasma acceleration. (author)

  1. Colour marking of transparent materials by laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanada, Yasutaka; Sugioka, Koji; Miyamoto, Iwao; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate colour marking of a transparent material using laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA) system. After the LIPAA process, metal thin film is deposited on the surface of the ablated groove. This feature is applied to RGB (red, green and blue) colour marking by using specific metal targets. The metal targets, for instance, are Pb 3 O 4 for red, Cr 2 O 3 for green and [Cu(C 32 H 15 ClN 8 )] for blue colour marking. Additionally, adhesion of the metal thin film deposited on the processed groove by various experimental conditions is investigated

  2. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan Joe Saetveit

    2008-01-01

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 (micro)g L -1 or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 (micro)L injection in a physiological saline matrix

  3. Nonlinear spectrum of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in laser-accelerated planar plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskinen, M. J.; Schmitt, A.

    2007-01-01

    A model for the nonlinear spectrum of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in laser-accelerated planar plasmas has been developed for a wide range of Froude numbers and scale sizes. It is found that the spectrum can be characterized by an inverse power law with spectral index of approximately 2 in the limit of small-wavenumber spectrum cutoffs and small-scale density gradient scale lengths. Comparison of the model spectrum with recent experimental observations is made with good agreement

  4. Secondary plasma formation after single pulse laser ablation underwater and its advantages for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilović, M R; Cvejić, M; Lazic, V; Jovićević, S

    2016-06-07

    In this work we present studies of spatial and temporal plasma evolution after single pulse ablation of an aluminium target in water. The laser ablation was performed using 20 ns long pulses emitted at 1064 nm. The plasma characterization was performed by fast photography, the Schlieren technique, shadowgraphy and optical emission spectroscopy. The experimental results indicate the existence of two distinct plasma stages: the first stage has a duration of approximately 500 ns from the laser pulse, and is followed by a new plasma growth starting from the crater center. The secondary plasma slowly evolves inside the growing vapor bubble, and its optical emission lasts over several tens of microseconds. Later, the hot glowing particles, trapped inside the vapor cavity, were detected during the whole cycle of the bubble, where the first collapse occurs after 475 μs from the laser pulse. Differences in the plasma properties during the two evolution phases are discussed, with an accent on the optical emission since its detection is of primary importance for LIBS. Here we demonstrate that the LIBS signal quality in single pulse excitation underwater can be greatly enhanced by detecting only the secondary plasma emission, and also by applying long acquisition gates (in the order of 10-100 μs). The presented results are of great importance for LIBS measurements inside a liquid environment, since they prove that a good analytical signal can be obtained by using nanosecond pulses from a single commercial laser source and by employing cost effective, not gated detectors.

  5. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Sekine, Megumi; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface

  6. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  7. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke, E-mail: shunsuke.ikeda@riken.jp; Sekine, Megumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Romanelli, Mark [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Cinquegrani, David [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kumaki, Masafumi [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Horioka, Kazuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  8. Ultraviolet versus infrared: Effects of ablation laser wavelength on the expansion of laser-induced plasma into one-atmosphere argon gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Laye, Fabrice; Yu Jin; Lei Wenqi; Bai Xueshi; Zheng Lijuan; Zeng Heping

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced plasma from an aluminum target in one-atmosphere argon background has been investigated with ablation using nanosecond ultraviolet (UV: 355 nm) or infrared (IR: 1064 nm) laser pulses. Time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy was used as a diagnostics tool to have access to the plasma parameters during its propagation into the background, such as optical emission intensity, electron density, and temperature. The specific feature of nanosecond laser ablation is that the pulse duration is significantly longer than the initiation time of the plasma. Laser-supported absorption wave due to post-ablation absorption of the laser radiation by the vapor plume and the shocked background gas plays a dominant role in the propagation and subsequently the behavior of the plasma. We demonstrate that the difference in absorption rate between UV and IR radiations leads to different propagation behaviors of the plasma produced with these radiations. The consequence is that higher electron density and temperature are observed for UV ablation. While for IR ablation, the plasma is found with lower electron density and temperature in a larger and more homogenous axial profile. The difference is also that for UV ablation, the background gas is principally evacuated by the expansion of the vapor plume as predicted by the standard piston model. While for IR ablation, the background gas is effectively mixed to the ejected vapor at least hundreds of nanoseconds after the initiation of the plasma. Our observations suggest a description by laser-supported combustion wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by UV laser, while that by laser-supported detonation wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by IR laser. Finally, practical consequences of specific expansion behavior for UV or IR ablation are discussed in terms of analytical performance promised by corresponding plasmas for application with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  9. Evolution of the plasma parameters in the expanding laser ablation plume of silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen; Hansen, T.N.

    2002-01-01

    The angular and radial variation of the ion density and electron temperature in the plasma plume produced by laser ablation of silver at fluences of 0.8-1.3 J cm(-2) at 355 nm have been studied using a time-resolving Langmuir probe. The angular dependence of the electron temperature...... and the magnitude of the ion flux, at the time when the ion flux is maximised, agree with the predictions of the self-similar isentropic model of the plasma expansion by Anisimov et al. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  10. Surface modification of biomaterials by pulsed laser ablation deposition and plasma/gamma polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Kaustubh R.

    Surface modification of stainless-steel was carried out by two different methods: pulsed laser ablation deposition (PLAD) and a combined plasma/gamma process. A potential application was the surface modification of endovascular stents, to enhance biocompatibility. The pulsed laser ablation deposition process, had not been previously reported for modifying stents and represented a unique and potentially important method for surface modification of biomaterials. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elatomer was studied using the PLAD technique. Cross- linked PDMS was deemed important because of its general use for biomedical implants and devices as well as in other fields. Furthermore, PDMS deposition using PLAD had not been previously studied and any information gained on its ablation characteristics could be important scientifically and technologically. The studies reported here showed that the deposited silicone film properties had a dependence on the laser energy density incident on the target. Smooth, hydrophobic, silicone-like films were deposited at low energy densities (100-150 mJ/cm2). At high energy densities (>200 mJ/cm2), the films had an higher oxygen content than PDMS, were hydrophilic and tended to show a more particulate morphology. It was also determined that (1)the deposited films were stable and extremely adherent to the substrate, (2)silicone deposition exhibited an `incubation effect' which led to the film properties changing with laser pulse number and (3)films deposited under high vacuum were similar to films deposited at low vacuum levels. The mechanical properties of the PLAD films were determined by nanomechanical measurements which are based on the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). From these measurements, it was possible to determine the modulus of the films and also study their scratch resistance. Such measurement techniques represent a significant advance over current state-of-the-art thin film characterization methods. An empirical model for

  11. Trace Analysis of Irradiated Granite Samples from Hiroshima by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amr, M.A.; Helal, N.F.; Zahran, N.F.; Becker, J.S.; Pickhardt, C.; Dietze, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is widely accepted as a rapid and sensitive technique for trace elemental analysis of solid materials and for local analysis of inhomogeneous materials (such as geological samples). Due to its direct solid sample analysis capability, LA-ICP-MS (using a quadrupole based ICP-MS and at the Research Center Juelich developed laser ablation system: Nd-YAG-laser, 226 nm, 10 Hz and 5 ns) is applied for the analysis of geological (granite) samples from Hiroshima. In order to prepare homogeneous targets, these samples were melted together with a lithium-borate mixture in a muffle furnace at 1050 degree c. Furthermore, for investigating of matrix effects the powder of these samples is mixed with graphite and pressed as targets for laser ablation. The quantification of the analysis results was carried out using granite (GM) as standard reference material. The relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) for most elements, which were determined for correction of the measured values, varied between 0.3 and 3

  12. Stabilization of the Rayleigh - Taylor instability with convection in an ablatively accelerated laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bud'ko, A.B.; Liberman, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    In the framework of WKB approximation the problem is studied of stabilizing the Rayleigh - Taylor instability with unhomogeneous convective flow, developing in the ablation zone during the ablative acceleration of the laser target plasma. The eigenvalue (instability growth rates) problem is reduced to solving an algebraic equation with the coefficients depending on the unperturbed profile structure of hydrodynamic variables. For the important case of the incompressible plasma subsonic flow, the instability growth rates is shown to vanish at k=k 0 =max(2(g|∇ ln p|) 1/2 /ν). The consistency condition of the model consists in the smallness of the local Froude number in the region of instability development. However, as seen from the comparison with the numerical calculations, the model is well appicable also for the case of the sufficiently abrupt density gradient provided the Froude number is of order of unity

  13. Time resolved emission spectroscopy investigations of pulsed laser ablated plasmas of ZrO2 and Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadoko, A D; Lee, P S; Lee, P; Mohanty, S R; Rawat, R S

    2006-01-01

    With the rising trend of synthesizing ultra thin films and/or quantum-confined materials using laser ablation, optimization of deposition parameters plays an essential role in obtaining desired film characteristics. This paper presents the initial step of plasma optimization study by examining temporal distribution of the plasma formation by pulsed laser ablation of materials. The emitted spectra of ZrO 2 and Al 2 O 3 are obtained ∼3mm above the ablated target to derive the ablated plasma characteristics. The plasma temperature is estimated to be at around 2.35 eV, with electron density of 1.14 x 10 16 (cm -3 ). Emission spectra with different gate delay time (40-270 ns) are captured to study the time resolved plume characteristics. Transitory elemental species are identified

  14. Evaluation of pressure in a plasma produced by laser ablation of steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Jörg; Axente, Emanuel; Craciun, Valentin; Taleb, Aya; Pelascini, Frédéric

    2018-05-01

    We investigated the time evolution of pressure in the plume generated by laser ablation with ultraviolet nanosecond laser pulses in a near-atmospheric argon atmosphere. These conditions were previously identified to produce a plasma of properties that facilitate accurate spectroscopic diagnostics. Using steel as sample material, the present investigations benefit from the large number of reliable spectroscopic data available for iron. Recording time-resolved emission spectra with an echelle spectrometer, we were able to perform accurate measurements of electron density and temperature over a time interval from 200 ns to 12 μs. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium, we computed the plasma composition within the ablated vapor material and the corresponding kinetic pressure. The time evolution of plume pressure is shown to reach a minimum value below the pressure of the background gas. This indicates that the process of vapor-gas interdiffusion has a negligible influence on the plume expansion dynamics in the considered timescale. Moreover, the results promote the plasma pressure as a control parameter in calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  15. Quantitative images of metals in plant tissues measured by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.S.; Dietrich, R.C.; Matusch, A.; Pozebon, D.; Dressler, V.L.

    2008-01-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used for quantitative imaging of toxic and essential elements in thin sections (thickness of 30 or 40 μm) of tobacco plant tissues. Two-dimensional images of Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Cd, Rh, Pt and Pb in leaves, shoots and roots of tobacco were produced. Sections of the plant tissues (fixed onto glass slides) were scanned by a focused beam of a Nd:YAG laser in a laser ablation chamber. The ablated material was transported with argon as carrier gas to the ICP ion source at a quadrupole ICP-MS instrument. Ion intensities of the investigated elements were measured together with 13 C + , 33 S + and 34 S + within the entire plant tissue section. Matrix matching standards (prepared using powder of dried tobacco leaves) were used to constitute calibration curves, whereas the regression coefficient of the attained calibration curves was typically 0.99. The variability of LA-ICP-MS process, sample heterogeneity and water content in the sample were corrected by using 13 C + as internal standard. Quantitative imaging of the selected elements revealed their inhomogeneous distribution in leaves, shoots and roots

  16. A model of early formation of uranium molecular oxides in laser-ablated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finko, Mikhail; Curreli, Davide; Azer, Magdi; Weisz, David; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Rose, Timothy; Koroglu, Batikan; Radousky, Harry; Zaug, Joseph; Armstrong, Mike

    2017-10-01

    An important problem within the field of nuclear forensics is fractionation: the formation of post-detonation nuclear debris whose composition does not reflect that of the source weapon. We are investigating uranium fractionation in rapidly cooling plasma using a combined experimental and modeling approach. In particular, we use laser ablation of uranium metal samples to produce a low-temperature plasma with physical conditions similar to a condensing nuclear fireball. Here we present a first plasma-chemistry model of uranium molecular species formation during the early stage of laser ablated plasma evolution in atmospheric oxygen. The system is simulated using a global kinetic model with rate coefficients calculated according to literature data and the application of reaction rate theory. The model allows for a detailed analysis of the evolution of key uranium molecular species and represents the first step in producing a uranium fireball model that is kinetically validated against spatially and temporally resolved spectroscopy measurements. This project was sponsored by the DoD, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Grant HDTRA1-16- 1-0020. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. DoE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52- 07NA27344.

  17. A plasma model combined with an improved two-temperature equation for ultrafast laser ablation of dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Lan; Tsai, H.-L.

    2008-01-01

    It remains a big challenge to theoretically predict the material removal mechanism in femtosecond laser ablation. To bypass this unresolved problem, many calculations of femtosecond laser ablation of nonmetals have been based on the free electron density distribution without the actual consideration of the phase change mechanism. However, this widely used key assumption needs further theoretical and experimental confirmation. By combining the plasma model and improved two-temperature model developed by the authors, this study focuses on investigating ablation threshold fluence, depth, and shape during femtosecond laser ablation of dielectrics through nonthermal processes (the Coulomb explosion and electrostatic ablation). The predicted ablation depths and shapes in fused silica, by using (1) the plasma model only and (2) the plasma model plus the two-temperature equation, are both in agreement with published experimental data. The widely used assumptions for threshold fluence, ablation depth, and shape in the plasma model based on free electron density are validated by the comparison study and experimental data

  18. Development of near-field laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for sub-micrometric analysis of solid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabbour, Chirelle

    2016-01-01

    A near field laser ablation method was developed for chemical analysis of solid samples at sub-micrometric scale. This analytical technique combines a nanosecond laser Nd:YAG, an atomic Force Microscope (AFM), and an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS). In order to improve the spatial resolution of the laser ablation process, the near-field enhancement effect was applied by illuminating, by the laser beam, the apex of the AFM conductive sharp tip maintained at a few nanometers (5 to 30 nm) above the sample surface. The interaction between the illuminated tip and the sample surface enhances locally the incident laser energy and leads to the ablation process. By applying this technique to conducting gold and tantalum samples, and semiconducting silicon sample, a lateral resolution of 100 nm and depths of a few nanometers were demonstrated. Two home-made numerical codes have enabled the study of two phenomena occurring around the tip: the enhancement of the laser electrical field by tip effect, and the induced laser heating at the sample surface. The influence of the main operating parameters on these two phenomena, amplification and heating, was studied. an experimental multi-parametric study was carried out in order to understand the effect of different experimental parameters (laser fluence, laser wavelength, number of laser pulses, tip-to-sample distance, sample and tip nature) on the near-field laser ablation efficiency, crater dimensions and amount of ablated material. (author) [fr

  19. Laser ablation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  20. Global Modeling of Uranium Molecular Species Formation Using Laser-Ablated Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreli, Davide; Finko, Mikhail; Azer, Magdi; Armstrong, Mike; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Radousky, Harry; Rose, Timothy; Stavrou, Elissaios; Weisz, David; Zaug, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Uranium is chemically fractionated from other refractory elements in post-detonation nuclear debris but the mechanism is poorly understood. Fractionation alters the chemistry of the nuclear debris so that it no longer reflects the chemistry of the source weapon. The conditions of a condensing fireball can be simulated by a low-temperature plasma formed by vaporizing a uranium sample via laser heating. We have developed a global plasma kinetic model in order to model the chemical evolution of U/UOx species within an ablated plasma plume. The model allows to track the time evolution of the density and energy of an uranium plasma plume moving through an oxygen atmosphere of given fugacity, as well as other relevant quantities such as average electron and gas temperature. Comparison of model predictions with absorption spectroscopy of uranium-ablated plasmas provide preliminary insights on the key chemical species and evolution pathways involved during the fractionation process. This project was sponsored by the DoD, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Grant HDTRA1-16-1-0020. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. DoE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Effect of ablation photon energy on the distribution of molecular species in laser-induced plasma from polymer in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, W.Q. [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China); Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France); Ma, Q.L.; Motto-Ros, V.; Bai, X.S. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France); Zheng, L.J. [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China); Zeng, H.P., E-mail: hpzeng@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China); Yu, J., E-mail: Jin.Yu@lasim.univ-lyon1.fr [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France)

    2012-07-15

    Distribution of molecular species, C{sub 2} and CN, in laser-induced plasma from a polymer target (polyvinyl chloride: PVC) was observed for ablation with 266 nm and 355 nm pulses. The influence of ablation photon energy on the distribution of molecular species in the plasma has been thus studied. Time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy was used for the observation which led to the determination of emission intensity profiles of C{sub 2} molecule and CN radical for different delays after the impact of the laser pulse on the target. The profiles of related elements, C, N, and excitation temperature in the plasma were further determined to correlate with those of molecular emission intensity. Different behaviors were clearly observed between plasmas induced by pulses with the two different wavelengths chosen to be close each other in the near ultraviolet (UV). A closer analysis shows the photon energy corresponding to 266 nm pulse of 4.66 eV is larger than bond energies of all the chemical bonds in the studied polymer, while that of 355 nm radiation of 3.49 eV is smaller than or in the same range of the involved bond energies. Observed different behaviors suggest therefore different ablation mechanisms of polymer by laser radiation, and consequently different channels of molecule formation in the plasma. Observation of the morphology of the craters on the target surface left by laser ablation confirmed further different ablation mechanisms with the two used wavelengths. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The profiles of C{sub 2} and CN in a plasma induced from a PVC target were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different behaviors were observed for ablation with 266 nm and 355 nm pulses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different molecule formation channels were used to interpret such behaviors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphology of the craters confirmed further the different ablation mechanisms.

  2. Analysis of laser ablation: Contribution of ionization energy to the plasma and shock wave properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, S.-B.; Mao Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    By fitting simulation results with experimentally measured trajectories of the shock wave and the vapor/background gas contact surface, we found that inclusion of ionization energy in the analysis leads to a change in the evolution of the pressure, mass density, electron number density, and temperature of the vapor plume. The contribution of ionization energy to both the plasma and shock wave has been neglected in most studies of laser ablation. Compared to previous simulations, the densities, pressures, and temperatures are lower shortly after the laser pulse ( 50 ns). The predicted laser energy conversion ratio also showed about a 20% increase (from 35% to 45%) when the ionization energy is considered. The changes in the evolution of the physical quantities result from the retention of the ionization energy in the vapor plume, which is then gradually transformed to kinetic and thermal energies. When ionization energy is included in the simulation, the vapor plume attains higher expansion speeds and temperatures for a longer time after the laser pulse. The better determination of the temperature history of the vapor plume not only improves the understanding of the expansion process of the laser induced vapor plume but also is important for chemical analysis. The accurate temperature history provides supplementary information which enhances the accuracy of chemical analysis based on spectral emission measurements (e.g., laser induced breakdown spectroscopy)

  3. Detection efficiencies in nano- and femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waelle, M.; Koch, J.; Flamigni, L.; Heiroth, S.; Lippert, T.; Hartung, W.; Guenther, D.

    2009-01-01

    Detection efficiencies of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), defined as the ratio of ions reaching the detector and atoms released by LA were measured. For this purpose, LA of silicate glasses, zircon, and pure silicon was performed using nanosecond (ns) as well as femtosecond (fs) LA. For instance, ns-LA of silicate glass using helium as in-cell carrier gas resulted in detection efficiencies between approximately 1E-7 for low and 3E-5 for high mass range elements which were, in addition, almost independent on the laser wavelength and pulse duration chosen. In contrast, the application of argon as carrier gas was found to suppress the detection efficiencies systematically by a factor of up to 5 mainly due to a less efficient aerosol-to-ion conversion and ion transmission inside the ICP-MS

  4. Ultrashort Pulsed Laser Ablation of Magnesium Diboride: Plasma Characterization and Thin Films Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela De Bonis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A MgB2 target has been ablated by Nd:glass laser with a pulse duration of 250 fs. The plasma produced by the laser-target interaction, showing two temporal separated emissions, has been characterized by time and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy and ICCD fast imaging. The films, deposited on silicon substrates and formed by the coalescence of particles with nanometric size, have been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The first steps of the films growth have been studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The films deposition has been studied by varying the substrate temperature from 25 to 500°C and the best results have been obtained at room temperature.

  5. Spectroscopic study of emission coal mineral plasma produced by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera, L P; Pérez, J A; Riascos, H

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic analysis of plasma produced by laser ablation of coal samples using 1064 nm radiation pulses from a Q-switched Nd:YAG on different target under air ambient, was performed. The emission of molecular band systems such as C 2 Swan System (d 3 Π g →a 3 Π u ), the First Negative System N 2 (Band head at 501,53 nm) and emission lines of the C I, C II, were investigated using the optical emission spectroscopy technique. The C 2 molecular spectra (Swan band) were analyzed to determine vibrational temperature (0,62 eV); the density and electron temperature of the plasma have been evaluated using Stark broadening and the intensity of the nitrogen emission lines N II, the found values of 1,2 eV and 2,2 x10 18 cm −3 respectively.

  6. Investigation of plasma ablation and crater formation processes in the Prague Asterix Laser System laser facility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borodziuk, S.; Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Gus'kov, S.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Králiková, Božena; Rohlena, Karel; Skála, Jiří; Pisarczyk, P.; Kálal, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2004), s. 31-42 ISSN 0078-5466 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A100 Grant - others:HPRI-CT(XX) 1999-00053 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910; CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : laser-produced plasma * interferometric measurements * crater Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.308, year: 2004

  7. Nanoparticle Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Effect of nanoparticles deposited on sample surface on laser ablation and plasma emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Giacomo, A.; Gaudiuso, R.; Koral, C.; Dell'Aglio, M.; De Pascale, O.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the use of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) for improving Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is discussed. In the case of conductors an emission signal enhancement up to 1–2 orders of magnitude was obtained depositing NPs on the sample surface by drying a micro-drop of colloidal solution. The basic mechanisms of Nanoparticle Enhanced LIBS (NELIBS) were studied and the main causes of this significantly large enhancement were found to be related to the effect of NPs on the laser ablation process, in terms of a faster and more efficient production of seed electrons with respect to conventional LIBS. The characteristics of NELIBS-produced plasma were investigated by emission spectroscopy and spectrally resolved images. In spite of similar plasma parameters, the NELIBS plasma was found to have larger emission volume and longer persistence than the LIBS one. A method to determine NP concentration and size was also proposed, which involved depositing NPs on non-interacting substrates, and proved the feasibility of LIBS as a fast detection tool for a preliminary characterization of NPs. - Highlights: • Effect of NPs on sample surface enables instantaneous field emission. • More efficient ablation • LIBS emission enhancement up to 1–2 orders of magnitude • Possibility of NP characterization in terms of concentration and size

  8. Experimental Investigation of Molecular Species Formation in Metal Plasmas During Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radousky, H.; Crowhurst, J.; Rose, T.; Armstrong, M.; Stavrou, E.; Zaug, J.; Weisz, D.; Azer, M.; Finko, M.; Curreli, D.

    2016-10-01

    Atomic and molecular spectra on metal plasmas generated by laser ablation have been measured using single, nominally 6-7 ns pulses at 1064 nm, and with energies less than 50 mJ. The primary goal for these studies is to constrain the physical and chemical mechanisms that control the distribution of radionuclides in fallout after a nuclear detonation. In this work, laser emission spectroscopy was used to obtain in situdata for vapor phase molecular species as they form in a controlled oxygen atmosphere for a variety of metals such as Fe, Al, as well as preliminary results for U. In particular, the ablation plumes created from these metals have been imaged with a resolution of 10 ns, and it is possible to observe the expansion of the plume out to 0.5 us. These data serve as one set of inputs for a semi-empirical model to describe the chemical fractionation of uranium during fallout formation. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This project was sponsored by the Department of the Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, under Grant Number HDTRA1-16-1-0020.

  9. Laser ablation and deposition of wide bandgap semiconductors: plasma and nanostructure of deposits diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, M.; López-Arias, M.; Rebollar, E.; de Nalda, R.; Castillejo, M.

    2011-12-01

    Nanostructured CdS and ZnS films on Si (100) substrates were obtained by nanosecond pulsed laser deposition at the wavelengths of 266 and 532 nm. The effect of laser irradiation wavelength on the surface structure and crystallinity of deposits was characterized, together with the composition, expansion dynamics and thermodynamic parameters of the ablation plume. Deposits were analyzed by environmental scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction, while in situ monitoring of the plume was carried out with spectral, temporal and spatial resolution by optical emission spectroscopy. The deposits consist of 25-50 nm nanoparticle assembled films but ablation in the visible results in larger aggregates (150 nm) over imposed on the film surface. The aggregate free films grown at 266 nm on heated substrates are thicker than those grown at room temperature and in the former case they reveal a crystalline structure congruent with that of the initial target material. The observed trends are discussed in reference to the light absorption step, the plasma composition and the nucleation processes occurring on the substrate.

  10. Stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability by convection in an ablatively accelerated laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bul'ko, A.B.; Liberman, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The authors use the WKB-approximation to treat the problem of the stabilization by an inhomogeneous convective current of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability developing in the ablation zone when the plasma of laser targets is accelerated by ablation. The problem of the eigenvalues - the instability growth rates - is reduced to the solution of an algebraic equation with coefficients which depend on the structure of the unperturbed profiles of the hydrodynamic variables. They show for the practically important case of subsonic flow of an incompressible plasma that the instability growth rate vanishes for k = k o = max[2(g|∇lnρ|) 1/2 /v]. The condition for the self-consistency of the model is that the local Froude number be small in the region where the instability develops; however, comparison with numerical calculations shows that the model is also applicable in the case of rather steep density gradients when the Froude number is of order unity. 32 refs., 2 figs

  11. Understanding plume splitting of laser ablated plasma: A view from ion distribution dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Wei, Wenfu; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Plume splitting in low-pressure ambient air was understood in view of ion distribution dynamics from the laser ablated Al plasma (1064 nm 0.57 J/mm{sup 2}) by combining fast photography and spatially resolved spectroscopy. In the beginning, the spectral lines were mainly from the Al III ion. Then, the Bragg peak in stopping power of the ambient gas to Al III could be the dominant reason for the enhanced emission from the fast moving part, and the recombination of Al III to Al I-II ions near the target surface was response to the radiations from the slow moving/stationary part. As the ambient gas pressure increased, stopping distances of the Al III decreased, and radiation from the air ions became pronounced. The laser shadowgraph image at 1100 Pa indicated that the shock wave front located between the fast moving and slow moving parts. Electron densities of the fast moving plasma, which peaked at the plasma front, were on the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3}, and the electron temperatures were 2–3 eV.

  12. Laboratory simulation of laser propagation through plasma sheaths containing ablation particles of ZrB2-SiC-C during hypersonic flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Qing; Bai, Xiangxing; Ma, Ping; Huang, Jie; Ma, Jing; Yu, Siyuan; Shi, Hongyan; Sun, Xiudong; Liu, Yang; Lu, Yueguang

    2017-02-15

    The optical communication method has potential for solving the blackout problem, which is a big challenge faced in the development of aerospace. Two laser transmission systems were set up to explore the influence of the plasma and the ablation particles on the propagation of the laser. The experimental results indicate that the laser can transmit through the plasma with little attenuation. When there are ablation particles of ZrB2-SiC-C added in the plasma, the intensity of the laser has fluctuations. The work introduced in this Letter can be regarded as basic research of the propagation characters of the laser through plasma sheaths.

  13. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. An alternative technique for monitoring 90Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TsingHai Wang; Yan-Chen Lai; Yi-Kong Hsieh; Chu-Fang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Developing a rapid detection method for monitoring released 90 Sr remains a challenge to analytical chemists, particularly considering its low concentration and significant interferences in environmental samples. We proposed a concept as an alternative to detect 90 Sr on the surface of fish scales using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The high affinity of fish scales to Sr is capable of preconcentrating 90 Sr that minimizes isobaric interferences from 90 Zr + or 89 YH + , while tailing effect by abundant 88 Sr can be effectively reduced by adjusting the forward power of ICP-MS component. Adopting dried droplets of internal standards further allows a semiquantification of 90 Sr content on the surface of fish scales, which also arises an opportunity to monitoring the bioaccumulation of 90 Sr after Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. (author)

  14. Laser ablation microprobe inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry study on diffusion of uranium into cement materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, D.; Chida, T.; Cowper, M.

    2008-01-01

    The diffusion of uranium (U(VI)) in solid cement monoliths of ordinary portland cement (OPC) and low-heat portland cement containing 30 wt.% fly ash (FAC) was measured by an in-diffusion technique. Detailed sharp depth profiles of uranium in the solid cement matrices were successively and quantitatively measured using laser ablation microprobe inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LAMP-ICP-MS), and the apparent (D a ) and effective (D e ) diffusion coefficient of uranium in cement matrix were calculated as: D a =∝ 4 x 10 -16 m 2 s -1 and D e =∝ 3 x 10 -11 m 2 s -1 for OPC, and D a =∝ 2 x 10 -17 m 2 s -1 and D e =∝ 6 x 10 -13 m 2 s -1 for FAC. (orig.)

  15. Elemental fractionation in 785 nm picosecond and femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaheen, M.E., E-mail: mshaheen73@science.tanta.edu.eg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); Gagnon, J.E.; Fryer, B.J. [Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research (GLIER), University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4 (Canada); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4 (Canada)

    2015-05-01

    Elemental fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse width laser beams originating from the same laser system. Femtosecond and picosecond laser beams at pulse widths of 130 fs and 110 ps, respectively, and wavelength of 785 nm were used to ablate NIST 610 synthetic glass and SRM 1107 Naval Brass B at the same spot for 800 to 1000 laser pulses at different repetition rates (5 to 50 Hz). Elemental fractionation was found to depend on repetition rate and showed a trend with femtosecond laser ablation that is opposite to that observed in picosecond laser ablation for most measured isotopes. ICP-MS signal intensity was higher in femtosecond than picosecond LA-ICP-MS in both NIST 610 and naval brass when ablation was conducted under the same fluence and repetition rate. The differences in signal intensity were partly related to differences in particle size distribution between particles generated by femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses and the consequent differences in transport and ionization efficiencies. The main reason for the higher signal intensity resulting from femtosecond laser pulses was related to the larger crater sizes compared to those created during picosecond laser ablation. Elemental ratios measured using {sup 66}Zn/{sup 63}Cu, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th/{sup 238}U, {sup 66}Zn/{sup 232}Th and {sup 66}Zn/{sup 208}Pb were found to change with the number of laser pulses with data points being more scattered in picosecond than femtosecond laser pulses. Reproducibility of replicate measurements of signal intensities, fractionation and elemental ratios was better for fs-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 3 to 6%) than ps-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 7 to 11%). - Highlights: • Fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse widths using NIST 610 and Naval Brass. • Dependence of fractionation indices on repetition rate and pulse width. • Higher ablation rate was observed in picosecond compared to

  16. Elemental fractionation in 785 nm picosecond and femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaheen, M.E.; Gagnon, J.E.; Fryer, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Elemental fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse width laser beams originating from the same laser system. Femtosecond and picosecond laser beams at pulse widths of 130 fs and 110 ps, respectively, and wavelength of 785 nm were used to ablate NIST 610 synthetic glass and SRM 1107 Naval Brass B at the same spot for 800 to 1000 laser pulses at different repetition rates (5 to 50 Hz). Elemental fractionation was found to depend on repetition rate and showed a trend with femtosecond laser ablation that is opposite to that observed in picosecond laser ablation for most measured isotopes. ICP-MS signal intensity was higher in femtosecond than picosecond LA-ICP-MS in both NIST 610 and naval brass when ablation was conducted under the same fluence and repetition rate. The differences in signal intensity were partly related to differences in particle size distribution between particles generated by femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses and the consequent differences in transport and ionization efficiencies. The main reason for the higher signal intensity resulting from femtosecond laser pulses was related to the larger crater sizes compared to those created during picosecond laser ablation. Elemental ratios measured using 66 Zn/ 63 Cu, 208 Pb/ 238 U, 232 Th/ 238 U, 66 Zn/ 232 Th and 66 Zn/ 208 Pb were found to change with the number of laser pulses with data points being more scattered in picosecond than femtosecond laser pulses. Reproducibility of replicate measurements of signal intensities, fractionation and elemental ratios was better for fs-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 3 to 6%) than ps-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 7 to 11%). - Highlights: • Fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse widths using NIST 610 and Naval Brass. • Dependence of fractionation indices on repetition rate and pulse width. • Higher ablation rate was observed in picosecond compared to femtosecond laser ablation of NIST 610 and Brass

  17. Modeling of plasma distortions by laser-induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) and implications for the interpretation of LIAS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, M. Z.; Gierse, N.; Philipps, V.; Samm, U.

    2015-09-01

    For the interpretation of the line radiation observed from laser induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) such parameters as the density and temperature of electrons within very compact clouds of atoms and singly charged ions of ablated material have to be known. Compared to the local plasma conditions prior to the laser pulse, these can be strongly changed during LIAS since new electrons are generated by the ionisation of particles ejected from the irradiated target. Because of their transience and spatial inhomogeneity it is technically difficult to measure disturbances induced in the plasma by LIAS. To overcome this uncertainty a numerical model has been elaborated, providing a self-consistent description for the spreading of ablated particles and accompanying modifications in the plasma. The results of calculations for LIAS performed on carbon-containing targets in Ohmic and additionally heated discharges in the tokamak TEXTOR are presented. Due to the increase in the electron density the ‘ionisation per photon’ ratio, S/XB factor, is significantly enhanced compared to unperturbed plasma conditions. The impact of the amount of material ablated and of the plasma conditions before LIAS on the level of the S/XB-enhancement is investigated.

  18. Mapping of lead, magnesium and copper accumulation in plant tissues by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, J. [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2896/2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: kaiser@fme.vutbr.cz; Galiova, M.; Novotny, K.; Cervenka, R. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Reale, L. [Faculty of Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio (Coppito 1), 67010 L' Aquila (Italy); Novotny, J.; Liska, M.; Samek, O. [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2896/2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, V.; Hrdlicka, A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Stejskal, K.; Adam, V.; Kizek, R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University of Agriculture and Forestry, Zemedelska 1, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2009-01-15

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were utilized for mapping the accumulation of Pb, Mg and Cu with a resolution up to 200 {mu}m in a up to cm x cm area of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) leaves. The results obtained by LIBS and LA-ICP-MS are compared with the outcomes from Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) and Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC). It is shown that laser-ablation based analytical methods can substitute or supplement these techniques mainly in the cases when a fast multi-elemental mapping of a large sample area is needed.

  19. Power Laser Ablation Symposia

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Laser ablation describes the interaction of intense optical fields with matter, in which atoms are selectively driven off by thermal or nonthermal mechanisms. The field of laser ablation physics is advancing so rapidly that its principal results are seen only in specialized journals and conferences. This is the first book that combines the most recent results in this rapidly advancing field with authoritative treatment of laser ablation and its applications, including the physics of high-power laser-matter interaction. Many practical applications exist, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to propulsion of aerostats for pollution monitoring to laser ignition of hypersonic engines to laser cleaning nanoscale contaminants in high-volume computer hard drive manufacture to direct observation of the electronic or dissociative states in atoms and molecules, to studying the properties of materials during 200kbar shocks developed in 200fs. Selecting topics which are representative of such a broad field is difficu...

  20. Minimally-invasive Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis of model ancient copper alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walaszek, Damian [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre, Żwirki i Wigury 101, 02-089 Warszawa (Poland); Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Senn, Marianne; Wichser, Adrian [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Faller, Markus [Laboratory for Jointing Technology and Corrosion, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Wagner, Barbara; Bulska, Ewa [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre, Żwirki i Wigury 101, 02-089 Warszawa (Poland); Ulrich, Andrea [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)

    2014-09-01

    This work describes an evaluation of a strategy for multi-elemental analysis of typical ancient bronzes (copper, lead bronze and tin bronze) by means of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS).The samples originating from archeological experiments on ancient metal smelting processes using direct reduction in a ‘bloomery’ furnace as well as historical casting techniques were investigated with the use of the previously proposed analytical procedure, including metallurgical observation and preliminary visual estimation of the homogeneity of the samples. The results of LA-ICPMS analysis were compared to the results of bulk composition obtained by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) after acid digestion. These results were coherent for most of the elements confirming the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure, however the reliability of the quantitative information about the content of the most heterogeneously distributed elements was also discussed in more detail. - Highlights: • The previously proposed procedure was evaluated by analysis of model copper alloys. • The LA-ICPMS results were comparable to the obtained by means of XRF and ICPMS. • LA-ICPMS results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure.

  1. Synthesis of higher diamondoids by pulsed laser ablation plasmas in supercritical CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Sho; Stauss, Sven; Kato, Toru; Terashima, Kazuo; Sasaki, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (wavelength 532 nm; fluence 18 J/cm 2 ; pulse width 7 ns; repetition rate 10 Hz) of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was conducted in adamantane-dissolved supercritical CO 2 with and without cyclohexane as a cosolvent. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of the products revealed the presence of hydrocarbons possessing sp 3 -hybridized carbons similar to diamond structures. The synthesis of diamantane and other possible diamondoids consisting of up to 12 cages was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements of samples before and after pyrolysis treatment indicate the synthesis of the most compact decamantane, namely, superadamantane. It is thought that oxidant species originating from CO 2 during pulsed laser ablation might lead to the selective dissociation of C-H bonds, enabling the synthesis of low H/C ratio molecules. Therefore, laser ablation in supercritical CO 2 is proposed as a practical method for synthesizing diamondoids.

  2. TEM investigations of laser ablated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliegel, D.; Dundas, S.; Kosler, J.; Klementova, M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry suffers from fractionation effects hindering a non matrix matched calibration strategy. Different reasons for elemental fractionation that are related to the laser ablation, the transport and the vaporization in the plasma are discussed. One major question to be addressed linked to the vaporization yield in the ICP is in which of mineralogical phase the different ablated particle sizes enter the plasma. This contribution will investigate particles generated by a 213 nm laser from different samples such as minerals and alloys with respect to their chemical and phase compositions using high resolution TEM. (author)

  3. Experimental study of laser ablation as sample introduction technique for inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Winckel, S.

    2001-01-01

    The contribution consists of an abstract of a PhD thesis. In the PhD study, several complementary applications of laser-ablation were investigated in order to characterise experimentally laser ablation (LA) as a sample introduction technique for ICP-MS. Three applications of LA as a sample introduction technique are discussed: (1) the microchemical analysis of the patina of weathered marble; (2) the possibility to measure isotope ratios (in particular Pb isotope ratios in archaeological bronze artefacts); and (3) the determination of Si in Al as part of a dosimetric study of the BR2 reactor vessel

  4. Analysis of liquid samples using dried-droplet laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Trong-Mui; Hsieh, Hui-Fang; Chang, Wei-Ciang [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013 Taiwan (China); Chang, E.-E. [Department of Biochemistry, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City, 11031 Taiwan (China); Wang, Chu-Fang, E-mail: cfwang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013 Taiwan (China); Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-15

    In this study we developed a dried-droplet method for laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The proposed method provides accurate and precise results when building calibration curves and determining elements of interest in real liquid samples. After placing just 1 {mu}L of a liquid standard solution or a real sample onto the filter surface and then converting the solution into a very small, thin dry spot, the sample could be applied as an analytical subject for LA. To demonstrate the feasibility of this proposed method, we used LA-ICP-MS and conventional ICP-MS to determine the levels of 13 elements (Li, V, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Cd, Sb, Tl, and Pb) in five water samples. The correlation coefficients obtained from the various calibration curves ranged from 0.9920 ({sup 205}Tl) to 0.9998 ({sup 51}V), sufficient to allow the determination of a wide range of elements in the samples. We also investigated the effects of Methylene Blue (MB) and the NaCl concentration on the elemental analyses. MB could be used as an indicator during the ablation process; its presence in the samples only negligibly influenced the intensities of the signals of most of the tested elements. Notably, high NaCl contents led to signal suppression for some of the elements. In comparison with the established sample introduction by nebulization, our developed technique abrogates the need for time-consuming sample preparation and reduces the possibility of sample contamination.

  5. Developing the model of laser ablation by considering the interplay between emission and expansion of aluminum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei, F.; Tavassoli, S. H. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, ShahidBeheshti University, 19396 4716, G. C., Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    In the present study, the ablation behavior of aluminum target and its plasma radiation in noble ambient gases by a laser pulse with wavelength of 266 nm and pulse duration of 10 ns are numerically studied. A thermal model of laser ablation considering heat conduction, Euler equations, Saha-Eggert equations, Knudsen layer, mass and energy balance relations and optical shielding effects are used for calculation of plasma parameters. Effects of excitation energy on plasma expansion and its emissivity are investigated. Time and spatial-resolved plasma emission including bremsstrahlung, recombination and spectral emission at early delay times after laser irradiation is obtained. Effects of two ambient gases (He and Ar) as well as different gas pressures of 100, 300, 500, and 760 Torr on plasma expansion and its spectrum are studied. Results illustrate that at initial delay times, especially at high noble gas pressures, ionic lines have the maximum intensities, while at later times neutral lines dominate. When the pressure of ambient gas increases, a confinement of the plasma plume is predicted and the intensity of neutral lines decreases. Continuous emission increases with wavelength in both ambient gases. Spatially resolved analysis shows that an intense continuous emission is predicted next to the sample surface decreasing with distance from the latter.

  6. Self-consistent model of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in ablatively accelerated laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.V.; Golberg, S.M.; Liberman, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    A self-consistent approach to the problem of the growth rate of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in laser accelerated targets is developed. The analytical solution of the problem is obtained by solving the complete system of the hydrodynamical equations which include both thermal conductivity and energy release due to absorption of the laser light. The developed theory provides a rigorous justification for the supplementary boundary condition in the limiting case of the discontinuity model. An analysis of the suppression of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability by the ablation flow is done and it is found that there is a good agreement between the obtained solution and the approximate formula σ = 0.9√gk - 3u 1 k, where g is the acceleration, u 1 is the ablation velocity. This paper discusses different regimes of the ablative stabilization and compares them with previous analytical and numerical works

  7. Comparison of femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for uranium isotopic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havrilla, George Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McIntosh, Kathryn Gallagher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Judge, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dirmyer, Matthew R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Campbell, Keri [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gonzalez, Jhanis J. [Applied Spectra Inc., Fremont, CA (United States)

    2016-10-20

    Feasibility tests were conducted using femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for rapid uranium isotopic measurements. The samples used in this study consisted of a range of pg quantities of known 235/238 U solutions as dried spot residues of 300 pL drops on silicon substrates. The samples spanned the following enrichments of 235U: 0.5, 1.5, 2, 3, and 15.1%. In this direct comparison using these particular samples both pulse durations demonstrated near equivalent data can be produced on either system with respect to accuracy and precision. There is no question that either LA-ICP-MS method offers the potential for rapid, accurate and precise isotopic measurements of U10Mo materials whether DU, LEU or HEU. The LA-ICP-MS equipment used for this work is commercially available. The program is in the process of validating this work for large samples using center samples strips from Y-12 MP-1 LEU-Mo Casting #1.

  8. Comparison of femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for uranium isotopic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havrilla, George Joseph; McIntosh, Kathryn Gallagher; Judge, Elizabeth; Dirmyer, Matthew R.; Campbell, Keri; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.

    2016-01-01

    Feasibility tests were conducted using femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for rapid uranium isotopic measurements. The samples used in this study consisted of a range of pg quantities of known 235/238 U solutions as dried spot residues of 300 pL drops on silicon substrates. The samples spanned the following enrichments of 235 U: 0.5, 1.5, 2, 3, and 15.1%. In this direct comparison using these particular samples both pulse durations demonstrated near equivalent data can be produced on either system with respect to accuracy and precision. There is no question that either LA-ICP-MS method offers the potential for rapid, accurate and precise isotopic measurements of U10Mo materials whether DU, LEU or HEU. The LA-ICP-MS equipment used for this work is commercially available. The program is in the process of validating this work for large samples using center samples strips from Y-12 MP-1 LEU-Mo Casting #1.

  9. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of trace elements in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Yiling; Chang Chaochiang; Jiang Shiuhjen

    2003-01-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been applied to the determination of Cr, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in soil samples. The dried soil powder was pressed into a pellet for LA-ICP-MS analysis. Triton X-100 was added to work as the modifier to enhance the ion signals. The influences of instrument operating conditions (LA and ICP-MS) and pellet preparation on the ion signals were reported. For Cr determination, the ICP-MS was operated under the dynamic reaction cell mode which alleviated the mass overlap interference. Standard addition method and isotope dilution method were used for the quantitation work. The powder sample was spiked with suitable amounts of element standards and/or enriched isotopes, well-mixed, dried and then pressed into a pellet for LA-ICP-MS analysis. This method has been applied to determine Cr, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in NIST SRM 2711 Montana soil and NIST SRM 2709 San Joaquin soil reference materials. The analysis results were in agreement with the certified values. The precision between sample replicates was better than 5% with LA-ICP-MS method. Detection limits estimated from standard addition curves were approximately 0.9, 2, 9, 0.7 and 0.3 ng g -1 for Cr, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb, respectively

  10. Angular distributions of plasma edge velocity and integrated intensity: Update on specific impulse for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Pakhomov, Andrew V.

    2005-04-01

    This work concludes our discussion of the image processing technique developed earlier for determination of specific impulse (Isp) for Ablative Laser Propulsion (ALP). The plasma plumes are recorded with a time-resolved intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera. The plasma was formed in vacuum (˜ 3×10-3 Torr) by focusing output pulses of a laser system (100-ps pulsewidth at 532 nm wavelength and ˜35 mJ energy) on surfaces of C (graphite), Al, Si, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sn, and Pb elements. Angular profiles for integrated intensity and plasma expansion velocity were determined for the tested elements. Such profiles were used further for assessment of specific impulse. Specific impulses derived from angular distributions of plasma expansion velocity and integral intensity appeared in excellent agreement with the data derived earlier from force measurements.

  11. Angular distributions of plasma edge velocity and integrated intensity: Update on specific impulse for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jun; Pakhomov, Andrew V.

    2005-01-01

    This work concludes our discussion of the image processing technique developed earlier for determination of specific impulse (Isp) for Ablative Laser Propulsion (ALP). The plasma plumes are recorded with a time-resolved intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera. The plasma was formed in vacuum (∼ 3x10-3 Torr) by focusing output pulses of a laser system (100-ps pulsewidth at 532 nm wavelength and ∼35 mJ energy) on surfaces of C (graphite), Al, Si, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sn, and Pb elements. Angular profiles for integrated intensity and plasma expansion velocity were determined for the tested elements. Such profiles were used further for assessment of specific impulse. Specific impulses derived from angular distributions of plasma expansion velocity and integral intensity appeared in excellent agreement with the data derived earlier from force measurements

  12. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for analysis of pellets of plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Marcos S. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, km 235, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Schenk, Emily R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Santos, Dário [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Professor Arthur Riedel 275, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco José [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Almirall, José R., E-mail: almirall@fiu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States)

    2014-04-01

    An evaluation of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (LAICP OES) for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. Ground leaves of orange citrus, soy and sugarcane were comminuted using a high-speed ball mill, pressed into pellets and sampled directly with laser ablation and analyzed by ICP OES. The limits of detection (LODs) for the method ranged from as low as 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} for Zn to as high as 94 mg kg{sup −1} for K but were generally below 6 mg kg{sup −1} for most of the elements of interest. A certified reference material consisting of a similar matrix (NIST SRM 1547 peach leaves) was used to check the accuracy of the calibration and the reported method resulted in an average bias of ∼ 5% for all the elements of interest. The precision for the reported method ranged from as low as 4% relative standard deviation (RSD) for Mn to as high as 17% RSD for Zn but averaged ∼ 6.5% RSD for all the elements (n = 10). The proposed method was tested for the determination of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained for the corresponding acid digests by ICP-OES, no differences being observed by applying a paired t-test at the 95% confidence level. The reported direct solid sampling method provides a fast alternative to acid digestion that results in similar and appropriate analytical figures of merit with regard to sensitivity, accuracy and precision for plant material analysis. - Highlights: • An evaluation of LA-ICP-OES for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. • Orange citrus, soy and sugarcane plants were pressed into pellets and sampled directly. • The element menu consisted of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B. • LODs for the method ranged from 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} for Zn to 94 mg kg{sup −1} for K. • The precision ranged from 4% RSD for Mn to 17% RSD for Zn (∼ 6.5% RSD average)

  13. Laser ablation comparison by picosecond pulses train and nanosecond pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Filippov, M. N.; Bunkin, A. F.; Pershin, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    A comparison of laser ablation by a train of picosecond pulses and nanosecond pulses revealed a difference in laser craters, ablation thresholds, plasma sizes and spectral line intensities. Laser ablation with a train of picosecond pulses resulted in improved crater quality while ablated mass decreased up to 30%. A reduction in laser plasma dimensions for picosecond train ablation was observed while the intensity of atomic/ionic lines in the plasma spectra was greater by a factor of 2-4 indicating an improved excitation and atomization in the plasma.

  14. Scanning vs. single spot laser ablation (λ=213 nm) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Fernandez, Alberto; Mao Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Sampling strategy is defined in this work as the interaction of a repetitively pulsed laser beam with a fixed position on a sample (single spot) or with a moving sample (scan). Analytical performance of these sampling strategies was compared by using 213 nm laser ablation ICP-MS. A geological rock (Tuff) was quantitatively analyzed based on NIST series 610-616 glass standard reference materials. Laser ablation data were compared to ICP-MS analysis of the dissolved samples. The scan strategy (50 μm/s) produced a flat, steady temporal ICP-MS response whereas the single spot strategy produced a signal that decayed with time (after 60 s). Single-spot sampling provided better accuracy and precision than the scan strategy when the first 15 s of the sampling time was eliminated from the data analysis. In addition, the single spot strategy showed less matrix dependence among the four NIST glasses

  15. Assessment of Laser Induced Ablation Spectroscopy (LIAS) as a method for quantitative in situ surface diagnostic in plasma environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierse, Niels Hannes Gustav

    2014-01-01

    In this work Laser Induced Ablation Spectroscopy (LIAS) is investigated as an in situ plasma surface interaction diagnostic for fusion reactors and fusion experiments. In LIAS an intensive laser pulse is used to ablate the material under investigation during plasma operation. Ablation products penetrate into the edge region of the plasma and are excited and ionized. In case of molecules and clusters additionally dissociation occurs. The emitted line radiation is observed by radiometric calibrated spectroscopy. Results from LIAS of W/C/Al/D-mixed layers and amorphous hydrocarbon layers are presented. Using a fast camera system time resolved measurements of the LIAS.process could be performed, allowing investigation of the temporal behavior of excitation, dissociation and ionization processes. For Tungsten, 90% of the LIAS light is observed within 10±3 μs after the laser pulse. In case of carbon within 20±3 μs. Additionally separation in time of LIAS emission and the LIBS emission caused by the laser pulse at the surface within single measurements was demonstrated. This allows the separate analysis of both processes in a coaxial setup which is foreseen for future experiments. The inverse photon efficiency of the Balmer D_α-emission from LIAS of a-C:D-layers was found to be [(D)/(XB)]"a"-"C":"D""L""I""A""S"_→"D_D__α=71±7. The plasma perturbation due to LIAS was investigated by laser energy density variation when ablating W/C/Al/D.mixed layers. Local plasma perturbation is found to increase with laser energy density. Balmer H_γ/H_δ - line intensity ratio measurements only show for ohmic discharges and the case of the lowest central density signs of local plasma perturbation in LIAS of graphite samples. A simple analytical model for local plasma perturbation during LIAS is introduced and evaluated. Qualitative agreement between the model and the above reported experimental observations is found; a stronger influence on local conditions is found by tungsten

  16. Direct measurements of sample heating by a laser-induced air plasma in pre-ablation spark dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register, Janna; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Angel, S Michael

    2012-08-01

    Direct measurements of temperature changes were made using small thermocouples (TC), placed near a laser-induced air plasma. Temperature changes up to ~500 °C were observed. From the measured temperature changes, estimates were made of the amount of heat absorbed per unit area. This allowed calculations to be made of the surface temperature, as a function of time, of a sample heated by the air plasma that is generated during orthogonal pre-ablation spark dual-pulse (DP) LIBS measurements. In separate experiments, single-pulse (SP) LIBS emission and sample ablation rate measurements were performed on nickel at sample temperatures ranging from room temperature to the maximum surface temperature that was calculated using the TC measurement results (500 °C). A small, but real sample temperature-dependent increase in both SP LIBS emission and the rate of sample ablation was found for nickel samples heated up to 500 °C. Comparison of DP LIBS emission enhancement values for bulk nickel samples at room temperature versus the enhanced SP LIBS emission and sample ablation rates observed as a function of increasing sample temperature suggests that sample heating by the laser-induced air plasma plays only a minor role in DP LIBS emission enhancement.

  17. Plume splitting and oscillatory behavior in transient plasmas generated by high-fluence laser ablation in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focsa, C.; Gurlui, S.; Nica, P.; Agop, M.; Ziskind, M.

    2017-12-01

    We present a short overview of studies performed in our research groups over the last decade on the characterization of transient plasma plumes generated by laser ablation in various temporal regimes, from nanosecond to femtosecond. New results are also presented along with this overview, both being placed in the context of similar studies performed by other investigators. Optical (fast gate intensified CCD camera imaging and space- and time-resolved emission spectroscopy) and electrical (mainly Langmuir probe) methods have been applied to experimentally explore the dynamics of the plasma plume and its constituents. Peculiar effects as plume splitting and sharpening or oscillations onset have been evidenced in vacuum at high laser fluence. New theoretical approaches have been developed to account for the experimental observations.

  18. Spectroscopic and shadowgraphic analysis of laser induced plasmas in the orthogonal double pulse pre-ablation configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Pardini, L.; Palleschi, V.; Salvetti, A.; Tognoni, E.

    2006-01-01

    This work focuses on the study of the plumes obtained in the double pulse orthogonal Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in the pre-ablation configuration using both spectroscopic and shadowgraphic approaches. Single and double pulse LIBS experiments were carried out on a brass sample in air. Both the distance of the air plasma from the target surface and the interpulse delay were varied (respectively in the range 0.1-4.2 mm and up to 50 μs) revealing a significant variation of the plasma emission and of the plume-shock wave dynamical expansion in different cases. The intensity of both atomic and ionized zinc lines was measured in all the cases, allowing the calculation of the spatially averaged temperature and electron density and an estimation of the ablated mass. The line intensities and the thermodynamic parameters obtained by the spectroscopic measurements were discussed bearing in mind the dynamical expansion characteristics obtained from the shadowgraphic approach. All the data seem to be consistent with the model previously proposed for the double pulse collinear configuration where the line enhancement is mainly attributed to the ambient gas rarefaction produced by the first laser pulse, which causes a less effective shielding of the second laser pulse

  19. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  20. High excitation of the species in nitrogen–aluminum plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance microwave discharge of N2 gas and pulsed laser ablation of Al target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Peipei; Li, Yanli; Cai, Hua; You, Qinghu; Yang, Xu; Huang, Feiling; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-01-01

    A reactive nitrogen–aluminum plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge of N 2 gas and pulsed laser ablation of an Al target is characterized spectroscopically by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The vibrational and rotational temperatures of N 2 species are determined by spectral simulation. The generated plasma strongly emits radiation from a variety of excited species including ambient nitrogen and ablated aluminum and exhibits unique features in optical emission and temperature evolution compared with the plasmas generated by a pure ECR discharge or by the expansion of the ablation plume. The working N 2 gas is first excited by ECR discharge and the excitation of nitrogen is further enhanced due to the fast expansion of the aluminum plume induced by target ablation, while the excitation of the ablated aluminum is prolonged during the plume expansion in the ECR nitrogen plasma, resulting in the formation of strongly reactive nitrogen–aluminum plasma which contains highly excited species with high vibrational and rotational temperatures. The enhanced intensities and the prolonged duration of the optical emissions of the combined plasma would provide an improved analytical capability for spectrochemical analysis. - Highlights: • ECR discharge and pulsed laser ablation generate highly excited ECR–PLA plasma. • The expansion of PLA plasma results in excitation enhancement of ECR plasma species. • The ECR plasma leads to excitation prolongation of PLA plasma species. • The ECR–PLA plasma emits strong emissions from a variety of excited species. • The ECR–PLA plasma maintains high vibrational–rotational temperatures for a long time

  1. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdian, David C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  2. Multilayered metal oxide thin film gas sensors obtained by conventional and RF plasma-assisted laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitu, B.; Marotta, V.; Orlando, S.

    2006-01-01

    Multilayered thin films of In 2 O 3 and SnO 2 have been deposited by conventional and RF plasma-assisted reactive pulsed laser ablation, with the aim to evaluate their behaviour as toxic gas sensors. The depositions have been carried out by a frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser (λ = 532 nm, τ = 7 ns) on Si(1 0 0) substrates, in O 2 atmosphere. The thin films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrical resistance measurements. A comparison of the electrical response of the simple (indium oxide, tin oxide) and multilayered oxides to toxic gas (nitric oxide, NO) has been performed. The influence on the structural and electrical properties of the deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature and RF power is reported

  3. Tribological characterization of TiCN coatings deposited by two crossed laser ablation plasma beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Enrique; Escobar-Alarcón, L.; Camps, Iván; Muhl, Stephen; Flores, Martín

    2013-03-01

    The simultaneous laser ablation of two targets (graphite and titanium) in an Ar-N2 gas mixture was carried out to deposit thin films of the ternary compound TiCN at room temperature. The base conditions used to produce the TiN without carbon were taken from our previous studies. The experimental conditions for the ablation of the carbon target were varied so that the carbon content in the films could be changed depending on the carbon ion energy. The control of the experimental conditions was carried out using a Langmuir planar probe which permitted the determination of the mean kinetic ion energy. The maximum hardness value of 35 GPa, was obtained with a carbon ion energy of about 250 eV, which corresponds to a film with 5 at% carbon content. In order to perform tribological and scratch tests, two types of substrate were used: nitrided AISI 316 stainless steel and AISI 316 stainless steel previously coated with a thin titanium layer (˜50 nm). Values of the wear rate in the range of 1.39×10-6 to 7.45×10-5 mm3 N-1 m-1, friction coefficient from 0.21 to 0.28 and adhesion from scratch test measurements up to 80 N for final critical load, were obtained.

  4. Ablation Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed La1-xSrxTiO3+δ Coating Irradiated by High-Intensity Continuous Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinpeng; Ma, Zhuang; Gao, Yinjun; Gao, Lihong; Pervak, Vladimir; Wang, Lijun; Wei, Chenghua; Wang, Fuchi

    2017-10-11

    Laser protection for optical components, particularly those in high-power laser systems, has been a major concern. La 1-x Sr x TiO 3+δ with its good optical and thermal properties can be potentially applied as a high-temperature optical protective coating or high-reflectivity material for optical components. However, the high-power laser ablation behavior of plasma-sprayed La 1-x Sr x TiO 3+δ (x = 0.1) coatings has rarely been investigated. Thus, in this study, laser irradiation experiments were performed to study the effect of high-intensity continuous laser on the ablation behavior of the La 1-x Sr x TiO 3+δ coating. The results show that the La 1-x Sr x TiO 3+δ coating undergoes three ablation stages during laser irradiation: coating oxidation, formation and growth of new structures (columnar and dendritic crystals), and mechanical failure. A finite-element simulation was also conducted to explore the mechanism of the ablation damage to the La 1-x Sr x TiO 3+δ coating and provided a good understanding of the ablation behavior. The apparent ablation characteristics are attributed to the different temperature gradients determined by the reflectivity and thermal diffusivity of the La 1-x Sr x TiO 3+δ coating material, which are critical factors for improving the antilaser ablation property. Now, the stainless steel substrate deposited by it can effectively work as a protective shield layer against ablation by laser irradiation.

  5. Modeling CO2 Laser Ablative Impulse with Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation vaporization models have usually ignored the spatial dependence of the laser beam. Here, we consider effects from modeling using a Gaussian beam for both photochemical and photothermal conditions. The modeling results are compared to experimental and literature data for CO 2 laser ablation of the polymer polyoxymethylene under vacuum, and discussed in terms of the ablated mass areal density and momentum coupling coefficient. Extending the scope of discussion, laser ablative impulse generation research has lacked a cohesive strategy for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes. Existing models, mostly formulated for ultraviolet laser systems or metal targets, appear to be inappropriate or impractical for applications requiring CO 2 laser ablation of polymers. A recently proposed method for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes for analytical modeling is addressed here along with the implications of its use. Key control parameters are considered, along with the major propulsion parameters needed for laser ablation propulsion modeling.

  6. Impact of the cavitation bubble on a plasma emission following laser ablation in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilović, Marijana R.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the impact of the cavitation bubble on a plasma emission produced after the interaction of the strong focused laser radiation with the target in the liquid was studied. Several experimental techniques were applied to assess different aspects of the complex phenomena of the laser induced breakdown in the liquid media. The results of the fast photography, Schlieren and shadowgraphy techniques were compared with the results of simpler probe beam techniques, transmission and scattering. In addition, emission from the plasma was analysed using optical emission spectroscopy, with aim to relate the quality of the recorded spectral lines to the bubble properties. Bubble had proved to be more convenient surrounding than the liquid for the long lasting plasma emission, due to the high temperature and pressure state inside of it and significantly lower density, which causes less confined plasma. Changes in refractive index of the bubble were also monitored, although in the limited time interval, when the bubble was sufficiently expanded and the refractive index difference between the bubble and the water was large enough to produce glory rings and the bright spot in the bubble's centre. Reshaping of the plasma emission due to the optical properties of the bubble was detected and the need for careful optimization of the optical system was stressed. Contribution to the "Topical Issue: Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2016)", edited by Goran Poparic, Bratislav Obradovic, Dragana Maric and Aleksandar Milosavljevic.

  7. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures....... The accompanying field enhancement substantially lowers the ablation threshold of the polymer film and thus creates local ablation spots and corresponding topographic modifications of the polymer film. Such modifications are quantified straightforwardly via scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Thickness...

  8. High-resolution line-scan analysis of resin-embedded sediments using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, Rick; Jilbert, Tom; Mason, Paul R D; de Lange, Gert J.; Reichart, Gert Jan

    2015-01-01

    Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) line-scanning is a promising technique for producing high-resolution (μm-scale) geochemical records on resin-embedded sediments. However, this approach has not yet been thoroughly tested on sediment samples of known elemental

  9. High-resolution line-scan analysis of resin-embedded sediments using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, R.; Jilbert, T.; de Lange, G.J.; Reichart, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) line-scanning is a promising technique for producing high-resolution (µm-scale) geochemical records on resin-embedded sediments. However, this approach has not yet been thoroughly tested on sediment samples of known elemental

  10. Applications of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Johanna Sabine

    2002-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) have been applied as the most important inorganic mass spectrometric techniques having multielemental capability for the characterization of solid samples in materials science. ICP-MS is used for the sensitive determination of trace and ultratrace elements in digested solutions of solid samples or of process chemicals (ultrapure water, acids and organic solutions) for the semiconductor industry with detection limits down to sub-picogram per liter levels. Whereas ICP-MS on solid samples (e.g. high-purity ceramics) sometimes requires time-consuming sample preparation for its application in materials science, and the risk of contamination is a serious drawback, a fast, direct determination of trace elements in solid materials without any sample preparation by LA-ICP-MS is possible. The detection limits for the direct analysis of solid samples by LA-ICP-MS have been determined for many elements down to the nanogram per gram range. A deterioration of detection limits was observed for elements where interferences with polyatomic ions occur. The inherent interference problem can often be solved by applying a double-focusing sector field mass spectrometer at higher mass resolution or by collision-induced reactions of polyatomic ions with a collision gas using an ICP-MS fitted with collision cell. The main problem of LA-ICP-MS is quantification if no suitable standard reference materials with a similar matrix composition are available. The calibration problem in LA-ICP-MS can be solved using on-line solution-based calibration, and different procedures, such as external calibration and standard addition, have been discussed with respect to their application in materials science. The application of isotope dilution in solution-based calibration for trace metal determination in small amounts of noble metals has been developed as a new calibration strategy. This review discusses new

  11. Determination of refractive and volatile elements in sediment using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duodu, Godfred Odame; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Allen, Charlotte; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2015-10-22

    Wet-milling protocol was employed to produce pressed powder tablets with excellent cohesion and homogeneity suitable for laser ablation (LA) analysis of volatile and refractive elements in sediment. The influence of sample preparation on analytical performance was also investigated, including sample homogeneity, accuracy and limit of detection. Milling in volatile solvent for 40 min ensured sample is well mixed and could reasonably recover both volatile (Hg) and refractive (Zr) elements. With the exception of Cr (-52%) and Nb (+26%) major, minor and trace elements in STSD-1 and MESS-3 could be analysed within ±20% of the certified values. Comparison of the method with total digestion method using HF was tested by analysing 10 different sediment samples. The laser method recovers significantly higher amounts of analytes such as Ag, Cd, Sn and Sn than the total digestion method making it a more robust method for elements across the periodic table. LA-ICP-MS also eliminates the interferences from chemical reagents as well as the health and safety risks associated with digestion processes. Therefore, it can be considered as an enhanced method for the analysis of heterogeneous matrices such as river sediments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chemically assisted laser ablation ICP mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Takafumi

    2003-01-15

    A new laser ablation technique combined with a chemical evaporation reaction has been developed for elemental ratio analysis of solid samples using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS). Using a chemically assisted laser ablation (CIA) technique developed in this study, analytical repeatability of the elemental ratio measurement was successively improved. To evaluate the reliability of the CLA-ICPMS technique, Pb/U isotopic ratios were determined for zircon samples that have previously been analyzed by other techniques. Conventional laser ablation for Pb/U shows a serious elemental fractionation during ablation mainly due to the large difference in elemental volatility between Pb and U. In the case of Pb/U ratio measurement, a Freon R-134a gas (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) was introduced into the laser cell as a fluorination reactant. The Freon gas introduced into the laser cell reacts with the ablated sample U, and refractory U compounds are converted to a volatile U fluoride compound (UF6) under the high-temperature condition at the ablation site. This avoids the redeposition of U around the ablation pits. Although not all the U is reacted with Freon, formation of volatile UF compounds improves the transmission efficiency of U. Typical precision of the 206Pb/238U ratio measurement is 3-5% (2sigma) for NIST SRM 610 and Nancy 91500 zircon standard, and the U-Pb age data obtained here show good agreement within analytical uncertainties with the previously reported values. Since the observed Pb/U ratio for solid samples is relatively insensitive to laser power and ablation time, optimization of ablation conditions or acquisition parameters no longer needs to be performed on a sample-to-sample basis.

  13. Acceleration of Vaporization, Atomization, and Ionization Efficiencies in Inductively Coupled Plasma by Merging Laser-Ablated Particles with Hydrochloric Acid Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Takashi; Izumo, Saori; Furuta, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    To accelerate the vaporization, atomization, and ionization efficiencies in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we merged HCl gas with laser-ablated particles before introduction into the plasma, to convert their surface constituents from oxides to lower-melting chlorides. When particles were merged with HCl gas generated from a HCl solution at 200°C, the measured concentrations of elements in the particles were 135% higher on average than the concentrations in particles merged with ultrapure water vapor. Particle corrosion and surface roughness were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and oxide conversion to chlorides was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Under the optimum conditions, the recoveries of measured elements improved by 23% on average, and the recoveries of elements with high-melting oxides (Sr, Zr, and Th) improved by as much as 36%. These results indicate that vaporization, atomization, and ionization in the ICP improved when HCl gas was merged with the ablated particles.

  14. Multiplexed microRNA detection using lanthanide-labeled DNA probes and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bang, Thomas Christian; Shah, Pratik; Cho, Seok Keun

    2014-01-01

    coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). Three miRNAs from Arabidopsis thaliana were analyzed simultaneously with high specificity, and the sensitivity of the method was comparable to radioactive detection (low femtomol range). The perspective of the developed method is highly multiplexed......In the past decade, microRNAs (miRNAs) have drawn increasing attention due to their role in regulation of gene expression. Especially, their potential as biomarkers in disease diagnostics has motivated miRNA research, including the development of simple, accurate, and sensitive detection methods....... The narrow size range of miRNAs (20-24 nucleotides) combined with the chemical properties of conventional reporter tags has hampered the development of multiplexed miRNA assays. In this study, we have used lanthanide-labeled DNA probes for the detection of miRNAs on membranes using laser ablation inductively...

  15. Determination of refractive and volatile elements in sediment using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duodu, Godfred Odame [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), 2 George St, 4001, QLD (Australia); Goonetilleke, Ashantha [School of Civil Engineering and Built Environment, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), 2 George St, 4001, QLD (Australia); Allen, Charlotte [Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), 2 George St, 4001, QLD (Australia); Ayoko, Godwin A., E-mail: g.ayoko@qut.edu.au [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), 2 George St, 4001, QLD (Australia)

    2015-10-22

    Wet-milling protocol was employed to produce pressed powder tablets with excellent cohesion and homogeneity suitable for laser ablation (LA) analysis of volatile and refractive elements in sediment. The influence of sample preparation on analytical performance was also investigated, including sample homogeneity, accuracy and limit of detection. Milling in volatile solvent for 40 min ensured sample is well mixed and could reasonably recover both volatile (Hg) and refractive (Zr) elements. With the exception of Cr (−52%) and Nb (+26%) major, minor and trace elements in STSD-1 and MESS-3 could be analysed within ±20% of the certified values. Comparison of the method with total digestion method using HF was tested by analysing 10 different sediment samples. The laser method recovers significantly higher amounts of analytes such as Ag, Cd, Sn and Sn than the total digestion method making it a more robust method for elements across the periodic table. LA-ICP-MS also eliminates the interferences from chemical reagents as well as the health and safety risks associated with digestion processes. Therefore, it can be considered as an enhanced method for the analysis of heterogeneous matrices such as river sediments. - Highlights: • Wet milling was used to produce pressed tablet sediment for LA-ICP-MS analysis. • Milling was effective for refractive elements with narrow range of particle size. • This is the first use of LA-ICP-MS for Hg analysis in sediment samples. • Acceptable accuracy and precision were obtained for most of the elements studied. • Detection limits down to parts per trillion were observed for some elements.

  16. Dual purpose laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for pulsed laser deposition and diagnostics of thin film fabrication: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azdejković, Mersida Janeva; van Elteren, Johannes Teun; Rozman, Kristina Zuzek; Jaćimović, Radojko; Sarantopoulou, Evangelia; Kobe, Spomenka; Cefalas, Alkiviadis Constantinos

    2009-08-15

    PLD (pulsed laser deposition) is an attractive technique to fabricate thin films with a stoichiometry reflecting that of the target material. Conventional PLD instruments are more or less black boxes in which PLD is performed virtually "blind", i.e. without having great control on the important PLD parameters. In this preliminary study, for the first time, a 213 nm Nd-YAG commercial laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICPMS) intended for microanalysis work was used for PLD under atmospheric pressure and in and ex situ ICPMS analysis for diagnostics of the thin film fabrication process. A PLD demonstration experiment in a He atmosphere was performed with a Sm(13.8)Fe(82.2)Ta(4.0) target-Ta-coated silicon wafer substrate (contraption with defined geometry in the laser ablation chamber) to transfer the permanent magnetic properties of the target to the film. Although this paper is not dealing with the magnetic properties of the film, elemental analysis was applied as a means of depicting the PLD process. It was shown that in situ ICPMS monitoring of the ablation plume as a function of the laser fluence, beam diameter and repetition rate may be used to ensure the absence of large particles (normally having a stoichiometry somewhat different from the target). Furthermore, ex situ microanalysis of the deposited particles on the substrate, using the LA-ICPMS as an elemental mapping tool, allowed for the investigation of PLD parameters critical in the fabrication of a thin film with appropriate density, homogeneity and stoichiometry.

  17. High-speed photography of laser ablation plasmas from the high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, K.; Huntley, J.M.; Phillips, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    The luminous plume formed by laser ablation of the high-temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ has been investigated using high-speed framing photography. Variation of the background oxygen pressure was found to significantly influence the velocity distribution of the ablated species, leading in particular to shock wave formation and instabilities on the shock front at higher pressures. Spectral characteristics of the plume were studied using optical interference filters, and two distinct regions of emission were identified. (orig.)

  18. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with a twin quadrupole instrument using laser ablation sample introduction and monodisperse dried microparticulate injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Lloyd A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1996-10-17

    The focus of this dissertation is the use of a twin quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) for the simultaneous detection of two m/z values. The twin quadrupole ICP-MS is used with laser ablation sample introduction in both the steady state (10 Hz) and single pulse modes. Steady state signals are highly correlated and the majority of flicker noise cancels when the ratio is calculated. Using a copper sample, the isotope ratio 63Cu+/65Cu+ is measured with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.26%. Transient signals for single laser pulses are also obtained. Copper isotope ratio measurements for several laser pulses are measured with an RSD of 0.85%. Laser ablation (LA) is used with steel samples to assess the ability of the twin quadrupole ICP-MS to eliminate flicker noise of minor components of steel samples. Isotopic and internal standard ratios are measured in the first part of this work. The isotope ratio 52Cr+/53Cr+ (Cr present at 1.31 %) can be measured with an RSD of 0.06 % to 0.1 %. For internal standard elements, RSDs improve from 1.9 % in the Cr+ signal to 0.12% for the ratio of 51V+ to 52Cr+. In the second part of this work, one mass spectrometer is scanned while the second channel measures an individual m/z value. When the ratio of these two signals is calculated, the peak shapes in the mass spectrum are improved significantly. Pulses of analyte and matrix ions from individual drops are measured simultaneously using the twin quadrupole ICP-MS with monodisperse dried microparticulate injection (MDMI). At modest Pb concentrations (500 ppm), a shoulder on the leading edge of the Li+ signal becomes apparent. Space charge effects are consistent with the disturbances seen.

  19. Forensic analysis of printing inks using tandem Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Kiran; Trejos, Tatiana; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Elemental analysis, using either LA-ICP-MS or LIBS, can be used for the chemical characterization of materials of forensic interest to discriminate between source materials originating from different sources and also for the association of materials known to originate from the same source. In this study, a tandem LIBS/LA-ICP-MS system that combines the benefits of both LIBS and LA-ICP-MS was evaluated for the characterization of samples of printing inks (toners, inkjets, intaglio and offset.). The performance of both laser sampling methods is presented. A subset of 9 black laser toners, 10 colored (CMYK) inkjet samples, 12 colored (CMYK) offset samples and 12 intaglio inks originating from different manufacturing sources were analyzed to evaluate the discrimination capability of the tandem method. These samples were selected because they presented a very similar elemental profile by LA-ICP-MS. Although typical discrimination between different ink sources is found to be > 99% for a variety of inks when only LA-ICP-MS was used for the analysis, additional discrimination was achieved by combining the elemental results from the LIBS analysis to the LA-ICP-MS analysis in the tandem technique, enhancing the overall discrimination capability of the individual laser ablation methods. The LIBS measurements of the Ca, Fe, K and Si signals, in particular, improved the discrimination for this specific set of different ink samples previously shown to exhibit very similar LA-ICP-MS elemental profiles. The combination of these two techniques in a single setup resulted in better discrimination of the printing inks with two distinct fingerprint spectra, providing information from atomic/ionic emissions and isotopic composition (m/z) for each ink sample.

  20. Pulsed laser ablation of wire-shaped target in a thin water jet: effects of plasma features and bubble dynamics on the PLAL process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell’Aglio, Marcella; De Giacomo, Alessandro; Kohsakowski, Sebastian; Barcikowski, Stephan; Wagener, Philipp; Santagata, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, emission spectroscopy and fast imaging surveys during pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) for nanoparticles (NPs) production have been used, in order to provide further details about the process involved and the potentialities offered by a wire-shaped sample ablated in a flowing water jet. This kind of set-up has been explored because the laser ablation efficiency in water increases when a thin water layer and a wire-shaped target are used. In order to understand the physical processes causing the increasing ablation efficiency, both the laser-induced plasma and bubble dynamics generated in a flowing liquid jet have been analysed. The plasma parameters and the bubble behaviour in such a system have been compared with those observed in conventional PLAL experiments, where either a bulk or a wire-shaped target is immersed in bulk water. From the data presented here it is evidenced that the plasma and shockwave induced during the breakdown process can play a direct role in the ablation efficiency variation observed. With regard to the cavitation bubbles evolving near a free surface (the interface between water and air) it should be noted that these have to be treated with caution as a consequence of the strong influence played in these circumstances by the boundary of the water jet during its expansion dynamics. The effects due to the size of the liquid layer, the presence of the water/air interface, the liquid characteristics, the target shape, the plasma evolution and the bubble dynamics together with their outcomes on the NPs’ production, are presented and discussed. (paper)

  1. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-01-01

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  2. Forensic analysis of printing inks using tandem Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subedi, Kiran; Trejos, Tatiana; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Elemental analysis, using either LA-ICP-MS or LIBS, can be used for the chemical characterization of materials of forensic interest to discriminate between source materials originating from different sources and also for the association of materials known to originate from the same source. In this study, a tandem LIBS/LA-ICP-MS system that combines the benefits of both LIBS and LA-ICP-MS was evaluated for the characterization of samples of printing inks (toners, inkjets, intaglio and offset.). The performance of both laser sampling methods is presented. A subset of 9 black laser toners, 10 colored (CMYK) inkjet samples, 12 colored (CMYK) offset samples and 12 intaglio inks originating from different manufacturing sources were analyzed to evaluate the discrimination capability of the tandem method. These samples were selected because they presented a very similar elemental profile by LA-ICP-MS. Although typical discrimination between different ink sources is found to be > 99% for a variety of inks when only LA-ICP-MS was used for the analysis, additional discrimination was achieved by combining the elemental results from the LIBS analysis to the LA-ICP-MS analysis in the tandem technique, enhancing the overall discrimination capability of the individual laser ablation methods. The LIBS measurements of the Ca, Fe, K and Si signals, in particular, improved the discrimination for this specific set of different ink samples previously shown to exhibit very similar LA-ICP-MS elemental profiles. The combination of these two techniques in a single setup resulted in better discrimination of the printing inks with two distinct fingerprint spectra, providing information from atomic/ionic emissions and isotopic composition (m/z) for each ink sample. - Highlights: • The optimization of the parameters for LA-ICP-MS and LIBS in a tandem experiment are presented. • The analytical figures of merit for the tandem experiment for data collected simultaneously, are presented. • A

  3. Forensic analysis of printing inks using tandem Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subedi, Kiran, E-mail: ksube001@fiu.edu; Trejos, Tatiana, E-mail: trejost@fiu.edu; Almirall, José, E-mail: almirall@fiu.edu

    2015-01-01

    Elemental analysis, using either LA-ICP-MS or LIBS, can be used for the chemical characterization of materials of forensic interest to discriminate between source materials originating from different sources and also for the association of materials known to originate from the same source. In this study, a tandem LIBS/LA-ICP-MS system that combines the benefits of both LIBS and LA-ICP-MS was evaluated for the characterization of samples of printing inks (toners, inkjets, intaglio and offset.). The performance of both laser sampling methods is presented. A subset of 9 black laser toners, 10 colored (CMYK) inkjet samples, 12 colored (CMYK) offset samples and 12 intaglio inks originating from different manufacturing sources were analyzed to evaluate the discrimination capability of the tandem method. These samples were selected because they presented a very similar elemental profile by LA-ICP-MS. Although typical discrimination between different ink sources is found to be > 99% for a variety of inks when only LA-ICP-MS was used for the analysis, additional discrimination was achieved by combining the elemental results from the LIBS analysis to the LA-ICP-MS analysis in the tandem technique, enhancing the overall discrimination capability of the individual laser ablation methods. The LIBS measurements of the Ca, Fe, K and Si signals, in particular, improved the discrimination for this specific set of different ink samples previously shown to exhibit very similar LA-ICP-MS elemental profiles. The combination of these two techniques in a single setup resulted in better discrimination of the printing inks with two distinct fingerprint spectra, providing information from atomic/ionic emissions and isotopic composition (m/z) for each ink sample. - Highlights: • The optimization of the parameters for LA-ICP-MS and LIBS in a tandem experiment are presented. • The analytical figures of merit for the tandem experiment for data collected simultaneously, are presented. • A

  4. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, S; Vilar, R; Oliveira, V

    2012-01-01

    The surface morphology, structure and composition of human dentin treated with a femtosecond infrared laser (pulse duration 500 fs, wavelength 1030 nm, fluences ranging from 1 to 3 J cm -2 ) was studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average dentin ablation threshold under these conditions was 0.6 ± 0.2 J cm -2 and the ablation rate achieved in the range 1 to 2 µm/pulse for an average fluence of 3 J cm -2 . The ablation surfaces present an irregular and rugged appearance, with no significant traces of melting, deformation, cracking or carbonization. The smear layer was entirely removed by the laser treatment. For fluences only slightly higher than the ablation threshold the morphology of the laser-treated surfaces was very similar to the dentin fracture surfaces and the dentinal tubules remained open. For higher fluences, the surface was more porous and the dentin structure was partially concealed by ablation debris and a few resolidified droplets. Independently on the laser processing parameters and laser processing method used no sub-superficial cracking was observed. The dentin constitution and chemical composition was not significantly modified by the laser treatment in the processing parameter range used. In particular, the organic matter is not preferentially removed from the surface and no traces of high temperature phosphates, such as the β-tricalcium phosphate, were observed. The achieved results are compatible with an electrostatic ablation mechanism. In conclusion, the high beam quality and short pulse duration of the ultrafast laser used should allow the accurate preparation of cavities, with negligible damage of the underlying material. (paper)

  5. Visualizing fossilization using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry maps of trace elements in Late Cretaceous bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, A.E.; Rogers, R.R.; Trueman, C.N.

    2009-01-01

    Elemental maps generated by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) provide a previously unavailable high-resolution visualization of the complex physicochemical conditions operating within individual bones during the early stages of diagenesis and fossilization. A selection of LA-ICP-MS maps of bones collected from the Late Cretaceous of Montana (United States) and Madagascar graphically illustrate diverse paths to recrystallization, and reveal unique insights into geochemical aspects of taphonomic history. Some bones show distinct gradients in concentrations of rare earth elements and uranium, with highest concentrations at external bone margins. Others exhibit more intricate patterns of trace element uptake related to bone histology and its control on the flow paths of pore waters. Patterns of element uptake as revealed by LA-ICP-MS maps can be used to guide sampling strategies, and call into question previous studies that hinge upon localized bulk samples of fossilized bone tissue. LA-ICP-MS maps also allow for comparison of recrystallization rates among fossil bones, and afford a novel approach to identifying bones or regions of bones potentially suitable for extracting intact biogeochemical signals. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  6. On-line double isotope dilution laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the quantitative analysis of solid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Beatriz; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; García Alonso, J Ignacio; Malherbe, Julien; García-Fonseca, Sergio; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2014-12-03

    We report on the determination of trace elements in solid samples by the combination of on-line double isotope dilution and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The proposed method requires the sequential analysis of the sample and a certified natural abundance standard by on-line IDMS using the same isotopically-enriched spike solution. In this way, the mass fraction of the analyte in the sample can be directly referred to the certified standard so the previous characterization of the spike solution is not required. To validate the procedure, Sr, Rb and Pb were determined in certified reference materials with different matrices, including silicate glasses (SRM 610, 612 and 614) and powdered samples (PACS-2, SRM 2710a, SRM 1944, SRM 2702 and SRM 2780). The analysis of powdered samples was carried out both by the preparation of pressed pellets and by lithium borate fusion. Experimental results for the analysis of powdered samples were in agreement with the certified values for all materials. Relative standard deviations in the range of 6-21% for pressed pellets and 3-21% for fused solids were obtained from n=3 independent measurements. Minimal sample preparation, data treatment and consumption of the isotopically-enriched isotopes are the main advantages of the method over previously reported approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative study of the expansion dynamics of laser-driven plasma and shock wave in in-air and underwater ablation regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao T. P.; Tanabe, Rie; Ito, Yoshiro

    2018-03-01

    We compared the expansion characteristics of the plasma plumes and shock waves generated in laser-induced shock process between the two ablation regimes: in air and under water. The observation was made from the initial moment when the laser pulse hit the target until 1.5 μs. The shock processes were driven by focusing a single laser pulse (1064 nm, FWHM = 13 ns) onto the surface of epoxy-resin blocks using a 40-mm focal length lens. The estimated laser intensity at the target plane is approximate to 9 ×109Wcm-2 . We used the fast-imaging technique to observe the expansion of the plasma plume and a custom-designed time-resolved photoelasticity imaging technique to observe the propagation of shock waves with the time resolution of nanoseconds. We found that at the same intensity of the laser beam, the plasma expansion during the laser pulse follows different mechanisms: the plasma plume that grows in air follows a radiation-wave model while a detonation-wave model can explain the expansion of the plasma plume induced in water. The ideal blast wave theory can be used to predict the decay of the shock wave in air but is not appropriate to describe the decay of the shock wave induced under water.

  8. Laser-induced shockwave propagation from ablation in a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Xianzhong; Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Wen, S.-B.; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of laser-induced shockwaves from ablation inside of cavities was determined from time-resolved shadowgraph images. The temperature and electron number density of the laser-induced plasma was determined from spectroscopic measurements. These properties were compared to those for laser ablation on the flat surface under the same energy and background gas condition. A theoretical model was proposed to determine the amount of energy and vaporized mass stored in the vapor plume based on these measurements

  9. Spectrochemical analysis using laser plasma excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziemski, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on analyses of gases, liquids, particles, and surfaces in which laser plasma is used to vaporize and excite a material. The authors present a discussion of the interaction between laser radiation and a solid and some recent analytical results using laser plasma excitation on metals. The use of laser plasmas as an ablation source is also discussed

  10. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  11. Hybrid simulation of shock formation for super-Alfvénic expansion of laser ablated debris through an ambient, magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, S. E.; Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Constantin, C. G.; Niemann, C.; Winske, D.

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional hybrid simulations of perpendicular collisionless shocks are modeled after potential laboratory conditions that are attainable in the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California, Los Angeles Basic Plasma Science Facility. The kJ class 1053 nm Nd:Glass Raptor laser will be used to ablate carbon targets in the LAPD with on-target energies of 100-500 J. The ablated debris ions will expand into ambient, partially ionized hydrogen or helium. A parameter study is performed via hybrid simulation to determine possible conditions that could lead to shock formation in future LAPD experiments. Simulation results are presented along with a comparison to an analytical coupling parameter

  12. Studies of laser-plasma interactions, emphasizing ablative acceleration of thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamper, J.A.; Bodner, S.E.; Colombant, D.G.; Decoste, R.; Gold, S.H.; Grun, J.; Lehmberg, R.H.; Manheimer, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Introduction is given which discusses the irradiance constraints and some simple theoretical models. These simple models serve to introduce certain concepts and quantities needed to understand the experimental results. The NRL Pharos II Nd-glass laser system is outlined and a variety of diagnositcs are described including: incident and scattered laser light; particle energy, momentum and velocity; x-ray imaging and spectra; visible spectroscopy; and laser probing, including Doppler studies, inter-ferometry and dual-time shadowgraphy. Studies with these diagnostics are discussed and experimental results presented. Finally, a brief discussion is given of recent theoretical topics: optical ray retracing in stimulated backscatter and absorption and thermal flux inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence

  13. Influence of irradiation conditions on polytetrafluoroethylen ablation induced by soft x-rays emitted from laser-produced plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viskup, Richard; Juha, Libor; Krása, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 3 (2004), s. 277-284 ISSN 0323-0465 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA 055; GA MŠk 1P04LA235; GA MŠk LN00A100 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : ablation * X-rays Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.513, year: 2004

  14. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the characterization of pigments in prehistoric rock art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resano, Martin; García-Ruiz, Esperanza; Alloza, Ramiro; Marzo, Maria P; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2007-12-01

    In this work, several red-colored paintings of post-Paleolithic schematic style found in 10 different shelters in the vicinity of the Vero River (Huesca) were sampled and subjected to analysis by means of scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX), Raman spectroscopy, and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). The goal of this research was to obtain meaningful information on the samples composition, in order to establish differences or similarities among them. The combined use of these techniques proved beneficial, as Raman data permitted structural information on the compounds present (hematite was identified as the main pigment, whereas calcite and gypsum are the main components of the substrate layer, as well as of the accretions that covered the pigments) to be obtained, while the quantitative values obtained by SEM were suitable for the use of Ca as internal reference during LA-ICPMS analysis. However, it was this latter technique that provided the most relevant data for fingerprinting purposes. The potential of this technique for obtaining spatially resolved information allowed the multielement quantitative analysis of the pigment layer, in spite of the presence of superficial accretions. The sensitivity of the technique permitted the determination of more than 40 elements present in a wide concentration range (from microgram per gram to 10% level) with minimum sample consumption (approximately 900 ng for each sample, corresponding to five replicates). Finally, in order to establish significant differences, only those elements showing a high correlation with Fe (As, Co, Mo, Sb, Tl, and Zr, in this case) were selected, as it is expected that these were truly present in the original pigment, while others could have migrated into the pigment layer throughout time. By using this information, it seems feasible to discriminate between various paint pots, as demonstrated for the samples under

  15. Discrimination of side-window glass of Korean autos by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-Woo; Ryu, Jong-Sik; Min, Ji-Sook; Choi, Man-Yong; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Shin, Woo-Jin

    2016-07-15

    Fragments of glass from cars are often found at crime scenes and can be crucial evidence for solving the crime. The glass fragments are important as trace evidence at crime scenes related to car accidents and burgled homes. By identifying the origin of glass fragments, it is possible to infer the identity of a suspect. Our results represent a promising approach to a thorough forensic investigation of car glass. Thirty-five samples from the side windows of cars produced and used in South Korea were collected from the official agencies of five car manufacturers and from two glassmakers. In addition, 120 samples from side mirrors were collected from the same suppliers as well as from small businesses. Their chemical compositions (including Pb isotopes) were analyzed using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was performed. The percentages of major elements (Si, Ca, and Fe) in side-window glass varied within narrow ranges (30.0 ± 2.36%, 5.93 ± 0.52%, and 0.33 ± 0.05%, respectively), while the differences among Pb isotope ratios were not significant. In contrast, light rare earth elements (LREEs) were different from each glassmaker. From the LDA, the types of side-window glass were successfully discriminated according to car manufacturer, glassmaker, and even glass thickness. However, glass from side mirrors cannot be used for good forensic identifiers. Discrimination techniques for side-window glass, although not for side mirrors, using chemical compositions combined with multivariate statistical analyses provide evidence for forensic investigations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Application of femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for quantitative analysis of thin Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cell films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seokhee [School of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Gonzalez, Jhanis J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Applied Spectra Inc., 46665 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Yoo, Jong H. [Applied Spectra Inc., 46665 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Chirinos, Jose R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas 1041A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Russo, Richard E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Applied Spectra Inc., 46665 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Jeong, Sungho, E-mail: shjeong@gist.ac.kr [School of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-27

    This work reports that the composition of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin solar cell films can be quantitatively predicted with high accuracy and precision by femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (fs-LA-ICP-MS). It is demonstrated that the results are strongly influenced by sampling conditions during fs-laser beam (λ = 1030 nm, τ = 450 fs) scanning on the CIGS surface. The fs-LA-ICP-MS signals measured at optimal sampling conditions generally provide a straight line calibration with respect to the reference concentrations measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The concentration ratios predicted by fs-LA-ICP-MS showed high accuracy, to 95–97% of the values measured with ICP-OES, for Cu, In, Ga, and Se elements. - Highlights: • Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry of thin film is reported. • Concentration ratio prediction with a confidence level of 95–97% is achieved. • Quantitative determination of composition is demonstrated.

  17. The analysis of low-energy ion from a gas-puff laser plasma. The observation of ablated particles from the silicon irradiated with a fs laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, Hirozumi; Kamiya, Nobuyuki; Takeuchi, Akihiro; Ito, Tadashi; Suzuki, Noritomo; Daido, Hiroyuki; Mori, Michiaki; Ogura, Kouichi; Sagisaka, Akito; Orimo, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yukio; Hazama, Hisanao

    2005-01-01

    The single-shot creation of tadpolelike silicon nanoparticles constructed with multi-crystalline heads and amorphous tails by a high brightness fs-pulse laser was demonstrated. This is also the first demonstration of the creation of a nanosized connection of multicrystalline silicon with amorphous silicon. This result should expand the creation of new materials by a laser ablation using a high-intensity fs laser, and the created silicon nanoparticles can be applied to scientific and industrial fields. (author)

  18. Application of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma multicollector mass spectometry in determination of lead isotope ratios in common glass for forensic purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjåstad, Knut-Endre; Andersen, Tom; Simonsen, Siri Lene

    2013-01-01

    Samples of glass used as trace evidence in criminal cases are commonly small, with particle sizes below a millimeter. To perform chemical analysis suitable for forensic purposes, methods capable of analyzing such small samples are required. In this paper, analyses of lead isotope ratios by means of laser ablation inductively coupled multicollector mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) are presented. Sampling by use of laser ablation allows fragments down to 0.1 mg to be analyzed with sufficient precision to discriminate between glasses of different origin. In fact, the use of lead isotopes determined by LA-MC-ICP-MS approaches the discrimination attainable by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) analysis of dissolved samples of 5 mg or more. Further, we have obtained a probability distribution by two dimensional kernel density estimates for the collected data set as an alternative presentation method to the well-established bivariate plot. The underlying information available from kernel density estimates is of importance for forensic scientists involved in probabilistic interpretation of physical evidence. - Highlights: • Lead isotope ratios prove suitable to discriminate glass for forensic purposes. • 96% of glass samples from different sources were separated by lead isotopic ratios. • Laser ablation allows fragments of glass with extension of 0.5 mm to be analyzed. • Isotopic ratios of lead are well suited for statistical analysis of evidence

  19. Fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajirian, Ani L; Tarijian, Ani L; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Ablative laser technology has been in use for many years now. The large side effect profile however has limited its use. Fractional ablative technology is a newer development which combines a lesser side effect profile along with similar efficacy. In this paper we review fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing.

  20. Application of a particle separation device to reduce inductively coupled plasma-enhanced elemental fractionation in laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillong, Marcel; Kuhn, Hans-Rudolf; Guenther, Detlef

    2003-01-01

    The particle size distribution of laser ablation aerosols are a function of the wavelength, the energy density and the pulse duration of the laser, as well as the sample matrix and the gas environment. Further the size of the particles affects the vaporization and ionization efficiency in the inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Some matrices produce large particles, which are not completely vaporized and ionized in the ICP. The previous work has shown that analytical results such as matrix-independent calibration, accuracy and precision can be significantly influenced by the particle sizes of the particles. To minimize the particle size related incomplete conversion of the sample to ions in the ICP a particle separation device was developed, which allows effective particle separation using centrifugal forces in a thin coiled tube. In this device, the particle cut-off size is varied by changing the number of turns in the coil, as well as by changing the gas flow and the tube diameter. The interaction of the laser with the different samples leads to varying particle size distributions. When carrying out quantitative analysis with non-matrix matched calibration reference materials, it was shown that different particle cut-off sizes were required depending on the ICP conditions and the instrument used for analysis. Various sample materials were investigated in this study to demonstrate the applicability of the device. For silicate matrices, the capability of the ICP to produce ions was significantly reduced for particles larger than 0.5 μm, and was dependent on the element monitored. To reduce memory effects caused by the separated particles, a washout procedure was developed, which additionally allowed the analysis of the trapped particles. These results clearly demonstrate the very important particle size dependent ICP-MS signal response and the potential of the described particle size based separator for the reduction of ICP induced elemental fractionation

  1. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockrem, L.L.; Owens, J.W.; Seidel, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method

  2. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, C.M.; Jain, J.; Owens, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method

  3. Imaging of Selenium by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) in 2-D Electrophoresis Gels and Biological Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Elisa Castañeda Santa; Susanne Becker, J; Sabine Becker, J; Sussulini, Alessandra

    2018-01-01

    Selenium and selenoproteins are important components of living organisms that play a role in different biological processes. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a powerful analytical technique that has been employed to obtain distribution maps of selenium in biological tissues in a direct manner, as well as in selenoproteins, previously separated by their molecular masses and isoelectric points using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). In this chapter, we present the protocols to perform LA-ICP-MS imaging experiments, allowing the distribution visualization and determination of selenium and/or selenoproteins in biological systems.

  4. 5. Laser plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labaune, C.; Fuchs, J.; Bandulet, H.

    2002-01-01

    Imprint elimination, smoothing and preheat control are considerable problems in inertial fusion and their possible solution can be achieved by using low-density porous materials as a buffer in target design. The articles gathered in this document present various aspects of the laser-plasma interaction, among which we have noticed: -) numerical algorithmic improvements of the Vlasov solver toward the simulation of the laser-plasma interaction are proposed, -) the dependence of radiation temperatures and X-ray conversion efficiencies of hohlraum on the target structures and laser irradiation conditions are investigated, -) a study of laser interaction with ultra low-density (0,5 - 20 mg/cm 3 ) porous media analyzing backscattered light at incident laser frequency ω 0 and its harmonics 3*ω 0 /2 and 2*ω 0 is presented, -) investigations of laser interaction with solid targets and crater formation are carried out with the objective to determine the ablation loading efficiency, -) a self organization in an intense laser-driven plasma and the measure of the relative degree of order of the states in an open system based on the S-theorem are investigated, and -) the existence and stability of electromagnetic solitons generated in a relativistic interaction of an intense laser light with uniform under-dense cold plasma are studied

  5. Langmuir probe measurements and mass spectrometry of plasma plumes generated by laser ablation of La0.4Ca0.6MnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jikun; Lunney, James G.; Lippert, Thomas; Ojeda-G-P, Alejandro; Stender, Dieter; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    The plasma formed in vacuum by UV nanosecond laser ablation of La0.4Ca0.6MnO3 in the fluence range of 0.8 to 1.9 J cm-2 using both Langmuir probe analysis and energy-resolved mass spectrometry has been studied. Mass spectrometry shows that the main positive ion species are Ca+, Mn+, La+, and LaO+. The Ca+ and Mn+ energy distributions are quite broad and lie in the 0-100 eV region, with the average energies increasing with laser fluence. In contrast, the La+ and LaO+ distributions are strongly peaked around 10 eV. The net time-of-arrival signal derived from the measured positive ion energy distributions is broadly consistent with the positive ion signal measured by the Langmuir probe. We also detected a significant number of O- ions with energies in the range of 0 to 10 eV. The Langmuir probe was also used to measure the temporal variation of the electron density and temperature at 6 cm from the ablation target. In the period when O- ions are found at this position, the plasma conditions are consistent with those required for significant negative oxygen ion formation, as revealed by studies on radio frequency excited oxygen plasma.

  6. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry for the multi-element analysis of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resano, M.; García-Ruiz, E.; Vanhaecke, F.

    2005-11-01

    In this work, the potential of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the fast analysis of polymers has been explored. Different real-life samples (polyethylene shopping bags, an acrylonitrile butadiene styrene material and various plastic bricks) as well as several reference materials (VDA 001 to 004, Cd in polyethylene) have been selected for the study. Two polyethylene reference materials (ERM-EC 680 and 681), for which a reference or indicative value for the most relevant metals is available, have proved their suitability as standards for calibration. Special attention has been paid to the difficulties expected for the determination of Cr at the μg g - 1 level in this kind of materials, due to the interference of ArC + ions on the most abundant isotopes of Cr. The use of ammonia as a reaction gas in a dynamic reaction cell is shown to alleviate this problem, resulting in a limit of detection of 0.15 μg g - 1 for this element, while limiting only modestly the possibilities of the technique for simultaneous multi-element analysis. In this regard, As is the analyte most seriously affected by the use of ammonia, and its determination has to be carried out in vented mode, at the expense of measuring time. In all cases studied, accurate results could be obtained for elements ranging in content from the sub-μg g - 1 level to tens of thousands of μg g - 1 . However, the use of an element of known concentration as internal standard may be needed for materials with a matrix significantly different from that of the standard (polyethylene in this work). Precision ranged between 5% and 10% RSD for elements found at the 10 μg g - 1 level or higher, while this value could deteriorate to 20% for analytes found at the sub-μg g - 1 level. Overall, the technique evaluated presents many advantages for the fast and accurate multi-element analysis of these materials, avoiding laborious digestion procedures and minimizing the risk of analyte losses due

  7. Influence of binders on infrared laser ablation of powdered tungsten carbide pressed pellets in comparison with sintered tungsten carbide hardmetals studied by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hola, Marketa; Otruba, Vitezslav; Kanicky, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    Laser ablation (LA) was studied as a sample introduction technique for the analysis of powdered and sintered tungsten carbides (WC/Co) by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The possibility to work with powdered and compact materials with close chemical composition provided the opportunity to compare LA sampling of similar substances in different forms that require different preparation procedures. Powdered WC/Co precursors of sintered hardmetals were prepared for the ablation as pressed pellets with and without powdered silver as a binder, while sintered hardmetal blocks were embedded into a resin to obtain discs, which were then smoothed and polished. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operated at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with a pulse frequency of 10 Hz and maximum pulse energy of 220 mJ was used. A single lens was used for the laser beam focusing. An ablation cell (14 cm 3 ) mounted on a PC-controlled XY-translator was connected to an ICP spectrometer Jobin Yvon 170 Ultrace (laterally viewed ICP, mono- and polychromator) using a 1.5-m tubing (4 mm i.d.). Ablation was performed in a circular motion (2 mm diameter). Close attention was paid to the study of the crater parametres depending on hardness, cohesion and Ag binder presence in WC/Co samples. The influence of the Co content on the depth and structure of the ablation craters of the binderless pellets was also studied. Linear calibration plots of Nb, Ta and Ti were obtained for cemented WC/Co samples, binderless and binder-containing pellets. Relative widths of uncertainty intervals about the centroids vary between ± 3% and ± 7%, and exceptionally reach a value above 10%. The lowest determinable quantities (LDQ) of Nb, Ta and Ti calculated from the calibration lines were less than 0.5% (m/m). To evaluate the possibility of quantitative elemental analysis by LA-ICP-OES, two real sintered WC/Co samples and two real samples of powdered WC/Co materials were analysed. The

  8. Influence of binders on infrared laser ablation of powdered tungsten carbide pressed pellets in comparison with sintered tungsten carbide hardmetals studied by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hola, Marketa [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Otruba, Vitezslav [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, Viktor [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: viktork@chemi.muni.cz

    2006-05-15

    Laser ablation (LA) was studied as a sample introduction technique for the analysis of powdered and sintered tungsten carbides (WC/Co) by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The possibility to work with powdered and compact materials with close chemical composition provided the opportunity to compare LA sampling of similar substances in different forms that require different preparation procedures. Powdered WC/Co precursors of sintered hardmetals were prepared for the ablation as pressed pellets with and without powdered silver as a binder, while sintered hardmetal blocks were embedded into a resin to obtain discs, which were then smoothed and polished. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operated at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with a pulse frequency of 10 Hz and maximum pulse energy of 220 mJ was used. A single lens was used for the laser beam focusing. An ablation cell (14 cm{sup 3}) mounted on a PC-controlled XY-translator was connected to an ICP spectrometer Jobin Yvon 170 Ultrace (laterally viewed ICP, mono- and polychromator) using a 1.5-m tubing (4 mm i.d.). Ablation was performed in a circular motion (2 mm diameter). Close attention was paid to the study of the crater parametres depending on hardness, cohesion and Ag binder presence in WC/Co samples. The influence of the Co content on the depth and structure of the ablation craters of the binderless pellets was also studied. Linear calibration plots of Nb, Ta and Ti were obtained for cemented WC/Co samples, binderless and binder-containing pellets. Relative widths of uncertainty intervals about the centroids vary between {+-} 3% and {+-} 7%, and exceptionally reach a value above 10%. The lowest determinable quantities (LDQ) of Nb, Ta and Ti calculated from the calibration lines were less than 0.5% (m/m). To evaluate the possibility of quantitative elemental analysis by LA-ICP-OES, two real sintered WC/Co samples and two real samples of powdered WC/Co materials were analysed

  9. Efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma combined with fractional ablative carbon dioxide resurfacing laser in treatment of facial atrophic acne scars: A split-face randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Gita Faghihi; Shima Keyvan; Ali Asilian; Saeid Nouraei; Shadi Behfar; Mohamad Ali Nilforoushzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Autologous platelet-rich plasma has recently attracted significant attention throughout the medical field for its wound-healing ability. Aims: This study was conducted to investigate the potential of platelet-rich plasma combined with fractional laser therapy in the treatment of acne scarring. Methods: Sixteen patients (12 women and 4 men) who underwent split-face therapy were analyzed in this study. They received ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser combined with intradermal ...

  10. Application of laser ablation inductivly coupled plasma mass spectrometry for characterization of U-7Mo/Al-55i dispersion fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Mook; Park, Jai Il; Youn, Young Sang; Ha, Yeong Keong; Kim, Jong Yun [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    This technical note demonstrates the feasibility of using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the characterization of U–7Mo/Al–5Si dispersion fuel. Our measurements show 5.0% Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) for the reproducibility of measured {sup 98}Mo/{sup 238}U ratios in fuel particles from spot analysis, and 3.4% RSD for {sup 98}Mo/{sup 238}U ratios in a NIST-SRM 612 glass standard. Line scanning allows for the distinction of U–7Mo fuel particles from the Al–5Si matrix. Each mass spectrum peak indicates the presence of U–7Mo fuel particles, and the time width of each peak corresponds to the size of that fuel particle. The size of the fuel particles is estimated from the time width of the mass spectrum peak for {sup 98}Mo by considering the scan rate used during the line scan. This preliminary application clearly demonstrates that laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry can directly identify isotope ratios and sizes of the fuel particles in U–Mo/Al dispersion fuel. Once optimized further, this instrument will be a powerful tool for investigating irradiated dispersion fuels in terms of fission product distributions in fuel matrices, and the changes in fuel particle size or shape after irradiation.

  11. Micro-spectrochemical analysis of document paper and gel inks by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trejos, Tatiana, E-mail: trejost@fiu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); International Forensic Research Institute (IFRI), Florida International University, Miami, FL 3319 (United States); Flores, Alejandra, E-mail: aflor017@fiu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Almirall, Jose R., E-mail: almirall@fiu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); International Forensic Research Institute (IFRI), Florida International University, Miami, FL 3319 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Current methods used in document examinations are not suitable to associate or discriminate between sources of paper and gel inks with a high degree of certainty. Nearly non-destructive, laser-based methods using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were used to improve the forensic comparisons of gel inks, ballpoint inks and document papers based on similarities in elemental composition. Some of the advantages of these laser-based methods include minimum sample consumption/destruction, high sensitivity, high selectivity and excellent discrimination between samples from different origins. Figures of merit are reported including limits of detection, precision, homogeneity at a micro-scale and linear dynamic range. The variation of the elemental composition in paper was studied within a single sheet, between pages from the same ream, between papers produced by the same plant at different time intervals and between seventeen paper sources produced by ten different plants. The results show that elemental analysis of paper by LIBS and LA-ICP-MS provides excellent discrimination (> 98%) between different sources. Batches manufactured at weekly and monthly intervals in the same mill were also differentiated. The ink of more than 200 black pens was analyzed to determine the variation of the chemical composition of the ink within a single pen, between pens from the same package and between brands of gel inks and ballpoint inks. Homogeneity studies show smaller variation of elemental compositions within a single source than between different sources (i.e. brands and types). It was possible to discriminate between pen markings from different brands and between pen markings from the same brand but different model. Discrimination of {approx} 96-99% was achieved for sets that otherwise would remain inseparable by conventional methods. The results show that elemental analysis, using either LA

  12. Micro-spectrochemical analysis of document paper and gel inks by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trejos, Tatiana; Flores, Alejandra; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-01-01

    Current methods used in document examinations are not suitable to associate or discriminate between sources of paper and gel inks with a high degree of certainty. Nearly non-destructive, laser-based methods using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were used to improve the forensic comparisons of gel inks, ballpoint inks and document papers based on similarities in elemental composition. Some of the advantages of these laser-based methods include minimum sample consumption/destruction, high sensitivity, high selectivity and excellent discrimination between samples from different origins. Figures of merit are reported including limits of detection, precision, homogeneity at a micro-scale and linear dynamic range. The variation of the elemental composition in paper was studied within a single sheet, between pages from the same ream, between papers produced by the same plant at different time intervals and between seventeen paper sources produced by ten different plants. The results show that elemental analysis of paper by LIBS and LA-ICP-MS provides excellent discrimination (> 98%) between different sources. Batches manufactured at weekly and monthly intervals in the same mill were also differentiated. The ink of more than 200 black pens was analyzed to determine the variation of the chemical composition of the ink within a single pen, between pens from the same package and between brands of gel inks and ballpoint inks. Homogeneity studies show smaller variation of elemental compositions within a single source than between different sources (i.e. brands and types). It was possible to discriminate between pen markings from different brands and between pen markings from the same brand but different model. Discrimination of ∼ 96-99% was achieved for sets that otherwise would remain inseparable by conventional methods. The results show that elemental analysis, using either LA-ICP-MS or

  13. Advances in laser ablation of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Lowndes, D.H.; Chrisey, D.B.; Fogarassy, E.; Narayan, J.

    1998-01-01

    The symposium, Advances in Laser Ablation of Materials, was held at the 1998 MRS Spring Meeting in San Francisco, California. The papers in this symposium illustrate the advances in pulsed laser ablation for a wide variety of applications involving semiconductors, superconductors, metals, ceramics, and polymers. In particular, advances in the deposition of oxides and related materials are featured. Papers dealing with both fundamentals and the applications of laser ablation are presented. Topical areas include: fundamentals of ablation and growth; in situ diagnostics and nanoscale synthesis advances in laser ablation techniques; laser surface processing; pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric, magnetic, superconducting and optoelectronic thin films; and pulsed laser deposition of carbon-based and polymeric materials. Sixty papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  14. Efficiency of ablative plasma energy transfer into a massive aluminum target using different atomic number ablators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Stepniewski, W.; Jach, K.; Swierczynski, R.; Renner, Oldřich; Šmíd, Michal; Ullschmied, Jiří; Cikhart, J.; Klír, D.; Kubeš, P.; Řezáč, K.; Krouský, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skála, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2015), s. 379-386 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; AVČR(CZ) M100101208 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : ablator atomic number * crater volume * laser energy transfer * plasma ablative pressure Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UFP-V) Impact factor: 1.649, year: 2015

  15. Obtention of Ti nanoparticles by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz E, J.R.; Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Santiago, P.; Ascencio, J.

    2002-01-01

    The obtention of Ti nanoparticles around 5-30 nm diameter through the laser ablation technique is reported. The formation of nanoparticles is carried out in He atmosphere to different pressures, placing directly in Si substrates (100) and in Cu grids. The results show that the work pressure is an important parameter that allows to control the nanoparticles size. Also the plasma characterization results are presented where the Ti II is the predominant specie with an average kinetic energy of 1824 eV. (Author)

  16. 2D elemental mapping of sections of human kidney stones using laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Possibilities and limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vašinová Galiová, Michaela [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Čopjaková, Renata; Škoda, Radek [Department of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Štěpánková, Kateřina; Vaňková, Michaela [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kuta, Jan [Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Kamenice 126/3, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Prokeš, Lubomír [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kynický, Jindřich [Department of Pedology and Geology, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 3, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); and others

    2014-10-01

    A 213 nm Nd:YAG-based laser ablation (LA) system coupled to quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and an ArF* excimer-based LA-system coupled to a double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer were employed to study the spatial distribution of various elements in kidney stones (uroliths). Sections of the surfaces of uroliths were ablated according to line patterns to investigate the elemental profiles for the different urolith growth zones. This exploratory study was mainly focused on the distinguishing of the main constituents of urinary calculus fragments by means of LA-ICP-mass spectrometry. Changes in the ablation rate for oxalate and phosphate phases related to matrix density and hardness are discussed. Elemental association was investigated on the basis of 2D mapping. The possibility of using NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal as an external standard for calibration was tested. It is shown that LA-ICP-MS is helpful for determination of the mineralogical composition and size of all phases within the analyzed surface area, for tracing down elemental associations and for documenting the elemental content of urinary stones. LA-ICP-MS results (elemental contents and maps) are compared to those obtained with electron microprobe analysis and solution analysis ICP-MS. - Highlights: • Elements in phosphate and oxalate urolith phases were quantified by LA-ICP-MS. • SRM NIST 1486 Bone Meal was proved suitable for quantification in uroliths. • Different ablation rates in particular phases were included at quantification. • Oxalate and apatite phases show opposite hardness order to natural minerals. • Uroliths were classified according to elemental association to phases.

  17. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  18. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena-Diaz, M; Ponce, L; Arronte, M; Flores, T [Laboratorio TecnologIa Laser, CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Ind. Altamira, 89600, TAMPS (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  19. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena-Diaz, M; Ponce, L; Arronte, M; Flores, T

    2007-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained

  20. Reassembling Solid Materials by Femtosecond Laser Ablation: Case of Aluminum Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tohru; Matsuo, Yukari

    2013-06-01

    Through atomization and ionization, we could completely alter the composition of a nonconductive material, aluminum nitride, by femtosecond laser ablation. Preferential production of pure aluminum cluster cations Aln+ (n≤32) reflects not only their higher energetic stability compared with mixed clusters AlnNm+ but also completion of thermal relaxation in ablation plasma. Observation of metastable dissociation of Aln+ indicates that cluster cations have still enough internal energy for dissociation to occur, although the process is much slower than the cluster formation. Almost no cluster formation has been observed after nanosecond laser ablation of aluminum nitride, which highlights the distinct nature of ablation plasma produced by femtosecond laser ablation.

  1. Water spray assisted ultrashort laser pulse ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, M.; Kaakkunen, J.J.J.; Paivasaari, K.; Vahimaa, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We show the novel method to use multibeam processing with ultrashort pulses efficiently. ► Sprayed thin water layer on ablation zone enhances ablation rate and quality. ► In some cases this method also enables ablation of the deeper and straighter holes compared to ones made without the water layer. ► Method also makes possible to directly write features without the self-organizing structures. - Abstract: We have studied femtosecond ablation under sprayed thin water film and its influence and benefits compared with ablation in the air atmosphere. These have been studied in case of the hole and the groove ablation using IR femtosecond laser. Water enhances the ablation rate and in some situations it makes possible to ablate the holes with a higher aspect ratio. While ablating the grooves, the water spray allows using the high fluences without the generation of the self-organized structures.

  2. Ablative Laser Propulsion: An Update, Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Cohen, Timothy; Lin Jun; Thompson, M. Shane; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an updated review of studies on Ablative Laser Propulsion conducted by the Laser Propulsion Group (LPG) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. In particular, we describe the newest results of our experimental study of specific impulses and coupling coefficients achieved by double-pulsed ablation of graphite, aluminum, copper and lead targets

  3. Development of routines for simultaneous in situ chemical composition and stable Si isotope ratio analysis by femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frick, Daniel A., E-mail: dfrick@gfz-potsdam.de [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Schuessler, Jan A. [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Blanckenburg, Friedhelm von [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Geological Science, Freie Universität Berlin, 12249 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-09-28

    Stable metal (e.g. Li, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mo) and metalloid (B, Si, Ge) isotope ratio systems have emerged as geochemical tracers to fingerprint distinct physicochemical reactions. These systems are relevant to many Earth Science questions. The benefit of in situ microscale analysis using laser ablation (LA) over bulk sample analysis is to use the spatial context of different phases in the solid sample to disclose the processes that govern their chemical and isotopic compositions. However, there is a lack of in situ analytical routines to obtain a samples' stable isotope ratio together with its chemical composition. Here, we evaluate two novel analytical routines for the simultaneous determination of the chemical and Si stable isotope composition (δ{sup 30}Si) on the micrometre scale in geological samples. In both routines, multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) is combined with femtosecond-LA, where stable isotope ratios are corrected for mass bias using standard-sample-bracketing with matrix-independent calibration. The first method is based on laser ablation split stream (LASS), where the laser aerosol is split and introduced simultaneously into both the MC-ICP-MS and a quadrupole ICP-MS. The second method is based on optical emission spectroscopy using direct observation of the MC-ICP-MS plasma (LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES). Both methods are evaluated using international geological reference materials. Accurate and precise Si isotope ratios were obtained with an uncertainty typically better than 0.23‰, 2SD, δ{sup 30}Si. With both methods major element concentrations (e.g., Na, Al, Si, Mg, Ca) can be simultaneously determined. However, LASS-ICP-MS is superior over LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES, which is limited by its lower sensitivity. Moreover, LASS-ICP-MS offers trace element analysis down to the μg g{sup −1}-range for more than 28 elements due to lower limits of detection, and with typical uncertainties better than 15%. For in situ

  4. Development of routines for simultaneous in situ chemical composition and stable Si isotope ratio analysis by femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, Daniel A.; Schuessler, Jan A.; Blanckenburg, Friedhelm von

    2016-01-01

    Stable metal (e.g. Li, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mo) and metalloid (B, Si, Ge) isotope ratio systems have emerged as geochemical tracers to fingerprint distinct physicochemical reactions. These systems are relevant to many Earth Science questions. The benefit of in situ microscale analysis using laser ablation (LA) over bulk sample analysis is to use the spatial context of different phases in the solid sample to disclose the processes that govern their chemical and isotopic compositions. However, there is a lack of in situ analytical routines to obtain a samples' stable isotope ratio together with its chemical composition. Here, we evaluate two novel analytical routines for the simultaneous determination of the chemical and Si stable isotope composition (δ 30 Si) on the micrometre scale in geological samples. In both routines, multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) is combined with femtosecond-LA, where stable isotope ratios are corrected for mass bias using standard-sample-bracketing with matrix-independent calibration. The first method is based on laser ablation split stream (LASS), where the laser aerosol is split and introduced simultaneously into both the MC-ICP-MS and a quadrupole ICP-MS. The second method is based on optical emission spectroscopy using direct observation of the MC-ICP-MS plasma (LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES). Both methods are evaluated using international geological reference materials. Accurate and precise Si isotope ratios were obtained with an uncertainty typically better than 0.23‰, 2SD, δ 30 Si. With both methods major element concentrations (e.g., Na, Al, Si, Mg, Ca) can be simultaneously determined. However, LASS-ICP-MS is superior over LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES, which is limited by its lower sensitivity. Moreover, LASS-ICP-MS offers trace element analysis down to the μg g −1 -range for more than 28 elements due to lower limits of detection, and with typical uncertainties better than 15%. For in situ

  5. Fractional ablative erbium YAG laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth H; Haak, Christina S; Erlendsson, Andrés M

    2014-01-01

    laser parameters with tissue effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ex vivo pig skin was exposed to a miniaturized 2,940 nm AFXL, spot size 225 µm, density 5%, power levels 1.15-2.22 W, pulse durations 50-225 microseconds, pulse repetition rates 100-500 Hz, and 2, 20, or 50 stacked pulses, resulting in pulse......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Treatment of a variety of skin disorders with ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) is driving the development of portable AFXLs. This study measures micropore dimensions produced by a small 2,940 nm AFXL using a variety of stacked pulses, and determines a model correlating...... 190 to 347 µm. CONCLUSIONS: Pulse stacking with a small, low power 2,940 nm AFXL created reproducible shallow to deep micropores, and influenced micropore configuration. Mathematical modeling established relations between laser settings and micropore dimensions, which assists in choosing laser...

  6. A plasma microlens for ultrashort high power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzir, Yiftach; Eisenmann, Shmuel; Ferber, Yair; Zigler, Arie; Hubbard, Richard F.

    2009-07-01

    We present a technique for generation of miniature plasma lens system that can be used for focusing and collimating a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. The plasma lens was created by a nanosecond laser, which ablated a capillary entrance. The spatial configuration of the ablated plasma focused a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. This configuration offers versatility in the plasma lens small f-number for extremely tight focusing of high power lasers with no damage threshold restrictions of regular optical components.

  7. A plasma microlens for ultrashort high power lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzir, Yiftach; Eisenmann, Shmuel; Ferber, Yair; Zigler, Arie; Hubbard, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a technique for generation of miniature plasma lens system that can be used for focusing and collimating a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. The plasma lens was created by a nanosecond laser, which ablated a capillary entrance. The spatial configuration of the ablated plasma focused a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. This configuration offers versatility in the plasma lens small f-number for extremely tight focusing of high power lasers with no damage threshold restrictions of regular optical components.

  8. Pulse laser ablation at water-air interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro

    2010-06-01

    We studied a new pulse laser ablation phenomenon on a liquid surface layer, which is caused by the difference between the refractive indices of the two materials involved. The present study was motivated by our previous study, which showed that laser ablation can occur at the interface between a transparent material and a gas or liquid medium when the laser pulse is focused through the transparent material. In this case, the ablation threshold fluence is reduced remarkably. In the present study, experiments were conducted in water and air in order to confirm this phenomenon for a combination of two fluid media with different refractive indices. This phenomenon was observed in detail by pulse laser shadowgraphy. A high-resolution film was used to record the phenomenon with a Nd:YAG pulse laser with 10-ns duration as a light source. The laser ablation phenomenon on the liquid surface layer caused by a focused Nd:YAG laser pulse with 1064-nm wavelength was found to be followed by the splashing of the liquid surface, inducing a liquid jet with many ligaments. The liquid jet extension velocity was around 1000 m/s in a typical case. The liquid jet decelerated drastically due to rapid atomization at the tips of the ligaments. The liquid jet phenomenon was found to depend on the pulse laser parameters such as the laser fluence on the liquid surface, laser energy, and laser beam pattern. The threshold laser fluence for the generation of a liquid jet was 20 J/cm2. By increasing the incident laser energy with a fixed laser fluence, the laser focused area increased, which eventually led to an increase in the size of the plasma column. The larger the laser energy, the larger the jet size and the longer the temporal behavior. The laser beam pattern was found to have significant effects on the liquid jet’s velocity, shape, and history.

  9. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Examinations of the origins of polyatomic ions and advances in the sampling of particulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, Travis [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation provides a general introduction to Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation (LA) sampling, with an examination of analytical challenges in the employment of this technique. It discusses the origin of metal oxide ions (MO+) in LA-ICP-MS, as well as the effect of introducing helium and nitrogen to the aerosol gas flow on the formation of these polyatomic interferences. It extends the study of polyatomic ions in LA-ICP-MS to metal argide (MAr+) species, an additional source of possible significant interferences in the spectrum. It describes the application of fs-LA-ICP-MS to the determination of uranium isotope ratios in particulate samples.

  10. Laser ablation/ionization studies in a glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, K.R.; Harrison, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    The pin cathode glow discharge is used in the laboratory as an atomization/ionization source for a variety of applications, including solids mass spectrometry. Coupled with a tunable dye laser, the glow discharge may also serve as an atom reservoir for resonance ionization mass spectrometry in which the laser ionizes the discharge sputtered atoms. By tightly focusing the laser onto solid samples, various ablation effects may also be investigated. The laser may be used to generate an ionized plasma which may be directly analyzed by mass spectrometry. Alternatively, the ablated neutral atoms may be used in post-ablation excitation/ionization processes, in this case the glow discharge. The results of these investigations are the basis of this paper

  11. Effect of liquid film on near-threshold laser ablation of a solid surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongsik; Oh, Bukuk; Lee, Ho

    2004-01-30

    Enhancement of material ablation and photoacoustic excitation by an artificially deposited liquid film in the process of pulsed-laser ablation (PLA) is investigated in this paper. Ablation threshold, ablation rate, surface topography, and acoustic-transient emission are also measured for dry and liquid film-coated surfaces. The physical mechanisms of enhanced ablation in the liquid-assisted process are analyzed at relatively low laser fluences with negligible effect of laser-produced plasma. Particularly, correlation between material ablation and acoustic-transient generation is examined. In the experiment, aluminum thin-films and bulk foils are ablated by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pulses. The dependence of ablation rate and laser-induced topography on liquid film thickness and chemical composition is also examined. Photoacoustic emission is measured by the probe beam deflection method utilizing a CW HeNe laser and a microphone. In comparison with a dry ablation process, the liquid-assisted ablation process results in substantially augmented ablation efficiency and reduced ablation threshold. The results indicate that both increased laser-energy coupling, i.e., lowered reflectance, and amplified photoacoustic excitation in explosive vaporization of liquid are responsible for the enhanced material ablation.

  12. Current developments in laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for use in geology, forensics, and nuclear nonproliferation research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerly, Joshua D. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-08-26

    This dissertation focused on new applications of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The diverse fields that were investigated show the versatility of the technique. In Chapter 2, LA-ICP-MS was used to investigate the rare earth element (REE) profiles of garnets from the Broken Hill Deposit in New South Wales, Australia. The normalized REE profiles helped to shed new light on the formation of deposits of sulfide ores. This information may be helpful in identifying the location of sulfide ore deposits in other locations. New sources of metals such as Pg, Zn, and Ag, produced from these ores, are needed to sustain our current technological society. The application of LA-ICP-MS presented in Chapter 3 is the forensics analysis of automotive putty and caulking. The elemental analysis of these materials was combined with the use of Principal Components Analysis (PCA). The PCA comparison was able to differentiate the automotive putty samples by manufacturer and lot number. The analysis of caulk was able to show a differentiation based on manufacturer, but no clear differentiation was shown by lot number. This differentiation may allow matching of evidence in the future. This will require many more analyses and the construction of a database made up of many different samples. The 4th chapter was a study of the capabilities of LA-ICP-MS for fast and precise analysis of particle ensembles for nuclear nonproliferation applications. Laser ablation has the ability to spatially resolve particle ensembles which may contain uranium or other actinides from other particles present in a sample. This is of importance in samples obtained from air on filter media. The particle ensembles of interest may be mixed in amongst dust and other particulates. A problem arises when ablating these particle ensembles directly from the filter media. Dust particles other than ones of interest may be accidentally entrained in the aerosol of the ablated particle

  13. Analysis of plasma-mediated ablation in aqueous tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Jian; Guo Zhixiong

    2012-01-01

    Plasma-mediated ablation using ultrafast lasers in transparent media such as aqueous tissues is studied. It is postulated that a critical seed free electron density exists due to the multiphoton ionization in order to trigger the avalanche ionization which causes ablation and during the avalanche ionization process the contribution of laser-induced photon ionization is negligible. Based on this assumption, the ablation process can be treated as two separate processes - the multiphoton and avalanche ionizations - at different time stages; so that an analytical solution to the evolution of plasma formation is obtained for the first time. The analysis is applied to plasma-mediated ablation in corneal epithelium and validated via comparison with experimental data available in the literature. The critical seed free-electron density and the time to initiate the avalanche ionization for sub-picosecond laser pulses are analyzed. It is found that the critical seed free-electron density decreases as the pulse width increases, obeying a t p -5.65 rule. This model is further extended to the estimation of crater size in the ablation of tissue-mimic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The results match well with the available experimental measurements.

  14. Online Monitoring of Nanoparticles Formed during Nanosecond Laser Ablation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, H.; Holá, M.; Vojtíšek-Lomb, M.; Ondráček, Jakub; Kanický, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 125, NOV 1 (2016), s. 52-60 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : laser ablation * fast mobility particle sizer * inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.241, year: 2016

  15. Analysis of rare earth elements in coal fly ash using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert L.; Bank, Tracy; Montross, Scott; Roth, Elliot; Howard, Bret; Verba, Circe; Granite, Evan

    2018-05-01

    Reference standard NIST SRM 1633b and FA 345, a fly ash sample from an eastern U.S. coal power plant, were analyzed to determine and quantify the mineralogical association of rare earth elements (REE). These analyses were completed using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and a scanning electron microscope, equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS). Internal standardization was avoided by quantifying elemental concentrations by normalizing to 100% oxides. Mineral grains containing elevated REE concentrations were found in diverse chemical environments, but were most commonly found in regions where Al and Si were predominant. Dividing the spot analyses into time segments yielded plots that showed the REE content changing over time as individual mineral grains were being ablated. SEM-EDS images of FA 345 confirmed the trends that were found in the LA-ICP-MS results. Small grains of apatite, monazite, or zircon were frequently observed as free mineral grains or embedded in amorphous aluminosilicate glass and were not associated with ferrous particles. This finding is consistent with previous reports that magnetic enrichment may be an effective way of concentrating non-magnetic REE phases. Furthermore, aggressive mechanical and chemical-based separation schemes will be required to separate and recover REE from aluminosilicate glass.

  16. Selective Laser Ablation and Melting, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this project Advratech will develop a new additive manufacturing (AM) process called Selective Laser Ablation and Melting (SLAM). The key innovation in this...

  17. Prospective application of laser plasma propulsion in rocket technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xin; Zhang Jie; Li Yingjun

    2002-01-01

    Interest in laser plasma propulsion is growing intensively. The interaction of high intensity short laser pulses with materials can produce plasma expansion with a velocity of hundreds of km/s. The specific impulse of ablative laser propulsion can be many tens of times greater than that of chemical rockets. The development and potential application of laser plasma propulsion are discussed

  18. Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue Using Pulsed CO2 Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashishin, Yuichi; Sano, Shu; Nakayama, Takeyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Laser scalpels are currently used as a form of laser treatment. However, their ablation mechanism has not been clarified because laser excision of biological tissue occurs over a short time scale. Biological tissue ablation generates sound (laser-induced sound). This study seeks to clarify the ablation mechanism. The state of the gelatin ablation was determined using a high-speed video camera and the power reduction of a He-Ne laser beam. The aim of this study was to clarify the laser ablation mechanism by observing laser excision using the high-speed video camera and monitoring the power reduction of the He-Ne laser beam. We simulated laser excision of a biological tissue by irradiating gelatin (10 wt%) with radiation from a pulsed CO 2 laser (wavelength: 10.6 μm; pulse width: 80 ns). In addition, a microphone was used to measure the laser-induced sound. The first pulse caused ablation particles to be emitted in all directions; these particles were subsequently damped so that they formed a mushroom cloud. Furthermore, water was initially evaporated by laser irradiation and then tissue was ejected.

  19. The determination of low level trace elements in coals by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, C.A.; Spears, D.A.; Krause, P.; Cox, A.G. [University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    1999-11-01

    The rapid determination of elements present in low level concentrations in bituminous coals is possible using laser abalation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (l.a.-i.c.p.-m.s.). A wide range of trace elements can routinely be determined using this technique but it is for environmentally sensitive elements, such as As, Cd, Mo, Sb, Se and Hg, that it is of most use due to the low levels of detection. Calibration of the i.c.p.-m.s. was achieved using a series of uncertified coals and the method evaluated using the South African certified coals, Sarm 18, 19 and 20. A critical evaluation of the data obtained shows that for many of the elements studied the results obtained are both accurate and precise, even at very low concentrations, with the limits of detection for all of the elements being in the {mu}g/kg (parts per billion) range. 6 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Tissue ablation after 120W greenlight laser vaporization and bipolar plasma vaporization of the prostate: a comparison using transrectal three-dimensional ultrasound volumetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzbühler, Benedikt; Gross, Oliver; Fankhauser, Christian D.; Hefermehl, Lukas J.; Poyet, Cédric; Largo, Remo; Müntener, Michael; Seifert, Hans-Helge; Zimmermann, Matthias; Sulser, Tullio; Müller, Alexander; Hermanns, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Introduction and objectives: Greenlight laser vaporization (LV) of the prostate is characterized by simultaneous vaporization and coagulation of prostatic tissue resulting in tissue ablation together with excellent hemostasis during the procedure. It has been reported that bipolar plasma vaporization (BPV) of the prostate might be an alternative for LV. So far, it has not been shown that BPV is as effective as LV in terms of tissue ablation or hemostasis. We performed transrectal three-dimensional ultrasound investigations to compare the efficiency of tissue ablation between LV and BPV. Methods: Between 11.2009 and 5.2011, 50 patients underwent pure BPV in our institution. These patients were matched with regard to the pre-operative prostate volume to 50 LV patients from our existing 3D-volumetry-database. Transrectal 3D ultrasound and planimetric volumetry of the prostate were performed pre-operatively, after catheter removal, 6 weeks and 6 months. Results: Median pre-operative prostate volume was not significantly different between the two groups (45.3ml vs. 45.4ml; p=1.0). After catheter removal, median absolute volume reduction (BPV 12.4ml, LV 6.55ml) as well as relative volume reduction (27.8% vs. 16.4%) were significantly higher in the BPV group (p<0.001). After six weeks (42.9% vs. 33.3%) and six months (47.2% vs. 39.7%), relative volume reduction remained significantly higher in the BPV group (p<0.001). Absolute volume reduction was non-significantly higher in the BPV group after six weeks (18.4ml, 13.8ml; p=0.051) and six months (20.8ml, 18ml; p=0.3). Clinical outcome parameters improved significantly in both groups without relevant differences between the groups. Conclusions: Both vaporization techniques result in efficient tissue ablation with initial prostatic swelling. BPV seems to be superior due to a higher relative volume reduction. This difference had no clinical impact after a follow-up of 6M.

  1. Determination of major, minor and trace elements in rock samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Progress in the utilization of borate glasses as targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Tacito Dantas F.; Escalfoni, Rainerio; Fonseca, Teresa Cristina O. da; Miekeley, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    The present work is a continuation of a research study performed at our laboratory aiming at the multielement analysis of rock samples (basalts and shale) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in combination with laser ablation using borate glasses as analytical targets. Argon, nitrogen-argon mixtures and helium were evaluated as cell gases, the latter confirming its better performance. Different operational parameters of the laser, such as gas flow, energy, focus, scanning speed and sampling frequency were optimized. External calibration was made with standards prepared by fusion of geological reference materials (basalts 688 and BCR-2, obsidian SRM 278, and shale SGR-1) of different mass fractions in the meta-tetra borate matrix. Coefficients of determination (R 2 ) were > 0.99 for 30 elements from o total of 40 determined. Method validation was then performed using additional certified reference materials (BHVO-2, BIR-1, SCo-1) produced as borate targets in a similar way. Accuracies were better than 10% for most of the elements studied and analytical precisions, calculated from the residual standard deviations of calibration curves were, typically, between 6% and 10%. Additionally, the semiquantitative TotalQuant (registered) technique was applied, which gave, within the expected uncertainty for this calibration technique, concordant results when compared to the quantitative external calibration procedure. Both methods were then used for the analysis of marine shale samples, which are of great geological interest in petroleum prospecting.

  2. Investigation of matrix effects in 193 nm laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis using reference glasses of different transparencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czas, J.; Jochum, K.P.; Stoll, B.; Weis, U.; Yang, Q.-C.; Jacob, D.E.; Andreae, M.O.

    2012-01-01

    The degree of transparency of glasses, which depends on the Fe content, may influence the ablation behavior during laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis. To test possible matrix effects when using a 193 nm Nd:YAG laser, we have analyzed transparent and opaque NIST, BAM and USGS reference glasses. These reference materials are ideal for such investigations, because they are well characterized, most elements are homogeneously distributed at the micrometer scale, and their Fe content varies over a very large range, from 16 to 130,000 μg g −1 . Our measurements show that the fractionation factors of refractory and volatile lithophile elements, such as Sr, Ba, and Rb, are 1.00 ± 0.03 and independent of the degree of transparency. However, for volatile chalcophile/siderophile elements (e.g., Zn and Pb) the fractionation factors vary significantly between 0.7 and 1, depending on the spot sizes and the transparency of the material. Mass-load-induced matrix effects may also influence the accuracy of LA-ICP-MS analysis. They are less than 2% for the lithophile and up to 10% for volatile chalcophile/siderophile elements when the mass load varies by a factor 2.4. Relative sensitivity factors used for calibration of lithophile elements agree within uncertainty limits for transparent and opaque glasses when using a 193 nm laser. Even for volatile/chalcophile elements they differ only by 5–10%. The reliability of the LA-ICP-MS analyses is demonstrated by presenting concentration data of 27 trace elements in the NIST, BAM and USGS reference glasses using NIST SRM 612 for calibration, where highly accurate reference values are available. For trace element concentrations in the range between 1 and 500 μg g −1 , the reproducibility and the uncertainties at the 95% confidence level of the measurements vary between 1–4%, and 7–10%, respectively. - Highlights: ► Matrix effects are low for lithophile elements using a 193 nm laser

  3. Time-resolved studies of particle effects in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Part 2: Investigation of MO+ ions, effect of sample morphology, transport gas, and binding agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdian, D.; Bajic, S.; Baldwin, D.; Houk, R.

    2007-01-01

    Time resolved signals in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are studied to determine the influence of experimental parameters on ICP-induced fractionation effects. Differences in sample composition and morphology, i.e., ablating brass, glass, or dust pellets, have a profound effect on the time resolved signal. Helium transport gas significantly decreases large positive signal spikes arising from large particles in the ICP. A binder for pellets also reduces the abundance and amplitude of spikes in the signal. MO + ions also yield signal spikes, but these MO + spikes generally occur at different times from their atomic ion counterparts.

  4. Influence of laser ablation parameters on trueness of imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaculovič, T.; Warchilová, T.; Čadková, Z.; Száková, J.; Tlustoš, P.; Otruba, V.; Kanický, V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser ablation conditions vs. quality of LA-ICP-MS imaging (resolution, detection). • Increase in laser spot size improves detection limit, while deteriorates resolution. • Decrease in scan speed improves resolution but prolongs time of analysis. • Compromise spot size and scan speed meet required quality of imaging. • Metal-enriched/depleted zones in tapeworm sections were resolved by LA-ICP-MS. - Abstract: Influence of laser ablation conditions on limit of detection, spatial resolution and time of analysis was studied for laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) applied to elemental mapping. Laser repetition rate and laser fluence were investigated in tapeworm thin section to attain optimum ablation rate, yielding appropriately low detection limit which complies with elemental contents in the tissue. Effect of combinations of laser spot size and scan speed on relative broadening (Δw rel ) of image of the ablated pattern (line) was investigated with the aim to quantify the trueness of imaging. Ink lines printed on paper were employed for the study of influence of spot size and scan speed on limit of detection, relative broadening of elemental image and duration of elemental mapping. An uneven distribution of copper in a printed line (coffee stain effect) was observed. The Δw rel is strongly reduced (down to 2%) at low scan speed (10 μm s −1 ) and laser spot diameter of 10 μm but resulting in unacceptably long time of mapping (up to 3000 min). Finally, tapeworm thin-section elemental maps (4 mm × 5 mm) were obtained at the laser spot diameter of 65 μm and the scan speed of 65 μm s −1 within 100 min. A dissimilar lateral distribution of Pb was observed in comparison with that of Cu or Zn due to different pathways of element uptake

  5. Influence of laser ablation parameters on trueness of imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaculovič, T.; Warchilová, T. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic); CEITEC, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, Brno 62500 (Czech Republic); Čadková, Z.; Száková, J.; Tlustoš, P. [Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, Praha 16521 (Czech Republic); Otruba, V. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic); Kanický, V., E-mail: viktork@chemi.muni.cz [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic); CEITEC, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, Brno 62500 (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Laser ablation conditions vs. quality of LA-ICP-MS imaging (resolution, detection). • Increase in laser spot size improves detection limit, while deteriorates resolution. • Decrease in scan speed improves resolution but prolongs time of analysis. • Compromise spot size and scan speed meet required quality of imaging. • Metal-enriched/depleted zones in tapeworm sections were resolved by LA-ICP-MS. - Abstract: Influence of laser ablation conditions on limit of detection, spatial resolution and time of analysis was studied for laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) applied to elemental mapping. Laser repetition rate and laser fluence were investigated in tapeworm thin section to attain optimum ablation rate, yielding appropriately low detection limit which complies with elemental contents in the tissue. Effect of combinations of laser spot size and scan speed on relative broadening (Δw{sub rel}) of image of the ablated pattern (line) was investigated with the aim to quantify the trueness of imaging. Ink lines printed on paper were employed for the study of influence of spot size and scan speed on limit of detection, relative broadening of elemental image and duration of elemental mapping. An uneven distribution of copper in a printed line (coffee stain effect) was observed. The Δw{sub rel} is strongly reduced (down to 2%) at low scan speed (10 μm s{sup −1}) and laser spot diameter of 10 μm but resulting in unacceptably long time of mapping (up to 3000 min). Finally, tapeworm thin-section elemental maps (4 mm × 5 mm) were obtained at the laser spot diameter of 65 μm and the scan speed of 65 μm s{sup −1} within 100 min. A dissimilar lateral distribution of Pb was observed in comparison with that of Cu or Zn due to different pathways of element uptake.

  6. Solid material evaporation into an ECR source by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkewicz, R.; Stacy, J.; Greene, J.; Pardo, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to explore new methods of producing ion beams from solid materials, we are attempting to develop a laser-ablation technique for evaporating materials directly into an ECR ion source plasma. A pulsed NdYaG laser with approximately 25 watts average power and peak power density on the order of 10 7 W/cm 2 has been used off-line to measure ablation rates of various materials as a function of peak laser power. The benefits anticipated from the successful demonstration of this technique include the ability to use very small quantities of materials efficiently, improved material efficiency of incorporation into the ECR plasma, and decoupling of the material evaporation process from the ECR source tuning operation. Here we report on the results of these tests and describe the design for incorporating such a system directly with the ATLAS PII-ECR ion source

  7. Laser ablation characteristics of metallic materials: Role of Debye-Waller thermal parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, M Z

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a solid target results in the formation of a crater and a plasma plume. The characteristics of both depend on physical properties of target material, environmental conditions, and laser parameters (e.g. wavelength, pulse duration, energy, beam diameter) etc. It has been shown for numerous metals and their alloys that plasma threshold fluence, plasma threshold energy, ablation efficiency, ablation yield, angular distribution of laser produced plasma (LPP) ions, etc. are a unique function of the Debye-Waller thermal parameter B or the mean-square amplitude of atomic vibration of the target material for given experimental conditions. The FWHM of the angular distribution of LPP ions, ablation yield, and ablation efficiency increase whereas plasma threshold fluence and plasma threshold energy decrease as B-factor of the target material increases

  8. Real-time monitoring of indium tin oxide laser ablation in liquid crystal display patterning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, M.H.; Lu, Y.F.; Meng, M.; Low, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    Audible acoustic wave detection is applied to investigate KrF excimer laser ablation of Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) thin film layer for Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) patterning. It is found that there is no acoustic wave generation if laser fluence is lower than ITO ablation threshold. For laser fluence higher than the threshold, audible acoustic wave will be detected due to shock wave generation during ITO laser ablation. The amplitude of the acoustic wave is closely related to the laser ablation rate. With more laser pulse applied, the amplitude is dropped to zero because the ITO layer is completely removed. However, if laser fluence is increased higher than ablation threshold for glass substrate, the amplitude is also dropped with pulse number but not to zero. It is due to laser ablation of ITO layer and glass substrate at the same time. Since the thickness of ITO layer is in a scale of 100 nm, laser interaction with glass substrate will happen even at the first pulse of higher laser fluence irradiation. Laser ablation induced ITO plasma emission spectrum in visible light region is analyzed by an Optical Multi-channel Analyzer (OMA). Specific spectral lines are In I (325.8, 410.2 and 451.1 nm) and In II 591.1 nm. Spectral intensities of 410.2 and 451.1 nm lines are selected to characterize the evolution of ITO plasma intensity with laser fluence and pulse number. It is found that the spectral intensities are reduced to zero with laser pulse number. It is also found that spectral lines other than ITO plasma will appear for laser fluence higher than ablation threshold for glass substrate. Threshold fluences for glass and ITO ablation are estimated for setting up a parameter window to control LCD patterning in real-time

  9. Efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma combined with fractional ablative carbon dioxide resurfacing laser in treatment of facial atrophic acne scars: A split-face randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Faghihi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autologous platelet-rich plasma has recently attracted significant attention throughout the medical field for its wound-healing ability. Aims: This study was conducted to investigate the potential of platelet-rich plasma combined with fractional laser therapy in the treatment of acne scarring. Methods: Sixteen patients (12 women and 4 men who underwent split-face therapy were analyzed in this study. They received ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser combined with intradermal platelet-rich plasma treatment on one half of their face and ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser with intradermal normal saline on the other half. The injections were administered immediately after laser therapy. The treatment sessions were repeated after an interval of one month. The clinical response was assessed based on patient satisfaction and the objective evaluation of serial photographs by two blinded dermatologists at baseline, 1 month after the first treatment session and 4 months after the second. The adverse effects including erythema and edema were scored by participants on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 15 and 30 after each session. Results: Overall clinical improvement of acne scars was higher on the platelet-rich plasma-fractional carbon dioxide laser treated side but the difference was not statistically significant either 1 month after the first treatment session (P = 0.15 or 4 months after the second (P = 0.23. In addition, adverse effects (erythema and edema on the platelet-rich plasma-fractional carbon dioxide laser-treated side were more severe and of longer duration. Limitations: Small sample size, absence of all skin phototypes within the study group and lack of objective methods for the evaluation of response to treatment and adverse effects were the limitations. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that adding platelet-rich plasma to fractional carbon dioxide laser treatment did not produce any statistically significant synergistic effects

  10. Efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma combined with fractional ablative carbon dioxide resurfacing laser in treatment of facial atrophic acne scars: A split-face randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Gita; Keyvan, Shima; Asilian, Ali; Nouraei, Saeid; Behfar, Shadi; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohamad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Autologous platelet-rich plasma has recently attracted significant attention throughout the medical field for its wound-healing ability. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of platelet-rich plasma combined with fractional laser therapy in the treatment of acne scarring. Sixteen patients (12 women and 4 men) who underwent split-face therapy were analyzed in this study. They received ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser combined with intradermal platelet-rich plasma treatment on one half of their face and ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser with intradermal normal saline on the other half. The injections were administered immediately after laser therapy. The treatment sessions were repeated after an interval of one month. The clinical response was assessed based on patient satisfaction and the objective evaluation of serial photographs by two blinded dermatologists at baseline, 1 month after the first treatment session and 4 months after the second. The adverse effects including erythema and edema were scored by participants on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 15 and 30 after each session. Overall clinical improvement of acne scars was higher on the platelet-rich plasma-fractional carbon dioxide laser treated side but the difference was not statistically significant either 1 month after the first treatment session (P = 0.15) or 4 months after the second (P = 0.23). In addition, adverse effects (erythema and edema) on the platelet-rich plasma-fractional carbon dioxide laser-treated side were more severe and of longer duration. Small sample size, absence of all skin phototypes within the study group and lack of objective methods for the evaluation of response to treatment and adverse effects were the limitations. This study demonstrated that adding platelet-rich plasma to fractional carbon dioxide laser treatment did not produce any statistically significant synergistic effects and also resulted in more severe side effects and longer downtime.

  11. Characterization of laser ablation of copper in the irradiance regime of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, J., E-mail: jessica.picard@cea.fr [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Sirven, J.-B.; Lacour, J.-L. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DPC/SEARS/LANIE, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Musset, O. [Université de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS 5209, F-21000 Dijon (France); Cardona, D.; Hubinois, J.-C. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Mauchien, P. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DPC/SEARS/LANIE, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-11-01

    The LIBS signal depends both on the ablated mass and on the plasma excitation temperature. These fundamental parameters depend in a complex manner on laser ablation and on laser–plasma coupling. As several works in the literature suggest that laser ablation processes play a predominant role compared to plasma heating phenomena in the LIBS signal variations, this paper focuses on the study of laser ablation. The objective was to determine an interaction regime enabling to maximally control the laser ablation. Nanosecond laser ablation of copper at 266 nm was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry analysis, in air at 1 bar and in the vacuum. The laser beam spatial profile at the sample surface was characterized in order to give realistic values of the irradiance. The effect of the number of accumulated laser shots on the crater volume was studied. Then, the ablation crater morphology, volume, depth and diameter were measured as a function of irradiance between 0.35 and 96 GW/cm². Results show that in the vacuum, a regular trend is observed over the whole irradiance range. In air at 1 bar, below a certain irradiance, laser ablation is very similar to the vacuum case, and the ablation efficiency of copper was estimated at 0.15 ± 0.03 atom/photon. Beyond this irradiance, the laser beam propagation is strongly disrupted by the expansion of the dense plasma, and plasma shielding appears. The fraction of laser energy used for laser ablation and for plasma heating is estimated in the different irradiance regimes. - Highlights: • The morphology of copper's craters was studied as a function of the pulse energy. • Correlation at low energy and two pressures between crater volume and pulse energy • The ablation efficiency of copper at 1 bar is equal to 0.15 atom/photon. • Ablation efficiency in the vacuum is not limited by laser–plasma interaction. • Physical mechanisms of laser ablation at both pressures are discussed.

  12. Observation of the initial stage of the laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Atsumi; Yoda, Osamu; Ohyanagi, Takasumi; Murakami, Kouichi.

    1994-01-01

    The time and space resolved properties of laser ablated carbon particles were measured by X-ray absorption spectroscopy using Laser Plasma X-ray (LPX) as an X-ray source. The energy density of the irradiation laser on the sample was in the range of 0.5-20 J/cm 2 and the time delay was varied between 0 and 120ns. The absorption spectra exhibits several peaks originated from level to level transitions and an intense broad absorption in the energy range of C-K edge. At a delay time of 120ns, the absorption peak of 1s → 2p transition of neutral carbon atom (C 0 ), C - , C + and C 2+ ions were observed. The absorption peak from C 0 is stronger as the probing position is closer to the sample surface and its intensity decreases rapidly with distance from the sample surface. The absorption peak C 2+ ion was observed only at comparatively distant positions from surface. The maximum speed of highly charged ions are faster than that of neutral atoms and negative charged ions. The neutral atom and lower charged ions are emitted from the sample surface even after laser irradiation. The spatial distribution of the laser ablated particles in the localized helium gas environment were measured. In the helium gas environment, the ablation plume is depressed by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume. (author)

  13. Elemental mapping in fossil tooth root section of Ursus arctos by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vašinová Galiová, M.; Nývltová Fišáková, Miriam; Kynický, J.; Prokeš, L.; Neff, H.; Mason, A. Z.; Gadas, P.; Košler, J.; Kanický, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 105, 15 February 2013 (2013), s. 235-243 ISSN 0039-9140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80010507 Institutional support: RVO:68081758 Keywords : Diagenesis * Diet * Geochemical analysis * Laser ablation ICP-MS * Migration Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 3.511, year: 2013

  14. Direct trace-elemental analysis of urine samples by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after sample deposition on clinical filter papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramendía, Maite; Rello, Luis; Vanhaecke, Frank; Resano, Martín

    2012-10-16

    Collection of biological fluids on clinical filter papers shows important advantages from a logistic point of view, although analysis of these specimens is far from straightforward. Concerning urine analysis, and particularly when direct trace elemental analysis by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) is aimed at, several problems arise, such as lack of sensitivity or different distribution of the analytes on the filter paper, rendering obtaining reliable quantitative results quite difficult. In this paper, a novel approach for urine collection is proposed, which circumvents many of these problems. This methodology consists on the use of precut filter paper discs where large amounts of sample can be retained upon a single deposition. This provides higher amounts of the target analytes and, thus, sufficient sensitivity, and allows addition of an adequate internal standard at the clinical lab prior to analysis, therefore making it suitable for a strategy based on unsupervised sample collection and ulterior analysis at referral centers. On the basis of this sampling methodology, an analytical method was developed for the direct determination of several elements in urine (Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Sb, Sn, Tl, Pb, and V) at the low μg L(-1) level by means of LA-ICPMS. The method developed provides good results in terms of accuracy and LODs (≤1 μg L(-1) for most of the analytes tested), with a precision in the range of 15%, fit-for-purpose for clinical control analysis.

  15. Elemental bioimaging of nanosilver-coated prostheses using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaske, Franziska; Reifschneider, Olga; Gosheger, Georg; Wehe, Christoph A; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe; Hauschild, Gregor; Höll, Steffen

    2014-01-07

    The distribution of different chemical elements from a nanosilver-coated bone implant was visualized, combining the benefits of two complementary methods for elemental bioimaging, the nondestructive micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Challenges caused by the physically inhomogeneous materials including bone and soft tissues were addressed by polymer embedding. With the use of μ-XRF, fast sample mapping was achieved obtaining titanium and vanadium signals from the metal implant as well as phosphorus and calcium signals representing hard bone tissue and sulfur distribution representing soft tissues. Only by the use of LA-ICP-MS, the required high sensitivity and low detection limits for the determination of silver were obtained. Metal distribution within the part of cancellous bone was revealed for silver as well as for the implant constituents titanium, vanadium, and aluminum. Furthermore, the detection of coinciding high local zirconium and aluminum signals at the implant surface indicates remaining blasting abrasive from preoperative surface treatment of the nanosilver-coated device.

  16. Laser ablation - inductive coupled plasma - mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS) geochemistry characterization of albitites associated to uranium in Lagoa da Rabicha deposit, Lagoa Real, BA (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Lucilia A. Ramos de; Rios, Francisco Javier; Amorim, Lucas Eustaquio Dias; Souza, Aurelio da Silva; Prates, Sonia Pinto; Yardley, Bruce; Matos, Evando Carele

    2009-01-01

    The LA-ICP-MS technique is a good tool for mineral geochemical characterization. The technique has high spatial resolution, elevated sensibility, low detection limits and multi-elementary analysis possibility. Almost all chemistry elements can be analyzed by this methodology. Briefly, this methodology consists in vaporize the sample by Laser Ablation, which is dragged by argon into the Plasma where are created and accelerated the ions. They are separated by their mass/charge ratio into the Mass Spectrometer, being conveyed to a detector that convert the signals in specters. In this work LA-ICP-MS analyses were performed in two albitites thin sections, a mineralized and a non mineralized sample. Both samples are from the Lagoa da Rabicha Deposit, Uranium Lagoa Real Province, BA. From these analysis it was possible to chemically characterize the minerals present in the samples and better understand the trace elements on them. The results for plagioclase in both samples show that it is albite (NaAlSi 3 O 8 ). The albite from sample 200907-20 shows traces of strontium, lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium and thorium in one crystal. The albite from sample 200907-23 has strontium with uranium, yttrium and lead in smaller quantities. The results obtained in this work are very important and contribute to a better understanding of the uranium origin in Lagoa Real deposits. (author)

  17. Trace Element Analysis of Minerals in Magmatic-Hydrothermal Ores by Laser Ablation Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: Approaches and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Cook

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS has rapidly established itself as the method of choice for generation of multi-element datasets for specific minerals, with broad applications in Earth science. Variation in absolute concentrations of different trace elements within common, widely distributed phases, such as pyrite, iron-oxides (magnetite and hematite, and key accessory minerals, such as apatite and titanite, can be particularly valuable for understanding processes of ore formation, and when trace element distributions vary systematically within a mineral system, for a vector approach in mineral exploration. LA-ICP-MS trace element data can assist in element deportment and geometallurgical studies, providing proof of which minerals host key elements of economic relevance, or elements that are deleterious to various metallurgical processes. This contribution reviews recent advances in LA-ICP-MS methodology, reference standards, the application of the method to new mineral matrices, outstanding analytical uncertainties that impact on the quality and usefulness of trace element data, and future applications of the technique. We illustrate how data interpretation is highly dependent on an adequate understanding of prevailing mineral textures, geological history, and in some cases, crystal structure.

  18. Laser ablation studies in southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Edric; Forbes, A.; Turner, G. R.; Michaelis, Max M.

    2000-08-01

    With the launch of the South African National Laser Centre, new programs will need to be defined. Medical, environmental and industrial laser applications must obviously take top priority -- as opposed to the uranium isotope separation and military applications of the past. We argue however, that a small effort in laser ablation for space propulsion is justifiable, since a few very large CO2 lasers are available and since two tentative propulsion experiments have already been conducted in South Africa. We attempt to give LISP (Laser Impulse Space Propulsion) an equatorial and a Southern dimension.

  19. Dynamic behaviors of laser ablated Si particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyanagi, T.; Murakami, K.; Miyashita, A.; Yoda, O.

    1995-01-01

    The dynamics of laser-ablated Si particles produced by laser ablation have been investigated by time-and-space resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy in a time scale ranging from 0 ns to 120 ns with a time resolution of 10 ns. Neutral and charged particles are observed through all X-ray absorption spectra. Assignments of transitions from 2s and 2p initial states to higher Rydberg states of Si atom and ions are achieved, and we experimentally determine the L II,III absorption edges of neutral Si atom (Si 0 ) and Si + , Si 2+ , Si 3+ and Si 4+ ions. The main ablated particles are found to be Si atom and Si ions in the initial stage of 0 ns to 120 ns. The relative amounts depend strongly on times and laser energy densities. We find that the spatial distributions of particles produced by laser ablation are changed with supersonic helium gas bombardment, but no cluster formation takes place. This suggests that a higher-density region of helium gas is formed at the top of the plume of ablated particles, and free expansion of particles is restrained by this helium cloud, and that it takes more than 120 ns to form Si clusters. (author)

  20. Using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to characterize copper, zinc and mercury along grizzly bear hair providing estimate of diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noël, Marie, E-mail: marie.noel@stantec.com [Stantec Consulting Ltd. 2042 Mills Road, Unit 11, Sidney BC V8L 4X2 (Canada); Christensen, Jennie R., E-mail: jennie.christensen@stantec.com [Stantec Consulting Ltd. 2042 Mills Road, Unit 11, Sidney BC V8L 4X2 (Canada); Spence, Jody, E-mail: jodys@uvic.ca [School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Bob Wright Centre A405, University of Victoria, PO BOX 3065 STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3V6 (Canada); Robbins, Charles T., E-mail: ctrobbins@wsu.edu [School of the Environment and School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4236 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We enhanced an existing technique, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), to function as a non-lethal tool in the temporal characterization of trace element exposure in wild mammals. Mercury (Hg), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) were analyzed along the hair of captive and wild grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis). Laser parameters were optimized (consecutive 2000 μm line scans along the middle line of the hair at a speed of 50 μm/s; spot size = 30 μm) for consistent ablation of the hair. A pressed pellet of reference material DOLT-2 and sulfur were used as external and internal standards, respectively. Our newly adapted method passed the quality control tests with strong correlations between trace element concentrations obtained using LA-ICP-MS and those obtained with regular solution-ICP-MS (r{sup 2} = 0.92, 0.98, 0.63, 0.57, 0.99 and 0.90 for Hg, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb, respectively). Cross-correlation analyses revealed good reproducibility between trace element patterns obtained from hair collected from the same bear. One exception was Cd for which external contamination was observed resulting in poor reproducibility. In order to validate the method, we used LA-ICP-MS on the hair of five captive grizzly bears fed known and varying amounts of cutthroat trout over a period of 33 days. Trace element patterns along the hair revealed strong Hg, Cu and Zn signals coinciding with fish consumption. Accordingly, significant correlations between Hg, Cu, and Zn in the hair and Hg, Cu, and Zn intake were evident and we were able to develop accumulation models for each of these elements. While the use of LA-ICP-MS for the monitoring of trace elements in wildlife is in its infancy, this study highlights the robustness and applicability of this newly adapted method. - Highlights: • LA-ICP-MS provides temporal trace metal exposure information for wild grizzly bears. • Cu and Zn temporal exposures provide

  1. Multi-element quantification of ancient/historic glasses by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using sum normalization calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elteren, Johannes T. van; Tennent, Norman H.; Selih, Vid S.

    2009-01-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) for quantitative analysis of ancient/historic glasses is subject to calibration issues which have been addressed in this work. Since ancient/historic glasses have widely ranging matrix compositions, a complementary analysis by an alternative method is generally employed to determine at least one major element which can be used as an internal standard. We demonstrate that such a complementary analysis is unnecessary using a so-called sum normalization calibration technique (mathematically formulated) by simultaneous measurement of 54 elements and normalizing them to 100% [w/w] based on their corresponding oxide concentrations. The crux of this approach is that by assuming a random internal standard concentration of a particular major oxide, e.g. SiO 2 , the normalization algorithm varies the internal standard concentration until the cumulated concentrations of all 54 elemental oxides reach 100% [w/w]. The fact that 54 elements are measured simultaneously predetermines the laser ablation mode to rastering. Nine glass standards, some replicating historic compositions, were used for calibration. The linearity of the calibration graphs (forced through the origin) represented by the relative standard deviations in the slope were between 0.1 and 6.6% using SiO 2 as an internal standard. This allows high-accuracy determination of elemental oxides as confirmed by good agreement between found and reported values for major and minor elemental oxides in some synthetic glasses with typical medieval composition (European Science Foundation 151 and 158). Also for trace elemental concentrations of lanthanides in a reference glass (P and H Developments Ltd. DLH7, a base glass composition with nominally 75 μg g -1 elements added) accurate data were obtained. Interferences from polyatomic species and doubly charged species on the masses of trace elements are possible, depending on the base composition of the

  2. Using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to characterize copper, zinc and mercury along grizzly bear hair providing estimate of diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noël, Marie; Christensen, Jennie R.; Spence, Jody; Robbins, Charles T.

    2015-01-01

    We enhanced an existing technique, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), to function as a non-lethal tool in the temporal characterization of trace element exposure in wild mammals. Mercury (Hg), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) were analyzed along the hair of captive and wild grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis). Laser parameters were optimized (consecutive 2000 μm line scans along the middle line of the hair at a speed of 50 μm/s; spot size = 30 μm) for consistent ablation of the hair. A pressed pellet of reference material DOLT-2 and sulfur were used as external and internal standards, respectively. Our newly adapted method passed the quality control tests with strong correlations between trace element concentrations obtained using LA-ICP-MS and those obtained with regular solution-ICP-MS (r 2 = 0.92, 0.98, 0.63, 0.57, 0.99 and 0.90 for Hg, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb, respectively). Cross-correlation analyses revealed good reproducibility between trace element patterns obtained from hair collected from the same bear. One exception was Cd for which external contamination was observed resulting in poor reproducibility. In order to validate the method, we used LA-ICP-MS on the hair of five captive grizzly bears fed known and varying amounts of cutthroat trout over a period of 33 days. Trace element patterns along the hair revealed strong Hg, Cu and Zn signals coinciding with fish consumption. Accordingly, significant correlations between Hg, Cu, and Zn in the hair and Hg, Cu, and Zn intake were evident and we were able to develop accumulation models for each of these elements. While the use of LA-ICP-MS for the monitoring of trace elements in wildlife is in its infancy, this study highlights the robustness and applicability of this newly adapted method. - Highlights: • LA-ICP-MS provides temporal trace metal exposure information for wild grizzly bears. • Cu and Zn temporal exposures provide

  3. Quantitative analysis of major and trace elements in NH4HF2-modified silicate rock powders by laser ablation - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Hu, Zhaochu; Liu, Yongsheng; Yang, Wenwu; Chen, Haihong; Hu, Shenghong; Xiao, Hongyan

    2017-08-29

    In this paper, we described a NH 4 HF 2 digestion method as sample preparation for the rapid determination of major and trace elements in silicate rocks using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Sample powders digested by NH 4 HF 2 at 230 °C for 3 h form ultrafine powders with a typical grain size d 80  rocks have a consistent grain morphology and size, allowing us to produce pressed powder pellets that have excellent cohesion and homogeneity suitable for laser ablation micro-analysis without the addition of binder. The influences of the digestion parameters were investigated and optimized, including the evaporation stage of removing residual NH 4 HF 2 , sample homogenization, selection of the digestion vessel and calibration strategy of quantitative analysis. The optimized NH 4 HF 2 digestion method was applied to dissolve six silicate rock reference materials (BCR-2, BHVO-2, AGV-2, RGM-2, GSP-2, GSR-1) covering a wide range of rock types. Ten major elements and thirty-five trace elements were simultaneously analyzed by LA-ICP-MS. The analytical results of the six reference materials generally agreed with the recommended values, with discrepancies of less than 10% for most elements. The analytical precision is within 5% for most major elements and within 10% for most trace elements. Compared with previous methods of LA-ICP-MS bulk analysis, our method enables the complete dissolution of refractory minerals, such as zircon, in intermediate-acidic intrusive rocks and limits contamination as well as the loss of volatile elements. Moreover, there are many advantages for the new technique, including reducing matrix effects between reference materials and samples, spiking the internal standard simply and feasibly and sample batch processing. The applicability filed of the new technique in this study was focused on the whole-rock analysis of igneous rock samples, which are from basic rocks to acid rocks (45% rock analysis

  4. Development of a 2D laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry mapping procedure for mercury in maize (Zea mays L.) root cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debeljak, Marta [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Večna Pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Elteren, Johannes T. van, E-mail: elteren@ki.si [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Večna Pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-07-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LA-ICP-MS mapping to study the distribution of Hg in plant root cross-sections. •Sorption of LA-generated Hg vapour leads to serious memory effects. •Spot analysis with a delay time of 10 s in between spots alleviates memory effects. •Ablation straight through the sample simplifies calibration. •Hg{sup 2+} does not cross the endodermal root barrier of maize plants. -- Abstract: A LA-ICP-MS method based on a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser and a quadrupole ICP-MS has been developed for mapping of mercury in root cross-sections of maize (Zea mays L.) to investigate the mechanism of mercury uptake from soil and its potential translocation to the edible parts. Conventional rastering was found to be unusable due to sorption of mercury onto the internal parts of the LA device, giving rising to memory effects resulting in serious loss of resolution and inaccurate quantification. Spot analysis on a virtual grid on the surface of the root sections using washout times of 10 s in between spots greatly alleviated problems related to these memory effects. By ablating straight through the root sections on a poly(methyl methacrylate) support the calibration process was simplified as internal standardization and matrix-matching could be circumvented. Mercury-spiked freeze-drying embedding medium, sectioned similarly to the root sections, was used for the preparation of the standards. Standards and root sections were subjected to spot analysis using the following operational parameters: beam diameter, 15 μm; laser fluence, 2.5 J cm{sup −2}; repetition rate, 20 Hz; dwell time, 1 s; acquisition time, 0.1 s. The mercury peaks for standards and roots sections could be consistently integrated for quantification and construction of the 2D mercury maps for the root sections. This approach was successfully used to investigate the mercury distribution in root sections of maize grown in soil spiked to a level of 50 mg kg{sup −1} DW HgCl{sub 2}. It was

  5. Development of a 2D laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry mapping procedure for mercury in maize (Zea mays L.) root cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debeljak, Marta; Elteren, Johannes T. van; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LA-ICP-MS mapping to study the distribution of Hg in plant root cross-sections. •Sorption of LA-generated Hg vapour leads to serious memory effects. •Spot analysis with a delay time of 10 s in between spots alleviates memory effects. •Ablation straight through the sample simplifies calibration. •Hg 2+ does not cross the endodermal root barrier of maize plants. -- Abstract: A LA-ICP-MS method based on a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser and a quadrupole ICP-MS has been developed for mapping of mercury in root cross-sections of maize (Zea mays L.) to investigate the mechanism of mercury uptake from soil and its potential translocation to the edible parts. Conventional rastering was found to be unusable due to sorption of mercury onto the internal parts of the LA device, giving rising to memory effects resulting in serious loss of resolution and inaccurate quantification. Spot analysis on a virtual grid on the surface of the root sections using washout times of 10 s in between spots greatly alleviated problems related to these memory effects. By ablating straight through the root sections on a poly(methyl methacrylate) support the calibration process was simplified as internal standardization and matrix-matching could be circumvented. Mercury-spiked freeze-drying embedding medium, sectioned similarly to the root sections, was used for the preparation of the standards. Standards and root sections were subjected to spot analysis using the following operational parameters: beam diameter, 15 μm; laser fluence, 2.5 J cm −2 ; repetition rate, 20 Hz; dwell time, 1 s; acquisition time, 0.1 s. The mercury peaks for standards and roots sections could be consistently integrated for quantification and construction of the 2D mercury maps for the root sections. This approach was successfully used to investigate the mercury distribution in root sections of maize grown in soil spiked to a level of 50 mg kg −1 DW HgCl 2 . It was found that at given

  6. Elemental analysis of coal by tandem laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma time of flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Meirong; Oropeza, Dayana; Chirinos, José; González, Jhanis J.; Lu, Jidong; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The capabilities and analytical benefits of combined LIBS and LA-ICP-MS were evaluated for the analysis of coal samples. The ablation system consisted of a Nd:YAG laser operated 213 nm. A Czerny-turner spectrograph with ICCD detector and time-of-flight based mass spectrometer were utilized for LIBS and ICP-MS detection, respectively. This tandem approach allows simultaneous determination of major and minor elements (C, Si, Ca, Al, Mg), and trace elements (V, Ba, Pb, U, etc.) in the coal samples. The research focused on calibration strategies, specifically the use of univariate and multivariate data analysis on analytical performance. Partial least square regression (PLSR) was shown to minimize and compensate for matrix effects in the emission and mass spectra improving quantitative analysis by LIBS and LA-ICP-MS, respectively. The correlation between measurements from these two techniques demonstrated that mass spectral data combined with LIBS emission measurements by PLSR improved the accuracy and precision for quantitative analysis of trace elements in coal. - Highlights: • Tandem LIBS LA-ICP-MS • Simultaneous determination of major and minor elements and trace elements in the coal samples. • Extended Dynamic Range • Correlation between LIBS with LA-ICP-MS demonstrated improved the accuracy and precision for quantitative analysis of coal

  7. Elemental analysis of coal by tandem laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma time of flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Meirong [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640 (China); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Oropeza, Dayana [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chirinos, José [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Escuela de Química, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas 1041a (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); González, Jhanis J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lu, Jidong [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640 (China); Mao, Xianglei [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Russo, Richard E., E-mail: RERusso@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The capabilities and analytical benefits of combined LIBS and LA-ICP-MS were evaluated for the analysis of coal samples. The ablation system consisted of a Nd:YAG laser operated 213 nm. A Czerny-turner spectrograph with ICCD detector and time-of-flight based mass spectrometer were utilized for LIBS and ICP-MS detection, respectively. This tandem approach allows simultaneous determination of major and minor elements (C, Si, Ca, Al, Mg), and trace elements (V, Ba, Pb, U, etc.) in the coal samples. The research focused on calibration strategies, specifically the use of univariate and multivariate data analysis on analytical performance. Partial least square regression (PLSR) was shown to minimize and compensate for matrix effects in the emission and mass spectra improving quantitative analysis by LIBS and LA-ICP-MS, respectively. The correlation between measurements from these two techniques demonstrated that mass spectral data combined with LIBS emission measurements by PLSR improved the accuracy and precision for quantitative analysis of trace elements in coal. - Highlights: • Tandem LIBS LA-ICP-MS • Simultaneous determination of major and minor elements and trace elements in the coal samples. • Extended Dynamic Range • Correlation between LIBS with LA-ICP-MS demonstrated improved the accuracy and precision for quantitative analysis of coal.

  8. Femtosecond laser ablation of bovine cortical bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangueiro, Liliana T.; Vilar, Rui; Botelho do Rego, Ana M.; Muralha, Vania S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We study the surface topographical, structural, and compositional modifications induced in bovine cortical bone by femtosecond laser ablation. The tests are performed in air, with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (500 fs, 1030 nm) at fluences ranging from 0.55 to 2.24 J/cm2. The ablation process is monitored by acoustic emission measurements. The topography of the laser-treated surfaces is studied by scanning electron microscopy, and their constitution is characterized by glancing incidence x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation allows removing bone without melting, carbonization, or cracking. The structure and composition of the remaining tissue are essentially preserved, the only constitutional changes observed being a reduction of the organic material content and a partial recrystallization of hydroxyapatite in the most superficial region of samples. The results suggest that, within this fluence range, ablation occurs by a combination of thermal and electrostatic mechanisms, with the first type of mechanism predominating at lower fluences. The associated thermal effects explain the constitutional changes observed. We show that femtosecond lasers are a promising tool for delicate orthopaedic surgeries, where small amounts of bone must be cut with negligible damage, thus minimizing surgical trauma.

  9. Laser ablation of microparticles for nanostructure generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waraich, Palneet Singh; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2011-01-01

    The process of laser ablation of microparticles has been shown to generate nanoparticles from microparticles; but the generation of nanoparticle networks from microparticles has never been reported before. We report a unique approach for the generation of nanoparticle networks through ablation of microparticles. Using this approach, two samples containing microparticles of lead oxide (Pb 3 O 4 ) and nickel oxide (NiO), respectively, were ablated under ambient conditions using a femtosecond laser operating in the MHz repetition rate regime. Nanoparticle networks with particle diameter ranging from 60 to 90 nm were obtained by ablation of microparticles without use of any specialized equipment, catalysts or external stimulants. The formation of finer nanoparticle networks has been explained by considering the low pressure region created by the shockwave, causing rapid condensation of microparticles into finer nanoparticles. A comparison between the nanostructures generated by ablating microparticle and those by ablating bulk substrate was carried out; and a considerable reduction in size and narrowed size distribution was observed. Our nanostructure fabrication technique will be a unique process for nanoparticle network generation from a vast array of materials.

  10. Laser Plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -focusing in a plasma ... Center for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110 016, India; Tata Consultancy Services, Gurgaon, India; Ideal Institute of Technology, Ghaziabad, India; Center for Research in Cognitive, ...

  11. A rapid and reliable method for Pb isotopic analysis of peat and lichens by laser ablation-quadrupole-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for biomonitoring and sample screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kylander, M.E.; Weiss, D.J.; Jeffries, T.E.; Kober, B.; Dolgopolova, A.; Garcia-Sanchez, R.; Coles, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    An analytical protocol for rapid and reliable laser ablation-quadrupole (LA-Q)- and multi-collector (MC-) inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis of Pb isotope ratios ( 207 Pb/ 206 Pb and 208 Pb/ 206 Pb) in peats and lichens is developed. This technique is applicable to source tracing atmospheric Pb deposition in biomonitoring studies and sample screening. Reference materials and environmental samples were dry ashed and pressed into pellets for introduction by laser ablation. No binder was used to reduce contamination. LA-MC-ICP-MS internal and external precisions were 207 Pb/ 206 Pb and 208 Pb/ 206 Pb ratios. LA-Q-ICP-MS internal precisions on 207 Pb/ 206 Pb and 208 Pb/ 206 Pb ratios were lower with values for the different sample sets 208 Pb by Q-ICP-MS are identified as sources of reduced analytical performance

  12. Excimer laser ablation of the cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, George H.; Ediger, Marwood N.; Weiblinger, Richard P.

    1995-03-01

    Pulsed ultraviolet laser ablation is being extensively investigated clinically to reshape the optical surface of the eye and correct vision defects. Current knowledge of the laser/tissue interaction and the present state of the clinical evaluation are reviewed. In addition, the principal findings of internal Food and Drug Administration research are described in some detail, including a risk assessment of the laser-induced-fluorescence and measurement of the nonlinear optical properties of cornea during the intense UV irradiation. Finally, a survey is presented of the alternative laser technologies being explored for this ophthalmic application.

  13. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy of cross-beam pulsed laser ablation on graphite targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangines, R.; Sanchez Ake, C.; Sobral, H.; Villagran-Muniz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Cross-beam pulsed laser ablation with two delayed lasers is performed on two perpendicular graphite targets. The time delay between lasers is varied by up to 5 μs, and physical changes on the second plasma, due to the interaction with the first generated one, are determined by time resolved optical emission spectroscopy

  14. Femtosecond laser ablation of carbon reinforced polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, P.; Mendez, C.; Garcia, A.; Arias, I.; Roso, L.

    2006-01-01

    Interaction of intense ultrashort laser pulses (120 fs at 795 nm) with polymer based composites has been investigated. We have found that carbon filled polymers exhibit different ultrafast ablation behaviour depending on whether the filling material is carbon black or carbon fiber and on the polymer matrix itself. The shape and dimensions of the filling material are responsible for some geometrical bad quality effects in the entrance and inner surfaces of drilled microholes. We give an explanation for these non-quality effects in terms of fundamentals of ultrafast ablation process, specifically threshold laser fluences and material removal paths. Since carbon fiber reinforced polymers seemed particularly concerned, this could prevent the use of ultrafast ablation for microprocessing purposes of some of these materials

  15. Bending diamonds by femtosecond laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Peter; Esberg, Jakob; Kirsebom, Kim

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method based on femtosecond laser ablation for the fabrication of statically bent diamond crystals. Using this method, curvature radii of 1 m can easily be achieved, and the curvature obtained is very uniform. Since diamond is extremely tolerant to high radiation doses, partly due...

  16. Picosecond laser ablation of porcine sclera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góra, Wojciech S.; Harvey, Eleanor M.; Dhillon, Baljean; Parson, Simon H.; Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2013-03-01

    Lasers have been shown to be successful in certain medical procedures and they have been identified as potentially making a major contribution to the development of minimally invasive procedures. However, the uptake is not as widespread and there is scope for many other applications where laser devices may offer a significant advantage in comparison to the traditional surgical tools. The purpose of this research is to assess the potential of using a picosecond laser for minimally invasive laser sclerostomy. Experiments were carried out on porcine scleral samples due to the comparable properties to human tissue. Samples were prepared with a 5mm diameter trephine and were stored in lactated Ringer's solution. After laser machining, the samples were fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde, then dried and investigated under SEM. The laser used in the experiments is an industrial picosecond TRUMPF TruMicro laser operating at a wavelength of 1030nm, pulse length of 6ps, repetition rate of 1 kHz and a focused spot diameter of 30μm. The laser beam was scanned across the samples with the use of a galvanometer scan head and various ablation patterns were investigated. Processing parameters (pulse energy, spot and line separation) which allow for the most efficient laser ablation of scleral tissue without introducing any collateral damage were investigated. The potential to create various shapes, such as linear incisions, square cavities and circular cavities was demonstrated.

  17. Morphological and spectroscopic characterization of laser-ablated tungsten at various laser irradiances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, Mahreen; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Dawood, Asadullah [Government College University, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [University of Engineering and Technology, Department of Physics, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, M.F. [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Physics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2015-06-15

    The variation in surface morphology and plasma parameters of laser irradiated tungsten has been investigated as a function of irradiance. For this purpose, Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz) is employed. Tungsten targets were exposed to various laser irradiances ranging from 6 to 50 GW/cm{sup 2} under ambient environment of argon at a pressure of 20 Torr. Scanning electron microscope analysis has been performed to analyze the surface modification of irradiated tungsten. It revealed the formation of micro- and nanoscale surface structures. In central ablated area, distinct grains and crack formation are observed, whereas peripheral ablated areas are dominated by cones and pinhole formation. It was observed that at irradiances exceeding a value of 13 GW/cm{sup 2}, the morphological trend of the observed structures has been changed from erosion to melting and re-deposition dominant phase. Ablation efficiency as a function of laser irradiance has also been investigated by measuring the crater depth using surface profilometry analysis. It is found to be maximum at an irradiance of 13 GW/cm{sup 2} and decreases at high laser irradiances. In order to correlate the accumulated effects of plasma parameters with the surface modification, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis has been performed. The electron temperature and number density of tungsten plasma have been evaluated at various laser irradiances. Initially with the increase of the laser irradiance up to 13 GW/cm{sup 2}, an increasing trend is observed for both plasma parameters due to enhanced energy deposition. Afterward, a decreasing trend is achieved which is attributed to the shielding effect. With further increase in irradiance, a saturation stage comes and insignificant changes are observed in plasma parameters. This saturation is explainable on the basis of the formation of a self-regulating regime near the target surface. Surface modifications of laser irradiated tungsten have been correlated with

  18. Laser ablation deposition measurements from silver and nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Ellegaard, Ole; Schou, Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    The deposition rate for laser ablated metals has been studied in a standard geometry for fluences up to 20 J/cm(2). The rate for silver and nickel is a few percent of a monolayer per pulse at the laser wavelengths 532 nm and 355 nm. The rate for nickel is significantly higher than that for silver...... at 532 nm, whereas the rate for the two metals is similar at 355 nm. This behaviour disagrees with calculations based on the thermal properties at low intensities as well as predictions based on formation of an absorbing plasma at high intensities. The deposition rate falls strongly with increasing...

  19. The potential of using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma time of flight mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-TOF-MS) in the forensic analysis of micro debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scadding, Cameron J; Watling, R John; Thomas, Allen G

    2005-08-15

    The majority of crimes result in the generation of some form of physical evidence, which is available for collection by crime scene investigators or police. However, this debris is often limited in amount as modern criminals become more aware of its potential value to forensic scientists. The requirement to obtain robust evidence from increasingly smaller sized samples has required refinement and modification of old analytical techniques and the development of new ones. This paper describes a new method for the analysis of oxy-acetylene debris, left behind at a crime scene, and the establishment of its co-provenance with single particles of equivalent debris found on the clothing of persons of interest (POI). The ability to rapidly determine and match the elemental distribution patterns of debris collected from crime scenes to those recovered from persons of interest is essential in ensuring successful prosecution. Traditionally, relatively large amounts of sample (up to several milligrams) have been required to obtain a reliable elemental fingerprint of this type of material [R.J. Walting , B.F. Lynch, D. Herring, J. Anal. At. Spectrom. 12 (1997) 195]. However, this quantity of material is unlikely to be recovered from a POI. This paper describes the development and application of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma time of flight mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-TOF-MS), as an analytical protocol, which can be applied more appropriately to the analysis of micro-debris than conventional quadrupole based mass spectrometry. The resulting data, for debris as small as 70mum in diameter, was unambiguously matched between a single spherule recovered from a POI and a spherule recovered from the scene of crime, in an analytical procedure taking less than 5min.

  20. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta; Zielińska, Dobrochna; Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia; Kijowska, Agnieszka; Wagner, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th–14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers. - Highlights: • The analytical procedure for examination of unique wall paintings was proposed. • Identification of pigments and supporting layers of wall-paintings was obtained. • Heterogeneous samples were mapped with the use of LA-ICPMS. • Anatase in the sub-surface regions of samples was detected by Raman spectroscopy

  1. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Zielińska, Dobrochna [Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw, Krakowskie Przedmieście 26/28, 00-927 Warsaw (Poland); Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia [Chemical Faculty, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Kijowska, Agnieszka [National Museum in Warsaw, Aleje Jerozolimskie 3, 00-495 Warsaw (Poland); Wagner, Barbara, E-mail: barbog@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-11-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th–14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers. - Highlights: • The analytical procedure for examination of unique wall paintings was proposed. • Identification of pigments and supporting layers of wall-paintings was obtained. • Heterogeneous samples were mapped with the use of LA-ICPMS. • Anatase in the sub-surface regions of samples was detected by Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Investigating the influence of standard staining procedures on the copper distribution and concentration in Wilson's disease liver samples by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachmöller, Oliver; Aichler, Michaela; Schwamborn, Kristina; Lutz, Lisa; Werner, Martin; Sperling, Michael; Walch, Axel; Karst, Uwe

    2017-12-01

    The influence of rhodanine and haematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining on the copper distribution and concentration in liver needle biopsy samples originating from patients with Wilson's disease (WD), a rare autosomal recessive inherited disorder of the copper metabolism, is investigated. In contemporary diagnostic of WD, rhodanine staining is used for histopathology, since rhodanine and copper are forming a red to orange-red complex, which can be recognized in the liver tissue using a microscope. In this paper, a laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) method is applied for the analysis of eight different WD liver samples. Apart from a spatially resolved elemental detection as qualitative information, this LA-ICP-MS method offers also quantitative information by external calibration with matrix-matched gelatine standards. The sample set of this work included an unstained and a rhodanine stained section of each WD liver sample. While unstained sections of WD liver samples showed very distinct structures of the copper distribution with high copper concentrations, rhodanine stained sections revealed a blurred copper distribution with significant decreased concentrations in a range from 20 to more than 90%. This implies a copper removal from the liver tissue by complexation during the rhodanine staining. In contrast to this, a further HE stained sample of one WD liver sample did not show a significant decrease in the copper concentration and influence on the copper distribution in comparison to the unstained section. Therefore, HE staining can be combined with the analysis by means of LA-ICP-MS in two successive steps from one thin section of a biopsy specimen. This allows further information to be gained on the elemental distribution by LA-ICP-MS additional to results obtained by histological staining. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Validation of the determination of the B isotopic composition in Roman glasses with laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devulder, Veerle; Gerdes, Axel; Vanhaecke, Frank; Degryse, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) for the determination of the B isotopic composition in Roman glasses was investigated. The δ 11 B values thus obtained provide information on the natron flux used during the glass-making process. The glass samples used for this purpose were previously characterized using pneumatic nebulization (PN) MC-ICP-MS. Unfortunately, this method is time-consuming and labor-intensive and consumes some 100 mg of sample, which is a rather high amount for ancient materials. Therefore, the use of the less invasive and faster LA-MC-ICP-MS approach was explored. In this work, the results for 29 Roman glasses and 4 home-made glasses obtained using both techniques were compared to assess the suitability of LA-MC-ICP-MS in this context. The results are in excellent agreement within experimental uncertainty. No difference in overall mass discrimination was observed between the Roman glasses, NIST SRM 610 reference glass and B6 obsidian. The expanded uncertainty of the LA-MC-ICP-MS approach was estimated to be < 2‰, which is similar to that obtained upon sample digestion and PN-MC-ICP-MS measurement. - Highlights: • First use of LA-MC-ICP-MS for B isotopic analysis of ancient glass • Careful validation of LA-MC-ICP-MS approach • Similar precision & accuracy via solution MC-ICP-MS after isolation of B • Enhancement of sample throughput & reduction of sample consumption • Improved conditions for archeometric research on (pre-)Roman glass

  4. Study on the uptake and distribution of gadolinium based contrast agents in biological samples using laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingott, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium based contrast agents are used for magnetic resonance imaging. After their excretion by medicated patients they reach surface water passing waste water treatment plants where they are not removed sufficiently. The behavior of the contrast agents in the environment and the interaction with organisms was investigated in this work due to the toxicity of the free Gd 3+ ion and the associated risks, such as accumulation in the human food chain. In this work, the two elemental analytical imaging methods laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis (SRXRF) have been used to investigate the uptake, distribution, and excretion of Gd-based contrast agents by various biological systems. Both methods were analytically characterized and compared for this application. The detection limits of gadolinium were determined under optimized conditions by LA-ICP-MS and SRXRF. With calibration by remains of dried elemental standard droplets detection limits of 0.78 pg absolute amount of gadolinium (LA-ICP-MS), respectively 89 pg (SRXRF) were reached. Based on filamentous algae as water plants the uptake and the excretion of Gd-based contrast agents were revealed. The dependence on concentration of the contrast agent in the exposition solution and the independence of temporal uptake within one to seven days were studied for duckweed. By LA-ICP-MS gadolinium was quantified in a leaf of cress plant. The verification of the results was performed by SRXRF and ICP-MS after digestion. Furthermore, the uptake and distribution of Gd-based contrast agents in higher organisms (water flea) were observed. The exact location of gadolinium was resolved by three-dimensional μ-computed tomography by the comparison of an exposed with a Gd-free water flea. In all studies, gadolinium was detected in the investigated exposed model organisms. It can be concluded that the contrast agents were taken from the environment.

  5. Fusion Bead Procedure for Nuclear Forensics Employing Synthetic Enstatite to Dissolve Uraniferous and Other Challenging Materials Prior to Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, David G; Croudace, Ian W; Warwick, Phillip E

    2017-06-06

    There is an increasing demand for rapid and effective analytical tools to support nuclear forensic investigations of seized or suspect materials. Some methods are simply adapted from other scientific disciplines and can effectively be used to rapidly prepare complex materials for subsequent analysis. A novel sample fusion method is developed, tested, and validated to produce homogeneous, flux-free glass beads of geochemical reference materials (GRMs), uranium ores, and uranium ore concentrates (UOC) prior to the analysis of 14 rare earth elements (REE) via laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The novelty of the procedure is the production of glass beads using 9 parts high purity synthetic enstatite (MgSiO 3 ) as the glass former with 1 part of sample (sample mass ∼1.5 mg). The beads are rapidly prepared (∼10 min overall time) by fusing the blended mixture on an iridium strip resistance heater in an argon-purged chamber. Many elements can be measured in the glass bead, but the rare earth group in particular is a valuable series in nuclear forensic studies and is well-determined using LA-ICP-MS. The REE data obtained from the GRMs, presented as chondrite normalized patterns, are in very good agreement with consensus patterns. The UOCs have comparable patterns to solution ICP-MS methods and published data. The attractions of the current development are its conservation of sample, speed of preparation, and suitability for microbeam analysis, all of which are favorable for nuclear forensics practitioners and geochemists requiring REE patterns from scarce or valuable samples.

  6. Validation of the determination of the B isotopic composition in Roman glasses with laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devulder, Veerle [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S12, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 E-box 2408, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Gerdes, Axel [Institute of Geoscience, Goethe Universität, Altenhoeferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vanhaecke, Frank, E-mail: Frank.Vanhaecke@UGent.be [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S12, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Degryse, Patrick [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 E-box 2408, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-03-01

    The applicability of laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) for the determination of the B isotopic composition in Roman glasses was investigated. The δ{sup 11}B values thus obtained provide information on the natron flux used during the glass-making process. The glass samples used for this purpose were previously characterized using pneumatic nebulization (PN) MC-ICP-MS. Unfortunately, this method is time-consuming and labor-intensive and consumes some 100 mg of sample, which is a rather high amount for ancient materials. Therefore, the use of the less invasive and faster LA-MC-ICP-MS approach was explored. In this work, the results for 29 Roman glasses and 4 home-made glasses obtained using both techniques were compared to assess the suitability of LA-MC-ICP-MS in this context. The results are in excellent agreement within experimental uncertainty. No difference in overall mass discrimination was observed between the Roman glasses, NIST SRM 610 reference glass and B6 obsidian. The expanded uncertainty of the LA-MC-ICP-MS approach was estimated to be < 2‰, which is similar to that obtained upon sample digestion and PN-MC-ICP-MS measurement. - Highlights: • First use of LA-MC-ICP-MS for B isotopic analysis of ancient glass • Careful validation of LA-MC-ICP-MS approach • Similar precision & accuracy via solution MC-ICP-MS after isolation of B • Enhancement of sample throughput & reduction of sample consumption • Improved conditions for archeometric research on (pre-)Roman glass.

  7. Time-resolved emission from laser-ablated uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoffels, E.; Mullen, J. van der; Weijer, P. van de

    1991-01-01

    Time-resolved emission spectra from the plasma, induced by laser ablation of uranium samples have been studied. The dependence of the emission intensity on time is strongly affected by the nature and pressure of the buffer gas. Air and argon have been used in the pressure range 0.002 to 5 mbar. The emission intensity as a function of time displays three maxima, indicating that three different processes within the expanding plasma plume are involved. On basis of the time-resolved spectra we propose a model that explains qualitatively the phenomena that are responsible for this time behaviour. (author)

  8. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    of a variety of skin conditions, primarily chronically photodamaged skin, but also acne and burn scars. In addition, it is anticipated that AFR can be utilized in the laser-assisted delivery of topical drugs. Clinical efficacy coupled with minimal downtime has driven the development of various fractional...... ablative laser systems. Fractionated CO(2) (10,600-nm), erbium yttrium aluminum garnet, 2940-nm and yttrium scandium gallium garnet, 2790-nm lasers are available. In this article, we present an overview of AFR technology, devices and histopathology, and we summarize the current clinical possibilities...

  9. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    ablative laser systems. Fractionated CO(2) (10,600-nm), erbium yttrium aluminum garnet, 2940-nm and yttrium scandium gallium garnet, 2790-nm lasers are available. In this article, we present an overview of AFR technology, devices and histopathology, and we summarize the current clinical possibilities...... of a variety of skin conditions, primarily chronically photodamaged skin, but also acne and burn scars. In addition, it is anticipated that AFR can be utilized in the laser-assisted delivery of topical drugs. Clinical efficacy coupled with minimal downtime has driven the development of various fractional...

  10. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of agricultural soils using the sol-gel technique of pellet preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubova, I.; Hola, M.; Vaculovic, T.; Pinkas, J.; Prokes, L.; Stefan, I.; Kanicky, V.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Monitoring of metals in agricultural soils is gaining importance as they are accumulated by plants. A LAICPQMS method with Nd:YAG 213 nm laser has been developed for determination of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb in soil pellets prepared by the sol-gel technique. LA-ICPMS analysis of archive samples was verified by XRF of wax-soil pellets and ICPMS with nebulization of solutions obtained by total soil decomposition and by analysis of reference materials. Sequention extraction was used for fractionation analysis. (author)

  11. Effect of liquid properties on laser ablation of aluminum and titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Peixuan, E-mail: oypx12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [National Center of Novel Materials for International Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Peijie [National Center of Novel Materials for International Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Leksina, E.G.; Michurin, S.V. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); He, Liangju [School of Aerospace, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Porous surfaces are formed in Al alloy after wet ablation due to phase explosion. • A higher ablation rate is produced in glycerin than that in water and isopropanol. • Effect of liquid properties on mass-removal mechanisms was discussed. • Phase explosion and plasma-induced pressure contribute greatly to mass removal. • Density, heat conductivity and shock impendence of liquid affect ablation rates. - Abstract: In order to study the effect of liquid properties on laser ablation in liquids, aluminum 5A06 and titanium TB5 targets were irradiated by single-pulse infrared laser in isopropanol, distilled water, glycerin and as a comparison, in air, respectively. Craters induced by laser ablation were characterized using scanning electron and white-light interferometric microscopies. The results show that for liquid-mediated ablation, craters with porous surface structures were formed in aluminum target through phase explosion, while no micro-cavities were formed in titanium target owing to high critical temperature of titanium. In addition, ablation rates of aluminum and titanium targets vary with types of ambient media in accordance with such sequence: air < isopropanol < water < glycerin. Further, the influence of liquid properties on material-removal mechanisms for laser ablation in liquid is discussed. It is concluded that the density, thermal conductivity and acoustical impedance of liquid play a dominant role in laser ablation efficiency.

  12. Laser ablation of liquid surface in air induced by laser irradiation through liquid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro; Nakahara, Motonao

    2010-10-01

    The pulse laser ablation of a liquid surface in air when induced by laser irradiation through a liquid medium has been experimentally investigated. A supersonic liquid jet is observed at the liquid-air interface. The liquid surface layer is driven by a plasma plume that is produced by laser ablation at the layer, resulting in a liquid jet. This phenomenon occurs only when an Nd:YAG laser pulse (wavelength: 1064 nm) is focused from the liquid onto air at a low fluence of 20 J/cm2. In this case, as Fresnel’s law shows, the incident and reflected electric fields near the liquid surface layer are superposed constructively. In contrast, when the incident laser is focused from air onto the liquid, a liquid jet is produced only at an extremely high fluence, several times larger than that in the former case. The similarities and differences in the liquid jets and atomization processes are studied for several liquid samples, including water, ethanol, and vacuum oil. The laser ablation of the liquid surface is found to depend on the incident laser energy and laser fluence. A pulse laser light source and high-resolution film are required to observe the detailed structure of a liquid jet.

  13. Spectroscopic and imaging diagnostics of pulsed laser deposition laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thareja, Raj K.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of laser spectroscopic techniques used in the diagnostics of laser ablated plumes used for thin film deposition is given. An emerging laser spectroscopic imaging technique for the laser ablation material processing is discussed. (author)

  14. Ultraviolet-laser ablation of skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, R.J.; Linsker, R.; Wynne, J.J.; Torres, A.; Geronemus, R.G.

    1985-05-01

    The authors report on the use of pulsed ultraviolet-laser irradiation at 193 nm from an argon-fluoride laser and at 248 nm from a krypton-fluoride laser to ablate skin. In vitro, both wavelengths performed comparably, removing tissue precisely and cleanly, and leaving minimal thermal damage to the surrounding tissue. In vivo, the 193-nm laser radiation failed to remove tissue after bleeding began. The 248-nm radiation, however, continued to remove tissue despite bleeding and left a clean incision with only minimal thermal damage. The krypton-fluoride excimer laser beam at 248 nm, which should be deliverable through a quartz optical fiber, has great potential as a surgical instrument.

  15. Rail gun performance and plasma characteristics due to wall ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment of Bauer, et al. (1982) is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time.

  16. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  17. Physics of laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubenchik, A.; Witkowski, S.

    1991-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of laser fusion plasma physics and contains the most up-to-date information on high density plasma physics and radiation transport, useful for astrophysicists and high density physicists

  18. Inertial effects in laser-driven ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrach, R.J.; Szeoke, A.; Howard, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    The gasdynamic partial differential equations (PDE's) governing the motion of an ablatively accelerated target (rocket) contain an inertial force term that arises from acceleration of the reference frame in which the PDE's are written. We give a simple, intuitive description of this effect, and estimate its magnitude and parametric dependences by means of approximate analytical formulas inferred from our computer hydrocode calculations. Often this inertial term is negligible, but for problems in the areas of laser fusion and laser equation of state studies we find that it can substantially reduce the attainable hydrodynamic efficiency of acceleration and implosion

  19. Resonant laser ablation: mechanisms and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.E.; Bodla, R.; Eiden, G.C.; Nogar, N.S.; Smith, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    Resonant laser ablation (RLA) typically relies on irradiation of a sample in a mass spectrometer with modest intensity laser pulses tuned to a one or two photon resonant transition in the analyte of interest. This paper shows that RLA is well suited for highly sensitive analyses of complex samples. The examples actually studied are trace components in rhenium and technetium in nickel. The authors also studied the 2+1 multiphoton ionization spectrum of iron-56 detected by RLA of Re containing 70 ppm iron. Two-photon transition rates for Fe transitions were calculated perturbatively and found to agree semi-quantitatively with experimentally observed intensities. 17 refs., 3 figs

  20. Ablation of polymers by ultraviolet pulsed laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezini, A.; Benharrats, N.

    1993-08-01

    The surface modifications of different polymers treated by far UV-Excimer laser (λ = 193mn, 248, 308nm) are analysed by X-Ray Photoelectrons Spectroscopy. The main feature observed depends strongly on the absorption coefficients. For the high absorbing polymers such (PVC, PS, PI,...) the mechanism of the UV-Excimer Laser interaction appears to be governed by an ablative photodecomposition process (APD) with an APD threshold. In the other limit, i.e. low absorbing polymer the interaction leads to a photothermal process. (author). 51 refs, 24 figs, 7 tabs

  1. Recolonization of laser-ablated bacterial biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, Kanavillil; Obika, Hideki; Utsumi, Akihiro; Toshihiko, Ooie; Yano, Tetsuo

    2004-01-20

    The recolonization of laser-ablated bacterial monoculture biofilm was studied in the laboratory by using a flow-cytometer system. The marine biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora was used to develop biofilms on titanium coupons. Upon exposure to a low-power pulsed irradiation from an Nd:YAG laser, the coupons with biofilm were significantly reduced both in terms of total viable count (TVC) and area cover. The energy density used for a pulse of 5 ns was 0.1 J/cm(2) and the durations of irradiation exposure were 5 and 10 min. When placed in a flow of dilute ZoBell marine broth medium (10%) the laser-destructed bacterial film in a flow-cytometer showed significant recovery over a period of time. The flow of medium was regulated at 3.2 ml/min. The increase in area cover and TVC, however, was significantly less than that observed for nonirradiated control (t-test, Precolonization compared to control was thought be due to the lethal and sublethal impacts of laser irradiation on bacteria. This observation thus provided data on the online recolonization speed of biofilm, which is important when considering pulsed laser irradiation as an ablating technique of biofilm formation and removal in natural systems. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Laser ablation of UHMWPE-polyethylene by 438 nm high energy pulsed laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L.; Gammino, S.; Mezzasalma, A.M.; Visco, A.M.; Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J.; Woryna, E.; Krasa, J.; Laska, L.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Boody, F.P

    2004-04-15

    Pulsed laser ablation of ultra-high-molecular-weight-polyethylene (UHMWPE) is investigated at Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) Laboratory. The high ablation yield as a function of laser energy is presented at 438 nm laser wavelength. The mechanisms of the polymer ablation are studied on the base of ''in situ'' analysis, such as mass quadrupole spectrometry and time-of-flight measurements, and ''ex situ'' analysis, such as SEM investigations and Raman spectroscopy. Results show that the laser irradiation induces a strong polymer dehydrogenation and molecular emission due to different C{sub x}H{sub y} groups having high kinetic energy and high charge state. At a laser pulse energy of 150 J the H{sup +}, C{sup n+} ions (n=1 to 6) are emitted from the plasma with velocities of the order of 10{sup 8} cm/s, while the C{sub x}H{sub y} groups and the carbon clusters, detected up to C{sub 16}, have a velocity about one or two order magnitude lower. The laser ablation process produces a deep crater in the polymer, which depth depends on the laser pulse energy and it is of the order of 500 {mu}m. The crater volume increases with the laser pulse energy. Results demonstrated that the laser radiation modifies the polymer chains because dehydrogenated material and carbon-like structures are detected in the crater walls and in the bottom of the crater, respectively. A comparison of the experimental results with the data available in literature is presented and discussed.

  3. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-dynamic reaction cell-mass spectrometry for the multi-element analysis of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resano, M.; Garcia-Ruiz, E.; Vanhaecke, F.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the potential of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the fast analysis of polymers has been explored. Different real-life samples (polyethylene shopping bags, an acrylonitrile butadiene styrene material and various plastic bricks) as well as several reference materials (VDA 001 to 004, Cd in polyethylene) have been selected for the study. Two polyethylene reference materials (ERM-EC 680 and 681), for which a reference or indicative value for the most relevant metals is available, have proved their suitability as standards for calibration. Special attention has been paid to the difficulties expected for the determination of Cr at the μg g -1 level in this kind of materials, due to the interference of ArC + ions on the most abundant isotopes of Cr. The use of ammonia as a reaction gas in a dynamic reaction cell is shown to alleviate this problem, resulting in a limit of detection of 0.15 μg g -1 for this element, while limiting only modestly the possibilities of the technique for simultaneous multi-element analysis. In this regard, As is the analyte most seriously affected by the use of ammonia, and its determination has to be carried out in vented mode, at the expense of measuring time. In all cases studied, accurate results could be obtained for elements ranging in content from the sub-μg g -1 level to tens of thousands of μg g -1 . However, the use of an element of known concentration as internal standard may be needed for materials with a matrix significantly different from that of the standard (polyethylene in this work). Precision ranged between 5% and 10% RSD for elements found at the 10 μg g -1 level or higher, while this value could deteriorate to 20% for analytes found at the sub-μg g -1 level. Overall, the technique evaluated presents many advantages for the fast and accurate multi-element analysis of these materials, avoiding laborious digestion procedures and minimizing the risk of analyte losses due to the

  4. Effects of picosecond laser repetition rate on ablation of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Baoye; Deng, Leimin; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Fei; Duan, Jun, E-mail: duans@hust.edu.cn; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the effects of pulse repetition rate on ablation efficiency and quality of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel have been studied using a picosecond (ps) pulse Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser system at λ= 1064 nm. The experimental results of area ablation on target surface reveal that laser repetition rate plays a significant role in controlling ablation efficiency and quality. Increasing the laser repetition rate, while keeping a constant mean power improves the ablation efficiency and quality. For each laser mean power, there is an optimal repetition rate to achieve a higher laser ablation efficiency with low surface roughness. A high ablation efficiency of 42.29, 44.11 and 47.52 μm{sup 3}/mJ, with surface roughness of 0.476, 0.463 and 0.706 μm could be achieved at laser repetition rate of 10 MHz, for laser mean power of 15, 17 and 19 W, respectively. Scanning electron microcopy images revels that the surface morphology evolves from rough with numerous craters, to flat without pores when we increased the laser repetition rate. The effects of laser repetition rate on the heat accumulation, plasma shield and ablation threshold were analyzed by numerical simulation, spectral analysis and multi-laser shot, respectively. The synergetic effects of laser repetition rate on laser ablation rate and machining quality were analyzed and discussed systemically in this paper.

  5. Improvement of the surface finish obtained by laser ablation with a Nd: YAG laser on pre-ablated tool steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available . In recent years, these lasers have been used in other fields, such as laser ablation of small tools for plastics injection moulding. Laser ablation is a technology that is investigated as a method to improve the surface finish in tool steel. Different...

  6. Laser ablation under different electron heat conduction models in inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuanggui; Ren, Guoli; Huo, Wen Yi

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of three different electron heat conduction models on the laser ablation of gold plane target. Different from previous studies, we concentrate on the plasma conditions, the conversion efficiency from laser into soft x rays and the scaling relation of mass ablation, which are relevant to hohlraum physics study in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion. We find that the simulated electron temperature in corona region is sensitive to the electron heat conduction models. For different electron heat conduction models, there are obvious differences in magnitude and spatial profile of electron temperature. For the flux limit model, the calculated conversion efficiency is sensitive to flux limiters. In the laser ablation of gold, most of the laser energies are converted into x rays. So the scaling relation of mass ablation rate is quite different from that of low Z materials.

  7. Ablation mass features in multi-pulses femtosecond laser ablate molybdenum target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongye; Gierse, Niels; Wegner, Julian; Pretzler, Georg; Oelmann, Jannis; Brezinsek, Sebastijan; Liang, Yunfeng; Neubauer, Olaf; Rasinski, Marcin; Linsmeier, Christian; Ding, Hongbin

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the ablation mass features related to reflectivity of bulk Molybdenum (Mo) were investigated by a Ti: Sa 6 fs laser pulse at central wavelength 790 nm. The ablated mass removal was determined using Confocal Microscopy (CM) technique. The surface reflectivity was calibrated and measured by a Lambda 950 spectrophotometer as well as a CCD camera during laser ablation. The ablation mass loss per pulse increase with the increasing of laser shots, meanwhile the surface reflectivity decrease. The multi-pulses (100 shots) ablation threshold of Mo was determined to be 0.15 J/cm2. The incubation coefficient was estimated as 0.835. The reflectivity change of the Mo target surface following multi-pulses laser ablation were studied as a function of laser ablation shots at various laser fluences from 1.07 J/cm2 to 36.23 J/cm2. The results of measured reflectivity indicate that surface reflectivity of Mo target has a significant decline in the first 3-laser pulses at the various fluences. These results are important for developing a quantitative analysis model for laser induced ablation and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the first wall diagnosis of EAST tokamak.

  8. Effects of pressure rise on cw laser ablation of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCarpentier, Gerald L.; Motamedi, Massoud; Welch, Ashley J.

    1991-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to identify mechanisms responsible for the initiation of continuous wave (cw) laser ablation of tissue and investigate the role of pressure in the ablation process. Porcine aorta samples were irradiated in a chamber pressurized from 1 X 10-4 to 12 atmospheres absolute pressure. Acrylic and Zn-Se windows in the experimental pressure chamber allowed video and infrared cameras to simultaneously record mechanical and thermal events associated with cw argon laser ablation of these samples. Video and thermal images of tissue slabs documented the explosive nature of cw laser ablation of soft biological media and revealed similar ablation threshold temperatures and ablation onset times under different environmental pressures; however, more violent initiation explosions with decreasing environmental pressures were observed. These results suggest that ablation initiates with thermal alterations in the mechanical strength of the tissue and proceeds with an explosion induced by the presence superheated liquid within the tissue.

  9. Thermal Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: Radiofrequency and Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Valcavi, Roberto [Endocrinology Division and Thyroid Disease Center, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Pacella, Claudio M. [Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology Department, Ospedale Regina Apostolorum, Albano Laziale-Rome (IT); Rhim, Hyun Chul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Dong Kyu [Human Medical Imaging and Intervention Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Although ethanol ablation has been successfully used to treat cystic thyroid nodules, this procedure is less effective when the thyroid nodules are solid. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation, a newer procedure used to treat malignant liver tumors, has been valuable in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules regardless of the extent of the solid component. This article reviews the basic physics, techniques, applications, results, and complications of thyroid RF ablation, in comparison to laser ablation.

  10. Effect of ablation geometry on the dynamics, composition, and geometrical shape of thin film plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Alamgir; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2018-01-01

    The characteristics of plasma plume produced by front and back ablation of thin films have been investigated using fast imaging and optical emission spectroscopy. Ablation geometry dependence of the plume dynamics, its geometrical aspect and composition is emphasized. Also, the effect of an ambient environment and the beam diameter of an ablating laser on the front and back ablations is briefly discussed. Analysis of time resolved images and plasma parameters indicates that the energetic and spherical plasma formed by front ablation is strikingly different in comparison to the slow and nearly cylindrical plasma plume observed in the case of back ablation. Further shock formation, plume confinement, thermalization and validity of different expansion models in these two ablation geometries are also presented. The present study demonstrates the manipulation of kinetic energy, shape, ion/neutral compositions and directionality of the expanding plume by adjusting the experimental configuration, which is highly relevant to its utilization in various applications e.g., generation of energetic particles, tokamak edge plasma diagnostics, thin film deposition, etc.

  11. A study of particle generation during laser ablation with applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chunyi [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A study has been made of the generation of particles during laser ablation and has included size distribution measurements and observation of the formation processes. The particle size distribution with respect to different laser parameters was obtained in-line using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and a particle counter. The experimental results show that the particle size varies with laser energy, laser pulsewidth, ambient gas flow rate and sample properties. The results serve as a basis for controlling the size of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to study mass ejection processes and mechanisms. At higher laser irradiance, some particles were ejected in the liquid and even in the solid phase. Time-resolved images show the propagation of the shockwaves: external shockwaves propagate outward and decelerate, and internal shockwaves reflect back and forth between the gas contact surface and the sample surface. The internal shockwave is proposed to cause the ejection of liquid particles when the internal shockwave strikes the liquid molten layer. A simulation based on vapor plume expansion was carried out and provides satisfactory agreement with experimental results. Different material properties result in different particle ejection behavior:particle ejection for most materials including metals result in a conically shaped envelope for the ejected material while ejection for silicon resembles a liquid jet. The difference in density change when the materials melt was proposed to be an important factor in the different ejection behavior. The characteristics of particles generated by laser ablation have a strong influence on the chemical analysis of the irradiated sample. Large particles are more difficult to completely vaporize and ionize, and induced preferential vaporization causes fractionation (i.e. a detected chemical composition that differs from the sample material). Large particles also result in spikes in

  12. Synthesis of high Al content AlxGa1−xN ternary films by pulsed laser co-ablation of GaAs and Al targets assisted by nitrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Hua; You, Qinghu; Hu, Zhigao; Guo, Shuang; Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Al x Ga 1−x N films were synthesized by co-ablation of an Al target and a GaAs target. • Nitrogen plasma was used to assist the synthesis of Al x Ga 1−x N ternary films. • The Al x Ga 1−x N films are slightly rich in N with an Al content above 0.6. • The Al x Ga 1−x N films are hexagonal wurtzite in crystal structure. • The Al x Ga 1−x N films have an absorption edge of 260 nm and a band gap of 4.7 eV. - Abstract: We present the synthesis of Al x Ga 1−x N ternary films by pulsed laser co-ablation of a polycrystalline GaAs target and a metallic Al target in the environment of nitrogen plasma which provides nitrogen for the films and assists the formation of nitride films. Field emission scanning electron microscopy exposes the smooth surface appearance and dense film structure. X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy reveal the hexagonal wurtzite structure. Optical characterization shows high optical transmittance with an absorption edge of about 260 nm and a band gap of 4.7 eV. Compositional analysis gives the Al content of about 0.6. The structure and optical properties of the Al x Ga 1−x N films are compared with those of binary GaN and AlN films synthesized by ablating GaAs or Al target with the same nitrogen plasma assistance

  13. A thermal model for nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to simulate the nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of aluminum, a novel model was presented for the target ablation and plume expansion. The simulation of the target ablation was based on one-dimensional heat conduction, taking into account temperature dependent material properties, phase transition, dielectric transition and phase explosion. While the simulation of the plume expansion was based on one-dimensional gas-dynamical equation, taking into account ionization, plume absorption and shielding. By coupling the calculations of the target ablation and plume expansion, the characteristics of the target and plume were obtained. And the calculated results were in good agreement with the experimental data, in terms of ablation threshold and depth within the fluence range of the tested laser. Subsequently, investigations were carried out to analyze the mechanisms of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation. The calculated results showed that the maximum surface temperature remained at about 90% of the critical temperature (0.9Tc due to phase explosion. Moreover, the plume shielding has significant effects on the laser ablation, and the plume shielding proportion increase as the laser fluence increasing. The ambient pressure belows 100 Pa is more suitable for laser ablation, which can obtained larger ablation depth.

  14. Cutting thin glass by femtosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyesung; Kim, Dongsik

    2018-06-01

    The femtosecond laser ablation process for cutting thin aluminoborosilicate glass sheets of thickness 100 μm was investigated with emphasis on effective cutting speed (Veff) and mechanical strength of diced samples. The process parameters including the laser fluence (F), overlap ratio (r) of the laser beam and polarization direction were varied at a fixed pulse repetition rate f = 1 kHz to find the optimal process condition that maximizes Veff and edge strength. A three-point bending test was performed to evaluate the front-side and back-side bending (edge) strength of the laser-cut samples. Veff was proportional to F unless r exceeded a critical value, at which excessive energy began to be delivered at the same spot. The front-side edge strength was bigger than the back-side strength because of the back-side damages such as chipping. Good edge strength, as high as ∼280 MPa (front-side) and ∼230 MPa (back-side), was obtained at F = 19 J/m2, r = 0.99, with laser polarization vertical to the cutting path.

  15. Real time determination of the laser ablated mass by means of electric field-perturbation measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, P.; Álvarez, J.; Sarmiento, R.; Bredice, F.; Sánchez-Aké, C.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.; Palleschi, V.

    2018-04-01

    A Nd:YAG ns-pulsed laser was used to ablate Al, Cd and Zn targets, which were placed between the plates of a planar charged capacitor. The plasma generates a transient redistribution of the electrical charges on the plates that can be measured as a voltage drop across a resistor connected to the ground plate. This signal is proportional to the capacitor applied voltage, the distance between the plates and the total number of ions produced in the ablation process which in turn is related to the laser energy and the ablated mass. After a series of pulses, the targets were weighed on a thermogravimetric balance to measure the ablated mass. Our results show that the electrical signal measured on the resistor is univocally related to the ablated mass from the target. Therefore, after a proper calibration depending on the material and the experimental geometry, the electrical signal can be used for real time quantitative measurement of the ablated mass in pulsed laser generated plasma experiments. The experiments were repeated on an aluminum target, with and without the presence of the external electric field in order to determine the possible influence of the applied electric field on the ablated mass.

  16. Characteristics of target polarization by laser ablation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krása, Josef; Delle Side, D.; Giuffreda, E.; Nassisi, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2015), 601-605 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0454; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Target current in laser-produced plasmas * positive and negative target polarization * space structure of ion front Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.649, year: 2015

  17. Femtosecond laser ablation and cutting technology on PMP foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Chengwei; Li Guo; Huang Yanhua; Du Kai; Yang Liang

    2013-01-01

    The femtosecond laser ablation results of PMP foam (density of 90 mg/cm 3 ) were analyzed. The laser pulses used for the study were 800 nm in wavelength, 50 fs in pulse duration and the repetition rate was 1000 Hz. The ablation threshold of the foam was 0.91 J/cm 2 when it was shot by 100 laser pulses. The impacts of laser power, the pulse number and the numerical aperture of the focusing objective on the crater diameter were obtained. In the same femtosecond laser machining system, comparing with the ablation shape into copper foil, the important factor causing the irregular shape of the ablation region was verified that there were many different sizes and randomly distributed pores inside PMP foam. The carbonation phenomenon was observed on the edge of the ablated areas when the sample was ablated using high laser power or/and more laser pulses. Thermal effect was considered to be the causes of the carbonation. A new method based on coupling laser beam to cut thickness greater than 1 mm film-foam with femtosecond laser was proposed. Using this method, the femtosecond laser cutting thickness was greater than 1.5 mm, the angle between the cutting side wall and the laser beam optical axis might be less than 5°, and the cutting surface was clean. (authors)

  18. Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J H; Lucas, D; Koshland, C P

    2007-01-01

    Laser interaction with nanoscale particles is distinct and different from laser-bulk material interaction, where a hot plasma is normally created. Here, we review our studies on 193 nm laser ablation of various nanoscale particles including NaCl, soot, polystyrene, and gold. The 20 ns laser beam with fluences up to 0.3 J/cm 2 irradiates nanoparticles in a gas stream at laser repetition rates from 10 to 100 Hz. The particle size distributions before and after irradiation are measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and particle morphology is examined with electron microscopy. All the nanomaterials studied exhibit a similar disintegration pattern and similar particle formation characteristics. No broadband emission associated with particle heating or optical breakdown is observed. The nanoparticles formed after irradiation have a smaller mean diameter and an order of magnitude higher number concentration with a more spherical shape compared to the original particles. We use the photon-atom ratio (PAR) to interpret the laser-particle interaction energetics

  19. Pulsed laser ablation and deposition of niobium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansone, M.; De Bonis, A.; Santagata, A.; Rau, J.V.; Galasso, A.; Teghil, R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We have deposited in vacuum niobium carbide films by fs and ns PLD. • We have compared PLD performed by ultra-short and short laser pulses. • The films deposited by fs PLD of NbC are formed by nanoparticles. • The structure of the films produced by fs PLD at 500 °C corresponds to NbC. - Abstract: NbC crystalline films have been deposited in vacuum by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition technique. The films have been characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopies and by X-ray diffraction. To clarify the ablation–deposition mechanism, the plasma produced by the ablation process has been characterized by optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging. A comparison of the results with those obtained by ns pulsed deposition of the same target has been carried out.

  20. Laser Ablation for Cancer: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Fong, Yuman

    2017-01-01

    Laser ablation (LA) is gaining acceptance for the treatment of tumors as an alternative to surgical resection. This paper reviews the use of lasers for ablative and surgical applications. Also reviewed are solutions aimed at improving LA outcomes: hyperthermal treatment planning tools and thermometric techniques during LA, used to guide the surgeon in the choice and adjustment of the optimal laser settings, and the potential use of nanoparticles to allow biologic selectivity of ablative treatments. Promising technical solutions and a better knowledge of laser-tissue interaction should allow LA to be used in a safe and effective manner as a cancer treatment. PMID:28613248

  1. Laser Ablation for Cancer: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Schena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation (LA is gaining acceptance for the treatment of tumors as an alternative to surgical resection. This paper reviews the use of lasers for ablative and surgical applications. Also reviewed are solutions aimed at improving LA outcomes: hyperthermal treatment planning tools and thermometric techniques during LA, used to guide the surgeon in the choice and adjustment of the optimal laser settings, and the potential use of nanoparticles to allow biologic selectivity of ablative treatments. Promising technical solutions and a better knowledge of laser-tissue interaction should allow LA to be used in a safe and effective manner as a cancer treatment.

  2. Langmuir probe measurements and mass spectrometry of plasma plumes generated by laser ablation of La{sub 0.4}Ca{sub 0.6}MnO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jikun; Lippert, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.lippert@psi.ch; Ojeda-G-P, Alejandro; Stender, Dieter; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander [Department of General Energy Research, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Lunney, James G. [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-08-21

    The plasma formed in vacuum by UV nanosecond laser ablation of La{sub 0.4}Ca{sub 0.6}MnO{sub 3} in the fluence range of 0.8 to 1.9 J cm{sup −2} using both Langmuir probe analysis and energy-resolved mass spectrometry has been studied. Mass spectrometry shows that the main positive ion species are Ca{sup +}, Mn{sup +}, La{sup +}, and LaO{sup +}. The Ca{sup +} and Mn{sup +} energy distributions are quite broad and lie in the 0–100 eV region, with the average energies increasing with laser fluence. In contrast, the La{sup +} and LaO{sup +} distributions are strongly peaked around 10 eV. The net time-of-arrival signal derived from the measured positive ion energy distributions is broadly consistent with the positive ion signal measured by the Langmuir probe. We also detected a significant number of O{sup −} ions with energies in the range of 0 to 10 eV. The Langmuir probe was also used to measure the temporal variation of the electron density and temperature at 6 cm from the ablation target. In the period when O{sup −} ions are found at this position, the plasma conditions are consistent with those required for significant negative oxygen ion formation, as revealed by studies on radio frequency excited oxygen plasma.

  3. Benign thyroid nodule unresponsive to radiofrequency ablation treated with laser ablation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Silvia; Balestra, Margherita; Vera, Lara; Giusti, Massimo

    2018-05-11

    Radiofrequency ablation and laser ablation are safe and effective techniques for reducing thyroid nodule volume, neck symptoms, and cosmetic complaints. Therapeutic success is defined as a nodule reduction > 50% between 6 and 12 months after the procedure, but a percentage of nodules inexplicably do not respond to thermal ablation. We describe the case of a young Caucasian woman with a solid benign thyroid nodule who refused surgery and who had undergone radiofrequency ablation in 2013. The nodule did not respond in terms of either volume reduction or improvement in neck symptoms. After 2 years, given the patient's continued refusal of thyroidectomy, we proposed laser ablation. The nodule displayed a significant volume reduction (- 50% from radiofrequency ablation baseline volume, - 57% from laser ablation baseline), and the patient reported a significant improvement in neck symptoms (from 6/10 to 1/10 on a visual analogue scale). We conjecture that some benign thyroid nodules may be intrinsically resistant to necrosis when one specific ablation technique is used, but may respond to another technique. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of the effect of performing a different percutaneous ablation technique in a nodule that does not respond to radiofrequency ablation.

  4. Influence of ablation wavelength and time on optical properties of laser ablated carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnaeni, Hanna, M. Yusrul; Pambudi, A. A.; Murdaka, F. H.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dots, which are unique and applicable materials, have been produced using many techniques. In this work, we have fabricated carbon dots made of coconut fiber using laser ablation technique. The purpose of this work is to evaluate two ablation parameters, which are ablation wavelength and ablation time. We used pulsed laser from Nd:YAG laser with emit wavelength at 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm. We varied ablation time one hour and two hours. Photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence setup were used to study the optical properties of fabricated carbon dots. In general, fabricated carbon dots emit bluish green color emission upon excitation by blue laser. We found that carbon dots fabricated using 1064 nm laser produced the highest carbon dots emission among other samples. The peak wavelength of carbon dots emission is between 495 nm until 505 nm, which gives bluish green color emission. Two hours fabricated carbon dots gave four times higher emission than one hour fabricated carbon dot. More emission intensity of carbon dots means more carbon dots nanoparticles were fabricated during laser ablation process. In addition, we also measured electron dynamics of carbon dots using time-resolved photoluminescence. We found that sample with higher emission has longer electron decay time. Our finding gives optimum condition of carbon dots fabrication from coconut fiber using laser ablation technique. Moreover, fabricated carbon dots are non-toxic nanoparticles that can be applied for health, bio-tagging and medical applications.

  5. Macroparticle acceleration by laser induced ablation pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, M.D.J.; Motz, H.; Rumsby, P.T.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that the theoretical scaling of plasma pressure is very closely obeyed using ordinary Q-switched laser pulses, resulting in velocities of over 2 x 10 4 cm s -1 . The problems associated with increasing this velocity whilst still not rupturing the pellet have also been examined and an experiment to determine the results described. (orig.) [de

  6. Polarization of plastic targets by laser ablation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giuffreda, E.; Delle Side, D.; Krása, Josef; Nassisi, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, May (2016), s. 1-6, č. článku C05004. ISSN 1748-0221 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : lasers * ion sources * wake-field acceleration Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  7. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  8. Filament-induced remote surface ablation for long range laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohwetter, Ph.; Stelmaszczyk, K.; Woeste, L.; Ackermann, R.; Mejean, G.; Salmon, E.; Kasparian, J.; Yu, J.; Wolf, J.-P.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate laser induced ablation and plasma line emission from a metallic target at distances up to 180 m from the laser, using filaments (self-guided propagation structures ∼ 100 μm in diameter and ∼ 5 x 10 13 W/cm 2 in intensity) appearing as femtosecond and terawatt laser pulses propagating in air. The remarkable property of filaments to propagate over a long distance independently of the diffraction limit opens the frontier to long range operation of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. We call this special configuration of remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy 'remote filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy'. Our results show main features of filament-induced ablation on the surface of a metallic sample and associated plasma emission. Our experimental data allow us to estimate requirements for the detection system needed for kilometer-range remote filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiment

  9. Investigation of different liquid media and ablation times on pulsed laser ablation synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baladi, Arash; Sarraf Mamoory, Rasoul

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of Al targets in ethanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, Particle size distribution diagram from Laser Particle Size Analyzer (LPSA), UV-visible absorption spectra, and weight changes of targets were used for the characterization and comparison of products. The experiments demonstrated that ablation efficiency in ethylene glycol is too low, in ethanol is higher, and in acetone is highest. Comparison between ethanol and acetone clarified that acetone medium leads to finer nanoparticles (mean diameter of 30 nm) with narrower size distribution (from 10 to 100 nm). However, thin carbon layer coats some of them, which was not observed in ethanol medium. It was also revealed that higher ablation time resulted in higher ablated mass, but lower ablation rate. Finer nanoparticles, moreover, were synthesized in higher ablation times.

  10. Investigation of different liquid media and ablation times on pulsed laser ablation synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baladi, Arash [Materials Engineering Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Jalal Al Ahmad, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarraf Mamoory, Rasoul, E-mail: rsarrafm@modares.ac.ir [Materials Engineering Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Jalal Al Ahmad, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-01

    Aluminum nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of Al targets in ethanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, Particle size distribution diagram from Laser Particle Size Analyzer (LPSA), UV-visible absorption spectra, and weight changes of targets were used for the characterization and comparison of products. The experiments demonstrated that ablation efficiency in ethylene glycol is too low, in ethanol is higher, and in acetone is highest. Comparison between ethanol and acetone clarified that acetone medium leads to finer nanoparticles (mean diameter of 30 nm) with narrower size distribution (from 10 to 100 nm). However, thin carbon layer coats some of them, which was not observed in ethanol medium. It was also revealed that higher ablation time resulted in higher ablated mass, but lower ablation rate. Finer nanoparticles, moreover, were synthesized in higher ablation times.

  11. Near-field mapping by laser ablation of PMMA coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, J.; Maibohm, C.; Kostiucenko, O.

    2011-01-01

    The optical near-field of lithography-defined gold nanostructures, arranged into regular arrays on a gold film, is characterized via ablation of a polymer coating by laser illumination. The method utilizes femto-second laser pulses from a laser scanning microscope which induces electrical field...... that the different stages in the ablation process can be controlled and characterized making the technique suitable for characterizing optical near-fields of metal nanostructures....

  12. Laser ablation for analytical sampling: what can we learn from modeling?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaerts, Annemie; Chen Zhaoyang; Gijbels, Renaat; Vertes, Akos

    2003-01-01

    The paper is built up in two parts. First, a rather comprehensive introduction is given, with a brief overview of the different application fields of laser ablation, focusing mainly on the analytical applications, and an overview of the different modeling approaches available for laser ablation. Further, a discussion is presented here about the laser evaporated plume expansion in vacuum or in a background gas, as well as about the different mechanisms for particle formation in the laser ablation process, which is most relevant for laser ablation as solid sampling technique for inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry. In the second part, a model is presented that describes the interaction of an ns-pulsed laser with a Cu target, as well as the resulting plume expansion and plasma formation. The results presented here, include the temperature distribution in the target, the melting and evaporation of the target, the vapor density, velocity and temperature distribution in the evaporated plume, the ionization degree and the density profiles of Cu 0 atoms, Cu + and Cu 2+ ions and electrons in the plume (plasma), as well as the resulting plasma shielding of the incoming laser beam. Results are presented as a function of time during and after the laser pulse, and as a function of position in the target or in the plume. The influence of the target reflection coefficient on the above calculation results is investigated. Finally, the effect of the laser pulse fluence on the target heating, melting and vaporization, and on the plume characteristics and plasma formation is studied. Our modeling results are in reasonable agreement with calculated and measured data from literature

  13. Forensic investigation of brick stones using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheid, Nicole; Becker, Stefan; Duecking, Marc; Hampel, Gabriele; Volker Kratz, Jens; Watzke, Peter; Weis, Peter; Zauner, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Brick stones collected from different production facilities were studied for their elemental compositions under forensic aspects using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF). The aim of these examinations was to assess the potential of these methods in forensic comparison analyses of brick stones. The accuracy of the analysis methods was evaluated using NIST standard reference materials (679, 98b and 97b). In order to compare the stones to each other, multivariate data analysis was used. The evaluation of the INAA results (based on the concentrations of V, Na, K, Sm, U, Sc, Fe, Co, Rb and Cs) using principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis is presented as an example. The results derived from the different analytical methods are consistent. It was shown that elemental analysis using the described methods is a valuable tool for forensic examinations of brick stones.

  14. Laser ablation surface-enhanced Raman microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londero, Pablo S; Lombardi, John R; Leona, Marco

    2013-06-04

    Improved identification of trace organic compounds in complex matrixes is critical for a variety of fields such as material science, heritage science, and forensics. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a vibrational spectroscopy technique that can attain single-molecule sensitivity and has been shown to complement mass spectrometry, but lacks widespread application without a robust method that utilizes the effect. We demonstrate a new, highly sensitive, and widely applicable approach to SERS analysis based on laser ablation in the presence of a tailored plasmonic substrate. We analyze several challenging compounds, including non-water-soluble pigments and dyed leather from an ancient Egyptian chariot, achieving sensitivity as high as 120 amol for a 1:1 signal-to-noise ratio and 5 μm spatial resolution. This represents orders of magnitude improvement in spatial resolution and sensitivity compared to those of other SERS approaches intended for widespread application, greatly increasing the applicability of SERS.

  15. Ablation of Solid Hydrogen in a Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard

    1979-01-01

    Several hydrogen pellet ablation models based on the formation of a shielding neutral cloud have been reported by different authors. The predicted ablation rates are shown to follow almost the same scaling law and this is used to explain the authors' ablation experiment.......Several hydrogen pellet ablation models based on the formation of a shielding neutral cloud have been reported by different authors. The predicted ablation rates are shown to follow almost the same scaling law and this is used to explain the authors' ablation experiment....

  16. Single and double long pulse laser ablation of aluminum induced in air and water ambient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh; Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser ablation of aluminum target by single and double pulse (∼ 5 ns delay) in ambient air and distilled water • Comparing with air, in ambient water, plasma confinement results in higher crater depth. • In comparison with single pulse laser ablation, the absorption of the laser pulse energy is higher for double pulse regime. • As a result of ablated material expansion, the crater depth is decreased if the target is placed at lower depth. - Abstract: In this paper, single pulse and double pulse laser ablation of an aluminum target in two interaction ambient was investigated experimentally. The interaction was performed by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser beam in air and four depths (i.e. 9, 13, 17, and 21 mm) of distilled water ambient. The irradiation was carried out in single and collinear double pulse configurations in both air and liquid ambient. Crater geometry (depth and diameter) was measured by an optical microscope. The results indicated that the crater geometry strongly depends on both single pulse and double pulse configurations and interaction ambient. In single pulse regime, the crater diameter is higher for all water depths compared to that of air. However, the crater depth, depend on water depth, is higher or lower than the crater depth in air. In double pulse laser ablation, there are greater values for both crater diameters and crater depths in the water.

  17. Laser ablation of tumors: current concepts and recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroszczynski, C.; Gaffke, G.; Gnauck, M.; Ricke, J.; Felix, R.; Puls, R.; Speck, U.; Hosten, N.; Oettle, H.; Hohenberger, P.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this paper is to present technical innovations and clinical results of percutaneous interventional laser ablation of tumors using new techniques. Methods. Laser ablation was performed in 182 patients (liver tumors: 131, non hepatic tumors - bone, lung, others: 51) after interdisciplinary consensus was obtained. The procedure was done using a combination of imaging modalities (CT/MRI, CT/US) or only closed high field MRI (1.5 T). All patients received an MRI-scan immediately after laser ablation. Results. In 90.9% of the patients with liver tumors, a complete ablation was achieved. Major events occurred in 5.4%. The technical success rate of laser ablation in non-hepatic tumors was high, clinical results differed depending on the treated organ. Conclusions. The treatment of tumors of the liver and other organs up to 5 cm by laser ablation was a safe procedure with a low rate of complications and side effects. Image guidance by MRI is advantageous for precise tumor visualization in all dimensions, therapy monitoring, and control of laser ablation results. (orig.) [de

  18. Percutaneous laser ablation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Enrico; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Pacella, Claudio M

    2008-10-01

    Percutaneous image-guided procedures, largely based on thermal ablation, are at present under investigation for achieving a nonsurgical targeted cytoreduction in benign and malignant thyroid lesions. In several uncontrolled clinical trials and in two randomized clinical trials, laser ablation has demonstrated a good efficacy and safety for the shrinkage of benign cold thyroid nodules. In hyperfunctioning nodules, laser ablation induced a nearly 50% volume reduction with a variable frequency of normalization of thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. Laser ablation has been tested for the palliative treatment of poorly differentiated thyroid carcinomas, local recurrences or distant metastases. Laser ablation therapy is indicated for the shrinkage of benign cold nodules in patients with local pressure symptoms who are at high surgical risk. The treatment should be performed only by well trained operators and after a careful cytological evaluation. Laser ablation does not seem to be consistently effective in the long-term control of hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules and is not an alternative treatment to 131I therapy. Laser ablation may be considered for the cytoreduction of tumor tissue prior to external radiation therapy or chemotherapy of local or distant recurrences of thyroid malignancy that are not amenable to surgical or radioiodine treatment.

  19. Pulsed Tm:YAG laser ablation of knee joint tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei-Qiang; Vari, Sandor G.; Duffy, J. T.; Miller, J. M.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1992-06-01

    We investigated the effect of a free-running 2.01 micron pulsed Tm:YAG laser on bovine knee joint tissues. Ablation rates of fresh fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone were measured in saline as a function of laser fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and fiber core size (400 and 600 microns). All tissues could be effectively ablated and the ablation rate increased linearly with the increasing fluence. Use of fibers of different core sizes, while maintaining constant energy fluence, did not result in significant difference in ablation rate. Histology analyses of the ablated tissue samples reveal average Tm:YAG radiation induced thermal damage (denatunalization) zones ranging between 130 and 540 microns, depending on the laser parameters and the tissue type.

  20. Nanoparticle fabrication of hydroxyapatite by laser ablation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musaev, O. R.; Wieliczka, D. M.; Wrobel, J. M.; Kruger, M. B.; Dusevich, V.

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic polycrystalline hydroxyapatite was ablated in water with 337 nm radiation from a UV nitrogen pulsed laser. According to transmission electron microscopy micrographs, the ablated particles were approximately spherical and had a size of ∼80 nm. Raman spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that particles had the same structure as the original crystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the surface chemical composition was close to that of the original material. The characteristics of the ablated particles and estimations of the temperature rise of the hydroxyapatite surface under laser irradiation are consistent with the mechanism of explosive boiling being responsible for ablation. The experimental observations offer the basis for preparation of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles by laser ablation in water

  1. Elemental analysis of soils using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with multivariate discrimination: tape mounting as an alternative to pellets for small forensic transfer specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzi, Sarah C; Almirall, José R

    2014-01-01

    Elemental analysis of soil is a useful application of both laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in geological, agricultural, environmental, archeological, planetary, and forensic sciences. In forensic science, the question to be answered is often whether soil specimens found on objects (e.g., shoes, tires, or tools) originated from the crime scene or other location of interest. Elemental analysis of the soil from the object and the locations of interest results in a characteristic elemental profile of each specimen, consisting of the amount of each element present. Because multiple elements are measured, multivariate statistics can be used to compare the elemental profiles in order to determine whether the specimen from the object is similar to one of the locations of interest. Previous work involved milling and pressing 0.5 g of soil into pellets before analysis using LA-ICP-MS and LIBS. However, forensic examiners prefer techniques that require smaller samples, are less time consuming, and are less destructive, allowing for future analysis by other techniques. An alternative sample introduction method was developed to meet these needs while still providing quantitative results suitable for multivariate comparisons. The tape-mounting method involved deposition of a thin layer of soil onto double-sided adhesive tape. A comparison of tape-mounting and pellet method performance is reported for both LA-ICP-MS and LIBS. Calibration standards and reference materials, prepared using the tape method, were analyzed by LA-ICP-MS and LIBS. As with the pellet method, linear calibration curves were achieved with the tape method, as well as good precision and low bias. Soil specimens from Miami-Dade County were prepared by both the pellet and tape methods and analyzed by LA-ICP-MS and LIBS. Principal components analysis and linear discriminant analysis were applied to the multivariate data

  2. Application of 1013 ohm Faraday cup current amplifiers for boron isotopic analyses by solution mode and laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Nicholas S; Sadekov, Aleksey Yu; Misra, Sambuddha

    2018-01-15

    Boron isotope ratios (δ 11 B values) are used as a proxy for seawater paleo-pH, amongst several other applications. The analytical precision can be limited by the detection of low intensity ion beams from limited sample amounts. High-gain amplifiers offer improvements in signal/noise ratio and can be used to increase measurement precision and reduce sample amounts. 10 13 ohm amplifier technology has previously been applied to several radiogenic systems, but has thus far not been applied to non-traditional stable isotopes. Here we apply 10 13 ohm amplifier technology for the measurement of boron isotope ratios using solution mode MC-ICP-MS and laser ablation mode (LA-)MC-ICP-MS techniques. Precision is shown for reference materials as well as for low-volume foraminifera samples. The baseline uncertainty for a 0.1 pA 10 B + ion beam is reduced to ohm amplifier technology is demonstrated to offer advantages for the determination of δ 11 B values by both MC-ICP-MS and LA-MC-ICP-MS for small samples of biogenic carbonates, such as foraminifera shells. 10 13 ohm amplifier technology will also be of benefit to other non-traditional stable isotope measurements. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Osteoid Osteoma: Experience with Laser- and Radiofrequency-Induced Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, Bernhard; Tunn, Per-Ulf; Gaffke, Gunnar; Melcher, Ingo; Felix, Roland; Stroszczynski, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome of osteoid osteoma treated by thermal ablation after drill opening. A total of 17 patients and 20 procedures were included. All patients had typical clinical features (age, pain) and a typical radiograph showing a nidus. In 5 cases, additional histological specimens were acquired. After drill opening of the osteoid osteoma nidus, 12 thermal ablations were induced by laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) (9F Power-Laser-Set; Somatex, Germany) and 8 ablations by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RITA; StarBurst, USA). Initial clinical success with pain relief has been achieved in all patients after the first ablation. Three patients had an osteoid osteoma recurrence after 3, 9, and 10 months and were successfully re-treated by thermal ablation. No major complication and one minor complication (sensible defect) were recorded. Thermal ablation is a safe and minimally invasive therapy option for osteoid osteoma. Although the groups are too small for a comparative analysis, we determined no difference between laser- and radiofrequency-induced ablation in clinical outcome after ablation

  4. Neutral and plasma shielding model for pellet ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1987-10-01

    The neutral gas shielding model for ablation of frozen hydrogenic pellets is extended to include the effects of an initial Maxwelliam distribution of incident electron energies; a cold plasma shield outside the neutral shield and extended along the magnetic field; energetic neutral beam ions and alpha particles; and self-limiting electron ablation in the collisionless plasma limit. Including the full electron distribution increases ablation, but adding the cold ionized shield reduces ablation; the net effect is a modest reduction in pellet penetration compared with the monoenergetic electron neutral shielding model with no plasma shield. Unlike electrons, fast ions can enter the neutral shield directly without passing through the cold ionized shield because their gyro-orbits are typically larger than the diameter of the cold plasma tube. Fast alpha particles should not enhance the ablation rate unless their population exceeds that expected from local classical thermalization. Fast beam ions, however, may enhance ablation in the plasma periphery if their population is high enough. Self-limiting ablation in the collisionless limit leads to a temporary distortion of the original plasma electron Maxwellian distribution function through preferential depopulation of the higher-energy electrons. 23 refs., 9 figs

  5. Laser tattoo removal with preceding ablative fractional treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencič, Boris; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2013-06-01

    A combined laser tattoo removal treatment, first the ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) with an Er:YAG laser and then the q-switched (QSW) Nd:YAG laser treatment, was studied. Experiments show that significantly higher fluences can be used for the same tissue damage levels.

  6. Matrix effects in laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Staci, E-mail: staci.brown@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Ford, Alan, E-mail: alan.ford@alakaidefense.com [Alakai Defense Systems, 197 Replacement Ave, Suite 102, Fort Leonard Wood, MO 65473 (United States); Akpovo, Charlemagne C., E-mail: charlemagne.akpovo@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Martinez, Jorge, E-mail: jmartinez@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Johnson, Lewis, E-mail: lewis@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) can be used for the detection of isotopes of elements via isotopic shifts in diatomic species in a technique known as laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). While LAMIS works quite well for isotopic analysis of pure compounds under optimal conditions, it is desirable for it to be applicable for a variety of compounds and matrices. However, the LIBS plasma emission associated with LAMIS depends on several parameters, including the applied electric field of the laser pulse, the physical properties of the material being investigated, and the presence of additional elements other than the element of interest. In this paper, we address some of the pitfalls arising from these dependencies when using LAMIS for the determination of the relative isotopic abundance of boron-containing materials with varying chemical matrices. - Highlights: • LAMIS usually determines isotopic composition of boron compounds within 3 percent. • LaBO{sub 3} and some boron-containing mixtures yield inaccurate LAMIS results. • Higher laser energy reduces variability but does not remedy poor LAMIS outcomes.

  7. Use of laser ablation in nuclear decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moggia, Fabrice; Lecardonnel, Xavier; Damerval, Frederique

    2012-09-01

    The development and the use of clean decontamination process appear to be one of the main priorities for industries especially for nuclear industries. This is especially due to the fact of wastes minimization which is one of the principal commitments. One answer would be to use a photonic process such as the LASER process. The principle of this process is based on the absorption, by the contaminant, of the photon's energy. This energy then will propagate into the material and create some mechanical waves responsible of the interfaces embrittlement and de-cohesion. As we can see, this process so called LASER ablation does not use any chemicals and allows us to avoid any production of liquid waste. Since now a couple of years, the Clean-Up Business Unit of AREVA group (BE/CL) investigates this new decontamination technology. Many tests have been done in inactive conditions on various simulants such as paints, inks, resins, metallic oxides firstly in order to estimate its efficiency but also to fully qualify it. After that, we decided to move on hot tests to fully validate this new process and to show its interest for the nuclear industry. Those hot tests have been done on two kinds of contaminated material (on tank pieces covered with a thick metallic oxide layer and on metallic pieces covered with grease). Some information such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray scattering spectroscopy and decontamination factors (DF) will be provided in this paper. (authors)

  8. A novel quantification strategy of transferrin and albumin in human serum by species-unspecific isotope dilution laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Liuxing, E-mail: fenglx@nim.ac.cn; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Jun; Shen, Dairui; Li, Hongmei

    2015-07-16

    Highlights: • Species-unspecific ID-PAGE-LA-ICP-MS was used to quantify Alb and Tf in human serum. • Addition methods of species-unspecific {sup 34}S spike were evaluated. • Isotope change conditions were investigated to reach satisfactory “isotope equilibration”. • Human serum CRM (ERM-DA470k/IFCC) was used to validate the new arrangements. • The developed method offers potential for accurate quantification of protein by ID-PAGE-LA-ICP-MS. - Abstract: Species-specific (SS) isotope dilution analysis with gel electrophoresis (GE)-laser ablation (LA)-ICP-MS is a promising technique for the quantification of particular metal-binding proteins in biological samples. However, unavailable isotopically enriched spike and metal losses in GE separation are main limitations for SS-isotope dilution PAGE-LA-ICP-MS. In this study, we report for the first time the absolute quantification of transferrin (Tf) and albumin (Alb) in human serum by non-denaturing (native) GE combined with species-unspecific isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). In order to achieve a homogeneous distribution of both protein and isotope-enriched spike (simulated isotope equilibration), immersing the protein strips with {sup 34}S spike solution after gel electrophoresis was demonstrated to be an effective way of spike addition. Furthermore, effects of immersion time and {sup 34}S spike concentration were investigated to obtain optimal conditions of the post-electrophoresis isotope dilution method. The relative mass of spike and ablated sample (m{sub sp}/m{sub sam}) in IDMS equation was calculated by standard Tf and Alb proteins, which could be applied to the quantification of Tf and Alb in ERM-DA470k/IFCC for method confirmation. The results were in agreement with the certified value with good precision and small uncertainty (1.5–3%). In this method, species-specific spike protein is not necessary and the integrity of the heteroatom-protein could be maintained in sample preparation

  9. A novel quantification strategy of transferrin and albumin in human serum by species-unspecific isotope dilution laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Liuxing; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Jun; Shen, Dairui; Li, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Species-unspecific ID-PAGE-LA-ICP-MS was used to quantify Alb and Tf in human serum. • Addition methods of species-unspecific 34 S spike were evaluated. • Isotope change conditions were investigated to reach satisfactory “isotope equilibration”. • Human serum CRM (ERM-DA470k/IFCC) was used to validate the new arrangements. • The developed method offers potential for accurate quantification of protein by ID-PAGE-LA-ICP-MS. - Abstract: Species-specific (SS) isotope dilution analysis with gel electrophoresis (GE)-laser ablation (LA)-ICP-MS is a promising technique for the quantification of particular metal-binding proteins in biological samples. However, unavailable isotopically enriched spike and metal losses in GE separation are main limitations for SS-isotope dilution PAGE-LA-ICP-MS. In this study, we report for the first time the absolute quantification of transferrin (Tf) and albumin (Alb) in human serum by non-denaturing (native) GE combined with species-unspecific isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). In order to achieve a homogeneous distribution of both protein and isotope-enriched spike (simulated isotope equilibration), immersing the protein strips with 34 S spike solution after gel electrophoresis was demonstrated to be an effective way of spike addition. Furthermore, effects of immersion time and 34 S spike concentration were investigated to obtain optimal conditions of the post-electrophoresis isotope dilution method. The relative mass of spike and ablated sample (m sp /m sam ) in IDMS equation was calculated by standard Tf and Alb proteins, which could be applied to the quantification of Tf and Alb in ERM-DA470k/IFCC for method confirmation. The results were in agreement with the certified value with good precision and small uncertainty (1.5–3%). In this method, species-specific spike protein is not necessary and the integrity of the heteroatom-protein could be maintained in sample preparation process. Moreover, the

  10. Tactile Sensing From Laser-Ablated Metallized PET Films

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas Chandra; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and implementation of a novel sensor patch developed from commercial polyethylene terephthalate films metallized with aluminum on one side. The aluminum was ablated with laser to form interdigitated

  11. Micro Sampling System for Highly Radioactive Specimen by Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sun Ho; Ha, Yeong Keong; Han, Ki Chul; Park, Yang Soon; Jee, Kwang Yong; Kim, Won Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    Shielded laser ablation system composed of laser system, image analyser, XYZ translator with motion controller, ablation chamber, manipulator and various optics was designed. Nd:YAG laser which can be tunable from 1064 nm to 266 nm was selected as light source. CCD camera(< x 200) was chosen to analyze a crater less than 50 un in diameter. XYZ translator was composed of three linear stage which can travel 50 w with a minimum movement of 1 {mu}m and motion controller. Before the performance test, each part of system was optically aligned. To perform the ablation test, the specimen was ablated by 50 {mu}m interval and observed by image analyser The shape of crater was almost round, indicating laser beam has homogeneous energy distribution. The resolution and magnification of image system were compatible with the design.

  12. Laser ablation studies of Deposited Silver Colloids Active in SERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Porte, R.T.; Moreno, D.S.; Striano, M.C.; Munnoz, M.M.; Garcia-Ramos, J.V.; Cortes, S.S.; Koudoumas, E.

    2002-01-01

    Laser ablation of deposited silver colloids, active in SERS, is carried out at three different laser wavelengths (KrF, XeCl and Nd:YAG at λ = 248, 308 and 532 nm respectively). Emission form excited neutral Ag and Na atoms, present in the ablation plume, is detected with spectral and temporal resolution. The expansion velocity of Ag in the plume is estimated in ∼1x104m s-1, Low-fluence laser ablation of the colloids yields ionized species that are analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. Na+ and Agn+(n≤3) are observed. Composition of the mass spectra and widths of the mass peaks are found to be dependent on laser wavelength, suggesting that the dominant ablation mechanisms are different at the different wavelenghts.

  13. Ablation threshold and ablation mechanism transition of polyoxymethylene irradiated by CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gan; Cheng, Mousen; Li, Xiaokang

    2016-09-01

    Polyoxymethylene (POM) decomposes gradually as it is heated up by the irradiation of CO2 laser; the long-chain molecules of POM are broken into short chains, which leads to the lowering of the melting point and the critical temperature of the ablation products. When the product temperature is above the melting point, ablation comes up in the way of vaporization; when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature, all liquid products are transformed into gas instantly and the ablation mechanism is changed. The laser fluence at which significant ablation is observed is defined as the ablation threshold, and the fluence corresponding to the ablation mechanism changing is denoted as the flyover threshold. In this paper, random pyrolysis is adopted to describe the pyrolytic decomposition of POM, and consequently, the components of the pyrolysis products under different pyrolysis rates are acquired. The Group Contribution method is used to count the thermodynamic properties of the pyrolysis products, and the melting point and the critical temperature of the product mixture are obtained by the Mixing Law. The Knudsen layer relationship is employed to evaluate the ablation mass removal when the product temperature is below the critical temperature. The gas dynamics conservation laws associated with the Jouguet condition are used to calculate the mass removal when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature. Based on the model, a set of simulations for various laser intensities and lengths are carried out to generalize the relationships between the thresholds and the laser parameters. Besides the ablated mass areal density, which fits the experimental data quite well, the ablation temperature, pyrolysis rate, and product components are also discussed for a better understanding of the ablation mechanism of POM.

  14. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C.; Eklund, Peter C.; Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin C.; Shinn, Michelle

    2010-04-06

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces an output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  15. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  16. Simultaneous atomization and ionization of large organic molecules using femtosecond laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata-Nishimura, Mizuki; Tokanai, Fuyuki; Matsuo, Yukari; Kobayashi, Tohru; Kawai, Jun; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Tanihata, Isao; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2002-01-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated femtosecond laser ablation for simultaneous atomization and ionization (fs-SAI) of organic molecules on solid substrates. We find most of the constituent atoms of organic molecules are atomized and ionized non-resonantly by femtosecond laser ablation. This observation is in contrast with that for the photoionization of cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by femtosecond laser in the gas phase where little fragmentation has been observed. Crucial contribution of ablation plasma of solid sample to fs-SAI process is suggested. The ratio of natural abundance of stable isotopes contained in sample molecules is well reproduced, which confirms fs-SAI can be applied to the quantitative chemical analysis of isotope-labeled large organic molecules

  17. Effect of laser absorption on picosecond laser ablation of Cr12MoV mold steel, 9Cr18 stainless steel and H13A cemented carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baoye; Liu, Peng; Wang, Xizhao; Zhang, Fei; Deng, Leimin; Duan, Jun; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2018-05-01

    Due to excellent properties, Cr12MoV mold steel, 9Cr18 stainless steel and H13A cemented carbide are widely used in industry. In this paper, the effect of absorption of laser light on ablation efficiency and roughness have been studied using a picosecond pulse Nd:YVO4 laser. The experimental results reveal that laser wavelength, original surface roughness and chemical composition play an important role in controlling ablation efficiency and roughness. Firstly, higher ablation efficiency with lower surface roughness is achieved on the ablation of 9Cr18 at 532, comparing with 1064 nm. Secondly, the ablation efficiency increases while the Ra of the ablated region decreases with the decrease of original surface roughness on ablation of Cr12MoV mold steel at 532 nm. Thirdly, the ablation efficiency of H13A cemented carbide is much higher than 9Cr18 stainless steel and Cr12MoV mold steel at 1064 nm. Scanning electron microscopy images reveals the formation of pores on the surface of 9Cr18 stainless steel and Cr12MoV mold steel at 532 nm while no pores are formed at 1064 nm. As to H13A cemented carbide, worm-like structure is formed at 1064 nm. The synergetic effects of the heat accumulation, plasma shielding and ablation threshold on laser ablation efficiency and machining quality were analyzed and discussed systematically in this paper.

  18. Magnetic field selective enhancement of Li I lines comparing Li II line in laser ablated lithium plasma at 10- 2 mbar air ambient gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Wu, Ding; Sun, Liying; Hai, Ran; Liu, Jiamin; Ding, Hongbin

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the effect of magnetic field (1.1 T) on the atomic and ionic spectral emission of a laser produced lithium plasma at low pressure has been investigated. The experimental results indicate that magnetic field enhances the intensities of Li I spectral lines but reduces the Li II spectral lines intensities. In this study, two narrowband filters were placed before the ICCD camera to observe the evolution feature of Li II spectral line (548.39 nm, 2p3P2,1,0 → 2s3S1) and Li I spectral line (610.30 nm, 3d2P3/2, 5/2 → 2p2P1/2, 3/2), respectively. The plasma dynamic images show that with the magnetic field, the number density of luminous Li atoms is higher, while the number density of luminous Li ions is lower in comparison to the field-free case. The reduced Li II spectral intensities indicate that the quenching rate of Li ions in the excited state is greater than that without the magnetic field. The enhanced impact frequency of recombination indicates that magnetic field increases the recombination process of electron and Li ions. All of these observations strongly suggest that magnetic confinement increases the recombination process of the electrons with Li ions in the plasma, which results in the decrease in the intensity of Li II line. The results are useful for applying laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to in-situ diagnose the processes of lithium wall conditioning in EAST tokamak.

  19. Enthalpy model for heating, melting, and vaporization in laser ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilios Alexiades; David Autrique

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation is used in a growing number of applications in various areas including medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. In this work the heat transfer and phase change phenomena during nanosecond laser ablation of a copper (Cu) target in a helium (He) background gas at atmospheric pressure are presented. An enthalpy model is outlined, which accounts for heating, melting, and vaporization of the target. As far as we know, this is the first model th...

  20. Atmospheric pressure imaging mass spectrometry of drugs with various ablating lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshkunov, K A; Alimpiev, S S; Pento, A V; Grechnikov, A A; Nikifirov, S M; Simanovsky, Ya O

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure mass spectrometric detection efficiency of organic species (tofisopam and verapamil) was measured by means of the laser ablation of dried solution drops containing known amount of the analyte. Ablated molecules were ionized by an atmospheric pressure laser plasma cell and then introduced in the TOF mass-spectrometer. The spot was formed by dripping 2 μl of solution on the stainless steel substrate and consequent drying. Then it was scanned by an intense ablating beam of various lasers (CO 2 , Nd:YAG and femtosecond fiber laser) until the spot was completely eroded during the non-stop MS-analysis of ablated material. The sensitivity was defined as the ratio of the total ion current integral of the relevant mass peaks to the amount of molecules in the spot. All the tested lasers are suitable for the ablation and subsequent MS-detection of organic species in dried solution spots given enough power deposition is provided. The measured sensitivity values reach 0.1 ions/fg of tested analytes

  1. Desorption/ablation of lithium fluoride induced by extreme ultraviolet laser radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blejchař Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The availability of reliable modeling tools and input data required for the prediction of surface removal rate from the lithium fluoride targets irradiated by the intense photon beams is essential for many practical aspects. This study is motivated by the practical implementation of soft X-ray (SXR or extreme ultraviolet (XUV lasers for the pulsed ablation and thin film deposition. Specifically, it is focused on quantitative description of XUV laser-induced desorption/ablation from lithium fluoride, which is a reference large band-gap dielectric material with ionic crystalline structure. Computational framework was proposed and employed here for the reconstruction of plume expansion dynamics induced by the irradiation of lithium fluoride targets. The morphology of experimentally observed desorption/ablation craters were reproduced using idealized representation (two-zone approximation of the laser fluence profile. The calculation of desorption/ablation rate was performed using one-dimensional thermomechanic model (XUV-ABLATOR code taking into account laser heating and surface evaporation of the lithium fluoride target occurring on a nanosecond timescale. This step was followed by the application of two-dimensional hydrodynamic solver for description of laser-produced plasma plume expansion dynamics. The calculated plume lengths determined by numerical simulations were compared with a simple adiabatic expansion (blast-wave model.

  2. Optical wave microphone measurements of laser ablation of copper in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsugi, Fumiaki, E-mail: mitsugi@cs.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Ikegami, Tomoaki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Nakamiya, Toshiyuki; Sonoda, Yoshito [Graduate School of Industrial Engineering, Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Laser ablation plasma in a supercritical fluid has attracted much attention recently due to its usefulness in forming nanoparticles. Observation of the dynamic behavior of the supercritical fluid after laser irradiation of a solid is necessary for real-time monitoring and control of laser ablation. In this study, we utilized an optical wave microphone to monitor pulsed laser irradiation of a solid in a supercritical fluid. The optical wave microphone works based on Fraunhofer diffraction of phase modulation of light by changes in refractive index. We hereby report on our measurements for pulsed laser irradiation of a Cu target in supercritical carbon dioxide using an optical wave microphone. Photothermal acoustic waves which generated after single pulsed laser irradiation of a Cu target were detectable in supercritical carbon dioxide. The speed of sound around the critical point of supercritical carbon dioxide was clearly slower than that in gas. The optical wave microphone detected a signal during laser ablation of Cu in supercritical carbon dioxide that was caused by shockwave degeneration. - Highlights: • Photothermal acoustic wave in supercritical fluid was observed. • Sound speed around the critical point was slower than that in gas. • Optical wave microphone detected degeneration of a shockwave. • Ablation threshold of a solid in supercritical fluid can be estimated. • Generation of the second shockwave in supercritical phase was suggested.

  3. Photoactive dye enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Nguyen, Van Phuc; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-02-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia with high laser power. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue ablation with low laser power. The experiment was implemented on chicken breast due to minimal optical absorption Amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532-nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm2. Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-VIS spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with input parameter. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2+/-0.2 μm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33 % reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. In-depth comprehension on photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation can help accomplish efficient and safe laser treatment for BPH with low power application.

  4. Long-wave plasma radiofrequency ablation for treatment of xanthelasma palpebrarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Adone

    2018-03-01

    Xanthelasma palpebrarum is the most common type of xanthoma affecting the eyelids. It is characterized by asymptomatic soft yellowish macules, papules, or plaques over the upper and lower eyelids. Many treatments are available for management of xanthelasma palpebrarum, the most commonly used include surgical excision, ablative CO 2 or erbium lasers, nonablative Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, trichloroacetic acid peeling, and radiofrequency ablation. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of RF ablation in the treatment of xanthelasma palpebrarum, with D.A.S. Medical portable device (Technolux, Italia), a radiofrequency tool working with long-wave plasma energy and without anesthesia. Twenty patients, 15 female and 5 male, affected by xanthelasma palpebrarum, were enrolled for long-wave plasma radiofrequency ablation treatment. The treatment consisted of 3/4 sessions that were carried out at intervals of 30 days. Treatments were well tolerated by all patients with no adverse effects and optimal aesthetic results. The procedure is very fast and can be performed without anesthesia because of the low and tolerable pain stimulation. Long-wave plasma radiofrequency ablation is an effective option for treatment of xanthelasma palpebrarum and adds an additional tool to the increasing list of medical devices for aesthetic treatments. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Femtosecond envelope of the high-harmonic emission from ablation plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haessler, S; Gobert, O; Hergott, J-F; Lepetit, F; Perdrix, M; Carré, B; Salières, P; Bom, L B Elouga; Ozaki, T

    2012-01-01

    We characterize the temporal profile of the high-order harmonic emission from ablation plasma plumes using cross-correlations with the infrared (IR) laser beam provided by two-photon harmonic+IR ionization of rare gas atoms. We study both non-resonant plasmas (lead, gold and chrome) and resonant plasmas (indium and tin), i.e. plasmas presenting in the singly charged ions a strong radiative transition coinciding with a harmonic order. The cross-correlation traces are found to be very similar for all harmonic orders and all plasma targets. The recovered harmonic pulse durations are very similar to the driving laser, with a tendency towards being shorter, demonstrating that the emission is a directly laser-driven process even in the case of resonant harmonics. This provides a valuable input for theories describing resonant-harmonic emission and opens the perspective of a very high flux tabletop XUV source for applications. (paper)

  6. Parametric study on femtosecond laser pulse ablation of Au films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Xiaochang; Wang Chingyue; Yang Li; Li Jianping; Chai Lu; Jia Wei; Zhang Ruobing; Zhang Zhigang

    2006-01-01

    Ablation process of 1 kHz rate femtosecond lasers (pulse duration 148 fs, wavelength 775 nm) with Au films on silica substrates has been systemically studied. The single-pulse threshold can be obtained directly. For the multiple pulses the ablation threshold varies with the number of pulses applied to the surface due to the incubation effect. From the plot of accumulated laser fluence N x φ th (N) and the number of laser pulses N, incubation coefficient of Au film can be obtained (s = 0.765). As the pulse energy is increased, the single pulse ablation rate is increasing following two ablation logarithmic regimes, which can be explained by previous research

  7. Laser ablation of silicate glasses doped with transuranic actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.K.; Haire, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    Direct sampling laser ablation plasma mass spectrometry (DS-LAMS) was applied to silica glasses doped with 237 Np, 242 Pu or 241 Am using a unique instrument recently installed into a transuranic glovebox. The primary goal was to assess the utility of mass spectrometry of directly ablated ions for facile evaluation of actinide (An) constituents of silicate glass immobilization matrices used for encapsulation of radionuclides. The instrument and general procedures have been described elsewhere. Three high-purity silicate glasses prepared by a sol-gel process (SG) and one conventional high-temperature (HT; melting point ∼ 1,450 C) borosilicate glass were studied. These glasses comprised the following constituents, with compositions expressed in mass percentages: Np-HT ∼ 30% SiO 2 + 6% B 2 O 3 + 3% BaO + 13% Al 2 O 3 + 10% PbO + 30% La 2 O 3 + 8% 237 NpO 2 ; Np-SG ∼ 70% SiO 2 + 30% 237 NpO 2 ; Pu-SG ∼ 70% SiO 2 + 30% 242 PuO 2 ; Am-SG ∼ 85% SiO 2 + 15% 241 AmO 2

  8. Effect of ablation geometry on the formation of stagnation layer in laterally colliding plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Alamgir; Singh, Rajesh K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2015-01-01

    Interaction between two parallel propagating plasma plumes have been investigated in two different ablation schemes e.g. laser-blow-off (LBO) of thin film and conventional laser ablation (LPP). Fast imagine technique is used to study the dynamical and geometrical aspect of seed plasmas and induced stagnation layer in between the two expanding seed plasmas. Interaction between the energetic particles, coming from the seed plasmas are responsible for formation of stagnation layer. It has been found that geometrical shape, size, kinetic energy and divergence of plasma plumes are highly dependent on the ablation geometry. These variations in seed plasmas initiate the significant differences in the stagnation layer formed by LBO and LPP geometry. In this presentation, characteristic feature of stagnation layer which includes density, initiation time, emissive life time and geometry in both LBO and LPP geometry are briefly discussed. A comparative study of present results suggests that the plume composition and directionality of seed plasma play crucial role in mechanistic aspect of stagnation layer. (author)

  9. Applications of ultra-short pulsed laser ablation: thin films deposition and fs/ns dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teghil, R; De Bonis, A; Galasso, A; Santagata, A; Albano, G; Villani, P; Spera, D; Parisi, G P

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we report a survey of two of the large number of possible practical applications of the laser ablation performed by an ultra-short pulse laser, namely pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and fs/ns dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS). These applications differ from those using just longer pulsed lasers as a consequence of the distinctive characteristics of the plasma produced by ultra-short laser beams. The most important feature of this plasma is the large presence of particles with nanometric size which plays a fundamental role in both applications.

  10. Femtosecond laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) in ambient air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.B.; Hong, M.H.; Lu, Y.F.; Wu, D.J.; Lan, B.; Chong, T.C.

    2003-01-01

    Teflon, polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), is an important material in bioscience and medical application due to its special characteristics (bio-compatible, nonflammable, antiadhesive, and heat resistant). The advantages of ultrashort laser processing of Teflon include a minimal thermal penetration region and low processing temperatures, precision removal of material, and good-quality feature definition. In this paper, laser processing of PTFE in ambient air by a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser (780 nm, 110 fs) is investigated. It is found that the pulse number on each irradiated surface area must be large enough for a clear edge definition and the ablated depth increases with the pulse number. The air ionization effect at high laser fluences not only degrades the ablated structures quality but also reduces the ablation efficiency. High quality microstructures are demonstrated with controlling laser fluence below a critical fluence to exclude the air ionization effect. The ablated microstructures show strong adhesion property to liquids and clear edges that are suitable for bio-implantation applications. Theoretical calculation is used to analyze the evolution of the ablated width and depth at various laser fluences

  11. Toward a comprehensive UV laser ablation modeling of multicomponent materials—A non-equilibrium investigation on titanium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Oumeziane, Amina; Parisse, Jean-Denis

    2018-05-01

    Titanium carbide (TiC) coatings of great quality can be produced using nanosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Because the deposition rate and the transfer of the target stoichiometry depend strongly on the laser-target/laser-plasma interaction as well as the composition of the laser induced plume, investigating the ruling fundamental mechanisms behind the material ablation and the plasma evolution in the background environment under PLD conditions is essential. This work, which extends previous investigations dedicated to the study of nanosecond laser ablation of pure target materials, is a first step toward a comprehensive non-equilibrium model of multicomponent ones. A laser-material interaction model coupled to a laser-plasma interaction one is presented. A UV 20 ns KrF (248 nm) laser pulse is considered. Ablation depths, plasma ignition thresholds, and shielding rates have been calculated for a wide range of laser beam fluences. A comparison of TiC behavior with pure titanium material under the same conditions is made. Plasma characteristics such as temperature and composition have been investigated. An overall correlation between the various results is presented.

  12. Ins and outs of endovenous laser ablation: afterthoughts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, H. A. Martino; van Gemert, Martin J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Physicists and medical doctors "speak" different languages. Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a good example in which technology is essential to guide the doctor to the final result: optimal treatment. However, for the doctor, it is by far insufficient just to turn on the knobs of the laser. He

  13. 3D transient model to predict temperature and ablated areas during laser processing of metallic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak. B. Naghshine

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser processing is one of the most popular small-scale patterning methods and has many applications in semiconductor device fabrication and biomedical engineering. Numerical modelling of this process can be used for better understanding of the process, optimization, and predicting the quality of the final product. An accurate 3D model is presented here for short laser pulses that can predict the ablation depth and temperature distribution on any section of the material in a minimal amount of time. In this transient model, variations of thermal properties, plasma shielding, and phase change are considered. Ablation depth was measured using a 3D optical profiler. Calculated depths are in good agreement with measured values on laser treated titanium surfaces. The proposed model can be applied to a wide range of materials and laser systems.

  14. Synthesis by picosecond laser ablation of ligand-free Ag and Au nanoparticles for SERS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Enza; Spadaro, Salvatore; Santoro, Marco; Trusso, Sebastiano; Lucotti, Andrea.; Tommasini, Matteo.; Neri, Fortunato; Maria Ossi, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    The morphological and optical properties of noble metal nanoparticles prepared by picosecond laser generated plasmas in water were investigated. First, the ablation efficiency was maximized searching the optimal focusing conditions. The nanoparticle size, measured by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy, strongly depends on the laser fluence, keeping fixed the other deposition parameters such as the target to scanner objective distance and laser repetition frequency. STEM images indicate narrow gradients of NP sizes. Hence the optimization of ablation parameters favours a fine tuning of nanoparticles. UV-Visible spectroscopy helped to determine the appropriate laser wavelength to resonantly excite the localized surface plasmon to carry out Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) measurements. The SERS activity of Ag and Au substrates, obtained spraying the colloids synthesized in water, was tested using crystal violet as a probe molecule. The good SERS performance, observed at excitation wavelength 785 nm, is attributed to aggregation phenomena of nanoparticles sprayed on the support.

  15. Interaction of a laser-produced copper plasma jet with ambient plastic plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Badziak, J.; Borodziuk, S.; Chodukowski, T.; Gus’kov, S.Yu.; Demchenko, N. N.; Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Rezac, K.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Krouský, Eduard; Mašek, Karel; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Skála, Jiří; Pisarczyk, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 9 (2011), 095003-095003 ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E09092; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser produced-plasma jets * PALS laser * laser ablation * copper plasma * plastic plasma Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.425, year: 2011 http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/53/9/095003/pdf/0741-3335_53_9_095003.pdf

  16. Photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Van Phuc, Nguyen; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-11-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) over 20 years. Recently, application of high laser power up to 200 W was often reported to swiftly remove a large amount of prostatic tissue. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue vaporization with low laser power. Chicken breast tissue was selected as a target tissue due to minimal optical absorption at the visible wavelength. Four biocompatible photoactive dyes, including amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532 nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm(2) . Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-Vis spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2 ± 0.2 µm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. High aspect ratios up to 7.1 ± 0.4 entailed saturation behavior in the tissue ablation injected with AR and BD, possibly resulting from plume shielding and increased scattering due to coagulation. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33% reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. Due to

  17. Ablation from metals induced by visible and UV laser irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Schou, Jørgen; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte

    1996-01-01

    The deposition rate of laser-ablated silver has been determined for fluences between 0.5 and 15 J/cm2 at the wavelengths 532 and 355 nm for a beam spot area of around 0.01 cm2. The ablated metal was collected on a quartz crystal microbalance. The rate at 5 J/cm2 was about 4 × 1013 Ag/cm2 per pulse...

  18. Optical and plasma smoothing of laser imprinting in targets driven by lasers with SSD bandwidths up to 1 THz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehly, T.R.; Goncharov, V.N.; Gotchev, O.; Knauer, J.P.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Oron, D.; Regan, S.P.; Srebro, Y.; Seka, W.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    The creation of a plasma atmosphere in laser-target interactions increases the distance between the regions of laser absorption and hydrodynamic instability (ablation front), thus allowing thermal smoothing and a reduction of laser-imprinted modulations that reach the unstable ablation region. The total laser imprinting is reduced with pulse shapes that produce a plasma atmosphere more rapidly and by the implementation of temporal beam smoothing. These effects are measured and found to be consistent with models for the hydrodynamics and optical smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). Imprinting is reduced as the laser bandwidth is increased from 0.2 to 1.0 THz

  19. Cartilage ablation studies using mid-IR free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Jong-In; Peavy, George M.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2005-04-01

    The ablation rate of articular cartilage and fibrocartilage (meniscus), were quantified to examine wavelength and tissue-composition dependence of ablation efficiency for selected mid-infrared wavelengths. The wavelengths tested were 2.9 um (water dominant absorption), 6.1 (protein and water absorption) and 6.45 um (protein dominant absorption) generated by the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Vanderbilt University. The measurement of tissue mass removal using a microbalance during laser ablation was conducted to determine the ablation rates of cartilage. The technique can be accurate over methods such as profilometer and histology sectioning where tissue surface and the crater morphology may be affected by tissue processing. The ablation efficiency was found to be dependent upon the wavelength. Both articular cartilage and meniscus (fibrocartilage) ablations at 6.1 um were more efficient than those at the other wavelengths evaluated. We observed the lowest ablation efficiency of both types of cartilage with the 6.45 um wavelength, possibly due to the reduction in water absorption at this wavelength in comparison to the other wavelengths that were evaluated.

  20. Effect analysis of material properties of picosecond laser ablation for ABS/PVC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y. H.; Ho, C. Y.; Chiou, Y. J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper analytically investigates the picosecond laser ablation of ABS/PVC. Laser-pulsed ablation is a wellestablished tool for polymer. However the ablation mechanism of laser processing for polymer has not been thoroughly understood yet. This study utilized a thermal transport model to analyze the relationship between the ablation rate and laser fluences. This model considered the energy balance at the decomposition interface and Arrhenius law as the ablation mechanisms. The calculated variation of the ablation rate with the logarithm of the laser fluence agrees with the measured data. It is also validated in this work that the variation of the ablation rate with the logarithm of the laser fluence obeys Beer's law for low laser fluences. The effects of material properties and processing parameters on the ablation depth per pulse are also discussed for picosecond laser processing of ABS/PVC.

  1. Design and fabrication of a chamber for the deposit of thin films by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirino O, S.; Escobar A, I.; Camps C, E.; Garcia E, J.I.

    2000-01-01

    The laser ablation technique is an alternative for the obtention of thin films which is less expensive, more reliable, efficient and with some advantages with respect to conventional processes. On of the most important components which forms a laser ablation system is the vacuum chamber, that has as general purposes the following: a) To carry out studies about plasma such as optical emission spectroscopy and measurements by deflectometry. b) To carry out an In situ monitoring about the film growth through the reflectivity measurements of the combination substrate-film. c) To deposit thin films of different materials such as oxides, carbon, metals, etc. In this work it is showed how the vacuum chamber was designed and made to perform the store of thin films by laser ablation and for characterising the formed plasma as a result of the ablation process. The chamber design was enough versatile that will allow to add it more accessory just making it simple modifications. Its cost was very cheap more or less one twentieth of a commercial chamber. (Author)

  2. Infrared Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for Fingermark Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Camp, Eden E.; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K.

    2017-09-01

    Infrared laser ablation coupled to vacuum capture was employed to collect material from fingermarks deposited on surfaces of different porosity and roughness. Laser ablation at 3 μm was performed in reflection mode with subsequent capture of the ejecta with a filter connected to vacuum. Ablation and capture of standards from fingermarks was demonstrated on glass, plastic, aluminum, and cardboard surfaces. Using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), it was possible to detect caffeine after spiking with amounts as low as 1 ng. MALDI detection of condom lubricants and detection of antibacterial peptides from an antiseptic cream was demonstrated. Detection of explosives from fingermarks left on plastic surfaces as well as from direct deposition on the same surface using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was shown. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J.; Liu, C.; Wen, S.; Mao, X.; Russo, R.E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate glass particles from two sets of standard reference materials using femtosecond (150fs) and nanosecond (4ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the collected particles revealed that there are more and larger agglomerations of particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation. In contrast to the earlier findings for metal alloy samples, no correlation between the concentration of major elements and the median particle size was found. When the current data on glass were compared with the metal alloy data, there were clear differences in terms of particle size, crater depth, heat affected zone, and ICP-MS response. For example, glass particles were larger than metal alloy particles, the craters in glass were less deep than craters in metal alloys, and damage to the sample was less pronounced in glass compared to metal alloys samples. The femtosecond laser generated more intense ICP-MS signals compared to nanosecond laser ablation for both types of samples, although glass sample behavior was more similar between ns and fs-laser ablation than for metals alloys.

  4. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) Imaging of Cerebral Ischemia: Combined Analysis of Rat Brain Thin Cuts Toward Improved Tissue Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbekova, Anna; Lohninger, Hans; van Tilborg, Geralda A F; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Bonta, Maximilian; Limbeck, Andreas; Lendl, Bernhard; Al-Saad, Khalid A; Ali, Mohamed; Celikic, Minja; Ofner, Johannes

    2018-02-01

    Microspectroscopic techniques are widely used to complement histological studies. Due to recent developments in the field of chemical imaging, combined chemical analysis has become attractive. This technique facilitates a deepened analysis compared to single techniques or side-by-side analysis. In this study, rat brains harvested one week after induction of photothrombotic stroke were investigated. Adjacent thin cuts from rats' brains were imaged using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The LA-ICP-MS data were normalized using an internal standard (a thin gold layer). The acquired hyperspectral data cubes were fused and subjected to multivariate analysis. Brain regions affected by stroke as well as unaffected gray and white matter were identified and classified using a model based on either partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) or random decision forest (RDF) algorithms. The RDF algorithm demonstrated the best results for classification. Improved classification was observed in the case of fused data in comparison to individual data sets (either FT-IR or LA-ICP-MS). Variable importance analysis demonstrated that both molecular and elemental content contribute to the improved RDF classification. Univariate spectral analysis identified biochemical properties of the assigned tissue types. Classification of multisensor hyperspectral data sets using an RDF algorithm allows access to a novel and in-depth understanding of biochemical processes and solid chemical allocation of different brain regions.

  5. Desorption/ablation of lithium fluoride induced by extreme ultraviolet laser radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blejchař, T.; Nevrlý, V.; Vašinek, M.; Dostál, M.; Kozubková, M.; Dlabka, J.; Stachoň, M.; Juha, Libor; Bitala, P.; Zelinger, Zdeněk; Pira, Peter; Wild, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2016), s. 131-138 ISSN 0029-5922. [PLASMA 2015 : International Conference on Research and Applications of Plasmas. Warsaw, 07.09.2015-11.09.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : desorption * fluid dynamics * lithium fluoride * numerical simulation * plume expansion * pulsed laser ablation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 0.760, year: 2016

  6. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trelenberg, T.W.; Dinh, L.N.; Saw, C.K.; Stuart, B.C.; Balooch, M.

    2004-01-01

    The properties of femtosecond-pulsed laser deposited GaAs nanoclusters were investigated. Nanoclusters of GaAs were produced by laser ablating a single crystal GaAs target in vacuum or in a buffer gas using a Ti-sapphire laser with a 150 fs minimum pulse length. For in-vacuum deposition, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that the average cluster size was approximately 7 nm for laser pulse lengths between 150 fs and 25 ps. The average cluster size dropped to approximately 1.5 nm at a pulse length of 500 ps. It was also observed that film thickness decreased with increasing laser pulse length. A reflective coating, which accumulated on the laser admission window during ablation, reduced the amount of laser energy reaching the target for subsequent laser shots and developed more rapidly at longer pulse lengths. This observation indicates that non-stoichiometric (metallic) ablatants were produced more readily at longer pulse lengths. The angular distribution of ejected material about the target normal was well fitted to a bi-cosine distribution of cos 47 θ+ cos 4 θ for ablation in vacuum using 150 fs pulses. XPS and AES revealed that the vacuum-deposited films contained excess amorphous Ga or As in addition to the stoichiometric GaAs nanocrystals seen with XRD. However, films containing only the GaAs nanocrystals were produced when ablation was carried out in the presence of a buffer gas with a pressure in excess of 6.67 Pa. At buffer gas pressure on the order of 1 Torr, it was found that the stoichiometry of the ablated target was also preserved. These experiments indicate that both laser pulse length and buffer gas pressure play important roles in the formation of multi-element nanocrystals by laser ablation. The effects of gas pressure on the target's morphology and the size of the GaAs nanocrystals formed will also be discussed

  7. Laser ablation of dental calculus at 400 nm using a Ti:sapphire laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenly, Joshua E.; Seka, Wolf; Rechmann, Peter

    2009-02-01

    A Nd:YAG laser-pumped, frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser is used for selective ablation of calculus. The laser provides calculus removal. This is in stark contrast with tightly focused Gaussian beams that are energetically inefficient and lead to irreproducible results. Calculus is well ablated at high fluences >=2J/cm2 stalling occurs below this fluence because of photobleaching. Healthy hard tissue is not removed at fluences <=3 J/cm2.

  8. Enthalpy model for heating, melting, and vaporization in laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Alexiades

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation is used in a growing number of applications in various areas including medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. In this work the heat transfer and phase change phenomena during nanosecond laser ablation of a copper (Cu target in a helium (He background gas at atmospheric pressure are presented. An enthalpy model is outlined, which accounts for heating, melting, and vaporization of the target. As far as we know, this is the first model that connects the thermodynamics and underlying kinetics of this challenging phase change problem in a self-consistent way.

  9. Morphological changes in ultrafast laser ablation plumes with varying spot size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harilal, S S; Diwakar, P K; Polek, M P; Phillips, M C

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the role of spot size on plume morphology during ultrafast laser ablation of metal targets. Our results show that the spatial features of fs LA plumes are strongly dependent on the focal spot size. Two-dimensional self-emission images showed that the shape of the ultrafast laser ablation plumes changes from spherical to cylindrical with an increasing spot size from 100 to 600 μm. The changes in plume morphology and internal structures are related to ion emission dynamics from the plasma, where broader angular ion distribution and faster ions are noticed for the smallest spot size used. The present results clearly show that the morphological changes in the plume with spot size are independent of laser pulse width.

  10. Production of calcium phosphate coating by laser ablation for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayor, M.B.; Arias, J.L.; Garcia-Sanz, F.J.; Pou, J.; Leon, B.; Perez-Amor, M.

    1998-01-01

    Apatitic calcium phosphates are used as coating to improve the fixation of orthopaedic and dental implants. The commercial technique to produce these coatings (plasma-spray) shows some problems of adherence and control of their physicochemical properties. In this communication laser ablation is presented as a solution to overcome these problems. The ablation system consists in a vacuum chamber filled with water vapour up to the desired pressure. The laser beam of an ArF excimer laser is focused on a hydroxyapatite target, and the coating is deposited on a substrate parallel to the target maintained at certain temperature. The physicochemical properties of the material were analysed by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) X ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X ray spectroscopy (EDX). Taking into account these results, two types of coatings were choose to asses their bio compatibility in vitro. (Author) 15 refs

  11. Dynamics of the plume produced by nanosecond ultraviolet laser ablation of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the ablation plume of a partially ionized plasma produced by a nanosecond UV laser with different irradiation spot geometries has been explored. We have used an ensemble of quartz crystal microbalances to make the first systematic and quantitative study of how the shape of the plume...... varies as the aspect ratio (b/a) of the elliptical laser spot is varied by about a factor of ten. The flip-over effect can be described by the adiabatic expansion model of Anisimov using a value of the adiabatic constant of about gamma = 1.4. We have also studied the forward peaking of the ablation plume...... for a large number of metals at the same laser fluence. Contrary to earlier reports, we find that the more refractory metals have the broader angular distributions....

  12. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1–10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm{sup −2} is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He–Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm{sup −2} and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm{sup −2}. The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  13. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-01-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1–10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm"−"2 is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He–Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm"−"2 and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm"−"2. The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  14. Ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene using a continuous CO2 laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstopyatov, E M

    2005-01-01

    The ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is studied using a continuous CO 2 laser beam of 30-50 W at a mean intensity of 0.05-50 MW m -2 . The ablation products and changes in the target layer are examined using infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The main experiments were conducted with an unfocused beam of intensity 0.9-1.2 MW m -2 . The radiation-polymer interaction characteristics were found to change appreciably as the ablation conditions are approached. Within the polymer layer, light scattering diminishes and true resonant light absorption increases. Two distinct polymer components, which differ primarily in their resistance to CO 2 laser radiation, were found to exist under ablation conditions. The less stable component depolymerizes intensively, while the more resistant component is blown up into fibres by intense gas flow. The reasons behind this behaviour are discussed. Preliminary gamma irradiation of PTFE is found to have a significant influence on the laser ablation process

  15. Characterization of superconducting thin films deposited by laser ablation. Caracterisation de films minces supraconducteurs deposes par ablation laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentis, M; Delaporte, P [I.M.F.M., 13 - Marseille (FR); Gerri, M; Marine, W [Aix-Marseille-2 Univ., 13-Marseille (FR). Centre Universitaire de Luminy

    1991-05-01

    Thin films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} are deposited by laser ablation on MgO and YSZ substrates. Deposits by infrared (I.R.) Nd: YAG are non stoechiometric. The films having the best superconductor qualities are deposited by ablation with an excimer U.V. laser ({lambda} = 308 nm). These films are epitaxiated with the c axis perpendicular to the substrate. The film quality depends on the substrate temperature, oxygen pressure and cooling speed.

  16. High resolution selective multilayer laser processing by nanosecond laser ablation of metal nanoparticle films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan Heng; Hwang, David J.; Chung, Jaewon; Ryu, Sangil; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-01-01

    Ablation of gold nanoparticle films on polymer was explored using a nanosecond pulsed laser, with the goal to achieve feature size reduction and functionality not amenable with inkjet printing. The ablation threshold fluence for the unsintered nanoparticle deposit was at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the bulk film. This could be explained by the combined effects of melting temperature depression, lower conductive heat transfer loss, strong absorption of the incident laser beam, and the relatively weak bonding between nanoparticles. The ablation physics were verified by the nanoparticle sintering characterization, ablation threshold measurement, time resolved ablation plume shadowgraphs, analysis of ablation ejecta, and the measurement and calculation of optical properties. High resolution and clean feature fabrication with small energy and selective multilayer processing are demonstrated

  17. Investigations on pulsed laser ablation of Sn at 1064 nm wavelength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Ctr. Papardo 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Margarone, D [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Ctr. Papardo 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy)

    2006-11-01

    A Nd:Yag laser operating at 1064 nm, 900 mJ maximum pulse energy and 9 ns pulse duration, is employed to irradiate solid tin targets placed in a high vacuum (10{sup -7} mbar). The Sn plasma produced on the target surface is investigated with different analysis techniques, such as ion collectors, mass quadrupole spectrometry, electron microscopy and surface profilers. Measurements of ablation threshold, ablation yield, atomic and molecular emission, ion and neutral emission are reported. A time-of-flight technique is employed to calculate the velocity and the kinetic energy of the ion emission from the plasma. The angular distributions of the ejected ion species and of their kinetic energy are strongly peaked along the normal to the target surface. A valuation of the electric field generated inside the non-equilibrium plasma is given and discussed.

  18. Optical wave microphone measurement during laser ablation of Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsugi, Fumiaki, E-mail: mitsugi@cs.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Ide, Ryota; Ikegami, Tomoaki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Nakamiya, Toshiyuki; Sonoda, Yoshito [Graduate School of Industrial Engineering, Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto, 862-8652 (Japan)

    2012-10-30

    Pulsed laser irradiation is used for surface treatment of a solid and ablation for particle formation in gas, liquid or supercritical phase media. When a pulsed laser is used to irradiate a solid, spatial refractive index variations (including photothermal expansion, shockwaves and particles) occur, which vary depending on the energy density of the pulsed laser. We focused on this phenomenon and applied an unique method for detection of refractive index variation using an optical wave microphone based on Fraunhofer diffraction. In this research, we analyzed the waveforms and frequencies of refractive index variations caused by pulsed laser irradiation of silicon in air and measured with an optical wave microphone.

  19. LASER ABLATION OF MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON UNDER PULSED-FREQUENCY FIBER LASER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Veiko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of research. The paper deals with research of the surface ablation for single-crystal silicon wafers and properties of materials obtained in response to silicon ablation while scanning beam radiation of pulse fiber ytterbium laser with a wavelenght λ = 1062 nm in view of variation of radiation power and scanning modes. Method. Wafers of commercial p-type conductivity silicon doped with boron (111, n-type conductivity silicon doped with phosphorus (100 have been under research with a layer of intrinsical silicon oxide having the thickness equal to several 10 s of nanometers and SiO2 layer thickness from 120 to 300 nm grown by thermal oxidation method. The learning system comprises pulse fiber ytterbium laser with a wavelenght λ = 1062 nm. The laser rated-power output is equal to 20 W, pulse length is 100 ns. Pulses frequency is in the range from 20 kHz to 100 kHz. Rated energy in the pulse is equal to 1.0 mJ. Scanning has been carried out by means of two axial scanning device driven by VM2500+ and controlled by personal computer with «SinMarkТМ» software package. Scanning velocity is in the range from 10 mm/s to 4000 mm/s, the covering varies from 100 lines per mm to 3000 lines per mm. Control of samples has been carried out by means of Axio Imager A1m optical microscope Carl Zeiss production with a high definition digital video camera. All experiments have been carried out in the mode of focused laser beam with a radiation spot diameter at the substrate equal to 50 μm. The change of temperature and its distribution along the surface have been evaluated by FLIR IR imager of SC7000 series. Main results. It is shown that ablation occurs without silicon melting and with plasma torch origination. The particles of ejected silicon take part in formation of silicon ions plasma and atmosphere gases supporting the plasmo-chemical growth of SiO2. The range of beam scanning modes is determined where the growth of SiO2 layer is observed

  20. Angular distributions and total yield of laser ablated silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Nordskov, A.; Schou, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    The angular distribution of laser ablated silver has been measured in situ with a newly constructed setup with an array of microbalances. The distribution is strongly peaked in the forward direction corresponding to cospθ, where p varies between 5 and 9 for laser fluences from 2 to 7 J/cm2 at 355...... nm for a beam spot of 0.015 cm2. The total deposited yield is of the order 1015 Ag-atoms per pulse....

  1. Ins and outs of endovenous laser ablation: Afterthoughts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A.M. Neumann (Martino); M.J.C. van Gemert (Martin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPhysicists and medical doctors "speak" different languages. Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a good example in which technology is essential to guide the doctor to the final result: optimal treatment. However, for the doctor, it is by far insufficient just to turn on the knobs of the

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  3. Absorption Enhanced Liquid Ablation with TEA CO2 Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sterling, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    ... that strongly absorbs radiation in the 8-11 m wavelength interval. A TEA CO2 laser (λ = 10.6 m), 300 ns pulse width and 8 J pulse energy, was used for ablation of water diluted NaBF4 contained in a conical aluminum nozzle...

  4. Superhydrophobic/superoleophilic magnetic elastomers by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milionis, Athanasios, E-mail: am2vy@virginia.edu [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Fragouli, Despina; Brandi, Fernando; Liakos, Ioannis; Barroso, Suset [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Ruffilli, Roberta [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Athanassiou, Athanassia, E-mail: athanassia.athanassiou@iit.it [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets. • Laser irradiation of the nanocomposites induces chemical and structural changes to the surface. • The laser-patterned surfaces exhibit superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity. • The particle contribution in altering the surface and bulk properties of the material is studied. - Abstract: We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets with superhydrophobic and supeoleophilic surfaces generated by laser ablation. Polydimethylsiloxane elastomer free-standing films, loaded homogeneously with 2% wt. carbon coated iron nanoparticles, were ablated by UV (248 nm), nanosecond laser pulses. The laser irradiation induces chemical and structural changes (both in micro- and nano-scale) to the surfaces of the nanocomposites rendering them superhydrophobic. The use of nanoparticles increases the UV light absorption efficiency of the nanocomposite samples, and thus facilitates the ablation process, since the number of pulses and the laser fluence required are greatly reduced compared to the bare polymer. Additionally the magnetic nanoparticles enhance significantly the superhydrophobic and oleophilic properties of the PDMS sheets, and provide to PDMS magnetic properties making possible its actuation by a weak external magnetic field. These nanocomposite elastomers can be considered for applications requiring magnetic MEMS for the controlled separation of liquids.

  5. Laser plasma instability experiments with KrF lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S.; Chan, L-Y.; Kehne, D.; Schmitt, A. J.; Colombant, D.; Velikovich, A.; Oh, J.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Afeyan, B.; Phillips, L.; Seely, J.; Brown, C.; Feldman, U.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Mostovych, A. N.; Holland, G.

    2007-01-01

    Deleterious effects of laser-plasma instability (LPI) may limit the maximum laser irradiation that can be used for inertial confinement fusion. The short wavelength (248 nm), large bandwidth, and very uniform illumination available with krypton-fluoride (KrF) lasers should increase the maximum usable intensity by suppressing LPI. The concomitant increase in ablation pressure would allow implosion of low-aspect-ratio pellets to ignition with substantial gain (>20) at much reduced laser energy. The proposed KrF-laser-based Fusion Test Facility (FTF) would exploit this strategy to achieve significant fusion power (150 MW) with a rep-rate system that has a per pulse laser energy well below 1 MJ. Measurements of LPI using the Nike KrF laser are presented at and above intensities needed for the FTF (I∼2x10 15 W/cm 2 ). The results to date indicate that LPI is indeed suppressed. With overlapped beam intensity above the planar, single beam intensity threshold for the two-plasmon decay instability, no evidence of instability was observed via measurements of (3/2)ω o and (1/2)ω o harmonic emissions

  6. Spatial confinement effects on spectroscopic and morphological studies of nanosecond laser-ablated Zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Asma; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Ahmad, Riaz; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Zaheer, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Spatial confinement effects on plasma parameters and surface morphology of laser ablated Zr (Zirconium) are studied by introducing a metallic blocker. Nd:YAG laser at various fluencies ranging from 8 J cm-2 to 32 J cm-2 was employed as an irradiation source. All measurements were performed in the presence of Ar under different pressures. Confinement effects offered by metallic blocker are investigated by placing the blocker at different distances of 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm from the target surface. It is revealed from LIBS analysis that both plasma parameters i.e. excitation temperature and electron number density increase with increasing laser fluence due to enhancement in energy deposition. It is also observed that spatial confinement offered by metallic blocker is responsible for the enhancement of both electron temperature and electron number density of Zr plasma. This is true for all laser fluences and pressures of Ar. Maximum values of electron temperature and electron number density without blocker are 12,600 K and 14 × 1017 cm-3 respectively whereas, these values are enhanced to 15,000 K and 21 × 1017 cm-3 in the presence of blocker. The physical mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of Zr plasma parameters are plasma compression, confinement and pronounced collisional excitations due to reflection of shock waves. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis was performed to explore the surface morphology of laser ablated Zr. It reveals the formation of cones, cavities and ripples. These features become more distinct and well defined in the presence of blocker due to plasma confinement. The optimum combination of blocker distance, fluence and Ar pressure can identify the suitable conditions for defining the role of plasma parameters for surface structuring.

  7. Laser plasma interactions in hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruer, W.L.

    1994-10-05

    Lasers plasma instabilities are an important constraint in x-ray driven inertial confinement fusion. In hohlraums irradiated with 1.06 {mu}m light on the Shiva laser, plasma instabilities were extremely deleterious, driving the program to the use of shorter wavelength light. Excellent coupling has been achieved in hohlraums driven with 0.35 {mu}m light on the Nova laser. Considerable attention is being given to the scaling of this excellent coupling to the larger hohlraums for an ignition target. Various instability control mechanisms such as large plasma wave damping and laser beam incoherence are discussed, as well as scaling experiments to check the instability levels.

  8. Ablation of Hydrogen Pellets in Hydrogen and Helium Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L W; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard; Øster, Flemming

    1975-01-01

    Measurements on the interaction between solid hydrogen pellets and rotating plasmas are reported. The investigations were carried out because of the possibility of refuelling fusion reactors by the injection of pellets. The ablation rate found is higher than expected on the basis of a theory...

  9. The application of laser plasma in ophthalmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yujiang; Luo Le; Sun Yabing

    2000-01-01

    The production and development of laser plasma are introduced, and the contribution of laser biomedicine and laser plasma technology to ophthalmology is analyzed. The latest three progresses (laser photocoagulation, photo-refractive keratotomy and laser iridectomy) of laser plasma applications in ophthalmology are presented

  10. Ablation of Liquids for Laser Propulsion With TEA CO2 Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Sterling, Enrique; Lin, Jun; Pakhomov, Andrew V; Larson, C. W; Mead, Jr., Franklin B

    2005-01-01

    .... A Transversely Excited at Atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser operated at 10.6 um, 300 ns pulse width, and 9 J pulse energy was used to ablate liquids contained in various aluminum and glass vessels...

  11. Ablation of Liquids for Laser Propulsion with TEA CO2 Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Sterling, Enrique; Lin, Jun; Pakhomov, Andrew V; Larson, C. W; Mead, Jr, Franklin B

    2005-01-01

    .... A Transversely Excited at Atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser operated at 10.6 micro-m, 300 ns pulse width, and 9 J pulse energy was used to ablate liquids contained in various aluminum and glass vessels...

  12. 308-nm excimer laser ablation of human cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodoehl, John A.; Rhodes, Anthony L.; Meller, Menachem M.; Sherk, Henry H.

    1993-07-01

    The XeCl excimer laser was investigated as an ablating tool for human fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. Quantitative measurements were made of tissue ablation rates as a function of fluence in meniscal fibrocartilage and articular hyaline cartilage. A force of 1.47 Newtons was applied to an 800 micrometers fiber with the laser delivering a range of fluences (40 to 190 mj/mm2) firing at a frequency of 5 Hz. To assess the effect of repetition rate on ablation rate, a set of measurements was made at a constant fluence of 60 mj/mm2, with the repetition rate varying from 10 to 40 Hz. Histologic and morphometric analysis was performed using light microscopy. The results of these studies revealed that the ablation rate was directly proportional to fluence over the range tested. Fibrocartilage was ablated at a rate 2.56 times faster than hyaline cartilage at the maximum fluence tested. Repetition rate had no effect on the penetration per pulse. Adjacent tissue damage was noted to be minimal (10 - 70 micrometers ).

  13. Percutaneous laser ablation of unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacella, Claudio M. [Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Via San Francesco 50, Albano Laziale, Rome 00041 (Italy)], E-mail: claudiomaurizio.pacella@fastwebnet.it; Stasi, Roberto; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Pacella, Sara; Graziano, Filomena Maria; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Papini, Enrico [Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Via San Francesco 50, Albano Laziale, Rome 00041 (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical benefits of percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) in patients with unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Patients and methods: Four patients with hepatic metastases from ACC and a Cushing's syndrome underwent ultrasound-guided PLA. In one case the procedure was performed also on the primary tumor. Results: After three sessions of PLA, the primary tumor of 15 cm was ablated by 75%. After 1-4 (median 1) sessions of PLA, five liver metastases ranging from 2 to 5 cm were completely ablated, while the sixth tumor of 12 cm was ablated by 75%. There were no major complications. Treatment resulted in an improvement of performance status and a reduction of the daily dosage of mitotane in all patients. The three patients with liver metastases presented a marked decrease of 24-h urine cortisol levels, an improved control of hypertension and a mean weight loss of 2.8 kg. After a median follow-up after PLA of 27.0 months (range, 9-48 months), two patients have died of tumor progression, while two other patients remain alive and free of disease. Conclusions: Percutaneous laser ablation is a feasible, safe and well tolerated procedure for the palliative treatment of unresectable primary and metastatic ACC. Further study is required to evaluate the impact of PLA on survival.

  14. Percutaneous laser ablation of unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacella, Claudio M.; Stasi, Roberto; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Pacella, Sara; Graziano, Filomena Maria; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Papini, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical benefits of percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) in patients with unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Patients and methods: Four patients with hepatic metastases from ACC and a Cushing's syndrome underwent ultrasound-guided PLA. In one case the procedure was performed also on the primary tumor. Results: After three sessions of PLA, the primary tumor of 15 cm was ablated by 75%. After 1-4 (median 1) sessions of PLA, five liver metastases ranging from 2 to 5 cm were completely ablated, while the sixth tumor of 12 cm was ablated by 75%. There were no major complications. Treatment resulted in an improvement of performance status and a reduction of the daily dosage of mitotane in all patients. The three patients with liver metastases presented a marked decrease of 24-h urine cortisol levels, an improved control of hypertension and a mean weight loss of 2.8 kg. After a median follow-up after PLA of 27.0 months (range, 9-48 months), two patients have died of tumor progression, while two other patients remain alive and free of disease. Conclusions: Percutaneous laser ablation is a feasible, safe and well tolerated procedure for the palliative treatment of unresectable primary and metastatic ACC. Further study is required to evaluate the impact of PLA on survival

  15. Numerical analysis of laser ablation and damage in glass with multiple picosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingying; Eppelt, Urs; Russ, Simone; Hartmann, Claudia; Siebert, Christof; Zhu, Jianqiang; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2013-04-08

    This study presents a novel numerical model for laser ablation and laser damage in glass including beam propagation and nonlinear absorption of multiple incident ultrashort laser pulses. The laser ablation and damage in the glass cutting process with a picosecond pulsed laser was studied. The numerical results were in good agreement with our experimental observations, thereby revealing the damage mechanism induced by laser ablation. Beam propagation effects such as interference, diffraction and refraction, play a major role in the evolution of the crater structure and the damage region. There are three different damage regions, a thin layer and two different kinds of spikes. Moreover, the electronic damage mechanism was verified and distinguished from heat modification using the experimental results with different pulse spatial overlaps.

  16. Clinical effects of non-ablative and ablative fractional lasers on various hair disorders: a case series of 17 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Suhyun; Choi, Min Ju; Zheng, Zhenlong; Goo, Boncheol; Kim, Do-Young; Cho, Sung Bin

    2013-04-01

    Both ablative and non-ablative fractional lasers have been applied to various uncommon hair disorders. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the clinical effects of fractional laser therapy on the course of primary follicular and perifollicular pathologies and subsequent hair regrowth. A retrospective review of 17 patients with uncommon hair disorders - including ophiasis, autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis, various secondary cicatricial alopecias, pubic hypotrichosis, frontal fibrosing alopecia, and perifolliculitis abscedens et suffodiens - was conducted. All patients had been treated with non-ablative and/or ablative fractional laser therapies. The mean clinical improvement score in these 17 patients was 2.2, while the mean patient satisfaction score was 2.5. Of the 17 subjects, 12 (70.6%) demonstrated a clinical response to non-ablative and/or ablative fractional laser treatments, including individuals with ophiasis, autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis, secondary cicatricial alopecia (scleroderma and pressure-induced alopecia), frontal fibrosing alopecia, and perifolliculitis abscedens et suffodiens. Conversely, patients with long-standing ophiasis, surgical scar-induced secondary cicatricial alopecia, and pubic hypotrichosis did not respond to fractional laser therapy. Our findings demonstrate that the use of non-ablative and/or ablative fractional lasers promoted hair growth in certain cases of uncommon hair disorders without any remarkable side effects.

  17. Feasibility study of carbon particles injection by laser ablation to calibrate spectroscopic erosion measurements in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naiim Habib, M.; Mercadier, L.; Marandet, Y.; Delaporte, Ph.; Hernandez, C.; Grisolia, C.; Monier-Garbet, P.

    2011-01-01

    To check if spectroscopic measurements can be used for erosion determination, we propose to inject in the line of sight of the diagnostic, during plasma operation, a known carbon particle source, produced by laser ablation. A first assessment of this technique will be presented in the context of the Tore Supra tokamak.

  18. In situ Sr/Sr investigation of igneous apatites and carbonates using laser-ablation MC-ICP-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizzarro, Martin; Simonetti, A.; Stevenson, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    In situ Sr isotopic compositions of coexisting apatite and carbonate for carbonatites from the Sarfartoq alkaline complex, Greenland, have been determined by laser-ablation multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This study is the first to examine the extent of Sr isotopic ho...

  19. Plasmas and intense laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.T.

    1984-01-01

    The present article begins with a description of the laser technology required to reach the high irradiances of interest and provides a brief outline of the more important diagnostic techniques used in investigating the plasmas. An introduction to plasma waves is given and the linear and nonlinear excitation of waves is discussed. The remainder of the article describes some of the experimental evidence supporting the interpretation of the plasma behaviour at high laser-light intensities in terms of the excitation of plasma waves and the subsequent heating of plasma by these waves. (author)

  20. Ablation by ultrashort laser pulses: Atomistic and thermodynamic analysis of the processes at the ablation threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Arun K.; Inogamov, Nail A.; Rethfeld, Baerbel; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2008-01-01

    Ultrafast laser irradiation of solids may ablate material off the surface. We study this process for thin films using molecular-dynamics simulation and thermodynamic analysis. Both metals and Lennard-Jones (LJ) materials are studied. We find that despite the large difference in thermodynamical properties between these two classes of materials--e.g., for aluminum versus LJ the ratio T c /T tr of critical to triple-point temperature differs by more than a factor of 4--the values of the ablation threshold energy E abl normalized to the cohesion energy, ε abl =E abl /E coh , are surprisingly universal: all are near 0.3 with ±30% scattering. The difference in the ratio T c /T tr means that for metals the melting threshold ε m is low, ε m abl , while for LJ it is high, ε m >ε abl . This thermodynamical consideration gives a simple explanation for the difference between metals and LJ. It explains why despite the universality in ε abl , metals thermomechanically ablate always from the liquid state. This is opposite to LJ materials, which (near threshold) ablate from the solid state. Furthermore, we find that immediately below the ablation threshold, the formation of large voids (cavitation) in the irradiated material leads to a strong temporary expansion on a very slow time scale. This feature is easily distinguished from the acoustic oscillations governing the material response at smaller intensities, on the one hand, and the ablation occurring at larger intensities, on the other hand. This finding allows us to explain the puzzle of huge surface excursions found in experiments at near-threshold laser irradiation

  1. Infrared laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Shrestha, Bindesh; Kauppila, Tiina J; Vertes, Akos; Kostiainen, Risto

    2012-02-07

    In this paper we introduce laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization (LAAPPI), a novel atmospheric pressure ion source for mass spectrometry. In LAAPPI the analytes are ablated from water-rich solid samples or from aqueous solutions with an infrared (IR) laser running at 2.94 μm wavelength. Approximately 12 mm above the sample surface, the ablation plume is intercepted with an orthogonal hot solvent (e.g., toluene or anisole) jet, which is generated by a heated nebulizer microchip and directed toward the mass spectrometer inlet. The ablated analytes are desolvated and ionized in the gas-phase by atmospheric pressure photoionization using a 10 eV vacuum ultraviolet krypton discharge lamp. The effect of operational parameters and spray solvent on the performance of LAAPPI is studied. LAAPPI offers ~300 μm lateral resolution comparable to, e.g., matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization. In addition to polar compounds, LAAPPI efficiently ionizes neutral and nonpolar compounds. The bioanalytical application of the method is demonstrated by the direct LAAPPI analysis of rat brain tissue sections and sour orange (Citrus aurantium) leaves. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  2. Laser ablation of titanium in liquid in external electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkov, A.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, “Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University)”, 9 Institutskiy per., 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Barmina, E.V., E-mail: barminaev@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 31, Kashirskoye Highway, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Voronov, V.V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • Ablation of a bulk Ti target by 10 ps laser pulses in liquid is experimentally studied in external DC electric field. • Applied cathodic bias leads to increase in average size of self-organized nanostructures formed upon ablation of titanium target. • Laser ablation of Ti target in external electric field results in generation of elongated titanium oxide nanoparticles. - Abstract: Ablation of a bulk Ti target by 10 ps laser pulses in water is experimentally studied in external DC electric field. It is demonstrated that both lateral size of nanostructures (NS) on Ti surface and their density depend on the electric field applied to the target. Scanning Electron Microscopy of NS reveals the shift of their size distribution function toward larger sizes with applied field (cathodic bias, 25 V DC). Density of mushroom-like NS with applied electric field amounts to 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}. X-ray diffraction of generated nanoparticles (NPs) shows difference in the crystallographic structure of NPs of non-stoichiometric Ti oxides generated with and without electric field. This conclusion is corroborated with the optical absorption spectroscopy of obtained colloids. Transmission Electron Microscopy of NPs also shows difference in morphology of particles produced with and without cathodic bias. The results are interpreted on the basis of instability of the melt on Ti surface in the electric field.

  3. Next generation Er:YAG fractional ablative laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, A.; Vizhanyo, A.; Krammer, P.; Summer, S.; Gross, S.; Bragagna, T.; Böhler, C.

    2011-03-01

    Pantec Biosolutions AG presents a portable fractional ablative laser system based on a miniaturized diode pumped Er:YAG laser. The system can operate at repetition rates up to 500 Hz and has an incorporated beam deflection unit. It is smaller, lighter and cost efficient compared to systems based on lamp pumped Er:YAG lasers and incorporates a skin layer detection to guarantee precise control of the microporation process. The pulse parameters enable a variety of applications in dermatology and in general medicine, as demonstrated by first results on transdermal drug delivery of FSH (follicle stimulating hormone).

  4. Bayesian Integration and Classification of Composition C-4 Plastic Explosives Based on Time-of-Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Christine M; Kelly, Ryan T; Alexander, Liz; Newburn, Matt; Bader, Sydney; Ewing, Robert G; Fahey, Albert J; Atkinson, David A; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2016-04-05

    Time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) were used for characterization and identification of unique signatures from a series of 18 Composition C-4 plastic explosives. The samples were obtained from various commercial and military sources around the country. Positive and negative ion TOF-SIMS data were acquired directly from the C-4 residue on Si surfaces, where the positive ion mass spectra obtained were consistent with the major composition of organic additives, and the negative ion mass spectra were more consistent with explosive content in the C-4 samples. Each series of mass spectra was subjected to partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), a multivariate statistical analysis approach which serves to first find the areas of maximum variance within different classes of C-4 and subsequently to classify unknown samples based on correlations between the unknown data set and the original data set (often referred to as a training data set). This method was able to successfully classify test samples of C-4, though with a limited degree of certainty. The classification accuracy of the method was further improved by integrating the positive and negative ion data using a Bayesian approach. The TOF-SIMS data was combined with a second analytical method, LA-ICPMS, which was used to analyze elemental signatures in the C-4. The integrated data were able to classify test samples with a high degree of certainty. Results indicate that this Bayesian integrated approach constitutes a robust classification method that should be employable even in dirty samples collected in the field.

  5. Using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to explore geochemical taphonomy of vertebrate fossils in the upper cretaceous two medicine and Judith River formations of Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, R.R.; Fricke, H.C.; Addona, V.; Canavan, R.R.; Dwyer, C.N.; Harwood, C.L.; Koenig, A.E.; Murray, R.; Thole, J.T.; Williams, J.

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to determine rare earth element (REE) content of 76 fossil bones collected from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Two Medicine (TMF) and Judith River (JRF) Formations of Montana. REE content is distinctive at the formation scale, with TMF samples exhibiting generally higher overall REE content and greater variability in REE enrichment than JRF samples. Moreover, JRF bones exhibit relative enrichment in heavy REE, whereas TMF bones span heavy and light enrichment fields in roughly equal proportions. TMF bones are also characterized by more negative Ce anomalies and greater U enrichment than JRF bones, which is consistent with more oxidizing diagenetic conditions in the TMF. Bonebeds in both formations show general consistency in REE content, with no indication of spatial or temporal mixing within sites. Previous studies, however, suggest that the bonebeds in question are attritional assemblages that accumulated over considerable time spans. The absence of geochemical evidence for mixing is consistent with diagenesis transpiring in settings that remained chemically and hydrologically stable during recrystallization. Lithology-related patterns in REE content were also compared, and TMF bones recovered from fluvial sandstones show relative enrichment in heavy REE when compared with bones recovered from fine-grained floodplain deposits. In contrast, JRF bones, regardless of lithologic context (sandstone versus mudstone), exhibit similar patterns of REE uptake. This result is consistent with previous reconstructions that suggest that channel-hosted microfossil bonebeds of the JRF developed via the reworking of preexisting concentrations embedded in the interfluve. Geochemical data further indicate that reworked elements were potentially delivered to channels in a recrystallized condition, which is consistent with rapid adsorption of REE postmortem. Copyright ?? 2010, SEPM (Society for

  6. PREFACE AND CONFERENCE INFORMATION: Eighth International Conference on Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Herman, Peter R.; Bäuerle, Dieter; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2007-04-01

    Laser ablation encompasses a wide range of delicate to extreme light interactions with matter that present considerably challenging problems for scientists to study and understand. At the same time, laser ablation also represents a basic process of significant commercial importance in laser material processing—defining a multi-billion dollar industry today. These topics were widely addressed at the 8th International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA), held in Banff, Canada on 11-16 September 2005. The meeting took place amongst the majestic and natural beauty of the Canadian Rocky Mountains at The Banff Centre, where delegates enjoyed many inspiring presentations and discussions in a unique campus learning environment. The conference brought together world leading scientists, students and industry representatives to examine the basic science of laser ablation and improve our understanding of the many physical, chemical and/or biological processes driven by the laser. The multi-disciplinary research presented at the meeting underlies some of our most important trends at the forefront of science and technology today that are represented in the papers collected in this volume. Here you will find new processes that are producing novel types of nanostructures and nano-materials with unusual and promising properties. Laser processes are described for delicately manipulating living cells or modifying their internal structure with unprecedented degrees of control and precision. Learn about short-pulse lasers that are driving extreme physical processes on record-fast time scales and opening new directions from material processing applications. The conference papers further highlight forefront application areas in pulsed laser deposition, nanoscience, analytical methods, materials, and microprocessing applications. Laser ablation continues to grow and evolve, touching forefront areas in science and driving new technological trends in laser processing applications. Please

  7. Revealing of hydrodynamic and electrostatic factors in the center-of-mass velocity of an expanding plasma generated by pulsed laser ablation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krása, Josef; Lorusso, A.; Nassisi, V.; Velardi, L.; Velyhan, Andriy

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2011), s. 113-119 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 228334 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : angular distribution of ions * Faraday cup signal function * partial ion currents Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.623, year: 2011

  8. Optical properties of tin oxide nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation in water: Influence of laser ablation time duration and laser fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desarkar, Himadri Sankar; Kumbhakar, P.; Mitra, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal tin oxide nanoparticles are prepared by laser (having a wavelength of 1064 nm) ablation of tin metallic target immersed in pure deionized water. The influences of laser ablation time and laser fluence on the size and optical properties of the synthesized nanoparticles are studied. Prepared tin oxide nanoparticles are characterized by transmission electron microscope, selected area electron diffraction and UV–Visible absorption spectroscopy. The morphology of prepared tin oxide nanoparticles is found to be mostly spherical and with sizes in the nanometric range (mean radius of 3.2 to 7.3 nm). The measured UV–Visible absorption spectra show the presence of absorption peaks in the ultraviolet region. The band gap energy of samples prepared with different laser ablation time duration is calculated and is found to be increased with decrease in size (radius) of the prepared nanoparticles. Photoluminescence emission measurements at room temperature show that all the samples exhibit photoluminescence in the visible region. The peak photoluminescence emission intensity in the sample prepared with 50 min of laser ablation time is 3.5 times larger than that obtained in the sample prepared with 10 min of laser ablation time. - Highlights: ► SnO 2 nanoparticles (6.4–14.6 nm) are prepared by laser ablation in liquid technique. ► The influences of laser ablation time and laser fluence are studied. ► Samples are characterized by TEM and UV–Visible absorption spectroscopy. ► UV–Visible absorption spectra exhibit quantum confinement effect. ► Samples exhibit enhanced photoluminescence emissions in the visible region.

  9. Ablation of silicon with bursts of femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiuso, Caterina; Kämmer, Helena; Dreisow, Felix; Ancona, Antonio; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of ultrafast laser ablation of silicon with bursts of pulses. The pristine 1030nm-wavelength 200-fs pulses were split into bursts of up to 16 sub-pulses with time separation ranging from 0.5ps to 4080ps. The total ablation threshold fluence was measured depending on the burst features, finding that it strongly increases with the number of sub-pulses for longer sub-pulse delays, while a slowly increasing trend is observed for shorter separation time. The ablation depth per burst follows two different trends according to the time separation between the sub-pulses, as well as the total threshold fluence. For delays shorter than 4ps it decreases with the number of pulses, while for time separations longer than 510ps, deeper craters were achieved by increasing the number of subpulses in the burst, probably due to a change of the effective penetration depth.

  10. Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy for laser-ablated silicon particles in xenon gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makimura, Tetsuya; Sakuramoto, Tamaki; Murakami, Kouichi

    1996-01-01

    We developed a laboratory-scale in situ apparatus for soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy with a time resolution of 10 ns and a space resolution of 100 μm. Utilizing this spectrometer, we have investigated the dynamics of silicon atoms formed by laser ablation in xenon gas. It was found that 4d-electrons in the xenon atoms are excited through collision with electrons in the laser-generated silicon plasma. (author)

  11. Histological evaluation of vertical laser channels from ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbølling Haak, Christina; Illes, Monica; Paasch, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) represents a new treatment potential for various skin conditions and new laser devices are being introduced. It is important to gain information about the impact of laser settings on the dimensions of the created laser channels for obtaining a safe...... and efficient treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to establish a standard model to document the histological tissue damage profiles after AFR and to test a new laser device at diverse settings. Ex vivo abdominal pig skin was treated with a MedArt 620, prototype fractional carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser...... (Medart, Hvidovre, Denmark) delivering single microbeams (MB) with a spot size of 165 µm. By using a constant pulse duration of 2 ms, intensities of 1-18 W, single and 2-4 stacked pulses, energies were delivered in a range from 2-144 mJ/MB. Histological evaluations included 3-4 high-quality histological...

  12. Histological evaluation of vertical laser channels from ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbølling Haak, Christina; Illes, Monica; Paasch, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) represents a new treatment potential for various skin conditions and new laser devices are being introduced. It is important to gain information about the impact of laser settings on the dimensions of the created laser channels for obtaining a safe...... and efficient treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to establish a standard model to document the histological tissue damage profiles after AFR and to test a new laser device at diverse settings. Ex vivo abdominal pig skin was treated with a MedArt 620, prototype fractional carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser...... (Medart, Hvidovre, Denmark) delivering single microbeams (MB) with a spot size of 165 μm. By using a constant pulse duration of 2 ms, intensities of 1-18 W, single and 2-4 stacked pulses, energies were delivered in a range from 2-144 mJ/MB. Histological evaluations included 3-4 high-quality histological...

  13. Ablative skin resurfacing with a novel microablative CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotkin, Robert H; Sarnoff, Deborah S; Cannarozzo, Giovanni; Sadick, Neil S; Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene

    2009-02-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser skin resurfacing has been a mainstay of facial rejuvenation since its introduction in the mid 1990s. Recently, a new generation of fractional or microablative CO2 lasers has been introduced to the marketplace. According to the concept of fractional photothermolysis, these lasers ablate only a fraction of the epidermal and dermal architecture in the treatment area. An array of microscopic thermal wounds is created that ablates the epidermis and dermis within very tiny zones; adjacent to these areas, the epidermis and dermis are spared. This microablative process of laser skin resurfacing has proven safe and effective not only for facial rejuvenation, but elsewhere on the body as well. It is capable of improving wrinkles, acne scars, and other types of atrophic scars and benign pigmented lesions associated with elastotic, sun-damaged skin. Because of the areas of spared epidermis and dermis inherent in a procedure that employs fractional photothermolysis, healing is more rapid compared to fully ablative CO2 laser skin resurfacing and downtime is proportionately reduced. A series of 32 consecutive patients underwent a single laser resurfacing procedure with the a new microablative CO2 laser. All patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months and were asked to complete patient satisfaction questionnaires; a 6 month postoperative photographic evaluation by an independent physician, not involved in the treatment, was also performed. Both sets of data were graded and reported on a quartile scale. Results demonstrated greater than 50% improvement in almost all patients with those undergoing treatment for wrinkles, epidermal pigment or solar elastosis deriving the greatest change for the better (>75%).

  14. Characterization and Comparison of Aluminum, Silicon, and Carbon Laser Ablation Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iratcabal, Jeremy; Swanson, Kyle; Covington, Aaron

    2017-10-01

    Laser ablation of solid targets produces plasma plumes with rapidly evolving temperature and density gradients. These gradients can be measured using laser interferometric techniques that allow for the study of the plasma as the plume expands from the target surface and the temperature and density decrease. A systematic study of the temperature and density of aluminum, silicon, and carbon plasma plumes produced with a 2 TW/cm2 laser using spectroscopic, interferometric, fast imaging, and charge diagnostics will be presented. Carbon, aluminum, and silicon plumes are of interest because they are closely grouped on the periodic table but have very different material characteristics. Temporally and spatially resolved data was collected to characterize the evolution of the plasma in the plume. To probe the plasmas produced from these materials, optical spectroscopy was employed to identify and measure the temperature of the coexisting neutral and ionized atomic and molecular species. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer was employed to measure electron density. ICCD imaging and shadowgraphy were used to image the plume dynamics. A comparison of plasma evolution for each element will also be presented and will provide data to benchmark plasma codes. This work was supported by the University of Nevada, Reno, the U.S. DOE /NNSA Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0002075, and National Securities Technologies, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946/Subcontract No. 165819.

  15. Confinement of laser plasma expansion with strong external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui-bo; Hu, Guang-yue; Liang, Yi-han; Tao, Tao; Wang, Yu-lin; Hu, Peng; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2018-05-01

    The evolutions of laser ablation plasma, expanding in strong (∼10 T) transverse external magnetic field, were investigated in experiments and simulations. The experimental results show that the magnetic field pressure causes the plasma decelerate and accumulate at the plasma-field interface, and then form a low-density plasma bubble. The saturation size of the plasma bubble has a scaling law on laser energy and magnetic field intensity. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation results support the observation and find that the scaling law (V max ∝ E p /B 2, where V max is the maximum volume of the plasma bubble, E p is the absorbed laser energy, and B is the magnetic field intensity) is effective in a broad laser energy range from several joules to kilo-joules, since the plasma is always in the state of magnetic field frozen while expanding. About 15% absorbed laser energy converts into magnetic field energy stored in compressed and curved magnetic field lines. The duration that the plasma bubble comes to maximum size has another scaling law t max ∝ E p 1/2/B 2. The plasma expanding dynamics in external magnetic field have a similar character with that in underdense gas, which indicates that the external magnetic field may be a feasible approach to replace the gas filled in hohlraum to suppress the wall plasma expansion and mitigate the stimulated scattering process in indirect drive ignition.

  16. Polymers designed for laser ablation-influence of photochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, T.; Dickinson, J.T.; Hauer, M.; Kopitkovas, G.; Langford, S.C.; Masuhara, H.; Nuyken, O.; Robert, J.; Salmio, H.; Tada, T.; Tomita, K.; Wokaun, A.

    2002-01-01

    The ablation characteristics of various polymers were studied at low and high fluences. The polymers can be divided into three groups, i.e. polymers containing triazene and ester groups, the same polymers without the triazene group, and polyimide as reference polymer. At high fluences similar ablation parameters, i.e. etch rates and effective absorption coefficients, were obtained for all polymers. The main difference is the absence of carbon deposits for the designed polymers. At low fluences (at 308 nm) very pronounced differences are detected. The polymers containing the photochemically most active group (triazene) exhibit the lowest threshold of ablation (as low as 25 mJ cm -2 ) and the highest etch rates (up to 3 μm/pulse), followed by the designed polyesters and then polyimide. The laser-induced decomposition of the designed polymers was studied by nanosecond-interferometry. Only the triazene-polymer reveals etching without any sign of surface swelling, which is observed for all other polymers. The etching of the triazene-polymer starts and ends with the laser pulse, clearly indicating photochemical etching. The triazene-polymer was also studied by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). The intensities of the ablation fragments show pronounced differences between irradiation at the absorption band of the triazene group (308 nm) and irradiation at a shorter wavelength (248 nm)

  17. Observation of hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated plasma in a small hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hang; Kuang, Longyu; Jiang, Shaoen, E-mail: jiangshn@vip.sina.com; Ding, Yongkun, E-mail: ding-yk@vip.sina.com [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Song, Tianming; Yang, Jiamin, E-mail: yjm70018@sina.cn; Zhu, Tuo; Lin, Zhiwei; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Haiying; Yu, Ruizhen; Liu, Shenye [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2015-07-15

    In the hohlraum used in laser indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments, hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated high-Z plasma have a great effect on laser injection efficiency, radiation uniformity, and diagnosis of hohlraum radiation field from diagnostic windows (DW). To study plasma filling in the DWs, a laser-irradiated Ti disk was used to generate 2–5 keV narrow energy band X-ray as the intense backlighter source, and laser-produced X-ray in a hohlraum with low-Z foam tamper was used to heat a small hole surrounded by gold wall with 150 μm in diameter and 100 μm deep. The hydrodynamic movement of the gold plasma in the small hole was measured by an X-ray framing camera and the results are analyzed. Quantitative measurement of the plasma areal density distribution and evolution in the small hole can be used to assess the effect of plasma filling on the diagnosis from the DWs.

  18. Investigation of laser ablation of CVD diamond film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Choung-Lii; Chou, W. C.; Ma, Kung-Jen; Chen, Ta-Tung; Liu, Y. M.; Kuo, Y. S.; Chen, Ying-Tung

    2005-04-01

    Diamond, having many advanced physical and mechanical properties, is one of the most important materials used in the mechanical, telecommunication and optoelectronic industry. However, high hardness value and extreme brittleness have made diamond extremely difficult to be machined by conventional mechanical grinding and polishing. In the present study, the microwave CVD method was employed to produce epitaxial diamond films on silicon single crystal. Laser ablation experiments were then conducted on the obtained diamond films. The underlying material removal mechanisms, microstructure of the machined surface and related machining conditions were also investigated. It was found that during the laser ablation, peaks of the diamond grains were removed mainly by the photo-thermal effects introduced by excimer laser. The diamond structures of the protruded diamond grains were transformed by the laser photonic energy into graphite, amorphous diamond and amorphous carbon which were removed by the subsequent laser shots. As the protruding peaks gradually removed from the surface the removal rate decreased. Surface roughness (Ra) was improved from above 1μm to around 0.1μm in few minutes time in this study. However, a scanning technique would be required if a large area was to be polished by laser and, as a consequence, it could be very time consuming.

  19. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    See, Tian Long; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin; Zhong, Xiang Li

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ablation threshold for excimer laser is lower compared to femtosecond laser. • Effective optical penetration depth for excimer laser is lower compared to femtosecond laser. • Two ablation characteristic regimes are observed for femtosecond laser ablation. • Reduction of C=C bond following excimer or fs laser ablation is observed. • Addition of oxygen- and nitrogen-rich functional groups is observed. - Abstract: This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser–material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (F_t_h = 0.087 J/cm"2) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (F_t_h = 1.576 J/cm"2), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α"−"1 = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α"−"1 = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the C=C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas C=C bond is partially

  20. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    See, Tian Long, E-mail: tianlong.see@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Liu, Zhu [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Li, Lin [Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Zhong, Xiang Li [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-28

    Highlights: • Ablation threshold for excimer laser is lower compared to femtosecond laser. • Effective optical penetration depth for excimer laser is lower compared to femtosecond laser. • Two ablation characteristic regimes are observed for femtosecond laser ablation. • Reduction of C=C bond following excimer or fs laser ablation is observed. • Addition of oxygen- and nitrogen-rich functional groups is observed. - Abstract: This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser–material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (F{sub th} = 0.087 J/cm{sup 2}) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (F{sub th} = 1.576 J/cm{sup 2}), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α{sup −1} = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α{sup −1} = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the C=C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas

  1. Laser ablation synthesis of monodispersed magnetic alloy nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seto, Takafumi; Koga, Kenji; Akinaga, Hiroyuki; Takano, Fumiyoshi; Orii, Takaaki; Hirasawa, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    Monodispersed CoPt alloy nanoparticles were synthesized by a pulsed laser ablation (PLA) technique coupled with a low-pressure operating differential mobility analyzer (LP-DMA). The CoPt alloy nanoparticles were generated by laser ablating a solid Co-Pt target. In CoPt alloy nanoparticles synthesized from a target with a Co composition of 75 at%, the nanoparticle surfaces were covered by an oxide layer and exhibited a core-shell structure. In contrast, no shell was observed in particles generated from a target with a Co:Pt ratio of 50:50 at%. According to an EDX analysis, the compositions of the individual nanoparticles were almost the same as that of the target material. Finally, the magnetic hysteresis loops of the CoPt alloy nanoparticles exhibited ferromagnetism

  2. Nanostructured films of metal particles obtained by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz-Miranda, M., E-mail: muniz@unifi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica “U. Schiff”, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Gellini, C. [Dipartimento di Chimica “U. Schiff”, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Giorgetti, E.; Margheri, G.; Marsili, P. [Istituto Sistemi Complessi (CNR), Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Lascialfari, L.; Becucci, L. [Dipartimento di Chimica “U. Schiff”, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Trigari, S. [Istituto Sistemi Complessi (CNR), Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Giammanco, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Fermi”, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    Colloidal dispersions of silver and gold nanoparticles were obtained in pure water by ablation with nanosecond pulsed laser. Then, by filtration of the metal particles on alumina, we fabricated nanostructured films, whose surface morphology was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and related to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) after adsorption of adenine. - Highlights: • Ag and Au colloidal nanoparticles were obtained by laser ablation. • Nanostructured Ag and Au films were fabricated by filtration of metal nanoparticles. • Surface morphology of metal films was investigated by atomic force microscopy. • Surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of adenine on metal films were obtained. • SERS enhancements were related to the surface roughness of the metal films.

  3. Laser ablation synthesis of monodispersed magnetic alloy nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seto, Takafumi, E-mail: t.seto@aist.go.jp; Koga, Kenji; Akinaga, Hiroyuki; Takano, Fumiyoshi; Orii, Takaaki; Hirasawa, Makoto [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Research Consortium for Synthetic Nano-Function Materials Project (SYNAF) (Japan)

    2006-08-15

    Monodispersed CoPt alloy nanoparticles were synthesized by a pulsed laser ablation (PLA) technique coupled with a low-pressure operating differential mobility analyzer (LP-DMA). The CoPt alloy nanoparticles were generated by laser ablating a solid Co-Pt target. In CoPt alloy nanoparticles synthesized from a target with a Co composition of 75 at%, the nanoparticle surfaces were covered by an oxide layer and exhibited a core-shell structure. In contrast, no shell was observed in particles generated from a target with a Co:Pt ratio of 50:50 at%. According to an EDX analysis, the compositions of the individual nanoparticles were almost the same as that of the target material. Finally, the magnetic hysteresis loops of the CoPt alloy nanoparticles exhibited ferromagnetism.

  4. Laser Ablation Experiments on the Tamdakht H5 Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan M.; Stern, Eric

    2017-01-01

    High-powered lasers were used to induce ablation and to form fusion crusts in the lab on Tamdakht H5 chondrites and basalt. These ground tests were undertaken to improve our understanding, and ultimately improve our abilty to model and predict, meteoroid ablation during atmospheric entry. The infrared fiber laser at the LHMEL facilty, operated in the continuous wave (i.e. non-pulsed) mode, provided radiation surface heat flux at levels similar to meteor entry for these tests. Results are presented from the first round of testing on samples of Tamdakht H5 ordinary chondrite which were ex-posed to entry-relevant heating rates between 2 and 10 kWcm2.

  5. Precise femtosecond laser ablation of dental hard tissue: preliminary investigation on adequate laser parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikov, Todor; Pecheva, Emilia; Petrov, Todor; Montgomery, Paul; Antoni, Frederic; Leong-Hoi, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the possibility of introducing state-of-the-art commercial femtosecond laser system in restorative dentistry by maintaining well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also in overcoming disadvantages such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. Femtosecond ablation of dental hard tissue is investigated by changing the irradiation parameters (pulsed laser energy, scanning speed and pulse repetition rate), assessed for enamel and dentin. The femtosecond laser system used in this work may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, due to the expected effective ablation and low temperature increase when using ultra short laser pulses. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this system seems to be promising for promoting a laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach in restorative dentistry. (paper)

  6. Atmospheric pressure plasma-assisted femtosecond laser engraving of aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, Christoph; Gimpel, Thomas; Tasche, Daniel; Koch née Hoffmeister, Jennifer; Brückner, Stephan; Flachenecker, Günter; Wieneke, Stephan; Schade, Wolfgang; Viöl, Wolfgang

    2018-05-01

    In this contribution, we report on the impact of direct dielectric barrier discharge argon plasma at atmospheric pressure on femtosecond laser engraving of aluminium. It is shown that the assisting plasma strongly affects the surface geometry and formation of spikes of both laser-engraved single lines and patterns of adjacent lines with an appropriate overlap. Further, it was observed that the overall ablation depth is significantly increased in case of large-scale patterning whereas no notable differences in ablation depth are found for single lines. Several possible mechanisms and underlying effects of this behaviour are suggested. The increase in ablation depth is supposed to be due to a plasma-induced removal of debris particles from the cutting point via charging and oxidation as supported by EDX analysis of the re-solidified debris. Furthermore, the impact of a higher degree of surface wrinkling as well as direct interactions of plasma species with the aluminium surface on the ablation process are discussed.

  7. Laser ablation of the protein lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Amoruso, Salvatore

    produced thin films of average thickness up to 300 nm, which not only contained a significant amount of intact molecules, but also maintained the bioactivity. These films were produced by a nanosecond laser in the UV regime at 355 nm with 2 J/cm2. The surprising fact that these molecules can be transferred......Lysozyme is a well-known protein, which is used in food processing because of its bactericidal properties. The mass (14307 amu) is in the range in which it easily can be monitored by mass spectrometric methods, for example by MALDI (Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization). We have recently...... to a substrate as intact molecules by the violent laser impact ( up to 50 mJ/pulse) has not yet been understood. One issue is that up to 150 ng/pulse is removed by the laser, and much of the material is ejected from the target in relatively large chunks. We have explored as well the excitation mechanics by laser...

  8. Growth of epitaxial thin films by pulsed laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    High-quality, high-temperature superconductor (HTSc) films can be grown by the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) process. This article provides a detailed introduction to the advantages and curent limitations of PLA for epitaxial film growth. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods and on exploitation of PLA to control epitaxial growth at either the unit cell or the atomic-layer level. Examples are taken from recent HTSc film growth. 33 figs, 127 refs

  9. Laser ablation of Bi-substituted gadolinium iron garnet films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, N.; Hayashida, K.; Kawano, K.; Higuchi, K.; Ohkoshi, M.; Tsushima, K.

    1995-01-01

    Bi-substituted gadolinium iron garnet films were deposited by laser ablation. The composition, the structure and the magnetic properties of the films were found to be strongly dependent both on the compositions of the targets and on the pressure of oxygen. The highest values of Bi-substitution up to x=1.44 with uniform composition were obtained, after annealing in air. ((orig.))

  10. Laser ablation of molecular carbon nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D., E-mail: d.fischer@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schwinghammer, K. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany); Sondermann, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Lau, V.W.; Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lotsch, B.V. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We present a method for the preparation of thin films on sapphire substrates of the carbon nitride precursors dicyandiamide (C{sub 2}N{sub 4}H{sub 4}), melamine (C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}), and melem (C{sub 6}N{sub 10}H{sub 6}), using the femtosecond-pulsed laser deposition technique (femto-PLD) at different temperatures. The depositions were carried out under high vacuum with a femtosecond-pulsed laser. The focused laser beam is scanned on the surface of a rotating target consisting of the pelletized compounds. The resulting polycrystalline, opaque films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, SEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements. The crystal structures and optical/spectroscopic results of the obtained rough films largely match those of the bulk materials.

  11. Negative ion production by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Motoi [Doshisha Univ., Tanabe, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Sasao, Mamiko

    1997-02-01

    The status of the development of Li{sup -} production by generating a neutral Li flux with an intense radiation of a laser beam onto the surface of Li metal has been reported. The experimental apparatus was arranged to detect a mass separated Li{sup +} and Li{sup -} ion beams. A Li sputtering probe, immersed in the extraction region of a compact (6cm diam. 7cm long) magnetic multipole ion source was irradiated with a Nd-YAG laser of 0.4 J/pulse. The production of mass-separated positive ions of Li by laser irradiation has been confirmed, but the production of Li{sup -} has not been confirmed yet due to the noise caused by a temporal discharge. (author)

  12. Laser-aided plasma diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donne, A. J. H.; Barth, C. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper will focus on two types of laser-aided diagnostics: Thomson scattering and laser-induced fluorescence. Thomson scattering is a very powerful diagnostic, which is applied at nearly every magnetic confinement device. Depending on the experimental conditions different plasma parameters can

  13. Measurement of inclusion size by laser ablation ICP mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasev, Andrey V.; Suito, Hideaki

    2004-01-01

    By using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), the measurement of particle size has been made for one component oxide (Al 2 O 3 and MgO) and multicomponent oxide (12CaO·7Al 2 O 3 and CaO-Al 2 O 3 -MgO) located on surface of iron or glass sample. The method of particle size estimation by LA-ICP-MS has been developed coupled with a new method of making samples with particles. The size calibration lines for Al 2 O 3 , MgO and CaO particles have been obtained. The results of particle size measurement by LA-ICP-MS are compared with those by SEM and single-particle optical sensing (SPOS) methods. It was confirmed that LA-ICP-MS has the perspective to be used for the quick measurement of inclusion composition and size in metal and other materials. The size frequency distributions of Al 2 O 3 particles measured by LA-ICP-MS in iron samples with particles agree reasonably well with those by SEM and SPOS in the range of particle diameter from 2 to 20 μm. The size of Al 2 O 3 , MgO and complex oxide (12CaO·7Al 2 O 3 and CaO-Al 2 O 3 -MgO) particles measured by LA-ICP-MS is in good agreement with that by SEM in the range of particle diameter from 10 to 40 μm. (author)

  14. Comparison of soft and hard tissue ablation with sub-ps and ns pulse lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L.B.; Stuart, B.C.; Celliers, P.M.; Feit, M.D.; Glinsky, M.E.; Heredia, N.J.; Herman, S.; Lane, S.M.; London, R.A.; Matthews, D.L.; Perry, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chang, T.D. [Veterans Administration Hospital, Martinez, CA (United States); Neev, J. [Beckman Laser Inst. and Medical Clinic, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses offers several unique advantages. The nonlinear energy deposition is insensitive to tissue type, allowing this tool to be used for soft and hard tissue ablation. The localized energy deposition lead to precise ablation depth and minimal collateral damage. This paper reports on efforts to study and demonstrate tissue ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser. Ablation efficiency and extent of collateral damage for 0.3 ps and 1000 ps duration laser pulses are compared. Temperature measurements of the rear surface of a tooth section is also presented.

  15. Tactile Sensing From Laser-Ablated Metallized PET Films

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya

    2016-10-17

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and implementation of a novel sensor patch developed from commercial polyethylene terephthalate films metallized with aluminum on one side. The aluminum was ablated with laser to form interdigitated electrodes to make sensor prototypes. The interdigitated electrodes were patterned on the substrate with a laser cutter. Characterization of the prototypes was done to determine their operating frequency followed by experimentation. The prototypes have been used as a tactile sensor showing promising results for using these patches in applications with contact pressures considerably lesser than normal human contact pressure.

  16. Preparation of Ta Te2 thin films by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, M.D.; Alkhwam, M.; Alkhasm, M.

    2006-03-01

    The laser ablation system consisting of a vacuum chamber and Nd-YAG laser has been built for deposition TaTe 2 on three different substrates (Silicon, glass, and Aluminium). The surface topography of the prepared thin films has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). TaTe 2 powder was characterized by using x-ray diffraction. The crystallinity of the thin films was examined by x-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show no peaks corresponding TaTe 2 , but there are some indications to the Ta 3 N 5 . (author)

  17. Optical Thomson scatter from laser-ablated plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delserieys, A.; Khattak, F. Y.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Riley, D.; Pedregosa Gutierrez, J.

    2008-01-01

    We have obtained density and temperature informations on an expanding KrF laser-ablated magnesium plume via optical Thomson scatter with a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. The electron temperature was found to decay with the expected T e ∝t -1 dependence. However, we have found the electron density to have a time dependence n e ∝t -4.95 which can be explained by strong recombination processes. We also observed atomic Raman satellites originating from transitions between the different angular momentum levels of the metastable 3 P 0 term in Mg I

  18. Surface wettability of silicon substrates enhanced by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Shih-Feng [National Applied Research Laboratories, Instrument Technology Research Center, Hsinchu (China); National Chiao Tung University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hsinchu (China); Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Hsiao, Sheng-Yi [National Applied Research Laboratories, Instrument Technology Research Center, Hsinchu (China); Chen, Ming-Fei [National Changhua University of Education, Department of Mechatronics Engineering, Changhua (China); Lin, Yung-Sheng [Hungkuang University, Department of Applied Cosmetology and Graduate Institute of Cosmetic Science, Taichung (China); Chou, Chang-Pin [National Chiao Tung University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hsinchu (China)

    2010-11-15

    Laser-ablation techniques have been widely applied for removing material from a solid surface using a laser-beam irradiating apparatus. This paper presents a surface-texturing technique to create rough patterns on a silicon substrate using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser system. The different degrees of microstructure and surface roughness were adjusted by the laser fluence and laser pulse duration. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a 3D confocal laser-scanning microscope are used to measure the surface micrograph and roughness of the patterns, respectively. The contact angle variations between droplets on the textured surface were measured using an FTA 188 video contact angle analyzer. The results indicate that increasing the values of laser fluence and laser pulse duration pushes more molten slag piled around these patterns to create micro-sized craters and leads to an increase in the crater height and surface roughness. A typical example of a droplet on a laser-textured surface shows that the droplet spreads very quickly and almost disappears within 0.5167 s, compared to a contact angle of 47.9 on an untextured surface. This processing technique can also be applied to fabricating Si solar panels to increase the absorption efficiency of light. (orig.)

  19. In situ deuterium inventory measurements of a-C:D layers on tungsten in TEXTOR by laser induced ablation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierse, N; Brezinsek, S; Coenen, J W; Huber, A; Laengner, M; Möller, S; Nonhoff, M; Philipps, V; Pospieszczyk, A; Schweer, B; Sergienko, G; Xiao, Q; Zlobinski, M; Samm, U; Giesen, T F

    2014-01-01

    Laser induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) is a diagnostic to provide temporally and spatially resolved in situ measurements of tritium retention and material migration in order to characterize the status of the first wall in future fusion devices. In LIAS, a ns-laser pulse ablates the first nanometres of the first wall plasma-facing components into the plasma edge. The resulting line radiation by plasma excitation is observed by spectroscopy. In the case of the full ionizing plasma and with knowledge of appropriate photon efficiencies for the corresponding line emission the amount of ablated material can be measured in situ. We present the photon efficiency for the deuterium Balmer α-line resulting from ablation in TEXTOR by performing LIAS on amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:D) layers deposited on tungsten substrate of thicknesses between 0.1 and 1.1 μm. An experimental inverse photon efficiency of [(D/(XB))] D α (EXP) a-C:D→ LIAS D =75.9±23.4 was determined. This value is a factor 5 larger than predicted values from the ADAS database for atomic injection of deuterium under TEXTOR plasma edge conditions and about twice as high, assuming normal wall recycling and release of molecular deuterium and break-up of D 2 via the molecular ion which is usually observed at the high temperature tokamak edge (T e  > 30 eV). (paper)

  20. Laser ablation of hard tissue: correlation between the laser beam parameters and the post-ablative tissue characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafetinides, Alexandros A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan

    2003-11-01

    Hard dental tissue laser applications, such as preventive treatment, laser diagnosis of caries, laser etching of enamel, laser decay removal and cavity preparation, and more recently use of the laser light to enlarge the root canal during the endodontic therapy, have been investigated for in vitro and in vivo applications. Post-ablative surface characteristics, e.g. degree of charring, cracks and other surface deformation, can be evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The experimental data are discussed in relevance with the laser beam characteristics, e.g. pulse duration, beam profile, and the beam delivery systems employed. Techniques based on the laser illumination of the dental tissues and the subsequent evaluation of the scattered fluorescent light will be a valuable tool in early diagnosis of tooth diseases, as carious dentin or enamel. The laser induced autofluorescence signal of healthy dentin is much stronger than that of the carious dentin. However, a better understanding of the transmission patterns of laser light in teeth, for both diagnosis and therapy is needed, before the laser procedures can be used in a clinical environment.

  1. Fabrication of CVD graphene-based devices via laser ablation for wafer-scale characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackenzie, David; Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Whelan, Patrick Rebsdorf

    2015-01-01

    Selective laser ablation of a wafer-scale graphene film is shown to provide flexible, high speed (1 wafer/hour) device fabrication while avoiding the degradation of electrical properties associated with traditional lithographic methods. Picosecond laser pulses with single pulse peak fluences of 140......-effect mobility, doping level, on–off ratio, and conductance minimum before and after laser ablation fabrication....

  2. Periodic patterning of silicon by direct nanosecond laser interference ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavera, T.; Pérez, N.; Rodríguez, A.; Yurrita, P.; Olaizola, S.M.; Castaño, E.

    2011-01-01

    The production of periodic structures in silicon wafers by four-beam is presented. Because laser interference ablation is a single-step and cost-effective process, there is a great technological interest in the fabrication of these structures for their use as antireflection surfaces. Three different laser fluences are used to modify the silicon surface (0.8 J cm -2 , 1.3 J cm -2 , 2.0 J cm -2 ) creating bumps in the rim of the irradiated area. Laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), in particular micro and nano-ripples, are also observed. Measurements of the reflectivity show a decrease in the reflectance for the samples processed with a laser fluence of 2.0 J cm -2 , probably caused by the appearance of the nano-ripples in the structured area, while bumps start to deteriorate.

  3. Doping of silicon by carbon during laser ablation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciukaitis, G.; Brikas, M.; Kazlauskiene, V.; Miskinis, J.

    2007-04-01

    Effect of laser ablation on properties of remaining material was investigated in silicon. It was established that laser cutting of wafers in air induced doping of silicon by carbon. The effect was found to be more distinct by the use of higher laser power or UV radiation. Carbon ions created bonds with silicon in the depth of silicon. Formation of the silicon carbide type bonds was confirmed by SIMS, XPS and AES measurements. Modeling of the carbon diffusion was performed to clarify its depth profile in silicon. Photo-chemical reactions of such type changed the structure of material and could be a reason for the reduced quality of machining. A controlled atmosphere was applied to prevent carbonization of silicon during laser cutting.

  4. Doping of silicon by carbon during laser ablation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raciukaitis, G; Brikas, M; Kazlauskiene, V; Miskinis, J

    2007-01-01

    Effect of laser ablation on properties of remaining material was investigated in silicon. It was established that laser cutting of wafers in air induced doping of silicon by carbon. The effect was found to be more distinct by the use of higher laser power or UV radiation. Carbon ions created bonds with silicon in the depth of silicon. Formation of the silicon carbide type bonds was confirmed by SIMS, XPS and AES measurements. Modeling of the carbon diffusion was performed to clarify its depth profile in silicon. Photo-chemical reactions of such type changed the structure of material and could be a reason for the reduced quality of machining. A controlled atmosphere was applied to prevent carbonization of silicon during laser cutting

  5. Doping of silicon with carbon during laser ablation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Račiukaitis, G.; Brikas, M.; Kazlauskienė, V.; Miškinis, J.

    2006-12-01

    The effect of laser ablation on properties of remaining material in silicon was investigated. It was found that laser cutting of wafers in the air induced the doping of silicon with carbon. The effect was more distinct when using higher laser power or UV radiation. Carbon ions created bonds with silicon atoms in the depth of the material. Formation of the silicon carbide type bonds was confirmed by SIMS, XPS and AES measurements. Modeling of the carbon diffusion to clarify its depth profile in silicon was performed. Photochemical reactions of such type changed the structure of material and could be the reason of the reduced machining quality. The controlled atmosphere was applied to prevent carbonization of silicon during laser cutting.

  6. Ablation of biological tissues by radiation of strontium vapor laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldatov, A. N., E-mail: general@tic.tsu.ru; Vasilieva, A. V., E-mail: anita-tomsk@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Lenin ave., 36, 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    A two-stage laser system consisting of a master oscillator and a power amplifier based on sources of self- contained transitions in pairs SrI and SrII has been developed. The radiation spectrum contains 8 laser lines generating in the range of 1 – 6.45 μm, with a generation pulse length of 50 – 150 ns, and pulse energy of ∼ 2.5 mJ. The divergence of the output beam was close to the diffraction and did not exceed 0.5 mrad. The control range of the laser pulse repetition rate varied from 10 to 15 000 Hz. The given laser system has allowed to perform ablation of bone tissue samples without visible thermal damage.

  7. Minimizing matrix effect by femtosecond laser ablation and ionization in elemental determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bochao; He, Miaohong; Hang, Wei; Huang, Benli

    2013-05-07

    Matrix effect is unavoidable in direct solid analysis, which usually is a leading cause of the nonstoichiometric effect in quantitative analysis. In this research, experiments were carried out to study the overall characteristics of atomization and ionization in laser-solid interaction. Both nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) lasers were applied in a buffer-gas-assisted ionization source coupled with an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Twenty-nine solid standards of ten different matrices, including six metals and four dielectrics, were analyzed. The results indicate that the fs-laser mode offers more stable relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) with irradiance higher than 7 × 10(13) W·cm(-2), which could be more reliable in the determination of element composition of solids. The matrix effect is reduced by half when the fs-laser is employed, owing to the fact that the fs-laser ablation and ionization (fs-LAI) incurs an almost heat-free ablation process and creates a dense plasma for the stable ionization.

  8. Ablative Fractional 10 600 nm Carbon Dioxide Laser Versus Non-ablative Fractional 1540 nm Erbium-Glass Laser in Egyptian Post-acne Scar patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaie, Mohamed L; Ibrahim, Shady M; Saudi, Wael

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Non-ablative fractional erbium-doped glass 1540 nm and fractional ablative 10600 nm carbon dioxide lasers are regarded as effective modalities for treating acne atrophic scars. In this study, we aimed to compare the effectiveness of fractional CO 2 laser and fractional nonablative 1540 nm erbium doped glass laser in treating post acne atrophic scars in Egyptian patients. Methods: Fifty-eight patients complaining of moderate and severe acne atrophic scars were randomly divided into 2 groups of 29 patients each. Both groups were subjected to 4 treatment sessions with 3 weeks interval and were followed up for 3 months. In group A, enrolled patient sreceived C2 laser, while in group B, patients were treated with 1540 nm erbium glass fractional laser. Results: Clinical assessment revealed that the mean grades of progress and improvement were higher with fractional 10600 nm CO2 laser but with non-significant difference between both treatments ( P = 0.1). The overall patients' satisfaction with both lasers were not significantly different ( P = 0.44). Conclusion: Both fractional ablative CO2 and fractional non-ablative erbium glass lasers are good modalities for treating acne scars with a high efficacy and safety profile and good patient satisfaction. The fractional ablative laser showed higher efficacy while non-ablative laser offered less pain and shorter downtime.

  9. Laser ablation of lysozyme with UV, visible and infrared femto- and nanosecond pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Matei, Andreea

    Lysozyme is an interesting molecule for laser ablation of organic materials, because the ablation has been comprehensively studied, it is a medium heavy molecule with a mass of 14305 Da, which can be detected by standard techniques, and because it is used as a bactericidal protein in the food...... industry. Lysozyme molecules do not absorb energy for wavelengths above 310 nm, but nevertheless there is a strong mass loss by ablation for laser irradiation in the visible regime. The total ablation yield of lysozyme at 355 nm and at 2 J/cm2 is about 155 µg/pulse, possibly one of the highest ablation...... the ablation process for different wavelengths and time duration. Measurements for 6-7-ns laser ablation were carried out at DTU on Risø Campus, while measurements with pulses of 300 fs were carried out at the University of Naples in a similar setup. For all wavelengths except at nanosecond laser pulses at 355...

  10. Pulsed laser ablation of Germanium under vacuum and hydrogen environments at various fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, Shazia, E-mail: shaziabashir@gcu.edu.pk [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Dawood, Asadullah; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Hayat, Asma; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Mahmood, Arshad [National Institute of Laser and Optronics (NILOP), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • Germanium targets were exposed under vacuum and H{sub 2} environment by nanosecond laser pulses. • The effect of laser fluence and ambient environment has been investigated. • The surface morphology is investigated by SEM analysis. • Raman and FTIR Spectroscopy are performed to reveal structural modification. • Electrical conductivity is probed by four probe method. - Abstract: Laser fluence and ambient environment play a significant role for the formation and development of the micro/nano-structures on the laser irradiated targets. Single crystal (1 0 0) Germanium (Ge) has been ablated under two environments of vacuum (10{sup −3} Torr) and hydrogen (100 Torr) at various fluences ranging from 4.5 J cm{sup −2} to 6 J cm{sup −2}. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser with wavelength of 248 nm, pulse duration of 18 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets was explored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge is measured by four probe method. SEM analysis exhibits the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), cones and micro-bumps in both ambient environments (vacuum and hydrogen). The formation as well as development of these structures is strongly dependent upon the laser fluence and environmental conditions. The periodicity of LIPSS or ripples varies from 38 μm to 60 μm in case of vacuum whereas in case of hydrogen environment, the periodicity varies from 20 μm to 45 μm. The difference in number of ripples and periodicity as well as in shape and size of cones and bumps in vacuum and hydrogen is explained on the basis of confinement and shielding effect of plasma. FTIR spectroscopy reveals that no new bands are formed for laser ablated Ge under vacuum, whereas C−H stretching vibration band is

  11. Propagation profile of ablation front driven by a nonuniform UV laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, I.; Tanimoto, M.; Kasai, T.; Yano, M.

    1985-01-01

    Spatial profile of ablation front is observed under the irradiation of spatially modulated 0.27-μm laser beam. Propagation depth of the ablation front is derived by means of various methods which detect x-ray radiation from aluminum substrates overcoated with polyethylene layers of different thicknesses. A higher mass ablation rate is observed for the UV laser than the longer wavelength lasers. However, observation with an x-ray television camera shows that the spatial nonuniformity in the laser beam is projected on the ablation front surface without substantial smoothing

  12. Synthesis and Properties of Platinum Nanoparticles by Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Mendivil Palma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum (Pt nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL technique in different liquids (acetone, ethanol, and methanol. Ablation was performed using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with output energy of 230 mJ/pulse for 532 nm wavelength. Ablation time and laser energy fluence were varied for all the liquids. Effects of laser energy fluence, ablation time, and nature of the liquid were reported. The mean size, size distributions, shape, elemental composition, and optical properties of Pt nanoparticles synthesized by PLAL were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy.

  13. Performance of Er:YAG laser ablation of hard bone under different irrigation water cooling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán Bernal, Lina M.; Shayeganrad, Gholamreza; Kosa, Gabor; Zelechowski, Marek; Rauter, Georg; Friederich, Niklaus; Cattin, Philippe C.; Zam, Azhar

    2018-02-01

    The biological applicability of the Erbium-doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser in surgical processes is so far limited to hard dental tissues. Using the Er:YAG laser for bone ablation is being studied since it has shown good performance for ablating dental hard tissues at the wavelength 2.94 μm, which coincides with the absorption peak of water, one of the main components of hard tissue, like teeth and bone. To obtain a decent performance of the laser in the cutting process, we aim at examining the influence of sequenced water jet irrigation on both, the ablation rate and the prevention of carbonization while performing laser ablation of bone with fixed laser parameters. An Er:YAG laser at 2.94 μm wavelength, 940 mJ energy per pulse, 400 μs pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate is used for the ablation of a porcine femur bone under different pulsed water jet irrigation conditions. We used micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scans to determine the geometry of the ablated areas. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used for qualitative observations for the presence of carbonization and micro-fractures on the ablated surfaces. We evaluate the performance of the laser ablation process for the different water jet conditions in terms of the ablation rate, quantified by the ablated volume per second and the ablation efficiency, calculated as the ablated volume per pulse energy. We provide an optimized system for laser ablation which delivers the appropriate amount of water to the bone and consequently, the bone is ablated in the most efficient way possible without carbonization.

  14. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin; Park, Cheol

    2010-03-02

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  15. Ablation of selected conducting layers by fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Ryszard; Tomczyk, Mariusz; Walczak, Maria

    2014-08-01

    Laser Direct Writing (LDW) are used in the manufacture of electronic circuits, pads, and paths in sub millimeter scale. They can also be used in the sensors systems. Ablative laser writing in a thin functional layer of material deposited on the dielectric substrate is one of the LDW methods. Nowadays functional conductive layers are composed from graphene paint or nanosilver paint, indium tin oxide (ITO), AgHTTM and layers containing carbon nanotubes. Creating conducting structures in transparent layers (ITO, AgHT and carbon nanotubes layers) may have special importance e.g. for flexi electronics. The paper presents research on the fabrication of systems of paths and appropriate pattern systems of paths and selected electronic circuits in AgHTTM and ITO layers deposited on glass and polymer substrates. An influence of parameters of ablative fiber laser treatment in nanosecond regime as well as an influence of scanning mode of laser beam on the pattern fidelity and on electrical parameters of a generated circuit was investigated.

  16. Plume expansion dynamics during laser ablation of manganates in oxygen atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoruso, S.; Sambri, A.; Wang, X.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of the plasma plume generated by excimer laser ablation of a LaMnO 3 target is investigated by using fast photography and optical emission spectroscopy. The plume propagation in an oxygen environment is examined with pressure ranging from vacuum to few hundreds Pa. Imaging analysis of the plume emission has allowed following the changes in the plume front dynamics as a function of time and pressure. The expansion dynamics of the plume front is examined by means of a theoretical description of plume evolution and shock-wave propagation in dimensionless variables. Optical emission spectroscopy analysis showed that the oxides are mainly formed in the gas-phase through reaction of the ablated atomic species with ambient oxygen. Moreover, we observed that the formation of oxides is strongly favoured at a pressure level where the formation of a shock-wave occurs

  17. Investigation of excimer laser ablation threshold of polymers using a microphone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, Joerg; Niino, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Akira

    2002-09-30

    KrF excimer laser ablation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyimide (PI) and polycarbonate (PC) in air was studied by an in situ monitoring technique using a microphone. The microphone signal generated by a short acoustic pulse represented the etch rate of laser ablation depending on the laser fluence, i.e., the ablation 'strength'. From a linear relationship between the microphone output voltage and the laser fluence, the single-pulse ablation thresholds were found to be 30 mJ cm{sup -2} for PET, 37 mJ cm{sup -2} for PI and 51 mJ cm{sup -2} for PC (20-pulses threshold). The ablation thresholds of PET and PI were not influenced by the number of pulses per spot, while PC showed an incubation phenomenon. A microphone technique provides a simple method to determine the excimer laser ablation threshold of polymer films.

  18. The spectrum of laser skin resurfacing: nonablative, fractional, and ablative laser resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2008-05-01

    The drive to attain cosmetic facial enhancement with minimal risk and rapid recovery has inspired the field of nonsurgical skin rejuvenation. Laser resurfacing was introduced in the 1980s with continuous wave carbon dioxide (CO(2)) lasers; however, because of a high rate of side effects, including scarring, short-pulse, high-peak power, and rapidly scanned, focused-beam CO(2) lasers and normal-mode erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet lasers were developed, which remove skin in a precisely controlled manner. The prolonged 2-week recovery time and small but significant complication risk prompted the development of non-ablative and, more recently, fractional resurfacing in order to minimize risk and shorten recovery times. Nonablative resurfacing produces dermal thermal injury to improve rhytides and photodamage while preserving the epidermis. Fractional resurfacing thermally ablates microscopic columns of epidermal and dermal tissue in regularly spaced arrays over a fraction of the skin surface. This intermediate approach increases efficacy as compared to nonablative resurfacing, but with faster recovery as compared to ablative resurfacing. Neither nonablative nor fractional resurfacing produces results comparable to ablative laser skin resurfacing, but both have become much more popular than the latter because the risks of treatment are limited in the face of acceptable improvement. At the completion of this learning activity, participants should be familiar with the spectrum of lasers and light technologies available for skin resurfacing, published studies of safety and efficacy, indications, methodologies, side effects, complications, and management.

  19. Selective ablation of a titanium nitride film on tungsten carbide substrate using ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Eduardo Spinelli

    2017-01-01

    Surface coatings are applied to many cutting tools in the metallurgical industry in order to improve cutting efficiency and extend its useful life. In this work, tests were performed to remove the coating of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) pellets, using an ultrashort laser pulses beam. After determination of the damage thresholds of the film and the substrate, were ablated on the surface of the coating lines using two ablation conditions, it was initially operated on the low fluence regime for the film, and later on the low fluence regime of the substrate, far below the threshold of the film, applying high overlapping pulses. A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was set up to monitor the materials present in the plasma generated by the laser, but the system did not present sufficient sensitivity to read the low intensity of the plasma generated in the process and was not used. After the analysis of the traces by electron microscopy, optical profilometer and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, it was not possible to determine a safe process to carry out the selective removal of the film in question, however, due to the data obtained and observations of the results in some traces, new possibilities were raised, opening the discussion for future work. (author)

  20. Investigation of ultrashort pulse laser ablation of solid targets by measuring the ablation-generated momentum using a torsion pendulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Wang, Wentao; Zhu, Xiaonong; Liu, Jiansheng; Xu, Kuanhong; Huang, Peng; Zhao, Jiefeng; Li, Ruxin; Wang, Mingwei

    2011-04-25

    50 fs - 12 ps laser pulses are employed to ablate aluminum, copper, iron, and graphite targets. The ablation-generated momentum is measured with a torsion pendulum. Corresponding time-resolved shadowgraphic measurements show that the ablation process at the optimal laser fluence achieving the maximal momentum is primarily dominated by the photomechanical mechanism. When laser pulses with specific laser fluence are used and the pulse duration is tuned from 50 fs to 12 ps, the generated momentum firstly increases and then remains almost constant, which could be attributed to the change of the ablation mechanism involved from atomization to phase explosion. The investigation of the ablation-generated momentum also reveals a nonlinear momentum-energy conversion scaling law, namely, as the pulse energy increases, the momentum obtained by the target increases nonlinearly. This may be caused by the effective reduction of the dissipated energy into the surrounding of the ablation zone as the pulse energy increases, which indicates that for femtosecond laser the dissipated energy into the surrounding target is still significant.

  1. X-Ray Laser in an Ablative Capillary Discharge Driven by an m=0 Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    The development of EUV and soft-X ray lasers made great progress during the last decade. In most cases powerful primary lasers in the UV-, visible and near-infrared spectral regions are employed to produce the dense hot plasmas needed as active media for the lasers. Widely spread applications require small table-top systems and here capillary discharges offer an alternative approach and are being studied by several groups. By selecting properly the transient discharge conditions, collisional excitation or three-body recombination are the effective mechanisms to achieve population inversion. At the Ruhr-University a different approach is pursued where charge exchange between different ions in colliding plasmas is utilized. The plasmas are produced in a small ablative capillary discharge made of polyacetal. In the second half cycle an m=O instability develops and results in hot plasmas in the neck regions which stream into the cold plasma outside and create overpopulation of the n=3 level of hydrogenic carbon leading to lasing on the Balmer-alpha line at 18.22 nm. A waved structure of the inner capillary wall induces reliably the instability and pinhole pictures give the clue why not all materials are useful. Double pass experiments using a multilayer mirror give an effective gain-length product of GL=4.3 for a 3 cm long capillary and a life-time of the inversion layers of 400 ps

  2. Laser applications in nanotechnology: nanofabrication using laser ablation and laser nanolithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, G N

    2013-01-01

    The fact that nanoparticles and nanomaterials have fundamental properties different both from their constituent atoms or molecules and from their bulk counterparts has stimulated great interest, both theoretical and practical, in nanoparticles and nanoparticle-based assemblies (functional materials), with the result that these structures have become the subject of explosive research over the last twenty years or so. A great deal of progress in this field has relied on the use of lasers. In this paper, the directions followed and results obtained in laser nanotechnology research are reviewed. The parameters, properties, and applications of nanoparticles are discussed, along with the physical and chemical methods for their fabrication and investigation. Nanofabrication applications of and fundamental physical principles behind laser ablation and laser nanolithography are discussed in detail. The applications of laser radiation are shown to range from fabricating, melting, and evaporating nanoparticles to changing their shape, structure, size, and size distribution, through studying their dynamics and forming them into periodic arrays and various structures and assemblies. The historical development of research on nanoparticles and nanomaterials and the application of laser nanotechnology in various fields are briefly reviewed. (reviews of topical problems)

  3. Radiation effects on the laser ablative shockwaves from aluminum under atmospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sai Shiva, S.; Leela, C.H.; Prem Kiran, P.; Sijoy, C.D.; Chaturvedi, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of laser ablative shockwaves (LASW) from Aluminum under atmospheric pressures is numerically modeled using a one-dimensional, three-temperature (electron, ion and thermal radiation temperatures), non-equilibrium, radiation hydrodynamic (RHD) model. The governing RHD equations in Lagrangian form are solved by using an implicit scheme. Similarly, the energy relaxation between the electrons and ions and the electrons and thermal radiation are determined implicitly. Apart from these, the energy equation takes into account the flux-limited electron thermal heat flux. The RHD equations are closed by using a two temperature QEOS model for the Al. The MULTI-fs code is modified to incorporate the nanosecond laser absorption model via the photoionization (PI) and the inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) processes. The spatio-temporal evolution of the laser ablative shockwaves generated by focusing a second harmonic (532 nm, 7ns) of Nd:YAG laser on to Aluminum target under atmospheric pressures in air is captured using a shadowgraphy technique. These measurements are made from 200 ns to 10 μs after the laser pulse with a temporal resolution of 1.5 ns. We report the details of the RHD model and compare the simulated and experimental results for input laser energies in the range of 25 - 175 mJ per pulse. The evolution of the plasma parameters like electron density, charge states and the shockwaves launched into the ambient atmosphere due to expanding plasma plume are compared. The role of thermal radiation on the evolution of LASW from Al is discussed. (author)

  4. Formation of silicon carbide by laser ablation in graphene oxide-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone suspension on silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaleh, Babak; Ghasemi, Samaneh; Torkamany, Mohammad Javad; Salehzadeh, Sadegh; Maleki, Farahnaz

    2018-01-01

    Laser ablation of a silicon wafer in graphene oxide-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (GO-NMP) suspension was carried out with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (pulse duration = 250 ns, wavelength = 1064 nm). The surface of silicon wafer before and after laser ablation was studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The results showed that the ablation of silicon surface in liquid by pulsed laser was done by the process of melt expulsion under the influence of the confined plasma-induced pressure or shock wave trapped between the silicon wafer and the liquid. The X-ray diffraction‌ (XRD) pattern of Si wafer after laser ablation showed that 4H-SiC layer is formed on its surface. The formation of the above layer was also confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy‌ (XPS), as well as EDX was utilized. The reflectance of samples decreased with increasing pulse energy. Therefore, the morphological alteration and the formation of SiC layer at high energy increase absorption intensity in the UV‌-vis regions. Theoretical calculations confirm that the formation of silicon carbide from graphene oxide and silicon wafer is considerably endothermic. Development of new methods for increasing the reflectance without causing harmful effects is still an important issue for crystalline Si solar cells. By using the method described in this paper, the optical properties of solar cells can be improved.

  5. Plasma Emission Spectra of Opuntia Nopalea Obtained with Microsecond Laser Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponce, L.; Flores, T.; Arronte, A.; Flores, A.

    2008-01-01

    Laser-induced Plasma Spectroscopy was performed during the spines ablation of Opuntia by using Nd:YAG microsecond laser pulses. The results show strong absorption in Glochids that causes the intense electronic noise on the spectra. This process is consider suitable for practical elimination of spines in alimentary products like opuntia

  6. On the elemental analysis of different cigarette brands using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-ablation time of flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nasar; Umar, Zeshan A.; Ahmed, Rizwan; Aslam Baig, M.

    2017-10-01

    We present qualitative and quantitative analysis of the trace elements present in different brands of tobacco available in Pakistan using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser ablation Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (LA-TOFMS). The compositional analysis using the calibration free LIBS technique is based on the observed emission spectra of the laser produced plasma plume whereas the elemental composition analysis using LA-TOFMS is based on the mass spectra of the ions produced by laser ablation. The optical emission spectra of these samples contain spectral lines of calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, silicon, strontium, barium, lithium and aluminum with varying intensities. The corresponding mass spectra of the elements were detected in LA-TOF-MS with their composition concentration. The analysis of different brands of cigarettes demonstrates that LIBS coupled with a LA-TOF-MS is a powerful technique for the elemental analysis of the trace elements in any solid sample.

  7. Production of silver nanoparticles by laser ablation in open air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutinguiza, M.; Comesaña, R.; Lusquiños, F.; Riveiro, A.; Val, J. del; Pou, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles have been obtained by laser ablation of metallic Ag in open air using nanosecond laser. • The continuous process enables increasing the production yield. • The obtained particles are rounded shape with narrow size distribution. - Abstract: Silver nanoparticles have attracted much attention as a subject of investigation due to their well-known properties, such as good conductivity, antibacterial and catalytic effects, etc. They are used in many different areas, such as medicine, industrial applications, scientific investigation, etc. There are different techniques for producing Ag nanoparticles, chemical, electrochemical, sonochemical, etc. These methods often lead to impurities together with nanoparticles or colloidal solutions. In this work, laser ablation of solids in open air conditions (LASOA) is used to produce silver nanoparticles and collect them on glass substrates. Production and deposition of silver nanoparticles are integrated in the same step to reduce the process. The obtained particles are analysed and the nanoparticles formation mechanism is discussed. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy. The obtained nanoparticles consisted of Ag nanoparticles showing rounded shape with diameters ranging from few to 50 nm

  8. Laser ablation of posterior urethral valves by fetal cystoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, José María; Masoller, Narcis; Devlieger, Roland; Passchyn, Esther; Gómez, Olga; Rodo, Joan; Deprest, Jan A; Gratacós, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    To report the results of fetal cystoscopic laser ablation of posterior urethral valves (PUV) in a consecutive series in two referral centers. Twenty pregnant women with a presumptive isolated PUV were treated with fetal cystoscopy under local anesthesia. Identification and fulguration of the PUV by one or several firing-contacts with diode laser were attempted. Perinatal and long-term outcomes were prospectively recorded. The median gestational age at procedure was 18.1 weeks (range 15.0-25.6), and median operation time was 24 min (range 15-40). Access to the urethra was achieved in 19/20 (95%) cases, and postoperative, normalization of bladder size and amniotic fluid was observed in 16/20 (80%). Overall, there were 9 (45%) terminations of pregnancy and 11 women (55%) delivered a liveborn baby at a mean gestational age of 37.3 (29.1-40.2) weeks. No infants developed pulmonary hypoplasia and all were alive at 15-110 months. Eight (40% of all fetuses, 72.7% of newborns) had normal renal function and 3 (27.3%) had renal failure awaiting renal transplantation. Fetoscopic laser ablation for PUV can achieve bladder decompression and amniotic fluid normalization with a single procedure in selected cases with anyhydramnios. There is still a significant risk of progression to renal failure pre or postnatally. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Production of silver nanoparticles by laser ablation in open air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutinguiza, M., E-mail: mohamed@uvigo.es [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9. Vigo, 36310 (Spain); Comesaña, R. [Materials Engineering, Applied Mechanics and Construction Dpt., University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, Vigo, 36310 (Spain); Lusquiños, F.; Riveiro, A.; Val, J. del; Pou, J. [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9. Vigo, 36310 (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles have been obtained by laser ablation of metallic Ag in open air using nanosecond laser. • The continuous process enables increasing the production yield. • The obtained particles are rounded shape with narrow size distribution. - Abstract: Silver nanoparticles have attracted much attention as a subject of investigation due to their well-known properties, such as good conductivity, antibacterial and catalytic effects, etc. They are used in many different areas, such as medicine, industrial applications, scientific investigation, etc. There are different techniques for producing Ag nanoparticles, chemical, electrochemical, sonochemical, etc. These methods often lead to impurities together with nanoparticles or colloidal solutions. In this work, laser ablation of solids in open air conditions (LASOA) is used to produce silver nanoparticles and collect them on glass substrates. Production and deposition of silver nanoparticles are integrated in the same step to reduce the process. The obtained particles are analysed and the nanoparticles formation mechanism is discussed. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy. The obtained nanoparticles consisted of Ag nanoparticles showing rounded shape with diameters ranging from few to 50 nm.

  10. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-01-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS

  11. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-09-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  12. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 2-12-1 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Romanelli, M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States); Kumaki, M. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0072 (Japan); Fuwa, Y. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kanesue, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hayashizaki, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 2-12-1 (Japan); Lambiase, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Okamura, M. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  13. Generation of nanoclusters by ultrafast laser ablation of Al: Molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Phillips, Mark C.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Dressman, Phillip; Miloshevsky, Gennady

    2017-11-01

    The laser ablation of materials induced by an ultrashort femtosecond pulse is a complex phenomenon, which depends on both the material properties and the properties of the laser pulse. The unique capability of a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) and Momentum Scaling Model (MSM) methods is developed and applied to a large atomic system for studying the process of ultrafast laser-material interactions, behavior of matter in a highly non-equilibrium state, material disintegration, and formation of nanoparticles (NPs). Laser pulses with several fluences in the range from 500 J/m2 to 5000 J/m2 interacting with a large system of aluminum atoms are simulated. The response of Al material to the laser energy deposition is investigated within the finite-size laser spot. It is found that the shape of the plasma plume is dynamically changing during an expansion process. At several tens of picoseconds it can be characterized as a long hollow ellipsoid surrounded by atomized and nano-clustered particles. The time evolution of NP clusters in the plume is investigated. The collisions between the single Al atoms and generated NPs and fragmentation of large NPs determine the fractions of different-size NP clusters in the plume. The MD-MSM simulations show that laser fluence greatly affects the size distribution of NPs, their polar angles, magnitude and direction vectors of NP velocities. These results and predictions are supported by the experimental data and previous MD simulations.

  14. Thin solid films deposited by pulsed laser ablating spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Guangle

    2002-01-01

    The fabricating technique of thin solid films deposited by pulsed laser ablating spray is a new technique. The background from which it came into being and the process of its evolution were briefly described. According to relative documents, basic principle of the technique was dwelt on. Based on the latest documents, the status quo, including the studying abroad and home, was discussed in detail. The advantages, shortcomings, prospect of its utility, the significance of studying as well as critic problems were summarized. Some proposal was suggested

  15. Ultra-fast movies of thin-film laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domke, Matthias; Rapp, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael; Huber, Heinz P.

    2012-11-01

    Ultra-short-pulse laser irradiation of thin molybdenum films from the glass substrate side initiates an intact Mo disk lift off free from thermal effects. For the investigation of the underlying physical effects, ultra-fast pump-probe microscopy is used to produce stop-motion movies of the single-pulse ablation process, initiated by a 660-fs laser pulse. The ultra-fast dynamics in the femtosecond and picosecond ranges are captured by stroboscopic illumination of the sample with an optically delayed probe pulse of 510-fs duration. The nanosecond and microsecond delay ranges of the probe pulse are covered by an electronically triggered 600-ps laser. Thus, the setup enables an observation of general laser ablation processes from the femtosecond delay range up to the final state. A comparison of time- and space-resolved observations of film and glass substrate side irradiation of a 470-nm molybdenum layer reveals the driving mechanisms of the Mo disk lift off initiated by glass-side irradiation. Observations suggest that a phase explosion generates a liquid-gas mixture in the molybdenum/glass interface about 10 ps after the impact of the pump laser pulse. Then, a shock wave and gas expansion cause the molybdenum layer to bulge, while the enclosed liquid-gas mixture cools and condenses at delay times in the 100-ps range. The bulging continues for approximately 20 ns, when an intact Mo disk shears and lifts off at a velocity of above 70 m/s. As a result, the remaining hole is free from thermal effects.

  16. Bimodal Nanoparticle Size Distributions Produced by Laser Ablation of Microparticles in Aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, William T.; Malyavanatham, Gokul; Henneke, Dale E.; O'Brien, Daniel T.; Becker, Michael F.; Keto, John W.

    2002-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles were produced by laser ablation of a continuously flowing aerosol of microparticles in nitrogen at varying laser fluences. Transmission electron micrographs were analyzed to determine the effect of laser fluence on the nanoparticle size distribution. These distributions exhibited bimodality with a large number of particles in a mode at small sizes (3-6-nm) and a second, less populated mode at larger sizes (11-16-nm). Both modes shifted to larger sizes with increasing laser fluence, with the small size mode shifting by 35% and the larger size mode by 25% over a fluence range of 0.3-4.2-J/cm 2 . Size histograms for each mode were found to be well represented by log-normal distributions. The distribution of mass displayed a striking shift from the large to the small size mode with increasing laser fluence. These results are discussed in terms of a model of nanoparticle formation from two distinct laser-solid interactions. Initially, laser vaporization of material from the surface leads to condensation of nanoparticles in the ambient gas. Material evaporation occurs until the plasma breakdown threshold of the microparticles is reached, generating a shock wave that propagates through the remaining material. Rapid condensation of the vapor in the low-pressure region occurs behind the traveling shock wave. Measurement of particle size distributions versus gas pressure in the ablation region, as well as, versus microparticle feedstock size confirmed the assignment of the larger size mode to surface-vaporization and the smaller size mode to shock-formed nanoparticles

  17. Laser frequency modulation with electron plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, T. J.; Latorre, V. R.

    1972-01-01

    When laser beam passes through electron plasma its frequency shifts by amount proportional to plasma density. This density varies with modulating signal resulting in corresponding modulation of laser beam frequency. Necessary apparatus is relatively inexpensive since crystals are not required.

  18. Process and structures for fabrication of solar cells with laser ablation steps to form contact holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D; Dennis, Tim; Waldhauer, Ann; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-11-19

    Contact holes of solar cells are formed by laser ablation to accomodate various solar cell designs. Use of a laser to form the contact holes is facilitated by replacing films formed on the diffusion regions with a film that has substantially uniform thickness. Contact holes may be formed to deep diffusion regions to increase the laser ablation process margins. The laser configuration may be tailored to form contact holes through dielectric films of varying thickness.

  19. Laser ablation of polymer coatings allows for electromagnetic field enhancement mapping around nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Subdiffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures....... The accompanying field enhancement substantially lowers the ablation threshold of the polymer film and thus creates local ablation spots and corresponding topographic modifications of the polymer film. Such modifications are quantified straightforwardly via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy...

  20. Picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide: Effect of crystallinity on the material response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Rocio; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon [Manufacturing Processes Department, Fundacion TEKNIKER, Av. Otaola 20, 20600, Eibar, Guipuzcoa (Spain); Lejardi, Ainhoa; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon [Department of Mining and Metallurgy Engineering and Materials Science, School of Engineering, University of the Basque Country (EHU-UPV), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-11-01

    The picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide (PLLA) as a function of laser fluence and degree of crystallinity was examined. The ablation parameters and the surface modifications were analyzed under various irradiation conditions using laser wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet through the visible. When processing the amorphous PLLA, both energy threshold and topography varied considerably depending on laser wavelength. Laser irradiation showed a reduction in the energy ablation threshold as the degree of crystallinity increased, probably related to photomechanical effects involved in laser ablation with ultra-short pulses and the lower stress accommodation behavior of semicrystalline polymers. In particular, cooperative chain motions are impeded by the higher degree of crystallinity, showing fragile mechanical behavior and lower energy dissipation. The experimental results on ablation rate versus laser energy showed that UV laser ablation on semicrystalline PLLA was more efficient than the visible ablation, i.e., it exhibits higher etch rates over a wide range of pulse energy conditions. These results were interpreted in terms of photo-thermal and photo-chemical response of polymers as a function of material micro-structure and incident laser wavelength. High quality micro-grooves were produced in amorphous PLLA, reveling the potential of ultra-fast laser processing technique in the field of micro-structuring biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications.

  1. Picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide: Effect of crystallinity on the material response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, Rocio; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon; Lejardi, Ainhoa; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon

    2011-01-01

    The picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide (PLLA) as a function of laser fluence and degree of crystallinity was examined. The ablation parameters and the surface modifications were analyzed under various irradiation conditions using laser wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet through the visible. When processing the amorphous PLLA, both energy threshold and topography varied considerably depending on laser wavelength. Laser irradiation showed a reduction in the energy ablation threshold as the degree of crystallinity increased, probably related to photomechanical effects involved in laser ablation with ultra-short pulses and the lower stress accommodation behavior of semicrystalline polymers. In particular, cooperative chain motions are impeded by the higher degree of crystallinity, showing fragile mechanical behavior and lower energy dissipation. The experimental results on ablation rate versus laser energy showed that UV laser ablation on semicrystalline PLLA was more efficient than the visible ablation, i.e., it exhibits higher etch rates over a wide range of pulse energy conditions. These results were interpreted in terms of photo-thermal and photo-chemical response of polymers as a function of material micro-structure and incident laser wavelength. High quality micro-grooves were produced in amorphous PLLA, reveling the potential of ultra-fast laser processing technique in the field of micro-structuring biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications.

  2. Time Resolved Shadowgraph Images of Silicon during Laser Ablation: Shockwaves and Particle Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C Y; Mao, X L; Greif, R; Russo, R E

    2007-01-01

    Time resolved shadowgraph images were recorded of shockwaves and particle ejection from silicon during laser ablation. Particle ejection and expansion were correlated to an internal shockwave resonating between the shockwave front and the target surface. The number of particles ablated increased with laser energy and was related to the crater volume

  3. Time Resolved Shadowgraph Images of Silicon during Laser Ablation:Shockwaves and Particle Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.Y.; Mao, X.L.; Greif, R.; Russo, R.E.

    2006-05-06

    Time resolved shadowgraph images were recorded of shockwaves and particle ejection from silicon during laser ablation. Particle ejection and expansion were correlated to an internal shockwave resonating between the shockwave front and the target surface. The number of particles ablated increased with laser energy and was related to the crater volume.

  4. Laser ablation and competitive technologies in paint stripping of heavy anticorrosion coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuöcker, Georg D.; Bielak, Robert

    2007-05-01

    During the last years surface preparation prior to coating operations became an important research and development task, since tightened environmental regulations have to be faced in view of the deliberation of hazardous compounds of coatings. Especially, ship-yards get more and more under pressure, because the environmental commitment of their Asian competitors is fairly limited. Therefore, in the US and in Europe several technology evaluation projects have been launched to face this challenge. The majority of coating service providers and ship yards use grit blasting; this process causes heavy emissions as of dust and enormous amounts of waste as polluted sand. Coating removal without any blasting material would reduce the environmental impact. Laser processing offers ecological advantages. Therefore thermal processes like laser ablation have been studied thoroughly in several published projects and also in this study. Many of these studies have been focused on the maintenance of airplanes, but not on de-coating of heavy protective coatings. In this case the required laser power is extra-high. This study is focused on the maintenance of heavy anti-corrosion coatings and compares the industrial requirements and the opportunities of the innovative laser processes. Based on the results of this analysis similar approaches as e.g. plasma jet coating ablation have been studied. It was concluded that none of these methods can compete economically with the conventional processes as grit blasting and water jetting since the required ablation rate is very high (>60m2/h). A new process is required that is not based on any blasting operation and which does not depend strongly on the coating's characteristic. The delamination of the coating where the coatings is not removed by evaporation, but in little pieces of the complete coating system meets these requirements. The delamination can be accomplished by the thermal destruction of the primer coating by an intense heat pulse

  5. [Study of enhancement effect of laser-induced crater on plasma radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Guo, Qing-Lin; Su, Hong-Xin; Li, Guang

    2009-02-01

    Single pulses exported from high-energy neodymium glass laser were used to act on the same position of soil sample surface repeatedly, and the plasma emission spectra generated from sequential laser pulse action were collected by spectral recording system. The experimental results show that the laser-induced soil plasma radiation was enhanced continuously under the confinement effect of the crater walls, and the line intensities and signal-to-background ratios both had different improvements along with increasing the number of acting pulses. The photographs of the plasma image and crater appearance were taken to study the plasma shape, laser-induced crater appearance, and the mass of the ablated sample. The internal mechanism behind that laser-induced crater enhanced plasma radiation was researched. Under the sequential laser pulse action, the forming plasma as a result enlarges gradually first, leading to distortion at the trail of plasma plume, and then, its volume diminishes slowly. And also, the color of the plasma changes from buff to white gradually, which implies that the temperature increases constantly. The laser-induced crater had a regular shape, that is, the diameter increased from its bottom to top gradually, thus forming a taper. The mass of the laser-ablated substance descends along with increasing the amount of action pulse. Atomization degree of vaporized substance was improved in virtue of the crater confinement effect, Fresnel absorption produced from the crater walls reflection, and the inverse bremsstrahlung, and the plasma radiation intensity was enhanced as a result.

  6. MR guided percutaneous laser lumbar disk hernia ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Takuo; Terao, Tohru; Ishibashi, Toshihiro; Yuhki, Ichiro; Harada, Junta; Tashima, Michiko [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital; Abe, Toshiaki

    1998-03-01

    An MRI unit for interventional procedure is very useful for minimally invasive surgery of the brain and spine. Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) utilizing X-ray fluoroscopy is a relatively new less invasive procedure for treatment of lumbar disc herniation. MR guided laser surgery is applied to patients with disc herniation at our department. Approaching the target of the disc protrusion was easily conducted and vaporizing the disc hernia directly using a laser was possible under MR fluoroscopy. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the usefulness of MR guided percutaneous laser disc hernia ablation (MR-guided PLDHA). As subjects, 36 patients with lumbar disc herniation, including 23 cases with L4/5 involvement and 13 cases with L5/S1 involvement were studied. Among these, 26 were males and 10 were females, age ranging from 24 to 62. We used an open type MR system (Hitachi, Airis 0.3T), a permanent, open configuration MR system. A YAG laser (LaserScope, USA) was used for PLDHA. An MR compatible 18G titanium needle 15 cm in length was used to puncture the herniated discs. The MR compatible needle was clearly visualized, and used to safely and accurately puncture the target herniated disc in each case with multidimensional guidance. Application of the laser was performed with MR guidance. The energy dose from the laser ranged from 800 to 2100 joules. In most cases, signs and symptoms improved in the patients immediately after disc vaporization. The overall success rate was 88.9%. The complication rate was 2.8%, including one case of discitis after PLDHA. MR fluoroscopy sequence permits near real time imaging and provides an easy approach to the therapeutic target of disc herniation. MR guided PLDHA is a minimally invasive procedure and is very useful for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusion. (author)

  7. MR guided percutaneous laser lumbar disk hernia ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Takuo; Terao, Tohru; Ishibashi, Toshihiro; Yuhki, Ichiro; Harada, Junta; Tashima, Michiko; Abe, Toshiaki.

    1998-01-01

    An MRI unit for interventional procedure is very useful for minimally invasive surgery of the brain and spine. Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) utilizing X-ray fluoroscopy is a relatively new less invasive procedure for treatment of lumbar disc herniation. MR guided laser surgery is applied to patients with disc herniation at our department. Approaching the target of the disc protrusion was easily conducted and vaporizing the disc hernia directly using a laser was possible under MR fluoroscopy. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the usefulness of MR guided percutaneous laser disc hernia ablation (MR-guided PLDHA). As subjects, 36 patients with lumbar disc herniation, including 23 cases with L4/5 involvement and 13 cases with L5/S1 involvement were studied. Among these, 26 were males and 10 were females, age ranging from 24 to 62. We used an open type MR system (Hitachi, Airis 0.3T), a permanent, open configuration MR system. A YAG laser (LaserScope, USA) was used for PLDHA. An MR compatible 18G titanium needle 15 cm in length was used to puncture the herniated discs. The MR compatible needle was clearly visualized, and used to safely and accurately puncture the target herniated disc in each case with multidimensional guidance. Application of the laser was performed with MR guidance. The energy dose from the laser ranged from 800 to 2100 joules. In most cases, signs and symptoms improved in the patients immediately after disc vaporization. The overall success rate was 88.9%. The complication rate was 2.8%, including one case of discitis after PLDHA. MR fluoroscopy sequence permits near real time imaging and provides an easy approach to the therapeutic target of disc herniation. MR guided PLDHA is a minimally invasive procedure and is very useful for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusion. (author)

  8. Pulsed-laser ablation of co-deposits on JT-60 graphite tile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakawa, Youichi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Shibahara, Takahiro; Sugiyama, Kazuyoshi; Tanabe, Tetsuo

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of the co-deposits on a JT-60 open-divertor tile using the fourth harmonic of a 20 ps-Nd: YAG laser has been investigated. With increasing the laser intensity, three regions, non-ablation region (NAR), weak-ablation region (WAR), and strong-ablation region (SAR) were distinguished. Transition from NAR to WAR and WAR to SAR occurred at the threshold laser intensity for laser ablation and that for strong ionization of carbon atoms, respectively. The ablation accompanied desorption of H 2 and C 2 H 2 , with minor contribution of other hydrocarbons, while production of H 2 O was small. In NAR and WAR the number of the hydrogen desorbed by the laser irradiation was less than that of hydrogen retained in the ablated volume, while in SAR it was much larger, owing to thermal desorption of hydrogen gas from the region surrounding the ablated volume. For the ablative removal of hydrogen isotopes, SAR is more desirable because of higher removal efficiency and less production of hydrocarbons

  9. Pulsed-laser ablation of co-deposits on JT-60 graphite tile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakawa, Youichi [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: sakawa-y@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Watanabe, Daisuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Shibahara, Takahiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Sugiyama, Kazuyoshi [Interdisciplinary School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Tanabe, Tetsuo [Interdisciplinary School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2007-08-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of the co-deposits on a JT-60 open-divertor tile using the fourth harmonic of a 20 ps-Nd: YAG laser has been investigated. With increasing the laser intensity, three regions, non-ablation region (NAR), weak-ablation region (WAR), and strong-ablation region (SAR) were distinguished. Transition from NAR to WAR and WAR to SAR occurred at the threshold laser intensity for laser ablation and that for strong ionization of carbon atoms, respectively. The ablation accompanied desorption of H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, with minor contribution of other hydrocarbons, while production of H{sub 2}O was small. In NAR and WAR the number of the hydrogen desorbed by the laser irradiation was less than that of hydrogen retained in the ablated volume, while in SAR it was much larger, owing to thermal desorption of hydrogen gas from the region surrounding the ablated volume. For the ablative removal of hydrogen isotopes, SAR is more desirable because of higher removal efficiency and less production of hydrocarbons.

  10. Investigation of the wavelength dependence of laser stratigraphy on Cu and Ni coatings using LIBS compared to a pure thermal ablation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulis, Evgeniya; Pacher, Ulrich; Weimerskirch, Morris J. J.; Nagy, Tristan O.; Kautek, Wolfgang

    2017-12-01

    In this study, galvanic coatings of Cu and Ni, typically applied in industrial standard routines, were investigated. Ablation experiments were carried out using the first two harmonic wavelengths of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser and the resulting plasma spectra were analysed using a linear Pearson correlation method. For both wavelengths the absorption/ablation behaviour as well as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) depth profiles were studied varying laser fluences between 4.3-17.2 J/cm^2 at 532 nm and 2.9-11.7 J/cm^2 at 1064 nm. The LIBS-stratigrams were compared with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy of cross-sections. The ablation rates were calculated and compared to theoretical values originating from a thermal ablation model. Generally, higher ablation rates were obtained with 532 nm light for both materials. The light-plasma interaction is suggested as possible cause of the lower ablation rates in the infrared regime. Neither clear evidence of the pure thermal ablation, nor correlation with optical properties of investigated materials was obtained.

  11. Tomography of laser fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceglio, N.M.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental programs exist in a number of laboratories throughout the world to test the feasibility of using powerful laser systems to drive the implosion of hydrogen isotope fuel to thermonuclear burn conditions. In a typical experiment multiple laser beams are focused onto a glass microshell (typically 50 μm to 200 μm diameter) filled with an equimolar D-T gas mixture. X-ray and particle emissions from the target provide important information about the hydrodynamic implosion of the glass shell and the associated compression and heating of the D-T fuel. Standard diagnostics for imaging such emissions are the grazing incidence reflection (GIR) x-ray microscope and the pinhole camera. Recently, a particular coded imaging technique, Zone Plate Coded Imaging (ZPCI), has been successfully used for x-ray and particle microscopy of laser fusion plasmas. ZPCI is highly attractive for investigating laser produced plasmas because it possesses a tomographic capability not shared by either the GIR or pinhole imaging techniques. This presentation provides a brief discussion of the tomographic potential of ZPCI. In addition, the first tomographic x-ray images (tomographic resolution approximately 74 μm) of a laser produced plasma are presented

  12. Three dimensional characterization of laser ablation craters using high resolution X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmed, A. H.; du Plessis, A.; le Roux, S. G.; Hartnick, E.; Von Bergmann, H.; Maaza, M.

    2018-01-01

    Laboratory X-ray computed tomography is an emerging technology for the 3D characterization and dimensional analysis of many types of materials. In this work we demonstrate the usefulness of this characterization method for the full three dimensional analysis of laser ablation craters, in the context of a laser induced breakdown spectroscopy setup. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy relies on laser ablation for sampling the material of interest. We demonstrate here qualitatively (in images) and quantitatively (in terms of crater cone angles, depths, diameters and volume) laser ablation crater analysis in 3D for metal (aluminum) and rock (false gold ore). We show the effect of a Gaussian beam profile on the resulting crater geometry, as well as the first visual evidence of undercutting in the rock sample, most likely due to ejection of relatively large grains. The method holds promise for optimization of laser ablation setups especially for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  13. Noncontact Er:YAG laser ablation: clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostálová, T; Jelínková, H; Kucerová, H; Krejsa, O; Hamal, K; Kubelka, J; Procházka, S

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of laser ablation in comparison with the classical drilling preparation. For the experiment, the Er:YAG laser drilling machine was used. The system had a laser head, water cooler, and power supply with automatic control. Spot size of 300-350 microns was used for the preparation. Repetition rate of 1-4 Hz, and pulse energies of 100-400 mJ with water spray were chosen. Cavity shape in comparison with classical drill, time of preparation, and influence of cavity shape on filling materials retention in accordance with the U.S. Public Health Service System were used. The evaluation criteria for noncontact Er:YAG ablation were done. The cavity shape is irregular, but spot surface has larger area and microretentive appearance. Caries of enamel and dentin were treated with a noncontact preparation. It was possible to remove the old insufficient fillings, except for amalgam or metal alloys. The average number of pulses was 111.22 (SE 67.57). Vibrations of microexplosions during preparation were felt by patients on 14 cavities; however, nobody felt unpleasant pain. The qualities of filling materials in laser cavities were very stable; however, cavo surface margin discoloration of 82-86% of Alfa rating could be a problem. Changes of the color and anatomic form of the tooth were observed in 4-8%. In comparison with the classical treatment, it could be said that the retention and quality of filling materials is the same or very similar.

  14. Development and application of a calibration technique for laser ablation - ICP - MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boue-Bigne, F

    2000-08-20

    Laser Ablation - Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a powerful analytical technique for the direct elemental analysis of solid samples, with spatial resolution down to a few microns. However, calibration remains the limiting factor in obtaining quantitative analysis by LA-ICP-MS for a wide range of sample types. No universal method exists as yet and the ones that are currently used tend to employ matrix-matched solid standards. Matrix-matched solid standards are not available for many types of sample, such as polymers, biological materials, fluid inclusions, etc. The need for a universal method of calibration that involves standards that are easy to prepare and suitable for any type of sample is required. Additional to matrix-matching, internal standards are widely used in LA-ICP-MS for quantitative analyses. The internal standard compensates for the different ablation yields from the sample and the standard and for the laser shot-to-shot variation. Given that the use of an internal standard is required to obtain reliable results, the need for matrix-matching might be regarded as questionable. This project has focused on the development and application of a new method of calibration for LA-ICP-MS. It involves the use of aqueous standards whose absorption characteristics are modified by the addition of a chromophore to the solution. Additives were selected for ablation with KrF excimer, and Nd:YAG lasers. The influence of the additive concentration on the ablation yield was investigated for different laser energies. Response curves were obtained showing that as the additive concentration was increased, less energy was required to ablate the modified standard solutions efficiently. A general procedure was then defined for the preparation and use of the modified standard solutions for a given sample. The new method of calibration was used for the quantitative analysis of different sample types: low density polyethylene (LDPE), polyketone (PK

  15. Development and application of a calibration technique for laser ablation - ICP - MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boue-Bigne, F.

    2000-01-01

    Laser Ablation - Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a powerful analytical technique for the direct elemental analysis of solid samples, with spatial resolution down to a few microns. However, calibration remains the limiting factor in obtaining quantitative analysis by LA-ICP-MS for a wide range of sample types. No universal method exists as yet and the ones that are currently used tend to employ matrix-matched solid standards. Matrix-matched solid standards are not available for many types of sample, such as polymers, biological materials, fluid inclusions, etc. The need for a universal method of calibration that involves standards that are easy to prepare and suitable for any type of sample is required. Additional to matrix-matching, internal standards are widely used in LA-ICP-MS for quantitative analyses. The internal standard compensates for the different ablation yields from the sample and the standard and for the laser shot-to-shot variation. Given that the use of an internal standard is required to obtain reliable results, the need for matrix-matching might be regarded as questionable. This project has focused on the development and application of a new method of calibration for LA-ICP-MS. It involves the use of aqueous standards whose absorption characteristics are modified by the addition of a chromophore to the solution. Additives were selected for ablation with KrF excimer, and Nd:YAG lasers. The influence of the additive concentration on the ablation yield was investigated for different laser energies. Response curves were obtained showing that as the additive concentration was increased, less energy was required to ablate the modified standard solutions efficiently. A general procedure was then defined for the preparation and use of the modified standard solutions for a given sample. The new method of calibration was used for the quantitative analysis of different sample types: low density polyethylene (LDPE), polyketone (PK

  16. Ablation and formation by plasma of silver metallic films on poly aniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, J.C.; Olayo, G.; Morales, J.; Cruz, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    This work shows a study about the ablation by plasma conditions in which is possible to form silver layers over polymeric surfaces with the purpose to increase the electric conductivity of the surface. The adhesion between layers formed by polymerization and ablation by plasma respectively is high, with this it is possible to find adequate conditions for getting the polymerization and ablation simultaneously forming with this a thin polymer matrix which would have metallic elements dispersed in its structure. (Author)

  17. Equation of state study of Laser Megajoule capsules ablator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin-Lalu, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This PhD thesis enters the field of inertial confinement fusion studies. In particular, it focuses on the equation of state tables of ablator materials synthesized on LMJ capsules. This work is indeed aims at improving the theoretical models introduced into the equation of state tables. We focused in the Mbar-eV pressure-temperature range because it can be access on kJ-scale laser facilities.In order to achieve this, we used the QEOS model, which is simple to use, configurable, and easily modifiable.First, quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations were performed to generate cold compression curve as well as shock compression curves along the principal Hugoniot. Simulations were compared to QEOS model and showed that atomic bond dissociation has an effect on the compressibility. Results from these simulations are then used to parametrize the Grueneisen parameter in order to generate a tabulated equation of state that includes dissociation. It allowed us to show its influence on shock timing in a hydrodynamic simulation.Second, thermodynamic states along the Hugoniot were measured during three experimental campaigns upon the LULI2000 and GEKKO XII laser facilities. Experimental data confirm QMD simulations.This study was performed on two ablator materials which are an undoped polymer CHO, and a silicon-doped polymer CHOSi. Results showed universal shock compression properties. (author) [fr

  18. Obtention of high hardness multilayer systems by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia T, I.S.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis work the synthesis of thin films of titanium nitride (TiN), amorphous carbon nitride (CN x ) amorphous carbon (a-C) and Ti/TiN/CNx multilayers and Ti/TiN/a-C by means of the laser ablation technique, with the objective of obtaining films of high hardness is studied, as well as to produce multilayer coatings with superior properties to the individual layers. The effect that has the laser fluence used for ablationing the targets in the structure and mechanical properties of the films deposited of TiN was investigated. It was found that the hardness is increased in lineal way approximately with the fluence increment up to 19 J/cm 2 . Thin films of a-C with hardness of the order of 12 GPa. likewise CN x films with high hardness (18.4 GPa) were obtained. The hardness of the deposited films was analyzed and it was related with its microstructure and deposit conditions. It was concluded that the Ti/TiN/CNx and Ti/TiN/a-C systems presented bigger hardness that of its individual components. (Author)

  19. Lasers plasmas and magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertazzi, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    We studied the coupling between a laser produced plasmas and a magnetic field in two cases: 1) in the context of Inertial Fusion Confinement (ICF), we first studied how magnetic fields are self generated during the interaction between a target and a laser, then 2) to progress in the understanding of the large-scale shaping of astrophysical jets, we studied the influence of an externally applied magnetic field on the dynamics of a laser-produced plasma expanding into vacuum. The first part of this thesis is thus dedicated to a numerical and experimental study of the self generated magnetic fields that are produced following the irradiation of a solid target by a high power laser (having pulse duration in the nanosecond and picosecond regimes). These fields play an important role in the frame of ICF since they influence the dynamics of the electrons produced during the laser-matter interaction, and thus condition the success of ICF experiments. The second part of this thesis is a numerical and experimental study of the influence of an externally applied magnetic field on the morphology of a laser produced plasma freely otherwise expanding into vacuum. This work aims at better understanding the observed large-scale collimation of astrophysical jets which cannot be understood in the frame of existing models. We notably show that a purely axial magnetic field can force an initially isotropic laboratory flow, scaled to be representative of a flow emerging from a Young Star Object, in a re-collimation shock, from which emerges a narrow, well collimated jet. We also show that the plasma heating induced at the re-collimation point could explain the 'puzzling' observations of stationary X ray emission zones embedded within astrophysical jets. (author) [fr

  20. Experimental study on 800 nm femtosecond laser ablation of fused silica in air and vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shi-zhen, E-mail: xusz@uestc.edu.cn [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yao, Cai-zhen; Liao, Wei [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yuan, Xiao-dong, E-mail: yxd66my@163.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Wang, Tao [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zu, Xiao-tao [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Ablation rates of fused silica were studied as a function of femtosecond laser pulse fluences (0.7–41 J/cm{sup 2}) in air and vacuum. The experiment was conducted by using a Ti:sapphire laser that emits radiation at 800 nm with a pulse width of 35 fs and a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The morphology and ablation depth of laser-induced damage crater were evaluated by using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ablation rates were calculated from the depth of craters induced by multiple laser pulses. Results showed that two ablation regimes, i.e. non-thermal and thermal ablation co-existed in air and vacuum at low and moderate fluences. A drop of ablation rate was observed at high fluence (higher than 9.5 J/cm{sup 2}) in air. While in vacuum, the ablation rate increased continuously with the increasing of laser fluence and much higher than that in air. The drop of ablation rate observed at high fluence in air was due to the strong defocusing effects associated with the non-equilibrium ionization of air. Furthermore, the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT), which was determined from the relationship between crater area and the logarithm of laser energy, was found to depend on the number of incident pulses on the same spot, and similar phenomenon was observed in air and vacuum.

  1. Hard tissue ablation with a spray-assisted mid-IR laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H W; Rizoiu, I; Welch, A J

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the dominant mechanism(s) for dental enamel ablation with the application of water spray. A free-running Er,Cr:YSGG (yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser was used to ablate human enamel tissue at various radiant exposures. During dental ablation, distilled water was sprayed on the sample surface, and these results were compared to ablation without a spray (dry ablation). In order to identify dominant ablation mechanisms, transient acoustic waves were compared to ablation thresholds and the volume of material removed. The ablation profile and depth were measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Irregular surface modification, charring and peripheral cracks were associated with dry ablation, whereas craters for spray samples were relatively clean without thermal damage. In spite of a 60% higher ablation threshold for spray associated irradiations owing to water absorption, acoustic peak pressures were six times higher and ablation volume was up to a factor of 2 larger compared to dry ablation. The enhanced pressure and ablation performance of the spray-assisted process was the result of rapid water vaporization, material ejection with recoil stress, interstitial water explosion and possibly liquid-jet formation. With water cooling and abrasive/disruptive mechanical effects, the spray ablation can be a safe and efficient modality for dental treatment

  2. Hard tissue ablation with a spray-assisted mid-IR laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H. W.; Rizoiu, I.; Welch, A. J.

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the dominant mechanism(s) for dental enamel ablation with the application of water spray. A free-running Er,Cr:YSGG (yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser was used to ablate human enamel tissue at various radiant exposures. During dental ablation, distilled water was sprayed on the sample surface, and these results were compared to ablation without a spray (dry ablation). In order to identify dominant ablation mechanisms, transient acoustic waves were compared to ablation thresholds and the volume of material removed. The ablation profile and depth were measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Irregular surface modification, charring and peripheral cracks were associated with dry ablation, whereas craters for spray samples were relatively clean without thermal damage. In spite of a 60% higher ablation threshold for spray associated irradiations owing to water absorption, acoustic peak pressures were six times higher and ablation volume was up to a factor of 2 larger compared to dry ablation. The enhanced pressure and ablation performance of the spray-assisted process was the result of rapid water vaporization, material ejection with recoil stress, interstitial water explosion and possibly liquid-jet formation. With water cooling and abrasive/disruptive mechanical effects, the spray ablation can be a safe and efficient modality for dental treatment.

  3. Laser Ablation Increases PEM/Catalyst Interfacial Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, Jay; Yalisove, Steve

    2009-01-01

    An investigational method of improving the performance of a fuel cell that contains a polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM) is based on the concept of roughening the surface of the PEM, prior to deposition of a thin layer of catalyst, in order to increase the PEM/catalyst interfacial area and thereby increase the degree of utilization of the catalyst. The roughening is done by means of laser ablation under carefully controlled conditions. Next, the roughened membrane surface is coated with the thin layer of catalyst (which is typically platinum), then sandwiched between two electrode/catalyst structures to form a membrane/ele c t - rode assembly. The feasibility of the roughening technique was demonstrated in experiments in which proton-conducting membranes made of a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, protonconducting polymer were ablated by use of femtosecond laser pulses. It was found that when proper combinations of the pulse intensity, pulse-repetition rate, and number of repetitions was chosen, the initially flat, smooth membrane surfaces became roughened to such an extent as to be converted to networks of nodules interconnected by filaments (see Figure 1). In further experiments, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was performed on a pristine (smooth) membrane and on two laser-roughened membranes after the membranes were coated with platinum on both sides. Some preliminary EIS data were interpreted as showing that notwithstanding the potential for laser-induced damage, the bulk conductivities of the membranes were not diminished in the roughening process. Other preliminary EIS data (see Figure 2) were interpreted as signifying that the surface areas of the laser-roughened membranes were significantly greater than those of the smooth membrane. Moreover, elemental analyses showed that the sulfur-containing molecular groups necessary for proton conduction remained intact, even near the laser-roughened surfaces. These preliminary results can be taken

  4. Fractional versus ablative erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser resurfacing for facial rejuvenation: an objective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Domyati, Moetaz; Abd-El-Raheem, Talal; Abdel-Wahab, Hossam; Medhat, Walid; Hosam, Wael; El-Fakahany, Hasan; Al Anwer, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Laser is one of the main tools for skin resurfacing. Erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) was the second ablative laser, after carbon dioxide, emitting wavelength of 2940 nm. Fractional laser resurfacing has been developed to overcome the drawbacks of ablative lasers. We aimed to objectively evaluate the histopathological and immunohistochemical effects of Er:YAG 2940-nm laser for facial rejuvenation (multiple sessions of fractional vs single session of ablative Er:YAG laser). Facial resurfacing with single-session ablative Er:YAG laser was performed on 6 volunteers. Another 6 were resurfaced using fractional Er:YAG laser (4 sessions). Histopathological (hematoxylin-eosin, orcein, Masson trichrome, and picrosirius red stains) and immunohistochemical assessment for skin biopsy specimens were done before laser resurfacing and after 1 and 6 months. Histometry for epidermal thickness and quantitative assessment for neocollagen formation; collagen I, III, and VII; elastin; and tropoelastin were done for all skin biopsy specimens. Both lasers resulted in increased epidermal thickness. Dermal collagen showed increased neocollagen formation with increased concentration of collagen types I, III, and VII. Dermal elastic tissue studies revealed decreased elastin whereas tropoelastin concentration increased after laser resurfacing. Neither laser showed significant difference between their effects clinically and on dermal collagen. Changes in epidermal thickness, elastin, and tropoelastin were significantly more marked after ablative laser. The small number of patients is a limitation, yet the results show significant improvement. Multiple sessions of fractional laser have comparable effects to a single session of ablative Er:YAG laser on dermal collagen but ablative laser has more effect on elastic tissue and epidermis. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He), O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis.

  6. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq

    2013-01-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO 2 : N 2 : He), O 2 , N 2 , and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis

  7. Laser plasma LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Baggett, N.; Claus, J.; Fernow, R.; Ghosh, A.; Giordano, S.; Radeka, V.; Stumer, I.; Takacs, P.; Warren, J.

    1985-01-01

    The grating accelerator concept is reviewed. The use of a double row of conducting droplets instead of a conventional grating constrains the fields to a narrow band. The use of droplets also allows fields that will destroy the structure. RF modelling results are presented together with a simple theory of the fields. Coupling to incoming radiation is described. A possible laser specification is also given. (orig.)

  8. Laser plasma LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Baggett, N.; Claus, J.

    1984-01-01

    The grating accelerator concept is reviewed. The use of a double row of conducting droplets instead of a conventional grating constrains the fields to a narrow band. The use of droplets also allows fields that will destroy the structure. The rf modeling results are presented together with a simple theory of the fields. Coupling to incoming radiation is described. A possible laser specification is also given. 9 references, 8 figures

  9. Nonlinear laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaw, P. K.

    2017-12-01

    Soon after lasers were invented, there was tremendous curiosity on the nonlinear phenomena which would result in their interaction with a fully ionized plasma. Apart from the basic interest, it was realized that it could be used for the achievement of nuclear fusion in the laboratory. This led us to a paper on the propagation of a laser beam into an inhomogeneous fusion plasma, where it was first demonstrated that light would go up to the critical layer (where the frequency matches the plasma frequency) and get reflected from there with a reflection coefficient of order unity. The reflection coefficient was determined by collisional effects. Since the wave was expected to slow down to near zero group speed at the reflection point, the dominant collision frequency determining the reflection coefficient was the collision frequency at the reflection point. It turned out that the absorption of light was rather small for fusion temperatures. This placed a premium on investigation of nonlinear phenomena which might contribute to the absorption and penetration of the light into high-density plasma. An early investigation showed that electron jitter with respect to ions would be responsible for the excitation of decay instabilities which convert light waves into electrostatic plasma waves and ion waves near the critical frequency. These electrostatic waves would then get absorbed into the plasma even in the collisionless case and lead to plasma heating which is nonlinear. Detailed estimates of this heating were made. Similar nonlinear processes which could lead to stimulated scattering of light in the underdense region (ω >ω _p) were investigated together with a number of other workers. All these nonlinear processes need a critical threshold power for excitation. Another important process which was discovered around the same time had to do with filamentation and trapping of light when certain thresholds were exceeded. All of this work has been extensively verified in

  10. Bone Ablation at 2.94 mm Using the Free-Electron Laser and Er:YAG Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Borislav; Hakimian, Arman; Peavy, G. M.; Haglund, Richard

    2002-03-01

    Bone Ablation at 2.94 microns Using the Free-Electron Laser and Er:YAG Laser in Perfluorocarbon Compounds B. Ivanov^1, A. M. Hakimian^1, G. M. Peavy^2, R. F. Haglund, Jr.1 1Department of Physics and Astronomy, W. M. Keck Foundation Free-Electron Laser Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 2Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 We report studies on the efficiency of mid-IR laser ablation of cow cortical bone using the Vanderbilt free-electron laser (FEL), when irrigating the ablation zone with an inert and biocompatible perfluorocarbon compounds (PFC). At 2.94 microns, the bone matrix (mainly by water) absorbs the radiation while the PFCs transmit this wavelength, dissipate heat and acoustical stress, and prevent carbonization of the bone sample. The ablation rate, as a function of laser fluence, scanning speed and the type of PFC, was investigated. The laser fluence was estimated to be 5 J/cm^2 - 100 J/cm^2 with a laser focal spot diameter of 160 microns 500 microns and a scanning speed of 40 microns/s 2960 microns/s. The ablation rate was estimated from scanning electron microscopy to be 0.5 mm/s 2.4 mm/s. Comparisons of ablation rates with the FEL and a Er:YAG laser at 2.94 microns are being evaluated.

  11. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy detection of laser ablation produced particles: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quarles, C. Derrick; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Choi, Inhee; Ruiz, Javier; Mao, Xianglei; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Russo, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The use of a liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) microplasma source as an alternative to conventional inductively coupled plasma (ICP) detection of laser ablation (LA) produced particles using a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm is demonstrated. This configuration utilizes a 180° geometry, which is different from the 40° geometry that was used to ionize ablated particles followed by mass spectrometric detection. The use of a hollow counter electrode (nickel, 0.3 cm o.d., 0.1 cm i.d.) was implemented to introduce ablated particles directly into the APGD plasma with helium as a carrier gas. The LS-APGD source was optimized using ablated copper as the test sample (helium carrier gas flow rate (0.30 L min −1 He), discharge current (60 mA), laser power (44 mJ), and solution electrode sheath gas (0.2 L min −1 He) and solution flow rates (10 μL min −1 5% HNO 3 )). Standard brass samples having known Zn/Cu percentages were ablated and analyzed using the LS-APGD source. As a comparison, the established technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze the same set of brass standards under similar ablation conditions to the LS-AGPD measurements, yielding comparable results. The Zn/Cu ratio results for the LS-APGD and LIBS measurements showed good similarity to previous measurements using ICP-MS detection. The performance of the LS-APGD–OES microplasma, comparable to well established methods, with lower capital and operational overhead expenses, suggests a great deal of promise as an analytical excitation source. - Highlights: ► Particles formed by laser ablation are readily introduced to the LS-APGD microplasma. ► The low power microplasma has sufficient energy to vaporize laser produced particles. ► Qualitative analysis of brass alloys is performed using a simple OES ratio method. ► The qualitative performance of the LS-APGD microplasma is on-par with LIBS analysis.

  12. Thermal effect of laser ablation on the surface of carbon fiber reinforced plastic during laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Sato, Yuji; Matsunaga, Ei-ichi; Tsukamoto, Masahiro

    2018-02-01

    Although laser processing is widely used for many applications, the cutting quality of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) decreases around the heat-affected zone (HAZ) during laser processing. Carbon fibers are exposed around the HAZ, and tensile strength decreases with increasing length of the HAZ. Some theoretical studies of thermal conductions that do not consider fluid dynamics have been performed; however, theoretical considerations that include the dynamics of laser ablation are scarce. Using removed mass and depth observed from experiments, the dynamics of laser ablation of CFRP with high-temperature and high-pressure of compressive gas is simulated herein. In this calculation, the mushroom-like shape of laser ablation is qualitatively simulated compared with experiments using a high-speed camera. Considering the removal temperature of the resin and the temperature distribution at each point on the surface, the simulation results suggest that a wide area of the resin is removed when the processing depth is shallow, and a rounded kerf is generated as the processing depth increases.

  13. Density determination in the TEXTOR boundary layer by laser-ablated fast lithium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospieszczyk, A.; Ross, G.G.

    1988-01-01

    A method is presented which allows a determination of electron density profiles in the plasma boundary of a fusion device up to some 10 13 cm -3 within about 100 μs. For this purpose, the complete attenuation of an injected lithium beam is determined by measuring its optical emission profile. The beam is generated by a ruby laser, which ablates small portions of a LiF coating with a thickness of about 1000 A from the rear side of a glass substrate. The produced lithium atoms have velocities of 1 x 10 6 cm/s and can penetrate into the plasma until n/sub e/ x l ≅1 x 10 13 cm -2 . For the measurement of the optical emission profile of the excited lithium atoms, a silicon photodiode array camera is used. The emission profile is then converted into an electron density profile with the help of the ionization rate for lithium atoms by electron impact

  14. Femtosecond laser ablation and nanoparticle formation in intermetallic NiAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, David J., E-mail: davidjjorgensen@engr.ucsb.edu; Titus, Michael S.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • The single-pulse fs laser ablation threshold of NiAl is 83 mJ/cm{sup 2}. • The transition between low- and high-fluence ablation regimes is 2.8 J/cm{sup 2}. • A bimodal size distribution of nanoparticles is formed with fs laser ablation. • Smaller nanoparticles are enriched in Al during pulsed fs laser ablation. • The target surface is depleted in Al during pulsed fs laser ablation. - Abstract: The ablation behavior of a stoichiometric intermetallic compound β-NiAl subjected to femtosecond laser pulsing in air has been investigated. The single-pulse ablation threshold for NiAl was determined to be 83 ± 4 mJ/cm{sup 2} and the transition to the high-fluence ablation regime occurred at 2.8 ± 0.3 J/cm{sup 2}. Two sizes of nanoparticles consisting of Al, NiAl, Ni{sub 3}Al and NiO were formed and ejected from the target during high-fluence ablation. Chemical analysis revealed that smaller nanoparticles (1–30 nm) tended to be rich in Al while larger nanoparticles (>100 nm) were lean in Al. Ablation in the low-fluence regime maintained this trend. Redeposited material and nanoparticles remaining on the surface after a single 3.7 J/cm{sup 2} pulse, one hundred 1.7 J/cm{sup 2} pulses, or one thousand 250 mJ/cm{sup 2} pulses were enriched in Al relative to the bulk target composition. Further, the surface of the irradiated high-fluence region was depleted in Al indicating that the fs laser ablation removal rate of the intermetallic constituents in this regime does not scale with the individual pure element ablation thresholds.

  15. Properties of the ablation process for excimer laser ablation of Y1Ba2Cu3O7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neifeld, R.A.; Potenziani, E.; Sinclair, W.R.; Hill III, W.T.; Turner, B.; Pinkas, A.

    1991-01-01

    The process of excimer laser ablation has been studied while varying the laser fluence from 0.237 to 19.1 J/cm 2 . Ion time-of-flight, total charge, target etch depth per pulse, and etch volume per pulse have been measured. Results indicate a maximum ablation volume and minimum ionization fraction occur near 5 J/cm 2 . Several of the parameters measured vary rapidly in the 1--5 J/cm 2 range. Variation in these parameters strongly influences the properties of films grown by this technique

  16. An investigation on 800 nm femtosecond laser ablation of K9 glass in air and vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shi-zhen, E-mail: xusz@uestc.edu.cn [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yao, Cai-zhen [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Dou, Hong-qiang [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Sichuan Engineering Technical College, Deyang 618000 (China); Liao, Wei, E-mail: liaowei@caep.cn [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Xiao-yang; Ding, Ren-jie [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhang, Li-juan; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Xiao-dong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zu, Xiao-tao [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • The fs laser ablation of borosilicate glass (K9) were investigated under 35 and 500 fs pulses. • At high fluence regime, the ablation rate at 35 fs in air increased to a plateau, and 500 fs in air and vacuum decreased. • The mechanisms of multiple-photon ionization and impact ionization were included. • The ablation morphologies of smooth zone and laser-induced periodic surface structures were presented and illustrated. • The ablation mechanisms of non-thermal and thermal ablation were included. - Abstract: Ablation rates of K9 glass were studied as a function of femtosecond laser fluences. The central wavelength was 800 nm, and pulse durations of 35 fs and 500 fs in air and vacuum were employed. Ablation thresholds of 0.42 J/cm{sup 2} and 2.1 J/cm{sup 2} were obtained at 35 fs and 500 fs, respectively, which were independent with the ambient conditions and depend on the incident pulse numbers due to incubation effects. The ablation rate of 35 fs pulse laser increased with the increasing of laser fluence in vacuum, while in air condition, it slowly increased to a plateau at high fluence. The ablation rate of 500 fs pulse laser showed an increase at low fluence and a slow drop of ablation rate was observed at high fluence in air and