WorldWideScience

Sample records for laser materials processing

  1. Laser material processing

    CERN Document Server

    Steen, William

    2010-01-01

    This text moves from the basics of laser physics to detailed treatments of all major materials processing techniques for which lasers are now essential. New chapters cover laser physics, drilling, micro- and nanomanufacturing and biomedical laser processing.

  2. Lasers in materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.I.; Rockower, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    A status report on the uranium Laser Isotope Separation (LIS) Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented. Prior to this status report, process economic analysis is presented so as to understand how the unique properties of laser photons can be best utilized in the production of materials and components despite the high cost of laser energy. The characteristics of potential applications that are necessary for success are identified, and those factors that have up to now frustrated attempts to find commercially viable laser induced chemical and physical process for the production of new or existing materials are pointed out

  3. Laser processing of materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The initial foundation of laser theory was laid by Einstein [11]. ..... general definition and scope of the processes as understood in conventional practice, but is ..... [54]. Laser welding of Ti-alloys. Welding. 2001 TiNi shape memory alloys. CW–CO2. Study corrosion, mechanical and shape memory properties of weldments.

  4. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    The use femtosecond pulses for materials processing results in very precise cutting and drilling with high efficiency. Energy deposited in the electrons is not coupled into the bulk during the pulse, resulting in negligible shock or thermal loading to adjacent areas

  5. Laser materials processing with diode lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lin; Lawrence, Jonathan; Spencer, Julian T.

    1996-01-01

    Laser materials processing is currently dominated by CO2, Nd-YAG and Excimer lasers. Continuous advances in semiconductor laser technology over the last decade have increased the average power output of the devices annualy by two fold, resulting in the commercial availability of the diode lasers today with delivery output powers in excess of 60W in CW mode and 5kW in qasi-CW mode. The advantages of compactness, high reliability, high efficiency and potential low cost, due to the mass producti...

  6. Laser applications in materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ready, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The seminar focused on laser annealing of semiconductors, laser processing of semiconductor devices and formation of coatings and powders, surface modification with lasers, and specialized laser processing methods. Papers were presented on the theoretical analysis of thermal and mass transport during laser annealing, applications of scanning continuous-wave and pulsed lasers in silicon technology, laser techniques in photovoltaic applications, and the synthesis of ceramic powders from laser-heated gas-phase reactants. Other papers included: reflectance changes of metals during laser irradiation, surface-alloying using high-power continuous lasers, laser growth of silicon ribbon, and commercial laser-shock processes

  7. Shearography in laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualini, M.M.S.; Steinbichler, H.

    1999-01-01

    Several optical methods have been presented in recent years to monitor and assist laser material process (welding, cutting, transformation hardening), from laser triangulation and laser 3D scanning to speckle. We propose the alternative use of shearography for surface investigation. Shearography is, basically, the first derivative of the interference intensities of holograms. This enables to perform real time measurements with high accuracy but less constraint to control environmental vibrations. We propose an optical head that may operate as a shearographic system or as a Twymann-Green interferometer, accordingly to certain contour conditions. We discuss some theoretical aspects and possible practical applications of the device along with some preliminary experimental results. (author)

  8. Some applications on laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oros, C.

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the state-of-the-art in laser material processing for a large types of lasers from IR (CO 2 laser, NdYAG laser) to UV (excimer laser) and different kinds of materials (metals, dielectrics) is given. Laser radiation has found a wide range of applications as machining tool for various kinds of materials processing. The machining geometry, the work piece geometry, the material properties and economic productivity claim for customized systems with special design for beam guiding, shaping and delivery in order to fully utilize the laser radiation for surface processing with optimum efficiency, maximum processing speed and high processing quality. The laser-material interaction involves complex processes of heating, melting, vaporization, ejection of atoms, ions, and molecules, shock waves, plasma initiation and plasma expansion. The interaction is dependent on the laser beam parameters (pulse duration, energy and wavelength), the solid target properties and the surrounding environments condition. Experimental results for laser surface melting and laser ablation are given. Also, assuming the applicability of a one dimensional model for short pulses used, and restricting condition to single-pulse exposure, the temperature rise on the target was calculated taking account of the finite optical absorption depth and pulse duration of the laser

  9. Laser processing and analysis of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Duley, W W

    1983-01-01

    It has often been said that the laser is a solution searching for a problem. The rapid development of laser technology over the past dozen years has led to the availability of reliable, industrially rated laser sources with a wide variety of output characteristics. This, in turn, has resulted in new laser applications as the laser becomes a familiar processing and analytical tool. The field of materials science, in particular, has become a fertile one for new laser applications. Laser annealing, alloying, cladding, and heat treating were all but unknown 10 years ago. Today, each is a separate, dynamic field of research activity with many of the early laboratory experiments resulting in the development of new industrial processing techniques using laser technology. Ten years ago, chemical processing was in its infancy awaiting, primarily, the development of reliable tunable laser sources. Now, with tunability over the entire spectrum from the vacuum ultraviolet to the far infrared, photo­ chemistry is undergo...

  10. Development of laser materials processing and laser metrology techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Chung, Chin Man; Kim, Jeong Mook; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Kwang Suk; Baik, Sung Hoon; Kim, Seong Ouk; Park, Seung Kyu

    1997-09-01

    The applications of remote laser materials processing and metrology have been investigated in nuclear industry from the beginning of laser invention because they can reduce the risks of workers in the hostile environment by remote operation. The objective of this project is the development of laser material processing and metrology techniques for repairing and inspection to improve the safety of nuclear power plants. As to repairing, we developed our own laser sleeve welding head and innovative optical laser weld monitoring techniques to control the sleeve welding process. Furthermore, we designed and fabricated a 800 W Nd:YAG and a 150 W Excimer laser systems for high power laser materials processing in nuclear industry such as cladding and decontamination. As to inspection, we developed an ESPI and a laser triangulation 3-D profile measurement system for defect detection which can complement ECT and UT inspections. We also developed a scanning laser vibrometer for remote vibration measurement of large structures and tested its performance. (author). 58 refs., 16 tabs., 137 figs

  11. Laser Materials Processing for NASA's Aerospace Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarathnam, Karthik; Hunyady, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    Lasers are useful for performing operations such as joining, machining, built-up freeform fabrication, and surface treatment. Due to the multifunctional nature of a single tool and the variety of materials that can be processed, these attributes are attractive in order to support long-term missions in space. However, current laser technology also has drawbacks for space-based applications. Specifically, size, power efficiency, lack of robustness, and problems processing highly reflective materials are all concerns. With the advent of recent breakthroughs in solidstate laser (e.g., diode-pumped lasers) and fiber optic technologies, the potential to perform multiple processing techniques in space has increased significantly. A review of the historical development of lasers from their infancy to the present will be used to show how these issues may be addressed. The review will also indicate where further development is necessary to realize a laser-based materials processing capability in space. The broad utility of laser beams in synthesizing various classes of engineering materials will be illustrated using state-of-the art processing maps for select lightweight alloys typically found on spacecraft. Both short- and long-term space missions will benefit from the development of a universal laser-based tool with low power consumption, improved process flexibility, compactness (e.g., miniaturization), robustness, and automation for maximum utility with a minimum of human interaction. The potential advantages of using lasers with suitable wavelength and beam properties for future space missions to the moon, Mars and beyond will be discussed. The laser processing experiments in the present report were performed using a diode pumped, pulsed/continuous wave Nd:YAG laser (50 W max average laser power), with a 1064 nm wavelength. The processed materials included Ti-6AI-4V, Al-2219 and Al-2090. For Phase I of this project, the laser process conditions were varied and optimized

  12. GPC Light Shaper for energy efficient laser materials processing.

    OpenAIRE

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Aabo, Thomas; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    The biggest use of lasers is in materials processing. In manufacturing, lasers are used for cutting, drilling, marking and other machining processes. Similarly, lasers are important in microfabrication processes such as photolithography, direct laser writing, or ablation. Lasers are advantageous because they do not wear out, have no physical contact with the processed material, avoid heating or warping effects, and are generally more precise. Since lasers are easier to adapt to different opti...

  13. Light-material interactions in laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, S.; Albright, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discusses how light interactions with materials in laser material processing operations occur by a variety of mechanisms depending on the material being processed, the wavelength of the laser light, the gaseous environment, and the physical state of the material surface. The high reflectivity of metals limits the fraction of the beam power absorbed by the solid metal surface. For metals in the solid state, reflectivity increases as the wavelength of the laser light and the electrical conductivity of the metal increase. The reflectivity of metals is reduced upon heating to the melting point, and further reduced upon melting. At high power densities the liquid metal surface is heated so quickly that very rapid vaporization occurs. The recoil force produced by the evaporation causes a depression in the liquid/vapor interface. The keyhole resulting from this depression allows for multiple reflections and thus increases beam absorption in the liquid

  14. Automotive perspective on laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper a broad review is given of the development and use of laser processing in the automotive industry. a brief introduction to the major types of processing lasers and related systems is followed by a summary of the major processing regimes. Examples are given of the automotive industry's use of lasers in a variety of applications, from heat treating and welding, to cutting and marking

  15. Optical improvement for laser material processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosman, J.; De Keijzer, M.A.; De Kok, C.J.G.M. [ECN Engineering and Services, Petten (Netherlands); Molenaar, R.; Kettelarij, H.

    2010-05-15

    The use of laser technology enables flexibility and new concepts for example solar cell production but also optical moulds. The reason why laser technology is used in these cases is not the laser system itself but the ability to tailor this type of energy to the demands of the production processes. To ensure the full potential of the laser technology it can be improved by adding optical elements like polarizer, cameras, lenses and sensors. Two of these extra optical elements are presented here. First laser pulse energy attenuation. This is used to increase the controllability of laser processes. And second a new camera optic that enables integrated alignment with respect to features on the product. This last option enables marking on existing features and automated compensation of scanner drift. These camera systems can be used for micro welding of polymers and repair of existing markings in moulds.

  16. Laser processing for manufacturing nanocarbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Hai Hoang

    CNTs have been considered as the excellent candidate to revolutionize a broad range of applications. There have been many method developed to manipulate the chemistry and the structure of CNTs. Laser with non-contact treatment capability exhibits many processing advantages, including solid-state treatment, extremely fast processing rate, and high processing resolution. In addition, the outstanding monochromatic, coherent, and directional beam generates the powerful energy absorption and the resultant extreme processing conditions. In my research, a unique laser scanning method was developed to process CNTs, controlling the oxidation and the graphitization. The achieved controllability of this method was applied to address the important issues of the current CNT processing methods for three applications. The controllable oxidation of CNTs by laser scanning method was applied to cut CNT films to produce high-performance cathodes for FE devices. The production method includes two important self-developed techniques to produce the cold cathodes: the production of highly oriented and uniformly distributed CNT sheets and the precise laser trimming process. Laser cutting is the unique method to produce the cathodes with remarkable features, including ultrathin freestanding structure (~200 nm), greatly high aspect ratio, hybrid CNT-GNR emitter arrays, even emitter separation, and directional emitter alignment. This unique cathode structure was unachievable by other methods. The developed FE devices successfully solved the screening effect issue encounter by current FE devices. The laser-control oxidation method was further developed to sequentially remove graphitic walls of CNTs. The laser oxidation process was directed to occur along the CNT axes by the laser scanning direction. Additionally, the oxidation was further assisted by the curvature stress and the thermal expansion of the graphitic nanotubes, ultimately opening (namely unzipping) the tubular structure to

  17. GPC Light Shaper for energy efficient laser materials processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark Jayson

    The biggest use of lasers is in materials processing. In manufacturing, lasers are used for cutting, drilling, marking and other machining processes. Similarly, lasers are important in microfabrication processes such as photolithography, direct laser writing, or ablation. Lasers are advantageous...... with steep, well defined edges that would further increase laser cutting precision or allow “single shot” laser engraving of arbitrary 2D profiles, as opposed to point scanning [3,4]. Instead of lossy approaches, GPC beam shaping is achieved with simplified, binary phase-only optics [5] that redistributes...... because they do not wear out, have no physical contact with the processed material, avoid heating or warping effects, and are generally more precise. Since lasers are easier to adapt to different optimized shapes, they can be even more precise and energy efficient for materials processing. The cost...

  18. Energy enhancer for mask based laser materials processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastue, Jens; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1996-01-01

    A device capable of drastically improving the energy efficiency of present mask based laser materials processing systems is presented. Good accordance between experiments and simulations for a TEA-CO2 laser system designed for laser marking has been demonstrated. The energy efficiency may...... be improved with a factor of 2 - 4 for typical mask transmittances between 10 - 40%....

  19. Material Processing with High Power CO2-Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakowsky, Lothar

    1986-10-01

    After a period of research and development lasertechnique now is regarded as an important instrument for flexible, economic and fully automatic manufacturing. Especially cutting of flat metal sheets with high power C02-lasers and CNC controlled two or three axes handling systems is a wide spread. application. Three dimensional laser cutting, laser-welding and -heat treatment are just at the be ginning of industrial use in production lines. The main. advantages of laser technology. are - high. accuracy - high, processing velocity - law thermal distortion. - no tool abrasion. The market for laser material processing systems had 1985 a volume of 300 Mio S with growth rates between, 20 % and 30 %. The topic of this lecture are hiTrh. power CO2-lasers. Besides this systems two others are used as machining tools, Nd-YAG- and Eximer lasers. All applications of high. power CO2-lasers to industrial material processing show that high processing velocity and quality are only guaranteed in case of a stable intensity. profile on the workpiece. This is only achieved by laser systems without any power and mode fluctuations and by handling systems of high accuracy. Two applications in the automotive industry are described, below as examples for laser cutting and laser welding of special cylindrical motor parts.

  20. Microstructural evolution and control in laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, R.; Nath, A.K.

    2005-01-01

    Laser processing, because of its characteristic features, often gives rise to unique microstructure and properties not obtained with other conventional processes. We present various diverse laser processing case studies involving control of microstructure through judicious selection of processing parameters carried out with indigenously developed high power CO 2 lasers. The first study describes microstructural control during end plug laser welding of PFBR fuel pin, involving crack pone alloy D9 tube and type 316 M stainless steel (SS) plug, through preferential displacement of focused laser beam. Crater and associated cracks were eliminated by suitable laser power ramping. Another case study describes how low heat input characteristics of laser cladding process has been exploited for suppressing dilution in 'Colomony 6' deposits on austenitic SS. The results are in sharp contrast to extensive dilution noticed in Colmony 6 hard faced deposits made by GTAW. A novel laser surface melting (LSM) treatment for type 316 (N) SS weld metal has been developed to generate a sensitization-resistant microstructure which leads to enhanced resistance against intergranular corrosion (IGC). IGC resistance of laser treated surface has been found to be critically dependent on laser processing parameters. Experimental observations have been analyzed with thermal simulation. We have also studied the effect of laser beam spatial intensity profile on the microstructure in LSM. We have developed laser-assisted graded hard facing of austenitic SS substrate with Stellite 6 which, in contrast to direct deposition either by laser or GTAW, produced smooth transition in chemical composition and hardness used to control grain coarsening and martensite formation in type 430 SS weldment. Laser rapid manufacturing (LRM) is emerging as a new rapid and cost effective process for low volume fabrication, esp. of expensive materials. The talk will also present microstructural characteristics of laser

  1. The Newest Laser Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Baek Yeon

    2007-01-01

    This book mentions laser processing with laser principle, laser history, laser beam property, laser kinds, foundation of laser processing such as laser oscillation, characteristic of laser processing, laser for processing and its characteristic, processing of laser hole including conception of processing of laser hole and each material, and hole processing of metal material, cut of laser, reality of cut, laser welding, laser surface hardening, application case of special processing and safety measurement of laser.

  2. Technology Assessment of Laser-Assisted Materials Processing in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarathnam, Karthik; Taminger, Karen M. B.

    2001-01-01

    Lasers are useful for performing operations such as joining, machining, built-up freeform fabrication, shock processing, and surface treatments. These attributes are attractive for the supportability of longer-term missions in space due to the multi-functionality of a single tool and the variety of materials that can be processed. However, current laser technology also has drawbacks for space-based applications, specifically size, power efficiency, lack of robustness, and problems processing highly reflective materials. A review of recent laser developments will be used to show how these issues may be reduced and indicate where further improvement is necessary to realize a laser-based materials processing capability in space. The broad utility of laser beams in synthesizing various classes of engineering materials will be illustrated using state-of-the art processing maps for select lightweight alloys typically found on spacecraft. With the advent of recent breakthroughs in diode-pumped solid-state lasers and fiber optic technologies, the potential to perform multiple processing techniques is increasing significantly. Lasers with suitable wavelengths and beam properties have tremendous potential for supporting future space missions to the moon, Mars and beyond.

  3. High Efficiency Mask Based Laser Materials Processing with TEA-CO2 - and Excimer Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastue, Jens; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In general, mask based laser materials processing techniques suffer from a very low energy efficiency. We have developed a simple device called an energy enhancer, which is capable of increasing the energy efficiency of typical mask based laser materials processing systems. A short review of the ...... line marking with TEA-CO2 laser of high speed canning lines. The second one is manufactured for marking or microdrilling with excimer laser....

  4. Laser materials processing applications at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargrove, R.S.; Dragon, E.P.; Hackel, R.P.; Kautz, D.D.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    High power and high radiance laser technologies developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) such as copper-vapor lasers, solid-state slab lasers, dye lasers, harmonic wavelength conversion of these lasers, and fiber optic delivery systems show great promise for material processing tasks. Evaluation of models suggests significant potential for tenfold increases in welding, cutting, and drilling performance, as well as capability for applications in emerging technologies such as micromachining, surface treatment, and stereolithography. Copper and dye laser systems are currently being developed at LLNL for uranium enrichment production facilities. The goals of this program are to develop low-cost, reliable and maintainable industrial laser systems. Chains of copper lasers currently operate at more than 1.5 kW output and achieve mean time between failures of more than 1,000 hours. The beam quality of copper vapor lasers is approximately three times the diffraction limit. Dye lasers have near diffraction limited beam quality at greater than 1.0 kW. Diode laser pumped, Nd:YAG slab lasers are also being developed at LLNL. Current designs achieve powers of greater than 1.0 kW and projected beam quality is in the two to five times diffraction limited range. Results from cutting and drilling studies in titanium and stainless steel alloys show that cuts and holes with extremely fine features can be made with dye and copper-vapor lasers. High radiance beams produce low distortion and small heat-affected zones. The authors have accomplished very high aspect ratio holes in drilling tests (> 60: 1) and features with micron scale (5-50 μm) sizes. Other, traditionally more difficult, materials such as copper, aluminum and ceramics will soon be studied in detail

  5. Mathematical modelling of the laser processing of compose materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromyko, G.F.; Matsuka, N.P.

    2009-01-01

    Expansion of the protective coating scope led to the necessity to work out lower priced methods of treatment of machine elements. Making of an adequate, agreed with process features, mathematical model and development of effective methods of its solving are promising directions in this fields. In this paper the mathematical model of high-temperature laser treatment via moving source of pre-sprayed with composite powder padding is developed. Presented model describes accurately enough the heat processes taking place by laser processing of machine elements. Varying input parameters of model (laser power, temperature and composition of environment, characteristics and quantitative composition of using materials, etc.) one can get a cheap tool of preliminary estimates for wide range of similar problems. Difference method, based on process physical features and taking into account main process-dependent parameters had been developed for solving of the built system of nonlinear equations. (authors)

  6. Femtosecond laser processing of photovoltaic and transparent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sanghoon

    The photovoltaic semiconducting and transparent dielectric materials are of high interest in current industry. Femtosecond laser processing can be an effective technique to fabricate such materials since non-linear photochemical mechanisms predominantly occur. In this series of studies, femtosecond (fs) laser processing techniques that include laser drilling on Si wafer, laser scribing on CIGS thin film, laser ablation on Lithium Niobate (LN) crystal, and fabrication of 3D structures in fused silica were studied. The fs laser drilling on Si wafer was performed to fabricate via holes for wrap-through PV devices. For reduction of the number of shots in fs laser drilling process, self-action of laser light in the air was initiated. To understand physical phenomena during laser drilling, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), emission, and shadowgraph images were studied. The result indicated the presence of two mechanisms that include fabrication by self-guided beam and wall-guided beam. Based on our study, we could fabricate ~16 micrometer circular-shaped via holes with ~200 laser pulses on 160-170 micrometer thick c- and mc-Si wafer. For the fs laser scribing on ink jet printed CIGS thin film solar cell, the effect of various parameters that include pulse accumulation, wavelength, pulse energy, and overlapping were elucidated. In our processing regime, the effect of wavelength could be diminished due to compensation between beam size, pulse accumulation, energy fluence, and the absorption coefficient. On the other hand, for high PRF fs laser processing, pulse accumulation effect cannot be ignored, while it can be negligible in low PRF fs laser processing. The result indicated the presence of a critical energy fluence for initiating delamination of CIGS layer. To avoid delamination and fabricate fine isolation lines, the overlapping method can be applied. With this method, ~1 micrometer width isolation lines were fabricated. The fs laser ablation on LN wafer was studied

  7. Present and future trends of laser materials processing in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunawa, Akira

    1991-10-01

    Lasers quickly penetrated into Japanese industries in the mid-80s. The paper reviews the present situation of industrial lasers and their applications in Japanese industries for materials removal, joining, and some surface modification technologies as well as their economical evaluation compared with competitive technologies. Laser cutting of metallic and nonmetallic thin sheets is widely prevalent even in small scale industries as a flexible manufacturing tool. As for the laser welding is concerned, industrial applications are rather limited in mass production lines. This mainly comes from the fact that the present laser technologies have not employed the adaptive control because of the lack of sensors, monitoring, and control systems which can tolerate the high-precision and high-speed processing. In spite of this situation, laser welding is rapidly increasing in recent years in industries such as automotive, machinery, electric/electronic, steel, heavy industries, etc. Laser surface modification technologies have attracted significant interest from industrial people, but actual application is very limited today. However, the number of R&D papers is increasing year by year. The paper also reviews these new technology trends in Japan.

  8. Powder Flux Regulation in the Laser Material Deposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrizubieta, Jon Iñaki; Wegener, Maximiliam; Arntz, Kristian; Lamikiz, Aitzol; Ruiz, Jose Exequiel

    In the present research work a powder flux regulation system has been designed, developed and validated with the aim of improving the Laser Material Deposition (LMD) process. In this process, the amount of deposited material per substrate surface unit area depends on the real feed rate of the nozzle. Therefore, a regulation system based on a solenoid valve has been installed at the nozzle entrance in order to control the powder flux. The powder flux control has been performed based on the machine real feed rate, which is compared with the programmed feed rate. An instantaneous velocity error is calculated and the powder flow is controlled as a function of this variation using Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) signals. Thereby, in zones where the Laser Material Deposition machine reduces the feed rate due to a trajectory change, powder accumulation can be avoided and the generated clads would present a homogeneous shape.

  9. Material model validation for laser shock peening process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarchinta, H K; Grandhi, R V; Langer, K; Stargel, D S

    2009-01-01

    Advanced mechanical surface enhancement techniques have been used successfully to increase the fatigue life of metallic components. These techniques impart deep compressive residual stresses into the component to counter potentially damage-inducing tensile stresses generated under service loading. Laser shock peening (LSP) is an advanced mechanical surface enhancement technique used predominantly in the aircraft industry. To reduce costs and make the technique available on a large-scale basis for industrial applications, simulation of the LSP process is required. Accurate simulation of the LSP process is a challenging task, because the process has many parameters such as laser spot size, pressure profile and material model that must be precisely determined. This work focuses on investigating the appropriate material model that could be used in simulation and design. In the LSP process material is subjected to strain rates of 10 6  s −1 , which is very high compared with conventional strain rates. The importance of an accurate material model increases because the material behaves significantly different at such high strain rates. This work investigates the effect of multiple nonlinear material models for representing the elastic–plastic behavior of materials. Elastic perfectly plastic, Johnson–Cook and Zerilli–Armstrong models are used, and the performance of each model is compared with available experimental results

  10. High precision laser processing of sensitive materials by Microjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibailly, Ochelio D.; Wagner, Frank R.; Mayor, Laetitia; Richerzhagen, Bernold

    2003-11-01

    Material laser cutting is well known and widely used in industrial processes, including micro fabrication. An increasing number of applications require nevertheless a superior machining quality than can be achieved using this method. A possibility to increase the cut quality is to opt for the water-jet guided laser technology. In this technique the laser is conducted to the work piece by total internal reflection in a thin stable water-jet, comparable to the core of an optical fiber. The water jet guided laser technique was developed originally in order to reduce the heat damaged zone near the cut, but in fact many other advantages were observed due to the usage of a water-jet instead of an assist gas stream applied in conventional laser cutting. In brief, the advantages are three-fold: the absence of divergence due to light guiding, the efficient melt expulsion, and optimum work piece cooling. In this presentation we will give an overview on several industrial applications of the water-jet guided laser technique. These applications range from the cutting of CBN or ferrite cores to the dicing of thin wafers and the manufacturing of stencils, each illustrates the important impact of the water-jet usage.

  11. [INVITED] Computational intelligence for smart laser materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, Giuseppe

    2018-03-01

    Computational intelligence (CI) involves using a computer algorithm to capture hidden knowledge from data and to use them for training ;intelligent machine; to make complex decisions without human intervention. As simulation is becoming more prevalent from design and planning to manufacturing and operations, laser material processing can also benefit from computer generating knowledge through soft computing. This work is a review of the state-of-the-art on the methodology and applications of CI in laser materials processing (LMP), which is nowadays receiving increasing interest from world class manufacturers and 4.0 industry. The focus is on the methods that have been proven effective and robust in solving several problems in welding, cutting, drilling, surface treating and additive manufacturing using the laser beam. After a basic description of the most common computational intelligences employed in manufacturing, four sections, namely, laser joining, machining, surface, and additive covered the most recent applications in the already extensive literature regarding the CI in LMP. Eventually, emerging trends and future challenges were identified and discussed.

  12. Development of high-power CO2 lasers and laser material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Ashish K.; Choudhary, Praveen; Kumar, Manoj; Kaul, R.

    2000-02-01

    Scaling laws to determine the physical dimensions of the active medium and optical resonator parameters for designing convective cooled CO2 lasers have been established. High power CW CO2 lasers upto 5 kW output power and a high repetition rate TEA CO2 laser of 500 Hz and 500 W average power incorporated with a novel scheme for uniform UV pre- ionization have been developed for material processing applications. Technical viability of laser processing of several engineering components, for example laser surface hardening of fine teeth of files, laser welding of martensitic steel shroud and titanium alloy under-strap of turbine, laser cladding of Ni super-alloy with stellite for refurbishing turbine blades were established using these lasers. Laser alloying of pre-placed SiC coating on different types of aluminum alloy, commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and laser curing of thermosetting powder coating have been also studied. Development of these lasers and results of some of the processing studies are briefly presented here.

  13. Ultrafast Bessel beams: advanced tools for laser materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, Razvan; Bhuyan, Manoj K.; Zhang, Guodong; Cheng, Guanghua; Meyer, Remy; Courvoisier, Francois

    2018-05-01

    Ultrafast Bessel beams demonstrate a significant capacity of structuring transparent materials with a high degree of accuracy and exceptional aspect ratio. The ability to localize energy on the nanometer scale (bypassing the 100-nm milestone) makes them ideal tools for advanced laser nanoscale processing on surfaces and in the bulk. This allows to generate and combine micron and nano-sized features into hybrid structures that show novel functionalities. Their high aspect ratio and the accurate location can equally drive an efficient material modification and processing strategy on large dimensions. We review, here, the main concepts of generating and using Bessel non-diffractive beams and their remarkable features, discuss general characteristics of their interaction with matter in ablation and material modification regimes, and advocate their use for obtaining hybrid micro and nanoscale structures in two and three dimensions (2D and 3D) performing complex functions. High-throughput applications are indicated. The example list ranges from surface nanostructuring and laser cutting to ultrafast laser welding and the fabrication of 3D photonic systems embedded in the volume.

  14. Laser materials processing as manufacturing technology; Seisan gijutsu to shite no laser kako

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, I. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes the laser material processing. Laser is artificial light that uses the amplification based on the induced emission of light. It is very excellent in directivity and monochromaticity. The high power density and concentration characteristics of laser enable a variety of high-performance processing such as junction, removal, reforming, and addition. Excellent controllability (that facilitates the automated processing), transmission performance (the processing by energy transmission in long range space is most suitable for laser), and non-contact processing (that contains no wearing, noise, and contamination) are great advantages that the existing processing method does not have. In the wide wavelength area between ultraviolet and infrared areas, the laser that can be used for material processing is very wide over the range of the continuous oscillation to the ultra short pulse of a nanosecond order. The thermal processing accompanied by melting and evaporation as well as the non-thermal processing (quantum processing) by a photochemical reaction is also available as the type of processing. The processing used for manufacturing technology is almost thermal processing including removal, junction, reforming, and addition. The thermal processing covers the range of electronics to heavy industry. 29 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Physics of Laser Materials Processing Theory and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gladush, Gennady G

    2011-01-01

    This book describes the basic mechanisms, theory, simulations and technological aspects of Laser processing techniques. It covers the principles of laser quenching, welding, cutting, alloying, selective sintering, ablation, etc. The main attention is paid to the quantitative description. The diversity and complexity of technological and physical processes is discussed using a unitary approach. The book aims on understanding the cause-and-effect relations in physical processes in Laser technologies. It will help researchers and engineers to improve the existing and develop new Laser machining techniques. The book addresses readers with a certain background in general physics and mathematical analysis: graduate students, researchers and engineers practicing laser applications.

  16. Material Processing Opportunites Utilizing a Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Alan

    1996-11-01

    Many properties of photocathode-driven Free Electron Lasers (FEL) are extremely attractive for material processing applications. These include: 1) broad-band tunability across the IR and UV spectra which permits wavelength optimization, depth deposition control and utilization of resonance phenomena; 2) picosecond pulse structure with continuous nanosecond spacing for optimum deposition efficiency and minimal collateral damage; 3) high peak and average radiated power for economic processing in quantity; and 4) high brightness for spatially defined energy deposition and intense energy density in small spots. We discuss five areas: polymer, metal and electronic material processing, micromachining and defense applications; where IR or UV material processing will find application if the economics is favorable. Specific examples in the IR and UV, such as surface texturing of polymers for improved look and feel, and anti-microbial food packaging films, which have been demonstrated using UV excimer lamps and lasers, will be given. Unfortunately, although the process utility is readily proven, the power levels and costs of lamps and lasers do not scale to production margins. However, from these examples, application specific cost targets ranging from 0.1=A2/kJ to 10=A2/kJ of delivered radiation at power levels from 10 kW to 500 kW, have been developed and are used to define strawman FEL processing systems. Since =46EL radiation energy extraction from the generating electron beam is typically a few percent, at these high average power levels, economic considerations dictate the use of a superconducting RF accelerator with energy recovery to minimize cavity and beam dump power loss. Such a 1 kW IR FEL, funded by the US Navy, is presently under construction at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This dual-use device, scheduled to generate first light in late 1997, will test both the viability of high-power FELs for shipboard self-defense against cruise

  17. Contribution to the beam plasma material interactions during material processing with TEA CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaschek, Rainer; Konrad, Peter E.; Mayerhofer, Roland; Bergmann, Hans W.; Bickel, Peter G.; Kowalewicz, Roland; Kuttenberger, Alfred; Christiansen, Jens

    1995-03-01

    The TEA-CO2-laser (transversely excited atmospheric pressure) is a tool for the pulsed processing of materials with peak power densities up to 1010 W/cm2 and a FWHM of 70 ns. The interaction between the laser beam, the surface of the work piece and the surrounding atmosphere as well as gas pressure and the formation of an induced plasma influences the response of the target. It was found that depending on the power density and the atmosphere the response can take two forms. (1) No target modification due to optical break through of the atmosphere and therefore shielding of the target (air pressure above 10 mbar, depending on the material). (2) Processing of materials (air pressure below 10 mbar, depending on the material) with melting of metallic surfaces (power density above 0.5 109 W/cm2), hole formation (power density of 5 109 W/cm2) and shock hardening (power density of 3.5 1010 W/cm2). All those phenomena are usually linked with the occurrence of laser supported combustion waves and laser supported detonation waves, respectively for which the mechanism is still not completely understood. The present paper shows how short time photography and spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy can be used to better understand the various processes that occur during laser beam interaction. The spectra of titanium and aluminum are observed and correlated with the modification of the target. If the power density is high enough and the gas pressure above a material and gas composition specific threshold, the plasma radiation shows only spectral lines of the background atmosphere. If the gas pressure is below this threshold, a modification of the target surface (melting, evaporation and solid state transformation) with TEA-CO2- laser pulses is possible and the material specific spectra is observed. In some cases spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy of a plasma allows the calculation of electron temperatures by comparison of two spectral lines.

  18. Laser materials processing of complex components. From reverse engineering via automated beam path generation to short process development cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgl, R.; Brandstätter, E.

    2016-03-01

    The article presents an overview of what is possible nowadays in the field of laser materials processing. The state of the art in the complete process chain is shown, starting with the generation of a specific components CAD data and continuing with the automated motion path generation for the laser head carried by a CNC or robot system. Application examples from laser welding, laser cladding and additive laser manufacturing are given.

  19. Novel Aspects of Materials Processing by Ultrafast Lasers: From Electronic to Biological and Cultural Heritage Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotakis, C; Zorba, V; Stratakis, E; Athanassiou, A; Tzanetakis, P; Zergioti, I; Papagoglou, D G; Sambani, K; Filippidis, G; Farsari, M; Pouli, V; Bounos, G; Georgiou, S

    2007-01-01

    Materials processing by ultrafast lasers offers several distinct possibilities for micro/nano scale applications. This is due to the unique characteristics of the laser-matter interactions involved, when sub-picosecond pulses are employed. Prospects arising will be discussed in the context of surface and in bulk laser induced modifications. In particular, examples of diverse applications including the development and functionalization of laser engineered surfaces, the laser transfer of biomolecules and the functionalization of 3D structures constructed by three-photon stereolithography will be presented. Furthermore, the removal of molecular substrates by ultrafast laser ablation will be discussed with emphasis placed on assessing the photochemical changes induced in the remaining bulk material. The results indicate that in femtosecond laser processing of organic materials, besides the well acknowledged morphological advantages, a second fundamental factor responsible for its success pertains to the selective chemical effects. This is crucial for the laser cleaning of sensitive painted artworks

  20. Laser materials processing of complex components: from reverse engineering via automated beam path generation to short process development cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgl, Richard; Brandstätter, Elmar

    2017-01-01

    The article presents an overview of what is possible nowadays in the field of laser materials processing. The state of the art in the complete process chain is shown, starting with the generation of a specific components CAD data and continuing with the automated motion path generation for the laser head carried by a CNC or robot system. Application examples from laser cladding and laser-based additive manufacturing are given.

  1. Lasers in materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Ossi, Paolo; Zhigilei, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    This book covers various aspects of lasers in materials science, including a comprehensive overview on basic principles of laser-materials interactions and applications enabled by pulsed laser systems.  The material is organized in a coherent way, providing the reader with a harmonic architecture. While systematically covering the major current and emerging areas of lasers processing applications, the Volume provides examples of targeted modification of material properties achieved through careful control of the processing conditions and laser irradiation parameters. Special emphasis is placed on specific strategies aimed at nanoscale control of material structure and properties to match the stringent requirements of modern applications.  Laser fabrication of novel nanomaterials, which expands to the domains of photonics, photovoltaics, sensing, and biomedical applications, is also discussed in the Volume. This book assembles chapters based on lectures delivered at the Venice International School on Lasers...

  2. Monitoring of laser material processing using machine integrated low-coherence interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Rouwen; König, Niels; Schmitt, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Laser material processing has become an indispensable tool in modern production. With the availability of high power pico- and femtosecond laser sources, laser material processing is advancing into applications, which demand for highest accuracies such as laser micro milling or laser drilling. In order to enable narrow tolerance windows, a closedloop monitoring of the geometrical properties of the processed work piece is essential for achieving a robust manufacturing process. Low coherence interferometry (LCI) is a high-precision measuring principle well-known from surface metrology. In recent years, we demonstrated successful integrations of LCI into several different laser material processing methods. Within this paper, we give an overview about the different machine integration strategies, that always aim at a complete and ideally telecentric integration of the measurement device into the existing beam path of the processing laser. Thus, highly accurate depth measurements within machine coordinates and a subsequent process control and quality assurance are possible. First products using this principle have already found its way to the market, which underlines the potential of this technology for the monitoring of laser material processing.

  3. High power CO II lasers and their material processing applications at Centre for Advanced Technology, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, A. K.; Paul, C. P.; Rao, B. T.; Kau, R.; Raghu, T.; Mazumdar, J. Dutta; Dayal, R. K.; Mudali, U. Kamachi; Sastikumar, D.; Gandhi, B. K.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed high power transverse flow (TF) CW CO II lasers up to 15kW, a high repetition rate TEA CO II laser of 500Hz, 500W average power and a RF excited fast axial flow CO II laser at the Centre for Advanced Technology and have carried out various material processing applications with these lasers. We observed very little variation of discharge voltage with electrode gap in TF CO II lasers. With optimally modulated laser beam we obtained better results in laser piercing and cutting of titanium and resolidification of 3 16L stainless steel weld-metal for improving intergranular corrosion resistance. We carried out microstructure and phase analysis of laser bent 304 stainless steel sheet and optimum process zones were obtained. We carried out laser cladding of 316L stainless steel and Al-alloy substrates with Mo, WC, and Cr IIC 3 powder to improve their wear characteristics. We developed a laser rapid manufacturing facility and fabricated components of various geometries with minimum surface roughness of 5-7 microns Ra and surface waviness of 45 microns between overlapped layers using Colmonoy-6, 3 16L stainless steel and Inconel powders. Cutting of thick concrete blocks by repeated laser glazing followed by mechanical scrubbing process and drilling holes on a vertical concrete with laser beam incident at an optimum angle allowing molten material to flow out under gravity were also done. Some of these studies are briefly presented here.

  4. A compact plasma pre-ionized TEA-CO2 laser pulse clipper for material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmi, Taieb

    2017-08-01

    An extra-laser cavity CO2-TEA laser pulse clipper using gas breakdown techniques for high spatial resolution material processing and shallow material engraving and drilling processes is presented. Complete extinction of the nitrogen tail, that extends the pulse width, is obtained at pressures from 375 up to 1500 torr for nitrogen and argon gases. Excellent energy stability and pulse repeatability were further enhanced using high voltage assisted preionized plasma gas technique. Experimental data illustrates the direct correlation between laser pulse width and depth of engraving in aluminum and alumina materials.

  5. Laser Shock Processing of Metallic Materials: Coupling of Laser-Plasma Interaction and Material Behaviour Models for the Assessment of Key Process Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocana, J. L.; Morales, M.; Molpeceres, C.; Porro, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Profiting by the increasing availability of laser sources delivering intensities above 109 W/cm 2 with pulse energies in the range of several Joules and pulse widths in the range of nanoseconds, laser shock processing (LSP) is consolidating as an effective technology for the improvement of surface mechanical and corrosion resistance properties of metals. The main advantage of the laser shock processing technique consists on its capability of inducing a relatively deep compression residual stresses field into metallic alloy pieces allowing an improved mechanical behaviour, explicitly, the life improvement of the treated specimens against wear, crack growth and stress corrosion cracking. Although significant work from the experimental side has been contributed to explore the optimum conditions of application of the treatments and to assess their ultimate capability to provide enhanced mechanical behaviour to work-pieces of typical materials, only limited attempts have been developed in the way of full comprehension and predictive assessment of the characteristic physical processes and material transformations with a specific consideration of real material properties. In the present paper, a review on the physical issues dominating the development of LSP processes from a high intensity laser-matter interaction point of view is presented along with the theoretical and computational methods developed by the authors for their predictive assessment and practical results at laboratory scale on the application of the technique to different materials.

  6. Optimisation Of Cutting Parameters Of Composite Material Laser Cutting Process By Taguchi Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokesh, S.; Niresh, J.; Neelakrishnan, S.; Rahul, S. P. Deepak

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a laser cutting process model that can predict the relationship between the process input parameters and resultant surface roughness, kerf width characteristics. The research conduct is based on the Design of Experiment (DOE) analysis. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) is used in this work. It is one of the most practical and most effective techniques to develop a process model. Even though RSM has been used for the optimization of the laser process, this research investigates laser cutting of materials like Composite wood (veneer)to be best circumstances of laser cutting using RSM process. The input parameters evaluated are focal length, power supply and cutting speed, the output responses being kerf width, surface roughness, temperature. To efficiently optimize and customize the kerf width and surface roughness characteristics, a machine laser cutting process model using Taguchi L9 orthogonal methodology was proposed.

  7. Computational simulation of laser heat processing of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Vijaya; Gnanamuthu, Daniel

    1987-04-01

    A computational model simulating the laser heat treatment of AISI 4140 steel plates with a CW CO2 laser beam has been developed on the basis of the three-dimensional, time-dependent heat equation (subject to the appropriate boundary conditions). The solution method is based on Newton iteration applied to a triple-approximate factorized form of the equation. The method is implicit and time-accurate; the maintenance of time-accuracy in the numerical formulation is noted to be critical for the simulation of finite length workpieces with a finite laser beam dwell time.

  8. Improve the material absorption of light and enhance the laser tube bending process utilizing laser softening heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhan, Khalil Ibraheem; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Zakaria, Azmi; Ismail, Mohd Idris Shah B.; Alsabti, Naseer Mahdi Hadi; Ahmad, Ahmad Kamal

    2018-02-01

    Laser forming is a flexible control process that has a wide spectrum of applications; particularly, laser tube bending. It offers the perfect solution for many industrial fields, such as aerospace, engines, heat exchangers, and air conditioners. A high power pulsed Nd-YAG laser with a maximum average power of 300 W emitting at 1064 nm and fiber-coupled is used to irradiate stainless steel 304 (SS304) tubes of 12.7 mm diameter, 0.6 mm thickness and 70 mm length. Moreover, a motorized rotation stage with a computer controller is employed to hold and rotate the tube. In this paper, an experimental investigation is carried out to improve the laser tube bending process by enhancing the absorption coefficient of the material and the mechanical formability using laser softening heat treatment. The material surface is coated with an oxidization layer; hence, the material absorption of laser light is increased and the temperature rapidly rises. The processing speed is enhanced and the output bending angle is increased to 1.9° with an increment of 70% after the laser softening heat treatment.

  9. 193nm high power lasers for the wide bandgap material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Junichi; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Kakizaki, Koji; Oizumi, Hiroaki; Mimura, Toshio; Matsunaga, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2017-02-01

    Recently infrared laser has faced resolution limit of finer micromachining requirement on especially semiconductor packaging like Fan-Out Wafer Level Package (FO-WLP) and Through Glass Via hole (TGV) which are hard to process with less defect. In this study, we investigated ablation rate with deep ultra violet excimer laser to explore its possibilities of micromachining on organic and glass interposers. These results were observed with a laser microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). As the ablation rates of both materials were quite affordable value, excimer laser is expected to be put in practical use for mass production.

  10. International laser safety standardization. From the European perspective with an emphasis on materials processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulmeister, K [Div. of Life Sciences, Dept. of Radiation Protection, Oesterreichisches Forschungszentrum Seibersdorf, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    1997-08-01

    This report reviews international standards relevant to the safety of laser products and laser installations, with an emphasis on the safety of laser materials processing from the European perspective. In the first paragraphs an overview of the international standards organisations, their relative roles and ways of developing new standards is given. In the second part of the report, work currently underway in the respective standards committees is summarised and specific standards dealing with different aspects of laser safety are discussed. An appendix contains a list of standards organised in standards organisations (IEC, ISO and EN). (author)

  11. International laser safety standardization. From the European perspective with an emphasis on materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulmeister, K.

    1997-08-01

    This report reviews international standards relevant to the safety of laser products and laser installations, with an emphasis on the safety of laser materials processing from the European perspective. In the first paragraphs an overview of the international standards organisations, their relative roles and ways of developing new standards is given. In the second part of the report, work currently underway in the respective standards committees is summarised and specific standards dealing with different aspects of laser safety are discussed. An appendix contains a list of standards organised in standards organisations IEC, ISO and EN). (author)

  12. Multi-wavelength copper vapour lasers for novel materials processing application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, M.; Foster-Turner, R.; Kearsley, A.; Evans, J.

    1995-01-01

    The copper vapour laser (CVL) is a high average power, short pulse laser with a multi-kilohertz pulse repetition rate. The CVL laser lines (511 nm and 578 nm) combined with the good beam quality and high peak power available from these lasers allow it to operate in a unique parameter space. Consequently, it has demonstrated many unique and advantageous machining characteristics. We have also demonstrated efficient conversion of CVL radiation to other wavelengths using non-linear frequency conversion, dye lasers and Ti:AL 2 O 3 . Output powers of up to 4 W at 255 nm have been achieved by frequency doubling. The frequency doubled CVL is inherently narrow linewidth and frequency locked making it a suitable source for UV photolithography. Slope efficiencies in excess of 25 % have been achieved with CVL pumped Ti:Al 2 O 3 and dye lasers. These laser extend the wavelengths options into the red and infrared regions of the spectrum. The near diffraction limited beams from these tunable lasers can be efficiently frequency doubled into the blue and near UV. The wide range of wavelength options from the CVL enable a wide variety of materials processing and material interactions to be explored. A European consortium for Copper Laser Applications in Manufacture and Production (CLAMP) has been set up under the EUREKA scheme to coordinate the commercial and technical expertise currently available in Europe. (author)

  13. Laser cutting of various materials: Kerf width size analysis and life cycle assessment of cutting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shaukat, Mian Mobeen; Ashraf, Farhan

    2017-08-01

    Laser cutting of various materials including Ti-6Al-4V alloy, steel 304, Inconel 625, and alumina is carried out to assess the kerf width size variation along the cut section. The life cycle assessment is carried out to determine the environmental impact of the laser cutting in terms of the material waste during the cutting process. The kerf width size is formulated and predicted using the lump parameter analysis and it is measured from the experiments. The influence of laser output power and laser cutting speed on the kerf width size variation is analyzed using the analytical tools including scanning electron and optical microscopes. In the experiments, high pressure nitrogen assisting gas is used to prevent oxidation reactions in the cutting section. It is found that the kerf width size predicted from the lump parameter analysis agrees well with the experimental data. The kerf width size variation increases with increasing laser output power. However, this behavior reverses with increasing laser cutting speed. The life cycle assessment reveals that material selection for laser cutting is critical for the environmental protection point of view. Inconel 625 contributes the most to the environmental damages; however, recycling of the waste of the laser cutting reduces this contribution.

  14. Laser Materials Processing Final Report CRADA No. TC-1526-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lehane, C. J. [United Technologies Corp., East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This CRADA project was a joint effort between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and United Technologies Corporation (UTC)/Pratt & Whitney (P&W) to demonstrate process capability for drilling holes in turbine airfoils using LLNL-developed femtosecond laser machining technology. The basis for this development was the ability of femtosecond lasers to drill precision holes in variety of materials with little or no collateral damage. The ultimate objective was to develop a laser machine tool consisting of an extremely advanced femtosecond laser subsystem to be developed by LLNL on a best-effort basis and a drilling station for turbine blades and vanes to be developed by P&W. In addition, P&W was responsible for commercializing the system. The goal of the so called Advanced Laser Drilling (ALD) system was to drill specified complex hole-shapes in turbine blades and vanes with a high degree precision and repeatability and simultaneously capable of very high speed processing.

  15. Fabrication of a reinforced polymer microstructure using femtosecond laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alubaidy, M; Venkatakrishnan, K; Tan, B

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for the formation of microfeatures with reinforced polymer using femtosecond laser material processing. The femtosecond laser was used for the generation of a three-dimensional interweaved nanofiber and the construction of microfeatures, such as microchannels and voxels, through two-photon polymerization of a nanofiber-dispersed polymer resin. This new method has the potential of direct fabrication of reinforced micro/nanostructures.

  16. Ultra-short laser processing of transparent material at the interface to liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehme, R; Pissadakis, S; Ehrhardt, M; Ruthe, D; Zimmer, K

    2006-01-01

    Similarly to laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) with nanosecond ultraviolet (ns UV) laser pulses, the irradiation of the solid/liquid interface of fused silica with sub-picosecond (sub-ps) UV and femtosecond near infrared (fs NIR) laser pulses results in etching of the fused silica surface and deposition of decomposition products from liquid. Furthermore, the etch threshold is reduced compared with both direct ablation with an fs laser in air and backside etching with UV ns pulses. Using 0.5 M pyrene/toluene as absorbing liquid, the thresholds were determined to be 70 mJ cm -2 (sub-ps UV) and 330 mJ cm -2 (fs NIR). Furthermore, an almost linear increase in the etch rate with increasing laser fluence was found. The roughness of surfaces backside etched with ultra-short pulses is higher in comparison with ns pulses but lower than that obtained using direct fs laser ablation. Hence a combination of processes involved in fs laser ablation and ns backside etching can be expected. The processes at the ultra-short pulse laser irradiated solid/liquid interface are discussed, considering the effects of ultra-fast heating, multi-photon absorption processes, as well as defect generation in the materials

  17. Development of advanced coatings for laser modifications through process and materials simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martukanitz, R.P.; Babu, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    A simulation-based system is currently being constructed to aid in the development of advanced coating systems for laser cladding and surface alloying. The system employs loosely coupled material and process models that allow rapid determination of material compatibility over a wide range of processing conditions. The primary emphasis is on the development and identification of composite coatings for improved wear and corrosion resistance. The material model utilizes computational thermodynamics and kinetic analysis to establish phase stability and extent of diffusional reactions that may result from the thermal response of the material during virtual processing. The process model is used to develop accurate thermal histories associated with the laser surface modification process and provides critical input for the non-isothermal materials simulations. These techniques were utilized to design a laser surface modification experiment that utilized the addition of stainless steel alloy 431 and TiC produced using argon and argon and nitrogen shielding. The deposits representing alloy 431 and TiC powder produced in argon resulted in microstructures retaining some TiC particles and an increase in hardness when compared to deposits produced using only the 431 powder. Laser deposits representing alloy 431 and TiC powder produced with a mixture of argon and nitrogen shielding gas resulted in microstructures retaining some TiC particles, as well as fine precipitates of Ti(CN) formed during cooling and a further increase in hardness of the deposit

  18. Direct diode lasers and their advantages for materials processing and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, Haro; Ferrario, Fabio; Koch, Ralf; Kruschke, Bastian; Pahl, Ulrich; Pflueger, Silke; Grohe, Andreas; Gries, Wolfgang; Eibl, Florian; Kohl, Stefanie; Dobler, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The brightness of diode lasers is improving continuously and has recently started to approach the level of some solid state lasers. The main technology drivers over the last decade were improvements of the diode laser output power and divergence, enhanced optical stacking techniques and system design, and most recently dense spectral combining. Power densities at the work piece exceed 1 MW/cm2 with commercially available industrial focus optics. These power densities are sufficient for cutting and welding as well as ablation. Single emitter based diode laser systems further offer the advantage of fast current modulation due their lower drive current compared to diode bars. Direct diode lasers may not be able to compete with other technologies as fiber or CO2-lasers in terms of maximum power or beam quality. But diode lasers offer a range of features that are not possible to implement in a classical laser. We present an overview of those features that will make the direct diode laser a very valuable addition in the near future, especially for the materials processing market. As the brightness of diode lasers is constantly improving, BPP of less than 5mm*mrad have been reported with multikW output power. Especially single emitter-based diode lasers further offer the advantage of very fast current modulation due to their low drive current and therefore low drive voltage. State of the art diode drivers are already demonstrated with pulse durations of direct current control allows pulses of several microseconds with hundreds of watts average power. Spot sizes of less than 100 μm are obtained at the work piece. Such a diode system allows materials processing with a pulse parameter range that is hardly addressed by any other laser system. High productivity material ablation with cost effective lasers is enabled. The wide variety of wavelengths, high brightness, fast power modulation and high efficiency of diode lasers results in a strong pull of existing markets, but

  19. Laser material processing with tightly focused cylindrical vector beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevinskas, Rokas, E-mail: rd1c12@soton.ac.uk; Zhang, Jingyu; Beresna, Martynas; Gecevičius, Mindaugas; Kazansky, Peter G. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Kazanskii, Andrey G. [Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Svirko, Yuri P. [Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Institute of Photonics, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.BOX 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland)

    2016-05-30

    We demonstrate a comprehensive modification study of silica glass, crystalline silicon, and amorphous silicon film, irradiated by tightly focused cylindrical vector beams with azimuthal and radial polarizations. The evidence of the longitudinal field associated with radial polarization is revealed by second harmonic generation in z-cut lithium niobate crystal. Despite the lower threshold of ring-shaped modification of silicon materials, the modification in the center of single pulse radially polarized beam is not observed. The phenomenon is interpreted in terms of the enhanced reflection of longitudinal component at the interface with high-index contrast, demonstrating that the longitudinal component is inefficient for the flat surface modification. Enhanced interaction of the longitudinal light field with silicon nanopillar structures produced by the first pulse of double-pulse irradiation is also demonstrated.

  20. The theory of laser materials processing heat and mass transfer in modern technology

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The revised edition of this important reference volume presents an expanded overview of the analytical and numerical approaches employed when exploring and developing modern laser materials processing techniques. The book shows how general principles can be used to obtain insight into laser processes, whether derived from fundamental physical theory or from direct observation of experimental results. The book gives readers an understanding of the strengths and limitations of simple numerical and analytical models that can then be used as the starting-point for more elaborate models of specific practical, theoretical or commercial value. Following an introduction to the mathematical formulation of some relevant classes of physical ideas, the core of the book consists of chapters addressing key applications in detail: cutting, keyhole welding, drilling, arc and hybrid laser-arc welding, hardening, cladding and forming. The second edition includes a new a chapter on glass cutting with lasers, as employed in the ...

  1. Computational science simulation of laser materials processing and provision of their irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    2016-01-01

    In laser processing, it is necessary for achieving the intended performance and product, to understand the complex physical courses including melting and solidification phenomena occurring in laser processing, and thus to set proper laser irradiation conditions. This condition optimization work requires an enormous amount of overhead due to repeated efforts, and has become a cause for inhibiting the introduction of laser processing technology into the industrial field that points to the small lot production of many products. JAEA tried to make it possible to quantitatively handle the complex physical course from the laser light irradiation to the fabricating material until the completion of processing, and is under development of the computational science simulation code SPLICE that connects micro behavior and macro behavior through a multi-level scale model. This SPLICE is able to visualize the design space and to reduce the overhead associated with the setting of laser irradiation conditions and the like, which gives the prospect of being effective as a tool for front-loading. This approach has been confirmed to be effective for the welding and fusing process. (A.O.)

  2. Laser Processing and Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bäuerle, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    This book gives an overview of the fundamentals and applications of laser-matter interactions, in particular with regard to laser material processing. Special attention is given to laser-induced physical and chemical processes at gas-solid, liquid-solid, and solid-solid interfaces. Starting with the background physics, the book proceeds to examine applications of lasers in “standard” laser machining and laser chemical processing (LCP), including the patterning, coating, and modification of material surfaces. This fourth edition has been enlarged to cover the rapid advances in the understanding of the dynamics of materials under the action of ultrashort laser pulses, and to include a number of new topics, in particular the increasing importance of lasers in various different fields of surface functionalizations and nanotechnology. In two additional chapters, recent developments in biotechnology, medicine, art conservation and restoration are summarized. Graduate students, physicists, chemists, engineers, a...

  3. Lasers in chemical processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.I.

    1982-01-01

    The high cost of laser energy is the crucial issue in any potential laser-processing application. It is expensive relative to other forms of energy and to most bulk chemicals. We show those factors that have previously frustrated attempts to find commercially viable laser-induced processes for the production of materials. Having identified the general criteria to be satisfied by an economically successful laser process and shown how these imply the laser-system requirements, we present a status report on the uranium laser isotope separation (LIS) program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  4. Design of high-brightness TEM00-mode solar-pumped laser for renewable material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, D.; Almeida, J.

    2014-08-01

    The conversion of sunlight into laser light by direct solar pumping is of ever-increasing importance because broadband, temporally constant, sunlight is converted into laser light, which can be a source of narrowband, collimated, rapidly pulsed, radiation with the possibility of obtaining extremely high brightness and intensity. Nonlinear processes, such as harmonic generation, might be used to obtain broad wavelength coverage, including the ultraviolet wavelengths, where the solar flux is very weak. The direct excitation of large lasers by sunlight offers the prospect of a drastic reduction in the cost of coherent optical radiation for high average power materials processing. This renewable laser has a large potential for many applications such as high-temperature materials processing, renewable magnesium-hydrogen energy cycle and so on. We propose here a scalable TEM00 mode solar laser pumping scheme, which is composed of four firststage 1.13 m diameter Fresnel lenses with its respective folding mirrors mounted on a two-axis automatic solar tracker. Concentrated solar power at the four focal spots of these Fresnel lenses are focused individually along a common 3.5 mm diameter, 70 mm length Nd:YAG rod via four pairs of second-stage fused-silica spherical lenses and third-stage 2D-CPCs (Compound Parabolic Concentrator), sitting just above the laser rod which is also double-pass pumped by four V-shaped pumping cavities. Distilled water cools both the rod and the concentrators. 15.4 W TEM00 solar laser power is numerically calculated, corresponding to 6.7 times enhancement in laser beam brightness.

  5. Design of a high pulse repitition frequency carbon dioxide laser for processing high damage threshold materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatwin, Christopher R.; McDonald, Donald W.; Scott, Brian F.

    1989-07-01

    The absence of an applications led design philosophy has compromised both the development of laser source technology and its effective implementation into manufacturing technology in particular. For example, CO2 lasers are still incapable of processing classes of refractory and non-ferrous metals. Whilst the scope of this paper is restricted to high power CO2 lasers; the design methodology reported herein is applicable to source technology in general, which when exploited, will effect an expansion of applications. The CO2 laser operational envelope should not only be expanded to incorporate high damage threshold materials but also offer a greater degree of controllability. By a combination of modelling and experimentation the requisite beam characteristics, at the workpiece, were determined then utilised to design the Laser Manufacturing System. The design of sub-system elements was achieved by a combination of experimentation and simulation which benefited from a comprehensive set of software tools. By linking these tools the physical processes in the laser - electron processes in the plasma, the history of photons in the resonator, etc. - can be related, in a detailed model, to the heating mechanisms in the workpiece.

  6. 2000W high beam quality diode laser for direct materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wen-bin; Liu, You-qiang; Cao, Yin-hua; Gao, Jing; Pan, Fei; Wang, Zhi-yong

    2011-11-01

    This article describes high beam quality and kilowatt-class diode laser system for direct materials processing, using optical design software ZEMAX® to simulate the diode laser optical path, including the beam shaping, collimation, coupling, focus, etc.. In the experiment, the diode laser stack of 808nm and the diode laser stack of 915nm were used for the wavelength coupling, which were built vertical stacks up to 16 bars. The threshold current of the stack is 6.4A, the operating current is 85A and the output power is 1280W. Through experiments, after collimating the diode laser beam with micro-lenses, the fast axis BPP of the stack is less than 60mm.mrad, and the slow-axis BPP of the stack is less than 75mm.mrad. After shaping the laser beam and improving the beam quality, the fast axis BPP of the stack is still 60mm.mrad, and the slow-axis BPP of the stack is less than 19mm.mrad. After wavelength coupling and focusing, ultimately the power of 2150W was obtained, focal spot size of 1.5mm * 1.2mm with focal length 300mm. The laser power density is 1.2×105W/cm2, and that can be used for metal remelting, alloying, cladding and welding. The total optical coupling conversion efficiency is 84%, and the total electrical - optical conversion efficiency is 50%.

  7. Modern reflective optics for material processing with high power CO/sub 2/-laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juptner, W.P.O.; Sepold, G.; Rothe, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The state of the art in diamond turning of parabolic mirrors allows to manufacture high quality surfaces at a reasonable low price. In this paper a report is given on mirror optics and systems which were developed with the following aims: Small losses of laser power in the system with a high efficiency of the laser beam processing system; Long lifetime of the mirrors under material processing conditions; High Standard of the optical quality; Flexibility for different applications. The requested qualities are guaranteed by the whole construction of the optics and the system. The theoretical works, the state of the art of the development and the future aspects of these laser working head systems are reported

  8. Prototype of an energy enhancer for mask based laser materials processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastue, Jens; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In general mask based laser material processing (MBLMP) is a process which suffers from a low energy efficiency, because the majority of the laser light is absorbed in or reflected by the mask. We have developed a device called an energy enhancer which is capable of improving the energy efficienc...... component reflectivity and alignment sensitivity are investigated in order to evaluate the possibility of making commercial use of the device. The obtainable image quality and how this is influenced by the focusing and imaging system is discussed in some detail....... by a factor of 2 - 4 for a typical TEA-CO2 system for mask based laser marking. A simple ray-tracing model has been built in order to design and optimise the energy enhancer. Thus we present experimental results as well as simulations and show fine accordance between the two. Important system parameters like...

  9. Development of laser material processing and laser metrology techniques. Development of the power supply of high power CO{sub 2} laser for material processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Heon Ju; Lee, Yong Hak; Jang, Do Hyun; Kim, Su Hun [Cheju National University, Cheju (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-08-01

    The 2 Kw solid state RF power supply has been designed and fabricated The power supply was composed of oscillator, driver amplifier and power amplifier. Each part of the power supply was developed and tested. The impedance matching circuit to apply this RF power supply for laser discharge excitation was fabricated also. The RF discharge experiment for the excitation of CO{sub 2} laser was performed. The radiofrequency power supply which has the output power of 2 Kw has been developed. The subsystems of the power supply have been fabricated and their performances were reliable. The RF discharge experiment to generate the laser plasma has been performed and input power density of 6 W/cm{sub 3} has been achieved. (author). 5 refs., 28 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. New materials properties achievable by ion implantation doping and laser processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, B.R.; Larson, B.C.; White, C.W.; Narayan, J.; Wilson, S.R.; Pronko, P.P.

    1978-12-01

    It is well established that ion implantation techniques can be used to introduce selected impurities into solids in a controlled, accurate and often unique manner. Recent experiments have shown that pulsed laser processing of materials can lead to surface melting, dopant redistribution and crystal regrowth, all on extremely short time scales (approx. < 1 μ sec.). These two processes can be combined to achieve properties not possible with normal materials preparation techniques, or to alter materials properties in a more efficient manner. Investigations are presented utilizing the combined techniques of positive ion scattering-channeling, x-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy which show that supersaturated alloys can be formed in the surface regions (approx. 1 μm) of ion implanted, laser annealed silicon single crystals, and that these surfaces undergo a unique one dimensional lattice contraction or expansion depending on the dopant species. The resultant surface has a lattice parameter significantly different from the bulk, is free from any damage defects, has essentially all the dopant atoms in substitutional sites and the impurity concentrations can exceed solid solubility limits by more than an order of magnitude

  11. Material Evaluation and Process Optimization of CNT-Coated Polymer Powders for Selective Laser Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangqin Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs as nano-reinforcements were introduced to facilitate the laser sintering process and enhance the thermal and mechanical properties of polymeric composites. A dual experimental-theoretical method was proposed to evaluate the processability and predict the process parameters of newly developed CNT-coated polyamide 12 (CNTs/PA12 powders. The thermal conductivity, melt viscosity, phase transition and temperature-dependent density and heat capacity of PA12 and CNTs/PA12 powders were characterized for material evaluation. The composite powders exhibited improved heat conduction and heat absorption compared with virgin polymer powders, and the stable sintering range of composite powders was extended and found to be favourable for the sintering process. The microstructures of sintered composites revealed that the CNTs remained at the powder boundaries and formed network architectures, which instantaneously induced the significant enhancements in tensile strength, elongation at break and toughness without sacrificing tensile modulus.

  12. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  13. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  14. X-ray emission as a potential hazard during ultrashort pulse laser material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legall, Herbert; Schwanke, Christoph; Pentzien, Simone; Dittmar, Günter; Bonse, Jörn; Krüger, Jörg

    2018-06-01

    In laser machining with ultrashort laser pulses unwanted X-ray radiation in the keV range can be generated when a critical laser intensity is exceeded. Even if the emitted X-ray dose per pulse is low, high laser repetition rates can lead to an accumulation of X-ray doses beyond exposure safety limits. For 925 fs pulse duration at a center wavelength of 1030 nm, the X-ray emission was investigated up to an intensity of 2.6 × 1014 W/cm2. The experiments were performed in air with a thin disk laser at a repetition rate of 400 kHz. X-ray spectra and doses were measured for various planar target materials covering a wide range of the periodic table from aluminum to tungsten. Without radiation shielding, the measured radiation doses at this high repetition rate clearly exceed the regulatory limits. Estimations for an adequate radiation shielding are provided.

  15. Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, Kenneth; Weck, Phil

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Visible) and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line analysis of actinide elements in a solvent extraction process in real time. These techniques have been used for measuring actinide speciation and concentration under laboratory conditions and are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques, researchers must determine the fundamental speciation of target actinides and the resulting influence on spectroscopic properties. Detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be established and utilized in a range of areas, particularly those related to materials accountability and process control. Through this project, researchers will develop tools and spectroscopic techniques to evaluate solution extraction conditions and concentrations of U, Pu, and Cm in extraction processes, addressing areas of process control and materials accountability. The team will evaluate UV- Visible and TRLFS for use in solvent extraction-based separations. Ongoing research is examining efficacy of UV-Visible spectroscopy to evaluate uranium and plutonium speciation under conditions found in the UREX process and using TRLFS to evaluate Cm speciation and concentration in the TALSPEAK process. A uranyl and plutonium nitrate UV-Visible spectroscopy study met with success, which supports the utility and continued exploration of spectroscopic methods for evaluation of actinide concentrations and solution conditions for other aspects of the UREX+ solvent extraction scheme. This project will examine U and Pu absorbance in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, perform detailed examination of Cm in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, study U laser fluorescence, and apply project data to contactors. The team will also determine peak ratios as a function of solution concentrations for the UV

  16. An integrated approach of topology optimized design and selective laser melting process for titanium implants materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dongming; Yang, Yongqiang; Su, Xubin; Wang, Di; Sun, Jianfeng

    2013-01-01

    The load-bearing bone implants materials should have sufficient stiffness and large porosity, which are interacted since larger porosity causes lower mechanical properties. This paper is to seek the maximum stiffness architecture with the constraint of specific volume fraction by topology optimization approach, that is, maximum porosity can be achieved with predefine stiffness properties. The effective elastic modulus of conventional cubic and topology optimized scaffolds were calculated using finite element analysis (FEA) method; also, some specimens with different porosities of 41.1%, 50.3%, 60.2% and 70.7% respectively were fabricated by Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process and were tested by compression test. Results showed that the computational effective elastic modulus of optimized scaffolds was approximately 13% higher than cubic scaffolds, the experimental stiffness values were reduced by 76% than the computational ones. The combination of topology optimization approach and SLM process would be available for development of titanium implants materials in consideration of both porosity and mechanical stiffness.

  17. Studies on laser material processing with nanosecond and sub-nanosecond and picosecond and sub-picosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Tao, Sha; Wang, Brian; Zhao, Jay

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, laser ablation of widely used metal (Al, Cu. stainless-steel), semiconductor (Si), transparent material (glass, sapphire), ceramic (Al2O3, AlN) and polymer (PI, PMMA) in industry were systematically studied with pulse width from nanosecond (5-100ns), picosecond (6-10ps) to sub-picosecond (0.8-0.95ps). A critical damage zone (CDZ) of up to 100um with ns laser, efficiency were also investigated. This is to explore how to provide industry users the best laser solution for device micro-fabrication with best price. Our studies of cutting and drilling with ns, ps, and sub-ps lasers indicate that it is feasible to achieve user accepted quality and speed with cost-effective and reliable laser by optimizing processing conditions.

  18. Factors affecting the laser processing of wood, 2: Effects of material parameters on machinability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, T.; Hayashi, D.

    1994-01-01

    Material parameters of wood were investigated. Factors relating to the workpiece include cutting direction, specific gravity, and components of the wood such as resin-like materials. Also studies of the effects of irregular tissue on machinability were made. The interactions between laser beam and materials are often greatly complex. They depend on the characteristics of the laser beam, the thermal constants of the woods, and the optical surface properties of the woods. Therefore, high quality beam mode and carefully selected materials were used. The following laser cutting properties became clear after studying the experimental results. Slow speed cutting and softwoods make slight differences, regarding cutting section and fiber direction. However, it can beconsidered that there is not very much change except in cross-section. Because of the high power density of laser, cutting speed makes no big difference. The irregular tissue of wood cannot maintain normal cutting speed and accuracy. The factor of genuine density eta, which is thought to be entirely independent of each specific gravity, is definedas the concept of density in general. It can be obtained by applying a simple rule, that is, the eta is the ratio of r(u)/rho(s) where rho(s) is the wood substance as the characteristic value of wood, and r(u)is specific gravity. An experimental formula shows that the depth of cut decreases in proportion to the value of eta. However, in the strict sense of the word, data of wood material as a natural resources mustbe treated qualitatively, because there are deviations from regularity due to various reasons. (author)

  19. Femtosecond Laser Processing of Membranes for Sensor Devices on different Bulk Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Zehetner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that diaphragms for sensor applications can be fabricated by laser ablation in a~variety of substrates such as ceramics, glass, sapphire or SiC. However, ablation can cause pinholes in membranes made of SiC, Si and metals. Our experiments indicate that pinhole defects in the ablated membranes are affected by ripple structures related to the polarization of the laser. From our simulation results on light propagation in Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS we find out that they are acting as a slot waveguide in SiC material. The results further show that field intensity is enhanced inside LIPSS and spreads out at surface distortions promoting the formation of pinholes. The membrane corner area is most vulnerable for pinhole formation. Pinholes funnel laser radiation into the bulk material causing structural damage and stress in the membrane. We show that a~polarization flipping technique inhibits the formation of pin holes caused by LIPSS.

  20. Analysis of material modifications caused by nanosecond pulsed UV laser processing of SiC and GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, Olaf; Wernicke, Tim; Wuerfl, Joachim; Traenkle, Guenther [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Hergenroeder, Roland [ISAS-Institute for Analytical Sciences, Dortmund (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    The effects of direct UV laser processing on single crystal SiC in ambient air were investigated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and measurements of the electrical resistance using the transfer length method (TLM). Scanning electron microscopy was applied to study the morphology and dimensions of the laser-treated regions. After laser processing using a nanosecond pulsed solid-state laser the debris consisting of silicon oxide was removed by etching in buffered hydrofluoric acid. A layer of resolidified material remains at the surface indicating the thermal impact of the laser process. The Si/C ratio is significantly disturbed at the surface of the resolidified layer and approaches unity in a depth of several tens of nanometers. A privileged oxidation of carbon leaves elementary resolidified silicon at the surface, where nanocrystalline silicon was detected. Oxygen and nitrogen were detected near the surface down to a depth of some tens of nanometers. A conductive surface film is formed, which is attributed to the thermal impact causing the formation of the silicon-rich surface layer and the incorporation of nitrogen as dopant. No indications for microcrack or defect formation were found beneath the layer of resolidified material. (orig.)

  1. Thin film removal mechanisms in ns-laser processing of photovoltaic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovatsek, J.; Tamhankar, A.; Patel, R.S.; Bulgakova, N.M.; Bonse, J.

    2010-01-01

    The removal of thin films widely used in photovoltaics (amorphous silicon, tin oxide, zinc oxide, aluminum, and molybdenum) is studied experimentally using multi-kHz Q-switched solid-state lasers at 532 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths. The processing ('scribing') is performed through the film-supporting glass plate at scribing speeds of the order of m/s. The dependence of the film removal threshold on the laser pulse duration (8 ns to 40 ns) is investigated and the results are complemented by a multi-layer thermal model used for numerical simulations of the laser-induced spatio-temporal temperature field within the samples. Possible film removal mechanisms are discussed upon consideration of optical, geometrical, thermal and mechanical properties of the layers.

  2. Ultrashort pulse laser processing of hard tissue, dental restoration materials, and biocompatibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, A.; Strassl, M.; Beer, F.; Verhagen, L.; Wittschier, M.; Wintner, E.

    2007-07-01

    During the last few years, ultra-short laser pulses have proven their potential for application in medical tissue treatment in many ways. In hard tissue ablation, their aptitude for material ablation with negligible collateral damage provides many advantages. Especially teeth representing an anatomically and physiologically very special region with less blood circulation and lower healing rates than other tissues require most careful treatment. Hence, overheating of the pulp and induction of microcracks are some of the most problematic issues in dental preparation. Up till now it was shown by many authors that the application of picosecond or femtosecond pulses allows to perform ablation with very low damaging potential also fitting to the physiological requirements indicated. Beside the short interaction time with the irradiated matter, scanning of the ultra-short pulse trains turned out to be crucial for ablating cavities of the required quality. One main reason for this can be seen in the fact that during scanning the time period between two subsequent pulses incident on the same spot is so much extended that no heat accumulation effects occur and each pulse can be treated as a first one with respect to its local impact. Extension of this advantageous technique to biocompatible materials, i.e. in this case dental restoration materials and titanium plasma-sprayed implants, is just a matter of consequence. Recently published results on composites fit well with earlier data on dental hard tissue. In case of plaque which has to be removed from implants, it turns out that removal of at least the calcified version is harder than tissue removal. Therefore, besides ultra-short lasers, also Diode and Neodymium lasers, in cw and pulsed modes, have been studied with respect to plaque removal and sterilization. The temperature increase during laser exposure has been experimentally evaluated in parallel.

  3. Synthesis of magnetic nanofibers using femtosecond laser material processing in air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Bo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, we report formation of weblike fibrous nanostructure and nanoparticles of magnetic neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB via femtosecond laser radiation at MHz pulse repetition frequency in air at atmospheric pressure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis revealed that the nanostructure is formed due to aggregation of polycrystalline nanoparticles of the respective constituent materials. The nanofibers diameter varies between 30 and 70 nm and they are mixed with nanoparticles. The effect of pulse to pulse separation rate on the size of the magnetic fibrous structure and the magnetic strength was reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis revealed metallic and oxide phases in the nanostructure. The growth of magnetic nanostructure is highly recommended for the applications of magnetic devices like biosensors and the results suggest that the pulsed-laser method is a promising technique for growing nanocrystalline magnetic nanofibers and nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

  4. Synthesis of magnetic nanofibers using femtosecond laser material processing in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we report formation of weblike fibrous nanostructure and nanoparticles of magnetic neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) via femtosecond laser radiation at MHz pulse repetition frequency in air at atmospheric pressure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis revealed that the nanostructure is formed due to aggregation of polycrystalline nanoparticles of the respective constituent materials. The nanofibers diameter varies between 30 and 70 nm and they are mixed with nanoparticles. The effect of pulse to pulse separation rate on the size of the magnetic fibrous structure and the magnetic strength was reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed metallic and oxide phases in the nanostructure. The growth of magnetic nanostructure is highly recommended for the applications of magnetic devices like biosensors and the results suggest that the pulsed-laser method is a promising technique for growing nanocrystalline magnetic nanofibers and nanoparticles for biomedical applications. PMID:21711890

  5. Materials processing issues for non-destructive laser gas sampling (NDLGS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-09

    The Non-Destructive Laser Gas Sampling (NDLGS) process essentially involves three steps: (1) laser drilling through the top of a crimped tube made of 304L stainles steel (Hammar and Svennson Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} = 1.55, produced in 1985); (2) gas sampling; and (3) laser re-welding of the crimp. All three steps are performed in a sealed chamber with a fused silica window under controlled vacuum conditions. Quality requirements for successful processing call for a hermetic re-weld with no cracks or other defects in the fusion zone or HAZ. It has been well established that austenitic stainless steels ({gamma}-SS), such as 304L, can suffer from solidification cracking if their Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} is below a critical value that causes solidification to occur as austenite (fcc structure) and their combined impurity level (%P+%S) is above {approx}0.02%. Conversely, for Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} values above the critical level, solidification occurs as ferrite (bcc structure), and cracking propensity is greatly reduced at all combined impurity levels. The consensus of results from studies of several researchers starting in the late 1970's indicates that the critical Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} value is {approx}1.5 for arc welds. However, more recent studies by the author and others show that the critical Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} value increases to {approx}1 .6 for weld processes with very rapid thermal cycles, such as the pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam welding (LBW) process used here. Initial attempts at NDLGS using pulsed LBW resulted in considerable solidification cracking, consistent with the results of work discussed above. After a brief introduction to the welding metallurgy of {gamma}-SS, this presentation will review the results of a study aimed at developing a production-ready process that eliminates cracking. The solution to the cracking issue, developed at LANL, involved locally augmenting the Cr content by applying either Cr or a Cr-rich stainless steel (ER 312) to the top

  6. The Theory of Laser Materials Processing Heat and Mass Transfer in Modern Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Dowden, John

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the book is to show how general principles can be used to obtain insight into laser processes. The principles used may come from fundamental physical theory or from direct observation of experimental results, but an understanding of the general characteristics of the behaviour of a process is essential for intelligent investigation and implementation, whether the approach is experimental, observational, numerical or analytical. The last two have a special value since the associated costs can be relatively low and may be used as a starting point for more expensive techniques. The construction of simple models whose underlying principles are easy to see is therefore of special value, and an understanding of their strengths and limitations is essential. The applications considered in detail are cutting, keyhole welding, drilling, arc and hybrid laser-arc welding, hardening, cladding, forming and cutting, but the general principles have a very wide application; metallurgical aspects are considered,...

  7. Advances in laser ablation of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Lowndes, D.H.; Chrisey, D.B.; Fogarassy, E.; Narayan, J.

    1998-01-01

    The symposium, Advances in Laser Ablation of Materials, was held at the 1998 MRS Spring Meeting in San Francisco, California. The papers in this symposium illustrate the advances in pulsed laser ablation for a wide variety of applications involving semiconductors, superconductors, metals, ceramics, and polymers. In particular, advances in the deposition of oxides and related materials are featured. Papers dealing with both fundamentals and the applications of laser ablation are presented. Topical areas include: fundamentals of ablation and growth; in situ diagnostics and nanoscale synthesis advances in laser ablation techniques; laser surface processing; pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric, magnetic, superconducting and optoelectronic thin films; and pulsed laser deposition of carbon-based and polymeric materials. Sixty papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  8. Laser Peening Process and Its Impact on Materials Properties in Comparison with Shot Peening and Ultrasonic Impact Peening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujba, Abdullahi K.; Medraj, Mamoun

    2014-01-01

    The laser shock peening (LSP) process using a Q-switched pulsed laser beam for surface modification has been reviewed. The development of the LSP technique and its numerous advantages over the conventional shot peening (SP) such as better surface finish, higher depths of residual stress and uniform distribution of intensity were discussed. Similar comparison with ultrasonic impact peening (UIP)/ultrasonic shot peening (USP) was incorporated, when possible. The generation of shock waves, processing parameters, and characterization of LSP treated specimens were described. Special attention was given to the influence of LSP process parameters on residual stress profiles, material properties and structures. Based on the studies so far, more fundamental understanding is still needed when selecting optimized LSP processing parameters and substrate conditions. A summary of the parametric studies of LSP on different materials has been presented. Furthermore, enhancements in the surface micro and nanohardness, elastic modulus, tensile yield strength and refinement of microstructure which translates to increased fatigue life, fretting fatigue life, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion resistance were addressed. However, research gaps related to the inconsistencies in the literature were identified. Current status, developments and challenges of the LSP technique were discussed. PMID:28788284

  9. Novel materials for laser refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehlen, Markus P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The status of optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids is reviewed, and the various factors that limit the performance of current laser-cooling materials are discussed. Efficient optical refrigeration is possible in materials for which {Dirac_h}{omega}{sub max} < E{sub p}/8, where {Dirac_h}{omega}{sub max} is the maximum phonon energy of the host material and E{sub p} is the pump energy of the rare-earth dopant. Transition-metal and OH{sup -}impurities at levels >100 ppb are believed to be the main factors for the limited laser-cooling performance in current materials. The many components of doped ZBLAN glass pose particular processing challenges. Binary fluoride glasses such as YF{sub 3}-LiF are considered as alternatives to ZBLAN. The crystalline system KPb{sub 2}CI{sub 5} :Dy{sup 3+} is identified as a prime candidate for high-efficiency laser cooling.

  10. Development and Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Weck, Phil; Poineau, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Visible) and Time Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line, real-time analysis of the actinide elements in a solvent extraction process. UV-Visible and TRLFS techniques have been used for measuring the speciation and concentration of the actinides under laboratory conditions. These methods are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques for GNEP applications, the fundamental speciation of the target actinides and the resulting influence on 3 spectroscopic properties must be determined. Through this effort detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be establish and utilized in a range of areas of interest to GNEP, especially in areas related to materials accountability and process control.

  11. Photon technology. Laser processing technology; Photon technology. Laser process gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Survey has been conducted to develop laser processing technology utilizing the interaction between substance and photon. This is a part of the leading research on photon technology development. The photon technology development is aimed at novel technology development highly utilizing the quantum nature of photons. In the field of laser processing, high quality photons are used as tools, special functions of atoms and molecules will be discovered, and processing for functional fabrication (photon machining) will be established. A role of laser processing in industries has become significant, which is currently spreading not only into cutting and welding of materials and scalpels but also into such a special field as ultrafine processing of materials. The spreading is sometimes obstructed due to the difficulty of procurement of suitable machines and materials, and the increase of cost. The purpose of this study is to develop the optimal laser technology, to elucidate the interaction between substance and photon, and to develop the laser system and the transmission and regulation systems which realize the optimal conditions. 387 refs., 115 figs., 25 tabs.

  12. Laser application in high temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohse, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The scope and priorities of laser application in materials science and technology are attracting widespread interest. After a brief discussion of the unique capabilities of laser application in the various fields of materials science, main emphasis is given on the three areas of materials processing, surface modification and alloying, and property measurements at high temperatures. In materials processing the operational regimes for surface hardening, drilling, welding and laser glazing are discussed. Surface modifications by laser melting, quenching and surface alloying, the formation of solid solutions, metastable phases and amorphous solids on the basis of rapid solidification, ion implantation and ion beam mixing are considered. The influence of solidification rates and interface velocities on the surface properties are given. The extension of property measurements up to and beyond the melting point of refractory materials into their critical region by a transient-type dynamic laser pulse heating technique is given for the three examples of vapour pressure measurement, density and heat capacity determination in the solid and liquid phases. A new approach, the laser autoclave technique, applying laser heating and x-ray shadow technique under autoclave conditions to acoustically levitated spheres will be presented. (author)

  13. Materials for spaceborne laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusarov, A.

    2006-01-01

    Advanced laser systems are attracting a growing interest for space missions, in particular for LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) applications. An important issue for the LIDARs is the very strict requirements on the optical performance and more specifically the need for a high optical output power combined with a nearly perfect output beam quality. These features are traditionally in conflict with each other. Thermally induced phase distortions indeed corrupt the beam quality of high-power solid-state lasers and it becomes increasingly difficult to maintain a good beam quality while increasing the output power. A possible solution of the problem is to use the optical phase conjugation, which provides a method to dynamically correct for those aberrations. A process by which phase-conjugated waves can be generated is the SBS (stimulated Brillouin scattering). SBS mirrors commonly used in terrestrial application are based on liquids or gases, which are not 'space-friendly' and often toxic. The solid-state alternative seems the most appropriate for space. Such PCMs (Phase-Conjugating Mirrors) have been the subject of many research efforts in recent years and a significant progress in improving their characteristics has been achieved. However, the issue of space qualification remains open. To address it, the European Space Agency initiated in 2004 the research project named Solid-State Phase Conjugation, Radiation Testing and Evaluation for Core Laser Technologies with the TRT (Thales Research and Technology), France, as the prime contractor, and the CSL (Centre Spatial de Liege) and SCKCEN as the subcontractors. The project is to be completed in 2006. To qualify a PCM for a spaceborne laser system, one has to address a number of specific issues. Such a component must be mechanically rugged to sustain vibrations during the launch phase, provide a low out-gassing to prevent optical surfaces contamination in vacuum, be highly reliable to operate properly without

  14. Laser processing of metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, G.L.; Kumar, Dilip; Roy, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    Laser, due to its high degree of coherence can produce powder density in the range of 10 3 -10 11 W/mm 2 . This high power density of the laser beam enables it to be utilized for many industrial applications, e.g. welding, cutting, drilling, surface treatment, etc. Laser processing of materials has many advantages, e.g. good quality product at high processing speed, least heat affected zone, minimum distortion, etc. In addition, the same laser system can be utilized for different applications, a very cost effective factor for any industry. Therefore laser has been adopted for processing of different materials for a wide range of applications and is now replacing conventional materials processing techniques on commercial merits with several economic and metallurgical advantages. Applications of laser to process materials of different thicknesses varying from 0.1 mm to 100 mm have demonstrat ed its capability as an important manufacturing tool for engineering industries. While lasers have most widely been utilized in welding, cutting and drilling they have also found applications in surface treatment of metals and alloys, e.g. transfor mation hardening and annealing. More recently, there has been significant amount of research being undertaken in laser glazing, laser surface alloying and laser cladding for obtaining improved surface properties. This report reviews the stat us of laser processing of metals and alloys emphasising its metallurgical aspects a nd deals with the different laser processes like welding, cutting, drilling and surface treatment highlighting the types and choice of laser and its interaction with metals and alloys and the applications of these processes. (author). 93 refs., 32 figs., 7 tables

  15. Laser Processing of Multilayered Thermal Spray Coatings: Optimal Processing Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewolde, Mahder; Zhang, Tao; Lee, Hwasoo; Sampath, Sanjay; Hwang, David; Longtin, Jon

    2017-12-01

    Laser processing offers an innovative approach for the fabrication and transformation of a wide range of materials. As a rapid, non-contact, and precision material removal technology, lasers are natural tools to process thermal spray coatings. Recently, a thermoelectric generator (TEG) was fabricated using thermal spray and laser processing. The TEG device represents a multilayer, multimaterial functional thermal spray structure, with laser processing serving an essential role in its fabrication. Several unique challenges are presented when processing such multilayer coatings, and the focus of this work is on the selection of laser processing parameters for optimal feature quality and device performance. A parametric study is carried out using three short-pulse lasers, where laser power, repetition rate and processing speed are varied to determine the laser parameters that result in high-quality features. The resulting laser patterns are characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electrical isolation tests between patterned regions. The underlying laser interaction and material removal mechanisms that affect the feature quality are discussed. Feature quality was found to improve both by using a multiscanning approach and an optional assist gas of air or nitrogen. Electrically isolated regions were also patterned in a cylindrical test specimen.

  16. 3 kW single stage all-fiber Yb-doped single-mode fiber laser for highly reflective and highly thermal conductive materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, S.; Nguyen, H. K.; Kashiwagi, M.; Uchiyama, K.; Shima, K.; Tanaka, D.

    2017-02-01

    A 3 kW single stage all-fiber Yb-doped single-mode fiber laser with bi-directional pumping configuration has been demonstrated. Our newly developed high-power LD modules are employed for a high available pump power of 4.9 kW. The length of the delivery fiber is 20 m which is long enough to be used in most of laser processing machines. An output power of 3 kW was achieved at a pump power of 4.23 kW. The slope efficiency was 70%. SRS was able to be suppressed at the same output power by increasing ratio of backward pump power. The SRS level was improved by 5dB when 57% backward pump ratio was adopted compared with the case of 50%. SRS was 35dB below the laser power at the output power of 3 kW even with a 20-m delivery fiber. The M-squared factor was 1.3. Single-mode beam quality was obtained. To evaluate practical utility of the 3 kW single-mode fiber laser, a Bead-on-Plate (BoP) test onto a pure copper plate was executed. The BoP test onto a copper plate was made without stopping or damaging the laser system. That indicates our high power single-mode fiber lasers can be used practically in processing of materials with high reflectivity and high thermal conductivity.

  17. Laser Processing Technology using Metal Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jeong-Hwan; Moon, Young-Hoon [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of this paper is to review the state of laser processing technology using metal powders. In recent years, a series of research and development efforts have been undertaken worldwide to develop laser processing technologies to fabricate metal-based parts. Layered manufacturing by the laser melting process is gaining ground for use in manufacturing rapid prototypes (RP), tools (RT) and functional end products. Selective laser sintering / melting (SLS/SLM) is one of the most rapidly growing rapid prototyping techniques. This is mainly due to the processes's suitability for almost any materials, including polymers, metals, ceramics and many types of composites. The interaction between the laser beam and the powder material used in the laser melting process is one of the dominant phenomena defining feasibility and quality. In the case of SLS, the powder is not fully melted during laser scanning, therefore the SLS-processed parts are not fully dense and have relatively low strength. To overcome this disadvantage, SLM and laser cladding (LC) processes have been used to enable full melting of the powder. Further studies on the laser processing technology will be continued due to the many potential applications that the technology offers.

  18. Lateral Temperature-Gradient Method for High-Throughput Characterization of Material Processing by Millisecond Laser Annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robert T; Jacobs, Alan G; Sorg, Victoria C; Jung, Byungki; Hill, Megan O; Treml, Benjamin E; Thompson, Michael O

    2016-09-12

    A high-throughput method for characterizing the temperature dependence of material properties following microsecond to millisecond thermal annealing, exploiting the temperature gradients created by a lateral gradient laser spike anneal (lgLSA), is presented. Laser scans generate spatial thermal gradients of up to 5 °C/μm with peak temperatures ranging from ambient to in excess of 1400 °C, limited only by laser power and materials thermal limits. Discrete spatial property measurements across the temperature gradient are then equivalent to independent measurements after varying temperature anneals. Accurate temperature calibrations, essential to quantitative analysis, are critical and methods for both peak temperature and spatial/temporal temperature profile characterization are presented. These include absolute temperature calibrations based on melting and thermal decomposition, and time-resolved profiles measured using platinum thermistors. A variety of spatially resolved measurement probes, ranging from point-like continuous profiling to large area sampling, are discussed. Examples from annealing of III-V semiconductors, CdSe quantum dots, low-κ dielectrics, and block copolymers are included to demonstrate the flexibility, high throughput, and precision of this technique.

  19. Optimizing laser beam profiles using micro-lens arrays for efficient material processing: applications to solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Dirk; Homburg, Oliver; Mitra, Thomas; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Jarczynski, Manfred; Meinschien, Jens; Bayer, Andreas; Lissotschenko, Vitalij

    2009-02-01

    High power laser sources are used in various production tools for microelectronic products and solar cells, including the applications annealing, lithography, edge isolation as well as dicing and patterning. Besides the right choice of the laser source suitable high performance optics for generating the appropriate beam profile and intensity distribution are of high importance for the right processing speed, quality and yield. For industrial applications equally important is an adequate understanding of the physics of the light-matter interaction behind the process. In advance simulations of the tool performance can minimize technical and financial risk as well as lead times for prototyping and introduction into series production. LIMO has developed its own software founded on the Maxwell equations taking into account all important physical aspects of the laser based process: the light source, the beam shaping optical system and the light-matter interaction. Based on this knowledge together with a unique free-form micro-lens array production technology and patented micro-optics beam shaping designs a number of novel solar cell production tool sub-systems have been built. The basic functionalities, design principles and performance results are presented with a special emphasis on resilience, cost reduction and process reliability.

  20. A Multi-Scale Modeling of Laser Cladding Process (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cao, J; Choi, J

    2006-01-01

    Laser cladding is an additive manufacturing process that a laser generates a melt-pool on the substrate material while a second material, as a powder or a wire form, is injected into that melt-pool...

  1. Laser-beam interactions with materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allmen, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    Lasers are becoming popular tools and research instruments in materials research, metallurgy, semiconductor technology and engineering. This text treats, from a physicist's point of view, the processes that lasers can induce in materials. A broad view of the field and its perspectives is given: physical topics covered range from optics to shock waves, and applications range from semiconductor annealing to fusion-plasma production. Intuitive analytical models are used whenever possible, in order to foster creative thinking and facilitate access to newcomers and nonspecialists

  2. Laser induced forward transfer of soft materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palla-Papavlu, A; Dinca, V; Luculescu, C; Dinescu, M; Shaw-Stewart, J; Lippert, T; Nagel, M

    2010-01-01

    A strong research effort is presently aimed at patterning methodologies for obtaining controlled defined micrometric polymeric structures for a wide range of applications, including electronics, optoelectronics, sensors, medicine etc. Lasers have been identified as appropriate tools for processing of different materials, such as ceramics and metals, but also for soft, easily damageable materials (biological compounds and polymers). In this work we study the dynamics of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) with a gap between the donor and the receiver substrates, which is the basis for possible applications that require multilayer depositions with high spatial resolution

  3. Metal processing with ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Paul S.; Felt, M. D.; Komashko, Aleksey M.; Perry, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Stuart, Brent C.

    2000-08-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation has been shown to produce well-defined cuts and holes in metals with minimal heat effect to the remaining material. Ultrashort laser pulse processing shows promise as an important technique for materials processing. We will discuss the physical effects associated with processing based experimental and modeling results. Intense ultra-short laser pulse (USLP) generates high pressures and temperatures in a subsurface layer during the pulse, which can strongly modify the absorption. We carried out simulations of USLP absorption versus material and pulse parameters. The ablation rate as function of the laser parameters has been estimated. Since every laser pulse removes only a small amount of material, a practical laser processing system must have high repetition rate. We will demonstrate that planar ablation is unstable and the initially smooth crater bottom develops a corrugated pattern after many tens of shots. The corrugation growth rate, angle of incidence and the polarization of laser electric field dependence will be discussed. In the nonlinear stage, the formation of coherent structures with scales much larger than the laser wavelength was observed. Also, there appears to be a threshold fluence above which a narrow, nearly perfectly circular channel forms after a few hundred shots. Subsequent shots deepen this channel without significantly increasing its diameter. The role of light absorption in the hole walls will be discussed.

  4. The effect of laser welding process parameters on the mechanical and microstructural properties of V-4CR-4TI structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, C. B.; Natesan, K.; Xu, Z.; Smith, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    V-Cr-Ti alloys are among the leading candidate materials for the frost wall and other structural materials applications in fusion power reactors because of several important advantages including inherently low irradiation-induced activity, good mechanical properties, good compatibility with lithium, high thermal conductivity and good resistance to irradiation-induced swelling and damage [1]. However, weldability of these alloys in general must be demonstrated, and laser welding, specifically, must be developed. Laser welding is considered to be an attractive process for construction of a reactor due to its high penetrating power and potential flexibility. This paper reports on a systematic study which was conducted to examine the use of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to weld sheet materials of V-Cr-Ti alloys and to characterize the microstructural and mechanical properties of the resulting joints. Deep penetration and defect-free welds were achieved under an optimal combination of laser parameters including focal length of lens, pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, beam travel speed, and shielding gas arrangement. The key for defect-free welds was found to be the stabilization of the keyhole and providing an escape path for the gas trapped in the weld. An innovative method was developed to obtain deep penetration and oxygen contamination free welds. Oxygen and nitrogen uptake were reduced to levels only a few ppm higher than the base metal by design and development of an environmental control box. The effort directed at developing an acceptable postwelding heat treatment showed that five passes of a diffuse laser beam over the welded region softened the weld material, especially in the root region of the weld

  5. Beam processing of advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, J.; Copley, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    International Conference on Beam Processing of Advanced Materials was held at the Fall TMS/ASM Materials Week at Chicago, Illinois, November 2--5, 1992. The symposium was devoted to the recent advances in processing of materials by an energy source such as laser, electron, ion beams, etc. The symposium served as a forum on the science of beam-induced materials processing and implications of this science to practical implementation. An increased emphasis on obtaining an understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of beam-induced surface processes was a major trend observed at this years symposium. This has resulted in the increased use of advanced diagnostic techniques and modeling studies to determine the rate controlling steps in these processes. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  6. Laser cutting: industrial relevance, process optimization, and laser safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haferkamp, Heinz; Goede, Martin; von Busse, Alexander; Thuerk, Oliver

    1998-09-01

    Compared to other technological relevant laser machining processes, up to now laser cutting is the application most frequently used. With respect to the large amount of possible fields of application and the variety of different materials that can be machined, this technology has reached a stable position within the world market of material processing. Reachable machining quality for laser beam cutting is influenced by various laser and process parameters. Process integrated quality techniques have to be applied to ensure high-quality products and a cost effective use of the laser manufacturing plant. Therefore, rugged and versatile online process monitoring techniques at an affordable price would be desirable. Methods for the characterization of single plant components (e.g. laser source and optical path) have to be substituted by an omnivalent control system, capable of process data acquisition and analysis as well as the automatic adaptation of machining and laser parameters to changes in process and ambient conditions. At the Laser Zentrum Hannover eV, locally highly resolved thermographic measurements of the temperature distribution within the processing zone using cost effective measuring devices are performed. Characteristic values for cutting quality and plunge control as well as for the optimization of the surface roughness at the cutting edges can be deducted from the spatial distribution of the temperature field and the measured temperature gradients. Main influencing parameters on the temperature characteristic within the cutting zone are the laser beam intensity and pulse duration in pulse operation mode. For continuous operation mode, the temperature distribution is mainly determined by the laser output power related to the cutting velocity. With higher cutting velocities temperatures at the cutting front increase, reaching their maximum at the optimum cutting velocity. Here absorption of the incident laser radiation is drastically increased due to

  7. Laser Processing of Metals and Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singaravelu, Senthilraja [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    A laser offers a unique set of opportunities for precise delivery of high quality coherent energy. This energy can be tailored to alter the properties of material allowing a very flexible adjustment of the interaction that can lead to melting, vaporization, or just surface modification. Nowadays laser systems can be found in nearly all branches of research and industry for numerous applications. Sufficient evidence exists in the literature to suggest that further advancements in the field of laser material processing will rely significantly on the development of new process schemes. As a result they can be applied in various applications starting from fundamental research on systems, materials and processes performed on a scientific and technical basis for the industrial needs. The interaction of intense laser radiation with solid surfaces has extensively been studied for many years, in part, for development of possible applications. In this thesis, I present several applications of laser processing of metals and polymers including polishing niobium surface, producing a superconducting phase niobium nitride and depositing thin films of niobium nitride and organic material (cyclic olefin copolymer). The treated materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), high resolution optical microscopy, surface profilometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Power spectral density (PSD) spectra computed from AFM data gives further insight into the effect of laser melting on the topography of the treated niobium.

  8. Laser additive manufacturing of high-performance materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    This book entitled “Laser Additive Manufacturing of High-Performance Materials” covers the specific aspects of laser additive manufacturing of high-performance new materials components based on an unconventional materials incremental manufacturing philosophy, in terms of materials design and preparation, process control and optimization, and theories of physical and chemical metallurgy. This book describes the capabilities and characteristics of the development of new metallic materials components by laser additive manufacturing process, including nanostructured materials, in situ composite materials, particle reinforced metal matrix composites, etc. The topics presented in this book, similar as laser additive manufacturing technology itself, show a significant interdisciplinary feature, integrating laser technology, materials science, metallurgical engineering, and mechanical engineering. This is a book for researchers, students, practicing engineers, and manufacturing industry professionals interested i...

  9. Laser-assisted fabrication of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Manna, Indranil

    2013-01-01

    Laser assisted fabrication involves shaping of materials using laser as a source of heat. It can be achieved by removal of materials (laser assisted cutting, drilling, etc.), deformation (bending, extrusion), joining (welding, soldering) and addition of materials (surface cladding or direct laser cladding). This book on ´Laser assisted Fabrication’ is aimed at developing in-depth engineering concepts on various laser assisted macro and micro-fabrication techniques with the focus on application and a review of the engineering background of different micro/macro-fabrication techniques, thermal history of the treated zone and microstructural development and evolution of properties of the treated zone.

  10. Laser and electron-beam powder-bed additive manufacturing of metallic implants: A review on processes, materials and designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, Swee Leong; An, Jia; Yeong, Wai Yee; Wiria, Florencia Edith

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM), also commonly known as 3D printing, allows the direct fabrication of functional parts with complex shapes from digital models. In this review, the current progress of two AM processes suitable for metallic orthopaedic implant applications, namely selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM) are presented. Several critical design factors such as the need for data acquisition for patient-specific design, design dependent porosity for osteo-inductive implants, surface topology of the implants and design for reduction of stress-shielding in implants are discussed. Additive manufactured biomaterials such as 316L stainless steel, titanium-6aluminium-4vanadium (Ti6Al4V) and cobalt-chromium (CoCr) are highlighted. Limitations and future potential of such technologies are also explored. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Application of Laser Plasma Sources of Soft X-rays and Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) in Imaging, Processing Materials and Photoionization Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P. W.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M.; Ahad, I. U.; Fok, T.; Szczurek, A.; Wȩgrzyński, Ł.

    In the paper we present new applications of laser plasma sources of soft X-rays and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) in various areas of plasma physics, nanotechnology and biomedical engineering. The sources are based on a gas puff target irradiated with nanosecond laser pulses from commercial Nd: YAG lasers, generating pulses with time duration from 1 to 10 ns and energies from 0.5 to 10 J at a 10 Hz repetition rate. The targets are produced with the use of a double valve system equipped with a special nozzle to form a double-stream gas puff target which allows for high conversion efficiency of laser energy into soft X-rays and EUV without degradation of the nozzle. The sources are equipped with various optical systems to collect soft X-ray and EUV radiation and form the radiation beam. New applications of these sources in imaging, including EUV tomography and soft X-ray microscopy, processing of materials and photoionization studies are presented.

  12. Semiconductor processing with excimer lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.T.; Narayan, J.; Christie, W.H.; van der Leeden, G.A.; Rothe, D.E.; Cheng, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    The advantages of pulsed excimer lasers for semiconductor processing are reviewed. Extensive comparisons of the quality of annealing of ion-implanted Si obtained with XeCl and ruby lasers have been made. The results indicate that irrespective of the large differences in the optical properties of Si at uv and visible wavelengths, the efficiency of usage of the incident energy for annealing is comparable for the two lasers. However, because of the excellent optical beam quality, the XeCl laser can provide superior control of the surface melting and the resulting junction depth. Furthermore, the concentrations of electrically active point defects in the XeCl laser annealed region are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than that obtained from ruby or Nd:YAG lasers. All these results seem to suggest that XeCl lasers should be suitable for fabricating not only solar cells but also the more advanced device structures required for VLSI or VHSIC applications

  13. Laser-driven hydrothermal process studied with excimer laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariella, Raymond; Rubenchik, Alexander; Fong, Erika; Norton, Mary; Hollingsworth, William; Clarkson, James; Johnsen, Howard; Osborn, David L.

    2017-08-01

    Previously, we discovered [Mariella et al., J. Appl. Phys. 114, 014904 (2013)] that modest-fluence/modest-intensity 351-nm laser pulses, with insufficient fluence/intensity to ablate rock, mineral, or concrete samples via surface vaporization, still removed the surface material from water-submerged target samples with confinement of the removed material, and then dispersed at least some of the removed material into the water as a long-lived suspension of nanoparticles. We called this new process, which appears to include the generation of larger colorless particles, "laser-driven hydrothermal processing" (LDHP) [Mariella et al., J. Appl. Phys. 114, 014904 (2013)]. We, now, report that we have studied this process using 248-nm and 193-nm laser light on submerged concrete, quartzite, and obsidian, and, even though light at these wavelengths is more strongly absorbed than at 351 nm, we found that the overall efficiency of LDHP, in terms of the mass of the target removed per Joule of laser-pulse energy, is lower with 248-nm and 193-nm laser pulses than with 351-nm laser pulses. Given that stronger absorption creates higher peak surface temperatures for comparable laser fluence and intensity, it was surprising to observe reduced efficiencies for material removal. We also measured the nascent particle-size distributions that LDHP creates in the submerging water and found that they do not display the long tail towards larger particle sizes that we had observed when there had been a multi-week delay between experiments and the date of measuring the size distributions. This is consistent with transient dissolution of the solid surface, followed by diffusion-limited kinetics of nucleation and growth of particles from the resulting thin layer of supersaturated solution at the sample surface.

  14. Transport phenomena in materials processing---1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, B.J.; Lior, N.; Lavine, A.; Flik, M.; Karwe, M.V.; Bergman, T.L.; Beckermann, C.; Charmchi, M.

    1990-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume represent a wide range of current research interests in processes such as food and polymer processing, casting, welding, machining, laser cutting, and superconductor processing. This volume includes papers presented in four sessions: Heat Transfer in Materials Processing; Thermal Phenomena in Superconductor Processing; Heat Transfer in Food and Polymer Processing; Heat Transfer in CAsting and Welding

  15. Laser Additive Manufacturing of Magnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikler, C. V.; Chaudhary, V.; Borkar, T.; Soni, V.; Jaeger, D.; Chen, X.; Contieri, R.; Ramanujan, R. V.; Banerjee, R.

    2017-03-01

    While laser additive manufacturing is becoming increasingly important in the context of next-generation manufacturing technologies, most current research efforts focus on optimizing process parameters for the processing of mature alloys for structural applications (primarily stainless steels, titanium base, and nickel base alloys) from pre-alloyed powder feedstocks to achieve properties superior to conventionally processed counterparts. However, laser additive manufacturing or processing can also be applied to functional materials. This article focuses on the use of directed energy deposition-based additive manufacturing technologies, such as the laser engineered net shaping (LENS™) process, to deposit magnetic alloys. Three case studies are presented: Fe-30 at.%Ni, permalloys of the type Ni-Fe-V and Ni-Fe-Mo, and Fe-Si-B-Cu-Nb (derived from Finemet) alloys. All these alloys have been processed from a blend of elemental powders used as the feedstock, and their resultant microstructures, phase formation, and magnetic properties are discussed in this paper. Although these alloys were produced from a blend of elemental powders, they exhibited relatively uniform microstructures and comparable magnetic properties to those of their conventionally processed counterparts.

  16. Analysis of energy transfer process based emission spectra of erbium doped germanate glasses for mid-infrared laser materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Muzhi; Wei, Tao; Zhou, Beier; Tian, Ying; Zhou, Jiajia; Xu, Shiqing, E-mail: shiqingxu@cjlu.edu.cn; Zhang, Junjie, E-mail: jjzhang@cjlu.edu.cn

    2015-03-25

    Highlights: • Er{sup 3+} doped germanate glass with good thermal stability were prepared. • Ionic boding nature was proved by bonding parameter calculation. • Mid-infrared fluorescent behaviors and energy transfer were investigated. • Rate equation and Dexter’s theory were utilized to elucidate 2.7 μm emission. - Abstract: Er{sup 3+} activated germanate glass with good thermal stability was prepared. Bonding parameters have been calculated and the nature of ionic bonding of the germanate glass has been determined. Mid-infrared fluorescence was observed and corresponding radiative properties were investigated. For Er{sup 3+}:{sup 4}I{sub 11/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 13/2} transition, high spontaneous radiative transition probability (30.09 s{sup −1}), large emission cross section ((14.84 ± 0.10) × 10{sup −21} cm{sup 2}) and superior gain performance were obtained from the prepared glass. Besides, energy transfer processes concerning the 2.7 μm emission were also discussed in detail. According to simplified rate equation and Dexter’s theory, energy transfer microscopic parameters were computed to elucidate observed 2.7 μm emissions. Results demonstrate that the prepared germanate glass possessing excellent spectroscopic properties might be an attractive candidate for mid-infrared laser or amplifier.

  17. Analysis of energy transfer process based emission spectra of erbium doped germanate glasses for mid-infrared laser materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Muzhi; Wei, Tao; Zhou, Beier; Tian, Ying; Zhou, Jiajia; Xu, Shiqing; Zhang, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Er 3+ doped germanate glass with good thermal stability were prepared. • Ionic boding nature was proved by bonding parameter calculation. • Mid-infrared fluorescent behaviors and energy transfer were investigated. • Rate equation and Dexter’s theory were utilized to elucidate 2.7 μm emission. - Abstract: Er 3+ activated germanate glass with good thermal stability was prepared. Bonding parameters have been calculated and the nature of ionic bonding of the germanate glass has been determined. Mid-infrared fluorescence was observed and corresponding radiative properties were investigated. For Er 3+ : 4 I 11/2 → 4 I 13/2 transition, high spontaneous radiative transition probability (30.09 s −1 ), large emission cross section ((14.84 ± 0.10) × 10 −21 cm 2 ) and superior gain performance were obtained from the prepared glass. Besides, energy transfer processes concerning the 2.7 μm emission were also discussed in detail. According to simplified rate equation and Dexter’s theory, energy transfer microscopic parameters were computed to elucidate observed 2.7 μm emissions. Results demonstrate that the prepared germanate glass possessing excellent spectroscopic properties might be an attractive candidate for mid-infrared laser or amplifier

  18. Modeling multiphase materials processes

    CERN Document Server

    Iguchi, Manabu

    2010-01-01

    ""Modeling Multiphase Materials Processes: Gas-Liquid Systems"" describes the methodology and application of physical and mathematical modeling to multi-phase flow phenomena in materials processing. The book focuses on systems involving gas-liquid interaction, the most prevalent in current metallurgical processes. The performance characteristics of these processes are largely dependent on transport phenomena. This volume covers the inherent characteristics that complicate the modeling of transport phenomena in such systems, including complex multiphase structure, intense turbulence, opacity of

  19. Laser processing of ceramics for microelectronics manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposili, Robert S.; Bovatsek, James; Patel, Rajesh

    2017-03-01

    Ceramic materials are used extensively in the microelectronics, semiconductor, and LED lighting industries because of their electrically insulating and thermally conductive properties, as well as for their high-temperature-service capabilities. However, their brittleness presents significant challenges for conventional machining processes. In this paper we report on a series of experiments that demonstrate and characterize the efficacy of pulsed nanosecond UV and green lasers in machining ceramics commonly used in microelectronics manufacturing, such as aluminum oxide (alumina) and aluminum nitride. With a series of laser pocket milling experiments, fundamental volume ablation rate and ablation efficiency data were generated. In addition, techniques for various industrial machining processes, such as shallow scribing and deep scribing, were developed and demonstrated. We demonstrate that lasers with higher average powers offer higher processing rates with the one exception of deep scribes in aluminum nitride, where a lower average power but higher pulse energy source outperformed a higher average power laser.

  20. Surface processing by high power excimer laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehle, M [SOPRA, 92 - Bois-Colombes (France)

    1995-03-01

    Surface processing with lasers is a promising field of research and applications because lasers bring substantial advantages : laser beams work at distance, laser treatments are clean in respect of environment consideration and they offer innovative capabilities for surface treatment which cannot be reached by other way. Excimer lasers are pulsed, gaseous lasers which emit in UV spectral range - the most common are XeCl (308 nm), KrF (248 nm), ArF (193 nm). From 1980 up to 1994, many of them have been used for research, medical and industrial applications such as spectroscopy, PRK (photo-refractive keratotomy) and micro-machining. In the last six years, from 1987 up to 1993, efforts have been done in order to jump from 100 W average power up to 1 kW for XeCl laser at {lambda} = 308 nm. It was the aim of AMMTRA project in Japan as EU205 and EU213 Eureka projects in Europe. In this framework, SOPRA developed VEL (Very large Excimer Laser). In 1992, 1 kW (10 J x 100 Hz) millstone has been reached for the first time, this technology is based on X-Ray preionization and large laser medium (5 liters). Surface treatments based on this laser source are the main purpose of VEL Lasers. Some of them are given for instance : (a) Turbine blades made with metallic substrate and ceramic coatings on the top, are glazed in order to increase corrosion resistance of ceramic and metal sandwich. (b) Selective ablation of organic coatings deposited on fragile composite material is investigated in Aerospace industry. (c) Chock hardening of bulk metallic materials or alloys are investigated for automotive industry in order to increase wear resistance. (d) Ablation of thin surface oxides of polluted steels are under investigation in nuclear industry for decontamination. (J.P.N.).

  1. Surface processing by high power excimer laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehle, M.

    1995-01-01

    Surface processing with lasers is a promising field of research and applications because lasers bring substantial advantages : laser beams work at distance, laser treatments are clean in respect of environment consideration and they offer innovative capabilities for surface treatment which cannot be reached by other way. Excimer lasers are pulsed, gaseous lasers which emit in UV spectral range - the most common are XeCl (308 nm), KrF (248 nm), ArF (193 nm). From 1980 up to 1994, many of them have been used for research, medical and industrial applications such as spectroscopy, PRK (photo-refractive keratotomy) and micro-machining. In the last six years, from 1987 up to 1993, efforts have been done in order to jump from 100 W average power up to 1 kW for XeCl laser at λ = 308 nm. It was the aim of AMMTRA project in Japan as EU205 and EU213 Eureka projects in Europe. In this framework, SOPRA developed VEL (Very large Excimer Laser). In 1992, 1 kW (10 J x 100 Hz) millstone has been reached for the first time, this technology is based on X-Ray preionization and large laser medium (5 liters). Surface treatments based on this laser source are the main purpose of VEL Lasers. Some of them are given for instance : a) Turbine blades made with metallic substrate and ceramic coatings on the top, are glazed in order to increase corrosion resistance of ceramic and metal sandwich. b) Selective ablation of organic coatings deposited on fragile composite material is investigated in Aerospace industry. c) Chock hardening of bulk metallic materials or alloys are investigated for automotive industry in order to increase wear resistance. d) Ablation of thin surface oxides of polluted steels are under investigation in nuclear industry for decontamination. (J.P.N.)

  2. Laser-induced damage in optical materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ristau, Detlev

    2014-01-01

    Dedicated to users and developers of high-powered systems, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials focuses on the research field of laser-induced damage and explores the significant and steady growth of applications for high-power lasers in the academic, industrial, and military arenas. Written by renowned experts in the field, this book concentrates on the major topics of laser-induced damage in optical materials and most specifically addresses research in laser damage that occurs in the bulk and on the surface or the coating of optical components. It considers key issues in the field of hi

  3. Effect of Moisture Content of Paper Material on Laser Cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Alexander; Saukkonen, Esa; Piili, Heidi; Salminen, Antti

    Laser technology has been used in industrial processes for several decades. The most advanced development and implementation took place in laser welding and cutting of metals in automotive and ship building industries. However, there is high potential to apply laser processing to other materials in various industrial fields. One of these potential fields could be paper industry to fulfill the demand for high quality, fast and reliable cutting technology. Difficulties in industrial application of laser cutting for paper industry are associated to lack of basic information, awareness of technology and its application possibilities. Nowadays possibilities of using laser cutting for paper materials are widened and high automation level of equipment has made this technology more interesting for manufacturing processes. Promising area of laser cutting application at paper making machines is longitudinal cutting of paper web (edge trimming). There are few locations at a paper making machine where edge trimming is usually done: wet press section, calender or rewinder. Paper web is characterized with different moisture content at different points of the paper making machine. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of moisture content of paper material on laser cutting parameters. Effect of moisture content on cellulose fibers, laser absorption and energy needed for cutting is described as well. Laser cutting tests were carried out using CO2 laser.

  4. Lasers for the SILVA laser isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapierre, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The main principles of the laser isotope separation process for the production of enriched uranium at lower cost, are reviewed and the corresponding optimal laser characteristics are described. The development of the SILVA laser isotope separation process involved researches in the various domains of pump lasers, dye lasers, laser and optics systems and two test facilities for the feasibility studies which are expected for 1997

  5. Laser assisted embedding of nanoparticles into metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Dong; Suslov, Sergey; Ye Chang; Liao Yiliang; Liu, C. Richard; Cheng, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a methodology of half-embedding nanoparticles into metallic materials. Transparent and opaque nanoparticles are chosen to demonstrate the process of laser assisted nanoparticle embedding. Dip coating method is used to coat transparent or opaque nanoparticle on the surface of metallic material. Nanoparticles are embedded into substrate by laser irradiation. In this study, the mechanism and process of nanoparticle embedding are investigated. It is found both transparent and opaque nanoparticles embedding are with high densities and good uniformities.

  6. LASER PROCESSING ON SINGLE CRYSTALS BY UV PULSE LASER

    OpenAIRE

    龍見, 雅美; 佐々木, 徹; 高山, 恭宜

    2009-01-01

    Laser processing by using UV pulsed laser was carried out on single crystal such as sapphire and diamond in order to understand the fundamental laser processing on single crystal. The absorption edges of diamond and sapphire are longer and shorter than the wave length of UV laser, respectively. The processed regions by laser with near threshold power of processing show quite different state in each crystal.

  7. Investigation of the thermal and optical performance of a spatial light modulator with high average power picosecond laser exposure for materials processing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, G.; Whitehead, D.; Perrie, W.; Allegre, O. J.; Olle, V.; Li, Q.; Tang, Y.; Dawson, K.; Jin, Y.; Edwardson, S. P.; Li, L.; Dearden, G.

    2018-03-01

    parallel beam processing at 〈P〉  =  100 W. Hence, no permanent changes in SLM phase response characteristics have been detected. This research work will help to accelerate the use of liquid crystal spatial light modulators for both scientific and ultra high throughput laser-materials micro-structuring applications.

  8. Computational dynamics of laser alloyed metallic materials for improved corrosion performance: computational dynamics of laser alloyed metallic materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fatoba, OS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser alloying is a material processing method which utilizes the high power density available from defocused laser beam to melt both metal coatings and a part of the underlying substrate. Since melting occur solitary at the surface, large...

  9. Laser Cutting of Different Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir ÇAVDAR

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper; in general potential developments and trends of a particular machining field by extensively evaluating present studies of laser beam machining have been discussed. As it is indicated below, technical literatures have been subsumed under five major headlines: Experimental studies, reviews, optimization researches of the cutting parameters, theoretical modelling studies of laser beam cutting and academic studies relating to laser cutting

  10. New laser materials: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    In the Interim Report No. 1, it was reported that the fluorescence lifetime (≥ 750μs) in Nd doped Y(PO 3 ) 3 was longer by a factor of three as compared to YAG. This means potentially three times as much energy storage and consequently more efficient for flashlamp pumping. It also makes diode pumping easier. In addition, since the Y site is octahedrally coordinated, there is a possibility of energy transfer using Cr as the sensitizing element. As suggested by W. Krupke, we decided to explore the trivalent cation metaphosphates systematically. The compounds investigated can be represented by the general formula A(PO 3 ) 3 where A = Y, Lu, In, Sc, GA and Al. The object is to study the fluorescence characteristics of Nd and Cr as well as the effectiveness of energy transfer from Cr to Nd. In addition, we also investigated other possible laser host crystals, notably CaMgSi 2 O 6 (diopside), LaBO 3 and La(BO 2 ) 3 . Results on these materials will also be discussed

  11. Development of Ceramic Solid-State Laser Host Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Trivedi, Sudhir; Kutcher, Susan; Wang, Chen-Chia; Kim, Joo-Soo; Hommerich, Uwe; Shukla, Vijay; Sadangi, Rajendra

    2009-01-01

    Polycrystalline ceramic laser materials are gaining importance in the development of novel diode-pumped solid-state lasers. Compared to single-crystals, ceramic laser materials offer advantages in terms of ease of fabrication, shape, size, and control of dopant concentrations. Recently, we have developed Neodymium doped Yttria (Nd:Y2O3) as a solid-state ceramic laser material. A scalable production method was utilized to make spherical non agglomerated and monodisperse metastable ceramic powders of compositions that were used to fabricate polycrystalline ceramic material components. This processing technique allowed for higher doping concentrations without the segregation problems that are normally encountered in single crystalline growth. We have successfully fabricated undoped and Neodymium doped Yttria material up to 2" in diameter, Ytterbium doped Yttria, and erbium doped Yttria. We are also in the process of developing other sesquioxides such as scandium Oxide (Sc2O3) and Lutesium Oxide (Lu2O3) doped with Ytterbium, erbium and thulium dopants. In this paper, we present our initial results on the material, optical, and spectroscopic properties of the doped and undoped sesquioxide materials. Polycrystalline ceramic lasers have enormous potential applications including remote sensing, chem.-bio detection, and space exploration research. It is also potentially much less expensive to produce ceramic laser materials compared to their single crystalline counterparts because of the shorter fabrication time and the potential for mass production in large sizes.

  12. Rapidly processable radiographic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brabandere, L.A. de; Borginon, H.A.; Pattyn, H.A.; Pollet, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    A new rapidly processable radiographic silver halide material is described for use in mammography and non-destructive testing of industrial materials. The radiographic material is used for direct exposure to penetrating radiation without the use of fluorescent-intensifying screens. It consists of a transparent support with a layer of hydrophilic colloid silver halide emulsion on one or both sides. Examples of the preparation of three different silver halide emulsions are given including the use of different chemical sensitizers. These new radiographic materials have good resistance to the formation of pressure marks in rapid processing apparatus and they have improved sensitivity for direct exposure to penetrating radiation compared to conventional radiographic emulsions. (U.K.)

  13. Laser spectroscopy of gas confined in nanoporous materials

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, Tomas; Shen, Zhijian

    2010-01-01

    We show that high-resolution laser spectroscopy can probe surface interactions of gas confined in nanocavities of porous materials. We report on strong line broadening and unfamiliar line shapes due to tight confinement, as well as signal enhancement due to multiple photon scattering. This new domain of laser spectroscopy constitute a challenge for the theory of collisions and spectroscopic line shapes, and open for new ways of analyzing porous materials and processes taking place therein.

  14. Charged particle and laser irradiation of selected materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svendsen, W.E.

    1996-11-01

    The main topics of the present thesis are the processes governing electronic sputtering of insulators and laser ablation of metals and insulators. The sputtering yield for electron bombardment of solid deuterium was investigated using quartz crystal microbalances as the measuring technique. The sputtering yield was measured with varying electron energy and deuterium film thickness. Laser ablation measurements of silver and nickel were carried out using a Nd:YAG laser. The effect of various experimental parameters such as background gas pressure (Ar, N 2 ), position of quartz crystals with respect to target position and the optimal number of laser shots for carrying out the experiments were investigated. The deposition rate was measured with varying laser wavelength and laser fluence. The angular distribution of the ablated material was measured for silver as well. A theoretical model based on the thermal properties of laser interaction with metals was applied in the initial phase of ablation. For the non-thermal processes governing laser interaction with the ablated plasma plume, a model developed by Phipps and Dreyfus was used to interpret the results. Laser ablation measurements of water-ice were carried using a Nitrogen laser. Attempts were made to measure the deposition rate for various the laser wavelengths and energies. (au) 8 tabs., 49 ills., 77 refs

  15. Charged particle and laser irradiation of selected materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendsen, W E

    1996-11-01

    The main topics of the present thesis are the processes governing electronic sputtering of insulators and laser ablation of metals and insulators. The sputtering yield for electron bombardment of solid deuterium was investigated using quartz crystal microbalances as the measuring technique. The sputtering yield was measured with varying electron energy and deuterium film thickness. Laser ablation measurements of silver and nickel were carried out using a Nd:YAG laser. The effect of various experimental parameters such as background gas pressure (Ar, N{sub 2}), position of quartz crystals with respect to target position and the optimal number of laser shots for carrying out the experiments were investigated. The deposition rate was measured with varying laser wavelength and laser fluence. The angular distribution of the ablated material was measured for silver as well. A theoretical model based on the thermal properties of laser interaction with metals was applied in the initial phase of ablation. For the non-thermal processes governing laser interaction with the ablated plasma plume, a model developed by Phipps and Dreyfus was used to interpret the results. Laser ablation measurements of water-ice were carried using a Nitrogen laser. Attempts were made to measure the deposition rate for various the laser wavelengths and energies. (au) 8 tabs., 49 ills., 77 refs.

  16. Femtosecond laser excitation of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Balling, Peter; Frislev, Martin Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We report an approach to modeling the interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and dielectric materials. The model includes the excitation of carriers by the laser through strongfield excitation, collisional excitation, and absorption in the plasma consisting of conduction-band electrons formed...

  17. Temperature analysis of laser ignited metalized material using spectroscopic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Ishaan; Sharma, Pallavi; Daipuriya, Ritu; Singh, Manpreet

    2018-05-01

    The temperature measurement of the laser ignited aluminized Nano energetic mixture using spectroscopy has a great scope in in analysing the material characteristic and combustion analysis. The spectroscopic analysis helps to do in depth study of combustion of materials which is difficult to do using standard pyrometric methods. Laser ignition was used because it consumes less energy as compared to electric ignition but ignited material dissipate the same energy as dissipated by electric ignition and also with the same impact. Here, the presented research is primarily focused on the temperature analysis of energetic material which comprises of explosive material mixed with nano-material and is ignited with the help of laser. Spectroscopy technique is used here to estimate the temperature during the ignition process. The Nano energetic mixture used in the research does not comprise of any material that is sensitive to high impact.

  18. Materials testing using laser energy deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, W.W.; Calder, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    A convenient method for determining the elastic constants of materials has been devised using the energy from a Q-switched neodymium-glass laser. Stress waves are induced in materials having circular rod or rectangular bar geometries by the absorption of energy from the laser. The wave transit times through the material are recorded with a piezoelectric transducer. Both dilatation and shear wave velocities are determined in a single test using an ultrasonic technique and these velocities are used to calculate the elastic constants of the material. A comparison of the constants determined for ten common engineering materials using this method is made with constants derived using the conventional ultrasonic pulse technique and agreement is shown to be about one percent in most cases. Effects of material geometry are discussed and surface damage to the material caused by laser energy absorption is shown

  19. Review of selective laser melting: Materials and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, C. Y., E-mail: cyap001@e.ntu.edu.sg [Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Block N3.1 - B2c - 01, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Energy Research Institute @ NTU, Interdisciplinary Graduate School, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Block S2 - B3a - 01, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Chua, C. K., E-mail: mckchua@ntu.edu.sg; Liu, Z. H., E-mail: azhliu@ntu.edu.sg; Zhang, D. Q., E-mail: zhangdq@ntu.edu.sg; Loh, L. E., E-mail: leloh1@e.ntu.edu.sg; Sing, S. L., E-mail: sing0011@e.ntu.edu.sg [Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Block N3.1 - B2c - 01, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Dong, Z. L., E-mail: zldong@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science & Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Block N4.1, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-12-15

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a particular rapid prototyping, 3D printing, or Additive Manufacturing (AM) technique designed to use high power-density laser to melt and fuse metallic powders. A component is built by selectively melting and fusing powders within and between layers. The SLM technique is also commonly known as direct selective laser sintering, LaserCusing, and direct metal laser sintering, and this technique has been proven to produce near net-shape parts up to 99.9% relative density. This enables the process to build near full density functional parts and has viable economic benefits. Recent developments of fibre optics and high-power laser have also enabled SLM to process different metallic materials, such as copper, aluminium, and tungsten. Similarly, this has also opened up research opportunities in SLM of ceramic and composite materials. The review presents the SLM process and some of the common physical phenomena associated with this AM technology. It then focuses on the following areas: (a) applications of SLM materials and (b) mechanical properties of SLM parts achieved in research publications. The review is not meant to put a ceiling on the capabilities of the SLM process but to enable readers to have an overview on the material properties achieved by the SLM process so far. Trends in research of SLM are also elaborated in the last section.

  20. Review of selective laser melting: Materials and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, C. Y.; Chua, C. K.; Dong, Z. L.; Liu, Z. H.; Zhang, D. Q.; Loh, L. E.; Sing, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a particular rapid prototyping, 3D printing, or Additive Manufacturing (AM) technique designed to use high power-density laser to melt and fuse metallic powders. A component is built by selectively melting and fusing powders within and between layers. The SLM technique is also commonly known as direct selective laser sintering, LaserCusing, and direct metal laser sintering, and this technique has been proven to produce near net-shape parts up to 99.9% relative density. This enables the process to build near full density functional parts and has viable economic benefits. Recent developments of fibre optics and high-power laser have also enabled SLM to process different metallic materials, such as copper, aluminium, and tungsten. Similarly, this has also opened up research opportunities in SLM of ceramic and composite materials. The review presents the SLM process and some of the common physical phenomena associated with this AM technology. It then focuses on the following areas: (a) applications of SLM materials and (b) mechanical properties of SLM parts achieved in research publications. The review is not meant to put a ceiling on the capabilities of the SLM process but to enable readers to have an overview on the material properties achieved by the SLM process so far. Trends in research of SLM are also elaborated in the last section.

  1. Review of selective laser melting: Materials and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, C. Y.; Chua, C. K.; Liu, Z. H.; Zhang, D. Q.; Loh, L. E.; Sing, S. L.; Dong, Z. L.

    2015-01-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a particular rapid prototyping, 3D printing, or Additive Manufacturing (AM) technique designed to use high power-density laser to melt and fuse metallic powders. A component is built by selectively melting and fusing powders within and between layers. The SLM technique is also commonly known as direct selective laser sintering, LaserCusing, and direct metal laser sintering, and this technique has been proven to produce near net-shape parts up to 99.9% relative density. This enables the process to build near full density functional parts and has viable economic benefits. Recent developments of fibre optics and high-power laser have also enabled SLM to process different metallic materials, such as copper, aluminium, and tungsten. Similarly, this has also opened up research opportunities in SLM of ceramic and composite materials. The review presents the SLM process and some of the common physical phenomena associated with this AM technology. It then focuses on the following areas: (a) applications of SLM materials and (b) mechanical properties of SLM parts achieved in research publications. The review is not meant to put a ceiling on the capabilities of the SLM process but to enable readers to have an overview on the material properties achieved by the SLM process so far. Trends in research of SLM are also elaborated in the last section

  2. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...... video pictures (400 Hz), a clear impact on the seam characteristics has been identified when a hump occurs.Finally, a clear correlation between the position of the focus point, the resultant process type and the corresponding signal intensity and signal variation has been found for sheets welded...

  3. Short-pulse laser interactions with disordered materials and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phinney, L.M.; Goldman, C.H.; Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    High-power, short-pulse lasers in the picosecond and subpicosecond range are utilized in an increasing number of technologies, including materials processing and diagnostics, micro-electronics and devices, and medicine. In these applications, the short-pulse radiation interacts with a wide range of media encompassing disordered materials and liquids. Examples of disordered materials include porous media, polymers, organic tissues, and amorphous forms of silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon dioxide. In order to accurately model, efficiently control, and optimize short-pulse, laser-material interactions, a thorough understanding of the energy transport mechanisms is necessary. Thus, fractals and percolation theory are used to analyze the anomalous diffusion regime in random media. In liquids, the thermal aspects of saturable and multiphoton absorption are examined. Finally, a novel application of short-pulse laser radiation to reduce surface adhesion forces in microstructures through short-pulse laser-induced water desorption is presented.

  4. Solid material evaporation into an ECR source by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkewicz, R.; Stacy, J.; Greene, J.; Pardo, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to explore new methods of producing ion beams from solid materials, we are attempting to develop a laser-ablation technique for evaporating materials directly into an ECR ion source plasma. A pulsed NdYaG laser with approximately 25 watts average power and peak power density on the order of 10 7 W/cm 2 has been used off-line to measure ablation rates of various materials as a function of peak laser power. The benefits anticipated from the successful demonstration of this technique include the ability to use very small quantities of materials efficiently, improved material efficiency of incorporation into the ECR plasma, and decoupling of the material evaporation process from the ECR source tuning operation. Here we report on the results of these tests and describe the design for incorporating such a system directly with the ATLAS PII-ECR ion source

  5. Advanced materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giamei, A.F.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced materials will require improved processing methods due to high melting points, low toughness or ductility values, high reactivity with air or ceramics and typically complex crystal structures with significant anisotropy in flow and/or fracture stress. Materials for structural applications at elevated temperature in critical systems will require processing with a high degree of control. This requires an improved understanding of the relationship between process variables and microstructure to enable control systems to achieve consistently high quality. One avenue to the required level of understanding is computer simulation. Past attempts to do process modeling have been hampered by incomplete data regarding thermophysical or mechanical material behavior. Some of the required data can be calculated. Due to the advances in software and hardware, accuracy and costs are in the realm of acquiring experimental data. Such calculations can, for example, be done at an atomic level to compute lattice energy, fault energies, density of states and charge densities. These can lead to fundamental information about the competition between slip and fracture, anisotropy of bond strength (and therefore cleavage strength), cohesive strength, adhesive strength, elastic modulus, thermal expansion and possibly other quantities which are difficult (and therefore expensive to measure). Some of these quantities can be fed into a process model. It is probable that temperature dependencies can be derived numerically as well. Examples are given of the beginnings of such an approach for Ni 3 Al and MoSi 2 . Solidification problems are examples of the state-of-the-art process modeling and adequately demonstrate the need for extensive input data. Such processes can be monitored in terms of interfacial position vs. time, cooling rate and thermal gradient

  6. Progress in ultrafast laser processing and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Koji

    2017-03-01

    The unique characteristics of ultrafast lasers have rapidly revolutionized materials processing after their first demonstration in 1987. The ultrashort pulse width of the laser suppresses heat diffusion to the surroundings of the processed region, which minimizes the formation of a heat-affected zone and thereby enables ultrahigh precision micro- and nanofabrication of various materials. In addition, the extremely high peak intensity can induce nonlinear multiphoton absorption, which extends the diversity of materials that can be processed to transparent materials such as glass. Nonlinear multiphoton absorption enables three-dimensional (3D) micro- and nanofabrication by irradiation with tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses inside transparent materials. Thus, ultrafast lasers are currently widely used for both fundamental research and practical applications. This review presents progress in ultrafast laser processing, including micromachining, surface micro- and nanostructuring, nanoablation, and 3D and volume processing. Advanced technologies that promise to enhance the performance of ultrafast laser processing, such as hybrid additive and subtractive processing, and shaped beam processing are discussed. Commercial and industrial applications of ultrafast laser processing are also introduced. Finally, future prospects of the technology are given with a summary.

  7. Precision laser processing for micro electronics and fiber optic manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew; Osborne, Mike; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Dinkel, Duane W.

    2008-02-01

    The application of laser based materials processing for precision micro scale manufacturing in the electronics and fiber optic industry is becoming increasingly widespread and accepted. This presentation will review latest laser technologies available and discuss the issues to be considered in choosing the most appropriate laser and processing parameters. High repetition rate, short duration pulsed lasers have improved rapidly in recent years in terms of both performance and reliability enabling flexible, cost effective processing of many material types including metal, silicon, plastic, ceramic and glass. Demonstrating the relevance of laser micromachining, application examples where laser processing is in use for production will be presented, including miniaturization of surface mount capacitors by applying a laser technique for demetalization of tracks in the capacitor manufacturing process and high quality laser machining of fiber optics including stripping, cleaving and lensing, resulting in optical quality finishes without the need for traditional polishing. Applications include telecoms, biomedical and sensing. OpTek Systems was formed in 2000 and provide fully integrated systems and sub contract services for laser processes. They are headquartered in the UK and are establishing a presence in North America through a laser processing facility in South Carolina and sales office in the North East.

  8. Applications Of Laser Processing For Automotive Manufacturing In Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masashi; Ueda, Katsuhiko; Takagi, Soya

    1986-11-01

    Recently in Japan, laser processing is increasingly being employed for production, so that laser cutting, laser welding and other laser material processing have begun to be used in various industries. As a result, the number of lasers sold has been increasing year by year in Japan. In the Japanese automotive industry, a number applications have been introduced in laboratories and production lines. In this paper, several current instances of such laser applications will be introduced. In the case of welding, studies have been conducted on applying laser welding to automatic transmission components, in place of electron beam welding. Another example of application, the combination of lasers and robots to form highly flexible manufacturing systems, has been adopted for trimming steel panel and plastic components.

  9. Induced Current Characteristics Due to Laser Induced Plasma and Its Application to Laser Processing Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madjid, Syahrun Nur; Idris, Nasrullah; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2011-01-01

    In laser processing, suitable conditions for laser and gas play important role in ensuring a high quality of processing. To determine suitable conditions, we employed the electromagnetic phenomena associated with laser plasma generation. An electrode circuit was utilised to detect induced current due to the fast electrons propelled from the material during laser material processing. The characteristics of induced current were examined by changing parameters such as supplied voltage, laser pulse energy, number of laser shots, and type of ambient gas. These characteristics were compared with the optical emission characteristics. It was shown that the induced current technique proposed in this study is much more sensitive than the optical method in monitoring laser processing, that is to determine the precise focusing condition, and to accurately determine the moment of completion of laser beam penetration. In this study it was also shown that the induced current technique induced by CW CO 2 laser can be applied in industrial material processing for monitoring the penetration completion in a stainless steel plate drilling process.

  10. Material chemistry and process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    The contents of this book are purpose of investigation, system of investigation, summary of investigation characteristic of this investigation, way to read the result table on prediction of investigation, object of investigation, important research and investigation fields, period of realizable prediction, cause of the obstacle for realization, propel way for studying and development, means of policy, comparison identical and similar task with the last time, illustration of future world in 2025 the result of investigation on material and the result of investigation on chemistry and process.

  11. Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic methods are well known and have been used to measure various intrinsic material properties, such as, elastic coefficients, density, crystal axis orientation, microstructural texture, and residual stress. Extrinsic properties, such as, dimensions, motion variables or temperature are also readily determined from acoustic methods. Laser acoustics, employing optical generation and detection of elastic waves, has a unique advantage over other acoustic methods-it is noncontacting, uses the sample surface itself for transduction, requires no couplant or invasive sample surface preparation and can be utilized in any hostile environment allowing optical access to the sample surface. In addition, optical generation and detection probe beams can be focused to the micron scale and/or shaped to alter the transduction process with a degree of control not possible using contact transduction methods. Laser methods are amenable to both continuous wave and pulse-echo measurements and have been used from Hz to 100's of GHz (time scales from sec to psec) and with amplitudes sufficient to fracture materials. This paper shall review recent applications of laser acoustic methods to determining material properties in hostile environments that preclude the use of contacting transduction techniques. Example environments include high temperature (>1000C) sintering and molten metal processing, thin film deposition by plasma techniques, materials moving at high velocity during the fabrication process and nuclear high radiation regions. Recent technological advances in solid-state lasers and telecommunications have greatly aided the development and implementation of laser acoustic methods, particularly at ultra high frequencies. Consequently, laser acoustic material property measurements exhibit high precision and reproducibility today. In addition, optical techniques provide methods of imaging acoustic motion that is both quantitative and rapid. Possible future directions for laser

  12. Laser Cutting of Materials of Various Thicknesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Grepl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thise paper deals with the application of laser technology and optimizing the parameters for cutting nickel alloy. The theoretical part of the paper describes various types of lasers, their principles and usage. The experimental part focuses on optimizing the section parameteres of Haynes 718 alloy using a CO2 gas laser. This alloy is employed in the production of components for the aircraft industry. The experiment was performed on the Wibro Delta laser system designed for sizable parts. The actual section is measured with respect to its quality and any accompanying side effects that occur during the process. In this case, laser output and cutting speed were the parameters with most influence on the final cut. The summary explains the results achieved in a metallographic laboratory.

  13. Laser-limiting materials for medical use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Kopylova, Tat'yana N.; Tereshchenko, Sergey A.; Reznichenko, Alexander V.; Selishchev, Sergey V.

    2004-03-01

    The important problem of modern laser medicine is the decrease of an exposure of biological tissues outside of an operational field and can be solved by optical radiation limiting. Organic dyes with reversibly darkening can be placed onto surfaces of irradiated tissues or can be introduced in solder for laser welding of vessels. The limiting properties of a set of nontoxic organic compounds were investigated. Nonlinear optical properties of dyes having reverse saturable absorption (pyran styryl derivatives, cyanine and porphyrine compounds) were studied under XeCl and YAG:Nd (II harmonics) lasers excitation. The effect of attenuation of a visible laser radiation is obtained for ethanol solutions of cyanines: radiation attenuation coefficient ( AC) = 25-35 at N/S = 100-250 MW/cm2. In water solutions of such compounds in UV spectrum range AC ~ 10. The spectral characteristics of compounds appeared expedient enough to operational use in laser limiters (broad passband in visible range of a spectrum). Under the data of Z-scanning (the scheme F/10) value AC ~ 70 was reached. The limiting of power laser radiation in visible (λ = 532 nm) and UV- (λ = 308 nm) spectral region and nanosecond pulse duration (7 -13 ns) across porphyrine solutions and their complexes with some metals (13 compounds) was investigated too. The comparative study of optical limiting dependence on intensity of laser radiation, solvent type and concentration of solutions was carried out for selecte wavelength. There was shown a possible use of pyran styryl derivatives DCM as limiters of visual laser radiation. To understand a mechanism of laser radiation limitation the light induced processes were experimentally and theoretically studied in organic molecules. The quantum-chemical investigation of one cyanine compound was carried out. There were noted the perspectives of laser radiation limiting by application of inverted schemes of traditional laser shutters. Usage of phenomena of light -induced

  14. Investigation of Thermal Stress Distribution in Laser Spot Welding Process

    OpenAIRE

    Osamah F. Abdulateef

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the laser spot welding process of low carbon steel sheet. The investigations were based on analytical and finite element analyses. The analytical analysis was focused on a consistent set of equations representing interaction of the laser beam with materials. The numerical analysis based on 3-D finite element analysis of heat flow during laser spot welding taken into account the temperature dependence of the physical properties and latent heat of transf...

  15. The effect of laser welding process parameters on the mechanical and microstructural properties of V-4Cr-4Ti structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, C.; Natesan, K.; Xu, Z.; Smith, D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on a systematic study which was conducted to examine the use of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to weld sheet materials of V-Cr-Ti alloys and to characterize the microstructural and mechanical properties of the resulting joints. Deep penetration and defect-free welds were achieved under an optimal combination of laser parameters including focal length of lens, pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, beam travel speed, and shielding gas arrangement. The key for defect-free welds was found to be the stabilization of the keyhole and providing an escape path for the gas trapped in the weld. An innovative method was developed to obtain deep penetration and oxygen contamination free welds. Oxygen and nitrogen uptake were reduced to levels only a few ppm higher than the base metal by design and development of an environmental control box. Effort directed at developing an acceptable postwelding heat treatment showed that five passes of a diffuse laser beam over the welded region softened the weld material, especially in the root region of the weld

  16. Laser Beam Melting of Multi-Material Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumer, Tobias; Karg, Michael; Schmidt, Michael

    First results regarding the realisation of multi-material components manufactured by Laser Beam Melting of polymers and metals are published. For realising composite structures from polymer powders by additive manufacturing, at first relevant material properties regarding compatibility have to be analysed. The paper shows the main requirements for compatibility between different materials and offers first results in form of a compatibility matrix of possible combinations for composite structures. For achieving gradient properties of additively manufactured metal parts by using composite materials the composition of alloying components in the powder and adapted process strategies are varied. As an alternative to atomizing pre-alloyed materials, mixtures of different powders are investigated.

  17. AIR EMISSIONS FROM LASER DRILLING OF PRINTED WIRING BOARD MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of a study to characterize gases generated during laser drilling of printed wiring board (PWB) material and identifies the pollutants and generation rates found during the drilling process. Typically found in the missions stream were trace amounts of carbo...

  18. Modeling short-pulse laser excitation of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Sandkamm, Ditte Både; Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical description of ultrashort-pulse laser excitation of dielectric materials based on strong-field excitation in the Keldysh picture combined with a multiple-rateequation model for the electronic excitation including collisional processes is presented. The model includes light attenuation...

  19. Raw material versus processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, E.A.T.

    1989-01-01

    Some brazilian aspects related with the obtainment of raw materials for advanced ceramic products are described. The necessity of import raw materials by the advanced ceramic industries is mentioned, generating dangerous depedence for the country. The brazilian mineral reserves for using in raw materials of advanced ceramic are also cited. (C.G.C.) [pt

  20. Laser irradiation of carbon–tungsten materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, A; Lungu, C P; Ursescu, D; Porosnicu, C; Grigoriu, C; Avotina, L; Kizane, G; Marin, A; Osiceanu, P; Grigorescu, C E A; Demitri, N

    2014-01-01

    Carbon–tungsten layers deposited on graphite by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) were directly irradiated with a femtosecond terawatt laser. The morphological and structural changes produced in the irradiated area by different numbers of pulses were systematically explored, both along the spots and in their depths. Although micro-Raman and Synchrotron-x-ray diffraction investigations have shown no carbide formation, they have shown the unexpected presence of embedded nano-diamonds in the areas irradiated with high fluencies. Scanning electron microscopy images show a cumulative effect of the laser pulses on the morphology through the ablation process. The micro-Raman spatial mapping signalled an increased percentage of sp 3 carbon bonding in the areas irradiated with laser fluencies around the ablation threshold. In-depth x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations suggested a weak cumulative effect on the percentage increase of the sp 2 -sp 3 transitions with the number of laser pulses just for nanometric layer thicknesses. (paper)

  1. Acoustic damage detection in laser-cut CFRP composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Michiteru; Harada, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Takayuki; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) composite material, which is expected to reduce the weight of automotive, airplane and etc., was cut by laser irradiation with a pulsed-CO2 laser (TRUMPF TFL5000; P=800W, 20kHz, τ=8μs, λ=10.6μm, V=1m/min) and single-mode fiber lasers (IPG YLR-300-SM; P=300W, λ=1.07μm, V=1m/min)(IPG YLR- 2000-SM; P=2kW, λ=1.07μm, V=7m/min). To detect thermal damage at the laser cutting of CFRP materials consisting of thermoset resin matrix and PAN or PITCH-based carbon fiber, the cut quality was observed by X-ray CT. The effect of laser cutting process on the mechanical strength for CFRP tested at the tensile test. Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring, high-speed camera and scanning electron microscopy were used for the failure process analysis. AE signals and fractographic features characteristic of each laser-cut CFRP were identified.

  2. Femtosecond laser interaction with protection materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, S.; Krueger, J.; Hertwig, A.; Fiedler, A.; Kautek, W

    2003-03-15

    Textile, aluminium and polyethylene used as components in laser protection curtains were investigated with respect to their ablation behaviour. Employing 33-fs pulses (800 nm wavelength, 1 kHz repetition rate), ex situ geometrical measurements of the ablation cavities and in situ acoustic investigations with a microphone were performed to determine the ablation thresholds in the single- and multi-pulse cases. The acoustical method proved advantageous for complex surface morphologies and/or single laser pulse interactions. Incubation phenomena can be observed for all the materials studied. Technically relevant multi-pulse ablation thresholds are presented and are compared with the single-pulse (1-on-1) irradiation.

  3. Two-dimensional materials for ultrafast lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fengqiu

    2017-01-01

    As the fundamental optical properties and novel photophysics of graphene and related two-dimensional (2D) crystals are being extensively investigated and revealed, a range of potential applications in optical and optoelectronic devices have been proposed and demonstrated. Of the many possibilities, the use of 2D materials as broadband, cost-effective and versatile ultrafast optical switches (or saturable absorbers) for short-pulsed lasers constitutes a rapidly developing field with not only a good number of publications, but also a promising prospect for commercial exploitation. This review primarily focuses on the recent development of pulsed lasers based on several representative 2D materials. The comparative advantages of these materials are discussed, and challenges to practical exploitation, which represent good future directions of research, are laid out. (paper)

  4. Fs-laser processing of polydimethylsiloxane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanasov, Petar A., E-mail: paatanas@ie.bas.bg; Nedyalkov, Nikolay N. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsarigradsko Shose, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Valova, Eugenia I.; Georgieva, Zhenya S.; Armyanov, Stefan A.; Kolev, Konstantin N. [Rostislaw Kaischew Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 11, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Amoruso, Salvatore; Wang, Xuan; Bruzzese, Ricardo [CNR-SPIN, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Sawczak, Miroslaw; Śliwiński, Gerard [Photophysics Department, The Szewalski Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, 14 Fiszera St, 80-231 Gdańsk (Poland)

    2014-07-14

    We present an experimental analysis on surface structuring of polydimethylsiloxane films with UV (263 nm) femtosecond laser pulses, in air. Laser processed areas are analyzed by optical microscopy, SEM, and μ-Raman spectroscopy. The laser-treated sample shows the formation of a randomly nanostructured surface morphology. μ-Raman spectra, carried out at both 514 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths, prior and after laser treatment allow evidencing the changes in the sample structure. The influence of the laser fluence on the surface morphology is studied. Finally, successful electro-less metallization of the laser-processed sample is achieved, even after several months from the laser-treatment contrary to previous observation with nanosecond pulses. Our findings address the effectiveness of fs-laser treatment and chemical metallization of polydimethylsiloxane films with perspective technological interest in micro-fabrication devices for MEMS and nano-electromechanical systems.

  5. Development of pulse laser processing for mounting fiber Bragg grating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Aikihko; Shimada, Yukihiro; Yonemoto, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Ishibashi, Hisayoshi [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umebidai Kidugawa Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Applied Laser Technology Institute, Tsuruga Head Office, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 65-20 Kizaki Tsuruga Fukui 914-8585 (Japan); Technical Research and Development Institute, Kumagai Gumi Co., Ltd., 2-1 Tsukudo, Shinjuku Tokyo 162-8557 (Japan)

    2012-07-11

    Pulse laser processing has been developed for the application of industrial plants in monitoring and maintenance. Surface cleaning by nano-second laser ablation was demonstrated for decontamination of oxide layers of Cr contained steel. Direct writing by femtosecond processing induced a Bragg grating in optical fiber to make it a seismic sensor for structural health monitoring. Adhesive cement was used to fix the seismic sensor on the surface of reactor coolant pipe material. Pulse laser processing and its related technologies were presented to overcome the severe accidents of nuclear power plants.

  6. Fuzzy model for Laser Assisted Bending Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannini Oliviero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a fuzzy model was developed to predict the residual bending in a conventional metal bending process assisted by a high power diode laser. The study was focused on AA6082T6 aluminium thin sheets. In most dynamic sheet metal forming operations, the highly nonlinear deformation processes cause large amounts of elastic strain energy stored in the formed material. The novel hybrid forming process was thus aimed at inducing the local heating of the mechanically bent workpiece in order to decrease or eliminate the related springback phenomena. In particular, the influence on the extent of springback phenomena of laser process parameters such as source power, scan speed and starting elastic deformation of mechanically bent sheets, was experimentally assessed. Consistent trends in experimental response according to operational parameters were found. Accordingly, 3D process maps of the extent of the springback phenomena according to operational parameters were constructed. The effect of the inherent uncertainties on the predicted residual bending caused by the approximation in the model parameters was evaluated. In particular, a fuzzy-logic based approach was used to describe the model uncertainties and the transformation method was applied to propagate their effect on the residual bending.

  7. Sensor integration for robotic laser welding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Ostendorf, A; Hoult, A.; Lu, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The use of robotic laser welding is increasing among industrial applications, because of its ability to weld objects in three dimensions. Robotic laser welding involves three sub-processes: seam detection and tracking, welding process control, and weld seam inspection. Usually, for each sub-process,

  8. Laser Trimming of CuAlMo Thin-Film Resistors: Effect of Laser Processing Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkett, Martin; Penlington, Roger

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports the effect of varying laser trimming process parameters on the electrical performance of a novel CuAlMo thin-film resistor material. The films were prepared on Al2O3 substrates by direct-current (DC) magnetron sputtering, before being laser trimmed to target resistance value. The effect of varying key laser parameters of power, Q-rate, and bite size on the resistor stability and tolerance accuracy were systematically investigated. By reducing laser power and bite size and balancing this with Q-rate setting, significant improvements in resistor stability and resistor tolerance accuracies of less than ±0.5% were achieved.

  9. CO2 laser and plasma microjet process for improving laser optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusasco, Raymond M.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Butler, James A.; Grundler, Walter; Governo, George K.

    2003-09-16

    A optic is produced for operation at the fundamental Nd:YAG laser wavelength of 1.06 micrometers through the tripled Nd:YAG laser wavelength of 355 nanometers by the method of reducing or eliminating the growth of laser damage sites in the optics by processing the optics to stop damage in the optics from growing to a predetermined critical size. A system is provided of mitigating the growth of laser-induced damage in optics by virtue of very localized removal of glass and absorbing material.

  10. Photon technology. Laser process technology; Photon technology. Laser process gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For developing laser process technology by interaction between substance and photon, the present state, system, R and D issues and proposal of such technology were summarized. Development of the photon technology aims at the modification of bonding conditions of substances by quantum energy of photon, and the new process technology for generating ultra- high temperature and pressure fields by concentrating photon on a minute region. Photon technology contributes to not only the conventional mechanical and thermal forming and removal machining but also function added machining (photon machining) in quantum level and new machining technology ranging from macro- to micro-machining, creating a new industrial field. This technology extends various fields from the basis of physics and chemistry to new bonding technology. Development of a compact high-quality high-power high-efficiency photon source, and advanced photon transmission technology are necessary. The basic explication of an unsolved physicochemical phenomenon related to photon and substance, and development of related application technologies are essential. 328 refs., 147 figs., 13 tabs.

  11. Laser formation of Bragg gratings in polymer nanocomposite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarov, M M; Khaydukov, K V; Sokolov, V I; Khaydukov, E V [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Shatura, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-31

    The method investigated in this work is based on the laser-induced, spatially inhomogeneous polymerisation of nanocomposite materials and allows control over the motion and structuring of nanoparticles. The mechanisms of nanoparticle concentration redistribution in the process of radical photopolymerisation are studied. It is shown that under the condition of spatially inhomogeneous illumination of a nanocomposite material, nanoparticles are diffused from the illuminated areas into the dark fields. Diffraction gratings with a thickness of 8 μm and a refractive index modulation of 1 × 10{sup -2} are written in an OCM-2 monomer impregnated by silicon nanoparticles. The gratings may be used in the development of narrowband filters, in holographic information recording and as dispersion elements in integrated optical devices. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  12. Ultrafast laser spectroscopy in complex solid state materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tianqi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This thesis summarizes my work on applying the ultrafast laser spectroscopy to the complex solid state materials. It shows that the ultrafast laser pulse can coherently control the material properties in the femtosecond time scale. And the ultrafast laser spectroscopy can be employed as a dynamical method for revealing the fundamental physical problems in the complex material systems.

  13. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physical Processes in Laser-Materials Interaction, which was the 9th course of the Europhysics School of Quantum Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    1983-01-01

    It is a pleasure to write a few words as an introduction to the proceedings of the 1980 NATO ASI on "Physical Processes in Laser­ Naterial Interaction." This ASI is the ninth course of a series devoted to lasers and their applications, held under the responsibility of the Quantum Electronics Division of the European Physical Society, and for this reason known as the "Europhysics School of Quantum Electronics." Since 1971 the School has been operating with the joint direc­ tion of myself as representative of the academic research, and Dr. D. Roess (formerly with Siemens AEG, Munich, and now with Sick, Optik und Electronik, GmbH, Munich) for the industrial applications. Indeed the aim of the School is to alternate fundamental and applied frontier topics in the area of quantum electronics and modern optics, in order to introduce young research people from universities and industrial R&D laboratories to the new aspects of research opened by the laser.

  14. Optical characteristics of novel bulk and nanoengineered laser host materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Sova, Stacey; Kelly, Lisa; Bevan, Talon; Arnold, Bradley; Cooper, Christopher; Choa, Fow-Sen; Singh, N. B.

    2018-02-01

    The hexagonal apatite single crystals have been investigated for their applications as laser host materials. Czochralksi and flux growth methods have been utilized to obtain single crystals. For low temperature processing (useful properties as laser hosts and bone materials. Calcium lanthanum silicate (Nd-doped) and lanthanum aluminate material systems were studied in detail. Nanoengineered calcium and lanthanum based silicates were synthesized by a solution method and their optical and morphological characteristics were compared with Czochralski grown bulk hydroxyapatite single crystals. Materials were evaluated by absorbance, fluorescence and Raman characteristics. Neodymium, iron and chromium doped crystals grown by a solution method showed weak but similar optical properties to that of Czochralski grown single crystals.

  15. Femtosecond laser patterning, synthesis, defect formation, and structural modification of atomic layered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Kim, Eunpa; Hwang, David J.

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes recent research on laser-based processing of twodimensional (2D) atomic layered materials, including graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). Ultrafast lasers offer unique processing routes that take advantage of distinct interaction mechanisms with 2D materials to enable extremely localized energy deposition. Experiments have shown that ablative direct patterning of graphene by ultrafast lasers can achieve resolutions of tens of nanometers, as well as single-step pattern transfer. Ultrafast lasers also induce non-thermal excitation mechanisms that are useful for the thinning of TMDCs to tune the 2D material bandgap. Laser-assisted site-specific doping was recently demonstrated where ultrafast laser radiation under ambient air environment could be used for the direct writing of high-quality graphene patterns on insulating substrates. This article concludes with an outlook towards developing further advanced laser processing with scalability, in situ monitoring strategies and potential applications.

  16. Parameters in selective laser melting for processing metallic powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzynowski, Tomasz; Chlebus, Edward; Kuźnicka, Bogumiła; Reiner, Jacek

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents results of studies on Selective Laser Melting. SLM is an additive manufacturing technology which may be used to process almost all metallic materials in the form of powder. Types of energy emission sources, mainly fiber lasers and/or Nd:YAG laser with similar characteristics and the wavelength of 1,06 - 1,08 microns, are provided primarily for processing metallic powder materials with high absorption of laser radiation. The paper presents results of selected variable parameters (laser power, scanning time, scanning strategy) and fixed parameters such as the protective atmosphere (argon, nitrogen, helium), temperature, type and shape of the powder material. The thematic scope is very broad, so the work was focused on optimizing the process of selective laser micrometallurgy for producing fully dense parts. The density is closely linked with other two conditions: discontinuity of the microstructure (microcracks) and stability (repeatability) of the process. Materials used for the research were stainless steel 316L (AISI), tool steel H13 (AISI), and titanium alloy Ti6Al7Nb (ISO 5832-11). Studies were performed with a scanning electron microscope, a light microscopes, a confocal microscope and a μCT scanner.

  17. Processing with kW fibre lasers: advantages and limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratky, A.; Schuöcker, D.; Liedl, G.

    2008-10-01

    Up-to-date fibre lasers produce multi-kw radiation with an excellent beam quality. Compared to CO2-lasers, fibre lasers have relatively low operational costs and offer a very high flexibility in production due to the beam delivery with process fibres. As a consequence, fibre lasers have attracted more and more attention. On the other hand, their use in industrial applications especially in the automotive industry is still limited to a certain extent and fibre lasers haven't replaced all other laser sources till now as it could be expected. In laser cutting, the small kerf width produced by fibre lasers should be advantageous since the heated volume is smaller compared to CO2-lasers. In fact, cutting velocities are usually much higher which is also caused by the higher absorption coefficient of most metals at the wavelength emitted by fibre lasers. Nevertheless, cutting with fibre lasers of some metals - e.g. stainless steels - is restricted to a small thicknesses of approx. 5mm. The reason for this is that the surface roughness of the edges increases dramatically with the thickness of the work piece. Applications of fibre lasers include e.g. remote welding or even remote cutting of a large variety of materials with usually excellent results. Due to the excellent beam quality the aspect ratio of the weld seam in relation to the penetration depth is quite good. In the case of thin sheet metal welding such a small beam waist is beneficial - but with thicker sheet metals it is very often disadvantageous since the preparation of samples is more complicated, costs increase and requirements on clamping devices rise. In this paper, advantages and disadvantages of fibre lasers are discussed briefly. Applications of a 1.5 kW fibre laser are presented and compared to classical laser systems.

  18. In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

  19. Fs-laser processing of medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanasov, P.A., E-mail: paatanas@ie.bas.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsaridradsko shose Blvd., Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Stankova, N.E.; Nedyalkov, N.N. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsaridradsko shose Blvd., Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Fukata, N. [International Centre for Materials for NanoArchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Hirsch, D.; Rauschenbach, B. [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification (IOM), Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Amoruso, S.; Wang, X. [Dipartimento di Fisica Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II and CNR-SPIN, Complesso Universitario di Monte S.Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Kolev, K.N.; Valova, E.I.; Georgieva, J.S.; Armyanov, St.A. [Rostislaw Kaischew Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 11, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Fs-laser (263, 527 and 1055 nm) processing of PDMS-elastomer is studied. • High quality trenches are produced on the PDMS surface. • The trenches are analyzed by Laser Microscope and by μ-Raman spectrometry. • Selective Ni metallization of the trenches is accomplished via electro-less plating. • The metalized trenches are studied by SEM. - Abstract: Medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer is a biomaterial widely used in medicine and high-tech devices, e.g. MEMS and NEMS. In this work, we report an experimental investigation on femtosecond laser processing of PDMS-elastomer with near infrared (NIR), visible (VIS) and ultraviolet (UV) pulses. High definition trenches are produced by varying processing parameters as laser wavelength, pulse duration, fluence, scanning speed and overlap of the subsequent pulses. The sample surface morphology and chemical composition are investigated by Laser Microscopy, SEM and Raman spectroscopy, addressing the effects of the various processing parameters through comparison with the native materials characteristics. For all the laser pulse wavelengths used, the produced tracks are successfully metalized with Ni via electro-less plating method. We observe a negligible influence of the time interval elapsed between laser treatment and metallization process. Our experimental findings suggest promising perspectives of femtosecond laser pulses in micro- and nano-fabrication of hi-tech PDMS devices.

  20. Aerospace Materials Process Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Cooling Transformation diagram ( CCT diagram ) When a IT diagram is used in the heat process modelling, we suppose that a sudden cooling (instantaneous...processes. CE, chooses instead to study thermo-mechanical properties referring to a CCT diagram . This is thinked to be more reliable to give a true...k , mm-_____sml l ml A I 1 III 12.4 This determination is however based on the following approximations: i) A CCT diagram is valid only for the

  1. Laser-matter structuration of optical and biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallo, L., E-mail: hallo@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Mezel, C., E-mail: candice.mezel@cea.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); CEA Le Ripault, 37260 Monts (France); Guillemot, F., E-mail: fabien.guillemot@inserm.fr [UMR 577 INSERM, Universite Bordeaux 2 (France); Chimier, B., E-mail: chimier@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Bourgeade, A., E-mail: antoine.bourgeade@cea.fr [CEA-CESTA, Le Barp (France); Regan, C., E-mail: regan@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Duchateau, G., E-mail: duchateau@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Souquet, A., E-mail: agnes.souquet@inserm.fr [UMR 577 INSERM, Universite Bordeaux 2 (France); Hebert, D., E-mail: david.hebert@cea.fr [CEA-CESTA, Le Barp (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this study we model nanomaterial structuring. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser energy deposition is discussed first. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full and approximate models are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic material response is addressed via hydrodynamics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sild effects are accounted for - Abstract: Interaction of ultrafast laser, i.e. from the femtosecond (fs) to the nanosecond (ns) regime, with initially transparent matter may produce very high energy density hot spots in the bulk as well as at the material surface, depending on focusing conditions. In the fs regime, absorption is due to ionisation of the dielectric, which enables absorption process to begin, and then hydrodynamic to take place. In the ns regime both absorption and hydrodynamic are coupled to each other, which complexifies considerably the comprehension but matter structuration looks similar. A numerical tool including solution of 3D Maxwell equations and a rate equation for free electrons is first compared to some available simple models of laser energy absorption. Then, subsequent material deformation, i.e. structuration, is determined by solving hydrodynamic equations, including or not solid behaviour. We show that nature of the final structures strongly depends on the amount of deposited energy and on the shape of the absorption zone. Then we address some problems related to laser-matter structuration of optical and biological materials in the fs, ps and ns regimes.

  2. Optical properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) during nanosecond laser processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankova, N.E., E-mail: nestankova@yahoo.com [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsaridradsko shose Boul., Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Atanasov, P.A.; Nikov, Ru.G.; Nikov, R.G.; Nedyalkov, N.N.; Stoyanchov, T.R. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsaridradsko shose Boul., Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Fukata, N. [International Center for Materials for NanoArchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Kolev, K.N.; Valova, E.I.; Georgieva, J.S.; Armyanov, St.A. [Rostislaw Kaischew Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 11, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Ns-laser (266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm) processing of medical grade PDMS is performed. • Investigation of the optical transmittance as a function of the laser beam parameters. • Analyses of laser treated area by optical & laser microscope and μ-Raman spectrometry. • Application as (MEAs) neural interface for monitor and stimulation of neural activity. - Abstract: This article presents experimental investigations of effects of the process parameters on the medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer processed by laser source with irradiation at UV (266 and 355 nm), VIS (532 nm) and NIR (1064 nm). Systematic experiments are done to characterize how the laser beam parameters (wavelength, fluence, and number of pulses) affect the optical properties and the chemical composition in the laser treated areas. Remarkable changes of the optical properties and the chemical composition are observed. Despite the low optical absorption of the native PDMS for UV, VIS and NIR wavelengths, successful laser treatment is accomplished due to the incubation process occurring below the polymer surface. With increasing of the fluence and the number of the pulses chemical transformations are revealed in the entire laser treated area and hence decreasing of the optical transmittance is observed. The incubation gets saturation after a certain number of pulses and the laser ablation of the material begins efficiently. At the UV and VIS wavelengths the number of the initial pulses, at which the optical transmittance begins to reduce, decreases from 16 up to 8 with increasing of the laser fluence up to 1.0, 2.5 and 10 J cm{sup −2} for 266, 355 and 532 nm, respectively. In the case of 1064 nm the optical transmittance begins to reduce at 11th pulse incident at a fluence of 13 J cm{sup −2} and the number of the pulses decreases to 8 when the fluence reaches value of 16 J cm{sup −2}. The threshold laser fluence needed to induce incubation process after certain

  3. Materials processing using supercritical fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlović Aleksandar M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most interesting areas of supercritical fluids applications is the processing of novel materials. These new materials are designed to meet specific requirements and to make possible new applications in Pharmaceuticals design, heterogeneous catalysis, micro- and nano-particles with unique structures, special insulating materials, super capacitors and other special technical materials. Two distinct possibilities to apply supercritical fluids in processing of materials: synthesis of materials in supercritical fluid environment and/or further processing of already obtained materials with the help of supercritical fluids. By adjusting synthesis parameters the properties of supercritical fluids can be significantly altered which further results in the materials with different structures. Unique materials can be also obtained by conducting synthesis in quite specific environments like reversed micelles. This paper is mainly devoted to processing of previously synthesized materials which are further processed using supercritical fluids. Several new methods have been developed to produce micro- and nano-particles with the use of supercritical fluids. The following methods: rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS supercritical anti-solvent (SAS, materials synthesis under supercritical conditions and encapsulation and coating using supercritical fluids were recently developed.

  4. Effect of material, process parameters, and simulated body fluids on mechanical properties of 13-93 bioactive glass porous constructs made by selective laser sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolan, Krishna C R; Leu, Ming C; Hilmas, Gregory E; Velez, Mariano

    2012-09-01

    The effect of particle size distribution, binder content, processing parameters, and sintering schedule on the microstructure and mechanical properties of porous constructs was investigated. The porous constructs were produced by indirect selective laser sintering (SLS) of 13-93 bioactive glass using stearic acid as a polymeric binder. The binder content and d(50) particle size in the feedstock powders were simultaneously reduced from 22 to 12 wt% and from 20 to 11 μm, respectively, to identify the minimum binder content required for the SLS fabrication. An average particle size of ∼16 μm with a binder content of 15 wt% significantly reduced post-processing time and improved mechanical properties. Increasing the laser power and scan speed at the energy density of 1 cal/cm² maintained the feature sharpness of the parts during the fabrication of green parts and could almost double the mechanical properties of the sintered parts. Changes in the heating rates, ranging from 0.1 to 2 °C/min, during the post-processing of the fabricated "green" scaffolds showed that the heating rate significantly affects the densification and mechanical properties of the sintered scaffolds. The compressive strength of the scaffolds manufactured with the optimized parameters varied from 41 MPa, for a scaffold with a porosity of ∼50%, to 157 MPa, for a dense part. The bioactive scaffolds soaked in simulated body fluids for durations up to 6 weeks were used to evaluate the change in mechanical properties in vitro. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Secondary emissions during fiber laser cutting of nuclear material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, A., E-mail: beatriz.mendes.lopez@gmail.com [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Assunção, E. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); European Federation for Welding, Joining and Cutting, Porto Salvo 2740-120 (Portugal); Pires, I. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Quintino, L. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); European Federation for Welding, Joining and Cutting, Porto Salvo 2740-120 (Portugal)

    2017-04-15

    The laser process has been studied for dismantling work for more than 10 years, however there is almost no data available concerning secondary emissions generated during the process. These emissions are inevitable during the laser cutting process and can have detrimental effects in human health and in the equipment. In terms of safety, for nuclear decommissioning, is crucial to point out ways of controlling the emissions of the process. This paper gives indications about the parameters to be used in order to reduce these secondary emissions and about the influence of these parameters on the particles size distribution. In general, for producing minimal dross and fume emissions the beam focus should be placed on the surface of the material. The higher percentage of secondary emissions which present higher diameter, increases approximately linearly with the stand-off distance and with the use of low air pressure.

  6. Process observation in fiber laser-based selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombansen, Ulrich; Gatej, Alexander; Pereira, Milton

    2015-01-01

    The process observation in selective laser melting (SLM) focuses on observing the interaction point where the powder is processed. To provide process relevant information, signals have to be acquired that are resolved in both time and space. Especially in high-power SLM, where more than 1 kW of laser power is used, processing speeds of several meters per second are required for a high-quality processing results. Therefore, an implementation of a suitable process observation system has to acquire a large amount of spatially resolved data at low sampling speeds or it has to restrict the acquisition to a predefined area at a high sampling speed. In any case, it is vitally important to synchronously record the laser beam position and the acquired signal. This is a prerequisite that allows the recorded data become information. Today, most SLM systems employ f-theta lenses to focus the processing laser beam onto the powder bed. This report describes the drawbacks that result for process observation and suggests a variable retro-focus system which solves these issues. The beam quality of fiber lasers delivers the processing laser beam to the powder bed at relevant focus diameters, which is a key prerequisite for this solution to be viable. The optical train we present here couples the processing laser beam and the process observation coaxially, ensuring consistent alignment of interaction zone and observed area. With respect to signal processing, we have developed a solution that synchronously acquires signals from a pyrometer and the position of the laser beam by sampling the data with a field programmable gate array. The relevance of the acquired signals has been validated by the scanning of a sample filament. Experiments with grooved samples show a correlation between different powder thicknesses and the acquired signals at relevant processing parameters. This basic work takes a first step toward self-optimization of the manufacturing process in SLM. It enables the

  7. Adjustment of Part Properties for an Elastomeric Laser Sintering Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, A.; Ünlü, T.

    2018-03-01

    Laser sintering of polymers is gaining more and more importance within the field of small series productions. Polyamide 12 is predominantly used, although a variety of other materials are also available for the laser sintering process. For example, elastomeric, rubberlike materials offer very different part property profiles. Those make the production of flexible parts like, e.g., sealings, flexible tubes or shoe soles possible because they offer high part ductility and low hardness. At the chair for manufacturing technology, a new elastomeric laser sintering material has been developed and then commercialized by a spin-off from university. The aim of the presented study was the analysis of the new material's properties. Proof was found that Shore hardness can be modified by varying the parameter settings. Therefore, the correlation between process parameters, energy input, Shore hardness and other part properties like mechanical properties were analyzed. Based on these results, suitable parameter settings were established which lead to the possibility of producing parts with different Shore hardnesses.

  8. Effect analysis of material properties of picosecond laser ablation for ABS/PVC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y. H.; Ho, C. Y.; Chiou, Y. J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper analytically investigates the picosecond laser ablation of ABS/PVC. Laser-pulsed ablation is a wellestablished tool for polymer. However the ablation mechanism of laser processing for polymer has not been thoroughly understood yet. This study utilized a thermal transport model to analyze the relationship between the ablation rate and laser fluences. This model considered the energy balance at the decomposition interface and Arrhenius law as the ablation mechanisms. The calculated variation of the ablation rate with the logarithm of the laser fluence agrees with the measured data. It is also validated in this work that the variation of the ablation rate with the logarithm of the laser fluence obeys Beer's law for low laser fluences. The effects of material properties and processing parameters on the ablation depth per pulse are also discussed for picosecond laser processing of ABS/PVC.

  9. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma during laser processing of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lober, R; Mazumder, J

    2007-01-01

    The role of the plasma in laser-metal interaction is of considerable interest due to its influence in the energy transfer mechanism in industrial laser materials processing. A 10 kW CO 2 laser was used to study its interaction with aluminium under an argon environment. The objective was to determine the absorption and refraction of the laser beam through the plasma during the processing of aluminium. Laser processing of aluminium is becoming an important topic for many industries, including the automobile industry. The spectroscopic relative line to continuum method was used to determine the electron temperature distribution within the plasma by investigating the 4158 A Ar I line emission and the continuum adjacent to it. The plasmas are induced in 1.0 atm pure Ar environment over a translating Al target, using f/7 and 10 kW CO 2 laser. Spectroscopic data indicated that the plasma composition and behaviour were Ar-dominated. Experimental results indicated the plasma core temperature to be 14 000-15 300 K over the incident range of laser powers investigated from 5 to 7 kW. It was found that 7.5-29% of the incident laser power was absorbed by the plasma. Cross-section analysis of the melt pools from the Al samples revealed the absence of any key-hole formation and confirmed that the energy transfer mechanism in the targets was conduction dominated for the reported range of experimental data

  10. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma during laser processing of aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lober, R.; Mazumder, J.

    2007-10-01

    The role of the plasma in laser-metal interaction is of considerable interest due to its influence in the energy transfer mechanism in industrial laser materials processing. A 10 kW CO2 laser was used to study its interaction with aluminium under an argon environment. The objective was to determine the absorption and refraction of the laser beam through the plasma during the processing of aluminium. Laser processing of aluminium is becoming an important topic for many industries, including the automobile industry. The spectroscopic relative line to continuum method was used to determine the electron temperature distribution within the plasma by investigating the 4158 Å Ar I line emission and the continuum adjacent to it. The plasmas are induced in 1.0 atm pure Ar environment over a translating Al target, using f/7 and 10 kW CO2 laser. Spectroscopic data indicated that the plasma composition and behaviour were Ar-dominated. Experimental results indicated the plasma core temperature to be 14 000-15 300 K over the incident range of laser powers investigated from 5 to 7 kW. It was found that 7.5-29% of the incident laser power was absorbed by the plasma. Cross-section analysis of the melt pools from the Al samples revealed the absence of any key-hole formation and confirmed that the energy transfer mechanism in the targets was conduction dominated for the reported range of experimental data.

  11. Numerical analysis of the effects of non-conventional laser beam geometries during laser melting of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safdar, Shakeel; Li, Lin; Sheikh, M A

    2007-01-01

    Laser melting is an important industrial activity encountered in a variety of laser manufacturing processes, e.g. selective laser melting, welding, brazing, soldering, glazing, surface alloying, cladding etc. The majority of these processes are carried out by using either circular or rectangular beams. At present, the melt pool characteristics such as melt pool geometry, thermal gradients and cooling rate are controlled by the variation of laser power, spot size or scanning speed. However, the variations in these parameters are often limited by other processing conditions. Although different laser beam modes and intensity distributions have been studied to improve the process, no other laser beam geometries have been investigated. The effect of laser beam geometry on the laser melting process has received very little attention. This paper presents an investigation of the effects of different beam geometries including circular, rectangular and diamond shapes on laser melting of metallic materials. The finite volume method has been used to simulate the transient effects of a moving beam for laser melting of mild steel (EN-43A) taking into account Marangoni and buoyancy convection. The temperature distribution, melt pool geometry, fluid flow velocities and heating/cooling rates have been calculated. Some of the results have been compared with the experimental data

  12. Process Studies on Laser Welding of Copper with Brilliant Green and Infrared Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Engler, Sebastian; Ramsayer, Reiner; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2011-01-01

    Copper materials are classified as difficult to weld with state-of-the-art lasers. High thermal conductivity in combination with low absorption at room temperature require high intensities for reaching a deep penetration welding process. The low absorption also causes high sensitivity to variations in surface conditions. Green laser radiation shows a considerable higher absorption at room temperature. This reduces the threshold intensity for deep penetration welding significantly. The influen...

  13. Advanced Materials and Processing 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Su, Chun Wei; Xia, Hui; Xiao, Pengfei

    2011-06-01

    wires / Shuling Zhang, Dawei Xing and Jianfei Sun -- Effect of Yb addition on the microstructure and tensile properties of Mg-5Al alloy / Su Mi Jo ... [et al.] -- Finite element analysis of the warm deep-drawing process of magnesium matrix composite reinforced with CNTs / Li Weixue and Zhang Hujun -- Effect of ultrasonic shot peening on the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of SUS304 / Deokgi Ahn ... [et al.] -- Microstructure of Fe-Cr surface infiltrated composite layer on gray iron substrate / Gui-Rong Yang ... [et al.] -- Effect of carbon contents and Ti addition on the microstructure of ultra-low carbon steel / Yinsheng He ... [et al.].Microstructure and mechanical property of laser direct manufacturing metal thin wall cylinder / X. D. Zhang ... [et al.] -- Evolution of morphology and composition of the carbides in Cr-Mo-V steel after service exposure / Jiling Dong ... [et al.] -- Thermal annealing treatment to achieve switchable and reversible wettability on ZnO nanowires surface / Changsong Liu ... [et al.] -- Physical and electrochemical properties of nanostructured nickel sulfide as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries / Seong-Ju Sim ... [et al.] -- Effect of heat treatment on fatigue behavior of biomedical Ni-Ti alloy wires under ultrasonic conditions / Zhou Huimin ... [et al.] -- The electrochemical behavior of Mg-Ce-Zn system / Kyung Chul Park ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of highly-oleophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces on microtextured Al substrates / Changsong Liu ... [et al.] -- Effect of cooling rate on microstructure and properties of Fe3Al intermetallics / Li Ya-Min, Liu Hong-Jun and Hao Yuan -- Calculation of laser transformation hardening with a circle beam / Binggong Yan and Jichang Liu -- The application of the unified homogeneous periodical boundary conditions to the prediction of effective elastic stiffness in a widespread field / Dong Yu, Hong Yang and Dong-Mei Luo -- Cyclic visco-plastic behavior of API X80 line

  14. Extraterrestrial materials processing and construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Applications of available terrestrial skills to the gathering of lunar materials and the processing of raw lunar materials into industrial feed stock were investigated. The literature on lunar soils and rocks was reviewed and the chemical processes by which major oxides and chemical elements can be extracted were identified. The gathering of lunar soil by means of excavation equipment was studied in terms of terrestrial experience with strip mining operations on earth. The application of electrostatic benefication techniques was examined for use on the moon to minimize the quantity of materials requiring surface transport and to optimize the stream of raw materials to be transported off the moon for subsequent industrial use.

  15. Laser Processing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics - Release of Carbon Fiber Segments During Short-pulsed Laser Processing of CFRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Juergen; Brodesser, Alexander; Hustedt, Michael; Bluemel, Sven; Jaeschke, Peter; Kaierle, Stefan

    Cutting and ablation using short-pulsed laser radiation are promising technologies to produce or repair CFRP components with outstanding mechanical properties e.g. for automotive and aircraft industry. Using sophisticated laser processing strategies and avoiding excessive heating of the workpiece, a high processing quality can be achieved. However, the interaction of laser radiation and composite material causes a notable release of hazardous substances from the process zone, amongst others carbon fiber segments or fibrous particles. In this work, amounts and geometries of the released fiber segments are analyzed and discussed in terms of their hazardous potential. Moreover, it is investigated to what extent gaseous organic process emissions are adsorbed at the fiber segments, similar to an adsorption of volatile organic compounds at activated carbon, which is typically used as filter material.

  16. High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, Robert; McConnell, Elizabeth

    2016-06-29

    Machining methods across many industries generally require multiple operations to machine and process advanced materials, features with micron precision, and complex shapes. The resulting multiple machining platforms can significantly affect manufacturing cycle time and the precision of the final parts, with a resultant increase in cost and energy consumption. Ultrafast lasers represent a transformative and disruptive technology that removes material with micron precision and in a single step manufacturing process. Such precision results from athermal ablation without modification or damage to the remaining material which is the key differentiator between ultrafast laser technologies and traditional laser technologies or mechanical processes. Athermal ablation without modification or damage to the material eliminates post-processing or multiple manufacturing steps. Combined with the appropriate technology to control the motion of the work piece, ultrafast lasers are excellent candidates to provide breakthrough machining capability for difficult-to-machine materials. At the project onset in early 2012, the project team recognized that substantial effort was necessary to improve the application of ultrafast laser and precise motion control technologies (for micromachining difficult-to-machine materials) to further the aggregate throughput and yield improvements over conventional machining methods. The project described in this report advanced these leading-edge technologies thru the development and verification of two platforms: a hybrid enhanced laser chassis and a multi-application testbed.

  17. Computational simulation of heat transfer in laser melted material flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, V.; Gnanamuthu, D.

    1986-01-01

    A computational procedure has been developed to study the heat transfer process in laser-melted material flow associated with surface heat treatment of metallic alloys to improve wear-and-tear and corrosion resistance. The time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved, accounting for both convective and conductive heat transfer processes. The convection, induced by surface tension and high surface temperature gradients, sets up a counterrotating vortex flow within the molten pool. This recirculating material flow is responsible for determining the molten pool shape and the associated cooling rates which affect the solidifying material composition. The numerical method involves an implicit triple-approximate factorization scheme for the energy equation, and an explicit treatment for the momentum and the continuity equations. An experimental setup, using a continuous wave CO 2 laser beam as a heat source, has been carried out to generate data for validation of the computational model. Results in terms of the depth, width, and shape of the molten pool and the heat-affected zone for various power settings and shapes of the laser, and for various travel speeds of the workpiece, compare very well with experimental data. The presence of the surface tension-induced vortex flow is demonstrated

  18. Laser diagnostics of materials and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, A. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Several examples are given of the ability of laser-based diagnostic techniques to make noninvasive measurements in hostile environments. Using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering both majority and minority species concentrations, as well as temperature, have been measured in the hot, high-pressure, particle-laden stream of a coal gasifier. In addition, numerous toxic and corrosive elements in the gasifier stream have been identified, but not yet quantified. In addition to providing the capability for making analytical determinations, laser techniques have been extensively employed to measure the rates of elementary chemical reactions. Recently, the temperature regime over which such meaurements are possible has been expanded. Although much of the laser diagnostic activity to date has involved investigations of the gas phase, significant information concerning heterogeneous phenomena can still be inferred. For instance, gas-solid reactions can manifest themselves as changes in vapor phase composition. Furthermore, in the future we expect expanded studies involving reactions of refractory metals (both atoms and clusters) and additional investigations of processes occurring at interfaces and on surfaces

  19. UV laser engraving of high temperature polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, D.; Laude, L.D.; Kolev, K.; Hanus, F.

    1999-01-01

    Among emerging technologies, those associated with laser sources as surface processing tools are quite promising. In the present work, a UV pulsed (excimer) laser source is experimented for engraving (or ablating) polymeric materials based on three high temperature polymers: polyethylene terephtalate (PET), polyethersulfone (PES) and polyphenylene sulfide (PPS). The ablation phenomenon is demonstrated on all these polymers and evaluated by stylus profilometry upon varying the laser fluence at impact. For each polymer, results give evidence for three characteristic quantities: an ablation threshold E sub 0, a maximum ablation depth per pulse z sub 0 and an initial rate of ablation α, just above threshold. A simple ablation model is presented which describes correctly the observed behaviours and associates closely the above quantities to the polymer formulation, thus providing for the first time a rational basis to polymer ablation. The model may be extended to parent plastic materials whenever containing the same polymers. It may also be used to predict the behaviours of other polymers when subjected to excimer laser irradiation

  20. Laser Materials and Laser Spectroscopy - A Satellite Meeting of IQEC '88

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijiang; Zhang, Zhiming

    1989-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Laser Materials * Laser Site Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Ions in Glass * Spectroscopy of Chromium Doped Tunable Laser Materials * Spectroscopic Properties of Nd3+ Ions in LaMgAl11O19 Crystal * Spectral Study and 2.938 μm Laser Emission of Er3+ in the Y3Al5O12 Crystal * Raman-infrared Spectra and Radiationless Relaxation of Laser Crystal NdAl3(BO3)4 * A Study on HB and FLN in BaFCl0.5Br0.5:Sm2+ at 77K * Pair-pumped Upconversion Solid State Lasers * CW Upconversion Laser Action in Neodymium and Erbium doped Solids * Ultra-high Sensitive Upconversion Fluorescence of YbF3 Doped with Trace Tm3+ and Er3+ * The Growth and Properties of NYAB and EYAB Multifunctional Crystal * Study on Fluorescence and Laser Light of Er3+ in Glass * Growth and Properties of Single Crystal Fibers for Laser Materials * A Study on the Quality of Sapphire, Ruby and Ti3+ Doped Sapphire Grown by Temperature Gradient Technique (TGT) and Czochralski Technique (CZ) * The Measurement of Output Property of Ti3+ Al2O3 Laser Crystal * An Xα Study of the Laser Crystal MgF2 : V2+ * Q-switched NAB Laser * Miniature YAG Lasers * Study of High Efficiency {LiF}:{F}^-_2 Color Center Crystals * Study on the Formation Conditions and Optical Properties of (F2+)H Color Center in NaCl:OH- Crystals * Novel Spectroscopic Properties of {LiF}:{F}^+_3 - {F}_2 Mixed Color Centers Laser Crystals * Terraced Substrate Visible GaAlAs Semiconductor Lasers with a Large Optical Cavity * The Temperature Dependence of Gain Spectra, Threshold Current and Auger Recombination in InGaAsP-InP Double Heterojunction Laser diode * Time-resolved Photoluminescence and Energy Transfer of Bound Excitons in GaP:N Crystals * Optical Limiting with Semiconductors * A Critical Review of High-efficiency Crystals for Tunable Lasers * Parametric Scattering in β - BaB2O4 Crystal Induced by Picosecond Pulses * Generation of Picosecond Pulses at 193 nm by Frequency Mixing in β - BaB2O4

  1. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    This is an editorial article (preface) for the publication of symposium papers in the Journal of Nuclear materials: These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15–19, 2015.

  2. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15-19, 2015.

  3. Laser microstructuring and annealing processes for lithium manganese oxide cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proell, J.; Kohler, R.; Torge, M.; Ulrich, S.; Ziebert, C.; Bruns, M.; Seifert, H.J.; Pfleging, W.

    2011-01-01

    It is expected that cathodes for lithium-ion batteries (LIB) composed out of nano-composite materials lead to an increase in power density of the LIB due to large electrochemically active surface areas but cathodes made of lithium manganese oxides (Li-Mn-O) suffer from structural instabilities due to their sensitivity to the average manganese oxidation state. Therefore, thin films in the Li-Mn-O system were synthesized by non-reactive radiofrequency magnetron sputtering of a spinel lithium manganese oxide target. For the enhancement of the power density and cycle stability, large area direct laser patterning using UV-laser radiation with a wavelength of 248 nm was performed. Subsequent laser annealing processes were investigated in a second step in order to set up a spinel-like phase using 940 nm laser radiation at a temperature of 680 deg. C. The interaction processes between UV-laser radiation and the material was investigated using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The changes in phase, structure and grain shape of the thin films due to the annealing process were recorded using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The structured cathodes were cycled using standard electrolyte and a metallic lithium anode. Different surface structures were investigated and a significant increase in cycling stability was found. Surface chemistry of an as-deposited as well as an electrochemically cycled thin film was investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  4. Heavy oils processing materials requirements crude processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloley, Andrew W. [CH2M Hill, Englewood, CO (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Over time, recommended best practices for crude unit materials selection have evolved to accommodate new operating requirements, feed qualities, and product qualities. The shift to heavier oil processing is one of the major changes in crude feed quality occurring over the last 20 years. The three major types of crude unit corrosion include sulfidation attack, naphthenic acid attack, and corrosion resulting from hydrolyzable chlorides. Heavy oils processing makes all three areas worse. Heavy oils have higher sulfur content; higher naphthenic acid content; and are more difficult to desalt, leading to higher chloride corrosion rates. Materials selection involves two major criteria, meeting required safety standards, and optimizing economics of the overall plant. Proper materials selection is only one component of a plant integrity approach. Materials selection cannot eliminate all corrosion. Proper materials selection requires appropriate support from other elements of an integrity protection program. The elements of integrity preservation include: materials selection (type and corrosion allowance); management limits on operating conditions allowed; feed quality control; chemical additives for corrosion reduction; and preventive maintenance and inspection (PMI). The following discussion must be taken in the context of the application of required supporting work in all the other areas. Within that context, specific materials recommendations are made to minimize corrosion due to the most common causes in the crude unit. (author)

  5. Optimizing a Laser Process for Making Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Holmes, William

    2010-01-01

    A systematic experimental study has been performed to determine the effects of each of the operating conditions in a double-pulse laser ablation process that is used to produce single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The comprehensive data compiled in this study have been analyzed to recommend conditions for optimizing the process and scaling up the process for mass production. The double-pulse laser ablation process for making SWCNTs was developed by Rice University researchers. Of all currently known nanotube-synthesizing processes (arc and chemical vapor deposition), this process yields the greatest proportion of SWCNTs in the product material. The aforementioned process conditions are important for optimizing the production of SWCNTs and scaling up production. Reports of previous research (mostly at Rice University) toward optimization of process conditions mention effects of oven temperature and briefly mention effects of flow conditions, but no systematic, comprehensive study of the effects of process conditions was done prior to the study described here. This was a parametric study, in which several production runs were carried out, changing one operating condition for each run. The study involved variation of a total of nine parameters: the sequence of the laser pulses, pulse-separation time, laser pulse energy density, buffer gas (helium or nitrogen instead of argon), oven temperature, pressure, flow speed, inner diameter of the flow tube, and flow-tube material.

  6. Materials in Participatory Design Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Nicolai Brodersen

    This dissertation presents three years of academic inquiry into the question of what role materials play in interaction design and participatory design processes. The dissertation aims at developing conceptual tools, based on Deweys pragmatism, for understanding how materials aid design reflection....... It has been developed using a research-through-design approach in which the author has conducted practical design work in order to investigate and experiment with using materials to scaffold design inquiry. The results of the PhD work is submitted as seven separate papers, submitted to esteemed journals...... and conferences within the field of interaction design and HCI. The work is motivated both by the growing interest in materials in interaction design and HCI and the interest in design processes and collaboration within those fields. At the core of the dissertation lies an interest in the many different materials...

  7. Multiphoton ionization processes in strong laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstic, P.

    1982-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization of hydrogen in ultrastrong laser fields is studied. The previous calculations of this process yield differing result for the transition rate. We show the relations between them and difficulties with each of them. One difficulty is that the finite spatial and time extent of the laser field has been omitted. It is also found that a laser field, which is sufficiently intense to be labeled ultrastrong, makes the electron move relativistically so that it becomes necessary to use Volkov states to describe the electron in the laser field. The transition rate is obtained, using a CO laser as an example, and it is found that the transition rate rises as the laser intensity rises. This is a consequence of the use of relativistic kinematics and is not true nonrelativistically. We also discuss the multiple peaks observed in the energy spectrum of electrons resulting from multiphoton ionization of atoms by lasers. When the laser intensity is large enough for the ponderomotive force to result in appreciable broading of the peaks we show the shape of the broadened peaks contains useful information. We show that the multiphoton ionization probability as a function of laser intensity can be obtained but that the free-free cross sections, which are in principle also obtainable, are probably not obtainable in practice. Finally, we describe the theory of the absorption of more than minimum numbers of photons needed to ionize an atom by an intense laser. The basic approximation used is that the atom is adiabatically deformed by the laser and an impulsive interaction then results in multiphoton absorption. In our first calculation we allow only one resonant excited state to be included in the adiabatic deformation. In our second we also allow the lowest energy continuum to be included. The two results are then compared

  8. Nitinol laser cutting: microstructure and functional properties of femtosecond and continuous wave laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, C. A.; Tuissi, A.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal processing can affect the properties of smart materials, and the correct selection of the best manufacturing technology is fundamental for producing high tech smart devices, containing embedded functional properties. In this work cutting of thin superelastic Nitinol plates using a femtosecond (fs) and continuous wave (CW) laser was studied. Diamond shaped elements were cut to characterize the kerf qualitative features; microstructural analysis of the cross sections allowed identification of thermal damage characteristics introduced into the material during the laser processes. A thermally undamaged microstructure was observed for fs laser cutting, while CW was seen to be characterized by a large heat-affected zone. Functional properties were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and tensile testing of laser cut microelements and of the reference material. It was seen that the martensitic transformation behavior of Nitinol is not affected by fs regime, while cw cutting provokes an effect equivalent to a high temperature thermal treatment in the material surrounding the cutting kerf, degradating the material properties. Finally, tensile testing indicated that superelastic performances were guaranteed by fs regime, while strong reduction of the recoverable strain was detected in the CW processed sample.

  9. Experimental analysis of Nd-YAG laser cutting of sheet materials - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amit; Yadava, Vinod

    2018-01-01

    Cutting of sheet material is considered as an important process due to its relevance among products of everyday life such as aircrafts, ships, cars, furniture etc. Among various sheet cutting processes (ASCPs), laser beam cutting is one of the most capable ASCP to create complex geometries with stringent design requirements in difficult-to-cut sheet materials. Based on the recent research work in the area of sheet cutting, it is found that the Nd-YAG laser is used for cutting of sheet material in general and reflective sheet material in particular. This paper reviews the experimental analysis of Nd-YAG laser cutting process, carried out to study the influence of laser cutting parameters on the process performance index. The significance of experimental modeling and different optimization approaches employed by various researchers has also been discussed in this study.

  10. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  11. Desorption and ionization processes in laser mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyl, G.J.Q. van der.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis results are reported from a study on the desorption- and ionization process initiated by infra-red laser irradiation (LDMS) or ion bombardment (SIMS) of thin organic sample layers. The study is especially focused on the formation of quasimolecular ions under these conditions. Results of these investigations can be used for a better optimization of the LDMS and SIMS techniques in organic mass spectrometry. First, an overview is given of laser desorption mass spectrometry. Next, the coupling of the laser energy into the organic sample layer is investigated. It is concluded that the laser energy is primarily absorbed by the substrate material and not by the organic overlayer. The formation of quasi-molecular ions, either in the gas phase or in the substrate surface is investigated. The final section reports kinetic energy distributions for ions sputtered from organic solids and liquids. (Auth.)

  12. Introduction to gas lasers with emphasis on selective excitation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Willett, Colin S

    1974-01-01

    Introduction to Gas Lasers: Population Inversion Mechanisms focuses on important processes in gas discharge lasers and basic atomic collision processes that operate in a gas laser. Organized into six chapters, this book first discusses the historical development and basic principles of gas lasers. Subsequent chapters describe the selective excitation processes in gas discharges and the specific neutral, ionized and molecular laser systems. This book will be a valuable reference on the behavior of gas-discharge lasers to anyone already in the field.

  13. Excimer laser surface modification: Process and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jervis, T.R.; Nastasi, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hirvonen, J.P. [Technical Research Institute, Espoo (Finland). Metallurgy Lab.

    1992-12-01

    Surface modification can improve materials for structural, tribological, and corrosion applications. Excimer laser light has been shown to provide a rapid means of modifying surfaces through heat treating, surface zone refining, and mixing. Laser pulses at modest power levels can easily melt the surfaces of many materials. Mixing within the molten layer or with the gas ambient may occur, if thermodynamically allowed, followed by rapid solidification. The high temperatures allow the system to overcome kinetic barriers found in some ion mixing experiments. Alternatively, surface zone refinement may result from repeated melting-solidification cycles. Ultraviolet laser light couples energy efficiently to the surface of metallic and ceramic materials. The nature of the modification that follows depends on the properties of the surface and substrate materials. Alloying from both gas and predeposited layer sources has been observed in metals, semiconductors, and ceramics as has surface enrichment of Cr by zone refinement of stainless steel. Rapid solidification after melting often results in the formation of nonequilibrium phases, including amorphous materials. Improved surface properties, including tribology and corrosion resistance, are observed in these materials.

  14. Analysis of hazardous substances released during CFRP laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hustedt, Michael; Walter, Juergen; Bluemel, Sven; Jaeschke, Peter; Kaierle, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Due to their outstanding mechanical properties, in particular their high specific strength parallel to the carbon fibers, carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) have a high potential regarding resource-efficient lightweight construction. Consequently, these composite materials are increasingly finding application in important industrial branches such as aircraft, automotive and wind energy industry. However, the processing of these materials is highly demanding. On the one hand, mechanical processing methods such as milling or drilling are sometimes rather slow, and they are connected with notable tool wear. On the other hand, thermal processing methods are critical as the two components matrix and reinforcement have widely differing thermophysical properties, possibly leading to damages of the composite structure in terms of pores or delamination. An emerging innovative method for processing of CFRP materials is the laser technology. As principally thermal method, laser processing is connected with the release of potentially hazardous, gaseous and particulate substances. Detailed knowledge of these process emissions is the basis to ensure the protection of man and the environment, according to the existing legal regulations. This knowledge will help to realize adequate protective measures and thus strengthen the development of CFRP laser processing. In this work, selected measurement methods and results of the analysis of the exhaust air and the air at the workplace during different laser processes with CFRP materials are presented. The investigations have been performed in the course of different cooperative projects, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) in the course of the funding initiative "Photonic Processes and Tools for Resource-Efficient Lightweight Structures".

  15. Separating uranium by laser: the atomic process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destro, Marcelo G.; Damiao, Alvaro J.; Neri, Jose W.; Schwab, Carlos; Rodrigues, Nicolau A.S.; Riva, Rudimar [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA-IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados

    1996-07-01

    Among the countries around the world that utilizes nuclear energy, several ones are investing significantly in the development of laser techniques applied to isotope separation. In Brazil these studies are concentrated in one research institute, the IEAv (Institute for Advanced Studies), and aim at demonstrating the viability of this process using, as much as possible, resources available in the country. In this paper we briefly describe the laser methods for isotope separation, giving an overview of the present research and development status in this area. We also show some results obtained our laboratories. We focused this report on the atomic route for laser isotope separation, mainly in the areas of laser development and spectroscopy. (author)

  16. Separating uranium by laser: the atomic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destro, Marcelo G.; Damiao, Alvaro J.; Neri, Jose W.; Schwab, Carlos; Rodrigues, Nicolau A.S.; Riva, Rudimar

    1996-01-01

    Among the countries around the world that utilizes nuclear energy, several ones are investing significantly in the development of laser techniques applied to isotope separation. In Brazil these studies are concentrated in one research institute, the IEAv (Institute for Advanced Studies), and aim at demonstrating the viability of this process using, as much as possible, resources available in the country. In this paper we briefly describe the laser methods for isotope separation, giving an overview of the present research and development status in this area. We also show some results obtained our laboratories. We focused this report on the atomic route for laser isotope separation, mainly in the areas of laser development and spectroscopy. (author)

  17. Laser Processed Condensing Heat Exchanger Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott; Wright, Sarah; Wallace, Sarah; Hamilton, Tanner; Dennis, Alexander; Zuhlke, Craig; Roth, Nick; Sanders, John

    2017-01-01

    The reliance on non-permanent coatings in Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX) designs is a significant technical issue to be solved before long-duration spaceflight can occur. Therefore, high reliability CHXs have been identified by the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) as critical technologies needed to move beyond low earth orbit. The Laser Processed Condensing Heat Exchanger project aims to solve these problems through the use of femtosecond laser processed surfaces, which have unique wetting properties and potentially exhibit anti-microbial growth properties. These surfaces were investigated to identify if they would be suitable candidates for a replacement CHX surface. Among the areas researched in this project include microbial growth testing, siloxane flow testing in which laser processed surfaces were exposed to siloxanes in an air stream, and manufacturability.

  18. Cutting of nonmetallic materials using Nd:YAG laser beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bashir Ahmed Tahir; Rashid Ahmed; M. G. B. Ashiq; Afaq Ahmed; M. A. Saeed

    2012-01-01

    This study deals with Nd:YAG laser cutting nonmetallic materials,which is one of the most important and popular industrial applications of laser.The main theme is to evaluate the effects of Nd:YAG laser beam power besides work piece scanning speed.For approximate cutting depth,a theoretical study is conducted in terms of material property and cutting speed.Results show a nonlinear relation between the cutting depth and input energy.There is no significant effect of speed on cutting depth with the speed being larger than 30 mm/s.An extra energy is utilized in the deep cutting.It is inferred that as the laser power increases,cutting depth increases.The experimental outcomes are in good agreement with theoretical results.This analysis will provide a guideline for laser-based industry to select a suitable laser for cutting,scribing,trimming,engraving,and marking nonmetallic materials.

  19. Cutting of nonmetallic materials using Nd:YAG laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, Bashir Ahmed; Ashiq, M.G. B.; Saeed, M.A.; Ahmed, Rashid; Ahmed, Afaq

    2012-01-01

    This study deals with Nd:YAG laser cutting nonmetallic materials, which is one of the most important and popular industrial applications of laser. The main theme is to evaluate the effects of Nd:YAG laser beam power besides work piece scanning speed. For approximate cutting depth, a theoretical study is conducted in terms of material property and cutting speed. Results show a nonlinear relation between the cutting depth and input energy. There is no significant effect of speed on cutting depth with the speed being larger than 30 mm/s. An extra energy is utilized in the deep cutting. It is inferred that as the laser power increases, cutting depth increases. The experimental outcomes are in good agreement with theoretical results. This analysis will provide a guideline for laser-based industry to select a suitable laser for cutting, scribing, trimming, engraving, and marking nonmetallic materials. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  20. Perovskite Materials for Light-Emitting Diodes and Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Sjoerd A; Boix, Pablo P; Yantara, Natalia; Li, Mingjie; Sum, Tze Chien; Mathews, Nripan; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G

    2016-08-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have cemented their position as an exceptional class of optoelectronic materials thanks to record photovoltaic efficiencies of 22.1%, as well as promising demonstrations of light-emitting diodes, lasers, and light-emitting transistors. Perovskite materials with photoluminescence quantum yields close to 100% and perovskite light-emitting diodes with external quantum efficiencies of 8% and current efficiencies of 43 cd A(-1) have been achieved. Although perovskite light-emitting devices are yet to become industrially relevant, in merely two years these devices have achieved the brightness and efficiencies that organic light-emitting diodes accomplished in two decades. Further advances will rely decisively on the multitude of compositional, structural variants that enable the formation of lower-dimensionality layered and three-dimensional perovskites, nanostructures, charge-transport materials, and device processing with architectural innovations. Here, the rapid advancements in perovskite light-emitting devices and lasers are reviewed. The key challenges in materials development, device fabrication, operational stability are addressed, and an outlook is presented that will address market viability of perovskite light-emitting devices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Process of recovering bituminous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1920-08-22

    A modification of the process covered by German Patent 389,393 for recovering bituminous materials from oil shale by extraction is disclosed consisting, in place of or besides wood spirit oil, of acetone oil, suitably of boiling point 80 to 130/sup 0/C, being used as the extraction medium.

  2. Transport of biologically active material in laser cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenz, M; Mathezloic, F; Stoffel, M H; Zweig, A D; Romano, V; Weber, H P

    1988-01-01

    The transport of biologically active material during laser cutting with CO2 and Er lasers is demonstrated. This transport mechanism removes particles from the surface of gelatin, agar, and liver samples into the depth of the laser-formed craters. The transport phenomenon is explained by a contraction and condensation of enclosed hot water vapor. We show by cultivating transported bacteria in agar that biological particles can survive the shock of the transport. Determination of the numbers of active cells evidences a more pronounced activity of the cultivated bacteria after impact with an Er laser than with a CO2 laser.

  3. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latanision, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    An annual report of the research activities of the Materials Processing Center of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is given. Research on dielectrophoresis in the microgravity environment, phase separation kinetics in immiscible liquids, transport properties of droplet clusters in gravity-free fields, probes and monitors for the study of solidification of molten semiconductors, fluid mechanics and mass transfer in melt crystal growth, and heat flow control and segregation in directional solidification are discussed.

  4. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marynowicz Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples’ surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  5. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marynowicz, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples' surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  6. Waste package materials selection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, A.K.; Fish, R.L.; McCright, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) is evaluating a site at Yucca Mountain in Southern Nevada to determine its suitability as a mined geologic disposal system (MGDS) for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). The B ampersand W Fuel Company (BWFC), as a part of the Management and Operating (M ampersand O) team in support of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP), is responsible for designing and developing the waste package for this potential repository. As part of this effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is responsible for testing materials and developing models for the materials to be used in the waste package. This paper is aimed at presenting the selection process for materials needed in fabricating the different components of the waste package

  7. Optimisation of the Laser Cutting Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Birgitte; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1996-01-01

    The problem in optimising the laser cutting process is outlined. Basic optimisation criteria and principles for adapting an optimisation method, the simplex method, are presented. The results of implementing a response function in the optimisation are discussed with respect to the quality as well...

  8. Modelling Hospital Materials Management Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Iannone

    2013-06-01

    integrated and detailed analysis and description model for hospital materials management data and tasks, which is able to tackle information from patient requirements to usage, from replenishment requests to supplying and handling activities. The model takes account of medical risk reduction, traceability and streamlined processes perspectives. Second, the paper translates this information into a business process model and mathematical formalization.The study provides a useful guide to the various relevant technology‐related, management and business issues, laying the foundations of an efficient reengineering of the supply chain to reduce healthcare costs and improve the quality of care.

  9. Precipitation processes in implanted materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borders, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Ion implantation is a nonequilibrium process. It is possible to implant materials with impurities to concentration levels which exceed the solid solubilities. The return of the system to thermodynamic equilibrium is often accomplished by precipitation of the implanted species or a compound involving atoms of both the host and the implanted species. This may involve long time scales when taking place at room temperature or it may take place during the implantation

  10. Process Studies on Laser Welding of Copper with Brilliant Green and Infrared Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Sebastian; Ramsayer, Reiner; Poprawe, Reinhart

    Copper materials are classified as difficult to weld with state-of-the-art lasers. High thermal conductivity in combination with low absorption at room temperature require high intensities for reaching a deep penetration welding process. The low absorption also causes high sensitivity to variations in surface conditions. Green laser radiation shows a considerable higher absorption at room temperature. This reduces the threshold intensity for deep penetration welding significantly. The influence of the green wavelength on energy coupling during heat conduction welding and deep penetration welding as well as the influence on the weld shape has been investigated.

  11. Fiber Laser Welding Properties of Copper Materials for Secondary Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Tae YOU

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Secondary battery is composed of four main elements: cathodes, anodes, membranes and electrolyte. The cathodes and the anodes are connected to the poles that allow input and output of the current generated while the battery is being charged or discharged. In this study laser welding is conducted for 40 sheets of pure copper material with thickness of 38μm, which are used in currently manufactured lithium-ion batteries, using pulse-wave fiber laser to compare welded joint to standard bolt joint and to determine optimum process parameters. The parameters, which has significant impact on penetration of the pulse waveform laser to the overlapped thin sheets, is the peak power while the size of the weld zone is mainly affected by the pulse irradiation time and the focal position. It is confirmed that overlapping rate is affected by the pulse repetition rate rather than by the pulse irradiation time. At the cross-section of the weld zone, even with the increased peak power, the width of the front bead weld size does not change significantly, but the cross-sectional area becomes larger. This is because the energy density per pulse increases as the peak power increases.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.4.16316

  12. Fundamentals of ultrafast laser-material interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shugaev, M.V.; Wu, Ch.; Armbruster, O.; Naghilou, A.; Brouwer, N.; Ivanov, D.S.; Derrien, Thibault; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Kautek, W.; Rethfeld, B.; Zhigilei, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 12 (2016), s. 960-968 ISSN 0883-7694 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1602; GA ČR GA16-12960S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 657424 - QuantumLaP Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : femtosecond laser * Coulomb explosion * microscopic mechanisms * electron-diffraction * molecular- dynamics * metal targets * ablation * surface * dielectrics Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 5.199, year: 2016

  13. Functionally graded materials produced with high power lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hosson, J. T. M.; Ocelik, V.; Chandra, T; Torralba, JM; Sakai, T

    2003-01-01

    In this keynote paper two examples will be present of functionally graded materials produced with high power Nd:YAG lasers. In particular the conditions for a successful Laser Melt Injection (LMI) of SiC and WC particles into the melt pool of A18Si and Ti6Al4V alloys are presented. The formation of

  14. Excimer laser processing of Ti-6Al-4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folkes, J.A.; Shibata, K.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of the excimer laser on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V is reported. Particular concentration is given to surface modification for potential materials processing applications. Results showed that: (1) there is an optimum energy for smoothing titanium; (2) at this energy density increasing the number of pulses has some, but not a significant, effect on the smoothing process; and (3) relatively smooth surfaces could be achieved at higher energy densities if the sample was processed in a helium atmosphere. Other typical surface modifications and features are also reported, including the effect of different gases on the process

  15. Experimental and Modeling Study of Liquid-Assisted—Laser Beam Micromachining of Smart Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur Parmar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Smart ceramic materials are next generation materials with the inherent intelligence to adapt to change in the external environment. These materials are destined to play an essential role in several critical engineering applications. Machining these materials using traditional machining processes is a challenge. The laser beam micromachining (LBMM process has the potential to machine such smart materials. However, laser machining when performed in air induces high thermal stress on the surface, often leading to crack formation, recast and re-deposition of ablated material, and large heat-affected zones (HAZ. Performing laser beam machining in the presence of a liquid medium could potentially resolve these issues. This research investigates the possibility of using a Liquid Assisted—Laser Beam Micromachining (LA-LBMM process for micromachining smart ceramic materials. Experimental studies are performed to compare the machining quality of laser beam machining process in air and in a liquid medium. The study reveals that the presence of liquid medium helps in controlling the heat-affected zone and the taper angle of the cavity drilled, thereby enhancing the machining quality. Analytical modeling is developed for the prediction of HAZ and cavity diameter both in air and underwater conditions, and the model is capable of predicting the experimental results to within 10% error.

  16. Mimicking lizard-like surface structures upon ultrashort laser pulse irradiation of inorganic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermens, U.; Kirner, S. V.; Emonts, C.; Comanns, P.; Skoulas, E.; Mimidis, A.; Mescheder, H.; Winands, K.; Krüger, J.; Stratakis, E.; Bonse, J.

    2017-10-01

    Inorganic materials, such as steel, were functionalized by ultrashort laser pulse irradiation (fs- to ps-range) to modify the surface's wetting behavior. The laser processing was performed by scanning the laser beam across the surface of initially polished flat sample material. A systematic experimental study of the laser processing parameters (peak fluence, scan velocity, line overlap) allowed the identification of different regimes associated with characteristic surface morphologies (laser-induced periodic surface structures, grooves, spikes, etc.). Analyses of the surface using optical as well as scanning electron microscopy revealed morphologies providing the optimum similarity to the natural skin of lizards. For mimicking skin structures of moisture-harvesting lizards towards an optimization of the surface wetting behavior, additionally a two-step laser processing strategy was established for realizing hierarchical microstructures. In this approach, micrometer-scaled capillaries (step 1) were superimposed by a laser-generated regular array of small dimples (step 2). Optical focus variation imaging measurements finally disclosed the three dimensional topography of the laser processed surfaces derived from lizard skin structures. The functionality of these surfaces was analyzed in view of wetting properties.

  17. Dimensional and material characteristics of direct deposited tool steel by CO II laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.

    2006-01-01

    Laser aided direct metalimaterial deposition (DMD) process builds metallic parts layer-by-layer directly from the CAD representation. In general, the process uses powdered metaUmaterials fed into a melt pool, creating fully dense parts. Success of this technology in the die and tool industry depends on the parts quality to be achieved. To obtain designed geometric dimensions and material properties, delicate control of the parameters such as laser power, spot diameter, traverse speed and powder mass flow rate is critical. In this paper, the dimensional and material characteristics of directed deposited H13 tool steel by CO II laser are investigated for the DMD process with a feedback height control system. The relationships between DMD process variables and the product characteristics are analyzed using statistical techniques. The performance of the DMD process is examined with the material characteristics of hardness, porosity, microstructure, and composition.

  18. Femtosecond laser induced phenomena in transparent solid materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, D.Z.; Sharafudeen, K.N.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    solved, especially concerning the interaction of strong, ultra-short electromagnetic pulses with matter, and also because potential advanced technologies will emerge due to the impressive capability of the intense femtosecond laser to create new material structures and hence functionalities. When......The interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with transparent materials is a topic that has caused great interest of scientists over the past two decades. It will continue to be a fascinating field in the coming years. This is because many challenging fundamental problems have not been......–matter interaction, and fabricate various integrated micro-devices. In recent years we have witnessed exciting development in understanding and applying femtosecond laser induced phenomena in transparent materials. The interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with transparent materials relies on non...

  19. Study of underwater laser propulsion using different target materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Hao; Chen, Jun; Han, Bing; Shen, Zhong-Hua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2014-07-14

    In order to investigate the influence of target materials, including aluminum (Al), titanium (Ti) and copper (Cu), on underwater laser propulsion, the analytical formula of the target momentum IT is deduced from the enhanced coupling theory of laser propulsion in atmosphere with transparent overlay metal target. The high-speed photography method and numerical simulation are employed to verify the IT model. It is shown that the enhanced coupling theory, which was developed originally for laser propulsion in atmosphere, is also applicable to underwater laser propulsion with metal targets.

  20. In situ TEM Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F.I., E-mail: fiallen@lbl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kim, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Andresen, N.C. [Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grigoropoulos, C.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Minor, A.M., E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    We present a modular assembly that enables both in situ Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing to be performed in a transmission electron microscope. The system comprises a lensed Raman probe mounted inside the microscope column in the specimen plane and a custom specimen holder with a vacuum feedthrough for a tapered optical fiber. The Raman probe incorporates both excitation and collection optics, and localized laser processing is performed using pulsed laser light delivered to the specimen via the tapered optical fiber. Precise positioning of the fiber is achieved using a nanomanipulation stage in combination with simultaneous electron-beam imaging of the tip-to-sample distance. Materials modification is monitored in real time by transmission electron microscopy. First results obtained using the assembly are presented for in situ pulsed laser ablation of MoS{sub 2} combined with Raman spectroscopy, complimented by electron-beam diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing in a TEM are demonstrated. • A lensed Raman probe is mounted in the sample chamber for close approach. • Localized laser processing is achieved using a tapered optical fiber. • Raman spectroscopy and pulsed laser ablation of MoS{sub 2} are performed in situ.

  1. In situ TEM Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, F.I.; Kim, E.; Andresen, N.C.; Grigoropoulos, C.P.; Minor, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a modular assembly that enables both in situ Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing to be performed in a transmission electron microscope. The system comprises a lensed Raman probe mounted inside the microscope column in the specimen plane and a custom specimen holder with a vacuum feedthrough for a tapered optical fiber. The Raman probe incorporates both excitation and collection optics, and localized laser processing is performed using pulsed laser light delivered to the specimen via the tapered optical fiber. Precise positioning of the fiber is achieved using a nanomanipulation stage in combination with simultaneous electron-beam imaging of the tip-to-sample distance. Materials modification is monitored in real time by transmission electron microscopy. First results obtained using the assembly are presented for in situ pulsed laser ablation of MoS_2 combined with Raman spectroscopy, complimented by electron-beam diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing in a TEM are demonstrated. • A lensed Raman probe is mounted in the sample chamber for close approach. • Localized laser processing is achieved using a tapered optical fiber. • Raman spectroscopy and pulsed laser ablation of MoS_2 are performed in situ.

  2. Laser cutting of laminated sheet material: a modeling exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, R.F.; Meijer, J.

    1997-01-01

    Laser cutting has been investigated for a number of aluminum-synthetic laminates, newly developed materials for the aeronautic and automotive industry. The materials consist of alternating aluminum and synthetic layers. It is shown that these materials can be cut at rates comparable to those of

  3. Process for calcining a material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    This invention is directed to a method and an apparatus to heat certain particles. These certain particles are heated to make them more desirable. In the heating of these particles, it is often desirable to expand the particles to make a light-weight aggregate. The light-weight aggregate may be used in making a building material or the like. In carrying out the process of heating these particles, there is used air for combustion of the combustible fuel and only a minimum of air for carrying of the particles or expansion of the particles

  4. Use of pre-pulse in laser spot welding of materials with high optical reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mys, Ihor; Geiger, Manfred

    2003-11-01

    Laser micro welding has become a standard manufacturing technique, particularly in industry sectors, such as automotive and aerospace electronics or medical devices, where the requirements for strength, miniaturization and temperature resistance are constantly rising. So far the use of laser micro welding is limited due to the fluctuation of the quality of the welded joints, because the welding results for material with high optical reflection and thermal conductivity, such as copper and copper alloys, depend very strongly on the condition of the material surface. This paper presents investigations on the use of a laser pre-pulse in spot welding of electronic materials with Nd:YAG laser. In order to achieve reproducible joining results two strategies are followed-up. The first one utilizes a reflection-based process control for measuring the reflection during the short pre-pulse. The intensity of the reflected light is used to calculate an appropriated welding pulse power, which corresponds to the measured relative absorption. Adjustment of laser parameters according to the condition of the surface is done in real time before laser main pulse. A second possibility for the stabilization of copper welding is the employment of a short and powerful laser pre-pulse before laser main pulse. This pre-pulse affects the workpiece surface and creates more reproducible absorption conditions for the main pulse, independent from the initial situation on material surface.

  5. Mechanics in Composite Materials and Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dae Gil

    1993-03-01

    This book includes introduction of composite materials, stress, in-plane stiffness of laminates strain rate, ply stress, failure criterion and bending, composite materials micromechanics, composite plates and micromechanics of composite materials. It also deals with process of composite materials such as autoclave vacuum bag degassing process, connection of composite materials, filament winding process, resin transfer molding, sheet molding compound and compression molding.

  6. Generation of ultrasound in materials using continuous-wave lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, James N; DiComo, Gregory P; Nikitin, Sergei

    2012-03-01

    Generating and detecting ultrasound is a standard method of nondestructive evaluation of materials. Pulsed lasers are used to generate ultrasound remotely in situations that prohibit the use of contact transducers. The scanning rate is limited by the repetition rates of the pulsed lasers, ranging between 10 and 100 Hz for lasers with sufficient pulse widths and energies. Alternately, a high-power continuous-wave laser can be scanned across the surface, creating an ultrasonic wavefront. Since generation is continuous, the scanning rate can be as much as 4 orders of magnitude higher than with pulsed lasers. This paper introduces the concept, comparing the theoretical scanning speed with generation by pulsed laser. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  7. Effects of chemical kinetics and starting material regeneration on the efficiency of an iodine laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, G.A.

    1977-05-01

    A model of the chemical kinetics occurring in an iodine laser amplifier is presented and used to calculate the degree to which the starting material is consumed as a result of laser operation. The cost of purchasing new starting material is estimated and shown to be prohibitive. A scheme for regenerating the starting material from the species present in the amplifier after lasing is proposed. It is shown that the estimated efficiency of this chemical regeneration process is appreciably higher than the projected optimum efficiency of the pumping process

  8. Thick film laser induced forward transfer for deposition of thermally and mechanically sensitive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kattamis, Nicholas T.; Purnick, Priscilla E.; Weiss, Ron; Arnold, Craig B.

    2007-01-01

    Laser forward transfer processes incorporating thin absorbing films can be used to deposit robust organic and inorganic materials but the deposition of more delicate materials has remained elusive due to contamination and stress induced during the transfer process. Here, we present the approach to high resolution patterning of sensitive materials by incorporating a thick film polymer absorbing layer that is able to dissipate shock energy through mechanical deformation. Multiple mechanisms for transfer as a function of incident laser energy are observed and we show viable and contamination-free deposition of living mammalian embryonic stem cells

  9. Picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide: Effect of crystallinity on the material response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Rocio; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon [Manufacturing Processes Department, Fundacion TEKNIKER, Av. Otaola 20, 20600, Eibar, Guipuzcoa (Spain); Lejardi, Ainhoa; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon [Department of Mining and Metallurgy Engineering and Materials Science, School of Engineering, University of the Basque Country (EHU-UPV), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-11-01

    The picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide (PLLA) as a function of laser fluence and degree of crystallinity was examined. The ablation parameters and the surface modifications were analyzed under various irradiation conditions using laser wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet through the visible. When processing the amorphous PLLA, both energy threshold and topography varied considerably depending on laser wavelength. Laser irradiation showed a reduction in the energy ablation threshold as the degree of crystallinity increased, probably related to photomechanical effects involved in laser ablation with ultra-short pulses and the lower stress accommodation behavior of semicrystalline polymers. In particular, cooperative chain motions are impeded by the higher degree of crystallinity, showing fragile mechanical behavior and lower energy dissipation. The experimental results on ablation rate versus laser energy showed that UV laser ablation on semicrystalline PLLA was more efficient than the visible ablation, i.e., it exhibits higher etch rates over a wide range of pulse energy conditions. These results were interpreted in terms of photo-thermal and photo-chemical response of polymers as a function of material micro-structure and incident laser wavelength. High quality micro-grooves were produced in amorphous PLLA, reveling the potential of ultra-fast laser processing technique in the field of micro-structuring biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications.

  10. Picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide: Effect of crystallinity on the material response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, Rocio; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon; Lejardi, Ainhoa; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon

    2011-01-01

    The picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide (PLLA) as a function of laser fluence and degree of crystallinity was examined. The ablation parameters and the surface modifications were analyzed under various irradiation conditions using laser wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet through the visible. When processing the amorphous PLLA, both energy threshold and topography varied considerably depending on laser wavelength. Laser irradiation showed a reduction in the energy ablation threshold as the degree of crystallinity increased, probably related to photomechanical effects involved in laser ablation with ultra-short pulses and the lower stress accommodation behavior of semicrystalline polymers. In particular, cooperative chain motions are impeded by the higher degree of crystallinity, showing fragile mechanical behavior and lower energy dissipation. The experimental results on ablation rate versus laser energy showed that UV laser ablation on semicrystalline PLLA was more efficient than the visible ablation, i.e., it exhibits higher etch rates over a wide range of pulse energy conditions. These results were interpreted in terms of photo-thermal and photo-chemical response of polymers as a function of material micro-structure and incident laser wavelength. High quality micro-grooves were produced in amorphous PLLA, reveling the potential of ultra-fast laser processing technique in the field of micro-structuring biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications.

  11. Laser post-processing of Inconel 625 made by selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkin, David; Helvajian, Henry; Steffeney, Lee; Hansen, William

    2016-04-01

    The effect of laser remelting of surfaces of as-built Selective Laser Melted (SLM) Inconel 625 was evaluated for its potential to improve the surface roughness of SLM parts. Many alloys made by SLM have properties similar to their wrought counterparts, but surface roughness of SLM-made parts is much higher than found in standard machine shop operations. This has implications for mechanical properties of SLM materials, such as a large debit in fatigue properties, and in applications of SLM, where surface roughness can alter fluid flow characteristics. Because complexity and netshape fabrication are fundamental advantages of Additive Manufacturing (AM), post-processing by mechanical means to reduce surface roughness detracts from the potential utility of AM. Use of a laser to improve surface roughness by targeted remelting or annealing offers the possibility of in-situ surface polishing of AM surfaces- the same laser used to melt the powder could be amplitude modulated to smooth the part during the build. The effects of remelting the surfaces of SLM Inconel 625 were demonstrated using a CW fiber laser (IPG: 1064 nm, 2-50 W) that is amplitude modulated with a pulse profile to induce remelting without spallation or ablation. The process achieved uniform depth of melting and improved surface roughness. The results show that with an appropriate pulse profile that meters the heat-load, surface features such as partially sintered powder particles and surface connected porosity can be mitigated via a secondary remelting/annealing event.

  12. Femtosecond laser studies of ultrafast intramolecular processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research is to better understand the detailed mechanisms of chemical reactions by observing, directly in time, the dynamics of fundamental chemical processes. In this work femtosecond laser pulses are used to initiate chemical processes and follow the progress of these processes in time. The authors are currently studying ultrafast internal conversion and subsequent intramolecular relaxation in unsaturated hydrocarbons. In addition, the authors are developing nonlinear optical techniques to prepare and monitor the time evolution of specific vibrational motions in ground electronic state molecules.

  13. Laser-accelerated particle beams for stress testing of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberio, M; Scisciò, M; Vallières, S; Cardelli, F; Chen, S N; Famulari, G; Gangolf, T; Revet, G; Schiavi, A; Senzacqua, M; Antici, P

    2018-01-25

    Laser-driven particle acceleration, obtained by irradiation of a solid target using an ultra-intense (I > 10 18  W/cm 2 ) short-pulse (duration testing materials and are particularly suited for identifying materials to be used in harsh conditions. We show that these laser-generated protons can produce, in a very short time scale, a strong mechanical and thermal damage, that, given the short irradiation time, does not allow for recovery of the material. We confirm this by analyzing changes in the mechanical, optical, electrical, and morphological properties of five materials of interest to be used in harsh conditions.

  14. Laser interaction with biological material mathematical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the principles of laser interaction with biological cells and tissues of varying degrees of organization. The problems of biomedical diagnostics are considered. Scattering of laser irradiation of blood cells is modeled for biological structures (dermis, epidermis, vascular plexus). An analytic theory is provided which is based on solving the wave equation for the electromagnetic field. It allows the accurate analysis of interference effects arising from the partial superposition of scattered waves. Treated topics of mathematical modeling are: optical characterization of biological tissue with large-scale and small-scale inhomogeneities in the layers, heating blood vessel under laser irradiation incident on the outer surface of the skin and thermo-chemical denaturation of biological structures at the example of human skin.

  15. Wear performance of laser processed tantalum coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrick, Stanley; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit, E-mail: amitband@wsu.edu

    2011-12-01

    This first generation investigation evaluates the in vitro tribological performance of laser-processed Ta coatings on Ti for load-bearing implant applications. Linear reciprocating wear tests in simulated body fluid showed one order of magnitude less wear rate, of the order of 10{sup -4} mm{sup 3}(N.m){sup -1}, for Ta coatings compared to Ti. Our results demonstrate that Ta coatings can potentially minimize the early-stage bone-implant interface micro-motion induced wear debris generation due to their excellent bioactivity comparable to that of hydroxyapatite (HA), high wear resistance and toughness compared to popular HA coatings. Highlights: {yields} In vitro wear performance of laser processed Ta coatings on Ti was evaluated. {yields} Wear tests in SBF showed one order of magnitude less wear for Ta coatings than Ti. {yields} Ta coatings can minimize early-stage micro-motion induced wear debris generation.

  16. Cavitation erosion of chromium-manganese and chromium-cobalt coatings processed by laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giren, B.G.; Szkodo, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the cavitation erosion of chromium-manganese and chromium-cobalt clads were tested, each of them for three cases: (1) without additional processing; (2) after laser heating of the solid state and (3) after laser remelting of the material. Armco iron, carbon steel 45 and chromium-nickel steel 0H18N9T were used as substrates. C.W. CO 2 laser with a beam power of 1000 W was used as a source of radiation. The investigated samples were subjected to cavitation impingement in a rotating disk facility. The results indicate that laser processing of the thick, electrode deposited coatings by laser beam leads in some cases to an increase of their cavitation resistance. Strong dependence of the coatings performance on the substrate, both for the laser processed or unprocessed parts of the materials was also discovered. (author)

  17. Toxicological characterization of chemicals produced from laser irradiation of graphite composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, J.

    1990-11-01

    One of the major potential hazards associated with laser machining of graphite composite materials is the toxic fumes and gases that are generated. When exposed to the intense energy of the laser beam, the organic polymer matrix of the composite material may decompose into various toxic by-products. To advance the understanding of the laser machining process from a health and safety viewpoint, this particular study consisted of the following steps: collect and analyze gaseous by-products generated during laser machining; collect particulates generated during laser machining and chemically extract them to determine the chemical species that may have absorbed or recondensed onto these particles; and review and evaluate the toxicity of the identified chemical species

  18. Wavelength dependence in laser floating zone processing. A case study with Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuente, G.F. de la; Diez, J.C.; Angurel, L.A.; Pena, J.I.; Sotelo, A.; Navarro, R.

    1995-01-01

    Laser floating zone processing methods are particularly suitable for studying crystal growth and the development of texture from the melt in many materials used in electrooptics, for example. A system is described that allows different laser wavelengths to be used, and first results on BSCCO superconducting fibers processed using different lasers are presented. (orig.)

  19. Integrated lunar materials manufacturing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Michael A. (Inventor); Knudsen, Christian W. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A manufacturing plant and process for production of oxygen on the moon uses lunar minerals as feed and a minimum of earth-imported, process materials. Lunar feed stocks are hydrogen-reducible minerals, ilmenite and lunar agglutinates occurring in numerous, explored locations mixed with other minerals in the pulverized surface layer of lunar soil known as regolith. Ilmenite (FeTiO.sub.3) and agglutinates contain ferrous (Fe.sup.+2) iron reducible by hydrogen to yield H.sub.2 O and metallic Fe at about 700.degree.-1,200.degree. C. The H.sub.2 O is electrolyzed in gas phase to yield H.sub.2 for recycle and O.sub.2 for storage and use. Hydrogen losses to lunar vacuum are minimized, with no net hydrogen (or any other earth-derived reagent) consumption except for small leaks. Feed minerals are surface-mined by front shovels and transported in trucks to the processing area. The machines are manned or robotic. Ilmenite and agglutinates occur mixed with silicate minerals which are not hydrogen-reducible at 700.degree.-1,200.degree. C. and consequently are separated and concentrated before feeding to the oxygen generation process. Solids rejected from the separation step and reduced solids from the oxygen process are returned to the mine area. The plant is powered by nuclear or solar power generators. Vapor-phase water electrolysis, a staged, countercurrent, fluidized bed reduction reactor and a radio-frequency-driven ceramic gas heater are used to improve thermal efficiency.

  20. Superconducting materials fabrication process and materials obtained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafon, M.O.; Magnier, C.

    1989-01-01

    The preparation process of a fine powder of YBaCuO type superconductors of easy sintering comprises: mixing in presence of alcohol an aqueous solution of rare earth nitrate or acetate, alkaline earth nitrate or acetate and copper nitrate or acetate and an oxalic acid solution, the pH value of the mixture is comprised between 2 and 4, the obtained precipitate is separated, dried, calcined and eventually crushed [fr

  1. Science, technology, and the industrialization of laser-driven processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.I.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Members of the laser program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) reviewed potential applications of lasers in industry, some of which are: isotope separation; cleanup of radioactive waste; trace impurity removal; selective chemical reactions; photochemical activation or dissociation of gases; control of combustion particulates; crystal and powder chemistry; and laser induced biochemistry. Many of these areas are currently under active study in the community. The investigation at LLNL focused on laser isotope separation of atomic uranium because of the large demand (> 1000 tonnes/year) and high product enrichment price (> $600/kg of product) for material used as fuel in commercial light-water nuclear power reactors. They also believed that once the technology was fully developed and deployed, it could be applied directly to separating many elements economically on an industrial scale. The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program at LLNL has an extensive uranium and plutonium program of >$100 M in FY85 and a minor research program for other elements. This report describes the AVLIS program conducted covering the following topics; candidate elements; separative work units; spectroscopic selectivety; major systems; facilities; integrated process model;multivariable sensitivety studies; world market; and US enrichment enterprise. 23 figs. (AT)

  2. SOFTWARE TOOL FOR LASER CUTTING PROCESS CONTROL – SOLVING REAL INDUSTRIAL CASE STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Madić

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser cutting is one of the leading non-conventional machining technologies with a wide spectrum of application in modern industry. It order to exploit a number of advantages that this technology offers for contour cutting of materials, it is necessary to carefully select laser cutting conditions for each given workpiece material, thickness and desired cut qualities. In other words, there is a need for process control of laser cutting. After a comprehensive analysis of the main laser cutting parameters and process performance characteristics, the application of the developed software tool “BRUTOMIZER” for off-line control of CO2 laser cutting process of three different workpiece materials (mild steel, stainless steel and aluminum is illustrated. Advantages and abilities of the developed software tool are also illustrated.

  3. Effect of thermal processes on critical operation conditions of high-power laser diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parashchuk, V V [Institute of Physics, Belarus Academy of Sciences, Minsk (Belarus); Vu Doan Mien [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2013-10-31

    Using numerical and analytical techniques in a threedimensional approximation, we have modelled the effect of spatial thermoelastic stress nonuniformity in a laser diode – heat sink system on the output characteristics of the device in different operation modes. We have studied the influence of the pulse duration, the geometry of the laser system and its thermophysical parameters on the critical pump current density, in particular for state-of-the-art heat conductive substrate materials. The proposed approach has been used to optimise the laser diode assembly process in terms of the quality of laser crystal positioning (bonding) on a heat sink. (lasers)

  4. Proceedings of microwave processing of materials 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beatty, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of the third MRS Symposium on Microwave Processing of Materials. Topics covered include: Microwave Processing Overviews, Numerical Modeling Techniques, Microwave Processing System Design, Microwave/Plasma Processing, Microwave/Materials Interactions, Microwave Processing of Ceramics, Microwave Processing of Polymers, Microwave Processing of Hazardous Wastes, Microwave NDE Techniques and Dielectric Properties and Measurements

  5. Modification induced by laser irradiation on physical features of plastics materials filled with nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scolaro Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Thermal Laser Welding (TLW process involves localized heating at the interface of two pieces of plastic that will be joined. Polymeric materials of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE, both pure and containing nanostructures at different concentrations (titanium and silver nanoparticles, were prepared as thin foils in order to produce an interface between a substrate transparent to the infrared laser wavelength and an highly absorbent substrate, in order to be welded by the laser irradiation. The used diode laser operates at 970 nm wavelength, in continuum, with a maximum energy of 100 mJ, for times of the order of 1 -60 s, with a spot of 300 μm of diameter. The properties of the polymers and of nanocomposite sheets, before and after the laser welding process, were measured in terms of optical characteristics, wetting ability, surface roughness and surface morphology.

  6. Lasers '90: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Lasers and Applications, San Diego, CA, Dec. 10-14, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.G.; Herbelin, J.

    1991-01-01

    The general topics considered are: x-ray lasers; FELs; solid state lasers; techniques and phenomena of ultrafast lasers; optical filters and free space laser communications; discharge lasers; tunable lasers; applications of lasers in medicine and surgery; lasers in materials processing; high power lasers; dynamics gratings, wave mixing, and holography; up-conversion lasers; lidar and laser radar; laser resonators; excimer lasers; laser propagation; nonlinear and quantum optics; blue-green technology; imaging; laser spectroscopy; chemical lasers; dye lasers; and lasers in chemistry

  7. Selective laser sintering of calcium phosphate materials for orthopedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Goonhee

    Two technologies, Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) and bioceramics are combined in this work to prepare bone replacement implants with complex geometry. SFF has emerged as a crucial technique for rapid prototyping in the last decade. Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) is one of the established SFF manufacturing processes that can build three-dimensional objects directly from computer models without part-specific tooling or human intervention. Meanwhile, there have been great efforts to develop implantable materials that can assist in regeneration of bone defects and injuries. However, little attention has been focused in shaping bones from these materials. The main thrust of this research was to develop a process that can combine those two separate efforts. The specific objective of this research is to develop a process that can construct bone replacement material of complex geometry from synthetic calcium phosphate materials by using the SLS process. The achievement of this goal can have a significant impact on the quality of health care in the sense that complete custom-fit bone and tooth structures suitable for implantation can be prepared within 24--48 hours of receipt of geometric information obtained either from patient Computed Tomographic (CT) data, from Computer Aided Design (CAD) software or from other imaging systems such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Holographic Laser Range Imaging (HLRI). In this research, two different processes have been developed. First is the SLS fabrication of porous bone implants. In this effort, systematic procedures have been established and calcium phosphate implants were successfully fabricated from various sources of geometric information. These efforts include material selection and preparation, SLS process parameter optimization, and development of post-processing techniques within the 48-hour time frame. Post-processing allows accurate control of geometry and of the chemistry of calcium phosphate, as well as

  8. Theoretical analysis of material removal mechanisms in pulsed laser fusion cutting of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintero, F [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Varas, F [Dpto Matematica Aplicada II, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Pou, J [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Lusquinos, F [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Boutinguiza, M [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Soto, R [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Perez-Amor, M [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2005-02-21

    It is well known that the efficiency of material removal mechanisms has a crucial influence on the performance and quality of the laser cutting process. However, they are very difficult to study since the physical processes and parameters which govern them are quite complicated to observe and measure experimentally. For this reason, the development of theoretical models to analyse the material removal mechanisms is very important for understanding the characteristics and influence of these processes. In this paper, a theoretical model of the pulsed laser fusion cutting of ceramics is presented. The material removal mechanisms from the cutting front are modelled under the assumption that the ceramic material may be, simultaneously, melted and evaporated by the laser radiation. Therefore, three ejection mechanisms are investigated together: ejection of molten material by the assist gas, evaporation of the liquid and ejection of molten material due to the recoil pressure generated by the evaporation from the cutting front. The temporal evolution of the material removal mechanisms and the thickness of the molten layer are solved for several laser pulse modes. Theoretical results are compared with experimental observations to validate the conclusions regarding the influence of frequency and pulse length on the cutting process.

  9. Time-resolved study of femtosecond laser induced micro-modifications inside transparent brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, F.; Matylitsky, V. V.; Domke, M.; Huber, Heinz P.

    2016-03-01

    Laser processing of optically transparent or semi-transparent, brittle materials is finding wide use in various manufacturing sectors. For example, in consumer electronic devices such as smartphones or tablets, cover glass needs to be cut precisely in various shapes. The unique advantage of material processing with femtosecond lasers is efficient, fast and localized energy deposition in nearly all types of solid materials. When an ultra-short laser pulse is focused inside glass, only the localized region in the neighborhood of the focal volume absorbs laser energy by nonlinear optical absorption. Therefore, the processing volume is strongly defined, while the rest of the target stays unaffected. Thus ultra-short pulse lasers allow cutting of the chemically strengthened glasses such as Corning Gorilla glass without cracking. Non-ablative cutting of transparent, brittle materials, using the newly developed femtosecond process ClearShapeTM from Spectra-Physics, is based on producing a micron-sized material modification track with well-defined geometry inside. The key point for development of the process is to understand the induced modification by a single femtosecond laser shot. In this paper, pump-probe microscopy techniques have been applied to study the defect formation inside of transparent materials, namely soda-lime glass samples, on a time scale between one nanosecond to several tens of microseconds. The observed effects include acoustic wave propagation as well as mechanical stress formation in the bulk of the glass. Besides better understanding of underlying physical mechanisms, our experimental observations have enabled us to find optimal process parameters for the glass cutting application and lead to better quality and speed for the ClearShapeTM process.

  10. A model for self-defocusing in laser drilling of polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chong; Quick, Nathaniel R.; Kar, Aravinda

    2008-01-01

    A numerical thermal model is presented for laser microvias drilling in multilayer electronic substrates with Nd:YAG (YAG denotes yttrium aluminum garnet) and CO 2 lasers. Such substrates have different optical properties such as the refractive index and absorption coefficient at these two laser wavelengths, resulting in different drilling mechanisms. Since the skin depth of the polymer is large for both the lasers, volumetric heating is considered in the model. As soon as a small cavity is formed during the drilling process, the concave curvature of the drilling front acts as a concave lens that diverges the incident laser beam. This self-defocusing effect can greatly reduce the drilling speed as predicted by the model. This effect makes the refractive index of the substrate at different wavelengths an important parameter for laser drilling. The model was used to calculate the laser ablation thresholds which were found to be 8 and 56 J/cm 2 for the CO 2 and Nd:YAG lasers respectively. Due to the expulsion of materials because of high internal pressures in the case of Nd:YAG laser microvia drilling, the ablation threshold may be far below the calculated value. A particular laser beam shape, such as pitch fork, was found to drill better holes than the Gaussian beam

  11. Composite materials processing, applications, characterizations

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Composite materials are used as substitutions of metals/traditional materials in aerospace, automotive, civil, mechanical and other industries. The present book collects the current knowledge and recent developments in the characterization and application of composite materials. To this purpose the volume describes the outstanding properties of this class of advanced material which recommend it for various industrial applications.

  12. Impacts of ambient and ablation plasmas on short- and ultrashort-pulse laser processing of surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Panchenko, A.N.; Zhukov, V.P.; Kudryashov, S.I.; Pereira, A.; Marine, W.; Mocek, Tomáš; Bulgakov, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2014), s. 1344-1372 ISSN 2072-666X R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0143 Grant - others:HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027; OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : pulsed laser ablation * laser material processing * laser plasma * ambient gas breakdown * material redeposition * plasma pipe formation * microstructures Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.269, year: 2014

  13. Cutting and machining energetic materials with a femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeske, Frank; Benterou, Jerry; Lee, Ronald; Roos, Edward [Energetic Materials Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2003-04-01

    A femtosecond (fs) laser has been used as a tool for solving many problems involving access, machining, disassembly, inspection and avoidance of undesirable hazardous waste streams in systems containing energetic materials. Because of the unique properties of the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with matter, the femtosecond laser can be used to safely cut these energetic materials in a precise manner without creating an unacceptable waste stream. Many types of secondary high explosives (HE) and propellants have been cut with the laser for a variety of applications ranging from disassembly of aging conventional weapons (demilitarization), inspection of energetic components of aging systems to creating unique shapes of HE for purposes of initiation and detonation physics studies. Hundreds of samples of energetic materials have been cut with the fs laser without ignition and, in most cases, without changing the surface morphology of the cut surfaces. The laser has also been useful in cutting nonenergetic components in close proximity to energetic materials. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. UV laser micromachining of ceramic materials: formation of columnar topographies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, V.; Vilar, R.; Conde, O.

    2001-01-01

    Laser machining is increasingly appearing as an alternative for micromachining of ceramics. Using ceramic materials using excimer lasers can result in smooth surfaces or in the formation of cone-like or columnar topography. Potential applications of cone-shaped or columnar surface topography include, for example, light trapping in anti-reflection coatings and improvement of adhesion bonding between ceramic materials. In this communication results of a comparative study of surface topography change during micromachining of several ceramic materials with different ablation behaviors are reported. (orig.)

  15. Modeling of high energy laser ignition of energetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung-cheol; Kim, Ki-hong; Yoh, Jack J.

    2008-01-01

    We present a model for simulating high energy laser heating and ignition of confined energetic materials. The model considers the effect of irradiating a steel plate with long laser pulses and continuous lasers of several kilowatts and the thermal response of well-characterized high explosives for ignition. Since there is enough time for the thermal wave to propagate into the target and to create a region of hot spot in the high explosives, electron thermal diffusion of ultrashort (femto- and picosecond) lasing is ignored; instead, heat diffusion of absorbed laser energy in the solid target is modeled with thermal decomposition kinetic models of high explosives. Numerically simulated pulsed-laser heating of solid target and thermal explosion of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine, triaminotrinitrobenzene, and octahydrotetranitrotetrazine are compared to experimental results. The experimental and numerical results are in good agreement

  16. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    conference organization. As many of you have experienced, the printed proceedings of these Laser Damage Symposia in our personal libraries are...responsible person or agency. I look forward to our continued relationship. Finally, let me thank the organizers of this Symposium. They have done a...the professional operation of the Symposium and Ms. Susie Rivera and Ms. Sheila Aaker for their part in the preparation and publication of the

  17. Laser Structuring of Thin Layers for Flexible Electronics by a Shock Wave-induced Delamination Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Pierre; Ehrhardt, Martin; Zimmer, Klaus

    The defect-free laser-assisted structuring of thin films on flexible substrates is a challenge for laser methods. However, solving this problem exhibits an outstanding potential for a pioneering development of flexible electronics. Thereby, the laser-assisted delamination method has a great application potential. At the delamination process: the localized removal of the layer is induced by a shock wave which is produced by a laser ablation process on the rear side of the substrate. In this study, the thin-film patterning process is investigated for different polymer substrates dependent on the material and laser parameters using a KrF excimer laser. The resultant structures were studied by optical microscopy and white light interferometry (WLI). The delamination process was tested at different samples (indium tin oxide (ITO) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET), epoxy-based negative photoresist (SU8) on polyimide (PI) and indium tin oxide/copper indium gallium selenide/molybdenum (ITO/CIGS/Mo) on PI.

  18. Material efficiency of laser metal deposited Ti6Al4V: Effect of laser power

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahamood, RM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The economy of using Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) process in the manufacturing of aerospace parts depends on the right processing parameters. LMD is an additive manufacturing technology capable of producing complex parts directly from the CAD model...

  19. Visualization of nanosecond laser-induced dewetting, ablation and crystallization processes in thin silicon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dongfeng; Zhang, Zifeng; Yu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Yawen

    2018-06-01

    In the present work, nanosecond pulsed laser crystallization, dewetting and ablation of thin amorphous silicon films are investigated by time-resolved imaging. Laser pulses of 532 nm wavelength and 7 ns temporal width are irradiated on silicon film. Below the dewetting threshold, crystallization process happens after 400 ns laser irradiation in the spot central region. With the increasing of laser fluence, it is observed that the dewetting process does not conclude until 300 ns after the laser irradiation, forming droplet-like particles in the spot central region. At higher laser intensities, ablative material removal occurs in the spot center. Cylindrical rims are formed in the peripheral dewetting zone due to solidification of transported matter at about 500 ns following the laser pulse exposure.

  20. Requirements and new materials for fusion laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokowski, S.E.; Weber, M.J.; Saroyan, R.A.; Hagen, W.F.

    1977-10-01

    Higher focusable power in neodymium glass fusion lasers can be obtained through the use of new materials with lower nonlinear index (n 2 ) and better energy storage capabilities than the presently employed silicate glass. Silicate, phosphate, fluorophosphate, and beryllium fluoride glasses are discussed in terms of fusion laser requirements, particularly those for the proposed Nova laser. Examples of the variation in spectroscopic and optical properties obtainable with compositional changes are given. Results of a system evaluation of potential laser materials show that fluorophosphate glasses have many of the desired properties for use in Nova. These glasses are now being cast in large sizes (30-cm diameter) and will be tested in prototype amplifiers in 1978

  1. Requirements and new materials for fusion laser systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokowski, S.E.; Weber, M.J.; Saroyan, R.A.; Hagen, W.F.

    1977-10-01

    Higher focusable power in neodymium glass fusion lasers can be obtained through the use of new materials with lower nonlinear index (n/sub 2/) and better energy storage capabilities than the presently employed silicate glass. Silicate, phosphate, fluorophosphate, and beryllium fluoride glasses are discussed in terms of fusion laser requirements, particularly those for the proposed Nova laser. Examples of the variation in spectroscopic and optical properties obtainable with compositional changes are given. Results of a system evaluation of potential laser materials show that fluorophosphate glasses have many of the desired properties for use in Nova. These glasses are now being cast in large sizes (30-cm diameter) and will be tested in prototype amplifiers in 1978.

  2. Deformation measurements of materials at low temperatures using laser speckle photography method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumio Nakahara; Yukihide Maeda; Kazunori Matsumura; Shigeyoshi Hisada; Takeyoshi Fujita; Kiyoshi Sugihara

    1992-01-01

    The authors observed deformations of several materials during cooling down process from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature using the laser speckle photography method. The in-plane displacements were measured by the image plane speckle photography and the out-of-plane displacement gradients by the defocused speckle photography. The results of measurements of in-plane displacement are compared with those of FEM analysis. The applicability of laser speckle photography method to cryogenic engineering are also discussed

  3. Study on Laser Welding Process Monitoring Method

    OpenAIRE

    Knag , Heeshin

    2017-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, a study of quality monitoring technology for the laser welding was conducted. The laser welding and the industrial robotic systems were used with robot-based laser welding systems. The laser system used in this study was 1.6 kW fiber laser, while the robot system was Industrial robot (pay-load : 130 kg). The robot-based laser welding system was equipped with a laser scanner system for remote laser welding. The welding joints of steel plate and steel plat...

  4. Study on Laser Welding Process Monitoring Method

    OpenAIRE

    Heeshin Knag

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a study of quality monitoring technology for the laser welding was conducted. The laser welding and the industrial robotic systems were used with robot-based laser welding systems. The laser system used in this study was 1.6 kW fiber laser, while the robot system was Industrial robot (pay-load : 130 kg). The robot-based laser welding system was equipped with a laser scanner system for remote laser welding. The welding joints of steel plate and steel plate coated with zinc were ...

  5. Effect of Cr4+ impurities in Nd:Cr:GSGG and Nd:Cr:YAG laser materials on parameters of lasers at solar pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payziyev, Sh.D.; Bakhramov, S.A.; Shayimov, F.F.; Fayziev, A.Sh.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of an effect of Cr 4+ impurity ions, existent in Nd 3+ :Cr 3+ :GSGG and Nd 3+ :Cr 3+ :YAG laser materials on output parameters of solar pumped lasers is carried out by modeling of lasing process at solar pumping. (authors)

  6. Laser Processing of Carbon Nanotube Transparent Conducting Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Andrew

    Transparent conducting films, or TCFs, are 2D electrical conductors with the ability to transmit light. Because of this, they are used in many popular electronics including smart phones, tablets, solar panels, and televisions. The most common material used as a TCF is indium tin oxide, or ITO. Although ITO has great electrical and optical characteristics, it is expensive, brittle, and difficult to pattern. These limitations have led researchers toward other materials for the next generation of displays and touch panels. The most promising material for next generation TCFs is carbon nanotubes, or CNTs. CNTs are cylindrical tubes of carbon no more than a few atoms thick. They have different electrical and optical properties depending on their atomic structure, and are extremely strong. As an electrode, they conduct electricity through an array of randomly dispersed tubes. The array is highly transparent because of gaps between the tubes, and size and optical properties of the CNTs. Many research groups have tried making CNT TCFs with opto-electric properties similar to ITO but have difficultly achieving high conductivity. This is partly attributed to impurities from fabrication and a mix of different tube types, but is mainly caused by low junction conductivity. In functionalized nanotubes, junction conductivity is impaired by covalently bonded molecules added to the sidewalls of the tubes. The addition of this molecule, known as functionalization, is designed to facilitate CNT dispersion in a solvent by adding properties of the molecule to the CNTs. While necessary for a good solution, functionalization decreases the conductivity in the CNT array by creating defects in the tube's structures and preventing direct inter-carbon bonding. This research investigates removing the functional coating (after tube deposition) by laser processing. Laser light is able to preferentially heat the CNTs because of their optical and electrical properties. Through local conduction

  7. Comparison of laser chemical processing and lasermicrojet for structuring and cutting silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopman, Sybille; Fell, Andreas; Mayer, Kuno; Mesec, Matthias; Rodofili, Andreas; Kray, Daniel [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Freiburg (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    This paper deals with the development of a new cutting method for thin silicon solar wafers with liquid-jet-guided lasers (lasermicrojet {sup registered}, LMJ, and laser chemical processing, LCP). Several laser systems with different wavelengths were tested to find the optimum laser system and processing parameters in terms of efficient material removal and deep laser cutting. Water and potassium hydroxide were used as carrier liquids to enhance laser ablation. The ablation efficiency was defined as a target parameter and experimentally determined by performing single laser grooves. It is demonstrated that the ablation process of LMJ is mainly affected by silicon melting and then removing by the liquid-jet momentum for single laser grooves. Best result for deep laser grooves is achieved if evaporation dominates the ablation process. Better surface quality referred to laser-induced crystalline damage is presented for a cut wafer with LMJ in comparison to a standard multiwire slurry saw. This shows a great potential of wafering with liquid-jet-guided lasers although no optimal liquid media was used. (orig.)

  8. Final Report: Laser-Material Interactions Relevant to Analytic Spectroscopy of Wide Band Gap Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, J. Thomas [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2014-04-05

    We summarize our studies aimed at developing an understanding of the underlying physics and chemistry in terms of laser materials interactions relevant to laser-based sampling and chemical analysis of wide bandgap materials. This work focused on the determination of mechanisms for the emission of electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules from laser irradiation of surfaces. We determined the important role of defects on these emissions, the thermal, chemical, and physical interactions responsible for matrix effects and mass-dependent transport/detection. This work supported development of new techniques and technology for the determination of trace elements contained such as nuclear waste materials.

  9. Predictive modeling, simulation, and optimization of laser processing techniques: UV nanosecond-pulsed laser micromachining of polymers and selective laser melting of powder metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criales Escobar, Luis Ernesto

    One of the most frequently evolving areas of research is the utilization of lasers for micro-manufacturing and additive manufacturing purposes. The use of laser beam as a tool for manufacturing arises from the need for flexible and rapid manufacturing at a low-to-mid cost. Laser micro-machining provides an advantage over mechanical micro-machining due to the faster production times of large batch sizes and the high costs associated with specific tools. Laser based additive manufacturing enables processing of powder metals for direct and rapid fabrication of products. Therefore, laser processing can be viewed as a fast, flexible, and cost-effective approach compared to traditional manufacturing processes. Two types of laser processing techniques are studied: laser ablation of polymers for micro-channel fabrication and selective laser melting of metal powders. Initially, a feasibility study for laser-based micro-channel fabrication of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) via experimentation is presented. In particular, the effectiveness of utilizing a nanosecond-pulsed laser as the energy source for laser ablation is studied. The results are analyzed statistically and a relationship between process parameters and micro-channel dimensions is established. Additionally, a process model is introduced for predicting channel depth. Model outputs are compared and analyzed to experimental results. The second part of this research focuses on a physics-based FEM approach for predicting the temperature profile and melt pool geometry in selective laser melting (SLM) of metal powders. Temperature profiles are calculated for a moving laser heat source to understand the temperature rise due to heating during SLM. Based on the predicted temperature distributions, melt pool geometry, i.e. the locations at which melting of the powder material occurs, is determined. Simulation results are compared against data obtained from experimental Inconel 625 test coupons fabricated at the National

  10. FY 1997 report on the study on cryogenic aggregate target PLD process by multi-laser excitation for using gaseous materials; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (kitai genryo riyo no tame no taju laser reiki ni yoru gokuteion gyoshutai target PLD process ni kansuru kenkyu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This paper reports the result in fiscal 1995 of the study on PLD (pulse laser deposition) thin film formation process having been made since 1993. In fiscal 1995, the effect of irradiation of excimer laser and YGA(SHG) on ablation of aggregates of N2, CH4, Ar, Kr and Xe, and the effect of time-delayed irradiation of YGA(SHG) and KrF excimer laser on ablation of N2 aggregate were studied aiming at exciting ablation by cryogenic aggregate alone. Experimental results by a newly developed multi-laser excitation experiment equipment are as follows. Ablation was not caused by KrF excimer laser irradiation, while caused by YGA(SHG) irradiation. Ablation was caused by 1mm thick N2 or CH4 aggregate alone. Kr target was the most promising among rare gas solid targets expected as seed of ablation occurrence. Multi-irradiation showed a different ablation behavior as compared with single YGA(SHG) irradiation, and in some cases, multi-irradiation not increased scattering of particles. Time-delayed multi- irradiation (YGA(SHG) excitation after excimer excitation) was effective. 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. The effect of optical system design for laser micro-hole drilling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chien-Fang; Lan, Yin-Te; Chien, Yu-Lun; Young, Hong-Tsu

    2017-08-01

    Lasers are a promising high accuracy tool to make small holes in composite or hard material. They offer advantages over the conventional machining process, which is time consuming and has scaling limitations. However, the major downfall in laser material processing is the relatively large heat affect zone or number of molten burrs it generates, even when using nanosecond lasers over high-cost ultrafast lasers. In this paper, we constructed a nanosecond laser processing system with a 532 nm wavelength laser source. In order to enhance precision and minimize the effect of heat generation with the laser drilling process, we investigated the geometric shape of optical elements and analyzed the images using the modulation transfer function (MTF) and encircled energy (EE) by using optical software Zemax. We discuss commercial spherical lenses, including plano-convex lenses, bi-convex lenses, plano-concave lenses, bi-concave lenses, best-form lenses, and meniscus lenses. Furthermore, we determined the best lens configuration by image evaluation, and then verified the results experimentally by carrying out the laser drilling process on multilayer flexible copper clad laminate (FCCL). The paper presents the drilling results obtained with different lens configurations and found the best configuration had a small heat affect zone and a clean edge along laser-drilled holes.

  12. Chemically modified carbon nanotubes as material enhanced laser desorption ionisation (MELDI) material in protein profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najam-ul-Haq, M.; Rainer, M.; Schwarzenauer, T.; Huck, C.W.; Bonn, G.K.

    2006-01-01

    Biomarkers play a potential role in the early detection and diagnosis of a disease. Our aim is to derivatize carbon nanotubes for exploration of the differences in human body fluids e.g. serum, through matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS) that can be related to disease and subsequently to be employed in the biomarker discovery process. This application we termed as the material enhanced laser desorption ionisation (MELDI). The versatility of this technology is meant to increase the amount of information from biological samples on the protein level, which will have a major impact to serve the cause of diagnostic markers. Serum peptides and proteins are immobilized on derivatized carbon nanotubes, which function as binding material. Protein-loaded suspension is placed on a stainless steel target or buckypaper on aluminum target for direct analysis with MALDI-MS. The elution method to wash the bound proteins from carbon nanotubes was employed to compare with the direct analysis procedure. Elution is carried out by MALDI matrix solution to get them out of the entangled nanotubes, which are difficult to desorb by laser due to the complex nanotube structures. The advantage of these optimized methods compared to the conventional screening methods is the improved sensitivity, selectivity and the short analysis time without prior albumin and immunoglobulin depletion. The comparison of similarly modified diamond and carbon nanotubes exhibit differences in their nature to bind the proteins out of serum due to the differences in their physical characteristics. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy provided hint for the presence of tertiary amine peak at the crucial chemical step of iminodiacetic acid addition to acid chloride functionality on carbon nanotubes. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was utilized to quantitatively measure the copper capacity of these derivatized carbon nanotubes which is a direct measure of capacity of

  13. Lasers for isotope separation processes and their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.

    1976-08-01

    The laser system requirements for isotope enrichment are presented in the context of an atomic uranium vapor process. Coherently pumped dye lasers using as the pump laser either the frequency doubled Nd:YAG or copper vapor are seen to be quite promising for meeting the near term requirements of a laser isotope separation (LIS) process. The utility of electrical discharge excitation of the rare gas halogens in an LIS context is discussed

  14. Reassembling Solid Materials by Femtosecond Laser Ablation: Case of Aluminum Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tohru; Matsuo, Yukari

    2013-06-01

    Through atomization and ionization, we could completely alter the composition of a nonconductive material, aluminum nitride, by femtosecond laser ablation. Preferential production of pure aluminum cluster cations Aln+ (n≤32) reflects not only their higher energetic stability compared with mixed clusters AlnNm+ but also completion of thermal relaxation in ablation plasma. Observation of metastable dissociation of Aln+ indicates that cluster cations have still enough internal energy for dissociation to occur, although the process is much slower than the cluster formation. Almost no cluster formation has been observed after nanosecond laser ablation of aluminum nitride, which highlights the distinct nature of ablation plasma produced by femtosecond laser ablation.

  15. Influence of non-collisional laser heating on the electron dynamics in dielectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilleau, L.; Duchateau, G.; Chimier, B.; Geoffroy, G.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2016-12-01

    The electron dynamics in dielectric materials induced by intense femtosecond laser pulses is theoretically addressed. The laser driven temporal evolution of the energy distribution of electrons in the conduction band is described by a kinetic Boltzmann equation. In addition to the collisional processes for energy transfer such as electron-phonon-photon and electron-electron interactions, a non-collisional process for photon absorption in the conduction band is included. It relies on direct transitions between sub-bands of the conduction band through multiphoton absorption. This mechanism is shown to significantly contribute to the laser heating of conduction electrons for large enough laser intensities. It also increases the time required for the electron distribution to reach the equilibrium state as described by the Fermi-Dirac statistics. Quantitative results are provided for quartz irradiated by a femtosecond laser pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm and for intensities in the range of tens of TW cm-2, lower than the ablation threshold. The change in the energy deposition induced by this non-collisional heating process is expected to have a significant influence on the laser processing of dielectric materials.

  16. Short-pulse-width micromachining of hard materials using DPSS Nd:YAG lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heglin, Michael; Govorkov, Sergei V.; Scaggs, Michael J.; Theoharidis, Haris; Schoelzel, T.

    2002-06-01

    The material processing of an industrial, short-pulse duration DPPS YAG laser producing peak powers greater than 0.2MW is discussed in this paper. This peak power provides sufficient materials processing capability to meet the micro machining needs in the automotive, semiconductor, micro- electronic, medical and telecommunication industries. All hard and soft materials including: plastics, metals, ceramics, diamond and other crystalline materials are suitable candidates for the processing capability of this laser. Micro level features can be machined in these materials to a depth in excess of 1mm with high quality results. In most applications feature sizes can be achieved that are not possible or economical with existing technologies. The optical beam delivery system requirements, and overall micro-machining set-up are also described. The drilling and cutting versatility down to feature sizes of less than 7 micrometers , as well as, complex shapes are shown. The wavelength, pulse length, and peakpower are described and relate to their effect on recast, micro-cracking and material removal rates. Material removal effects related to progressive penetration into the material will be reviewed. The requirements of this DPSS laser technology to meet the operational requirements for high duty cycle operation in industrial environments is covered along with processing flexibility and lower operating cost.

  17. Emerging materials by advanced processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaysser, W.A.; Weber-Bock, J.

    1989-01-01

    This volume contains 36 contributions with following subjects (selection): Densification of highly reactive aluminium titanate powders; influence of precursor history on carbon fiber characteristics; influence of water removal rate during calcination on the crystallization of ZrO2 from amorphous hydrous precipitates; tape casting of AlN; influence of processing on the properties of beta-SiC powders; corrosion of SiSiC by gases and basic slag at high temperature; influence of sintering and thermomechanical treatment on microstructure and properties of W-Ni-Fe alloys; mechanical alloying for development of sintered steels with high hard phase content (NbC); early stages of mechanical alloying in Ni-Ti and Ni-Al powder mixtures; growth and microstructural development of melt-oxidation derived Al2O3/Al-base composites; fabrication of RSBN composites; synthesis of high density coridierite bodies; comparative studies on post-HIP and sinter-HIP treatments on transformation thoughened ceramics; sinter HIP of SiC; precipitation mixing of Si3N4 with bimetallic oxides; temperature dependence of the interfacial energies in Al2O3-liquid metal systems; synthesis and microstructural examination of Synroc B; solid state investigation of ceramic-metal bonding; thermophysical properties of MgAl2O4; preparation, sintering and thermal expansion of MgAl2O4; microstructural studies on alumina-zirconia and metallized alumina ceramics; electrodeposition of metals (e.g. Ti, Mo, In) and metal oxides from molten salts; electrochemical deposition of Ti from nonaqueous media (DMSO, DMF); lithium as anode material in power sources (passivation); reduction of chromium(VI) when solar selective black chromium is deposited; thermodynamic optimization of phase diagrams (computer calculations); optimization of Na-Tl phase diagram; phase relations in the Y-Si-Al-O-N system: Controlled manufacturing of alpha/beta-SIALON composites. (MM)

  18. Refresher Course on Lasers and Applications in Chemical Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    lasers, modes of laser, mode locking, Q-switching, nonlinear optical materials, electro- optic and magneto-optic materials. It will also include laboratory demonstration experi- ments in selected areas of fluorescence and pump-probe methods. Teachers who wish to participate in the Refresher Course should submit their brief.

  19. A novel laser-based method for controlled crystallization in dental prosthesis materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, Peter; Neuenschwander, Beat; Schwaller, Patrick; Köhli, Benjamin; Lüscher, Beat; Senn, Florian; Kounga, Alain; Appert, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Glass-ceramic materials are increasingly becoming the material of choice in the field of dental prosthetics, as they can feature both high strength and very good aesthetics. It is believed that their color, microstructure and mechanical properties can be tuned such as to achieve an optimal lifelike performance. In order to reach that ultimate perfection a controlled arrangement of amorphous and crystalline phases in the material is required. A phase transformation from amorphous to crystalline is achieved by a heat treatment at defined temperature levels. The traditional approach is to perform the heat treatment in a furnace. This, however, only allows a homogeneous degree of crystallization over the whole volume of the parent glass material. Here a novel approach using a local heat treatment by laser irradiation is presented. To investigate the potential of this approach the crystallization process of SiO2-Li2O-Al2O3-based glass has been studied with laser systems (pulsed and continuous wave) operating at different wavelengths. Our results show the feasibility of gradual and partial crystallization of the base material using continuous laser irradiation. A dental prosthesis machined from an amorphous glassy state can be effectively treated with laser irradiation and crystallized within a confined region of a few millimeters starting from the body surface. Very good aesthetics have been achieved. Preliminary investigation with pulsed nanosecond lasers of a few hundreds nanoseconds pulse width has enabled more refinement of crystallization and possibility to place start of phase change within the material bulk.

  20. Nonequilibrium synthesis of Nb-Al alloys by laser processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewari, S.K.; Mazumder, J.

    1993-01-01

    The technique of laser surface modification provides a unique means of synthesizing novel nonequilibrium materials in near net shape. Claddings of several NbAl 3 alloys with Ti, B and Hf as a ternary alloy addition were prepared using a CW CO 2 laser. Isothermal oxidation behavior of the clads were examined in air. Oxidation tests at 800, 1,200 and 1,400 C. Alternating layers of alumina and NbAlO 4 were not observed in any of the samples as reported in literature for conventionally processed NbAl 3 oxidized under similar conditions. The parabolic rate constants for all the alloys, except 0 B, were comparable to that for isothermal oxidation of β-NiAl, at 1,200 and 1,400 C in 0.1 atm oxygen, which is a known alumina former. Ternary alloying additions for improved oxidation resistance at 1,400 C accompanied with improved ductility were identified

  1. Three-dimensional numerical simulation during laser processing of CFRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Sato, Yuji; Matsunaga, Ei-ichi; Tsukamoto, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    We performed three-dimensional numerical simulation about laser processing of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) using OpenFOAM as libraries of finite volume method (FVM). Although a little theoretical or numerical studies about heat affected zone (HAZ) formation were performed, there is no research discussing how HAZ is generated considering time development about removal of each material. It is important to understand difference of removal speed of carbon fiber and resin in order to improve quality of cut surface of CFRP. We demonstrated how the carbon fiber and resin are removed by heat of ablation plume by our simulation. We found that carbon fiber is removed faster than resin at first stage because of the difference of thermal conductivity, and after that, the resin is removed faster because of its low combustion temperature. This result suggests the existence of optimal contacting time of the laser ablation and kerf of the target.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition of the lysozyme protein: an unexpected “Inverse MAPLE” process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Matei, Andreea; Constantinescu, Catalin

    2012-01-01

    Films of organic materials are commonly deposited by laser assisted methods, such as MAPLE (matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation), where a few percent of the film material in the target is protected by a light-absorbing volatile matrix. Another possibility is to irradiate the dry organic...... the ejection and deposition of lysozyme. This can be called an “inverse MAPLE” process, since the ratio of “matrix” to film material in the target is 10:90, which is inverse of the typical MAPLE process where the film material is dissolved in the matrix down to several wt.%. Lysozyme is a well-known protein...

  3. Impacts of Ambient and Ablation Plasmas on Short- and Ultrashort-Pulse Laser Processing of Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda M. Bulgakova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that more than five decades have passed since the invention of laser, some topics of laser-matter interaction still remain incompletely studied. One of such topics is plasma impact on the overall phenomenon of the interaction and its particular features, including influence of the laser-excited plasma re-radiation, back flux of energetic plasma species, and massive material redeposition, on the surface quality and processing efficiency. In this paper, we analyze different plasma aspects, which go beyond a simple consideration of the well-known effect of plasma shielding of laser radiation. The following effects are considered: ambient gas ionization above the target on material processing with formation of a “plasma pipe”; back heating of the target by both laser-driven ambient and ablation plasmas through conductive and radiative heat transfer; plasma chemical effects on surface processing including microstructure growth on liquid metals; complicated dynamics of the ablation plasma flow interacting with an ambient gas that can result in substantial redeposition of material around the ablation spot. Together with a review summarizing our main to-date achievements and outlining research directions, we present new results underlining importance of laser plasma dynamics and photoionization of the gas environment upon laser processing of materials.

  4. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, Mark Alan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding.

  5. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, M.A.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding

  6. Evaluation of the sheet mechanical response to laser welding processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmignani, B.; Daneri, A.; Toselli, G.; Bellei, M.

    1995-07-01

    The simulation of the mechanical response of steel sheets, due to the heating during welding processes by a laser source beam, obtained by Abaqus standard code, is discussed. Different hypotheses for the material behaviour at temperatures greater than the fusion one have been tested and compared; in particular, some tests have been made taking the annealing effect into account by means of an user routine UMAT developed ad hoc. This work was presented at the 8th international Abaqus Users' conference at Paris, 31 May - 2 June 1995

  7. Spatial Control of Crystal Texture by Laser DMD Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Parallel to rolling direction 1120 827 31 205 24 Matweb In718 filler material 1140 414 Charpy Impact Energy (J) Hardness (HRC) Tensile strength (Mpa...J. Choi, K. Nagarathnam, J. Koch, and D. Hetzner, “The direct metal deposition of H13 tool steel for 3-D components,” JOM, 49(5), 1997, 55-60. 4. M...Transactions A, 36A, 2005, 3397-3406. 6. Y. Hua and J. Choi, “Feedback control effects on dimensions and defects of H13 tool steel by DMD process,” J. of Laser Applications, 17(2), 2005, 117-125. 412

  8. FY1998 research report on the R and D on the production process technology of eco-tailored tribo-materials. R and D on the production process technology of materials controlled in micro-meter order; 1998 nendo eco-tailored tribo-material sosei process gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu chosa hokokusho. Micro-meter order de seigyosareta material sosei process gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Combined laser process technology was applied to development of tribo-materials for such various parts as engine cylinder and valve sheet of various outdoor industrial machinery and transport machinery. In fiscal 1998, study was made mainly on the possibility of every laser process for development of tribo-materials with specific structures and compositions controlled in micro-meter order. The obtained principal results are as follows. As for the pulsed laser deposition process to produce wear resistant coatings for small cylinders, thick films were produced efficiently by laser spattering of molten particles using high-pulse energy laser irradiation on targets. As for the cylinder bore surface modification process by spraying and lasering, basic study was made on this process. As for the process to synthesize intermetallic compounds for engine valve sheets, the effect of laser irradiation conditions on surface modification was studied through laser irradiation on Fe{sub 3}Al compounds synthesized by hot press. (NEDO)

  9. Materials processing with intense pulsed ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    We review research investigating the application of intense pulsed ion beams (IPIBs) for the surface treatment and coating of materials. The short range (0.1-10 μm) and high-energy density (1-50 J/cm 2 ) of these short-pulsed (≤ 1 μs) beams (with ion currents I = 5 - 50 kA, and energies E = 100 - 1000 keV) make them ideal to flash-heat a target surface, similar to the more familiar pulsed laser processes. IPIB surface treatment induces rapid melt and solidification at up to 10 10 K/s to cause amorphous layer formation and the production of non-equilibrium microstructures. At higher energy density the target surface is vaporized, and the ablated vapor is condensed as coatings onto adjacent substrates or as nanophase powders. Progress towards the development of robust, high-repetition rate IPIB accelerators is presented along with economic estimates for the cost of ownership of this technology

  10. Technology and plasma-materials interaction processes of tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, R.T.; Kellman, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    A workshop on the technology and plasma-materials interaction processes of tokamak disruptions was held April 3, 1992 in Monterey, California, as a satellite meeting of the 10th International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions. The objective was to bring together researchers working on disruption measurements in operating tokamaks, those performing disruption simulation experiments using pulsed plasma gun, electron beam and laser systems, and computational physicists attempting to model the evolution and plasma-materials interaction processes of tokamak disruptions. This is a brief report on the workshop. 4 refs

  11. Interfacial adhesion of laser clad functionally graded materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y. T.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. T. M.

    2003-01-01

    Specially designed samples of laser clad AlSi40 functionally graded materials (FGM) are made for evaluating the interfacial adhesion. To obtain the interfacial bond strength notches are made right at the interface of the FGMs. In-situ microstructural observations during straining in a field-emission

  12. Interfacial adhesion of laser clad functionally graded materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hosson, JTM; Pei, YT; Ocelik, [No Value; Sudarshan, TS; Stiglich, JJ; Jeandin, M

    2002-01-01

    Specially designed samples of laser clad AlSi40 functionally graded materials (FGM) are made for evaluating the interfacial adhesion. To obtain the interfacial bond strength notches are made right at the interface of the FGMs. In-sitit microstructural observations during straining in an FEG-ESEM

  13. Material Engineering for Monolithic Semiconductor Mode-Locked Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulkova, Irina

    This thesis is devoted to the materials engineering for semiconductor monolithic passively mode-locked lasers (MLLs) as a compact energy-efficient source of ultrashort optical pulses. Up to the present day, the achievement of low-noise sub-picosecond pulse generation has remained a challenge...

  14. Ultrashort-pulse laser excitation and damage of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse; Balling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Ultrashort-pulse laser excitation of dielectrics is an intricate problem due to the strong coupling between the rapidly changing material properties and the light. In the present paper, details of a model based on a multiple-rate-equation description of the conduction band are provided. The model...

  15. Polymers for nuclear materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvinen, G.; Benicewicz, B.; Duke, J.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The use of open-celled microcellular foams as solid sorbents for metal ions and other solutes could provide a revolutionary development in separation science. Macroreticular and gel-bead materials are the current state-of-the-art for solid sorbents to separate metal ions and other solutes from solution. The new polymer materials examined in this effort offer a number of advantages over the older materials that can have a large impact on industrial separations. The advantages include larger usable surface area in contact with the solution, faster sorption kinetics, ability to tailor the uniform cell size to a specific application, and elimination of channeling and packing instability

  16. The Laser Damage Threshold for Materials and the Relation Between Solid-Melt and Melt-Vapor Interface Velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Osama Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    Numerous experiments have demonstrated and analytic theories have predicted that there is a threshold for pulsed laser ablation of a wide range of materials. Optical surface damage threshold is a very complex and important application of high-power lasers. Optical damage may also be considered to be the initial phase of laser ablation. In this work it was determined the time required and the threshold energy of a layer of thickness to heat up. We used the Finite Difference method to simulate the process of laser-target interaction in three cases. Namely, the case before melting begins using a continuous wave (c.w) laser source and a pulsed laser source, the case after the first change of state (from solid to melt), and the case after the second change of state (from melt to vapor). And also study the relation between the solid-melt and melt-vapor interface velocities to have a commonsense of the laser ablation process.

  17. Interaction of a high-power laser pulse with supercritical-density porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gus'kov, Sergei Yu; Rozanov, Vladislav B; Caruso, A; Strangio, C

    2000-01-01

    The properties of a nonequilibrium plasma produced by high-power laser pulses with intensities I L ∼ 10 14 -10 15 W cm -2 irradiating plane targets made of a porous material are investigated. The mean density of matter in targets was substantially higher than the critical plasma density corresponding to a plasma resonance. The density of porous material was ρ a ∼ 1 - 20 mg cm -3 , whereas the critical density at the wavelength of incident radiation was ρ cr ∼ 3 mg cm -3 . An anomalously high absorption (no less than 80%) of laser radiation inside a target was observed. Within the first 3 - 4 ns of interaction, the plasma flow through the irradiated target surface in the direction opposite of the direction of the laser beam was noticeably suppressed. Only about 5% of absorbed laser energy was transformed into the energy of particles in this flow during the laser pulse. Absorbed energy was stored as the internal plasma energy at this stage (the greenhouse effect). Then, this energy was transformed, similar to a strong explosion, into the energy of a powerful hydrodynamic flow of matter surrounding the absorption region. The specific features of the formation and evolution of a nonequilibrium laser-produced plasma in porous media are theoretically analysed. This study allows the results of experiments to be explained. In particular, we investigated absorption of laser radiation in the bulk of a target, volume evaporation of porous material, the expansion of a laser-produced plasma inside the pores, stochastic collisions of plasma flows, and hydrothermal energy dissipation. These processes give rise to long-lived oscillations of plasma density and lead to the formation of an internal region where laser radiation is absorbed. (invited paper)

  18. Comparative researches concerning cleaning chosen construction materials surface layer using UV and IR laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napadlek, W.; Marczak, J.; Kubicki, J.; Szudrowicz, M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents comparative research studies of cleaning out of deposits and pollution disposals on different constructional materials like; steel, cast iron, aluminium, copper by using UV and IR laser radiation of wavelength λ =1.064 μm; λ = 0.532 μm; λ = 0.355 μm and λ = 0.266 μm and also impulse laser TEA CO 2 at radiation λ = 10.6 μm were used for the experiments. Achieved experimental results gave us basic information on parameters and conditions and application of each used radiation wavelength. Each kind of pollution and base material should be individually treated, selecting the length of wave and radiation energy density. Laser microtreatment allows for broad cleaning application of the surface of constructional materials as well as may be used in future during manufacturing processes as: preparation of surface for PVD technology, galvanotechnics, cleaning of the surface of machine parts etc. (author)

  19. Thin-Film Material Science and Processing | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thin-Film Material Science and Processing Thin-Film Material Science and Processing Photo of a , a prime example of this research is thin-film photovoltaics (PV). Thin films are important because cadmium telluride thin film, showing from top to bottom: glass, transparent conducting oxide (thin layer

  20. Computational modelling of Er(3+): Garnet laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Lee H.

    1994-01-01

    The Er(3+) ion has attracted a lot of interest for four reasons: (1) Its (4)I(sub 13/2) yields (4)I(sub 15/2) transition lases in the eyesafe region near 1.5 micron; (2) the (4)I(sub 13/2) transition lases near 2.8 micron, an important wavelength for surgical purposes; (3) it displays surprisingly efficient upconversion with lasing observed at 1.7, 1.2, 0.85, 0.56, 0.55, and 0.47 micron following 1.5 micron pumping; and (4) it has absorption bands at 0.96 and 0.81 micron and thus can be diode pumped. However, properties desirable for upconversion reduce the efficiency of 1.5 and 3 micron laser operation and vice versa. Since all of the processes are influenced by the host via the crystal field induced stark splittings in the Er levels, this project undertook modelling of the host influence on the Er lasinng behavior. While growth and measurement of all ten Er(3+) doped garnets is the surest way of identifying hosts which maximize upconversion (or conversly, 1.5 and 3 micron performance), it is also expensive - costing approximately $10,000/material or approximately $100,000 for the materials computationally investigated here. The calculations were performed using a quantum mechanical point charge model developed by Clyde Morrison at Harry Diamond Laboratories. The programs were used to fit the Er:YAG experimental energy levels so that the crystal field parameters, B(sub nm) could be extracted. From these radial factors, rho (sub n) were determined for Er(3+) in garnets. These, in combination with crystal field components, Anm, available from X-ray data, were used to predict energy levels for Er in the other nine garnet hosts. The levels in Er:YAG were fit with an rms error of 12.2/cm over a 22,000/cm range. Predicted levels for two other garnets for which literature values were available had rms errors of less than 17/cm , showing the calculations to be reliable. Based on resonances between pairs of calculated stark levels, the model predicts GSGG as the best host

  1. Plasma processed coating of laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.; Letts, S.A.; Myers, D.W.; Crane, J.K.; Illige, J.D.; Hatcher, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    Coatings for laser fusion targets have been deposited in an inductively coupled discharge device by plasma polymerization. Two feed gases were used: perfluoro-2-butene, which produced a fluorocarbon coating (CF 1 3 ) with a density of 1.8 g/cc, and trans-2-butene which produced a hydrocarbon coating (CH 1 3 ) with a density of 1.0 g/cc. Uniform pin-hole free films have been deposited to a thickness of up to 30 μm of fluorocarbon and up to 110 μm of hydrocarbon. The effect of process variables on surface smoothness has been investigated. The basic defect in the coating has been found to result from shadowing by a small surface irregularity in an anisotropic coating flux

  2. Post-processing of 3D-printed parts using femtosecond and picosecond laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingareev, Ilya; Gehlich, Nils; Bonhoff, Tobias; Meiners, Wilhelm; Kelbassa, Ingomar; Biermann, Tim; Richardson, Martin C.

    2014-03-01

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D-printing, is a near-net shape manufacturing approach, delivering part geometry that can be considerably affected by various process conditions, heat-induced distortions, solidified melt droplets, partially fused powders, and surface modifications induced by the manufacturing tool motion and processing strategy. High-repetition rate femtosecond and picosecond laser radiation was utilized to improve surface quality of metal parts manufactured by laser additive techniques. Different laser scanning approaches were utilized to increase the ablation efficiency and to reduce the surface roughness while preserving the initial part geometry. We studied post-processing of 3D-shaped parts made of Nickel- and Titanium-base alloys by utilizing Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) as additive manufacturing techniques. Process parameters such as the pulse energy, the number of layers and their spatial separation were varied. Surface processing in several layers was necessary to remove the excessive material, such as individual powder particles, and to reduce the average surface roughness from asdeposited 22-45 μm to a few microns. Due to the ultrafast laser-processing regime and the small heat-affected zone induced in materials, this novel integrated manufacturing approach can be used to post-process parts made of thermally and mechanically sensitive materials, and to attain complex designed shapes with micrometer precision.

  3. Materials processing with superposed Bessel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoming; Trallero-Herrero, Carlos A.; Lei, Shuting

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental results of femtosecond laser processing on the surface of glass and metal thin film using superposed Bessel beams. These beams are generated by a combination of a spatial light modulator (SLM) and an axicon with >50% efficiency, and they possess the long depth-of-focus (propagation-invariant) property as found in ordinary Bessel beams. Through micromachining experiments using femtosecond laser pulses, we show that multiple craters can be fabricated on glass with single-shot exposure, and the 1+(⿿1) superposed beam can reduce collateral damage caused by the rings in zero-order Bessel beams in the scribing of metal thin film.

  4. Method of processing radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Susumu; Moriya, Tetsuo; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Kariya, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve contamination proofness, water proofness, close bondability and stretching performance of strippable paints coated to substrates liable to be contaminated with radioactive materials. Method: Strippable paints are previously coated on substrates which may possibly be contaminated with radioactive materials. After the contamination, the coated membranes are stripped and removed. Alternatively, the strippable paints may be coated on the already contaminated substrates and, after drying, the paints are stripped and removed. The strippable paints used herein have a composition comprising a styrene-butadiene block copolymer containing from 60 to 80 wt% of styrene as a main ingredient and from 0.3 to 5 % by weight of a higher alkyl amine compound having 12 to 18 carbon atoms blended with the copolymer. (Ikeda, J.)

  5. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03

    Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the

  6. Thermal coupling and damage mechanisms of laser radiation on selected materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwirzke, F.; Jenkins, W.F.; Schmidt, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    High power laser beams interact with targets by a variety of thermal, impulse, and electrical effects. Energy coupling is considerably enhanced once surface electrical breakdown occurs. The laser heated plasma then causes surface damage via thermal evaporation, ion sputtering, and unipolar arcing. While the first two are purely thermal and mechanical effects, the last one, unipolar arcing, is an electrical plasma-surface interaction process which leads to crater formation, usually called laser-pitting, a process which was often observed but not well understood. Unipolar arcing occurs when a plasma of sufficiently high electron temperature interacts with a surface. Without an external voltage applied, many electrical micro-arcs burn between the surface and the plasma, driven by local variations of the sheath potential with the surface acting as both the cathode and anode. Laser induced unipolar arcing represents the most damaging and non-uniform plasma-surface interaction process since the energy available in the plasma concentrates towards the cathode spots. This causes cratering of the materials surface. The ejection of material in the form of small jets from the craters leads to ripples in the critical plasma density contour. This in turn contributes to the onset of plasma instabilities, small scale magnetic field generation and laser beam filamentation. The ejection of a plasma jet from the unipolar arc crater also causes highly localized shock waves to propagate into the target, softening it in the process. Thus, local surface erosion by unipolar arcing is much more severe than for uniform energy deposition

  7. Electrospinning Materials, Processing, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wendorff, Joachim H; Greiner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Bringing together the world's experts in the field, this book summarizes the state-of-the art in electrospinning with detailed coverage of the various techniques, material systems, and their resulting fiber structures and properties, theoretical aspects, and applications. Throughout the book, the current status of knowledge is introduced with a critical view on accomplishments and novel persepectives. An experimental section gives hands-on guidance to beginners and experts alike.

  8. Process for preparing coating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryoke, Hideyasu; Kobayashi, Juichi; Kobayashi, Kei.

    1972-01-01

    A coating material curable with ionizing radiations or ultraviolet radiation can be prepared by reacting a compound (A) having one OH group and at least one α,β-ethylenic or allyl group with a polyisocyanate. (A) is a diester of a dicarboxylic acid. One of the ester groups may have a terminal α,β-ethylenic or allyl group and the other contains one OH and one α,β-ethylenic or allyl group. (A) is reacted with a polyisocyanate to yield an urethane. The latter may be diluted with a vinyl monomer. When exposed to a radiation, the coating material cures to give a film excellent in adhesion, impact strength and resistances to pollution, water and solvents. Dose of the ionizing radiation (α-, β-, γ-rays, electron beams) is 0.2-20 Mrad. In one example, 116 parts of 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate was reacted with 148 parts of phthalic anhydride and 142 parts of glycidyl methacrylate to give (A). (A) was reacted with 87 parts of tolylenediisocyanate. A metallic panel was coated with the coating material and cured with electron beams (5 Mrad). Pencil hardness was H, and gel fraction measured in acetone was above 97%. The coating was excellent in resistances to solvent and chemicals, impact strength and adhesion. (Kaichi, S.)

  9. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  10. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of laser deposited advanced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistla, Harihar Rakshit

    Additive manufacturing in the form of laser deposition is a unique way to manufacture near net shape metallic components from advanced materials. Rapid solidification facilitates the extension of solid solubility, compositional flexibility and decrease in micro-segregation in the melt among other advantages. The current work investigates the employment of laser deposition to fabricate the following: 1. Functionally gradient materials: This allows grading dissimilar materials compositionally to tailor specific properties of both these materials into a single component. Specific compositions of the candidate materials (SS 316, Inconel 625 and Ti64) were blended and deposited to study the brittle intermetallics reported in these systems. 2. High entropy alloys: These are multi- component alloys with equiatomic compositions of 5 or more elements. The ratio of Al to Ni was decreased to observe the transition of solid solution from a BCC to an FCC crystal structure in the AlFeCoCrNi system. 3. Structurally amorphous alloys: Zr-based metallic glasses have been reported to have high glass forming ability. These alloys have been laser deposited so as to rapidly cool them from the melt into an amorphous state. Microstructural analysis and X-ray diffraction were used to study the phase formation, and hardness was measured to estimate the mechanical properties.

  11. Analysis of coaxial laser micro cladding processing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Tarasova, Tatiana Vasilievna; Gvozdeva, Galina Olegovna; Nowotny, Steffen; Ableyeva, Riana R.; Dolzhikova, Evgenia Yu

    2018-01-01

    The laser build-up cladding is a well-known technique for repair, coatings and additive manufacturing tasks. Modern equipment for the laser cladding enables material to be deposited with the lateral resolution of about 100 μm and to manufacture miniature precise parts. However, the micro cladding regimes are unknown. Determination of these regimes is an expensive task as a well-known relation between laser cladding parameters and melt pool dimensions are changing by technology micro-miniaturi...

  12. Modeling the astrophysical dynamical process with laser-plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jiangfan; Zhang Jun; Zhang Jie

    2001-01-01

    The use of the state-of-the-art laser facility makes it possible to create conditions of the same or similar to those in the astrophysical processes. The introduction of the astrophysics-relevant ideas in laser-plasma experiments is propitious to the understanding of the astrophysical phenomena. However, the great difference between the laser-produced plasmas and the astrophysical processes makes it awkward to model the latter by laser-plasma experiments. The author addresses the physical backgrounds for modeling the astrophysical plasmas by laser plasmas, connecting these two kinds of plasmas by scaling laws. Thus, allowing the creation of experimental test beds where observations and models can be quantitatively compared with laser-plasma data. Special attentions are paid on the possibilities of using home-made laser facilities to model astrophysical phenomena

  13. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kaoumi, Djamel; Bai, Xian-Ming

    2017-12-01

    The 8th symposium on Microstructural Progresses in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) was held at San Diego Convention Center and Marriott Marquis & Marina, San Diego, California, USA, February 26-March 2, 2017, as part of the TMS 2017 146th Annual Meeting and Exhibition. Since 2003, when the first MPIM symposium was held in the same place, the symposium has been held in odd years and has grown to one of the biggest symposia in the TMS Annual Meeting which invites more than sixty symposia. In the 8th MPIM symposium, a total of 106 oral and poster presentations, including 16 invited talks, were delivered for 4 days.

  14. Material and process selection using product examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to suggest a different procedure for selecting materials and processes within the product development work. The procedure includes using product examples in order to increase the number of alternative materials and processes that is considered. Product examples can c...... a search engine, and through hyperlinks can relevant materials and processes be explored. Realising that designers are very sensitive to user interfaces do all descriptions of materials, processes and products include graphical descriptions, i.e. pictures or computer graphics....

  15. Material and process selection using product examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to suggest a different procedure for selecting materials and processes within the product development work. The procedure includes using product examples in order to increase the number of alternative materials and processes that is considered. Product examples can c...... a search engine, and through hyperlinks can relevant materials and processes be explored. Realising that designers are very sensitive to user interfaces do all descriptions of materials, processes and products include graphical descriptions, i.e. pictures or computer graphics....

  16. Finite element simulation of laser cutting process of steel sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meško Jozef

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lasers are widely used in industry as cutting tools due to ultra flexibility of the cutting conditions, obtaining high quality end product, quick set up, non-mechanical contact between the workpiece and the tool, and small size of the heat affected zone. In the present study, laser gas assisted cutting process is examined. The laser cutting sheet solution is practically always very convenient compared to conventional technologies and brings the greatest cost savings in the manufacturing process.

  17. 3D transient model to predict temperature and ablated areas during laser processing of metallic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak. B. Naghshine

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser processing is one of the most popular small-scale patterning methods and has many applications in semiconductor device fabrication and biomedical engineering. Numerical modelling of this process can be used for better understanding of the process, optimization, and predicting the quality of the final product. An accurate 3D model is presented here for short laser pulses that can predict the ablation depth and temperature distribution on any section of the material in a minimal amount of time. In this transient model, variations of thermal properties, plasma shielding, and phase change are considered. Ablation depth was measured using a 3D optical profiler. Calculated depths are in good agreement with measured values on laser treated titanium surfaces. The proposed model can be applied to a wide range of materials and laser systems.

  18. Application of laser processing for disassembly of nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Gennady A.; Zinchenko, A. V.; Arutyunyan, R. B.

    1998-12-01

    Provision of safety and drop of ecological risk at salvaging of nuclear submarines (NSM) of Russia Navy Forces represents one of the most actual problems of nowadays. It is necessary to remove from services of Russian Navy Forces 170 - 180 nuclear submarines by 2000. At salvaging of Russian Navy Forces NSM it should be necessary to cut out reactor compartments with more than 150 thousand tons of gross weight and to fragment terminal carcasses of submarines with gross weight of 2 million tons. Taking into account overall dimensions of salvaging objects and Euro-standard requirement on the sizes of carcass fragments, for salvaging of one NSM it is necessary to execute more than 10 km of cuts. Using of conventional methods of gas and plasma cutting of ship constructions and equipment polluted with radioactive oxides and bedding of insulation and paint and varnish materials causes contamination of working zones and environment by a mix of radioactive substances and highly toxic combustion products, nomenclature of which includes up to 50 names. Calculations carried out in the Institute of industrial and Marine Medicine have shown that salvage of just one NSM with using of gas and plasma cutting are accompanied by discharge into an environment of up to 11.5 kg of chromium oxides, up to 22.5 kg of manganese oxides, up to 97 kg of carbon oxides and up to 650 kg of nitrogen oxides. Fragmentation of such equipment by a method of directional explosion or hydraulic jet is problematic because of complexity of treated constructions and necessity to create special protective facilities, which will accumulate a bulk of radioactive and toxic discharges, as a consequence of the explosion and spreaded by shock waves and water deluges. In a number of new technological processes the cutting with using of high-power industrial lasers radiation stands out. As compared with other technological processes, laser cutting has many advantages determined by such unique properties of laser

  19. Thermoreflectance spectroscopy—Analysis of thermal processes in semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierścińska, D.

    2018-01-01

    This review focuses on theoretical foundations, experimental implementation and an overview of experimental results of the thermoreflectance spectroscopy as a powerful technique for temperature monitoring and analysis of thermal processes in semiconductor lasers. This is an optical, non-contact, high spatial resolution technique providing high temperature resolution and mapping capabilities. Thermoreflectance is a thermometric technique based on measuring of relative change of reflectivity of the surface of laser facet, which provides thermal images useful in hot spot detection and reliability studies. In this paper, principles and experimental implementation of the technique as a thermography tool is discussed. Some exemplary applications of TR to various types of lasers are presented, proving that thermoreflectance technique provides new insight into heat management problems in semiconductor lasers and in particular, that it allows studying thermal degradation processes occurring at laser facets. Additionally, thermal processes and basic mechanisms of degradation of the semiconductor laser are discussed.

  20. Spectroscopic and imaging diagnostics of pulsed laser deposition laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thareja, Raj K.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of laser spectroscopic techniques used in the diagnostics of laser ablated plumes used for thin film deposition is given. An emerging laser spectroscopic imaging technique for the laser ablation material processing is discussed. (author)

  1. Additive Manufacturing of High-Entropy Alloys by Laser Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Janssen, Niels; Smith, Stefan; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    This contribution concentrates on the possibilities of additive manufacturing of high-entropy clad layers by laser processing. In particular, the effects of the laser surface processing parameters on the microstructure and hardness of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were examined. AlCoCrFeNi alloys with

  2. Process of treating bituminous material, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, J P

    1939-09-28

    Process for the preparation of bituminous materials or substances which they contain and of better properties, especially those adhering and subdividing in the presence of water or moisture, in that these materials are mixed with amounts of sulfuric acid esters or arylsufonic aicd esters of low primary aliphatic alcohols or with materials from which these esters can be formed.

  3. Roadmap for Process Equipment Materials Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2003-10-01

    This Technology Roadmap addresses the ever-changing material needs of the chemical and allied process industries, and the energy, economic and environmental burdens associated with corrosion and other materials performance and lifetime issues. This Technology Roadmap outlines the most critical of these R&D needs, and how they can impact the challenges facing today’s materials of construction.

  4. Ablation, surface activation, and electroless metallization of insulating materials by pulsed excimer laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, D.H.; Godbole, M.J.; Pedraza, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    Pulsed-laser irradiation of wide bandgap ceramic substrates, using photons with sub-bandgap energies, activates the ceramic surface for subsequent electroless copper deposition. The copper deposit is confined within the irradiated region when the substrate is subsequently immersed in an electroless copper bath. However, a high laser fluence (typically several j/cm 2 ) and repeated laser shots are needed to obtain uniform copper coverage by this direct-irradiation process. In contrast, by first applying an evaporated SiO x thin film (with x ∼1), laser ablation at quite low energy density (∼0.5 J/cm 2 ) results in re-deposition on the ceramic substrate of material that is catalytic for subsequent electroless copper deposition. Experiments indicate that the re-deposited material is on silicon, on which copper nucleates. Using an SiO x film on a laser-transparent substrate, quite fine (∼12 μm) copper lines can be formed at the boundary of the region that is laser-etched in SiO x . Using SiO x with an absorbing (polycrystalline) ceramic substrate, more-or-less uniform activation and subsequent copper deposition are obtained. In the later case, interactions with the ceramic substrate also may be important for uniform deposition

  5. Advanced laser processing for industrial solar cell manufacturing (ALPINISM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, N.B.; Fieret, J. [Exitech Ltd. (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-04

    The study was aimed at improving methods for the manufacture of high efficiency solar cells and thereby increase production rates. The project focused on the laser grooved buried contact solar cell (LGBC) which is produced by high-speed laser machining. The specific objectives were (i) to optimise the laser technology for high speed processing; (ii) to optimise the solar cell process conditions for high speed processing; (iii) to produce a prototype tool and demonstrate high throughput; and (iv) to demonstrate increased cell efficiency using laser processing of rear contact. Essentially, all the objectives were met and Exitech have already sold six production tools and one research tool developed in this study. In addition, it was found that laser processing at the rear cell surface offers the prospect of LGBC solar cells with an efficiency of 20 per cent. BP Solar Limited carried out this work under contract to the DTI.

  6. Methods for Optimisation of the Laser Cutting Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Birgitte

    This thesis deals with the adaptation and implementation of various optimisation methods, in the field of experimental design, for the laser cutting process. The problem in optimising the laser cutting process has been defined and a structure for at Decision Support System (DSS......) for the optimisation of the laser cutting process has been suggested. The DSS consists of a database with the currently used and old parameter settings. Also one of the optimisation methods has been implemented in the DSS in order to facilitate the optimisation procedure for the laser operator. The Simplex Method has...... been adapted in two versions. A qualitative one, that by comparing the laser cut items optimise the process and a quantitative one that uses a weighted quality response in order to achieve a satisfactory quality and after that maximises the cutting speed thus increasing the productivity of the process...

  7. Surface Thermometry of Energetic Materials by Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    at 34 yttrium- aluminum -garnet (Dy:YAG). The simplified energy diagram of Dy:YAG is shown in Fig. 1. Absorbed laser light (at 355 nrm) can 5 excite the...the thermometric technique on a surface similar to that of an energetic material, a thermal-setting plastic supplied by Buehler, Ltd., was employed...temperature over the temperature range of interest. The rare-earth ion dysprosium (Dy) doped into a yttrium- aluminum -garnet (YAG) crystal was I determined

  8. Laser-based microstructuring of materials surfaces using low-cost microlens arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Daniel; Vara, G.; Diez, J. A.; O`Connor, Gerard M.; Arines, Justo; Gómez-Reino, C.; Flores-Arias, M.

    2012-03-01

    Since frictional interactions in microscopically small components are becoming increasingly important for the development of new products for all modern technology, we present a laser-based technique for micro-patterning surfaces of materials using low-cost microlens arrays. The microlens used were fabricated on soda-lime glass using a laser direct-write technique, followed by a thermal treatment into an oven. By combining laser direct-write and the thermal treatment it was possible to obtain high quality elements using a low cost infrared laser widely implemented in industry which makes this technique attractive in comparison with other more expensive methods. The main advantage of using microlens arrays for micropatterning surfaces is the possibility of fabricating a large number of identical structures simultaneously, leading to a highly efficient process. In order to study the capabilities of the microlens fabricated for microstructuring materials, identical structures and arrays of holes were fabricated over a variety of materials, such us, stainless steel, polymer and ceramic. The minimum diameter of the individual microstructure generated at surface is 5 μm. Different nanosecond lasers operating at Infrared, Green and UV were used. The topography and morphology of the elements obtained were determined using a confocal microscope SENSOFAR 2300 Plμ.

  9. Residual stress improvement mechanism on metal material by underwater laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Yuji; Yoda, Masaki; Mukai, Naruhiko; Obata, Minoru; Kanno, Masanori

    2000-01-01

    Residual stress improvement technology for component surface by underwater pulsed laser irradiation has been developed as a method of preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of core components in nuclear reactors. In order to optimize the laser irradiation conditions based on a complete understanding of the mechanism, the propagation of a shock wave induced by the impulse of laser irradiation and the dynamic response of the irradiated material were analyzed through time-dependent elasto-plastic calculations with a finite element program. The calculated results are compared with the measured results obtained by experiments in which laser pulses with an energy of 200 mJ are focused to a diameter of 0.8 mm on a water-immersed test piece of 20% cold-worked Type 304 austenitic stainless steel to simulate neutron irradiation hardening. A residual compressive stress, which is nearly equivalent to the yield stress of the processed material, remains on the material surface after passage of the shock wave with enough amplitude to induce a permanent strain. Multiple irradiation of laser pulses extends the stress-improved depth to about 1 mm, which would be the limit corresponding to the three-dimensional dispersion effect of the shock wave. (author)

  10. Numerical Model based Reliability Estimation of Selective Laser Melting Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2014-01-01

    Selective laser melting is developing into a standard manufacturing technology with applications in various sectors. However, the process is still far from being at par with conventional processes such as welding and casting, the primary reason of which is the unreliability of the process. While...... of the selective laser melting process. A validated 3D finite-volume alternating-direction-implicit numerical technique is used to model the selective laser melting process, and is calibrated against results from single track formation experiments. Correlation coefficients are determined for process input...... parameters such as laser power, speed, beam profile, etc. Subsequently, uncertainties in the processing parameters are utilized to predict a range for the various outputs, using a Monte Carlo method based uncertainty analysis methodology, and the reliability of the process is established....

  11. Investigation of residual stress in laser welding dissimilar materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirim, Denilson de Camargo; Oliveira, Rene Ramos de; Berretta, Jose Roberto; Rossi, Wagner de; Lima, Nelson Batista de; Delijaicov, Sergio; Gomes, Diego Oliva

    2010-01-01

    One of the most critical problems found in the different materials welding is the residual stress formation, that happens mainly for the fact of those materials they possess coefficients of thermal expansion and different thermal conductivities. Like this in this work the residual tension was evaluated in the technique of welding laser among the steel low carbon, AISI 1010 and AISI 304. The materials were united for it welds autogenous of top with a laser of continuous Nd:YAG in that they were varied the potency, speed and the focus of the laser stayed constant in relation to surface of the sample. The main objective of the study went identification and to analysis of the residual stress in HAZ on both sides of seem. Um planning factorial of two factors at two levels each it was executed for optimization the combination of the factors potency and speed. The obtained answers were the residual stress in different depths in HAZ. In the surface of the sample measures of residual stress were accomplished by the technique of X-ray diffraction. The hole drilling strain gage method it was applied to measure the residual stress on both sides of the union. The results were analyzed using the variance analysis and the statistical regression based on the different influences of the entrance and combination of the factors in the residual stress generated in that union. The results indicate that the development of models can foresee the answers satisfactorily. (author)

  12. Structure changes in steels and hard metal induced by nanosecond and femtosecond laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, Gabriel; Romano, Valerio; Weber, Heinz P.; Haefke, Henry; Gerbig, Yvonne; Sentis, Marc L.; Hermann, Joerg; Bruneau, Sebastien

    2003-11-01

    Investigations on the occurrence of structure and hardness changes (for two sorts of steel and for a hard metal substrate) in the immediate vicinity of laser induced craters are presented in this work. Experiments with femtosecond pulses were performed in air with a Ti:sapphire laser (800 nm, 100 fs) at mean fluences of 2, 5 and 10 J/cm2. Series of microcraters were induced with 100 to 5,000 laser pulses per hole. Experiments with similar fluences, but 10 to 40 pules per hole, were performed on the same materials using a Nd:YAG delivering 100 ns pulese. After laser irradiation, cuts were made through the processed samples and the changes occurred in the crystalline structure of the target materials were evidenced by metallographical analysis of the resulting cross-sections. Hardness measurements were performed in points situated in the immediate vicinity of the laser-induced pores. Affected zones in the material surrounding laser induced pores were always found in the ns-regime, however with different properties for various laser parameters. In the fs-regime, zones of modified materials were also found and in such zones a significant hardness increasing was evidenced; the limit of the low fluences regime, where no structure changes occurred, was found to be slightly above 2 J/cm2.

  13. Etching processes of transparent carbon nanotube thin films using laser technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.K.; Lin, R.C.; Li, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have potential as a transparent conductive material with good mechanical and electrical properties. However, carbon nanotube thin film deposition and etching processes are very difficult to pattern the electrode. In this study, transparent CNT film with a binder is coated on a PET flexible substrate. The transmittance and sheet resistance of carbon nanotube film are 84% and 1000 Ω/□, respectively. The etching process of carbon nanotube film on flexible substrates was investigated using 355 nm and 1064 nm laser sources. Experimental results show that carbon nanotube film can be ablated using laser technology. With the 355 nm UV laser, the minimum etched line width was 20 μm with a low amount of recast material of the ablated sections. The optimal conditions of laser ablation were determined for carbon nanotube film.

  14. Study on process of laser cladded nuclear valve parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunliang

    2000-01-01

    The microstructure and performances of the Co-base alloy coatings that are formed by laser cladding, plasma spurt welding and arc surfacing on the nuclear valve-sealing surface have been studied and compared. The combination costs of laser cladding, plasma spurt welding and arc, surfacing have been analyzed and compared. The results showed that the laser cladding processing has the advantages of high efficiency, low energy cost, a little machining allowance, high rate of finished products and low combination cost, compared with plasma spurt welding processing and arc surfacing processing. The laser cladding technology can improve the qualities of nuclear valve parts and increase their service life. Therefore, the laser cladding processing is a new technology with developing potential

  15. A study of process parameters on workpiece anisotropy in the laser engineered net shaping (LENSTM) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Shubham; Rao, Balkrishna C.

    2017-06-01

    The process of laser engineered net shaping (LENSTM) is an additive manufacturing technique that employs the coaxial flow of metallic powders with a high-power laser to form a melt pool and the subsequent deposition of the specimen on a substrate. Although research done over the past decade on the LENSTM processing of alloys of steel, titanium, nickel and other metallic materials typically reports superior mechanical properties in as-deposited specimens, when compared to the bulk material, there is anisotropy in the mechanical properties of the melt deposit. The current study involves the development of a numerical model of the LENSTM process, using the principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and the subsequent prediction of the volume fraction of equiaxed grains to predict process parameters required for the deposition of workpieces with isotropy in their properties. The numerical simulation is carried out on ANSYS-Fluent, whose data on thermal gradient are used to determine the volume fraction of the equiaxed grains present in the deposited specimen. This study has been validated against earlier efforts on the experimental studies of LENSTM for alloys of nickel. Besides being applicable to the wider family of metals and alloys, the results of this study will also facilitate effective process design to improve both product quality and productivity.

  16. Automated processing of nuclear materials accounting data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straka, J.; Pacak, P.; Moravec, J.

    1980-01-01

    An automated system was developed of nuclear materials accounting in Czechoslovakia. The system allows automating data processing including data storage. It comprises keeping records of inventories and material balance. In designing the system, the aim of the IAEA was taken into consideration, ie., building a unified information system interconnected with state-run systems of accounting and checking nuclear materials in the signatory countries of the non-proliferation treaty. The nuclear materials accounting programs were written in PL-1 and were tested at an EC 1040 computer at UJV Rez where also the routine data processing takes place. (B.S.)

  17. Doping of silicon with carbon during laser ablation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Račiukaitis, G.; Brikas, M.; Kazlauskienė, V.; Miškinis, J.

    2006-12-01

    The effect of laser ablation on properties of remaining material in silicon was investigated. It was found that laser cutting of wafers in the air induced the doping of silicon with carbon. The effect was more distinct when using higher laser power or UV radiation. Carbon ions created bonds with silicon atoms in the depth of the material. Formation of the silicon carbide type bonds was confirmed by SIMS, XPS and AES measurements. Modeling of the carbon diffusion to clarify its depth profile in silicon was performed. Photochemical reactions of such type changed the structure of material and could be the reason of the reduced machining quality. The controlled atmosphere was applied to prevent carbonization of silicon during laser cutting.

  18. Laser cutting of laminated sheet material: a modeling exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Roelof F.; Meijer, Johan

    1997-08-01

    Laser cutting has been investigated for a number of aluminum-synthetic laminates, newly developed materials for the aeronautic and automotive industry. The materials consist of alternating aluminum and synthetic layers. It is shown that these materials can be cut at rates comparable to those of homogeneous aluminum alloys. The cuts show little dross attachment. Also some damage on the synthetic layers has to be accepted. These results initiated a modeling exercise, which resulted in a numerical simulation code. The applied cutting model is based on describing the material in several horizontal layers, each with its own specific thermophysical and optical properties. The separate layers are coupled by known mass, energy and force balanced equations.

  19. Dross formation during laser cutting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B S; Aleem, B J Abdul [Mechanical Engineering Department, King Fahd University of Petoleum and Minerals, Dhahran 32161 (Saudi Arabia)

    2006-04-07

    Melt formation during laser cutting of metallic substrates is considered and the melt thickness is formulated using a lump parameter analysis. The droplet diameter is also predicted and compared with the experimental results. A CO{sub 2} laser with variable pulse frequency is used in the experiment. Oxygen, as assisting gas, impinging coaxially with the laser beam, is used at different pressures. SEM and XRD are carried out to obtain micrographs and oxide compounds formed in the dross. It is found that the liquid layer thickness increases with increasing laser output power and reduces with increasing assisting gas velocity. The droplet formed is spherical and the droplet size predicted agrees well with the experimental results.

  20. Metabonomics for detection of nuclear materials processing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd Michael; Luxon, Bruce A. (University Texas Medical Branch); Neerathilingam, Muniasamy (University Texas Medical Branch); Ansari, S. (University Texas Medical Branch); Volk, David (University Texas Medical Branch); Sarkar, S. (University Texas Medical Branch); Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2010-08-01

    Tracking nuclear materials production and processing, particularly covert operations, is a key national security concern, given that nuclear materials processing can be a signature of nuclear weapons activities by US adversaries. Covert trafficking can also result in homeland security threats, most notably allowing terrorists to assemble devices such as dirty bombs. Existing methods depend on isotope analysis and do not necessarily detect chronic low-level exposure. In this project, indigenous organisms such as plants, small mammals, and bacteria are utilized as living sensors for the presence of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Such 'metabolic fingerprinting' (or 'metabonomics') employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess alterations in organismal metabolism provoked by the environmental presence of nuclear materials processing, for example the tributyl phosphate employed in the processing of spent reactor fuel rods to extract and purify uranium and plutonium for weaponization.

  1. Metabonomics for detection of nuclear materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Todd Michael; Luxon, Bruce A.; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Ansari, S.; Volk, David; Sarkar, S.; Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Tracking nuclear materials production and processing, particularly covert operations, is a key national security concern, given that nuclear materials processing can be a signature of nuclear weapons activities by US adversaries. Covert trafficking can also result in homeland security threats, most notably allowing terrorists to assemble devices such as dirty bombs. Existing methods depend on isotope analysis and do not necessarily detect chronic low-level exposure. In this project, indigenous organisms such as plants, small mammals, and bacteria are utilized as living sensors for the presence of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Such 'metabolic fingerprinting' (or 'metabonomics') employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess alterations in organismal metabolism provoked by the environmental presence of nuclear materials processing, for example the tributyl phosphate employed in the processing of spent reactor fuel rods to extract and purify uranium and plutonium for weaponization.

  2. Material Properties of Laser-Welded Thin Silicon Foils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Hessmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended monocrystalline silicon base foil offers a great opportunity to combine low-cost production with high efficiency silicon solar cells on a large scale. By overcoming the area restriction of ingot-based monocrystalline silicon wafer production, costs could be decreased to thin film solar cell range. The extended monocrystalline silicon base foil consists of several individual thin silicon wafers which are welded together. A comparison of three different approaches to weld 50 μm thin silicon foils is investigated here: (1 laser spot welding with low constant feed speed, (2 laser line welding, and (3 keyhole welding. Cross-sections are prepared and analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD to reveal changes in the crystal structure at the welding side after laser irradiation. The treatment leads to the appearance of new grains and boundaries. The induced internal stress, using the three different laser welding processes, was investigated by micro-Raman analysis. We conclude that the keyhole welding process is the most favorable to produce thin silicon foils.

  3. Materials, processes, and environmental engineering network

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    The Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN) was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. Environmental replacement materials information is a newly developed focus of MPEEN. This database is the NASA Environmental Information System, NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team, NOET, to be hazardous to the environment. An environmental replacement technology database is contained within NEIS. Environmental concerns about materials are identified by NOET, and control or replacement strategies are formed. This database also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these hazardous materials. In addition to addressing environmental concerns, MPEEN contains one of the largest materials databases in the world. Over 600 users access this network on a daily basis. There is information available on failure analysis, metals and nonmetals testing, materials properties, standard and commercial parts, foreign alloy cross-reference, Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) data, and Materials and Processes Selection List data.

  4. Indirect Versus Direct Heating of Sheet Materials: Superplastic Forming and Diffusion Bonding Using Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocelyn, Alan; Kar, Aravinda; Fanourakis, Alexander; Flower, Terence; Ackerman, Mike; Keevil, Allen; Way, Jerome

    2010-06-01

    Many from within manufacturing industry consider superplastic forming (SPF) to be ‘high tech’, but it is often criticized as too complicated, expensive, slow and, in general, an unstable process when compared to other methods of manipulating sheet materials. Perhaps, the fundamental cause of this negative perception of SPF, and also of diffusion bonding (DB), is the fact that the current process of SPF/DB relies on indirect sources of heating to produce the conditions necessary for the material to be formed. Thus, heat is usually derived from the electrically heated platens of hydraulic presses, to a lesser extent from within furnaces and, sometimes, from heaters imbedded in ceramic moulds. Recent evaluations of these isothermal methods suggest they are slow, thermally inefficient and inappropriate for the process. In contrast, direct heating of only the material to be formed by modern, electrically efficient, lasers could transform SPF/DB into the first choice of designers in aerospace, automotive, marine, medical, architecture and leisure industries. Furthermore, ‘variable temperature’ direct heating which, in theory, is possible with a laser beam(s) may provide a means to control material thickness distribution, a goal of enormous importance as fuel efficient, lightweight structures for transportation systems are universally sought. This paper compares, and contrasts, the two systems and suggests how a change to laser heating might be achieved.

  5. Applications of Laser Precisely Processing Technology in Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    According to the design method of laser resonator cavity, we optimized the primary parameters of resonator and utilized LD arrays symmetrically pumping manner to implementing output of the high-brightness laser in our laser cutter, then which was applied to precisely cutting the conductive film of CuInSe2 solar cells, the buried contact silicon solar cells' electrode groove, and perforating in wafer which is used to the emitter wrap through silicon solar cells. Laser processing precision was less than 40μm, the results have met solar cell's fabrication technology, and made finally the buried cells' conversion efficiency be improved from 18% to 21% .

  6. Application of laser assisted cold spraying process for metal deposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlotleng, Monnamme

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser assisted cold spraying (LACS) process is a hybrid technique that uses laser and cold spray to deposit solid powders on metal substrates. For bonding to occur, the particle velocities must be supersonic which are achieved by entraining...

  7. Toward a virtual platform for materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, G. J.; Prahl, U.

    2009-05-01

    Any production is based on materials eventually becoming components of a final product. Material properties being determined by the microstructure of the material thus are of utmost importance both for productivity and reliability of processing during production and for application and reliability of the product components. A sound prediction of materials properties therefore is highly important. Such a prediction requires tracking of microstructure and properties evolution along the entire component life cycle starting from a homogeneous, isotropic and stress-free melt and eventually ending in failure under operational load. This article will outline ongoing activities at the RWTH Aachen University aiming at establishing a virtual platform for materials processing comprising a virtual, integrative numerical description of processes and of the microstructure evolution along the entire production chain and even extending further toward microstructure and properties evolution under operational conditions.

  8. Laser-solid interaction and dynamics of the laser-ablated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.R.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Geohegan, D.B.; Wood, R.F.; Donato, J.M.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Rapid transformations through the liquid and vapor phases induced by laser-solid interactions are described by the authors' thermal model with the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to determine the vaporization temperature under different surface pressure condition. Hydrodynamic behavior of the vapor during and after ablation is described by gas dynamic equations. These two models are coupled. Modeling results show that lower background pressure results lower laser energy density threshold for vaporization. The ablation rate and the amount of materials removed are proportional to the laser energy density above its threshold. The authors also demonstrate a dynamic source effect that accelerates the unsteady expansion of laser-ablated material in the direction perpendicular to the solid. A dynamic partial ionization effect is studied as well. A self-similar theory shows that the maximum expansion velocity is proportional to c s α, where 1 - α is the slope of the velocity profile. Numerical hydrodynamic modeling is in good agreement with the theory. With these effects, α is reduced. Therefore, the expansion front velocity is significantly higher than that from conventional models. The results are consistent with experiments. They further study how the plume propagates in high background gas condition. Under appropriate conditions, the plume is slowed down, separates with the background, is backward moving, and hits the solid surface. Then, it splits into two parts when it rebounds from the surface. The results from the modeling will be compared with experimental observations where possible

  9. Computer Processing Of Tunable-Diode-Laser Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Randy D.

    1991-01-01

    Tunable-diode-laser spectrometer measuring transmission spectrum of gas operates under control of computer, which also processes measurement data. Measurements in three channels processed into spectra. Computer controls current supplied to tunable diode laser, stepping it through small increments of wavelength while processing spectral measurements at each step. Program includes library of routines for general manipulation and plotting of spectra, least-squares fitting of direct-transmission and harmonic-absorption spectra, and deconvolution for determination of laser linewidth and for removal of instrumental broadening of spectral lines.

  10. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Shock waves create extreme states of matter with very high pressures, temperatures, and volumetric compressions, at an exceedingly rapid rate of change. We review how to use a beamsplitter and a note card to turn a typical chirp pulse amplified femtosecond laser system into an ultrafast shock dynamics machine. Open scientific questions that can be addressed with such an apparatus are described. We report on the development of several single shot time resolved diagnostics needed to answer these questions. These single shot diagnostics are expected to be broadly applicable to other types of laser ablation experiments. Experimental results measured from shocked material dynamics of several systems are detailed. Finally, we report on progress towards using transient absorption as a measure of electronic excitation and coherent Raman as a picosecond probe of temperature in shock compressed condensed matter.

  11. The Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing - LAMP - is a clean-room research facility run and operated by Pr. Gary Rubloff's group. Research activities focus...

  12. Advanced Materials Growth and Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This most extensive of U.S. Army materials growth and processing facilities houses seven dedicated, state-of-the-art, molecular beam epitaxy and three metal organic...

  13. High Speed Pump-Probe Apparatus for Observation of Transitional Effects in Ultrafast Laser Micromachining Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Alexeev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A pump-probe experimental approach has been shown to be a very efficient tool for the observation and analysis of various laser matter interaction effects. In those setups, synchronized laser pulses are used to create an event (pump and to simultaneously observe it (probe. In general, the physical effects that can be investigated with such an apparatus are restricted by the temporal resolution of the probe pulse and the observation window. The latter can be greatly extended by adjusting the pump-probe time delay under the assumption that the interaction process remains fairly reproducible. Unfortunately, this assumption becomes invalid in the case of high-repetition-rate ultrafast laser material processing, where the irradiation history strongly affects the ongoing interaction process. In this contribution, the authors present an extension of the pump-probe setup that allows to investigate transitional and dynamic effects present during ultrafast laser machining performed at high pulse repetition frequencies.

  14. Efficiency of laser beam utilization in gas laser cutting of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galushkin, M. G.; Grishaev, R. V.

    2018-02-01

    Relying on the condition of dynamic matching of the process parameters in gas laser cutting, the dependence of the beam utilization factor on the cutting speed and the beam power has been determined. An energy balance equation has been derived for a wide range of cutting speed values.

  15. K-α emission form medium and high-Z materials irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Zhavoronkov, N.; Andreev, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Fast electrons are created at the target surface during the interaction of high intensity ultra short laser pulses with solids. Fast electrons penetrate deep into the target where they generate K-α and Bremsstrahlung radiation. Generated high brightness K-α pulses offer the prospect of creating a cheap and compact X-ray source, posing a promising alternative to synchrotron radiation, e.g. in medical application and in material science. With an increase in laser intensity, efficient X-ray emission in the multi-keV range with pulse duration shorter than few picoseconds is expected. This short incoherent but monochromatic X-ray emission synchronized with laser pulses may be used for time-resolved measurements. Acceleration of fast electrons, their transport and K-α photon generation and emission from the target surface in both forward and backward directions are studied here numerically. The results are compared to recent experiments studying K-α emission from the front and rear surface of copper foil targets of various thicknesses and for various parameters of the laser plasma interaction. One-dimensional PIC simulations coupled with 3D time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations show that account of ionization processes and of density profile formed by laser ASE emission is essential for reliable explanation of experimental data. While sub-relativistic intensities are optimum for laser energy transformation into K-α emission for medium-Z targets, relativistic laser intensities have to be used for hard X-ray generation in high-Z materials. The cross-section for K-α shell ionization of high-Z elements by electrons increases or remains approximately constant within a factor of two at relativistic electron energies up to electron energies in the 100-MeV range. Moreover, the splitting ratio of K-α photon emission to Auger electron emission is favorable for high-Z materials, and thus efficient K-α emission is possible. In our

  16. Pre-Industry-Optimisation of the Laser Welding Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui

    This dissertation documents the investigations into on-line monitoring the CO2 laser welding process and optimising the process parameters for achieving high quality welds. The requirements for realisation of an on-line control system are, first of all, a clear understanding of the dynamic...... phenomena of the laser welding process including the behaviour of the keyhole and plume, and the correlation between the adjustable process parameters: laser power, welding speed, focal point position, gas parameters etc. and the characteristics describing the quality of the weld: seam depth and width......, porosity etc. Secondly, a reliable monitoring system for sensing the laser-induced plasma and plume emission and detecting weld defects and process parameter deviations from the optimum conditions. Finally, an efficient control system with a fast signal processor and a precise feed-back controller...

  17. Sandia Laboratories technical capabilities: materials and processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundergan, C.D.; Mead, P.L.

    1977-08-01

    Materials and process activities have emphasized the balance between research and development necessary to provide materials compatible with the extreme environments and performance requirements associated with nuclear ordnance. Specific technical areas which have continuing emphasis include metallurgy, composites, surface characterization and thin films, polymers, ceramics, and high-temperature characterization. Complete processing and fabrication facilities assure the capability for early evaluation and use of tailored materials. Efforts are focused on material applications involving structural and electronic materials, thermal and electrical insulation, radiation shields, and shock mitigation. Key elements in these efforts are functionability, reliability, and longevity. This interdisciplinary approach to scientific materials engineering results from the recognition that many disciplines are required to understand, characterize, and apply materials, and from the fact that material design is an essential element in meeting the objectives of quality, functionality, and life. In effect, the responsibility of a materials group extends beyond the development of a material into the understanding and description of its behavior in the extreme environments to which it will be subjected

  18. Integrated modelling in materials and process technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    Integrated modelling of entire process sequences and the subsequent in-service conditions, and multiphysics modelling of the single process steps are areas that increasingly support optimisation of manufactured parts. In the present paper, three different examples of modelling manufacturing...... processes from the viewpoint of combined materials and process modelling are presented: solidification of thin walled ductile cast iron, integrated modelling of spray forming and multiphysics modelling of friction stir welding. The fourth example describes integrated modelling applied to a failure analysis...

  19. Dissimilar material joining using laser (aluminum to steel using zinc-based filler wire)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Alexandre; Shabadi, Rajashekar; Deschamps, Alexis; Suery, Michel; Matteï, Simone; Grevey, Dominique; Cicala, Eugen

    2007-04-01

    Joining steel with aluminum involving the fusion of one or both materials is possible by laser beam welding technique. This paper describes a method, called laser braze welding, which is a suitable process to realize this structure. The main problem with thermal joining of steel/aluminum assembly with processes such as TIG or MIG is the formation of fragile intermetallic phases, which are detrimental to the mechanical performances of such joints. Braze welding permits a localized fusion of the materials resulting in a limitation on the growth of fragile phases. This article presents the results of a statistical approach for an overlap assembly configuration using a filler wire composed of 85% Zn and 15% Al. Tensile tests carried on these assemblies demonstrate a good performance of the joints. The fracture mechanisms of the joints are analyzed by a detailed characterization of the seams.

  20. Laser Research Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laser Research lab is thecenter for the development of new laser sources, nonlinear optical materials, frequency conversion processes and laser-based sensors for...

  1. CO II laser free-form processing of hard tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Martin; Klasing, Manfred; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Harbecke, Daniela; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Hering, Peter

    2007-07-01

    Drilling and surface processing of bone and tooth tissue belongs to standard medical procedures (bores and embeddings for implants, trepanation etc.). Small circular bores can be generally quickly produced with mechanical drills. However problems arise at angled drilling, the need to execute drilling procedures without damaging of sensitive soft tissue structures underneath the bone or the attempt to mill small non-circular cavities in hard tissue with high precision. We present investigations on laser hard tissue "milling", which can be advantageous for solving these problems. The processing of bone is done with a CO II laser (10.6 μm) with pulse durations of 50 - 100 μs, combined with a PC-controlled fast galvanic laser beam scanner and a fine water-spray, which helps keeping the ablation process effective and without thermal side-effects. Laser "milling" of non-circular cavities with 1 - 4 mm width and about 10 mm depth can be especially interesting for dental implantology. In ex-vivo investigations we found conditions for fast laser processing of these cavities without thermal damage and with minimised tapering. It included the exploration of different filling patterns (concentric rings, crosshatch, parallel lines, etc.), definition of maximal pulse duration, repetition rate and laser power, and optimal water spray position. The optimised results give evidence for the applicability of pulsed CO II lasers for biologically tolerable effective processing of deep cavities in hard tissue.

  2. Laser Spectroscopy Characterization of Materials for Frequency Agile Solid State Laser Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-15

    Received 30 November 1987; revised manuscript received 29 January 1988) Single crystals of lanthanum lutetium gallium garnet (LaLuGaG) were grown by...group may be realized it gar- dleternte itf other materials can be found with spectral nets formed with lanthanum occupying tile dodecaliedrial ,1nl...array-pumped Nd: YAG and Nd: Lu: YAG lasers," Opt. inates and gallates with the malilite structure," in Tunable Lett. 14, 116-118 (1989). Solid State

  3. Wavelength dependence of femtosecond laser-induced damage threshold of optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallais, L., E-mail: laurent.gallais@fresnel.fr; Douti, D.-B.; Commandré, M. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, Centrale Marseille, Institut Fresnel UMR 7249, 13013 Marseille (France); Batavičiūtė, G.; Pupka, E.; Ščiuka, M.; Smalakys, L.; Sirutkaitis, V.; Melninkaitis, A. [Laser Research Center, Vilnius University, Saulétekio aléja 10, LT-10223 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2015-06-14

    An experimental and numerical study of the laser-induced damage of the surface of optical material in the femtosecond regime is presented. The objective of this work is to investigate the different processes involved as a function of the ratio of photon to bandgap energies and compare the results to models based on nonlinear ionization processes. Experimentally, the laser-induced damage threshold of optical materials has been studied in a range of wavelengths from 1030 nm (1.2 eV) to 310 nm (4 eV) with pulse durations of 100 fs with the use of an optical parametric amplifier system. Semi-conductors and dielectrics materials, in bulk or thin film forms, in a range of bandgap from 1 to 10 eV have been tested in order to investigate the scaling of the femtosecond laser damage threshold with the bandgap and photon energy. A model based on the Keldysh photo-ionization theory and the description of impact ionization by a multiple-rate-equation system is used to explain the dependence of laser-breakdown with the photon energy. The calculated damage fluence threshold is found to be consistent with experimental results. From these results, the relative importance of the ionization processes can be derived depending on material properties and irradiation conditions. Moreover, the observed damage morphologies can be described within the framework of the model by taking into account the dynamics of energy deposition with one dimensional propagation simulations in the excited material and thermodynamical considerations.

  4. An investigation of laser processing of silica surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, A.J.; Stewart, A.F.; Exarhos, G.J.; Stowell, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    An initial set of experiments has been conducted to determine the practicality of laser processing of optical substrates. In contrast to earlier work, a high average power CO 2 laser was used to flood load the entire surface of each test sample. Fused silica substrates were laser polished on both surfaces at power densities ranging from 150 to 350 W/cm 2 . During each test sequence sample surface temperatures were recorded using a thermal imaging system. Extensive pre- and post-test characterization revealed that surface roughness and scattering of bare silica surfaces were reduced while internal stress increased. Laser damage thresholds were found to increase only for certain conditions. Changes in the microstructure were observed. These preliminary experiments demonstrate that laser processing can dramatically improve the optical properties of fused silica substrates

  5. Doping of silicon by carbon during laser ablation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciukaitis, G.; Brikas, M.; Kazlauskiene, V.; Miskinis, J.

    2007-04-01

    Effect of laser ablation on properties of remaining material was investigated in silicon. It was established that laser cutting of wafers in air induced doping of silicon by carbon. The effect was found to be more distinct by the use of higher laser power or UV radiation. Carbon ions created bonds with silicon in the depth of silicon. Formation of the silicon carbide type bonds was confirmed by SIMS, XPS and AES measurements. Modeling of the carbon diffusion was performed to clarify its depth profile in silicon. Photo-chemical reactions of such type changed the structure of material and could be a reason for the reduced quality of machining. A controlled atmosphere was applied to prevent carbonization of silicon during laser cutting.

  6. Doping of silicon by carbon during laser ablation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raciukaitis, G; Brikas, M; Kazlauskiene, V; Miskinis, J

    2007-01-01

    Effect of laser ablation on properties of remaining material was investigated in silicon. It was established that laser cutting of wafers in air induced doping of silicon by carbon. The effect was found to be more distinct by the use of higher laser power or UV radiation. Carbon ions created bonds with silicon in the depth of silicon. Formation of the silicon carbide type bonds was confirmed by SIMS, XPS and AES measurements. Modeling of the carbon diffusion was performed to clarify its depth profile in silicon. Photo-chemical reactions of such type changed the structure of material and could be a reason for the reduced quality of machining. A controlled atmosphere was applied to prevent carbonization of silicon during laser cutting

  7. Material Processing Facility - Skylab Experiment M512

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    This chart details Skylab's Materials Processing Facility experiment (M512). This facility, located in the Multiple Docking Adapter, was developed for Skylab and accommodated 14 different experiments that were carried out during the three marned missions. The abilities to melt and mix without the contaminating effects of containers, to suppress thermal convection and buoyancy in fluids, and to take advantage of electrostatic and magnetic forces and otherwise masked by gravitation opened the way to new knowledge of material properties and processes. This beginning would ultimately lead to the production of valuable new materials for use on Earth.

  8. Process and furnace for working bituminous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotzer, M

    1921-06-28

    A process for working up bitumen-containing materials, such as coal, peat and shale is characterized in that the material in thin-height batches with constant shaking by means of forward and backward movement of an elongated horizontal hearth heated underneath on which the material freely lies and on which it is moved in the furnace, through a single narrow furnace space with zone-wise heating of the hearth. A drying zone, a spent-material removal zone, and a carbonization zone are provided. Under separate hoods the gases and vapors are removed from these zones.

  9. Functionally Graded Materials by Laser Metal Deposition (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    composition of Fe-82 wt% V (powder-1) and Inconel - 625 (powder-2) powders are listed in Table 1. The substrate materials used for the experiment were cold...like laser power, travel speed and powder feed rate is yet to be determined to obtain a successful FGM. Inconel - 625 deposits showed macro-cracks...Composition (wt%) Powder-1: Fe-82 wt% V V (82), Al (0.68), Si (0.9), C (0.07), S (0.01), P (0.02), Fe (18) Powder-2: Inconel - 625 Ni (58), Cr (20-23

  10. Detailed numerical simulations of laser cooling processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Serrano, J.; Kohel, J.; Thompson, R.; Yu, N.

    2001-01-01

    We developed a detailed semiclassical numerical code of the forces applied on atoms in optical and magnetic fields to increase the understanding of the different roles that light, atomic collisions, background pressure, and number of particles play in experiments with laser cooled and trapped atoms.

  11. Process optimisation in selective laser melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vaerenbergh, J.

    2008-01-01

    The work presented here summarises part of the work I have done for the past six years. After a few interesting months of research on laser cutting of thick steel plates, I was lucky to land up in the emerging domain of Rapid Prototyping (RP): producing complex products layer by layer, directly from

  12. Synthesis and processing of nanostructured materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, R.W.

    1992-12-01

    Significant and growing interest is being exhibited in the novel and enhanced properties of nanostructured materials. These materials, with their constituent phase or grain structures modulated on a length scale less than 100 nm, are artificially synthesized by a wide variety of physical, chemical, and mechanical methods. In this NATO Advanced Study Institute, where mechanical behavior is emphasized, nanostructured materials with modulation dimensionalities from one (multilayers) to three (nanophase materials) are mainly considered. No attempt is made in this review to cover in detail all of the diverse methods available for the synthesis of nanostructured materials. Rather, the basic principles involved in their synthesis are discussed in terms of the special properties sought using examples of particular synthesis and processing methodologies. Some examples of the property changes that can result from one of these methods, cluster assembly of nanophase materials, are presented

  13. Artificial intelligence in the materials processing laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Materials science and engineering provides a vast arena for applications of artificial intelligence. Advanced materials research is an area in which challenging requirements confront the researcher, from the drawing board through production and into service. Advanced techniques results in the development of new materials for specialized applications. Hand-in-hand with these new materials are also requirements for state-of-the-art inspection methods to determine the integrity or fitness for service of structures fabricated from these materials. Two problems of current interest to the Materials Processing Laboratory at UAH are an expert system to assist in eddy current inspection of graphite epoxy components for aerospace and an expert system to assist in the design of superalloys for high temperature applications. Each project requires a different approach to reach the defined goals. Results to date are described for the eddy current analysis, but only the original concepts and approaches considered are given for the expert system to design superalloys.

  14. Space Environmental Effects on Materials and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbann, Leslie M.

    2009-01-01

    The Materials and Processes (M&P) Branch of the Structural Engineering Division at Johnson Space Center (JSC) seeks to uphold the production of dependable space hardware through materials research, which fits into NASA's purpose of advancing human exploration, use, and development of space. The Space Environmental Effects projects fully support these Agency goals. Two tasks were assigned to support M&P. Both assignments were to further the research of material behavior outside of Earth's atmosphere in order to determine which materials are most durable and safe to use in space for mitigating risks. One project, the Materials on International Space Station Experiments (MISSE) task, was to compile data from International Space Station (ISS) experiments to pinpoint beneficial space hardware. The other project was researching the effects on composite materials of exposure to high doses of radiation for a Lunar habitat project.

  15. Microwave processing of radioactive materials-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, T.L.; Berry, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is the first of two papers that reviews the major past and present applications of microwave energy for processing radioactive materials, with particular emphasis on processing radioactive wastes. Microwave heating occurs through the internal friction produced inside a dielectric material when its molecules vibrate in response to an oscillating microwave field. For this presentation, we shall focus on the two FCC-approved microwave frequencies for industrial, scientific, and medical use, 915 and 2450 MHz. Also, because of space limitations, we shall postpone addressing plasma processing of hazardous wastes using microwave energy until a later date. 13 refs., 4 figs

  16. Microstructure and Magnetic Properties of Magnetic Material Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhong, Kai Jyun; Huang, Wei-Chin; Lee, Wen Hsi

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a powder-based additive manufacturing which is capable of producing parts layer-by-layer from a 3D CAD model. The aim of this study is to adopt the selective laser melting technique to magnetic material fabrication. [1]For the SLM process to be practical in industrial use, highly specific mechanical properties of the final product must be achieved. The integrity of the manufactured components depend strongly on each single laser-melted track and every single layer, as well as the strength of the connections between them. In this study, effects of the processing parameters, such as the space distance of surface morphology is analyzed. Our hypothesis is that when a magnetic product is made by the selective laser melting techniques instead of traditional techniques, the finished component will have more precise and effective properties. This study analyzed the magnitudes of magnetic properties in comparison with different parameters in the SLM process and compiled a completed product to investigate the efficiency in contrast with products made with existing manufacturing processes.

  17. Experimental and numerical studies on laser-based powder deposition of slurry erosion resistant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Prabu

    Slurry erosion (the removal of material caused by the randomly moving high velocity liquid-solid particle mixture) is a serious issue in crude oil drilling, mining, turbines, rocket nozzles, pumps, and boiler tubes that causes excessive downtime and high operating costs as a result of premature part failure. The goal of this research is to enhance the service life of high-value components subjected to slurry erosion by utilizing the concept of functionally graded metal-ceramic composite material (FGMCCM) in which the favorable properties of metal (toughness, ductility, etc.) and ceramic (hardness) are tailored smoothly to improve erosion resistance. Among the potential manufacturing processes, such as the laser-based powder deposition (LBPD), the plasma transferred arc (PTA), and the thermal spray the LBPD process offers good composition and microstructure control with a high deposition rate in producing the FGMCCM. This research focuses on the development of nickel-tungsten carbide (Ni-WC) based FGMCCM using the LBPD process for applications the above mentioned. The LBPD of Ni-WC involves the introduction of Ni and WC powder particle by an inert gas into the laser-formed molten pool at the substrate via nozzles. The LBPD of Ni-WC includes complex multi-physical interactions between the laser beam, Ni-WC powder, substrate, and carrier and shielding gases that are governed by a number of process variables such as laser power, scanning speed, and powder flow rate. In order to develop the best Ni-WC based slurry erosion resistant material using the LBPD process, the following challenges associated with the fabrication and the performance evaluation need to be addressed: 1) flow behavior of the Ni-WC powder and its interaction with the laser, 2) the effect of the process variables, the material compositions, and the thermo-physical properties on thermal cycles, temperature gradient, cooling rate, and residual stress formation within the material and the subsequent

  18. Corrosion-Resistant Container for Molten-Material Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Theodore G.; McNaul, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In a carbothermal process, gaseous methane is passed over molten regolith, which is heated past its melting point to a temperature in excess of 1,625 C. At this temperature, materials in contact with the molten regolith (or regolith simulant) corrode and lose their structural properties. As a result, fabricating a crucible to hold the molten material and providing a method of contact heating have been problematic. Alternative containment approaches use a large crucible and limit the heat zone of the material being processed, which is inefficient because of volume and mass constraints. Alternative heating approaches use non-contact heating, such as by laser or concentrated solar energy, which can be inefficient in transferring heat and thus require higher power heat sources to accomplish processing. The innovation is a combination of materials, with a substrate material having high structural strength and stiffness and high-temperature capability, and a coating material with a high corrosion resistance and high-temperature capability. The material developed is a molybdenum substrate with an iridium coating. Creating the containment crucible or heater jacket using this material combination requires only that the molybdenum, which is easily processed by conventional methods such as milling, electric discharge machining, or forming and brazing, be fabricated into an appropriate shape, and that the iridium coating be applied to any surfaces that may come in contact with the corrosive molten material. In one engineering application, the molybdenum was fashioned into a container for a heat pipe. Since only the end of the heat pipe is used to heat the regolith, the container has a narrowing end with a nipple in which the heat pipe is snugly fit, and the external area of this nipple, which contacts the regolith to transfer heat into it, is coated with iridium. At the time of this reporting, no single material has been found that can perform the functions of this combination

  19. Study and characterization of ceramic materials from natural origin for application in jewellery design using laser texturing as innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elesbao, T.R.; Carus, L.A.; Tabarelli, A.C.; Vieira, R.P.; Takimi, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Technological development has been largely responsible for changes in the jewelry market. Seeking to contribute to the development of new products, this study analyzed the technique of laser texturing, aiming to add commercial and aesthetic values to the mother of pearl, material used in the jewelry field. The methodology was divided into physico-chemical characterization of the mother-of-pearl and of the resulting residue of laser texturing and analysis of the interaction of laser with the surface of the mother-of-pearl. The characterizations carried out were: Infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that the studied material is composed mainly by the aragonite crystal phase, different from that resulting residue from texturing process. Although the process remove some of the gem material, the effect water characteristic of the mother-of-pearl is maintained, suggesting that technology combined with research and design can increase the value of this material. (author)

  20. Experimental Study of Laser Cladding Methods on Water Erosion Resistance to Low Pressure Blades Materials of Steam Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental apparatus was built to study the effects of liquid-solid impact on laser cladding processing specimens of 17-4PH stainless steel material in the present investigation. Then the result of specimens without laser surface process was compared. The impact effect on the specimens was observed using the three-dimensional digital microscope. The depth of laser cladding and substrate material caused by liquid droplet impact was studied in detail and measured. The accuracy and reliability of the experimental system and computing methods were also verified. The depth of the impact area of laser cladding specimens was distributed in the range of 0.5–1.5 μm while the 17-4PH group was distributed in the range of 2.5–3.5 μm. In contrast with specimens without laser surface processing, the material processed by laser cladding has significantly higher resistance to water erosion.

  1. Evolutionary optimization of production materials workflow processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbert, Luke Thomas; Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee; Jacobsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We present an evolutionary optimisation technique for stochastic production processes, which is able to find improved production materials workflow processes with respect to arbitrary combinations of numerical quantities associated with the production process. Working from a core fragment...... of the BPMN language, we employ an evolutionary algorithm where stochastic model checking is used as a fitness function to determine the degree of improvement of candidate processes derived from the original process through mutation and cross-over operations. We illustrate this technique using a case study...

  2. Advances in radiation processing of polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makuuchi, K.; Sasak, T.; Vikis, A.C.; Singh, A.

    1993-12-01

    In this paper we review recent advances in industrial applications of electron-beam irradiation in the field of polymer processing at the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment (TRCRE) of JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), and the Whiteshell Laboratories of AECL Research, Canada. Irradiation of a substrate with ionizing radiation produces free radicals through ionization and excitation events. The subsequent chemistry of these radicals is used in radiation processing as a substitute for conventional processing techniques based on heating and/or the addition of chemicals. The advantages of radiation processing include the formation of novel products with desirable material properties, favourable overall process economics and, often, environmental benefits

  3. An international interdisciplinary graduate school in laser and material science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargin, Evelyne; Sarger, Laurent; Kaluza, Malte; Nolte, Stefan; Richardson, Martin; Richardson, Kathleen

    2009-06-01

    The main objective is to establish the first transatlantic Graduate School, proposing a truly international education, training and research platform in the field of Photonics and Material sciences. The wide scope of Photonics encompasses many application fields that will be mostly covered by various curricula involving Laser Optics and Material Sciences and Interactions. This cooperation will build a very efficient scientific international community able to address the 21 century challenges in Photonics and applications. Indeed, the highest level of education, namely Master and PhD , will address the so called "Skill shortage" that impact on our economy. The truly interdisciplinary theme of this graduate school is also a guarantee for the insertion of the graduate into the workforce.

  4. Pulsed laser photoacoustic spectrometer for study of solid materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, N.D.; Kartha, V.B.

    1991-01-01

    The technique of photoacoustic spectroscopy has wide applications bacause it is extremely sensitive, and can be used to obtain spectra in wide spectral range for solids, liquids, gases, solutions, crystals etc. which may be usually difficult by conventional methods. For studying a variety of materials, a pulsed laser photoacoustic spectrometer has been set up in the laboratory. The report discusses the design and performance of the instrument. Some of the spectra of materials like Nd 2 O 9 powder, Nd-YAG crystal, CoCl 2 6H 2 O etc. are shown. A detailed discussion on assignment of the spectra of Nd-YAG is also presented. (author). 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. New infrared solid state laser materials for CALIOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLoach, L.D.; Page, R.H.; Wilke, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    Tunable infrared laser light may serve as a useful means by which to detect the presence of the targeted effluents. Since optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) have proven to be a versatile method of generating coherent light from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared, this technology is a promising choice by which to service the CALIOPE applications. In addition, since some uncertainty remains regarding the precise wavelengths and molecules that will be targeted, the deployment of OPOs retains the greatest amount of wavelength flexibility. Another approach that the authors are considering is that of generating tunable infrared radiation directly with a diode-pumped solid state laser (DPSSL). One important advantage of a DPSSL is that it offers flexible pulse format modes that can be tailored to meet the needs of a particular application and target molecule. On the other hand, direct generation by a tunable DPSSL will generally be able to cover a more limited wavelength range than is possible with OPO technology. In support of the CALIOPE objectives the authors are exploring the potential for laser action among a class of materials comprised of transition metal-doped zinc chalcogenide crystals (i.e., ZnS, ZnSe and ZnTe). The Cr 2+ , Co 2+ and Ni 2+ dopants were selected as the most favorable candidates, on the basis of their documented spectral properties in the scientific literature. Thus far, the authors have characterized the absorption and emission properties of these ions in the ZnS and ZnSe crystals. The absorption spectra are used to determine the preferred wavelength at which the crystal should be pumped, while the emission spectra reveal the extent of the tuning range potentially offered by the material. In addition, measurements of the emission lifetime as a function of temperature turn out to be quite useful, since this data is suggestive of the room temperature emission yield

  6. Equation of state study of Laser Megajoule capsules ablator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin-Lalu, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This PhD thesis enters the field of inertial confinement fusion studies. In particular, it focuses on the equation of state tables of ablator materials synthesized on LMJ capsules. This work is indeed aims at improving the theoretical models introduced into the equation of state tables. We focused in the Mbar-eV pressure-temperature range because it can be access on kJ-scale laser facilities.In order to achieve this, we used the QEOS model, which is simple to use, configurable, and easily modifiable.First, quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations were performed to generate cold compression curve as well as shock compression curves along the principal Hugoniot. Simulations were compared to QEOS model and showed that atomic bond dissociation has an effect on the compressibility. Results from these simulations are then used to parametrize the Grueneisen parameter in order to generate a tabulated equation of state that includes dissociation. It allowed us to show its influence on shock timing in a hydrodynamic simulation.Second, thermodynamic states along the Hugoniot were measured during three experimental campaigns upon the LULI2000 and GEKKO XII laser facilities. Experimental data confirm QMD simulations.This study was performed on two ablator materials which are an undoped polymer CHO, and a silicon-doped polymer CHOSi. Results showed universal shock compression properties. (author) [fr

  7. Selection of refractory materials for pyrochemical processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axler, K.M.; DePoorter, G.L.; Bagaasen, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    Several pyrochemical processing operations require containment materials that exhibit minimal chemical interactions with the system, good thermal shock resistance, and reusability. One example is Direct Oxide Reduction (DOR). DOR involves the conversion of PuO 2 to metal by an oxidation/reduction reaction with Ca metal. The reaction proceeds within a molten salt flux at temperatures above 800C. A combination of thermodynamics, system thermodynamic modeling, and experimental investigations are in use to select and evaluate potential containment materials

  8. Radioactive Dry Process Material Treatment Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. J.; Hung, I. H.; Kim, K. K. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The project 'Radioactive Dry Process Material Treatment Technology Development' aims to be normal operation for the experiments at DUPIC fuel development facility (DFDF) and safe operation of the facility through the technology developments such as remote operation, maintenance and pair of the facility, treatment of various high level process wastes and trapping of volatile process gases. DUPIC Fuel Development Facility (DFDF) can accommodate highly active nuclear materials, and now it is for fabrication of the oxide fuel by dry process characterizing the proliferation resistance. During the second stage from march 2005 to February 2007, we carried out technology development of the remote maintenance and the DFDF's safe operation, development of treatment technology for process off-gas, and development of treatment technology for PWR cladding hull and the results was described in this report.

  9. Modeling of solid-state and excimer laser processes for 3D micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Andrew S.; Onischenko, Alexander I.; George, David S.; Pedder, James E.

    2005-04-01

    An efficient simulation method has recently been developed for multi-pulse ablation processes. This is based on pulse-by-pulse propagation of the machined surface according to one of several phenomenological models for the laser-material interaction. The technique allows quantitative predictions to be made about the surface shapes of complex machined parts, given only a minimal set of input data for parameter calibration. In the case of direct-write machining of polymers or glasses with ns-duration pulses, this data set can typically be limited to the surface profiles of a small number of standard test patterns. The use of phenomenological models for the laser-material interaction, calibrated by experimental feedback, allows fast simulation, and can achieve a high degree of accuracy for certain combinations of material, laser and geometry. In this paper, the capabilities and limitations of the approach are discussed, and recent results are presented for structures machined in SU8 photoresist.

  10. Development of electrical excited CO2-laser with transversal gas flow as well an axial flowed CO2-laser for material treatment, in particular for cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollermann-Windgasse, R.; Ackermann, F.

    1987-04-01

    The project describes the development of a new generation of CO 2 -lasers using high frequency discharge (13.56 MHz) for laser excitation by capacitive dielectrical input. HF-excitation has a lot of advantages compared with direct current technology, these are higher electrical input power into the plasma, better homogeneity and stability of discharges. In addition to this, HF-excitation shows excellent possibilities for pulsing and modulation. As a result of this, there are compact powerful laser systems with the possibility of scaling up to the multi-kW-range. The examination included fast transversal flowed as well as fast axial flowed systems. In the end of this project development prototypes with laser output power of 1000 W, 1500 W and 3000 W were available. Detailed attempts of application show that these lasers on grounds of excellent laser output quality and controlability of laser power specifically to each process make possible new ways for material treatment by laser. (orig./HP) [de

  11. The use of lasers in manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of a conference on the use of lasers in manufacturing, topics covered include: An introduction to industrial lasers; Production laser hardening for aerospace; The role of fiber optics in laser material processing; and Light-material interactions in laser material processing

  12. Photo-Machining of Semiconductor Related Materials with Femtosecond Laser Ablation and Characterization of Its Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokotani, Atushi; Mizuno, Toshio; Mukumoto, Toru; Kawahara, Kousuke; Ninomiya, Takahumi; Sawada, Hiroshi; Kurosawa, Kou

    We have analyzed the drilling process with femtosecond laser on the silicon surface in order to investigate a degree of thermal effect during the dicing process of the very thin silicon substrate. A regenerative amplified Ti:Al2O3 laser (E= 30˜500 μJ/pulse, τ= 200 fs, λ= 780 nm, f= 10 Hz) was used and focused onto a 50 μm-thick silicon sample. ICCD (Intensified Charge coupled Device) camera with a high-speed gate of 5 ns was utilized to take images of processing hole. First, we investigated the dependence of laser energy on the speed of the formation of the drilled hole. As a result, it was found that the lager the energy, the slower the speed of the formation under the minimum hole was obtained. Consequently, in the case of defocused condition, even when the smaller the energy density was used, the very slow speed of formation and the much lager thermal effects are simultaneously observed. So we can say that the degree of the thermal effects is not simply related to energy density of the laser but strongly related to the speed of the formation, which can be measured by the ICCD camera. The similar tendency was also obtained for other materials, which are important for the fabrication of ICs (Al, Cu, SiO2 and acrylic resin).

  13. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Materials and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, D. B.; Dost, E. F.; Flynn, B. W.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Nelson, K. M.; Sawicki, A. J.; Walker, T. H.; Lakes, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program was to develop the technology required for cost and weight efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. This contractor report describes results of material and process selection, development, and characterization activities. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of monolithic and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential frames and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements. Significant development efforts were expended on the AFP, braiding, and RTM processes. Sandwich core materials and core edge close-out design concepts were evaluated. Autoclave cure processes were developed for stiffened skin and sandwich structures. The stiffness, strength, notch sensitivity, and bearing/bypass properties of fiber-placed skin materials and braided/RTM'd circumferential frame materials were characterized. The strength and durability of cocured and cobonded joints were evaluated. Impact damage resistance of stiffened skin and sandwich structures typical of fuselage panels was investigated. Fluid penetration and migration mechanisms for sandwich panels were studied.

  14. Applications of free-electron lasers to measurements of energy transfer in biopolymers and materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Glenn S.; Johnson, J. B.; Kozub, John A.; Tribble, Jerri A.; Wagner, Katrina

    1992-08-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) provide tunable, pulsed radiation in the infrared. Using the FEL as a pump beam, we are investigating the mechanisms for energy transfer between localized vibrational modes and between vibrational modes and lattice or phonon modes. Either a laser-Raman system or a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer will serve as the probe beam, with the attribute of placing the burden of detection on two conventional spectroscopic techniques that circumvent the limited response of infrared detectors. More specifically, the Raman effect inelastically shifts an exciting laser line, typically a visible frequency, by the energy of the vibrational mode; however, the shifted Raman lines also lie in the visible, allowing for detection with highly efficient visible detectors. With regards to FTIR spectroscopy, the multiplex advantage yields a distinct benefit for infrared detector response. Our group is investigating intramolecular and intermolecular energy transfer processes in both biopolymers and more traditional materials. For example, alkali halides contain a number of defect types that effectively transfer energy in an intermolecular process. Similarly, the functioning of biopolymers depends on efficient intramolecular energy transfer. Understanding these mechanisms will enhance our ability to modify biopolymers and materials with applications to biology, medecine, and materials science.

  15. Parameters Influence of CO2 Laser on Cutting Quality of Polymer Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Cep

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with evaluating of the resulting surface state of the three plastic materials and identification of suitable conditions for laser cutting with CO2 tube. As representative were chosen polypropylene, polymethylmethacrylate and polyamide. When cutting these types of materials it could melt eventually their re-sintering. A suitable combination of parameters is possible to achieve of sufficient quality of the cut. The samples were cut at different feed speed and laser power. Then they was compared on the basis of the measured roughness parameters Ra a Rz by using a portable touch roughness Hommel-Etamic W5 and dates was processed according to ČSN EN ISO 4287. Cutting of samples was realized at the Department of Machining, Assembly and Engineering Metrology, VŠB-TUO.

  16. Cemented carbide cutting tool: Laser processing and thermal stress analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S. [Mechanical Engineering Department, KFUPM, Box 1913, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa; Arif, A.F.M. [Mechanical Engineering Department, KFUPM, Box 1913, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Karatas, C. [Engineering Faculty, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Ahsan, M. [Mechanical Engineering Department, KFUPM, Box 1913, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2007-04-15

    Laser treatment of cemented carbide tool surface consisting of W, C, TiC, TaC is examined and thermal stress developed due to temperature gradients in the laser treated region is predicted numerically. Temperature rise in the substrate material is computed numerically using the Fourier heating model. Experiment is carried out to treat the tool surfaces using a CO{sub 2} laser while SEM, XRD and EDS are carried out for morphological and structural characterization of the treated surface. Laser parameters were selected include the laser output power, duty cycle, assisting gas pressure, scanning speed, and nominal focus setting of the focusing lens. It is found that temperature gradient attains significantly high values below the surface particularly for titanium and tantalum carbides, which in turn, results in high thermal stress generation in this region. SEM examination of laser treated surface and its cross section reveals that crack initiation below the surface occurs and crack extends over the depth of the laser treated region.

  17. Metals and Alloys Material Stabilization Process Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RISENMAY, H.R.; BURK, R.A.

    2000-05-18

    This Plan outlines the process for brushing metal and alloys in accordance with the path forward discussed in the Integrated Project Management Plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617, and requirements set forth in the Project Management Plan for Materials Stabilization, HNF-3605. This plan provides the basis for selection of the location to process, the processes involved, equipment to be used, and the characterization of the contents of the can. The scope of the process is from retrieval of metals and alloys from storage to transfer back to storage in a repackaged configuration.

  18. Robot development for nuclear material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrotti, L.R.; Armantrout, G.A.; Allen, D.C.; Sievers, R.H. Sr.

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Energy is seeking to modernize its special nuclear material (SNM) production facilities and concurrently reduce radiation exposures and process and incidental radioactive waste generated. As part of this program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) lead team is developing and adapting generic and specific applications of commercial robotic technologies to SNM pyrochemical processing and other operations. A working gantry robot within a sealed processing glove box and a telerobot control test bed are manifestations of this effort. This paper describes the development challenges and progress in adapting processing, robotic, and nuclear safety technologies to the application. 3 figs

  19. Metals and Alloys Material Stabilization Process Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RISENMAY, H.R.; BURK, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This Plan outlines the process for brushing metal and alloys in accordance with the path forward discussed in the Integrated Project Management Plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617, and requirements set forth in the Project Management Plan for Materials Stabilization, HNF-3605. This plan provides the basis for selection of the location to process, the processes involved, equipment to be used, and the characterization of the contents of the can. The scope of the process is from retrieval of metals and alloys from storage to transfer back to storage in a repackaged configuration

  20. Photobiomodulation laser improves the early repair process of hypothyroid rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzêda e Silva, V. D.; Rodriguez, T. T.; Xavier, F. C. A.; dos Santos, J. N.; Vasconcelos, R. M.; Ramalho, L. M. P.

    2018-04-01

    Delay in wound healing has been observed in the hypothyroidism disfunction. Laser light can modulate various biological phenomena acting on different cell types. However, there are few reports in the literature regarding the effects of laser on wound healing of hypothyroid models. This study aimed to evaluate the differences in reepithelialization process of cutaneous wounds on hypothyroid and euthyroid rats treated with laser phototherapy. Forty-eight rats were divided into two main groups: euthyroid (EU) and hypothyroid (HYPO). Hypothyroidism was induced by Thyroidectomy. Each group was divided into subgroups: control (without laser) and laser groups. Standard surgical wound was created on the dorsum of each rat. The irradiation protocols (λ660 nm, 40 mW, CW; 10 J/cm2) was carried out immediately after wounding and repeated every 24h during 3 and 7 days. After animal death, specimens were taken, routinely processed, cut, stained with hematoxylin-eosin, and underwent histological analysis. Three days after the surgery, it was possible to observe initial reepithelialization in more advanced stages in the wound area of the irradiated hypothyroid group when compared to control hypothyroid group (p<0.05). No significant difference was found in the experimental period of 7 days among the groups. It was concluded that the laser light did influence reepithelialization process on hypothyroid rats in early stages of healing process.

  1. Removable partial denture alloys processed by laser-sintering technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alageel, Omar; Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Alsheghri, Ammar; Song, Jun; Caron, Eric; Tamimi, Faleh

    2018-04-01

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are traditionally made using a casting technique. New additive manufacturing processes based on laser sintering has been developed for quick fabrication of RPDs metal frameworks at low cost. The objective of this study was to characterize the mechanical, physical, and biocompatibility properties of RPD cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys produced by two laser-sintering systems and compare them to those prepared using traditional casting methods. The laser-sintered Co-Cr alloys were processed by the selective laser-sintering method (SLS) and the direct metal laser-sintering (DMLS) method using the Phenix system (L-1) and EOS system (L-2), respectively. L-1 and L-2 techniques were 8 and 3.5 times more precise than the casting (CC) technique (p laser-sintered and cast alloys were biocompatible. In conclusion, laser-sintered alloys are more precise and present better mechanical and fatigue properties than cast alloys for RPDs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 1174-1185, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Selective ablation of photovoltaic materials with UV laser sources for monolithic interconnection of devices based on a-Si:H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molpeceres, C. [Centro Laser UPM, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: carlos.molpeceres@upm.es; Lauzurica, S.; Garcia-Ballesteros, J.J.; Morales, M.; Guadano, G.; Ocana, J.L. [Centro Laser UPM, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, S.; Gandia, J.J. [Dept. de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Villar, F.; Nos, O.; Bertomeu, J. [CeRMAE Dept. Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-03-15

    Lasers are essential tools for cell isolation and monolithic interconnection in thin-film-silicon photovoltaic technologies. Laser ablation of transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), amorphous silicon structures and back contact removal are standard processes in industry for monolithic device interconnection. However, material ablation with minimum debris and small heat affected zone is one of the main difficulty is to achieve, to reduce costs and to improve device efficiency. In this paper we present recent results in laser ablation of photovoltaic materials using excimer and UV wavelengths of diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser sources. We discuss results concerning UV ablation of different TCO and thin-film silicon (a-Si:H and nc-Si:H), focussing our study on ablation threshold measurements and process-quality assessment using advanced optical microscopy techniques. In that way we show the advantages of using UV wavelengths for minimizing the characteristic material thermal affection of laser irradiation in the ns regime at higher wavelengths. Additionally we include preliminary results of selective ablation of film on film structures irradiating from the film side (direct writing configuration) including the problem of selective ablation of ZnO films on a-Si:H layers. In that way we demonstrate the potential use of UV wavelengths of fully commercial laser sources as an alternative to standard backscribing process in device fabrication.

  3. Selective ablation of photovoltaic materials with UV laser sources for monolithic interconnection of devices based on a-Si:H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molpeceres, C.; Lauzurica, S.; Garcia-Ballesteros, J.J.; Morales, M.; Guadano, G.; Ocana, J.L.; Fernandez, S.; Gandia, J.J.; Villar, F.; Nos, O.; Bertomeu, J.

    2009-01-01

    Lasers are essential tools for cell isolation and monolithic interconnection in thin-film-silicon photovoltaic technologies. Laser ablation of transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), amorphous silicon structures and back contact removal are standard processes in industry for monolithic device interconnection. However, material ablation with minimum debris and small heat affected zone is one of the main difficulty is to achieve, to reduce costs and to improve device efficiency. In this paper we present recent results in laser ablation of photovoltaic materials using excimer and UV wavelengths of diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser sources. We discuss results concerning UV ablation of different TCO and thin-film silicon (a-Si:H and nc-Si:H), focussing our study on ablation threshold measurements and process-quality assessment using advanced optical microscopy techniques. In that way we show the advantages of using UV wavelengths for minimizing the characteristic material thermal affection of laser irradiation in the ns regime at higher wavelengths. Additionally we include preliminary results of selective ablation of film on film structures irradiating from the film side (direct writing configuration) including the problem of selective ablation of ZnO films on a-Si:H layers. In that way we demonstrate the potential use of UV wavelengths of fully commercial laser sources as an alternative to standard backscribing process in device fabrication.

  4. Modulating calcium phosphate formation using CO2 laser engineering of a polymeric material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waugh, D.G.; Lawrence, J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of simulated body fluid (SBF) is widely used as a screening technique to assess the ability of materials to promote calcium phosphate formation. This paper details the use of CO 2 laser surface treatment of nylon® 6,6 to modulate calcium phosphate formation following immersion in SBF for 14 days. Through white light interferometry (WLI) it was determined that the laser surface processing gave rise to maximum Ra and Sa parameters of 1.3 and 4.4 μm, respectively. The use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) enabled a maximum increase in surface oxygen content of 5.6%at. to be identified. The laser-induced surface modifications gave rise to a modulation in the wettability characteristics such that the contact angle, θ, decreased for the whole area processed samples, as expected, and increased for the patterned samples. The increase in θ can be attributed to a transition in wetting nature to a mixed-state wetting regime. It was seen for all samples that calcium phosphate formed on each surface following 14 days. The largest increase in mass, Δg, owed to calcium phosphate formation, was brought about by the whole area processed sample irradiated with a fluence of 51 J cm −2 . No correlation between the calcium phosphate formation and the laser patterned surface properties was determined due to the likely affect of the mixed-state wetting regime. Strong correlations between θ, the surface energy parameters and the calcium phosphate formation for the whole area processed samples allow one to realize the potential for this surface treatment technique in predicting the bone forming ability of laser processed materials. - Highlights: ► Surface modifications brought about a modulation in the wetting of nylon 6,6. ► An increase in θ can be attributed to a mixed-state wetting regime. ► Laser surface treatment modulated the ability to promote apatite formation. ► Mixed-state wetting regime affected the promotion of uniform apatite formation.

  5. Modulating calcium phosphate formation using CO{sub 2} laser engineering of a polymeric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, D.G., E-mail: Dwaugh@lincoln.ac.uk; Lawrence, J.

    2012-02-01

    The use of simulated body fluid (SBF) is widely used as a screening technique to assess the ability of materials to promote calcium phosphate formation. This paper details the use of CO{sub 2} laser surface treatment of nylon Registered-Sign 6,6 to modulate calcium phosphate formation following immersion in SBF for 14 days. Through white light interferometry (WLI) it was determined that the laser surface processing gave rise to maximum Ra and Sa parameters of 1.3 and 4.4 {mu}m, respectively. The use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) enabled a maximum increase in surface oxygen content of 5.6%at. to be identified. The laser-induced surface modifications gave rise to a modulation in the wettability characteristics such that the contact angle, {theta}, decreased for the whole area processed samples, as expected, and increased for the patterned samples. The increase in {theta} can be attributed to a transition in wetting nature to a mixed-state wetting regime. It was seen for all samples that calcium phosphate formed on each surface following 14 days. The largest increase in mass, {Delta}g, owed to calcium phosphate formation, was brought about by the whole area processed sample irradiated with a fluence of 51 J cm{sup -2}. No correlation between the calcium phosphate formation and the laser patterned surface properties was determined due to the likely affect of the mixed-state wetting regime. Strong correlations between {theta}, the surface energy parameters and the calcium phosphate formation for the whole area processed samples allow one to realize the potential for this surface treatment technique in predicting the bone forming ability of laser processed materials. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface modifications brought about a modulation in the wetting of nylon 6,6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in {theta} can be attributed to a mixed-state wetting regime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser surface treatment modulated the

  6. Materials processing with superposed Bessel beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiaoming [Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Trallero-Herrero, Carlos A. [J. R. Macdonald Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Lei, Shuting, E-mail: lei@ksu.edu [Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Superpositions of Bessel beams can be generated with >50% efficiency using an SLM and an axicon. • These beams have orders-of-magnitude increase in depth-of-focus compared to Gaussian beams. • Multiple craters can be fabricated on glass with single-shot exposure. • The 1+(−1) superposition can reduce collateral damage caused by the rings in the zero-order Bessel beams. - Abstract: We report experimental results of femtosecond laser processing on the surface of glass and metal thin film using superposed Bessel beams. These beams are generated by a combination of a spatial light modulator (SLM) and an axicon with >50% efficiency, and they possess the long depth-of-focus (propagation-invariant) property as found in ordinary Bessel beams. Through micromachining experiments using femtosecond laser pulses, we show that multiple craters can be fabricated on glass with single-shot exposure, and the 1+(−1) superposed beam can reduce collateral damage caused by the rings in zero-order Bessel beams in the scribing of metal thin film.

  7. [INVITED] Evaluation of process observation features for laser metal welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenner, Felix; Klämpfl, Florian; Nagulin, Konstantin Yu.; Schmidt, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In the present study we show how fast the fluid dynamics change when changing the laser power for different feed rates during laser metal welding. By the use of two high-speed cameras and a data acquisition system we conclude how fast we have to image the process to measure the fluid dynamics with a very high certainty. Our experiments show that not all process features which can be measured during laser welding do represent the process behavior similarly well. Despite the good visibility of the vapor plume the monitoring of its movement is less suitable as an input signal for a closed-loop control. The features measured inside the keyhole show a good correlation with changes of process parameters. Due to its low noise, the area of the keyhole opening is well suited as an input signal for a closed-loop control of the process.

  8. Atomic processes in strong bichromatic elliptically polarized laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odžak, S., E-mail: senad.odzak@gmail.com; Hasović, E.; Gazibegović-Busuladžić, A.; Čerkić, A., E-mail: anercerkic@yahoo.com; Fetić, B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Kramo, A. [BHANSA, Aeronautical Meteorology Department, Kurta Schorka 36, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Busuladžić, M. [Medical Faculty, University of Sarajevo, Čekaluša 90, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Milošević, D. B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bistrik 7, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-03-25

    Nonlinear quantum-mechanical phenomena in strong laser fields, such as high-order harmonic generation (HHG) and above-threshold ionization (ATI) are significantly modified if the applied laser field is bichromatic and/or elliptically polarized. Numerical results obtained within the strong-field approximation are presented for two special cases. We show results for HHG by plasma ablation in a bichromatic linearly polarized laser field. We also consider the ATI process in bicircular field which consists of two coplanar counter-rotating circularly polarized fields.

  9. Momentum and velocity of the ablated material in laser machining of carbon fiber preforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucha, P.; Speker, N.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.

    2013-11-01

    The automation in fabrication of CFRP (carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics) parts demands efficient and low-cost machining technologies. In conventional cutting technologies, tool-wear and low process speeds are some of the reasons for high costs. Thus, the use of lasers is an attractive option for cutting CF-preforms. A typical effect degrading the quality in laser cutting CF-preform is a bulged cutting edge. This effect is assumed to be caused by interaction of the fibers with the ablated material, which leaves the kerf at high velocity. Hence, a method for measuring the momentum and the velocity of the vapor is presented in this article. To measure the momentum of the ablated material, the CF-preform is mounted on a precision scale while cutting it with a laser. The direction of the momentum was determined by measuring the momentum parallel and orthogonal to the CF-preform surface. A change of the direction of the momentum with different cutting-speeds is assessed at constant laser-power. Averaged velocities of the ablation products of up to 300 m/s were determined by measuring the ablated mass and the momentum.

  10. Laser processing of cast iron for enhanced erosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.H.; Altstetter, C.J.; Rigsbee, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The surfaces of nodular and gray cast iron have been modified by CO 2 laser processing for enhanced hardness and erosion resistance. Control of the near-surface microstructure was achieved primarily by controlling resolidification of the laser melted layer through variations in laser beam/target interaction time and beam power density. Typical interaction times and power densities used were 5 msec and 500 kW/cm 2 . Two basic kinds of microstructure can be produced-a feathery microstructure with high hardness (up to 1245 HV) and a dendritic microstructure with a metastable, fully austenitic matrix and lower hardness (600 to 800 HV). Erosion testing was done using slurries of SiO 2 or SiC in water. Weight loss and crater profile measurements were used to evaluate the erosion characteristics of the various microstructures. Both ductile and gray cast iron showed marked improvement in erosion resistance after laser processing

  11. SURFACE CAST IRON STRENGTHENING USING COMBINED LASER AND ULTRASONIC PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Devojno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides an analysis of ultrasonic surface plastic deformation and subsequent laser thermal strengthening of gray cast iron parts in the regime of hardening from a solid state with the purpose to obtain strengthened surface layers of bigger depth and less roughness of the processed surface. Program complex ANSYS 11.0 has been used for calculation of temperature fields induced by laser exposure.  The appropriate regime of laser processing without surface fusion has been selected on the basis of the applied complex. The possibility of displacement in the bottom boundary of α–γ-transformation temperature  for СЧ20 with 900 °С up to 800 °С is confirmed due to preliminary ultrasonic surface plastic deformation of the surface that allows to expand technological opportunities of laser quenching  of gray  cast iron from a solid state. 

  12. Review of laser mega joule target area: Design and processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geitzholz, M.; Lanternier, C.

    2006-01-01

    The Laser Mega Joule (LMJ) target area is currently designed to achieve ignition and significant fusion gain in laboratory. LMJ will be composed of 240 identical large 370 mm * 370 mm square laser beams. These beams will focus 2 mega-joules of energy at the wavelength of 351 nm on the center of an experiment chamber. Design studies for target equipment are well advanced, target chamber and target holder (concrete) works have already begun. A detailed overview of the target area equipment is presented: target chamber, frame, diagnostic inserter manipulator, final optic assembly, dual diagnostic and laser reference, non cryogenic target positioner. Recent technical and architectural choices are detailed including safety transfers and alignment processes (target, laser and diagnostic). All this target equipment allows us to optimize shot chrono-gram, from target metrology to the shot, including calibration process. (authors)

  13. Materials evaluation for a transuranic processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, S.A.; Schwenk, E.B.; Divine, J.R.

    1990-11-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company, with the assistance of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is developing a transuranium extraction process for preheating double-shell tank wastes at the Hanford Site to reduce the volume of transuranic waste being sent to a repository. The bench- scale transuranium extraction process development is reaching a stage where a pilot plant design has begun for the construction of a facility in the existing B Plant. Because of the potential corrosivity of neutralized cladding removal waste process streams, existing embedded piping alloys in B Plant are being evaluated and ''new'' alloys are being selected for the full-scale plant screening corrosion tests. Once the waste is acidified with HNO 3 , some of the process streams that are high in F - and low in Al and zr can produce corrosion rates exceeding 30,000 mil/yr in austenitic alloys. Initial results results are reported concerning the applicability of existing plant materials to withstand expected process solutions and conditions to help determine the feasibility of locating the plant at the selected facility. In addition, process changes are presented that should make the process solutions less corrosive to the existing materials. Experimental work confirms that Hastelloy B is unsatisfactory for the expected process solutions; type 304L, 347 and 309S stainless steels are satisfactory for service at room temperature and 60 degrees C, if process stream complexing is performed. Inconel 625 was satisfactory for all solutions. 17 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs

  14. Tribological coating of titanium alloys by laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Wang

    Titanium-based alloys have been used for aerospace materials for many years. Recently, these alloys are now being increasingly considered for automotive, industrial and consumer applications. Their excellent creep resistance, corrosion resistance and relative higher specific strength ratio are attractive for many applications. However, the main obstacle for the wide adoption of Ti alloys in various industries is their poor tribological properties. In slide wear, Ti deforms and adhesive wear readily occurs. Their poor tribological properties are mainly due to low hardness and absolute values of tensile and shear strength. Different surface modification techniques have been studied in order to improve the tribological characteristics of Ti alloys, i.e. PVD, nitrding, carburizing, boriding, plating etc. Coatings produced by these techniques have their own limitations such as thermal distortion and grain growth. A different approach is to introduce hard particles in the Ti alloy matrix to form a MMC coating, which has tailor-made hardness and wear resistance properties. Laser cladding or laser alloying techniques facilitate the fabrication of surface MMC on Ti alloys without thermal distortion to the substrate. In this project, the fabrication of hard and wear resistant layers of metal matrix composite on titanium alloys substrate by laser surface alloying was investigated. Powder mixtures of Mo and WC were used to form the MMC layer. By optimizing the processing parameters and pre-placed powder mixture compositions, surface MMC of different properties have been successfully fabricated on CP-Ti and Ti6A14V respectively. The structure and characteristics of the MMC surface were investigated by metallography, SEM, XRD, and E-DAX. It was found that the hardness of the laser alloyed Mo/WC MMC surface was 300% higher than that of the CP-Ti substrate Excellent metallurgical bonding with the MMC layer of the substrate has been achieved. The relative kinetic frictional tests

  15. Development of functional materials by using ultrafast laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotsuma, Y.; Sakakura, M.; Miura, K.

    2018-01-01

    The polarization-dependent periodic nanostructures inside various materials are successfully induced by ultrafast laser pulses. The periodic nanostructures in various materials can be empirically classified into the following three types: (1) structural deficiency, (2) expanded structure, (3) partial phase separation. Such periodic nanostructures exhibited not only optical anisotropy but also intriguing electric, thermal, and magnetic properties. The formation mechanisms of the periodic nanostructure was interpreted in terms of the interaction between incident light field and the generated electron plasma. Furthermore, the fact that the periodic nanostructures in semiconductors could be formed empirically only if it is indirect bandgap semiconductor materials indicates the stress-dependence of bandgap structure and/or the recombination of the excited electrons are also involved to the nanostructure formation. More recently we have also confirmed that the periodic nanostructures in glass are related to whether a large amount of non-bridged oxygen is present. In the presentation, we demonstrate new possibilities for functionalization of common materials ranging from an eternal 5D optical storage, a polarization imaging, to a thermoelectric conversion, based on the indicated phenomena.

  16. Materials issues in silicon integrated circuit processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmer, M.; Stimmell, J.; Strathman, M.

    1986-01-01

    The symposium on ''Materials Issues in Integrated Circuit Processing'' sought to bring together all of the materials issued pertinent to modern integrated circuit processing. The inherent properties of the materials are becoming an important concern in integrated circuit manufacturing and accordingly research in materials science is vital for the successful implementation of modern integrated circuit technology. The session on Silicon Materials Science revealed the advanced stage of knowledge which topics such as point defects, intrinsic and extrinsic gettering and diffusion kinetics have achieved. Adaption of this knowledge to specific integrated circuit processing technologies is beginning to be addressed. The session on Epitaxy included invited papers on epitaxial insulators and IR detectors. Heteroepitaxy on silicon is receiving great attention and the results presented in this session suggest that 3-d integrated structures are an increasingly realistic possibility. Progress in low temperature silicon epitaxy and epitaxy of thin films with abrupt interfaces was also reported. Diffusion and Ion Implantation were well presented. Regrowth of implant-damaged layers and the nature of the defects which remain after regrowth were discussed in no less than seven papers. Substantial progress was also reported in the understanding of amorphising boron implants and the use of gallium implants for the formation of shallow p/sup +/ -layers

  17. Effect of input variability on the quality of laser shock processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arif, Abul Fazal M. [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-10-15

    Laser shock processing (LSP) involves high-energy laser radiation combined with suitable overlays to generate highpressure pulses on the surface of the metal. The stress wave generated due to high pressure pulses propagates into the material causing the surface layer to yield and plastically deform, and thereby, develop a significant residual compressive stress in the surface region of the substrate material. The developed compressive stress field is beneficial to improve surface properties such as fatigue, wear, and corrosion. To improve the understanding of the shock hardening process, investigation into the physical processes involved is necessary. In the first part of this paper, the temporal variation in the pressure intensity and spot size is calculated by using a two-dimensional recoil pressure prediction model. Using an explicit non-linear FEA code, ANSYS LS-DYNA, the deformation behavior and residual stresses in the substrate material are predicted. In the second part, a probabilistic approach to the modeling and analysis of LSP is presented in this paper. Various factors that affect the probabilistic performance of the LSP are grouped into categories and a select number of factors known to be significant, for which the variability could be assessed, are modeled as random variables (such as recoil pressure, laser beam spot size, substrate material properties and others). The potential of the probabilistic approach in predicting the structural integrity of the laser-shocked components is addressed

  18. Effect of input variability on the quality of laser shock processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arif, Abul Fazal M.

    2009-01-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) involves high-energy laser radiation combined with suitable overlays to generate highpressure pulses on the surface of the metal. The stress wave generated due to high pressure pulses propagates into the material causing the surface layer to yield and plastically deform, and thereby, develop a significant residual compressive stress in the surface region of the substrate material. The developed compressive stress field is beneficial to improve surface properties such as fatigue, wear, and corrosion. To improve the understanding of the shock hardening process, investigation into the physical processes involved is necessary. In the first part of this paper, the temporal variation in the pressure intensity and spot size is calculated by using a two-dimensional recoil pressure prediction model. Using an explicit non-linear FEA code, ANSYS LS-DYNA, the deformation behavior and residual stresses in the substrate material are predicted. In the second part, a probabilistic approach to the modeling and analysis of LSP is presented in this paper. Various factors that affect the probabilistic performance of the LSP are grouped into categories and a select number of factors known to be significant, for which the variability could be assessed, are modeled as random variables (such as recoil pressure, laser beam spot size, substrate material properties and others). The potential of the probabilistic approach in predicting the structural integrity of the laser-shocked components is addressed

  19. Laser-excited photoluminescence of three-layer GaAs double-heterostructure laser material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, F.R.; Dixon, R.W.; Barnes, P.A.; Schumaker, N.E.

    1975-01-01

    The successful fabrication of high-quality DH GaAs lasers from a simplified three-layer structure is reported. A major asset of this structure is the transparency of its final layer to recombination radiation occurring in the active layer, thus permitting the use of nondestructive photoluminescent techniques for material evaluation prior to device fabrication. In the course of photoluminescence investigations on this material the additional important observation has been made that indirect excitation (in which photocarriers are generated in the top ternary layer) has significant advantages over direct excitation (in which photocarriers are generated directly in the active layer). These include (i) the direct measurement of Al concentrations in both upper layers, (ii) the measurements of the minority-carrier diffusion length in the upper layer, (iii) an easily obtained indication of taper in the thickness of the upper layer, and (iv) surprisingly effective excitation of the active layer. By combining direct and indirect excitation it is shown that a clearer understanding of the location and detrimental influences of defects in the GaAs laser structure may be obtained. For example, the width of the region of reduced luminescence associated with many defects is found to be very excitation dependent and is confirmed to arise fr []m reduced active region luminescence. The photoluminescent excitation techniques described should be useful in the study of other heterostructure devices and material systems

  20. PREFACE: Processing, Microstructure and Performance of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu Lung; Chen, John J. J.; Hodgson, Michael A.; Thambyah, Ashvin

    2009-07-01

    A workshop on Processing, Microstructure and Performance of Materials was held at the University of Auckland, School of Engineering, on 8-9 April 2009. Organised by the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Auckland, this meeting consisted of international participants and aimed at addressing the state-of-the-art research activities in processing, microstructure characterization and performance integrity investigation of materials. This two-day conference brought together scientists and engineers from New Zealand, Australia, Hong Kong, France, and the United Kingdom. Undoubtedly, this diverse group of participants brought a very international flair to the proceedings which also featured original research papers on areas such as Materials processing; Microstructure characterisation and microanalysis; Mechanical response at different length scales, Biomaterials and Material Structural integrity. There were a total of 10 invited speakers, 16 paper presentations, and 14 poster presentations. Consequently, the presentations were carefully considered by the scientific committee and participants were invited to submit full papers for this volume. All the invited paper submissions for this volume have been peer reviewed by experts in the various fields represented in this conference, this in accordance to the expected standards of the journal's Peer review policy for IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. The works in this publication consists of new and original research as well as several expert reviews of current state-of-the art technologies and scientific developments. Knowing some of the real constraints on hard-copy publishing of high quality, high resolution images, the editors are grateful to IOP Publishing for this opportunity to have the papers from this conference published on the online open-access platform. Listed in this volume are papers on a range of topics on materials research, including Ferguson's high strain

  1. Processing of a metastable titanium alloy (Ti-5553 by selective laser melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zopp

    2017-09-01

    Material densities above 99.93% were achieved by optimisation of energy input during selective laser melting process. However, the use of reference fraction (10–63 μm allowed the highest material density. Regarding to surface quality, an impact of coarse grain (53–63 μm was identified and an optimised grain size distribution derived. An optimum averaged surface roughness could be calculated, using a grain size between 25–32 μm.

  2. Microwave heating processes involving carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menendez, J.A.; Arenillas, A.; Fidalgo, B.; Fernandez, Y.; Zubizarreta, L.; Calvo, E.G.; Bermudez, J.M. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    Carbon materials are, in general, very good absorbents of microwaves, i.e., they are easily heated by microwave radiation. This characteristic allows them to be transformed by microwave heating, giving rise to new carbons with tailored properties, to be used as microwave receptors, in order to heat other materials indirectly, or to act as a catalyst and microwave receptor in different heterogeneous reactions. In recent years, the number of processes that combine the use of carbons and microwave heating instead of other methods based on conventional heating has increased. In this paper some of the microwave-assisted processes in which carbon materials are produced, transformed or used in thermal treatments (generally, as microwave absorbers and catalysts) are reviewed and the main achievements of this technique are compared with those obtained by means of conventional (non microwave-assisted) methods in similar conditions. (author)

  3. Physical and biochemical processes in composting material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van J.T.

    1996-01-01


    In the composting process temperature and oxygen concentrations are essential parameters. A main objective of this thesis is to formulate a mathematical model which can predict these parameters. In this model a number of important material properties must be used: composition in terms of

  4. Food Processing Curriculum Material and Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge.

    Intended for secondary vocational agriculture teachers, this curriculum guide contains a course outline and a resource manual for a seven-unit food processing course on meats. Within the course outline, units are divided into separate lessons. Materials provided for each lesson include preparation for instruction (student objectives, review of…

  5. Different Concepts of Materiality in Userdriven Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik; Tellerup, Susanne

    This paper introduces the Quadrant model for innovation. The model should be seen as a generative model for structuring processes in innovation with complex partnerships. The paper discusses the model and especially emphasises the need for, and the different concepts of materiality in innovation....

  6. Femtosecond laser ablation profile near an interface: Analysis based on the correlation with superficial properties of individual materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolodelli, Gustavo, E-mail: nicolodelli@ursa.ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Grupo de Optica, Av. Trabalhador Sancarlense 400, P.O. Box 369, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Grupo de Optica, Av. Trabalhador Sancarlense 400, P.O. Box 369, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    Femtosecond laser ablation of materials is turning to be an important tool for micromachining as well as for selective removal of biological tissues. In a great number of applications, laser ablation has to process through interfaces separating media of different properties. The investigation of the ablation behavior within materials and passing through interfaces is the main aim of this study. Especially, the analysis of the discontinuity in the ablation profile close to interfaces between distinct materials can reveal some of the phenomena involved in the formation of an ablated microcavity geometry. We have used a method that correlates the ablation cross sectional area with the local laser intensity. The effective intensity ablation properties were obtained from surface ablation data of distinct materials. The application of this method allows the prediction of the occurrence of a size discontinuity in the ablation geometry at the interface of distinct media, a fact which becomes important when planning applications in different media.

  7. Manufacturing of the ISO 25178-70 material measures with direct laser writing: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifler, M.; Hering, J.; von Freymann, G.; Seewig, J.

    2018-06-01

    The standard ISO 25178-70 defines material measures for the calibration of 2D- and 3D-topography measurement devices. Some of the suggested material measures are established within the industrial application for a long time while others have not yet been extensively researched regarding their practical abilities. This paper describes a holistic and systematic investigation of the ISO 25178-70 material measures. The manufacturing of the suggested geometries is executed with two-photon laser lithography, alias direct laser writing (DLW). Since this manufacturing process is not yet frequently used in a material measures context, it is examined regarding its suitability for the fabrication of the ISO 25178-70 material measures. With DLW, it is possible to manufacture multiple material measures on one sample in order to enable a comprehensive calibration of optical topography measurement devices. The manufactured ISO 25178-70 geometries are examined using different 3D-topography measuring devices. In doing so, their abilities regarding the calibration of the devices can be evaluated and the practical feasibility of their industrial application is assessed. For the review of this practical usefulness, varying calibration and evaluation strategies are taken into account.

  8. TRANSITION METAL OXIDES AS MATERIALS FOR ADDITIVE LASER MARKING ON STAINLESS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail Stoyanov Mihalev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The product information plays an important role in the improvement of the manufacturing, allowing the tracking of the part through the full life cycle. Laser marking is one of the most versatile techniques for this purpose. In this paper, a modification of the powder bed selective laser melting for additive laser marking of stainless steel parts is presented. This modification is based on the use of only one transition metal oxide chemically bonded to the stainless steel substrate, without using any additional materials and cleaning substances. The resulting additive coatings, produced from initial MoO3 and WO3 powders, show strong adhesion, high hardness, long durability and a high optical contrast. For estimation of the chemical and structural properties, the Raman and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD spectroscopy have been implemented. A computer model of the process of the laser melting and re-solidification has been developed as well. A comparative analysis of the properties of both (MoO3 and WO3 additive coatings has been performed. An attempt for a qualitative explanation of the thermo-chemical phenomena during the marking process has been undertaken.

  9. High-Tc thin films prepared by laser ablation: material distribution and droplet problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, David H.A.; IJsselsteijn, R.P.J.; IJsselsteijn, R.P.J.; Out, P.G.; Kuiper, H.J.H.; Flokstra, Jakob; Rogalla, Horst

    1992-01-01

    The lateral material distribution of laser-deposited YBa2Cu3O7¿¿ films and the density of droplets coming from the target were studied by varying the laser pulse energy, the laser spot size and the target-to-substrate distance. Silicon wafers at ambient temperature were used as substrates to

  10. Laser post-processing of halide perovskites for enhanced photoluminescence and absorbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiguntseva, E. Y.; Saraeva, I. N.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Ushakova, E. V.; Komissarenko, F. E.; Ishteev, A. R.; Tsypkin, A. N.; Haroldson, R.; Milichko, V. A.; Zuev, D. A.; Makarov, S. V.; Zakhidov, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Hybrid halide perovskites have emerged as one of the most promising type of materials for thin-film photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. Further boosting their performance is critically important for commercialization. Here we use femtosecond laser for post-processing of organo-metalic perovskite (MAPbI3) films. The high throughput laser approaches include both ablative silicon nanoparticles integration and laser-induced annealing. By using these techniques, we achieve strong enhancement of photoluminescence as well as useful light absorption. As a result, we observed experimentally 10-fold enhancement of absorbance in a perovskite layer with the silicon nanoparticles. Direct laser annealing allows for increasing of photoluminescence over 130%, and increase absorbance over 300% in near-IR range. We believe that the developed approaches pave the way to novel scalable and highly effective designs of perovskite based devices.

  11. Laser isotope separation - a new class of chemical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodall, K.B.; Mannik, L.; O'Neill, J.A.; Mader, D.L.; Nickerson, S.B.; Robins, J.R.; Bartoszek, F.E.; Gratton, D.

    1983-01-01

    Lasers may soon find several applications in chemical processing. The applications that have attracted the most research funding to date involve isotope separation for the nuclear industry. These isotopes have an unusually high value (≥$1000/kg) compared to bulk chemicals (∼$1/kg) and are generally required in very large quantities. In a laser isotope separation process, light is used to convert a separation that is very difficult or even impossible by conventional chemical engineering techniques to one that is readily handled by conventional separation technology. For some isotopes this can result in substantial capital and energy savings. A uranium enrichment process developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the closest to commercialization of the large scale laser isotope separation processes. Of particular interest to the Canadian nuclear industry are the laser separation of deuterium, tritium, zirconium-90 and carbon-14. In this paper, the basic principles behind laser isotope separation are reviewed and brief dscriptions of the more developed processes are given

  12. Colour marking of transparent materials by laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanada, Yasutaka; Sugioka, Koji; Miyamoto, Iwao; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate colour marking of a transparent material using laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA) system. After the LIPAA process, metal thin film is deposited on the surface of the ablated groove. This feature is applied to RGB (red, green and blue) colour marking by using specific metal targets. The metal targets, for instance, are Pb 3 O 4 for red, Cr 2 O 3 for green and [Cu(C 32 H 15 ClN 8 )] for blue colour marking. Additionally, adhesion of the metal thin film deposited on the processed groove by various experimental conditions is investigated

  13. Molten salt processes in special materials preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, N.; Suri, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    As a class, molten salts are the largest collection of non aqueous inorganic solvents. On account of their stability at high temperature and compatibility to a number of process requirements, molten salts are considered indispensable to realize many of the numerous benefits of high temperature technology. They play a crucial role and form the basis for numerous elegant processes for the preparation of metals and materials. Molten salt are considered versatile heat transfer media and have led to the evolution of many interesting reactor concepts in fission and possibly in fusion. They also have been the basis of thinking for few novel processes for power generation. While focusing principally on the actual utilization of molten salts for a variety of materials preparation efforts in BARC, this lecture also covers a few of the other areas of technological applications together with the scientific basis for considering the molten salts in such situations. (author)

  14. Dynamic actuation of a novel laser-processed NiTi linear actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pequegnat, A; Daly, M; Wang, J; Zhou, Y; Khan, M I

    2012-01-01

    A novel laser processing technique, capable of locally modifying the shape memory effect, was applied to enhance the functionality of a NiTi linear actuator. By altering local transformation temperatures, an additional memory was imparted into a monolithic NiTi wire to enable dynamic actuation via controlled resistive heating. Characterizations of the actuator load, displacement and cyclic properties were conducted using a custom-built spring-biased test set-up. Monotonic tensile testing was also implemented to characterize the deformation behaviour of the martensite phase. Observed differences in the deformation behaviour of laser-processed material were found to affect the magnitude of the active strain. Furthermore, residual strain during cyclic actuation testing was found to stabilize after 150 cycles while the recoverable strain remained constant. This laser-processed actuator will allow for the realization of new applications and improved control methods for shape memory alloys. (paper)

  15. A review of laser electrode processing for development and manufacturing of lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleging, Wilhelm

    2018-02-01

    Laser processes for cutting, annealing, structuring, and printing of battery materials have a great potential in order to minimize the fabrication costs and to increase the electrochemical performance and operational lifetime of lithium-ion cells. Hereby, a broad range of applications can be covered such as micro-batteries, mobile applications, electric vehicles, and stand-alone electric energy storage devices. Cost-efficient nanosecond (ns)-laser cutting of electrodes was one of the first laser technologies which were successfully transferred to industrial high-energy battery production. A defined thermal impact can be useful in electrode manufacturing which was demonstrated by laser annealing of thin-film electrodes for adjusting of battery active crystalline phases or by laser-based drying of composite thick-film electrodes for high-energy batteries. Ultrafast or ns-laser direct structuring or printing of electrode materials is a rather new technical approach in order to realize three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures. Three-dimensional electrode configurations lead to a better electrochemical performance in comparison to conventional 2D one, due to an increased active surface area, reduced mechanical tensions during electrochemical cycling, and an overall reduced cell impedance. Furthermore, it was shown that for thick-film composite electrodes an increase of electrolyte wetting could be achieved by introducing 3D micro-/nano-structures. Laser structuring can turn electrodes into superwicking. This has a positive impact regarding an increased battery lifetime and a reliable battery production. Finally, laser processes can be up-scaled in order to transfer the 3D battery concept to high-energy and high-power lithium-ion cells.

  16. Nd:YAG laser in endodontics: filling-material edge bordering on a root channel laser cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Andrei V.; Sinelnik, Yuri A.; Moroz, Boris T.; Pavlovskaya, Irina V.

    1997-12-01

    For the very first time it is represented a study of filling material edge bordering upon root channel cavity modified with a laser. As a filling material it is used a glass ionomer cement. It is demonstrated that Nd:YAG laser radiation effects on increase of grade of edge bordering on the average of 20 - 30% at temperature rise of no more than 2 - 3 degrees in periodontium area in a period of operation.

  17. Dielectric barrier discharge processing of aerospace materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, S J; Figgures, C C; Dixon, D G

    2004-01-01

    We report the use of atmospheric pressure, air based, dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) to treat materials commonly used in the aerospace industries. The material samples were processed using a test-bed of a conventional DBD configuration in which the sample formed one of the electrodes and was placed in close proximity to a ceramic electrode. The discharges generated a powerful, cold oxidizing environment which was able to remove organic contaminants, etch primer and paint layers, oxidize aluminium and roughen carbon fibre composites by the selective removal of resin

  18. Modification of transparent materials with ultrashort laser pulses: What is energetically and mechanically meaningful?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulgakova, Nadezhda M., E-mail: nadezhda.bulgakova@hilase.cz [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics ASCR, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic); Institute of Thermophysics SB RAS, 1 Lavrentyev Ave., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Zhukov, Vladimir P. [Institute of Computational Technologies SB RAS, 6 Lavrentyev Ave., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Karl Marx Ave., 630073, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sonina, Svetlana V. [Novosibirsk State University, 1 Koptuga Ave., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Meshcheryakov, Yuri P. [Design and Technology Branch of Lavrentyev Institute of Hydrodynamics SB RAS, Tereshkovoi street 29, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-21

    A comprehensive analysis of laser-induced modification of bulk glass by single ultrashort laser pulses is presented which is based on combination of optical Maxwell-based modeling with thermoelastoplastic simulations of post-irradiation behavior of matter. A controversial question on free electron density generated inside bulk glass by ultrashort laser pulses in modification regimes is addressed on energy balance grounds. Spatiotemporal dynamics of laser beam propagation in fused silica have been elucidated for the regimes used for direct laser writing in bulk glass. 3D thermoelastoplastic modeling of material relocation dynamics under laser-induced stresses has been performed up to the microsecond timescale when all motions in the material decay. The final modification structure is found to be imprinted into material matrix already at sub-nanosecond timescale. Modeling results agree well with available experimental data on laser light transmission through the sample and the final modification structure.

  19. Evaluating Acoustic Emission Signals as an in situ process monitoring technique for Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Karl A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Candy, Jim V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Guss, Gabe [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mathews, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-14

    In situ real-time monitoring of the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process has significant implications for the AM community. The ability to adjust the SLM process parameters during a build (in real-time) can save time, money and eliminate expensive material waste. Having a feedback loop in the process would allow the system to potentially ‘fix’ problem regions before a next powder layer is added. In this study we have investigated acoustic emission (AE) phenomena generated during the SLM process, and evaluated the results in terms of a single process parameter, of an in situ process monitoring technique.

  20. Feasible Application Area Study for Linear Laser Cutting in Paper Making Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happonen, A.; Stepanov, A.; Piili, H.

    Traditional industry sectors, like paper making industry, tend to stay within well-known technology rather than going forward towards promising, but still quite new technical solutions and applications. This study analyses the feasibility of the laser cutting in large-scale industrial paper making processes. Aim was to reveal development and process related challenges and improvement potential in paper making processes by utilizing laser technology. This study has been carried out, because there still seems to be only few large-scale industrial laser processing applications in paper converting processes worldwide, even in the beginning of 2010's. Because of this, the small-scale use of lasers in paper material manufacturing industry is related to a shortage of well-known and widely available published research articles and published measurement data (e.g. actual achieved cut speeds with high quality cut edges, set-up times and so on). It was concluded that laser cutting has strong potential in industrial applications for paper making industries. This potential includes quality improvements and a competitive advantage for paper machine manufacturers and industry. The innovations have also added potential, when developing new paper products. An example of these kinds of products are ones with printed intelligence, which could be a new business opportunity for the paper industries all around the world.

  1. Materials and processing science: Limits for microelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, R.

    1988-09-01

    The theme of this talk will be to illustrate examples of technologies that will drive materials and processing sciences to the limit and to describe some of the research being pursued to understand materials interactions which are pervasive to projected structure fabrication. It is to be expected that the future will see a progression to nanostructures where scaling laws will be tested and quantum transport will become more in evidence, to low temperature operation for tighter control and improved performance, to complex vertical profiles where 3D stacking and superlattices will produce denser packing and device flexibility, to faster communication links with optoelectronics, and to compatible packaging technologies. New low temperature processing techniques, such as epitaxy of silicon, PECVD of dielectrics, low temperature high pressure oxidation, silicon-germanium heterostructures, etc., must be combined with shallow metallurgies, new lithographic technologies, maskless patterning, rapid thermal processing (RTP) to produce needed profile control, reduce process incompatibilities and develop new device geometries. Materials interactions are of special consequence for chip substrates and illustrations of work in metal-ceramic and metal-polymer adhesion will be offered.

  2. Parametric study of development of Inconel-steel functionally graded materials by laser direct metal deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Kamran; Haq, Izhar ul; Khan, Ashfaq; Shah, Shaukat Ali; Khan, Mushtaq; Pinkerton, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Functionally graded steel and nickel super-alloy structures have been developed. • Mechanical properties of FGMs can be controlled by process input parameters. • SDAS is strongly dependent on the laser power and powder mass flow rate. • Carbides provide a mechanism to control the hardness and wear resistance of FGM. • Tensile strength of FGM is dependent on the laser power and powder mass flow rate. - Abstract: Laser direct metal deposition (LDMD) has developed from a prototyping to a single and multiple metals manufacturing technique. It offers an opportunity to produce graded components, with differing elemental composition, phase and microstructure at different locations. In this work, continuously graded Stainless Steel 316L and Inconel 718 thin wall structures made by direct laser metal deposition process have been explored. The paper considers the effects of process parameters including laser power levels and powder mass flow rates of SS316L and Inconel 718 during the deposition of the Steel–Ni graded structures. Microstructure characterisation and phase identification are performed by optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Mechanical testing, using methods such as hardness, wear resistance and tensile testing have been carried out on the structures. XRD results show the presence of the NbC and Fe 2 Nb phases formed during the deposition. The effect of experimental parameters on the microstructure and physical properties are determined and discussed. Work shows that mechanical properties can be controlled by input parameters and generation of carbides provides an opportunity to selectively control the hardness and wear resistance of the functionally graded material

  3. Laser lithotripsy with the Ho:YAG laser: fragmentation process revealed by time-resolved imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, Franz R.; Beghuin, Didier; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Venzi, Giordano; Jichlinski, Patrice; Rink, Klaus; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg; Graber, Peter

    1998-07-01

    Improvements of endoscopic techniques have renewed the interest of urologists in laser lithotripsy in recent years. Laser energy can be easily transmitted through flexible fibers thereby enabling different surgical procedures such as cutting, coagulating and lithotripsy. The Ho:YAG laser offers multiple medical applications in Urology, among them stone fragmentation. However, the present knowledge of its fragmentation mechanism is incomplete. The objective was therefore to analyze the fragmentation process and to discuss the clinical implications related to the underlying fragmentation mechanism. The stone fragmentation process during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy was observed by time resolved flash video imaging. Possible acoustic transient occurrence was simultaneously monitored with a PVDF-needle hydrophone. Fragmentation was performed on artificial and cystine kidney stones in water. We observed that though the fragmentation process is accompanied with the formation of a cavitation bubble, cavitation has only a minimal effect on stone fragmentation. Fragment ejection is mainly due to direct laser stone heating leading to vaporization of organic stone constituents and interstitial water. The minimal effect of the cavitation bubble is confirmed by acoustic transients measurements, which reveal weak pressure transients. Stone fragmentation with the Holmium laser is the result of vaporization of interstitial (stone) water and organic stone constituents. It is not due to the acoustic effects of a cavitation bubble or plasma formation. The fragmentation process is strongly related with heat production thereby harboring the risk of undesired thermal damage. Therefore, a solid comprehension of the fragmentation process is needed when using the different clinically available laser types of lithotripsy.

  4. Excitonic and photonic processes in materials

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This book is expected to present state-of-the-art understanding of a selection of excitonic and photonic processes in useful materials from semiconductors to insulators to metal/insulator nanocomposites, both inorganic and organic.  Among the featured applications are components of solar cells, detectors, light-emitting devices, scintillators, and materials with novel optical properties.  Excitonic properties are particularly important in organic photovoltaics and light emitting devices, as also in questions of the ultimate resolution and efficiency of new-generation scintillators for medical diagnostics,  border security, and nuclear nonproliferation.  Novel photonic and optoelectronic applications benefit from new material combinations and structures to be discussed.

  5. Enhancement of surface integrity of titanium alloy with copper by means of laser metal deposition process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erinosho, MF

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The laser metal deposition process possesses the combination of metallic powder and laser beam respectively. However, these combinations create an adhesive bonding that permanently solidifies the laser-enhanced-deposited powders. Titanium alloys (Ti...

  6. Welded joints integrity analysis and optimization for fiber laser welding of dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yuewei; Shao, Xinyu; Jiang, Ping; Li, Peigen; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Dissimilar materials welded joints provide many advantages in power, automotive, chemical, and spacecraft industries. The weld bead integrity which is determined by process parameters plays a significant role in the welding quality during the fiber laser welding (FLW) of dissimilar materials. In this paper, an optimization method by taking the integrity of the weld bead and weld area into consideration is proposed for FLW of dissimilar materials, the low carbon steel and stainless steel. The relationships between the weld bead integrity and process parameters are developed by the genetic algorithm optimized back propagation neural network (GA-BPNN). The particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is taken for optimizing the predicted outputs from GA-BPNN for the objective. Through the optimization process, the desired weld bead with good integrity and minimum weld area are obtained and the corresponding microstructure and microhardness are excellent. The mechanical properties of the optimized joints are greatly improved compared with that of the un-optimized welded joints. Moreover, the effects of significant factors are analyzed based on the statistical approach and the laser power (LP) is identified as the most significant factor on the weld bead integrity and weld area. The results indicate that the proposed method is effective for improving the reliability and stability of welded joints in the practical production.

  7. Observation of laser multiple filamentation process and multiple electron beams acceleration in a laser wakefield accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Wentao; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Hui; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Zhijun; Qi, Rong; Wang, Cheng; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-01-01

    The multiple filaments formation process in the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) was observed by imaging the transmitted laser beam after propagating in the plasma of different density. During propagation, the laser first self-focused into a single filament. After that, it began to defocus with energy spreading in the transverse direction. Two filaments then formed from it and began to propagate independently, moving away from each other. We have also demonstrated that the laser multiple filamentation would lead to the multiple electron beams acceleration in the LWFA via ionization-induced injection scheme. Besides, its influences on the accelerated electron beams were also analyzed both in the single-stage LWFA and cascaded LWFA

  8. Multiscale Modeling and Simulation of Material Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    challenge is how to develop methods that permit simulation of a process with a fewer number of atoms (for e.g. 106 instead of 1014 atoms in a cube) or...rreula bakgrundmes to ea wih poblms n-here. In dynamic simulations, the mass and momentum volving rapidly varying stress, such as stress field near a...significant, as indicated by numerical examples that will follow. We next summarize the coupling scheme with the aid of flowchart Fig. 8. The material

  9. Thermal effect of laser ablation on the surface of carbon fiber reinforced plastic during laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Sato, Yuji; Matsunaga, Ei-ichi; Tsukamoto, Masahiro

    2018-02-01

    Although laser processing is widely used for many applications, the cutting quality of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) decreases around the heat-affected zone (HAZ) during laser processing. Carbon fibers are exposed around the HAZ, and tensile strength decreases with increasing length of the HAZ. Some theoretical studies of thermal conductions that do not consider fluid dynamics have been performed; however, theoretical considerations that include the dynamics of laser ablation are scarce. Using removed mass and depth observed from experiments, the dynamics of laser ablation of CFRP with high-temperature and high-pressure of compressive gas is simulated herein. In this calculation, the mushroom-like shape of laser ablation is qualitatively simulated compared with experiments using a high-speed camera. Considering the removal temperature of the resin and the temperature distribution at each point on the surface, the simulation results suggest that a wide area of the resin is removed when the processing depth is shallow, and a rounded kerf is generated as the processing depth increases.

  10. Research and development prospects for the atomic uranium laser isotope separation process. Research report 442

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janes, G.S.; Forsen, H.K.; Levy, R.H.

    1977-06-01

    Research and development activities are being conducted on many aspects of the atomic uranium laser isotope separation process. Extensive laser spectroscopy studies have been made in order to identify attractive multi-step selective ionization schemes. Using low density (10 10 atoms/cm 3 ) apparatus, the excited state spectra of atomic uranium have been investigated via multiple step laser excitation and photoionization studies using two, three and four pulsed lasers. Observation of the spectra was accomplished by observing the yield of 235 U and 238 U ions as a function of the wavelength, intensities and delays of the various lasers. These data yielded information on the photoexcitation and photoionizatin cross sections, and on the location, J values, lifetimes, isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of the various atomic levels of uranium. Experiments on selective ionization of uranium vapor by multiple step laser excitation followed by ion extraction at 10 13 atoms/cm 3 density have produced 6% enriched 235 U. These indicate that this process is well adapted to produce light water reactor fuel but less suitable for highly enriched material. Application has been made for license for a 1979 experimental facility to provide data for a mid-1980 commercial plant

  11. Damage Mechanisms In Polymers Upon NIR Femtosecond Pulse Laser Irradiation: Sub-Threshold Processes And Their Implications For Laser Safety Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, Joern; Krueger, Joerg; Solis, Javier; Spielmann, Christian; Lippert, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This contribution investigates laser-induced damage of thin film and bulk polymer samples, with the focus on physical processes occurring close to the damage threshold. In-situ real-time reflectivity (RTR) measurements with picosecond (ps) and nanosecond (ns) temporal resolution were performed on thin polymer films on a timescale up to a few microseconds (μs). A model for polymer thin film damage is presented, indicating that irreversible chemical modification processes take place already below the fluence threshold for macroscopic damage. On dye-doped bulk polymer filters (as used for laser goggles), transmission studies using fs-and ps-laser pulses reveal the optical saturation behavior of the material and its relation to the threshold of permanent damage. Implications of the sub-threshold processes for laser safety applications will be discussed for thin film and bulk polymer damage.

  12. Modeling of Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in the Laser Multilayered Cladding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanrong; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2010-12-01

    The current work examines the heat-and-mass transfer process in the laser multilayered cladding of H13 tool steel powder by numerical modeling and experimental validation. A multiphase transient model is developed to investigate the evolution of the temperature field and flow velocity of the liquid phase in the molten pool. The solid region of the substrate and solidified clad, the liquid region of the melted clad material, and the gas region of the surrounding air are included. In this model, a level-set method is used to track the free surface motion of the molten pool with the powder material feeding and scanning of the laser beam. An enthalpy-porosity approach is applied to deal with the solidification and melting that occurs in the cladding process. Moreover, the laser heat input and heat losses from the forced convection and heat radiation that occurs on the top surface of the deposited layer are incorporated into the source term of the governing equations. The effects of the laser power, scanning speed, and powder-feed rate on the dilution and height of the multilayered clad are investigated based on the numerical model and experimental measurements. The results show that an increase of the laser power and powder feed rate, or a reduction of the scanning speed, can increase the clad height and directly influence the remelted depth of each layer of deposition. The numerical results have a qualitative agreement with the experimental measurements.

  13. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favalli, Andrea; Aymond, F.; Bridgewater, Jon S.; Croft, Stephen; Deppert, O.; Devlin, Matthew James; Falk, Katerina; Fernandez, Juan Carlos; Gautier, Donald Cort; Gonzales, Manuel A.; Goodsell, Alison Victoria; Guler, Nevzat; Hamilton, Christopher Eric; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, Randall Philip; Jung, Daniel; Kleinschmidt, Annika; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Pomerantz, Ishay; Roth, Markus; Santi, Peter Angelo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas; Wurden, Glen Anthony; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; McCary, E.

    2015-01-01

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  14. UV excimer laser and low temperature plasma treatments of polyamide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Yiu Wan Joanne

    ) functional groups, which increased water absorption. However, after tetrafluoromethane plasma treatment it was found that the -CF, -CF2 and -CF3 groups were introduced to the polyamide surface and this enhanced the hydrophobicity of the fabric. Suggested explanations are given of the mechanisms that produce the structure of the polyamide after the processes of laser irradiation (both high- and low-fluence) and plasma treatment. The fundamental approach used in modelling was considered the temperature profile of the material during the treatment. The development of high-fluence induced structures was caused by elevated temperatures in the subsurface volume and preexisting stress caused by fiber extrusion. The structure formation under LF laser irradiation was determined by thermal effect accompanied by the optical phenomenon of interference. Ripple structures formed by plasma were closely related to physical or chemical etching. Possible applications of plasma and laser technologies in the textile and clothing industries are considered. Oxygen plasma seems to be the best candidate to improve the wettability of the fabric, while tetrafluoromethane plasma can be applied to produce a water repellent surface. Surface treatments including CF4 plasma, high-fluence and low-fluence laser treatments produce a deeper color in disperse dyed fabrics using the same amount of dyestuff as chemicals like leveling agents and dyestuff can be reduced during the textile manufacturing process. UV laser and low temperature plasma modification processes are promising techniques for polymer/fabric surface modification and have industrial potential as they are environmentally friendly dry processes which do not involve any solvents.

  15. Study of the mechanisms involved in the laser superficial hardening process of metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Edmara Marques Rodrigues da

    2001-01-01

    The laser superficial hardening process of a ferrous alloy (gray cast iron) and of an aluminum-silicon alloy was investigated in this work. These metallic alloys are used in the automobile industry for manufacturing cylinders and pistons, respectively. By application of individual pulses and single tracks, the involved mechanisms during the processing were studied. Variables such as energy density, power density, temporal width, beam diameter on the sample surface, atmosphere of the processing region, overlapping and scanning velocity. The hardened surface was characterized by optical and scanning electronic microscopy, dispersive energy microanalysis, X-ray mapping, X-ray diffraction, and measurements of roughness and Vickers microhardness. Depending on the processing parameters, it is possible to obtain different microstructures. The affected area of gray cast iron, can be hardened by remelting or transformation hardening (total or partial) if the reached temperature is higher or not that of melting temperature. Laser treatment originated new structures such as retained austenite, martensite and, occasionally, eutectic of cellular dendritic structure. Aluminum-silicon alloy does not have phase transformation in solid state, it can be hardened only by remelting. The increase of hardness is a function of the precipitation hardening process, which makes the silicon particles smaller and more disperse in the matrix. Maximal values of microhardness (700-1000 HV) were reached with the laser treatment in gray cast iron samples. The initial microhardness is of 242 HV. For aluminum-silicon alloy, the laser remelting increases the initial microhardness of 128 HV to the range of 160-320 HV. The found results give a new perspective for using the CLA/IPEN's laser in the heat treatment area. Besides providing a higher absorptivity to the materials, compared with the CO 2 laser, and optical fiber access, the superficial hardening with Nd:YAG laser, depending on the level of

  16. Applications of laser produced ion beams to nuclear analysis of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mima, K.; Azuma, H.; Fujita, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Okuda, C.; Ukyo, Y.; Kato, Y.; Arrabal, R. Gonzalez; Soldo, F.; Perlado, J. M.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, S.

    2012-01-01

    Laser produced ion beams have unique characteristics which are ultra-short pulse, very low emittance, and variety of nuclear species. These characteristics could be used for analyzing various materials like low Z ion doped heavy metals or ceramics. Energies of laser produced ion beam extend from 0.1MeV to 100MeV. Therefore, various nuclear processes can be induced in the interactions of ion beams with samples. The ion beam driven nuclear analysis has been developed for many years by using various electrostatic accelerators. To explore the applicability of laser ion beam to the analysis of the Li ion battery, a proton beam with the diameter of ∼ 1.0 μm at Takasaki Ion Acceleration for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA was used. For the analysis, the PIGE (Particle-Induced Gamma Ray Emission) is used. The proton beam scans over Li battery electrode samples to diagnose Li density in the LiNi 0.85 Co 0.15 O 2 anode. As the results, PIGE images for Li area density distributions are obtained with the spatial resolution of better than 1.5μm FWHM. By the Li PIGE images, the depth dependence of de-intercalation levels of Li in the anode is obtained. By the POP experiments at TIARA, it is clarified that laser produced ion beam is appropriate for the Li ion battery analysis. 41.85.Lc, 41.75.Jv, 42.62.cf.

  17. All-fiber-coupled laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy sensor for hazardous materials analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohling, Christian [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); SECOPTA GmbH, Ostendstr. 25, 12459 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: c.bohling@pe.tu-clausthal.de; Hohmann, Konrad [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: k.hohmann@pe.tu-clausthal.de; Scheel, Dirk [Systektum GmbH, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Str. 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: d.scheel@systektum.de; Bauer, Christoph [LaserAnwendungsCentrum (LAC) Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Strasse 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: c.bauer@pe.tu-clausthal.de; Schippers, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: w.schippers@pe.tu-clausthal.de; Burgmeier, Joerg [LaserAnwendungsCentrum (LAC) Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Strasse 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: j.burgmeier@pe.tu-clausthal.de; Willer, Ulrike [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); LaserAnwendungsCentrum (LAC) Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Strasse 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: u.willer@pe.tu-clausthal.de; Holl, Gerhard [Wehrwissenschaftliches Institut fuer Werk-, Explosiv- und Betriebsstoffe (WIWEB), Grosses Cent, 53913, Swisttal (Germany)], E-mail: gerhardholl@bwb.orgd; Schade, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); LaserAnwendungsCentrum (LAC) Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Strasse 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: w.schade@pe.tu-clausthal.de

    2007-12-15

    An all-fiber-coupled laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) sensor device is developed. A passively Q-switched Cr{sup 4+}Nd{sup 3+}:YAG microchip laser is amplified within an Yb fiber amplifier, thus generating high power laser pulses (pulse energy E{sub p} = 0.8 mJ, wavelength {lambda} = 1064 nm, repetition rate f{sub rep.} = 5 kHz, pulse duration t{sub p} = 1.2 ns). A passive (LMA) optical fiber is spliced to the active fiber of an Yb fiber amplifier for direct guiding of high power laser pulses to the sensor tip. In front of the sensor a plasma is generated on the surface to be analyzed. The plasma emission is collected by a set of optical fibers also integrated into the sensor tip. The spectrally resolved LIBS spectra are processed by application of principal component analysis (PCA) and analyzed together with the time-resolved spectra with neural networks. Such procedure allows accurate analysis of samples by LIBS even for materials with similar atomic composition. The system has been tested successfully during field measurements at the German Armed Forces test facility at Oberjettenberg. The LIBS sensor is not restricted to anti-personnel mine detection but has also the potential to be suitable for analysis of bulk explosives and surface contaminations with explosives, e.g. for the detection of improvised explosive devices (IEDs)

  18. Laser damage study of material of the first wall of target chamber of the future laser Megajoule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubern, Christelle

    1999-01-01

    Study on damage of carbon-like, boron carbide, and stainless steel materials by ultraviolet laser light, has been carried out at CEA/CESTA in France. This work was performed to help designing and dimensioning the target chamber of the future Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility to be used for Inertial Confinement Fusion research. The study revealed that depending the laser fluence, the considered materials were ablated in different manners. lt was demonstrated that at low fluence, damage of carbon-like and boron carbide occurs through a thermal-mechanical mechanism resulting in sputtering of material. At higher fluence, damage was driven by a thermal mechanism, dissipating heat inside material until phase change developed. For stainless steel material, failures were the result of heat absorption associated to physical changes only. To explain and validate the proposed mechanisms, theoretical and experimental works were performed and satisfactory results came out. (author) [fr

  19. High Power High Efficiency Diode Laser Stack for Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuanyuan; Lu, Hui; Fu, Yueming; Cui, Yan

    2018-03-01

    High-power diode lasers based on GaAs semiconductor bars are well established as reliable and highly efficient laser sources. As diode laser is simple in structure, small size, longer life expectancy with the advantages of low prices, it is widely used in the industry processing, such as heat treating, welding, hardening, cladding and so on. Respectively, diode laser could make it possible to establish the practical application because of rectangular beam patterns which are suitable to make fine bead with less power. At this power level, it can have many important applications, such as surgery, welding of polymers, soldering, coatings and surface treatment of metals. But there are some applications, which require much higher power and brightness, e.g. hardening, key hole welding, cutting and metal welding. In addition, High power diode lasers in the military field also have important applications. So all developed countries have attached great importance to high-power diode laser system and its applications. This is mainly due their low performance. In this paper we will introduce the structure and the principle of the high power diode stack.

  20. Temperature response of biological materials to pulsed non-ablative CO2 laser irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugmans, M. J.; Kemper, J.; Gijsbers, G. H.; van der Meulen, F. W.; van Gemert, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents surface temperature responses of various tissue phantoms and in vitro and in vivo biological materials in air to non-ablative pulsed CO2 laser irradiation, measured with a thermocamera. We studied cooling off behavior of the materials after a laser pulse, to come to an

  1. High laser-fluence deposition of organic materials in water ice matrices by ''MAPLE''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Rodrigo, K.; Schou, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) is a deposition technique for organic material. Water ice was used as a matrix for the biotechnologically important guest material, polyethylene glycol (PEG), for concentrations from 0.5 to 4 wt.%. The target was irradiated with 6 ns laser pulses...

  2. Laser Process for Selective Emitter Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Poulain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective emitter solar cells can provide a significant increase in conversion efficiency. However current approaches need many technological steps and alignment procedures. This paper reports on a preliminary attempt to reduce the number of processing steps and therefore the cost of selective emitter cells. In the developed procedure, a phosphorous glass covered with silicon nitride acts as the doping source. A laser is used to open locally the antireflection coating and at the same time achieve local phosphorus diffusion. In this process the standard chemical etching of the phosphorous glass is avoided. Sheet resistance variation from 100 Ω/sq to 40 Ω/sq is demonstrated with a nanosecond UV laser. Numerical simulation of the laser-matter interaction is discussed to understand the dopant diffusion efficiency. Preliminary solar cells results show a 0.5% improvement compared with a homogeneous emitter structure.

  3. Contributions to process monitoring by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusak, David Alexander

    1998-12-01

    When a pulsed laser of sufficient energy and pulse duration is brought to a focus, multi-photon ionization creates free electrons in the focal volume. These electrons are accelerated in a process known as inverse Bremsstrahlung and cause collisional ionization of species in the focal volume. More charge carriers are produced and the process continues for the duration of the laser pulse. The manifestation of this process is a visible spark or plasma which typically lasts for tens of microseconds. This laser-induced plasma can serve as a source in an atomic emission experiment. Because the composition of the plasma is determined in large part by the environment in which it forms, elements in the laser target can be determined spectroscopically. The goal of a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) experiment is to establish a relationship between the concentration of an element of interest in the target and the intensity of light emitted from the laser-induced plasma at a wavelength characteristic of that element. Because LIBS requires only optical access to the sample and can perform elemental determinations in solids, liquids, or gases with little sample preparation, there is interest in using it as an on-line technique for process monitoring in a number of industrial applications. However, before the technique becomes useful in industrial applications, many issues regarding instrumentation and data analysis need to be addressed in the lab. The first two chapters of this dissertation provide, respectively, the basics of the atomic emission experiment and a background of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The next two chapters examine the effect of target water content on the laser-induced plasma and the use of LIBS for analysis of aqueous samples. Chapter 5 describes construction of a fiber optic LIBS probe and its use to study temporal electron number density evolution in plasmas formed on different metals. Chapter 6 is a study of excitation, vibrational

  4. Challenges in Laser Sintering of Melt-Processable Thermoset Imide Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Gornet, Timothy; Koerner, Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    Polymer Laser Sintering (LS) is an additive manufacturing technique that builds 3D models layer by layer using a laser to selectively melt cross sections in powdered polymeric materials, following sequential slices of the CAD model. LS generally uses thermoplastic polymeric powders, such as polyamides (i.e. Nylon), and the resultant 3D objects are often weaker in their strength compared to traditionally processed materials, due to the lack of polymer inter-chain connection in the z-direction. The objective of this project is to investigate the possibility of printing a melt-processable RTM370 imide resin powder terminated with reactive phenylethynyl groups by LS, followed by a postcure in order to promote additional crosslinking to achieve higher temperature (250-300 C) capability. A preliminary study to build tensile specimens by LS and the corresponding DSC and rheology study of RTM370 during LS process is presented.

  5. Studies on nanosecond 532nm and 355nm and ultrafast 515nm and 532nm laser cutting super-hard materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Tao, Sha; Wang, Brian; Zhao, Jay

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, micro-processing of three kinds of super-hard materials of poly-crystal diamond (PCD)/tungsten-carbide (WC), CVD-diamond and cubic boron nitride (CNB) has been systematically studied using nanosecond laser (532nm and 355nm), and ultrafast laser (532nm and 515nm). Our purpose is to investigate a full laser micro-cutting solution to achieve a ready-to-use cutting tool insert (CTI). The results show a clean cut with little burns and recasting at edge. The cutting speed of 2-10mm/min depending on thickness was obtained. The laser ablation process was also studied by varying laser parameters (wavelength, pulse width, pulse energy, repetition rate) and tool path to improve cutting speed. Also, studies on material removal efficiency (MRE) of PCD/WC with 355nm-ns and 515nm-fs laser as a function of laser fluence show that 355nm-ns laser is able to achieve higher MRE for PCD and WC. Thus, ultrafast laser is not necessarily used for superhard material cutting. Instead, post-polishing with ultrafast laser can be used to clean cutting surface and improve smoothness.

  6. Photolytic process for gasification of carbonaceous material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenty, S.

    1979-01-01

    Process and apparatus are disclosed for converting carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide by subjecting the carbon dioxide to radiation in the presence of carbonaceous material such as coal to form carbon monoxide. The preferred form of radiation is solar energy, and the process is preferably carried out in an atmosphere essentially free of oxygen. The invention also includes subjecting carbon monoxide to radiation to form purified carbon and useful heat energy. The two procedures can be combined into a single process for converting solar or other energy into useful thermal energy with the production of useful products. The reactor apparatus is specifically designed to carry out the radiation-induced conversions. Coal can be desulfurized and its caking characteristics altered by solar radiation in the presence of suitable gases. 3 figures

  7. Study of Material Consolidation at Higher Throughput Parameters in Selective Laser Melting of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Tracie

    2016-01-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process used increasingly in the aerospace industry to reduce the cost, weight, and fabrication time for complex propulsion components. SLM stands poised to revolutionize propulsion manufacturing, but there are a number of technical questions that must be addressed in order to achieve rapid, efficient fabrication and ensure adequate performance of parts manufactured using this process in safety-critical flight applications. Previous optimization studies for SLM using the Concept Laser M1 and M2 machines at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have centered on machine default parameters. The objective of this work is to characterize the impact of higher throughput parameters (a previously unexplored region of the manufacturing operating envelope for this application) on material consolidation. In phase I of this work, density blocks were analyzed to explore the relationship between build parameters (laser power, scan speed, hatch spacing, and layer thickness) and material consolidation (assessed in terms of as-built density and porosity). Phase II additionally considers the impact of post-processing, specifically hot isostatic pressing and heat treatment, as well as deposition pattern on material consolidation in the same higher energy parameter regime considered in the phase I work. Density and microstructure represent the "first-gate" metrics for determining the adequacy of the SLM process in this parameter range and, as a critical initial indicator of material quality, will factor into a follow-on DOE that assesses the impact of these parameters on mechanical properties. This work will contribute to creating a knowledge base (understanding material behavior in all ranges of the AM equipment operating envelope) that is critical to transitioning AM from the custom low rate production sphere it currently occupies to the world of mass high rate production, where parts are fabricated at a rapid

  8. A cutting-edge solution for 1µm laser metal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, N.; Kühl, P.; Karam, J.; Jonkers, J.; Villarreal-Saucedo, F.; Reyes, M.

    2017-02-01

    The recent 1μm-laser cutting market is dominated by fiber and disk lasers due to their excellent beam quality of below 4mm*mrad. Teradiode's 4kW direct diode laser source achieves similar beam quality while having a different beam shape and shorter wavelengths which are known for higher absorption rates at the inclined front of the cutting keyhole. Research projects, such as the HALO Project, have additionally shown that polarized radiation and beams with shapes different from the typical LG00 lead to improved cut quality for ferrous and non-ferrous metals. [1] Diode laser have the inherent property of not being sensitive to back reflection which brings advantages in cutting high-reflective materials. The II-VI HIGHYAG laser cutting head BIMO-FSC offers the unique feature of machine controlled and continuous adjustment of both the focus diameter and the focus position. This feature is proven to be beneficial for cutting and piercing with high speed and small hole diameters. In addition, the optics are designed for lowest focus shift. As a leading laser processing head manufacturer, II-VI HIGHYAG qualified its BIMO-FSC MZ (M=magnification, Z=focus position) cutting head for Teradiode's 4kW direct diode laser source to offer a cutting-edge solution for highpower laser cutting. Combining the magnification ability of the cutting head with this laser source, customers experience strong advantages in cutting metals in broad thickness ranges. Thicknesses up to 25mm mild steel can easily be cut with excellent edge quality. Furthermore, a new optical setup equivalent to an axicon with a variable axicon angle is demonstrated which generates variable sized ring spots. The setup provides new degrees of freedom to tailor the energy distribution for even higher productivity and quality.

  9. Patents - Superconductor materials, processes and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Test, A.

    1987-01-01

    A patent is a grant by a country to an inventor or his assignee of the right to exclude others for a limited period of time from making, using or selling the patented invention within its territory. It is reported that basic patents have been filed by IBM and the University of Houston to protect a broad range of warm superconducting materials or compounds. It is believed that other researchers are seeking patents to protect related or improved materials, processes and apparatus. Because of the importance of this field and to speed up the patent process, the United States Patent Office is giving, upon request, special expedited status to these patent applications. A survey of Japanese companies shows that more than 1500 patents have been applied for in Japan relating to superconducting materials, compositions, apparatus using superconductors and improvements. It appears that the goal of the Japanese companies is to obtain a patent position in Japan so that they can trade with companies wishing to do business in Japan for rights in other parts of the world

  10. Effect of process parameters on hardness, temperature profile and solidification of different layers processed by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Sazzad Hossain; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    In DMLS process objects are fabricated layer by layer from powdered material by melting induced by a controlled laser beam. Metallic powder melts and solidifies to form a single layer. Solidification map during layer formation is an important route to characterize micro-structure and grain morphology of sintered layer. Generally, solidification leads to columnar, equiaxed or mixture of these two types grain morphology depending on solidification rate and thermal gradient. Eutectic or dendritic structure can be formed in fully equiaxed zone. This dendritic growth has a large effect on material properties. Smaller dendrites generally increase ductility of the layer. Thus, materials can be designed by creating desired grain morphology in certain regions using DMLS process. To accomplish this, hardness, temperature distribution, thermal gradient and solidification cooling rate in processed layers will be studied under change of process variables by using finite element analysis, with specific application to Ti-6Al-4V.

  11. Effect of process parameters on hardness, temperature profile and solidification of different layers processed by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sazzad Hossain; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2016-07-01

    In DMLS process objects are fabricated layer by layer from powdered material by melting induced by a controlled laser beam. Metallic powder melts and solidifies to form a single layer. Solidification map during layer formation is an important route to characterize micro-structure and grain morphology of sintered layer. Generally, solidification leads to columnar, equiaxed or mixture of these two types grain morphology depending on solidification rate and thermal gradient. Eutectic or dendritic structure can be formed in fully equiaxed zone. This dendritic growth has a large effect on material properties. Smaller dendrites generally increase ductility of the layer. Thus, materials can be designed by creating desired grain morphology in certain regions using DMLS process. To accomplish this, hardness, temperature distribution, thermal gradient and solidification cooling rate in processed layers will be studied under change of process variables by using finite element analysis, with specific application to Ti-6Al-4V.

  12. Effect of process parameters on hardness, temperature profile and solidification of different layers processed by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Sazzad Hossain; Mian, Ahsan, E-mail: ahsan.mian@wright.edu; Srinivasan, Raghavan [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435 (United States)

    2016-07-12

    In DMLS process objects are fabricated layer by layer from powdered material by melting induced by a controlled laser beam. Metallic powder melts and solidifies to form a single layer. Solidification map during layer formation is an important route to characterize micro-structure and grain morphology of sintered layer. Generally, solidification leads to columnar, equiaxed or mixture of these two types grain morphology depending on solidification rate and thermal gradient. Eutectic or dendritic structure can be formed in fully equiaxed zone. This dendritic growth has a large effect on material properties. Smaller dendrites generally increase ductility of the layer. Thus, materials can be designed by creating desired grain morphology in certain regions using DMLS process. To accomplish this, hardness, temperature distribution, thermal gradient and solidification cooling rate in processed layers will be studied under change of process variables by using finite element analysis, with specific application to Ti-6Al-4V.

  13. Nanosecond laser ablation processes in aluminum-doped zinc-oxide for photovoltaic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canteli, D.; Fernandez, S.; Molpeceres, C.; Torres, I.; Gandía, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A study of the ablation of AZO thin films deposited at different temperature conditions with nanosecond UV laser light for photovoltaic devices has been performed. ► The ablation threshold of AZO thin films was measured and related with the absorption coefficient of the films at the laser wavelength, showing a direct correspondence. ► A change in the material structure in the areas closest to the edges of laser grooves made in samples deposited at temperatures below 100 °C was observed and studied. - Abstract: Aiming to a future use in thin film solar modules, the processing of aluminum doped zinc oxide thin films with good optoelectronic properties with a nanosecond-pulsed ultraviolet laser has been studied. The ablation threshold fluence of the films has been determined and associated with the material properties. The ablation process has been optimized and grooves with good properties for photovoltaic devices have been obtained. The morphology of the ablated surfaces has been observed by confocal microscopy and its structure has been characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of ablation parameters like focus distance, pulse energy and repetition frequency in the groove morphology has been studied with special attention to the thermal effects on the material structure.

  14. Nanosecond laser ablation processes in aluminum-doped zinc-oxide for photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canteli, D., E-mail: david.canteli@ciemat.es [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, S. [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Molpeceres, C. [Centro Laser, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ctra. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Torres, I.; Gandia, J.J. [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A study of the ablation of AZO thin films deposited at different temperature conditions with nanosecond UV laser light for photovoltaic devices has been performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ablation threshold of AZO thin films was measured and related with the absorption coefficient of the films at the laser wavelength, showing a direct correspondence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A change in the material structure in the areas closest to the edges of laser grooves made in samples deposited at temperatures below 100 Degree-Sign C was observed and studied. - Abstract: Aiming to a future use in thin film solar modules, the processing of aluminum doped zinc oxide thin films with good optoelectronic properties with a nanosecond-pulsed ultraviolet laser has been studied. The ablation threshold fluence of the films has been determined and associated with the material properties. The ablation process has been optimized and grooves with good properties for photovoltaic devices have been obtained. The morphology of the ablated surfaces has been observed by confocal microscopy and its structure has been characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of ablation parameters like focus distance, pulse energy and repetition frequency in the groove morphology has been studied with special attention to the thermal effects on the material structure.

  15. Evaluation of nonaqueous processes for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musgrave, B.C.; Grens, J.Z.; Knighton, J.B.; Coops, M.S.

    1983-12-01

    A working group was assigned the task of evaluating the status of nonaqueous processes for nuclear materials and the prospects for successful deployment of these technologies in the future. In the initial evaluation, the study was narrowed to the pyrochemical/pyrometallurgical processes closely related to the processes used for purification of plutonium and its conversion to metal. The status of the chemistry and process hardware were reviewed and the development needs in both chemistry and process equipment technology were evaluated. Finally, the requirements were established for successful deployment of this technology. The status of the technology was evaluated along three lines: (1) first the current applications were examined for completeness, (2) an attempt was made to construct closed-cycle flow sheets for several proposed applications, (3) and finally the status of technical development and future development needs for general applications were reviewed. By using these three evaluations, three different perspectives were constructed that together present a clear picture of how complete the technical development of these processes are

  16. Processing Interband Cascade Laser for High Temperature CW Operation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tober, Richard

    2004-01-01

    A narrow ridge-waveguide mid-IR interband cascade laser based on Type-II InAs/GaInSh heterostructures processed with a thick gold heat spreading layer operated CW at temperatures ranging from 80 K to 214.4 K...

  17. Secondary ionization processes in laser induced breakdown of electronegative gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamal Yosr, E.E.D.; Shafik, M.S.; Abdel-Moneim, H.M.

    1990-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the stepwise ionization processes which occur during the interaction of laser radiation with electronegative gases. Calculations are carried out adopting a modified version of the electron cascade model previously developed by Evans and Gamal. The modifications of the model are performed for the case of molecular oxygen to account for electron attachment losses. Particular attention is devoted to molecular oxygen at a pressure of 2.8 x 10 4 Torr irradiated by 10 ns pulse of Nd:YAG laser (λ=1.064 μm) at a peak intensity of 1.7x10 11 Wcm -2 . The calculations consider the effect of the secondary ionization processes on the electron energy distribution function and its parameters (evolution of the density of the excited molecules, electrons density as well as the electron mean energy during the laser flash). This analysis shows how the removal of slow electrons by attachment to oxygen molecules creates a strong competition between the stepwise ionization processes. These processes namely photoionization and collisional ionization deplete the electronic excited states and contribute eventually to the ionization growth rate in laser induced breakdown of electronegative gases. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  18. Femtosecond laser damage threshold and nonlinear characterization in bulk transparent SiC materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DesAutels, G. Logan; Finet, Marc; Ristich, Scott; Whitaker, Matt; Brewer, Chris; Juhl, Shane; Walker, Mark; Powers, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Semi-insulating and conducting SiC crystalline transparent substrates were studied after being processed by femtosecond (fs) laser radiation (780 nm at 160 fs). Z-scan and damage threshold experiments were performed on both SiC bulk materials to determine each sample's nonlinear and threshold parameters. 'Damage' in this text refers to an index of refraction modification as observed visually under an optical microscope. In addition, a study was performed to understand the damage threshold as a function of numerical aperture. Presented here for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, are the damage threshold, nonlinear index of refraction, and nonlinear absorption measured values

  19. Effect of nitrogen doping on wetting and photoactive properties of laser processed zinc oxide-graphene oxide nanocomposite layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    György, E., E-mail: egyorgy@icmab.es [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona (CSIC-ICMAB), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P. O. Box MG 36, 76900 Bucharest V (Romania); Pérez del Pino, A. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona (CSIC-ICMAB), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Logofatu, C. [National Institute for Materials Physics, P. O. Box MG. 7, 77125 Bucharest (Romania); Duta, A.; Isac, L. [Transilvania University of Brasov, Research Centre for Renewable Energy Systems and Recycling, Eroilor 29, 500036, Brasov (Romania)

    2014-07-14

    Zinc oxide-graphene oxide nanocomposite layers were submitted to laser irradiation in air or controlled nitrogen atmosphere using a frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG (λ = 266 nm, τ{sub FWHM} ≅ 3 ns, ν = 10 Hz) laser source. The experiments were performed in air at atmospheric pressure or in nitrogen at a pressure of 2 × 10{sup 4} Pa. The effect of the irradiation conditions, incident laser fluence value, and number of subsequent laser pulses on the surface morphology of the composite material was systematically investigated. The obtained results reveal that nitrogen incorporation improves significantly the wetting and photoactive properties of the laser processed layers. The kinetics of water contact angle variation when the samples are submitted to laser irradiation in nitrogen are faster than that of the samples irradiated in air, the surfaces becoming super-hydrophilic under UV light irradiation.

  20. Irradiation of nuclear materials with laser-plasma filaments produced in air and deuterium by terrawatt (TW) laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avotina, Liga; Lungu, Mihail; Dinca, Paul; Butoi, Bogdan; Cojocaru, Gabriel; Ungureanu, Razvan; Marcu, Aurelian; Luculescu, Catalin; Hapenciuc, Claudiu; Ganea, Paul C.; Petjukevics, Aleksandrs; Lungu, Cristian P.; Kizane, Gunta; Ticos, C. M.; Antohe, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Be-C-W mixed materials with variable atomic ratios were exposed to high power (TW) laser induced filamentation plasma in air in normal conditions and in deuterium at a reduced pressure of 20 Torr. Morphological and structural investigations were performed on the irradiated zones for both ambient conditions. The presence of low-pressure deuterium increased the overall ablation rate for all samples. From the elemental concentration point of view, the increase of the carbon percentage has led to an increase in the ablation rate. An increase of the tungsten percentage had the opposite effect. From structural spectroscopic investigations using XPS, Raman and FT-IR of the irradiated and non-irradiated sample surfaces, we conclude that deuterium-induced enhancement of the ablation process could be explained by preferential amorphous carbon removal, possibly by forming deuterated hydrocarbons which further evaporated, weakening the layer structure.